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Sample records for generalized kramers-kronig relations

  1. Causality and Kramers-Kronig relations for waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakestad, Magnus; Skaar, Johannes

    2005-11-28

    Starting from the condition that optical signals propagate causally, we derive Kramers-Kronig relations for waveguides. For hollow waveguides with perfectly conductive walls, the modes propagate causally and Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and imaginary part of the mode indices exist. For dielectric waveguides, there exists a Kramers-Kronig type relation between the real mode index of a guided mode and the imaginary mode indices associated with the evanescent modes. For weakly guiding waveguides, the Kramers-Kronig relations are particularly simple, as the modal dispersion is determined solely from the profile of the corresponding mode field.

  2. Kramers-Kronig relations and sum rules in nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Lucarini, Valerio; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Vartiainen, Erik

    2004-05-01

    The full potential of the Kramers-Kronig relations and sum rules for nonlinear susceptibilities has unfortunately drawn relatively little attention in nonlinear optical spectra analysis. In this feature article a simple treatment of an anharmonic oscillator model in description of the nonlinear susceptibility of media and holomorphic properties of the nonlinear susceptibility were utilized. Using such concepts, conventional Kramers-Kronig, multiply-subtractive Kramers-Kronig, and generalized Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations can be derived. We demonstrate how in practice the variety of different Kramers-Kronig relations mentioned above, as well as various sum rules, can be applied in nonlinear optical spectra analysis. As an example we treat the third-harmonic wave generation spectrum from a polymer.

  3. Response Theory for Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: Causality and Generalized Kramers-Kronig Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2008-05-01

    We consider the general response theory recently proposed by Ruelle for describing the impact of small perturbations to the non-equilibrium steady states resulting from Axiom A dynamical systems. We show that the causality of the response functions entails the possibility of writing a set of Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relations for the corresponding susceptibilities at all orders of nonlinearity. Nonetheless, only a special class of directly observable susceptibilities obey K-K relations. Specific results are provided for the case of arbitrary order harmonic response, which allows for a very comprehensive K-K analysis and the establishment of sum rules connecting the asymptotic behavior of the harmonic generation susceptibility to the short-time response of the perturbed system. These results set in a more general theoretical framework previous findings obtained for optical systems and simple mechanical models, and shed light on the very general impact of considering the principle of causality for testing self-consistency: the described dispersion relations constitute unavoidable benchmarks that any experimental and model generated dataset must obey. The theory exposed in the present paper is dual to the time-dependent theory of perturbations to equilibrium states and to non-equilibrium steady states, and has in principle similar range of applicability and limitations. In order to connect the equilibrium and the non equilibrium steady state case, we show how to rewrite the classical response theory by Kubo so that response functions formally identical to those proposed by Ruelle, apart from the measure involved in the phase space integration, are obtained. These results, taking into account the chaotic hypothesis by Gallavotti and Cohen, might be relevant in several fields, including climate research. In particular, whereas the fluctuation-dissipation theorem does not work for non-equilibrium systems, because of the non-equivalence between internal and external

  4. Kramers-Kronig Relations in Optical Materials Research

    CERN Document Server

    Lucarini, Valerio; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Vartiainen, Erik M

    2005-01-01

    This is the first one-volume work to provide a thorough and comprehensive description of the physical background, rigorous theory and applications of Kramers-Kronig relations in the fields of linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Currently, Kramers-Kronig relations have become basic tools in the investigation of the optical properties of materials. A brief presentation of the related data-retrieval technique, the maximum entropy method, is also given. The contents and style potentially make this a standard text for physicists, chemists and engineers interested in optical-materials research and development.

  5. Relationship between the Kramers-Kronig relations and negative index of refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Hickey, Mark C; Kussow, Adil-Gerai

    2010-01-01

    The condition for a negative index of refraction with respect to the vacuum index is established in terms of permittivity and permeability susceptibilities. It is found that the imposition of analyticity to satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relations is a sufficiently general criterion for a physical negative index. The satisfaction of the Kramers-Kronig relations is a manifestation of the principle of causality and the predicted frequency region of negative index agrees with the Depine-Lakhtakia condition for the phase velocity being anti-directed to the Poynting vector, although the conditions presented here do not assume {\\it a priori} a negative solution branch for n.

  6. Spatial Kramers-Kronig relations and the reflection of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    When a planar dielectric medium has a permittivity profile that is an analytic function in the upper or lower half of the complex position plane x = x‧ + ix″ then the real and imaginary parts of its permittivity are related by the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations. We find that such a medium will not reflect radiation incident from one side, whatever the angle of incidence. Using the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations, one can derive a real part of a permittivity profile from some given imaginary part (or vice versa) such that the reflection is guaranteed to be zero. This result is valid for both scalar and vector wave theories and may have relevance for designing materials that efficiently absorb radiation or for the creation of a new type of anti-reflection surface.

  7. Kramers-Kronig-consistent optical functions of anisotropic crystals: generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, M; Gompf, B; Faltermeier, D; Tripathi, A K; Pflaum, J; Schubert, M

    2008-11-24

    The Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and imaginary parts of a response function are widely used in solid-state physics to evaluate the corresponding quantity if only one component is measured. They are among the most fundamental statements since only based on the analytical behavior and causal nature of the material response [Phys. Rev. 104, 1760-1770 (1956)]. Optical losses, for instance, can be obtained from the dispersion of the dielectric constant at all wavelengths, and vice versa [Handbook of optical constants of solids, Vol. 1, p. 35]. Although the general validity was never casted into doubt, it is a longstanding problem that Kramers-Kronig relations cannot simply be applied to anisotropic crystalline materials because contributions from different directions mix in a frequency-dependent way. Here we present a general method to identify frequency-independent principal polarizability directions for which the Kramers-Kronig relations are obeyed even in materials with lowest symmetry. Using generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry on a single crystal surface of triclinic pentacene, as an example, enables us to evaluate the complex dielectric constant and to compare it with band-structure calculations along the crystallographic directions. A general recipe is provided how to proceed from a macroscopic measurement on a low symmetry crystal plane to the microscopic dielectric properties of the unit cell, along whose axes the Kramers-Kronig relations hold.

  8. Kramers-Kronig relations for plasma-like permittivities and the Casimir force

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The Kramers-Kronig relations are derived for the permittivity of the usual plasma model which neglects dissipation and of a generalized model which takes into account the interband transitions. The generalized plasma model is shown to be consistent with all precision experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force.

  9. The Extended Equivalence Principle and the Kramers-Kronig Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2002-01-01

    A seemingly obvious extension of the weak equivalence principle, in which all matter must respond to Post-Newtonian gravitational fields, such as Lense-Thirring and radiation fields, in a composition-independent way, is considered in light of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for the linear response of any material medium to these fields. It is argued that known observational facts lead to violations of this extended form of the equivalence principle. (PACS numbers: 04.80.Cc, 04.80.Nn, 03.65.Ud, 67.40.Bz)

  10. High field optical nonlinearity and the Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrand, J K; Cheng, Y-H; Milchberg, H M

    2012-09-14

    The nonlinear optical response to high fields is absolutely measured for the noble gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. We find that the response is quadratic in the laser field magnitude up to the ionization threshold of each gas. Its size and quadratic dependence are well predicted by a Kramers-Kronig analysis employing known ionization probabilities, and the results are consistent with calculations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  11. Counterintuitive dispersion violating Kramers-Kronig relations in gain slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Gang; Wang, Lin; Al-Amri, M; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M Suhail

    2014-06-13

    We demonstrate the counterintuitive dispersion effect that the peaks (dips) in the gain spectrum correspond to abnormal (normal) dispersion, contrary to the usual Kramers-Kronig point of view. This effect may also lead to two unique features: a broadband abnormal dispersion region and an observable Hartman effect. These results are explained in terms of interference and boundary effects. Finally, two experiments are proposed for the potential experimental verification.

  12. On the applicability of Kramers-Kronig relations for ultrasonic attenuation obeying a frequency power law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters; Hughes; Mobley; Brandenburger; Miller

    2000-08-01

    In the recent literature concern has been raised regarding the validity of Kramers-Kronig relations for media with ultrasonic attenuation obeying a frequency power law. It is demonstrated, however, that the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for application to these types of media are available. The developed dispersion relations are compared with measurements on several liquids, and agreement is found to better than 1 m/s over the experimentally available bandwidth. A discussion regarding the validity of these dispersion relations, in particular how the dispersion relations relate to the so-called Paley-Wiener conditions, forms the conclusion.

  13. Modified Hilbert transform pair and Kramers-Kronig relations for complex permittivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Modified versions of the Hilbert transform pair and the Kramers-Kronig relations are derived for the complex permittivity of a plasma/dielectric medium which is singular at the frequency of the applied electric field equal to 0. Such a complex permittivity exists when the plasma/dielectric model allows a loss term but no restoring term. Permittivity, in which both loss and restoring terms are included, is shown to satisfy the standard Hilbert transform pair and, thus, the Kramers-Kronig relations.

  14. Phase retrieval of reflection and transmission coefficients from Kramers-Kronig relations

    CERN Document Server

    Gralak, Boris; Zerrad, Myriam; Amra, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Analytic and passivity properties of reflection and transmission coefficients of thin-film multilayered stacks are investigated. Using a rigorous formalism based on the inverse Helmholtz operator, properties associated to causality principle and passivity are established when both temporal frequency and spatial wavevector are continued in the complex plane. This result extends the range of situations where the Kramers-Kronig relations can be used to deduce the phase from the intensity. In particular, it is rigorously shown that Kramers-Kronig relations for reflection and transmission coefficients remain valid at a fixed angle of incidence. Possibilities to exploit the new relationships are discussed.

  15. Phase retrieval of reflection and transmission coefficients from Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralak, Boris; Lequime, Michel; Zerrad, Myriam; Amra, Claude

    2015-03-01

    Analytic and passivity properties of reflection and transmission coefficients of thin-film multilayered stacks are investigated. Using a rigorous formalism based on the inverse Helmholtz operator, properties associated with the causality principle and passivity are established when both the temporal frequency and spatial wave vector are continued in the complex plane. This result extends the range of situations where the Kramers-Kronig relations can be used to deduce the phase from the intensity. In particular, it is rigorously shown that the Kramers-Kronig relations for reflection and transmission coefficients remain valid for all fixed angles of incidence. Possibilities for exploiting the new relationships are discussed and numerically tested.

  16. On a time-domain representation of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters; Hughes; Brandenburger; Miller

    2000-11-01

    The development of Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations is typically carried out in the frequency domain. An alternative approach known as the time-causal theory develops dispersion relations for media with attenuation obeying a frequency power law through analysis in the time domain [T. L. Szabo, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 491-500 (1994)]. Although both approaches predict identical dispersion relations, it is perceived that these two approaches are distinct from each other. It is shown, however, that the time-causal theory is in essence a time-domain formulation of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for the special case of media with attenuation obeying a frequency power law. Additionally, it is shown that time-domain representations of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations are available for a broader class of media than simply those with power law attenuation. The time-causal theory and the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations can be viewed as two complementary, yet equivalent, approaches to the study of dispersion.

  17. Kramers-Kronig relations applied to finite bandwidth data from suspensions of encapsulated microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley; Waters; Hughes; Hall; Marsh; Brandenburger; Miller

    2000-11-01

    In this work, the Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relations are applied to experimental data of resonant nature by limiting the interval of integration to the measurement spectrum. The data are from suspensions of encapsulated microbubbles (Albunex) and have the characteristics of an ultrasonic notch filter. The goal is to test the consistency of this dispersion and attenuation data with the Kramers-Kronig relations in a strict manner, without any parameters from outside the experimental bandwidth entering in to the calculations. In the course of reaching the goal, the artifacts associated with the truncation of the integrals are identified and it is shown how their impacts on the results can be minimized. The problem is first approached analytically by performing the Kramers-Kronig calculations over a restricted spectral band on a specific Hilbert transform pair (Lorentzian curves). The resulting closed-form solutions illustrate the type of artifacts that can occur due to truncation and also show that accurate results can be achieved. Next, both twice-subtracted and lower-order Kramers-Kronig relations are applied directly to the attenuation and dispersion data from the encapsulated microbubbles. Only parameters from within the experimental attenuation coefficient and phase velocity data sets are used. The twice-subtracted K-K relations produced accurate estimates for both the attenuation coefficient and dispersion across all 12 data sets. Lower-order Kramers-Kronig relations also produced good results over the finite spectrum for most of the data. In 2 of the 12 cases, the twice-subtracted relations tracked the data markedly better than the lower-order predictions. These calculations demonstrate that truncation artifacts do not overwhelm the causal link between the phase velocity and the attenuation coefficient for finite bandwidth calculations. This work provides experimental evidence supporting the validity of the subtracted forms of the acoustic K-K relations between the

  18. Wave reflection in dielectric media obeying spatial Kramers-Kronig relations

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In a recent work, S.A.R. Horsley and coworkers [Nature Photon 9, 436-439 (2015)] showed rather interestingly that planar dielectric media, for which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related by spatial Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations, are one-way reflectionless, whatever the angle of incidence. Such a fascinating property, besides of extending our comprehension of the fundamental phenomenon of reflection, may offer new ways for the design of antireflection surfaces and thin materials with efficient light absorption. However, KK dielectric media are generally described by slowly-decaying complex permittivity profiles which may introduce some subtle issues in the study of the scattering problem. Here we provide a condition on the imaginary part of the dielectric profile that ensures the existence of proper scattering states and present a proof of the one-way reflectionless property in KK dielectric media which is free from loophole. Finally, we show that instabilities might arise at ...

  19. The Kramers-Kronig relations for usual and anomalous Poisson-Nernst-Planck models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Lenzi, Ervin Kaminski; Barbero, Giovanni

    2013-11-20

    The consistency of the frequency response predicted by a class of electrochemical impedance expressions is analytically checked by invoking the Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations. These expressions are obtained in the context of Poisson-Nernst-Planck usual or anomalous diffusional models that satisfy Poisson's equation in a finite length situation. The theoretical results, besides being successful in interpreting experimental data, are also shown to obey the KK relations when these relations are modified accordingly.

  20. Kramers-Kronig relation between nonlinear absorption and refraction of C(60) and C(70).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Cheng; Liu, Tai-Min; Wei, Tai-Ying; Xin, Li; Li, Yi-Ci; Lee, Li-Shu; Chang, Che-Kai; Tang, Jaw-Luen; Yang, Sidney S; Wei, Tai-Huei

    2010-10-25

    Using the Z-scan technique with 532 nm 16 picosecond laser pulses, we observe reverse saturable absorption and positive nonlinear refraction of toluene solutions of both C(60) and C(70). By deducting the positive Kerr nonlinear refraction of the solvent, we notice that the solute molecules contribute to nonlinear refraction of opposite signs: positive for C(60) and negative for C(70). Attributing nonlinear absorption and refraction of both solutes to cascading one-photon excitations, we illustrate that they satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation. Accordingly, we attest the signs and magnitudes of nonlinear refraction for both solutes at 532 nm by Kramers-Kronig transform of the corresponding nonlinear absorption spectra.

  1. Wave reflection in dielectric media obeying spatial Kramers-Kronig relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent work, Horsley and coworkers (Nat. Photon., 9 (2015) 436) showed rather interestingly that planar dielectric media, for which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related by spatial Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations, are one-way reflectionless, whatever the angle of incidence. Such a fascinating property, besides extending our comprehension of the fundamental phenomenon of reflection, may offer new ways for the design of antireflection surfaces and thin materials with efficient light absorption. However, KK dielectric media are generally described by slowly decaying complex permittivity profiles which may introduce some subtle issues in the study of the scattering problem. Here we provide a condition on the imaginary part of the dielectric profile that ensures the existence of proper scattering states and present a proof of the one-way reflectionless property in KK dielectric media which is free from loopholes. Finally, we show that instabilities might arise at the interface of KK dielectric media when the medium is not purely dissipative.

  2. Kramers-Kronig relation in a Doppler-broadened Λ-type three-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Lu, Xiao-Gang; Bai, Jin-Hai; Pei, Li-Ya; Miao, Xing-Xu; Gao, Yan-Lei; Wu, Ling-An; Fu, Pan-Ming; Yang, Shi-Ping; Pang, Zhao-Guang; Wang, Ru-Quan; Zuo, Zhan-Chun

    2015-11-01

    We measure the absorption and dispersion in a Doppler-broadened Λ-type three level system by resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy with homodyne detection. Through studying the dressed state energies of the system, it is found that the absorption and dispersion satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation. The absorption and dispersion spectra calculated by employing this relation agree well with our experimental observations. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB922002 and 2010CB922904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274376 and 61308011), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. A2015205161).

  3. Non-reflecting permittivity profiles and the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, S A R; La Rocca, G C

    2015-01-01

    We show that if the permittivity profile of a planar dielectric medium is an analytic function in the upper (lower) half complex position plane then it won't reflect radiation from the left (right), whatever the angle of incidence. Consequently, using the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations one can derive a real part of a permittivity profile from some given imaginary part (or vice versa), such that the reflection is guaranteed to be zero. This result is valid for both scalar and vector wave theories, and may have relevance for efficiently absorbing radiation, or reducing reflection from bodies.

  4. Negative static permittivity and violation of Kramers-Kronig relations in quasi-two-dimensional crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, V. U.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the wave vector and frequency-dependent screening of the electric field in atomically thin (quasi-two-dimensional) crystals. For graphene and hexagonal boron nitride we find that, above a critical wave vector qc, the static permittivity ɛ (q >qc,ω =0 ) becomes negative and the Kramers-Kronig relations do not hold for ɛ (q >qc,ω ) . Thus, in quasi-two-dimensional crystals, we reveal the physical confirmation of a proposition put forward decades ago [D. A. Kirzhnits, Sov. Phys. Usp. 19, 530 (1976), 10.1070/PU1976v019n06ABEH005268], allowing for the breakdown of Kramers-Kronig relations and for negative static permittivity. In the vicinity of the critical wave vector, we find a giant growth of the permittivity. Our results, obtained in the ab initio calculations using both the random-phase approximation and the adiabatic time-dependent local-density approximation, and further confirmed with a simple slab model, allow us to argue that the above properties, being exceptional in the three-dimensional case, are common to quasi-two-dimensional systems.

  5. Making precise predictions of the Casimir force between metallic plates via a generalized Kramers-Kronig transform

    CERN Document Server

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of making precise predictions for the Casimir force is essential for addressing the striking contradiction that has arisen between the a new large distance Casimir experiment with gold plates, that has been interpreted as being consistent with the so-called Drude prescription and to rule out the plasma prescription, and a series of older precise short distance experiments, which were instead interpreted as being consistent with the plasma prescription and to rule out the Drude one. In a previous paper by the author [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 81}, 062501 (2010)] it was shown that a precise prediction of the Casimir force is possible in principle by a simple modification of the standard Kramers-Kronig relations, involving suitable analytic window functions, solely on the basis of experimental optical data in the frequency interval where they are available, without using uncontrolled data extrapolations towards zero frequency that are necessary with standard Kramers-Kronig relations. In the present paper...

  6. Pump-probe model for the Kramers-Kronig relations in a laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yum, Honam

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study theoretically a pump-probe model for the Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations during laser operation. A laser gain medium at steady state becomes saturated and the lasing field experiences a flat gain equal to the cavity loss. A solution of the laser equations reveals that the lasing frequency experiences a dispersion that is linear over the allowed bandwidth. However, outside this band, the lasing stops, so that the dispersion is that of the unsaturated gain medium. The combined profile is therefore non-analytical, and cannot be explained in terms of the KK relations. In order to interpret this situation, it is important to consider carefully the physical basis of the KK relations and its connection to causality. We conclude that the KK relation is expected to apply only to an independent probe applied to the medium, which is under excitation by the pump producing the gain as well as the lasing mode. The absorption/gain and dispersion profiles are then analytical, and satisfy the KK-relation...

  7. Using modified Kramers-Kronig relations to test transmission spectra of porous media in THz-TDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, H; Gornov, E; Zeitler, J A; Aaltonen, J; Peiponen, K-E

    2010-03-01

    We show that modified Kramers-Kronig relations provide a useful tool to test the validity of the complex refractive index extracted from transmission terahertz spectra of porous matrices containing pharmaceutical materials. The role of scattering of terahertz radiation is qualitatively considered as a reason for the observed discrepancy between experimental data and the values extracted from the inverted complex refractive index. As an example we present an analysis of the terahertz spectra of carbamazepine and lactose alpha-monohydrate.

  8. The Use of Kramers-Kronig Relations for Verification of Quality of Ferrite Magnetic Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko Nikolajs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex initial permeability (CIP as a function of frequency is one of the main properties of ferrites. This characteristic (CIP is measured experimentally, therefore there can be found noisy, doubtful or incomplete parts of the spectrum. Thus there is a need for a method of evaluation of quality of CIP. In this article for evaluation of the quality of experimental CIP spectra of polycrystalline ferrite materials the KKR (Kramers-Kronig relations are used. In order to apply KKR to experimentally measured data (i.e. data with finite limits the method of transforming these integral relations into summation relations with finite limits is developed and described. This method can be used only for CIP given over the wide frequency rage, so that the imaginary part of CIP is fully presented. Using KKR with the help of CIP spectra model (based on the effects coming from polycrystal grain sizes and defects distribution partly removes aforementioned limit. Thus with the help of the model we can also make CIP spectra reconstruction (in cases when CIP is noisy or incomplete and CIP spectra decomposition.

  9. Determining the refractive index of human hemoglobin solutions by Kramers-Kronig relations with an improved absorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gienger, Jonas; Groß, Hermann; Neukammer, Jörg; Bär, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The real part of the refractive index of aqueous solutions of human hemoglobin is computed from their absorption spectra in the wavelength range 250-1100 nm using the Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations, and the corresponding uncertainty analysis is provided. The strong ultraviolet (UV) and infrared absorbance of the water outside this spectral range were taken into account in a previous study employing KK relations. We improve these results by including the concentration dependence of the water absorbance as well as by modeling the deep UV absorbance of hemoglobin's peptide backbone. The two free parameters of the model for the deep UV absorbance are fixed by a global fit.

  10. A fast Fourier transform implementation of the Kramers-Kronig relations: Application to anomalous and left handed propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lucas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this this paper we quickly derive the Kramers-Kronig relations from simple causality considerations and propose a simple way to implement them using the Fast Fourier Transform. This work focuses on how to make these relations a usable tool even when their conditions of validity are not strictly respected. In this respect we emphasize on their application to the constant low level loss approximation at microwave frequencies. The method presented is demonstrated on various typical cases of fancy propagation: high velocity, negative phase velocity and evanescent waves.

  11. Experimental validation of the use of Kramers-Kronig relations to eliminate the phase sheet ambiguity in broadband phase spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousil, R L; Waters, K R; Miller, J G

    2001-05-01

    The technique of broadband phase spectroscopy proposed in 1978 by Sachse and Pao [J. Appl. Phys. 49, 4320-4327 (1978)] determines the phase velocity as a function of frequency from the Fourier transforms of a received reference and through-sample signal. Although quite successful, this approach can be influenced by an ambiguity in the phase velocity calculation which stems from the boundedness of the inverse tangent operation used to calculate phase. Several empirical approaches to resolve the phase ambiguity have been reported. An alternative approach that has not previously been considered appeals to the causal nature of the measurements. This article experimentally validates a method which uses the causally consistent Kramers-Kronig relations to eliminate the ambiguity in phase spectroscopy-derived phase velocity calculations. Broadband pulse and narrow-band tone burst measurements were performed on three gelatin-based phantoms containing different concentrations of graphite particles (0%, 10%, and 20% by volume). The phantoms were constructed to have attenuation coefficients which vary approximately linear-with-frequency, a dependence exhibited by many soft tissues. The narrow-band phase velocity measurements do not suffer from a phase ambiguity, and thus they serve as a "gold standard" against which the broadband phase velocity measurements are compared. The experimental results illustrate that using the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations in conjunction with phase spectroscopy-derived phase velocity measurements is an effective means by which to resolve the phase sheet ambiguity in broadband phase spectroscopy.

  12. Conductivity and relaxation time of porous silicon using the Kramers-Kronig relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dariani, R.S., E-mail: dariani@alzahra.ac.ir; Tavakoli, F.

    2015-01-01

    To review the dielectric characteristics of porous silicon samples with various porosities, an equivalent circuit including a capacitor and parallel resistance was used. By applying AC voltage with a constant amplitude of 200 mV to the circuit and using impedance measurements of the samples between 10–100 KHz, the variations in the capacitance, dielectric function, refractive index, and resistance for the samples at room temperature and up to 350 °C were studied. The dielectric characteristics of the samples decreased with increasing frequency. In addition, with increasing temperature, the pore diameters increased, and the dielectric characteristics varied. In this paper, we demonstrate that the relaxation time and DC conductivity could be obtained using the Kramers-Kronig function and Hilbert transformation. Our results indicate that the relaxation time and DC conductivity increase with increasing porosity, and with increasing temperature, the relaxation time decreases and the DC conductivity increases.

  13. Determining the index factor of extension function for Kramers-Kronig relation%Kramers-Kronig关系中外延函数指数因子确定∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾琼珍; 孙萍

    2015-01-01

    Kramers-Kronig can be used to extract refractive index and absorption coefficient of medium in terahertz (THz)region.But it is needed for reflectance to set up an extension function at high frequency.The exponential function is a kind of empirical extension function.In general,the index factor of exponential function is 2 or 4.In this paper,the optimized method used for the algorithm of finite difference time domain (FDTD)is proposed to determinate the index factor.Accuracy of refractive index and absorption coefficient is improved by this method.Determination of index factor is based on least square difference between simulation and measured time domain signals.The index factor corresponds to the minimum of least square difference. Experiment of shows glucose polycrystalline pellet that accuracy of refractive index and absorption coefficient is guaranteed when the optimized index factor is 0.495.This method provides a reference to extract refractive index and absorption coefficient of medium by Kramers-Kronig relation in the THz region.%在基于Kramers-Kronig(K-K)关系求解太赫兹(THz)频段介质的折射率和吸收系数时,针对反射率高频端外延指数函数的指数因子的确定问题,提出采用时域有限差分(FDTD)算法模拟优化指数因子的方法,从而保证提取介质折射率和吸收系数的精确性.该方法根据FDTD算法模拟与实测样品时域信号的最小二乘差来确定指数因子,当最小二乘差取极小值时所对应的指数因子即为最优解.葡萄糖多晶粉末压片的实验表明,采用本文所提出的利用FDTD算法模拟优化确定的指数因子为0.495,当用K-K关系求解折射率和吸收系数时得到的结果更加精确.

  14. Finite frequency f-sum rule for assessment of number density of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Kramers-Kronig relation for refractive index of colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Ville; Silfsten, Pertti; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-07-01

    Absorption spectra from colloids containing different concentrations of spherical gold nanoparticles in water were measured with a spectrophotometer. The absorption spectra were used to calculate the number density of nanoparticles (NPs) with the aid of an unconventional finite spectral band f-sum rule applied for gold colloid. Good correlation between the number density of dispersion electrons, obtained from the f-sum rule, and the number density of nanoparticles was found. The effective absolute refractive index of the gold colloid was obtained with the aid of a singly subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation, and in addition the refractive index change due to the nanoparticles was obtained with the aid of a conventional Kramers-Kronig relation. Such optical properties are valuable in studies of light interaction with nanoparticles.

  15. Causality study and numerical response of the magnetic permeability as a function of the frequency of ferrites using Kramers-Kronig relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fano, Walter G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires, Av. Eduardo Madero 399, C11106ACD Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: gustavo.fano@ieee.org; Boggi, Silvina; Razzitte, Adrian C. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, the numerical treatment of magnetic loss of NiZn, MnZn, Ni{sub 2}Y, and NiZnCu ferrite and their composites, by using Krameres-Kronig relations, is investigated. The complex magnetic permeability spectra for ferromagnetic materials have been studied. Due to the principle of causality and time independence in the relation between magnetic induction B and magnetic field H, the real and the imaginary part of the complex magnetic permeability are mutually dependent, and the correlation is given by the Krameres-Kronig equations. Through them, it is possible to measure the real component of the complex magnetic permeability, assuming the real component is given, and by the Hilbert transform, the imaginary part of the magnetic permeability can be calculated. Magnetic circuit model has been studied theoretically, focusing on the model's poles in the complex plane to verify the principle of causality and the temporary independence.

  16. Simplified expressions of the subtracted Kramers-Kronig relations using the expanded forms applied to ultrasonic power-law systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations are a large class of integral transformations that exploit the broad principle of simple causality in order to link the physical properties of matter and materials. In applications to the complex-valued wavenumber for acoustic propagation, the method of subtractions is used to form convergent integral relations between the phase velocity and the attenuation coefficient. When the method of subtractions is applied in the usual manner, the integrands in the relations become unnecessarily complicated. In this work, an expanded form of the subtracted relations is presented, which is essentially a truncated Taylor series expansion of the Hilbert transforms. The implementation of the relations only requires the explicit evaluation of two simply expressed integrals involving the Hilbert transform kernel. These two integrals determine the values of the other terms in the subtracted relations, demonstrating the computational efficiency of the technique. The method is illustrated analytically through its application to power-law attenuation coefficients and its associated dispersion, which are observed in a wide variety of materials. This approach explicitly shows the central role of the Hilbert transform kernel in the KK relations, which can become obscured in other formulations.

  17. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R; Miller, James G

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (c(g)) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (c(p)) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for c(g) and alpha' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  18. Magneto-optical Kramers-Kronig analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levallois, Julien; Nedoliuk, Ievgeniia O; Crassee, Iris; Kuzmenko, Alexey B

    2015-03-01

    We describe a simple magneto-optical experiment and introduce a magneto-optical Kramers-Kronig analysis (MOKKA) that together allow extracting the complex dielectric function for left- and right-handed circular polarizations in a broad range of frequencies without actually generating circularly polarized light. The experiment consists of measuring reflectivity and Kerr rotation, or alternatively transmission and Faraday rotation, at normal incidence using only standard broadband polarizers without retarders or quarter-wave plates. In a common case, where the magneto-optical rotation is small (below ∼0.2 rad), a fast measurement protocol can be realized, where the polarizers are fixed at 45(∘) with respect to each other. Apart from the time-effectiveness, the advantage of this protocol is that it can be implemented at ultra-high magnetic fields and in other situations, where an in-situ polarizer rotation is difficult. Overall, the proposed technique can be regarded as a magneto-optical generalization of the conventional Kramers-Kronig analysis of reflectivity on bulk samples and the Kramers-Kronig constrained variational analysis of more complex types of spectral data. We demonstrate the application of this method to the textbook semimetals bismuth and graphite and also use it to obtain handedness-resolved magneto-absorption spectra of graphene on SiC.

  19. Kramers-Kronig relation in a Doppler-broadenedΛ-type three-level system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梦; 庞兆广; 王如泉; 左战春; 芦小刚; 白金海; 裴丽娅; 缪兴绪; 高艳磊; 吴令安; 傅盘铭; 杨世平

    2015-01-01

    We measure the absorption and dispersion in a Doppler-broadenedΛ-type three level system by resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy with homodyne detection. Through studying the dressed state energies of the system, it is found that the absorption and dispersion satisfy the Kramers–Kronig relation. The absorption and dispersion spectra calculated by employing this relation agree well with our experimental observations.

  20. Observation of surface reduction of NiO to Ni by surface-sensitive total reflection X-ray spectroscopy using Kramers-Kronig relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Nitani, Hiroaki; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masaharu

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a promising surface-sensitive X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement method. This method is based on total reflection detection and Kramers-Kronig relations, and has been named the KK-XAFS method. Total reflection spectra are transformed via Kramers-Kronig relations to obtain XAFS spectra. KK-XAFS experiments give us surface-sensitive structural parameters, while usual EXAFS analyses yield bulk structural parameters. The total reflection spectra themselves are useful for observing and discussing time evolutions of chemical reactions at surfaces by quick scanning measurements. Chemical species are analyzed to estimate their fractions during reactions. The whole method would be named total reflection X-ray spectroscopy (TREXS). A reduction of the NiO layer at the surface of Ni (30 nm)/Si was observed in a laboratory-built TREXS in situ cell. The method would be applicable to observe chemical reactions starting at surfaces and to study their kinetics and mechanisms.

  1. Absorption and scattering of light by suspensions of cells and subcellular particles: an analysis in terms of Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, K Razi; Merzlyak, M N; Melø, T B

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of light scattering from suspensions of pigmented cells and particles is undertaken, and a practicable method, requiring only the experimentally measured extinction spectra, is documented. The analysis is based on two premises: Absorption and selective scattering from a single pool of pigments satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relations, which imply that one can be derived from the other; pigment-free domains contribute only nonselective scattering. This approach succeeds in simulating the spectra of many systems (human erythrocytes, chloroplasts and subchloroplast particles, algal cells) over a wide spectral range. Other, less favourable, cases are also examined, but even here the apparent discrepancy between theory adn experiment provides some clues that cannot be gleaned from absorption data alone.

  2. Determination of power-law attenuation coefficient and dispersion spectra in multi-wall carbon nanotube composites using Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Mack, Richard A; Gladden, Joseph R; Mantena, P Raju

    2009-07-01

    Using a broadband through-transmission technique, the attenuation coefficient and phase velocity spectra have been measured for a set of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-nylon composites (from pure nylon to 20% MWCNT by weight) in the ultrasonic frequency band from 4 to 14 MHz. The samples were found to be effectively homogeneous on spatial scales from the low end of ultrasonic wavelengths investigated and up (>0.2 mm). Using Kramers-Kronig relations, the attenuation and dispersion data were found to be consistent with a power-law attenuation model with a range of exponents from y=1.12 to y=1.19 over the measurement bandwidth. The attenuation coefficients of the respective samples are found to decrease with increasing MWCNT content and a similar trend holds also for the dispersion. In contrast, the mean phase velocities for the samples rise with increasing MWCNT content indicating an increase in the mechanical moduli.

  3. Kramers-Kronig, Bode, and the meaning of zero

    CERN Document Server

    Bechhoefer, John

    2011-01-01

    The implications of causality, as captured by the Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and imaginary parts of a linear response function, are familiar parts of the physics curriculum. In 1937, Bode derived a similar relation between the magnitude (response gain) and phase. Although the Kramers-Kronig relations are an equality, Bode's relation is effectively an inequality. This perhaps-surprising difference is explained using elementary examples and ultimately traces back to delays in the flow of information within the system formed by the physical object and measurement apparatus.

  4. Kramers-Kronig analysis of attenuation and dispersion in trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Kendall R; Hoffmeister, Brent K

    2005-12-01

    A restricted-bandwidth form of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations is applied to in vitro measurements of ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion properties of trabecular bone specimens from bovine tibia. The Kramers-Kronig analysis utilizes only experimentally measured properties and avoids extrapolation of ultrasonic properties beyond the known bandwidth. Compensation for the portions of the Kramers-Kronig integrals over the unknown bandwidth is partially achieved by the method of subtractions, where a subtraction frequency acts as an adjustable parameter. Good agreement is found between experimentally measured and Kramers-Kronig reconstructed dispersions. The restricted-bandwidth approach improves upon other forms of the Kramers-Kronig relations and may provide further insight into how ultrasound interacts with trabecular bone.

  5. Kramers-Kronig relationship between ultrasonic attenuation and phase velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Kramers-Kronig relations linking the attenuation and dispersion are presented for a linear acoustic system. These expressions are used as a starting point to derive approximate, nearly local expressions relating the ultrasonic attenuation at a specific frequency to the local frequency derivative of the phase velocity (i.e., dispersion). The validity of these approximate relationships is demonstrated in several acoustic systems exhibiting substantially different physical properties.

  6. Bidirectional invisibility in Kramers-Kronig optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of planar dielectric media with complex permittivity profiles that are fully invisible, for both left and right incidence sides, is introduced. Such optical media are locally isotropic, non-magnetic and belong to the recently discovered class of Kramers-Kronig media [{\\it Nature Photon.} 9, 436 (2015)], i.e. the spatial profiles of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related each other by a Hilbert transform. The transition from unidirectional to bidirectional invisibility, and the possibility to realize sharp reflection above a cut-off incidence angle, are also discussed.

  7. Bidirectional invisibility in Kramers-Kronig optical media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.

    2016-08-01

    A broad class of planar dielectric media with complex permittivity profiles that are fully invisible, for both left and right incidence sides, is introduced. Such optical media are locally isotropic, non-magnetic and belong to the recently discovered class of Kramers-Kronig media [{\\it Nature Photon.} 9, 436 (2015)], i.e. the spatial profiles of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity are related each other by a Hilbert transform. The transition from unidirectional to bidirectional invisibility, and the possibility to realize sharp reflection above a cut-off incidence angle, are also discussed.

  8. Validation of the laboratory measurements at seismic frequencies using the Kramers-Kronig relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaltsevitch, Vassily; Lebedev, Maxim; Gurevich, Boris

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple procedure concerning the application of the Kramers-Kronig relation for the validation of the laboratory measurements of the extensional attenuation and Young's modulus carried out on the solid specimens at seismic frequencies. The local approximation of the Kramers-Kronig relationship was applied to verify the seismic-frequency measurements conducted on four specimens: a viscoelastic polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) sample, and two water- and one glycerol-saturated sandstone samples. The experimental tests were performed at various axial (PMMA sample) and confining (sandstone samples) pressures. The measurements conducted on the PMMA sample and saturated sandstones revealed prominent extensional attenuation and significant dispersion of the Young's modulus. Our analysis shows that the quantitative relationship between the extensional attenuation and the Young's modulus is consistent with the causality principle presented by the Kramers-Kronig relationship. No particular physical models implying any constraints on the physical properties of the samples are required for this validation.

  9. Better Resolved Low Frequency Dispersions by the Apt Use of Kramers-Kronig Relations, Differential Operators, and All-In-1 Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Turnhout, J

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ε' into ε″ data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ε″ spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ε' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ε' and ε″ provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modeling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ε' and ε″ data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modeling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modeling with the help of the differences ε' and ε″ can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  10. Better resolved low frequency dispersions by the apt use of Kramers-Kronig relations, differential operators and all-in-1 modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan van Turnhout

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting  into  data. This allows us to calculate conduction free  spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced  data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of  and  provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modelling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating  and  data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modelling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modelling with the help of the differences  and  can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  11. Better resolved low frequency dispersions by the apt use of Kramers-Kronig relations, differential operators and all-in-1 modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnhout, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ɛ' into ɛ'' data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ɛ'' spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ɛ' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ɛ' and ɛ'' provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modelling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ɛ' and ɛ'' data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modelling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modelling with the help of the differences ɛ' and ɛ'' can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  12. Kramers-Kronig analysis of reflectance measured at oblique incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berreman, D W

    1967-09-01

    Kramers-Kronig analysis of spectra of reflectance has usually been done only with radiation incident as nearly normal to the sample surface as possible. Any effects of obliquity have been assumed to be negligible. However, it is not much more difficult or time consuming to do Kramers-Kronig analysis of spectra taken with almost any angle of incidence, provided that polarized radiation is used to obtain the data. The method for such analysis for radiation incident at almost any angle is described in this paper. The method fails with pi polarized radiation if the angle of incidence lies between the two somewhat different Brewster angles at the high and low frequency ends of the spectrum. The rather small error in a typical analysis caused by neglecting a 15 degrees angle of incidence is illustrated.

  13. Analysis of color-center-related contribution to Bragg grating formation in Ge:SiO 2 fiber based on a local Kramers -Kronig transformation of excess loss spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, B; Xie, W X; Douay, M; Bernage, P; Niay, P; Bayon, J F; Delevaque, E; Poignant, H

    1997-08-20

    UV-induced excess losses have been measured at various pulse energy densities and exposure times in germanosilicate optical fiber preform cores. The corresponding refractive-index changes have been determined through a Kramers -Kronig analysis. Because of the nonlinear behavior of the excess losses as a function of both exposure time and fluence per pulse, one should be careful when comparing the refractive-index modulation deduced from such measurements with that obtained from Bragg grating reflectivity. Indeed nonlinear effects such as saturation imply that it is necessary to take into account the local character of the change in absorption to calculate the evolution of the refractive-index modulation accurately as a function of the exposure time. Implications of these results are discussed.

  14. 基于Kramers-Kronig关系对薄膜材料光学特征的数值反演%Numerical inversion of the optical characteristics of film material based on Kramers-Kronig relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明军; 吴振森; 李应乐; 向宁静

    2010-01-01

    依据试验测量得到特殊镀金聚酯薄膜反射率谱及光学常数,利用Kramers-Kronig(K-K)关系,数值反演了镀金聚酯薄膜反射系数、相位反射率和光学常数.在近红外波段,将理论反演与试验测量值进行比较.结果表明:利用K-K方法反演薄膜材料表面的光学特征光谱反射率和光学常数实部误差较小,其中相位反射率的绝对误差小于0.96°,相对误差平均值为0.083 1,但消光系数试验和反演数据误差较大.在缺乏试验测量条件或已知部分材料光学特征的条件下,开展具有薄膜、涂层目标光谱散射和辐射特性的研究工作,该反演方法是行之有效的.

  15. Exact transition probabilities for a linear sweep through a Kramers-Kronig resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a localized electronic spin controlled by a circularly polarized optical beam and an external magnetic field. When the frequency of the beam is tuned near an optical resonance with a continuum of higher energy states, effective magnetic fields are induced on the two-level system via the inverse Faraday effect. We explore the process in which the frequency of the beam is made linearly time-dependent so that it sweeps through the optical resonance, starting and ending at the values far away from it. In addition to changes of spin states, Kramers-Kronig relations guarantee that a localized electron can also escape into a continuum of states. We argue that probabilities of transitions between different possible electronic states after such a sweep of the optical frequency can be found exactly, regardless the shape of the resonance. We also discuss extension of our results to multistate systems.

  16. Refractive index of solutions of human hemoglobin from the near-infrared to the ultraviolet range: Kramers-Kronig analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydoruk, Oleksiy; Zhernovaya, Olga; Tuchin, Valery; Douplik, Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Because direct measurements of the refractive index of hemoglobin over a large wavelength range are challenging, indirect methods deserve particular attention. Among them, the Kramers-Kronig relations are a powerful tool often used to derive the real part of a refractive index from its imaginary part. However, previous attempts to apply the relations to solutions of human hemoglobin have been somewhat controversial, resulting in disagreement between several studies. We show that this controversy can be resolved when careful attention is paid not only to the absorption of hemoglobin but also to the dispersion of the refractive index of the nonabsorbing solvent. We present a Kramers-Kroning analysis taking both contributions into account and compare the results with the data from several studies. Good agreement with experiments is found across the visible and parts of near-infrared and ultraviolet regions. These results reinstate the use of the Kramers-Kronig relations for hemoglobin solutions and provide an additional source of information about their refractive index.

  17. A Kramers-Kronig-based quality factor for shear wave propagation in soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, M W; Greenleaf, J F

    2009-10-01

    Shear wave propagation techniques have been introduced for measuring the viscoelastic material properties of tissue, but assessing the accuracy of these measurements is difficult for in vivo measurements in tissue. We propose using the Kramers-Kronig relationships to assess the consistency and quality of the measurements of shear wave attenuation and phase velocity. In ex vivo skeletal muscle we measured the wave attenuation at different frequencies, and then applied finite bandwidth Kramers-Kronig equations to predict the phase velocities. We compared these predictions with the measured phase velocities and assessed the mean square error (MSE) as a quality factor. An algorithm was derived for computing a quality factor using the Kramers-Kronig relationships.

  18. Causality-imposed (Kramers-Kronig) relationships between attenuation and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Kendall R; Mobley, Joel; Miller, James G

    2005-05-01

    Causality imposes restrictions on both the time-domain and frequency-domain responses of a system. The Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relations relate the real and imaginary parts of the frequency-domain response. In ultrasonics, K-K relations often are used to link attenuation and dispersion. We review both integral and differential forms of the frequency-domain K-K relations that are relevant to theoretical models and laboratory measurements. We consider two methods for implementing integral K-K relations for the case of finite-bandwidth data, namely, extrapolation of data and restriction of integration limits. For the latter approach, we discuss the accuracy of K-K predictions for specific classes of system behavior and how the truncation of the integrals affects this accuracy. We demonstrate the accurate prediction of attenuation and dispersion using several forms of the K-K relations relevant to experimental measurements of media with attenuation coefficients obeying a frequency power law and media consisting of resonant scatterers. We also review the time-causal relations that describe the time-domain consequences of causality in the wave equation. These relations can be thought of as time-domain analogs of the (frequency-domain) K-K relations. Causality-imposed relations, such as the K-K and time-causal relations, provide useful tools for the analysis of measurements and models of acoustic systems.

  19. Is the Kramers-Kronig relationship between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion maintained in the presence of apparent losses due to phase cancellation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Adam Q; Marutyan, Karen R; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2007-07-01

    Phase cancellation effects can compromise the integrity of ultrasonic measurements performed with phase sensitive receiving apertures. A lack of spatial coherence of the ultrasonic field incident on a phase sensitive receiving array can produce inaccuracies of the measured attenuation coefficient and phase velocity. The causal (Kramers-Kronig) link between these two quantities in the presence of phase distortion is investigated using two plastic polymer materials, Plexiglas and Lexan, that exhibit attenuation coefficients that increase linearly with frequency, in a fashion analogous to that of soft tissue. Flat and parallel plates were machined to have a step of a thickness corresponding to an integer number of half wavelengths within the bandwidth investigated, 3 to 7 MHz. Insonification of the stepped portion of each plate produces phase cancellation artifacts at the receiving aperture and, therefore, in the measured frequency dependent attenuation coefficient. Dispersion predictions using two different forms of the Kramers-Kronig relations were performed for the flat and the stepped regions of each plastic plate. Despite significant phase distortion and a detection system sensitive to these aberrations, the Kramers-Kronig link between the apparent attenuation coefficient and apparent phase velocity dispersion remains intact.

  20. Study of optical properties of thin copper films on glass substrate using Kramers-Kronig method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Morteza Ali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Different thicknesses of 99.97% Cu are deposited on glass substrate by thermal evaporation method at the rate of 2A˚/sec. Kramers-Kronig method is used for the analysis of the reflectivity constant in the range of 200nm

  1. Practical application of the Kramers-Kronig transformation on impedance measurements in solid state electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukamp, Bernard A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for executing the Kramers-Kronig transforms of electrochemical impedance data on a computer. Attention is paid to the extrapolation techniques for impedance data with a limited frequency range. It is shown that impedance spectra of systems with blocking electrodes, exhibiting a

  2. Kramers-Kronig analysis on the real refractive index of porous media in the terahertz spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfsten, Pertti; Kontturi, Ville; Ervasti, Tuomas; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-03-01

    We present a terahertz time-domain experimental technique for the detection of scattering from porous media. The method for detection of the scattering enables one to make a decision when Fresnel or Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis can be applied for a porous medium. In this study the real refractive index of a tablet is calculated using the conventional K-K dispersion relation and also using a singly subtractive K-K relation, which are applied to the extinction coefficient obtained from the Beer-Lambert law. The advantage of the K-K analysis is that one gets estimates both for absolute refractive index and also dispersion of the porous tablet, whereas Fresnel analysis provides only the absolute value of the index.

  3. Experimental verification of the Kramers-Kronig relationship for acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; Lahham, M; Martin, B G

    1990-01-01

    A spectral technique for effectively and accurately measuring acoustic attenuation over a wide frequency range is reported. The spectral technique for phase measurement developed by W. Sachse and Y.H. Pao (1978) was used to determine the acoustic dispersion. For acoustic waves, a very simple and useful Kramers-Kronig relationship was previously derived by M. O'Donnell, E.T. Jaynes, and J.G. Miller (1981). The attenuation was calculated, using this relationship, from the measured dispersion and then compared with the attenuation that was measured independently. Dispersion was deduced from the measured attenuation and compared with the measured dispersion. The results of two highly attenuative specimens are presented. The agreement between the calculated attenuation and measured attenuation is excellent. The deduced dispersion also agrees well with the measured one. This agreement verifies the simple Kramers-Kronig relationship used. It further shows the accuracy of the spectral techniques for attenuation and dispersion measurements over a wide frequency range.

  4. Investigation of the Kramers-Kronig analysis - Revised optical constants of AgCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, R. S.; Spicer, W. E.; White, J. J., III

    1974-01-01

    White and Straley (1968) have reported room-temperature optical constants for AgCl that exhibit negative, unphysical dips at the band edge. Because Morrison (1961) also obtained such behavior for InAs, InSb, and GaAs, a study is made of the possible sources of this anomaly. An artifact of the experimental reflectance data near this energy is found to be responsible. No defect in the Kramers-Kronig transform or its use is implied, contrary to some suggestions. The corrected optical constants of AgCl were modified by about 10% up to 5 eV, whereas at higher energies they were barely affected. Thus Kramers-Kronig-deduced optical constants that exhibit unusual structure are not affected by this structure at other energies. The new AgCl results are presented, and assignments are briefly discussed.

  5. Update on Kramers-Kronig relation for proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryniuk, Oleksii [JGU, Mainz (Germany); KNU, Kyiv (Ukraine); Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir [JGU, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    New evaluation of the Baldin sum rule and forward Compton scattering amplitude, as well as higher order sum rules, was made with updated data for proton total photoabsorption cross-section. Stability of resulting values, comparison to previous evaluations and consequences of results for higher order sum rules are discussed.

  6. Optical constants of various chromites as determined by Kramers-Kronig analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anki, M M; Lefez, B

    1996-03-20

    The infrared optical constants of a few different powders of chromites, XCr(2)O(4) (where X is Fe, Ni, Mg, Zn, or Cu), have been determined by Kramers-Kronig analysis of their infrared transmission and reflection spectra. The knowledge of these constants allows one to predict the different thin-layer infrared reflection spectra and to compare them, when it is possible, with the reflection spectra calculated with n and k obtained by the use of the classical oscillator method.

  7. Kramers-Kronig analysis of infrared reflection spectra with perpendicular polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Masui, A; Ishida, H

    1994-09-20

    The application of Kramers-Kronig analysis for reflection spectra from a single interface with perpendicular (s) polarization has been studied theoretically with regard to a phase correction term. The errors in phase shift and complex refractive index obtained by the use of Kramers-Kronig analysis have been examined for such techniques as external, internal, and total internal reflection spectroscopies by the use of spectral simulation and the complex refractive index based on dispersion theory. The advantages and disadvantages of the various measurement techniques used to obtain the complex refractive index of a sample material have been compared. It is concluded that the external reflection technique can be used until the sample thickness becomes too thin to provide the edge shape necessary to avoid the detection of reflection from the back surface. The total internal reflection technique should be used only for a thin-film sample because knowledge of the refractive index at some frequency is required and bcause this technique may yield larger errors than the other techniques in the complex refractive index obtained by the use of Kramers-Kronig analysis.

  8. Application of Kramers-Kronig relationships for titanium impedance data validation in a Ringer's solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the applicability of Kramers-Kronig (KK relationships to assess the validity of real and imaginary impedance measurements for titanium in a Ringer's solution using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS method. Nyquist and Bode plots showed a capacitive behaviour with a high impedance modulus including two time constants. Two procedures were employed in the implementation of the KK integral relationships based on an equivalent circuit which satisfies KK relationships and an ohmic resistance shunted to the measured EIS data. The titanium's EIS data satisfied the KK relationships.

    Este artículo estudia la aplicabilidad de las relaciones de Kramers-Kronig (KK al estudio de la validez de las medidas de impedancia (EIS, parte real y parte imaginaria, del titanio en contacto con la solución de Ringer. Los diagramas de Nyquist y Bode muestran un comportamiento capacitivo, con un módulo de impedancia elevado y con dos constantes de tiempo. En la implementación de las integrales de KK se emplearon dos procedimientos, que se basan en un circuito equivalente que cumple las relaciones de KK y en una resistencia óhmica en paralelo añadida a los datos de impedancia medidos. Los resultados de impedancia del titanio satisfacen las relaciones de KK.

  9. Calculation of the Kramers-Kronig transform of X-ray spectra by a piecewise Laurent polynomial method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Benjamin

    2014-09-22

    An algorithm is presented for the calculation of the Kramers-Kronig transform of a spectrum via a piecewise Laurent polynomial method. This algorithm is demonstrated to be highly accurate, while also being computationally efficient. The algorithm places no requirements on data point spacing and is capable of integrating across the full spectrum (i.e. from zero to infinity). Further, we present a computer application designed to aid in calculating the Kramers-Kronig transform on near-edge experimental X-ray absorption spectra (extended with atomic scattering factor data) in order to produce the dispersive part of the X-ray refractive index, including near-edge features.

  10. Using the Kramers-Kronig method to determine optical constants and evaluating its suitability as a linear transform for near-normal front-surface reflectance spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, A; Berets, S L; Milosevic, V; Milosevic, M

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the suitability of using the Kramers-Kronig transform to routinely extract optical constants from near-normal incidence reflectance spectra of solids and liquids is demonstrated. In addition, the possibility of utilizing the Kramers-Kronig transform as a linearizing transform for near-normal incidence reflectance spectra is investigated. Also, several commercial Kramers-Kronig software packages were utilized in determining the optical constants from the near-normal incidence reflectance of Plexiglas. Unexpectedly, the results produced by the various packages differed significantly. The near-normal reflectance of water was measured, the Kramers-Kronig transform was applied to extract the optical constants of water, and the result was compared to values found in the literature. Furthermore, the Kramers-Kronig transforms of near-normal incidence reflectance spectra of various concentrations of sugar in water were calculated to evaluate its use as a linearizing transform for quantitative applications.

  11. Kramers-Kronig analysis of molecular evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained by multimode step-index optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, R A; Ruddy, V P; Hieftje, G M

    1996-07-20

    Spectral distortions that arise in evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained with multimode step-index optical fibers are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analysis is performed by the application of Kramers-Kronig relations to the real and the imaginary parts of the complex refractive index of an absorbing external medium. It is demonstrated that even when the extinction coefficient of the external medium is small, anomalous dispersion of that medium in the vicinity of an absorption band must be considered. Deviations from Beer's law, band distortions, and shifts in peak position are quantified theoretically as a function of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the external medium; the effect of bandwidth for both Lorentzian and Gaussian bands is also evaluated. Numerical simulations are performed for two types of sensing sections in commonly used plastic-clad silica optical fibers. These sensors include an unclad fiber in contact with a lower-index absorbing liquid and a fiber with the original cladding modified with an absorbing species. The numerical results compare favorably with those found experimentally with these types of sensing sections.

  12. Treating retardation effects in valence EELS spectra for Kramers-Kronig analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöger-Pollach, M; Laister, A; Schattschneider, P

    2008-04-01

    Retardation effects such as Cerenkov losses and waveguide modes alter the valence electron energy-loss spectrum of semiconductors and insulators as soon as the speed of the probing electron exceeds the speed of light inside the probed medium. This leads to the dilemma, that optical properties from these media cannot be determined correctly using electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) if no corrections are applied. In this work we present two ways out of this dilemma: a reduction of the beam energy and the application of an off-line correction. We demonstrate the accuracy of these two methods by using two similar layers of Si(x):H having slightly different refractive indices and discuss the impact of the normalization parameter during Kramers-Kronig analysis (KKA) on the obtained dielectric properties. We further demonstrate that KKA can be applied without the use of standard specimens, if thickness determination using transmission electron microscopy and EELS is accurate enough.

  13. Direct observation of Kramers-Kronig self-phasing in coherently combined fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Leger, James R; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta

    2013-10-15

    A highly stable coherent beam-combining system has been designed to measure self-phasing in fiber lasers due to nonlinear effects. Whereas self-phasing in previous coherent combination experiments has been principally attributed to wavelength shifting, these wavelength effects have been efficiently suppressed in our experiment by using a dual-core fiber with closely balanced optical path lengths. The self-phasing from nonlinear effects could then be measured independently and directly by common-path interferometry with a probe laser. The Kramers-Kronig effect in the fiber gain media was observed to induce a phase shift that effectively canceled the applied path length errors, resulting in efficient lasing under all phase conditions. This process was demonstrated to result in robust lasing over a large range of pump conditions.

  14. Broadband CARS spectral phase retrieval using a time-domain Kramers-Kronig transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuexin; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2009-05-01

    We describe a closed-form approach for performing a Kramers-Kronig (KK) transform that can be used to rapidly and reliably retrieve the phase, and thus the resonant imaginary component, from a broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectrum with a nonflat background. In this approach we transform the frequency-domain data to the time domain, perform an operation that ensures a causality criterion is met, then transform back to the frequency domain. The fact that this method handles causality in the time domain allows us to conveniently account for spectrally varying nonresonant background from CARS as a response function with a finite rise time. A phase error accompanies KK transform of data with finite frequency range. In examples shown here, that phase error leads to small (<1%) errors in the retrieved resonant spectra.

  15. On the Kramers-Kronig transform with logarithmic kernel for the reflection phase in the Drude model

    CERN Document Server

    André, J -M; Jonnard, Philippe; Mahne, N; Giglia, Angela; Nannarone, S; 10.1080/09500340.2010.506015

    2011-01-01

    We use the Kramers-Kronig transform (KKT) with logarithmic kernel to obtain the reflection phase and, subsequently, the complex refractive index of a bulk mirror from reflectance. However, there remains some confusion regarding the formulation for this analysis. Assuming the damped Drude model for the dielectric constant and the oblique incidence case, we calculate the additional terms: phase at zero frequency and Blashke factor and we propose a reformulated KKT within this model. Absolute reflectance in the s-polarization case of a gold film is measured between 40 and 350 eV for various glancing angles using synchrotron radiation and its complex refractive index is deduced using the reformulated KKT that we propose. The results are discussed with respect to the data available in the literature.

  16. Determination of optical constants n and k of thin films from absorbance data using Kramers-Kronig relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, W R M; Pilling, S

    2014-04-01

    We present a code, called NKABS, to determine optical constants (complex refractive index) of thin films directly from the absorbance data in the infrared. The code is written in the Python language, which is more accurate and faster than previous methods in the literature. For solving the Kramers-Kronig relationship, we used the Maclaurin's methodology. Unlike other codes, which found convergence in 30-40 iterations, the NKABS reach the convergence in just 4 or 5 iterations. Additionally, to evaluate the error, this code calculates the MAPE (Mean Absolute Percentage Error) and the chi-square χ(2). The typical MAPE error obtained using NKABS is less than 1×10(-3)%. To illustrate the functionality of this code, we calculate the optical constants in the infrared spectral region of 28 different samples of astrophysical interest at different temperatures (10-300K), which simulates molecules in space environments, mostly the ones called astrophysical ices. The samples were obtained from the condensation of pure gases (e.g. CO, CO2, NH3, SO2), from the sublimation in vacuum of pure liquids (e.g. water, acetone, acetonitrile, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol and methanol) and from mixtures of different species (e.g. H2O:CO2, H2O:CO:NH3, H2O:CO2:NH3:CH4). Additionally films of solid biomolecules samples of astrochemistry/astrobiology interest (e.g. glycine, adenine) were probed. The code and the data-base obtained here are available on-line. The NKABS can also be employed to calculate refractive index of processed samples (by heating or radiation). Such data and the refractive index of virgin samples are required as input in several astrophysical models that calculate the radiative transfer in dusty astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks and circumstellar environments as well as dense molecular clouds.

  17. Kramers-Kronig analysis of soft x-ray reflectivity data of platinum thin film in 40-200 Å wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, R. K.; Sinha, Mangalika; Yadav, P.; Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H.

    2016-05-01

    Reflectivity beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron source is used to determine optical constants of a platinum thin film in the soft x-ray wavelength region of 40-200Å by applying Kramers-Kronig (KK) technique on R vs wavelength data. Upto 150Å wavelength region the results of KK analysis are found in good agreement with the Henke's optical constants and also with those obtained by the angle dependent reflectivity technique. A significant mismatch is observed above 150Å wavelength region which could be due to the presence of higher harmonics in the toroidal grating spectra of the reflectivity beamline.

  18. Determination of noise-free optical constants in the infrared by Kramers-Kronig transformation of the reflectance ratio in s- and p-polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Eduard; Schennach, Robert

    2010-06-01

    A method for Kramers-Kronig transformation of the reflectance ratio of s- and p-polarized light is discussed. The method is well suited for the determination of the optical constants of isotropic samples such as pellets prepared from powders. An algorithm is given that performs the transformation, including extrapolation at the data margins and an automated data fitting routine, that can handle very complex spectra of, e.g., biomacromolecules such as cellulose to obtain noise free spectra. Criteria for evaluation of the quality of the obtained data are given, and experimental data for cellulose II and xylane are presented.

  19. Kramers-kronig analysis of ratio reflectance spectra measured at an oblique angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querry, M R; Holland, W E

    1974-03-01

    Ratio reflectance R is defined as R = R(p)/R(s) , where R(p) and R(s), are absolute specular reflectances of a material for electromagnetic waves linearly polarized with the electric field vector parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence, respectively. An algorithm was developed for computing both the index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k from an R spectrum obtained for radiant flux incident on a plane surface of the material at an oblique angle in the range 10 degrees less, similar theta reflection of the two separate polarization components. Real and imaginary parts of a Fresnel equation for the ratio reflectivity provide equations for computing n and k when R, theta and Deltaø are known quantities. A synthetic R spectrum for water was generated by Appropriate use of n and k values for that substance and the generalized Fresnel equation for ratio reflectance. The algorithm, when applied to the synthetic R spectrum, returned values of n and k for water in the 25,000-500-cm(-1) wevenumber interval that were primarily limited in their accuracy by the interval size used for Simpson's rule numerical approximation of the K-K integral.

  20. Electrospun tungsten oxide NPs/PVA nanofibers: A study on the morphology and Kramers-Kronig analysis of infrared reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenari, Hossein Mahmoudi; Kangarlou, Haleh

    2016-10-01

    The major objective of this work is focused on the preparation and characterization of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) embedding tungsten oxide nanoparticles based on electrospinning technique. A surfactant (CTAB) was introduced to incorporate tungsten oxide nanoparticles into the PVA nanofibers homogeneously. To prepare a viscous solution of PVA nanofiber containing tungsten oxide nanoparticles, the distance between the tip of the needle and the surface of the foil was chosen as 10 and 15 cm. The tungsten oxide NPs/PVA composite nanofibers have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and reflectance spectrum in the wave length range of 200-1200 nm. Fiber diameters decrease with increasing of tip-to-collector distance from 10 to 15 cm. The average diameters were estimated about 165±30 nm and 145±30 nm from scanning electron microscopy at 10 and 15 cm, respectively. The optical properties of the electrospun nanofibers were examined by the Kramers-Kronig model. The optical results show that tungsten oxide nanopowder show almost five times higher conductivity, lower absorbance and zero band gap energy.

  1. Causality relations for materials with strong artificial optical chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, M V; Ezhov, A A; Artemov, V V; Rogov, O Y

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that the fundamental causality principle being applied to strongly chiral artificial materials yields the generalized Kramers-Kronig relations for the observables -- circular dichroism and optical activity. The relations include the Blaschke terms determined by material-specific features - the zeros of transmission amplitude on the complex frequency plane. By the example of subwavelength arrays of chiral holes in silver films we show that the causality relations can be used not only for a precise verification of experimental data but also for resolving the positions of material anomalies and resonances and quantifying the degree of their chiral splitting.

  2. Kramers-Kronig transformation of experimental electronic circular dichroism: application to the analysis of optical rotatory dispersion in dimethyl-L-tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Prasad L; Petrovic, Ana G; Zhang, Peng

    2006-09-01

    When a limited region of the experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectrum is subjected to Kramers-Kronig (KK) transformation, the resulting optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) may or may not reproduce the experimentally measured ORD in the long-wavelength nonresonant region. If the KK transform of experimentally measured ECD in a limited wavelength region reproduces the experimentally measured ORD in the long-wavelength nonresonant region, then that observation indicates that the ORD in the long-wavelength nonresonant region should be satisfactorily predicted from the correspondingly limited number of electronic transitions in a reliable quantum mechanical calculation. On the other hand, if the KK transform of experimentally measured ECD in a limited region does not reproduce the experimentally measured ORD in the long-wavelength nonresonant region, then it should be possible to identify the ECD bands in the shorter wavelength region that are responsible for the differences between experimentally observed ORD and KK-transformed ECD. This approach helps to identify the role of ECD associated with higher energy-excited states in the nature of ORD in the long-wavelength nonresonant region. These concepts are demonstrated here by measuring the experimental ECD and ORD for dimethyl-L-tartrate in different solvents. While ECD spectra of dimethyl-L-tartrate in different solvents show little variation, ORD spectra in the long-wavelength nonresonant region show marked solvent dependence. These observations are explained using the difference between experimental ORD and KK-transformed ECD. Quantum mechanical predictions of ECD and ORD are also presented for isolated (R, R)-dimethyl tartrate at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level.

  3. Integral relations of optical characteristics involving pairs of condensed medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnovskyj, Mykhajlo Y.; Tymochko, Bogdan M.; Rudeichuk, Volodymyr M.; Dominikov, Mickolay M.

    2015-11-01

    The integral relations among optical invariants and elipsometric parameters of light are obtained in this paper. It is shown, that among optical invariants there is an integral relation, similar to Kramers-Kronig relation for complex dielectric conductivity or a complex index of refraction. The possibility to determine the spectral values of conductivity through the integral transform of optical invariants or ellipsometric angles is discussed.

  4. A review of linear response theory for general differentiable dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, David

    2009-04-01

    The classical theory of linear response applies to statistical mechanics close to equilibrium. Away from equilibrium, one may describe the microscopic time evolution by a general differentiable dynamical system, identify nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) and study how these vary under perturbations of the dynamics. Remarkably, it turns out that for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems (those satisfying the 'chaotic hypothesis'), the linear response away from equilibrium is very similar to the linear response close to equilibrium: the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations hold, and the fluctuation-dispersion theorem survives in a modified form (which takes into account the oscillations around the 'attractor' corresponding to the NESS). If the chaotic hypothesis does not hold, two new phenomena may arise. The first is a violation of linear response in the sense that the NESS does not depend differentiably on parameters (but this nondifferentiability may be hard to see experimentally). The second phenomenon is a violation of the dispersion relations: the susceptibility has singularities in the upper half complex plane. These 'acausal' singularities are actually due to 'energy nonconservation': for a small periodic perturbation of the system, the amplitude of the linear response is arbitrarily large. This means that the NESS of the dynamical system under study is not 'inert' but can give energy to the outside world. An 'active' NESS of this sort is very different from an equilibrium state, and it would be interesting to see what happens for active states to the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem.

  5. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Canuto, V

    2015-01-01

    This is an English translation of the Italian version of an encyclopedia chapter that appeared in the Italian Encyclopedia of the Physical Sciences, edited by Bruno Bertotti (1994). Following requests from colleagues we have decided to make it available to a more general readership. We present the motivation for constructing General Relativity, provide a short discussion of tensor algebra, and follow the set up of Einstein equations. We discuss briefly the initial value problem, the linear approximation and how should non gravitational physics be described in curved spacetime.

  6. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I. B

    2005-01-01

    This book offers an alternative to other textbooks on the subject, providing a more specific discussion of numerous general relativistic effects for readers who have knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, including special relativity. Coverage includes gravitational lensing, signal retardation in the gravitational field of the Sun, the Reissner-Nordström solution, selected spin effects, the resonance transformation of an electromagnetic wave into a gravitational one, and the entropy and temperature of black holes. The book includes numerous problems at various levels of difficulty, making it ideal also for independent study by a broad readership of advanced students and researchers. I.B. Khriplovich is Chief Researcher, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, and Chair of Theoretical Physics at Novosibirsk University. Dr. Khriplovich is a Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded the Dirac Medal ``For the advancement of theoretical physics'' by Univ...

  7. Wave equations, dispersion relations, and van Hove singularities for applications of doublet mechanics to ultrasound propagation in bio- and nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junru; Layman, Christopher; Liu, Jun

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental mathematical framework for applications of Doublet Mechanics to ultrasound propagation in a discrete material is introduced. A multiscale wave equation, dispersion relation for longitudinal waves, and shear waves are derived. The van Hove singularities and corresponding highest frequency limits for the Mth-order wave equations of longitudinal and shear waves are determined for a widely used microbundle structure. Doublet Mechanics is applied to soft tissue and low-density polyethylene. The experimental dispersion data for soft tissue and low-density polyethylene are compared with results predicted by Doublet Mechanics and an attenuation model based on a Kramers-Kronig relation in classical continuum mechanics.

  8. Generalized derivations and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, M; Pysiak, L; Sasin, W

    2013-01-01

    We construct differential geometry (connection, curvature, etc.) based on generalized derivations of an algebra A. Such a derivation, introduced by Bresar in 1991, is given by a linear mapping u: A -> A such that there exists a usual derivation d of A satisfying the generalized Leibniz rule u(a b) = u(a) b + a d(b) for all a,b in A. The generalized geometry "is tested" in the case of the algebra of smooth functions on a manifold. We then apply this machinery to study the generalized general relativity. We define the Einstein-Hilbert action and deduce from it Einstein's field equations. We show that for a special class of metrics containing, besides the usual metric components, only one non-zero term, the action reduces to O'Hanlon action that is a Brans-Dicke action with potential and with the parameter \\omega equal to zero. We also show that the generalized Einstein equations (with zero energy-stress tensor) are equivalent to those of the Kaluza-Klein theory satisfying a "modified cylinder condition" and hav...

  9. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  10. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  11. General relativity and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This year marks the hundredth anniversary of Einstein's 1915 landmark paper "Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation" in which the field equations of general relativity were correctly formulated for the first time, thus rendering general relativity a complete theory. Over the subsequent hundred years physicists and astronomers have struggled with uncovering the consequences and applications of these equations. This contribution, which was written as an introduction to six chapters dealing with the connection between general relativity and cosmology that will appear in the two-volume book "One Hundred Years of General Relativity: From Genesis and Empirical Foundations to Gravitational Waves, Cosmology and Quantum Gravity," endeavors to provide a historical overview of the connection between general relativity and cosmology, two areas whose development has been closely intertwined.

  12. General Relativity and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  13. Quantum Gauge General Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning

    2004-01-01

    Based on gauge principle, a new model on quantum gravity is proposed in the frame work of quantum gauge theory of gravity. The model has local gravitational gauge symmetry, and the field equation of the gravitational gauge field is just the famous Einstein's field equation. Because of this reason, this model is called quantum gauge general relativity, which is the consistent unification of quantum theory and general relativity. The model proposed in this paper is a perturbatively renormalizable quantum gravity, which is one of the most important advantage of the quantum gauge general relativity proposed in this paper. Another important advantage of the quantum gauge general relativity is that it can explain both classical tests of gravity and quantum effects of gravitational interactions, such as gravitational phase effects found in COW experiments and gravitational shielding effects found in Podkletnov experiments.

  14. Causality and dispersion relations and the role of the S-matrix in the ongoing research

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The adaptation of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations to the causal localization structure of QFT led to an important project in particle physics, the only one with a successful closure. The same cannot be said about the subsequent attempts to formulate particle physics as a pure S-matrix project. The feasibility of a pure S-matrix approach are critically analyzed and their serious shortcomings are highlighted. Whereas the conceptual/mathematical demands of renormalized perturbation theory are modest and misunderstandings could easily be corrected, the correct understanding about the origin of the crossing property demands the use of the mathematical theory of modular localization and its relation to the thermal KMS condition. These concepts which combine localization, vacuum polarization and thermal properties under the roof of modular theory will be explained and their use in a new constructive (nonperturbative) approach to QFT will be indicated. The S-matrix still plays a predominant role, but differen...

  15. Matter in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  16. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  17. General Relativity Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    A hundred years after its birth, general relativity has become a highly successful theory in the sese that it has passed many experimental and observational tests and finds widespread application to diverse set of cosmic phenomena. It remains an accurate research field as more tests are deployed, epitomized by the exciting prospect of detecting gravitational radiation directly. General realtivity is the essential foundation of modern cosmology and underlies our detailed description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most powerful and dramatic cosmic sources. The interface with physics on both the largest and the smallest scales continues to be very fertile. In this talk I will attempt to highlight some key steps along the way to general relativity today.

  18. Deformed General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Deformed special relativity is embedded in deformed general relativity using the methods of canonical relativity and loop quantum gravity. Phase-space dependent deformations of symmetry algebras then appear, which in some regimes can be rewritten as non-linear Poincare algebras with momentum-dependent deformations of commutators between boosts and time translations. In contrast to deformed special relativity, the deformations are derived for generators with an unambiguous physical role, following from the relationship between canonical constraints of gravity with stress-energy components. The original deformation does not appear in momentum space and does not give rise to non-locality issues or problems with macroscopic objects. Contact with deformed special relativity may help to test loop quantum gravity or restrict its quantization ambiguities.

  19. Square of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Galtsov, D V

    1996-01-01

    We consider dilaton--axion gravity interacting with $p\\;\\, U(1)$ vectors ($p=6$ corresponding to $N=4$ supergravity) in four--dimensional spacetime admitting a non--null Killing vector field. It is argued that this theory exibits features of a ``square'' of vacuum General Relativity. In the three--dimensional formulation it is equivalent to a gravity coupled $SO(2,2+p)/(SO(2)\\times SO(2+p))$. Kähler coordinates are introduced on the target manifold generalising Ernst potentials of General Relativity. The corresponding Kähler potential is found to be equal to the logarithm of the product of the four--dimensional metric component $g_{00}$ in the Einstein frame and the dilaton factor, independently on presence of vector fields. The complex axidilaton field, while it undergoes holomorphic/antiholomorphic transformations under general target space isometries. The ``square'' property is also manifest in the two--dimensional reduction of the theory as a matrix generalization of the Kramer--Neugebauer map.

  20. Generalized uncertainty relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdegen, Andrzej; Ziobro, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    The standard uncertainty relations (UR) in quantum mechanics are typically used for unbounded operators (like the canonical pair). This implies the need for the control of the domain problems. On the other hand, the use of (possibly bounded) functions of basic observables usually leads to more complex and less readily interpretable relations. In addition, UR may turn trivial for certain states if the commutator of observables is not proportional to a positive operator. In this letter we consider a generalization of standard UR resulting from the use of two, instead of one, vector states. The possibility to link these states to each other in various ways adds additional flexibility to UR, which may compensate some of the above-mentioned drawbacks. We discuss applications of the general scheme, leading not only to technical improvements, but also to interesting new insight.

  1. Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    This lecture will present a review of the past and present tests of the General Relativity theory. The essentials of the theory will be recalled and the measurable effects will be listed and analyzed. The main historical confirmations of General Relativity will be described. Then, the present situation will be reviewed presenting a number of examples. The opportunities given by astrophysical and astrometric observations will be shortly discussed. Coming to terrestrial experiments the attention will be specially focused on ringlasers and a dedicated experiment for the Gran Sasso Laboratories, named by the acronym GINGER, will be presented. Mention will also be made of alternatives to the use of light, such as particle beams and superfluid rings.

  2. Tachyons in General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We consider the motion of tachyons (faster-than-light particles) in the framework of General Relativity. An important feature is the large contribution of low energy tachyons to the energy-momentum tensor. We also calculate the gravitational field produced by tachyons in particular geometric arrangements; and it appears that there could be self-cohering bundles of such matter. This leads us to suggest that such theoretical ideas might be relevant to major problems (dark matter and dark energy...

  3. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  4. Beyond Einstein's General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, Francisco S N

    2014-01-01

    Modern astrophysical and cosmological models are plagued with two severe theoretical difficulties, namely, the dark energy and the dark matter problems. Relative to the former, high-precision observational data have confirmed with startling evidence that the Universe is undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. This phase, one of the most important and challenging current problems in cosmology, represents a new imbalance in the governing gravitational equations. Several candidates, responsible for this expansion, have been proposed in the literature, in particular, dark energy models and modified gravity, amongst others. Outstanding questions are related to the nature of this so-called "dark energy" that is driving the acceleration of the universe, and whether it is due to the vacuum energy or a dynamical field. On the other hand, the late-time cosmic acceleration may be due to modifications of General Relativity, which introduce new degrees of freedom to the gravitational sector itself. We analyze some of...

  5. Strains in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The definition of relative accelerations and strains among a set of comoving particles is studied in connection with the geometric properties of the frame adapted to a "fiducial observer." We find that a relativistically complete and correct definition of strains must take into account the transport law of the chosen spatial triad along the observer's congruence. We use special congruences of (accelerated) test particles in some familiar spacetimes to elucidate such a point. The celebrated idea of Szekeres' compass of inertia, arising when studying geodesic deviation among a set of free-falling particles, is here generalized to the case of accelerated particles. In doing so we have naturally contributed to the theory of relativistic gravity gradiometer. Moreover, our analysis was made in an observer-dependent form, a fact that would be very useful when thinking about general relativistic tests on space stations orbiting compact objects like black holes and also in other interesting gravitational situations.

  6. Introduction to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarthy, R

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL RELATIVITY begins with a description of the geometry of curved space, explaining geodesics, parallel transport, covariant differentiation, geodesic deviation and spacetime symmetry by killing vectors. It then introduces Einstein's theory of gravitation followed by Schwarzschild solution with its relevance to Positive Mass theorem. The three tests for Einstein's gravity are explained. Other exact solutions such as Vaidya, Kerr and Reisner - Nordstrom metric are included. In the Chapter on cosmological solutions, a detailed description of Godel metric is provided. It then introduces five dimensional spacetime of Kaluza showing the unification of gravity with electromagnetism. This is extended to include non-Abelian gauge theory by invoking compact extra dimensions. Explicit expressions in this case for Christoffel connections and ricci tensor are derived and the higher dimensional gravity action is shown to compactification are given.

  7. Conformal General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pervushin, V

    2001-01-01

    The inflation-free solution of problems of the modern cosmology (horizon, cosmic initial data, Planck era, arrow of time, singularity,homogeneity, and so on) is considered in the conformal-invariant unified theory given in the space with geometry of similarity where we can measure only the conformal-invariant ratio of all quantities. Conformal General Relativity is defined as the $SU_c(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$-Standard Model where the dimensional parameter in the Higgs potential is replaced by a dilaton scalar field described by the negative Penrose-Chernikov-Tagirov action. Spontaneous SU(2) symmetry breaking is made on the level of the conformal-invariant angle of the dilaton-Higgs mixing, and it allows us to keep the structure of Einstein's theory with the equivalence principle. We show that the lowest order of the linearized equations of motion solves the problems mentioned above and describes the Cold Universe Scenario with the constant temperature T and z-history of all masses with respect to an obser...

  8. Milestones of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    We present a summary for non-specialists of the special issue of the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity on ‘Milestones of general relativity’, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the theory.

  9. Nonlocal General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, B

    2014-01-01

    A brief account of the present status of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation is presented. The main physical assumptions that underlie this theory are described. We clarify the physical meaning and significance of Weitzenb\\"ock's torsion, and emphasize its intimate relationship with the gravitational field, characterized by the Riemannian curvature of spacetime. In this theory, nonlocality can simulate dark matter; in fact, in the Newtonian regime, we recover the phenomenological Tohline-Kuhn approach to modified gravity. To account for the observational data regarding dark matter, nonlocality is associated with a characteristic length scale of order 1 kpc. The confrontation of nonlocal gravity with observation is briefly discussed.

  10. Genesis of general relativity - Discovery of general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Galina

    2012-01-01

    The intermediate stage of the development of general relativity is inseparable of Marcel Grossmann's mathematical assistance. Einstein acknowledges Grossmann's help during 1912-1914 to the development of general relativity. In fact, as with special relativity so was it with General relativity, Einstein received assistance only from his old friends, Marcel Grossmann and Michele Besso. However, he continued to consider Besso as his eternal "sounding board"...

  11. 100 Years of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, George F R

    2015-01-01

    This is Chapter 1 in the book General Relativity and Gravitation: A Centennial Perspective, Edited by Abhay Ashtekar (Editor in Chief), Beverly Berger, James Isenberg, Malcolm MacCallum. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June, 2015). It gives a survey of themes that have been developed during the 100 years of progress in general relativity theory.

  12. Hyperbolic Formulation of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Abrahams, A M; Choquet-Bruhat, Y; York, J W; Abrahams, Andrew; Anderson, Arlen; Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; York, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two geometrical well-posed hyperbolic formulations of general relativity are described. One admits any time-slicing which preserves a generalized harmonic condition. The other admits arbitrary time-slicings. Both systems have only the physical characteristic speeds of zero and the speed of light.

  13. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  14. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyse experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable -- maximal energy of the scattered photons -- would experience a significant shift in the Earth's gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of res...

  15. Pseudo-complex general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Peter O; Greiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents an pseudo-complex extension of General Relativity which addresses these issues and presents proposals for experimental examinations in strong fields near a large mass. General Relativity is a beautiful and well tested theory of gravitation. Nevertheless, it implies conceptual problems like the creation of singularities (Black Holes) as a result of the collapse of large masses, or the appearance of event horizons which exclude parts of the space-time from the observation of external observers. The mathematical and geometrical foundations of this extension are displayed in detail, and applications including orbits and accretion disks around large central masses, neutron stars or cosmological models are introduced. Calculations both for classical and extended applications are often executed in the form of problems with extensive solutions, which makes this volume also a valuable resource for any student of General Relativity.

  16. General relativity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, J

    2004-01-01

    An internationally famous physicist and electrical engineer, the author of this text was a pioneer in the investigation of gravitational waves. Joseph Weber's General Relativity and Gravitational Waves offers a classic treatment of the subject. Appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text remains ever relevant. Brief but thorough in its introduction to the foundations of general relativity, it also examines the elements of Riemannian geometry and tensor calculus applicable to this field.Approximately a quarter of the contents explores theoretical and experimenta

  17. A statistical mechanical approach for the computation of the climatic response to general forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, V.; Sarno, S.

    2011-01-01

    The climate belongs to the class of non-equilibrium forced and dissipative systems, for which most results of quasi-equilibrium statistical mechanics, including the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, do not apply. In this paper we show for the first time how the Ruelle linear response theory, developed for studying rigorously the impact of perturbations on general observables of non-equilibrium statistical mechanical systems, can be applied with great success to analyze the climatic response to general forcings. The crucial value of the Ruelle theory lies in the fact that it allows to compute the response of the system in terms of expectation values of explicit and computable functions of the phase space averaged over the invariant measure of the unperturbed state. We choose as test bed a classical version of the Lorenz 96 model, which, in spite of its simplicity, has a well-recognized prototypical value as it is a spatially extended one-dimensional model and presents the basic ingredients, such as dissipation, advection and the presence of an external forcing, of the actual atmosphere. We recapitulate the main aspects of the general response theory and propose some new general results. We then analyze the frequency dependence of the response of both local and global observables to perturbations having localized as well as global spatial patterns. We derive analytically several properties of the corresponding susceptibilities, such as asymptotic behavior, validity of Kramers-Kronig relations, and sum rules, whose main ingredient is the causality principle. We show that all the coefficients of the leading asymptotic expansions as well as the integral constraints can be written as linear function of parameters that describe the unperturbed properties of the system, such as its average energy. Some newly obtained empirical closure equations for such parameters allow to define such properties as an explicit function of the unperturbed forcing parameter alone for a

  18. A statistical mechanical approach for the computation of the climatic response to general forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lucarini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The climate belongs to the class of non-equilibrium forced and dissipative systems, for which most results of quasi-equilibrium statistical mechanics, including the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, do not apply. In this paper we show for the first time how the Ruelle linear response theory, developed for studying rigorously the impact of perturbations on general observables of non-equilibrium statistical mechanical systems, can be applied with great success to analyze the climatic response to general forcings. The crucial value of the Ruelle theory lies in the fact that it allows to compute the response of the system in terms of expectation values of explicit and computable functions of the phase space averaged over the invariant measure of the unperturbed state. We choose as test bed a classical version of the Lorenz 96 model, which, in spite of its simplicity, has a well-recognized prototypical value as it is a spatially extended one-dimensional model and presents the basic ingredients, such as dissipation, advection and the presence of an external forcing, of the actual atmosphere. We recapitulate the main aspects of the general response theory and propose some new general results. We then analyze the frequency dependence of the response of both local and global observables to perturbations having localized as well as global spatial patterns. We derive analytically several properties of the corresponding susceptibilities, such as asymptotic behavior, validity of Kramers-Kronig relations, and sum rules, whose main ingredient is the causality principle. We show that all the coefficients of the leading asymptotic expansions as well as the integral constraints can be written as linear function of parameters that describe the unperturbed properties of the system, such as its average energy. Some newly obtained empirical closure equations for such parameters allow to define such properties as an explicit function of the unperturbed forcing

  19. General relativity 50 years old

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    In May 1916, 'The Foundations of General Relativity Theory' by Albert Einstein was published in 'Annalen der Physik'. Fifty years later, this major contribution to scientific thought still has a rather isolated position with respect to the main-stream of scientific theory. (In contrast, the Special Theory of Relativity is one of the cornerstones of sub-nuclear physics.) To mark the anniversary of the publication of Einstein's paper a theoretician from CERN discusses the theory and its present status.

  20. Dimensional Analysis and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Newton's law of gravitation is a central topic in the first-year physics curriculum. A lecturer can go beyond the physical details and use the history of gravitation to discuss the development of scientific ideas; unfortunately, the most recent chapter in this history, general relativity, is not covered in first-year courses. This paper discusses…

  1. Dimensional Analysis and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Newton's law of gravitation is a central topic in the first-year physics curriculum. A lecturer can go beyond the physical details and use the history of gravitation to discuss the development of scientific ideas; unfortunately, the most recent chapter in this history, general relativity, is not covered in first-year courses. This paper discusses…

  2. Sgr A* and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    General relativity has been widely tested in weak gravitational fields but still stands largely untested in the strong-field regime. According to the no-hair theorem, black holes in general relativity depend only on their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Mass and spin are the first two multipole moments of the Kerr spacetime and completely determine all higher-order moments. The no-hair theorem and, hence, general relativity can be tested by measuring potential deviations from the Kerr metric affecting such higher-order moments. Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is a prime target for precision tests of general relativity with several experiments across the electromagnetic spectrum. First, near-infrared (NIR) monitoring of stars orbiting around Sgr A* with current and new instruments is expected to resolve their orbital precessions. Second, timing observations of radio pulsars near the Galactic center may detect characteristic residuals induced by the spin and quadrupole moment of Sgr A*. Third, th...

  3. General relativity and relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    Einstein established the theory of general relativity and the corresponding field equation in 1915 and its vacuum solutions were obtained by Schwarzschild and Kerr for, respectively, static and rotating black holes, in 1916 and 1963, respectively. They are, however, still playing an indispensable role, even after 100 years of their original discovery, to explain high energy astrophysical phenomena. Application of the solutions of Einstein's equation to resolve astrophysical phenomena has formed an important branch, namely relativistic astrophysics. I devote this article to enlightening some of the current astrophysical problems based on general relativity. However, there seem to be some issues with regard to explaining certain astrophysical phenomena based on Einstein's theory alone. I show that Einstein's theory and its modified form, both are necessary to explain modern astrophysical processes, in particular, those related to compact objects.

  4. The genesis of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Renn, Jürgen; Sauer, Tilman; Stachel, John

    2007-01-01

    This four-volume work represents the most comprehensive documentation and study of the creation of general relativity; one of the fundamental physical theories of the 20th century. It comprises key sources from Einstein and others who from the late 19th to the early 20th century contributed to this monumental development. Some of these sources are presented here in translation for the first time. Einstein’s famous Zurich notebook, which documents the pivotal steps toward general relativity, is reproduced here for the first time and transcribed in its entirety. The volumes offer detailed commentaries and analyses of these sources that are based on a close reading of these documents supplemented by interpretations by the leading historians of relativity. All in all, the facets of this work, based on more than a decade of research, combine to constitute one of the most in-depth studies of a scientific revolution ever written.

  5. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  6. Stable clocks and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Will, C M

    1995-01-01

    We survey the role of stable clocks in general relativity. Clock comparisons have provided important tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle, which underlies metric gravity. These include tests of the isotropy of clock comparisons (verification of local Lorentz invariance) and tests of the homogeneity of clock comparisons (verification of local position invariance). Comparisons of atomic clocks with gravitational clocks test the Strong Equivalence Principle by bounding cosmological variations in Newton's constant. Stable clocks also play a role in the search for gravitational radiation: comparision of atomic clocks with the binary pulsar's orbital clock has verified gravitational-wave damping, and phase-sensitive detection of waves from inspiralling compact binaries using laser interferometric gravitational observatories will facilitate extraction of useful source information from the data. Stable clocks together with general relativity have found important practical applications in navigational systems s...

  7. Quantum information and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Peres, A

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  8. General Relativity in Electrical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Philbin, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    In electrical engineering metamaterials have been developed that offer unprecedented control over electromagnetic fields. Here we show that general relativity lends the theoretical tools for designing devices made of such versatile materials. Given a desired device function, the theory describes the electromagnetic properties that turn this function into fact. We consider media that facilitate space-time transformations and include negative refraction. Our theory unifies the concepts operatin...

  9. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  10. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  11. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE IN GENERAL RELATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the simulation results of the metric of elementary particles, atoms, stars and galaxies in the general theory of relativity and Yang-Mills theory. We have shown metrics and field equations describing the transition to turbulence. The problems of a unified field theory with the turbulent fluctuations of the metric are considered. A transition from the Einstein equations to the diffusion equation and the Schrödinger equation in quantum mechanics is shown. Ther are examples of metrics in which the field equations are reduced to a single equation, it changes type depending on the equation of state. These examples can be seen as a transition to the geometric turbulence. It is shown that the field equations in general relativity can be reduced to a hyperbolic, elliptic or parabolic type. The equation of parabolic type describing the perturbations of the gravitational field on the scale of stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which is a generalization of the theory of gravitation Newton-Poisson in case of Riemannian geometry, taking into account the curvature of space-time has been derived. It was found that the geometric turbulence leads to an exchange between regions of different scale. Under turbulent exchange material formed of two types of clusters, having positive and negative energy density that corresponds to the classical and quantum particle motion respectively. These results allow us to answer the question about the origin of the quantum theory

  12. Is general relativity `essentially understood' ?

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, H

    2005-01-01

    The content of Einstein's theory of gravitation is encoded in the properties of the solutions to his field equations. There has been obtained a wealth of information about these solutions in the ninety years the theory has been around. It led to the prediction and the observation of physical phenomena which confirm the important role of general relativity in physics. The understanding of the domain of highly dynamical, strong field configurations is, however, still quite limited. The gravitational wave experiments are likely to provide soon observational data on phenomena which are not accessible by other means. Further theoretical progress will require, however, new methods for the analysis and the numerical calculation of the solutions to Einstein's field equations on large scales and under general assumptions. We discuss some of the problems involved, describe the status of the field and recent results, and point out some open problems.

  13. Isentropic Spheres in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Humi, Mayer

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical gas clouds undergo thermodynamically irreversible processes and emit heat to their surroundings. Due the emission of this heat one can envision an idealized situation in which gas entropy remains (almost) constant. With this motivation in mind we derive in this paper interior solutions to the Einstein equations of General Relativity for spheres which consist of isentropic gas. In particular we investigate solutions in which the mass distribution inside the sphere has several shells. Such spheres might be considered an early stage for the formation of a "solar system".

  14. General relativity a first examination

    CERN Document Server

    Blecher, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is suitable for a one-semester introduction to General Relativity for advanced undergraduates in physics and engineering. The book is concise so that the entire material can be covered in the one-semester time frame. Besides, the readers are introduced to the subject easily without the need for advanced mathematics. Though concise, the theory development is lucid and the readers are exposed to possible analytic calculations. Full solutions to some important problems are provided, and the experimental evidence is discussed in detail.

  15. Discrete Hamiltonian for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ziprick, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Beginning from canonical general relativity written in terms of Ashtekar variables, we derive a discrete phase space with a physical Hamiltonian for gravity. The key idea is to define the gravitational fields within a complex of three-dimensional cells such that the dynamics is completely described by discrete boundary variables, and the full theory is recovered in the continuum limit. Canonical quantization is attainable within the loop quantum gravity framework, and we believe this will lead to a promising candidate for quantum gravity.

  16. Discrete and finite General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M; Souza, Manoelito M. de; Silveira, Robson N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop the General Theory of Relativity in a formalism with extended causality that describes physical interaction through discrete, transversal and localized pointlike fields. The homogeneous field equations are then solved for a finite, singularity-free, point-like field that we associate to a ``classical graviton". The standard Einstein's continuous formalism is retrieved by means of an averaging process, and its continuous solutions are determined by the chsosen imposed symetry. The Schwarzschild metric is obtained by the imposition of spherical symmetry on the averaged field.

  17. General Relativity, Time and Determinism

    CERN Document Server

    Isenberg, James

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's theory of general relativity models the physical universe using spacetimes which satisfy Einstein's gravitational field equations. To date, Einstein's theory has been enormously successful in modeling observed gravitational phenomena, both at the astrophysical and the cosmological levels. The collection of spacetime solutions of Einstein's equations which have been effectively used for modeling the physical universe is a very small subset of the full set of solutions. Among this larger set, there are many spacetimes in which strange phenomena related to time are present: There are solutions containing regions in which determinism and the predictability of experimental outcomes breaks down (the Taub-NUT spacetimes), and there others in which the breakdown of determinism occurs everywhere (the G\\"odel universe). Should the existence of these strange solutions lead us to question the usefulness of Einstein's theory in modeling physical phenomena? Should it instead lead us to seriously search for stran...

  18. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  19. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  20. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-08-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  1. A generalized detailed balance relation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruelle, David

    2015-01-01

    Given a system $M$ in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio $r=\\pi_\\tau(K\\to J)/\\pi_\\tau(J\\to K)$ of the transition probabilities $M:J\\to K$ and $M:K\\to J$ in time $\\tau$. We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with $M$ and the transition $J\\to K$ occurs through different channels $\\alpha$ involving different reactions with the bath. We find that $r=\\sum p^\\alpha r^\\alpha$, where $p^\\alpha$ is the probability that channel $\\alpha$ occurs, and $r^\\alpha$ depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel $\\alpha$.

  2. Brownian Motion and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hara, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We construct a model of Brownian Motion on a pseudo-Riemannian manifold associated with general relativity. There are two aspects of the problem: The first is to define a sequence of stopping times associated with the Brownian "kicks" or impulses. The second is to define the dynamics of the particle along geodesics in between the Brownian kicks. When these two aspects are taken together, we can associate various distributions with the motion. We will find that the statistics of space-time events will obey a temperature dependent four dimensional Gaussian distribution defined over the quaternions which locally can be identified with Minkowski space. Analogously, the statistics of the 4-velocities will obey a kind of Maxwell-Juttner distribution. In contrast to previous work, our processes are characterized by two independent proper time variables defined with respect to the laboratory frame: a discrete one corresponding to the stopping times when the impulses take place and a continuous one corresponding to th...

  3. Global Monopole in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A; Podolyak, E R; Bronnikov, Kirill A.; Meierovich, Boris E.; Podolyak, Evgeny R.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the gravitational properties of a global monopole on the basis of the simplest Higgs scalar triplet model in general relativity. We begin with establishing some common features of hedgehog-type solutions with a regular center, independent of the choice of the symmetry-breaking potential. There are six types of qualitative behavior of the solutions; we show, in particular, that the metric can contain at most one simple horizon. For the standard Mexican hat potential, the previously known properties of the solutions are confirmed and some new results are obtained. Thus, we show analytically that solutions with monotonically growing Higgs field and finite energy in the static region exist only in the interval $1<\\gamma <3$, $\\gamma $ being the squared energy of spontaneous symmetry breaking in Planck units. The cosmological properties of these globally regular solutions apparently favor the idea that the standard Big Bang might be replaced with a nonsingular static core and a horizon appearing ...

  4. Causality-based criteria for a negative refractive index must be used with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsler, P; McCall, M W

    2008-10-17

    Using the principle of causality as expressed in the Kramers-Kronig relations, we derive a generalized criterion for a negative refractive index that admits imperfect transparency at an observation frequency omega. It also allows us to relate the global properties of the loss (i.e., its frequency response) to its local behavior at omega. However, causality-based criteria rely on the group velocity, not the Poynting vector. Since the two are not equivalent, we provide some simple examples to compare the two criteria.

  5. Causality-based criteria for a negative refractive index must be used with care

    CERN Document Server

    Kinsler, P; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.167401

    2008-01-01

    Using the principle of causality as expressed in the Kramers-Kronig relations, we derive a generalized criterion for a negative refractive index that admits imperfect transparency at an observation frequency $\\omega$. It also allows us to relate the global properties of the loss (i.e. its frequency response) to its local behaviour at $\\omega$. However, causality-based criteria rely the on the group velocity, not the Poynting vector. Since the two are not equivalent, we provide some simple examples to compare the two criteria.

  6. Optical conductivity of warm dense matter in wide frequency range within quantum statistical and kinetic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Veysman, M; Winkel, M; Reinholz, H

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental properties of warm dense matter are described by the dielectric function, which gives access to the frequency-dependent electrical conductivity, absorption, emission and scattering of radiation, charged particles stopping and further macroscopic properties. Different approaches to the dielectric function and the related dynamical collision frequency are compared in a wide frequency range. The high-frequency limit describing inverse bremsstrahlung and the low-frequency limit of the dc conductivity are considered. Sum rules and Kramers-Kronig relation are checked for the generalized linear response theory and the standard approach following kinetic theory. The results are discussed in application to aluminum, xenon and argon plasmas.

  7. Optical conductivity of warm dense matter within a wide frequency range using quantum statistical and kinetic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysman, M.; Röpke, G.; Winkel, M.; Reinholz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental properties of warm dense matter are described by the dielectric function, which gives access to the frequency-dependent electrical conductivity; absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation; charged particles stopping; and further macroscopic properties. Different approaches to the dielectric function and the related dynamical collision frequency are compared in a wide frequency range. The high-frequency limit describing inverse bremsstrahlung and the low-frequency limit of the dc conductivity are considered. Sum rules and Kramers-Kronig relation are checked for the generalized linear response theory and the standard approach following kinetic theory. The results are discussed in application to aluminum, xenon, and argon plasmas.

  8. General Relativity and Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the conceptual foundation of general relativity (GR) - equivalence principle, space-time geometry and special relativity, I train cross hairs on two characteristic predictions of GR - black holes and gravitational waves. These two consequences of GR have played a significant role in relativistic astrophysics, e.g. compact X-ray sources, quasars, blazars, coalescing binary pulsars, etc. With quantum theory wedded to GR, particle production from vacuum becomes a generic feature whenever event horizons are present. In this paper, I shall briefly discuss the fate of a `black hole atom' when Hawking radiation is taken into account. In the context of gravitational waves, I shall focus on the possible consequences of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from highly magnetized and rapidly spinning white dwarfs. The discovery of RX J0648.0-4418 system - a WD in a binary with mass slightly over 1.2 $ M_{\\odot}$, and rotating with spin period as short as 13.2 s, provides an impetus to revisit the pr...

  9. Experimental Study of Relationships between Ultrasonic Attenuation and Dispersion for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, A. A.; Shcherbinin, S. A.; Makariev, D. I.; Rybyanets, A. N.

    In this paper an experimental study of different ceramic matrix composites with high elastic losses and dispersion (porous piezoceramics, composites ceramics/crystals) were carried out. Complex sets of elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric parameters of the porous piezoceramics and ceramic matrix piezocomposites were determined by the impedance spectroscopy method using Piezoelectric Resonance Analysis software. Microstructure of polished and chipped surfaces of composite samples was observed with the optical and scanning electron microcopies. Experimental frequency dependencies of attenuation coefficients and ultrasonic velocities for different ceramic matrix composites were compared with the theoretical results obtained using general Kramers-Kronig relations between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion.

  10. Investigation of structural, electronic, elastic and optical properties of Cd1-x-yZnxHgyTe alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, M.

    2016-06-01

    Structural, optical and electronic properties and elastic constants of Cd1-x-yZnx HgyTe alloys have been studied by employing the commercial code Castep based on density functional theory. The generalized gradient approximation and local density approximation were utilized as exchange correlation. Using elastic constants for compounds, bulk modulus, band gap, Fermi energy and Kramers-Kronig relations, dielectric constants and the refractive index have been found through calculations. Apart from these, X-ray measurements revealed elastic constants and Vegard's law. It is seen that results obtained from theory and experiments are all in agreement.

  11. Action Principle for the Generalized Harmonic Formulation of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J David

    2010-01-01

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. The Z4 formulation of general relativity also can be defined by an action principle, as discussed by Bona, Bona--Casas and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic and Z4 actions is presented in detail.

  12. Introduction to the general relativity; Introduction a la relativite generale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radix, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with the introduction of the general relativity including the introduction of the tensorial calculation, the Euclidean space in curvilinear coordinates, the Riemann space, the recalls and complements of the restricted relativity and the elements of the general relativity. (O.L.) 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Fourth order deformed general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cuttell, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Whenever the condition of anomaly freedom is imposed within the framework of effective approaches to loop quantum cosmology, one seems to conclude that a deformation of general covariance is required. Here, starting from a general deformation we regain an effective gravitational Lagrangian including terms up to fourth order in extrinsic curvature. We subsequently constrain the form of the corrections, and then investigate the conditions for the occurrence of a big bounce and the realisation of an inflationary era, in the presence of a perfect fluid or scalar field.

  14. Uniform Acceleration in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  15. Causality and dispersion relations and the role of the S-matrix in the ongoing research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert, E-mail: schroer@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Univ. , Berlin (Germany). Inst. fur Theoretische Physik

    2011-07-01

    The adaptation of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations to the causal localization structure of QFT led to an important project in particle physics, the only one with a successful closure. The same cannot be said about the subsequent attempts to formulate particle physics as a pure S-matrix project. The feasibility of a pure S-matrix approach are critically analyzed and their seri- ous shortcomings are highlighted. Whereas the conceptual/mathematical demands of renormalized perturbation theory are modest and misunderstandings could easily be corrected, the correct understanding about the origin of the crossing property demands the use of the mathematical theory of modular localization and its relation to the thermal KMS condition. These concepts which combine localization, vacuum polarization and thermal properties under the roof of modular theory will be explained and their use in a new constructive (nonperturbative) approach to QFT will be indicated. The S-matrix still plays a predominant role, but different from Heisenberg's and Mandelstam's proposals the new project is not a pure S-matrix approach. (author)

  16. Isotropic stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, M K

    2013-01-01

    We present a general solution of the Einstein gravitational field equations for the static spherically symmetric gravitational interior spacetime of an isotropic fluid sphere. The solution is obtained by transforming the pressure isotropy condition, a second order ordinary differential equation, into a Riccati type first order differential equation, and using a general integrability condition for the Riccati equation. This allows us to obtain an exact non-singular solution of the interior field equations for a fluid sphere, expressed in the form of infinite power series. The physical features of the solution are studied in detail numerically by cutting the infinite series expansions, and restricting our numerical analysis by taking into account only $n=21$ terms in the power series representations of the relevant astrophysical parameters. In the present model all physical quantities (density, pressure, speed of sound etc.) are finite at the center of the sphere. The physical behavior of the solution essential...

  17. Quasilocal mass in general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mu-Tao; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2009-01-16

    There have been many attempts to define the notion of quasilocal mass for a spacelike two surface in spacetime by the Hamilton-Jacobi analysis. The essential difficulty in this approach is to identify the right choice of the background configuration to be subtracted from the physical Hamiltonian. Quasilocal mass should be non-negative for surfaces in general spacetime and zero for surfaces in flat spacetime. In this Letter, we propose a new definition of gauge-independent quasilocal mass and prove that it has the desired properties.

  18. A logic road from special relativity to general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Andréka, Hajnal; Madarász, Judit X.; Németi, István; Székely, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    We present a streamlined axiom system of special relativity in first-order logic. From this axiom system we "derive" an axiom system of general relativity in two natural steps. We will also see how the axioms of special relativity transform into those of general relativity. This way we hope to make general relativity more accessible for the non-specialist.

  19. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. With respect to an earlier version of the article, the present update provides additional information on numerical schemes, and extends the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general relativistic hydrodynamics. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of available numerical schemes is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is presented. These include gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes, and hydrodynamical evolutions of neutron stars. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances on the formulation of the gravitational field and hydrodynamic equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them.

  20. External symmetry in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cotaescu, I I

    2000-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the isometry transformations to the geometric context of the field theories with spin where the local frames are explicitly involved. We define the external symmetry transformations as isometries combined with suitable tetrad gauge transformations and we show that these form a group which is locally isomorphic with the isometry one. We point out that the symmetry transformations that leave invariant the equations of the fields with spin have generators with specific spin terms which represent new physical observables. The examples we present are the generators of the central symmetry and those of the maximal symmetries of the de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes derived in different tetrad gauge fixings. Pacs: 04.20.Cv, 04.62.+v, 11.30.-j

  1. Generalized powerlocales via relation lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Venema, Yde; Vosmaer, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces an endofunctor $\\VT$ on the category of frames, parametrized by an endofunctor $\\T$ on the category $\\Set$ that satisfies certain constraints. This generalizes Johnstone's construction of the Vietoris powerlocale, in the sense that his construction is obtained by taking for $\\T$ the finite covariant power set functor. Our construction of the $\\T$-powerlocale $\\VT \\bbL$ out of a frame $\\bbL$ is based on ideas from coalgebraic logic and makes explicit the connection between the Vietoris construction and Moss's coalgebraic cover modality. We show how to extend certain natural transformations between set functors to natural transformations between $\\T$-powerlocale functors. Finally, we prove that the operation $\\VT$ preserves some properties of frames, such as regularity, zero-dimensionality, and the combination of zero-dimensionality and compactness.

  2. The use of generalized functions and distributions in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbauer, R [Department of Mathematics, University of Vienna, Nordbergstrasse 15, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Vickers, J A [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-21

    We review the extent to which one can use classical distribution theory in describing solutions of Einstein's equations. We show that there are a number of physically interesting cases which cannot be treated using distribution theory but require a more general concept. We describe a mathematical theory of nonlinear generalized functions based on Colombeau algebras and show how this may be applied in general relativity. We end by discussing the concept of singularity in general relativity and show that certain solutions with weak singularities may be regarded as distributional solutions of Einstein's equations. (topical review)

  3. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  4. Conformal methods in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Valiente Kroon, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a systematic exposition of conformal methods and how they can be used to study the global properties of solutions to the equations of Einstein's theory of gravity. It shows that combining these ideas with differential geometry can elucidate the existence and stability of the basic solutions of the theory. Introducing the differential geometric, spinorial and PDE background required to gain a deep understanding of conformal methods, this text provides an accessible account of key results in mathematical relativity over the last thirty years, including the stability of de Sitter and Minkowski spacetimes. For graduate students and researchers, this self-contained account includes useful visual models to help the reader grasp abstract concepts and a list of further reading, making this the perfect reference companion on the topic.

  5. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  6. General relativity and mathematics; Relatividad General y Matematicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars, M.

    2015-07-01

    General relativity is more than a theory of gravity, since any physical process occupies space and lasts for a time, forcing to reconcile that physical theory that describes what the dynamic nature of space-time itself. (Author)

  7. Centennial of general relativity a celebration

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    It has been over 100 years since the presentation of the Theory of General Relativity by Albert Einstein, in its final formulation, to the Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences. To celebrate 100 years of general relativity, World Scientific publishes this volume with a dual goal: to assess the current status of the field of general relativity in broad terms, and discuss future directions. The volume thus consists of broad overviews summarizing major developments over the past decades and their perspective contributions.

  8. From continuum mechanics to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Using ideas from continuum mechanics we construct a theory of gravity. We show that this theory is equivalent to Einstein's theory of general relativity; it is also a much faster way of reaching general relativity than the conventional route. Our approach is simple and natural: we form a very general model and then apply two physical assumptions supported by experimental evidence. This easily reduces our construction to a model equivalent to general relativity. Finally, we suggest a simple way of modifying our theory to investigate non-standard space-time symmetries.

  9. General Relativity in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a theory of gravity in (1 + 1) dimensions that can be thought of as a toy model of general relativity. The theory should be a useful pedagogical tool, because it is mathematically much simpler than general relativity but shares much of the same conceptual structure; in particular, it gives a simple illustration of how gravity arises…

  10. General Relativity in the Undergraduate Physics Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Hartle, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Einstein's general relativity is increasingly important in contemporary physics on the frontiers of both the very largest distance scales (astrophysics and cosmology) and the very smallest(elementary particle physics). This paper makes the case for a `physics first' approach to introducing general relativity to undergraduate physics majors.

  11. General Relativity in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a theory of gravity in (1 + 1) dimensions that can be thought of as a toy model of general relativity. The theory should be a useful pedagogical tool, because it is mathematically much simpler than general relativity but shares much of the same conceptual structure; in particular, it gives a simple illustration of how gravity arises…

  12. Black Hole Based Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some impor...

  13. Spontaneously induced general relativity with holographic interior and general exterior

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Guo-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The general relativity (GR) might be viewed as a spontaneously induced theory from the scalar-tensor gravity, in which the would-have-been horizon connects the exterior solution of GR with a novel core of vanishing spatial volume. Using a simple but robust analytic method, we give the nontrivial core metric for the general exterior. Then we show that all the nontrivial features of the core, including the locally holographic entropy packing, are not influenced by the general exterior. We also investigate whether other modified theories of gravity can permit the nontrivial core.

  14. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analysing them are reviewed. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Future tests of EEP and of the inverse square law will search for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and new binary pulsar systems may yield further improvements.When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  15. O(3)-invariant tunneling in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, V.A.; Tkachev, I.I.; Kuzmin, V.A.

    1988-06-30

    We derived a general formula for the action for any O(3)-invariant tunneling processes in false vacuum decay in general relativity. The general classification of the bubble euclidean trajectories is elaborated and explicit expressions for bounces for some processes like the vacuum creation of a double bubble in particular in the vicinity of a black hole, the subbarrier creation of the Einstein-Rosen bridge, creation from nothing of two Minkowski worlds connected by a shell, etc., are given.

  16. The confrontation between general relativity and experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clifford M Will

    2004-10-01

    We review the experimental evidence for Einstein's general relativity. Tests of the Einstein equivalence principle support the postulates of curved space-time and bound variations of fundamental constants in space and time, while solar system experiments strongly confirm weak-field general relativity. The binary pulsar provides tests of gravitational wave damping and of strong-field general relativity. Future experiments, such as the gravity probe B gyroscope experiment, a satellite test of the equivalence principle, and tests of gravity at short distance to look for extra spatial dimensions could further constrain alternatives to general relativity. Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories on Earth and in space may provide new tests of scalar–tensor gravity and graviton-mass theories via the properties of gravitational waves.

  17. General relativity and the Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Aimed at researchers in mathematics and physics, this monograph, in which the author overviews the basic ideas in General Relativity, introduces the necessary mathematics and discusses some of the key open questions in the field. - ;General Relativity has passed all experimental and observational tests to model the motion of isolated bodies with strong gravitational fields, though the mathematical and numerical study of these motions is still in its infancy. It is believed that General Relativity models our cosmos, with a manifold of dimensions possibly greater than four and debatable topology opening a vast field of investigation for mathematicians and physicists alike. Remarkable conjectures have been. proposed, many results have been obtained but many fundamental questions remain open. In this monograph, aimed at researchers in mathematics and physics, the author overviews the basic ideas in General Relativity, introduces the necessary mathematics and discusses some of the key open questions in the. field....

  18. Black hole dynamics in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhay Ashtekar

    2007-07-01

    Basic features of dynamical black holes in full, non-linear general relativity are summarized in a pedagogical fashion. Qualitative properties of the evolution of various horizons follow directly from the celebrated Raychaudhuri equation.

  19. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  20. Spatiotemporal deformations of reflectionless potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Longhi, S.

    2017-08-01

    Reflectionless potentials for classical or matter waves represent an important class of scatteringless systems encountered in different areas of physics. Here we mathematically demonstrate that there is a family of non-Hermitian potentials that, in contrast to their Hermitian counterparts, remain reflectionless even when deformed in space or time. These are the profiles that satisfy the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations. We start by considering scattering of matter waves for the Schrödinger equation with an external field, where a moving potential is observed in the Kramers-Henneberger reference frame. We then generalize this result to the case of electromagnetic waves, by considering a slab of reflectionless material that both is scaled and has its center displaced as an arbitrary function of position. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that the backscattering from these profiles remains zero, even for extreme deformations. Our results indicate the supremacy of non-Hermitian Kramers-Kronig potentials over reflectionless Hermitian potentials in keeping their reflectionless property under deformation and could find applications to, e.g., reflectionless optical coatings of highly deformed surfaces based on perfect absorption.

  1. On Titanium Carbide Nanoparticles as the Origin of the 21 Micron Emission Feature in Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Li, A

    2003-01-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) nanocrystals were recently proposed as the carrier of the mysterious 21$\\mum$ emission feature observed in post-asymptotic giant branch stars, based on their close spectral match and the presolar nature of meteoritic TiC nanograins (which reveals their stellar ejecta origin). But we show in this {\\it Letter} that the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations, which relate the wavelength-integrated extinction cross section to the total dust mass, would impose a lower bound on the TiC mass. This Kramers-Kronig lower limit exceeds the maximum available TiC mass by a factor of at least $\\simali$50, independent of the absolute value of the ultraviolet/visible absorptivity of nano TiC. The TiC model is therefore readily ruled out by the Kramers-Kronig physical principle.

  2. A Golden Age of General Relativity? Some remarks on the history of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Goenner, Hubert F M

    2016-01-01

    In papers on the history of general relativity and in personal remembrances of relativists, keywords like "renaissance" and "golden age" of general relativity have been used. We try to show that the first label rests on a weak empirical basis. The second one, while describing a period of vivid growth in research in general relativity, exaggerates the importance of this particular development.

  3. Evaluating relative accommodations in general binocular dysfunctions

    OpenAIRE

    García Muñoz, Ángel; Cacho Martínez, Pilar; Lara Lacarcel, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the relationship between relative accommodation and general binocular disorders and to establish their importance in the diagnosis of these anomalies. Methods. We analyzed data of negative relative accommodation (NRA) and positive relative accommodation (PRA) in 69 patients with nonstrabismic binocular anomalies. Results. Statistical analysis showed that low values of NRA and PRA were not associated with any particular disorder. High values of PRA (>3.50 D) were related to...

  4. Generalized Lantern Relations and Planar Line Arrangements

    CERN Document Server

    Hironaka, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show that to each planar line arrangement defined over the real numbers, for which no two lines are parallel, one can write down a corresponding relation on Dehn twists that can be read off from the combinatorics and relative locations of intersections. This leads to an alternate proof of Wajnryb's generalized lantern relations, and of Endo, Mark and Horn-Morris' daisy relations.

  5. Anisotropic Generalized Ghost Pilgrim Dark Energy Model in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Rao, V. U. M.; Aditya, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type- I Universe filled with matter and generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) has been studied in general theory of relativity. To obtain determinate solution of the field equations we have used scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar which leads to a relation between the metric potentials. Some well-known cosmological parameters (equation of state (EoS) parameter ( ω Λ), deceleration parameter ( q) and squared speed of sound {vs2}) and planes (ω _{Λ }-dot {ω }_{Λ } and statefinder) are constructed for obtained model. The discussion and significance of these parameters is totally done through pilgrim dark energy parameter ( β) and cosmic time ( t).

  6. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.

    2016-03-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar-tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory.

  7. Teaching General Relativity to the Layperson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a lay course on general relativity (GR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Florida International University. It is presented in six hour-and-a-half weekly sessions. Other courses offered by the author include special relativity (which precedes the course described here), quantum theory, and cosmology. Students…

  8. Teaching General Relativity to the Layperson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a lay course on general relativity (GR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Florida International University. It is presented in six hour-and-a-half weekly sessions. Other courses offered by the author include special relativity (which precedes the course described here), quantum theory, and cosmology. Students…

  9. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Will, Clifford M

    2014-01-01

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them are reviewed and updated. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) is well supported by experiments such as the Eotvos experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational-wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  10. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M

    2014-01-01

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  11. Will gravitational waves confirm Einstein's General Relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Even if Einstein's General Relativity achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests, it also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this proceeding paper it is shown that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. General Relativity and Extended Theories of Gravity, will be the ultimate test for General Relativity. This proceeding paper is also a short review of the Essay which won Honorable Mention at the 2009 Gravity Research Foundation Awards.

  12. Introduction to 2-spinors in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donnell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This book deals with 2-spinors in general relativity, beginning by developing spinors in a geometrical way rather than using representation theory, which can be a little abstract. This gives the reader greater physical intuition into the way in which spinors behave. The book concentrates on the algebra and calculus of spinors connected with curved space-time. Many of the well-known tensor fields in general relativity are shown to have spinor counterparts. An analysis of the Lanczos spinor concludes the book, and some of the techniques so far encountered are applied to this. Exercises play an i

  13. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and other binary pulsar systems have yielded other tests, especially of strong-field effects. When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  14. Particle astrophysics of nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, K.; Tsuda, M. [Laboratory of Physics, Saitama Institute of Technology, Fukaya, Saitama (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    An explanation of relations between the large scale structure of the universe and the tiny scale structure of the particle physics, e.g. the observed mysterious relation between the (dark) energy density and the dark matter of the universe and the neutrino mass and the SUSY breaking mass scale of the particle physics may be given by the nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity (NLSUSY GR). NLSUSY GR shows that considering the physics before/of the big bang (BB) of the universe may be significant and may give new insight to unsolved problems of the low energy particle physics, cosmology and their relations. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Simple Recursion Relations for General Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Clifford; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    On-shell methods offer an alternative definition of quantum field theory at tree-level, replacing Feynman diagrams with recursion relations and interaction vertices with a handful of seed scattering amplitudes. In this paper we determine the simplest recursion relations needed to construct a general four-dimensional quantum field theory of massless particles. For this purpose we define a covering space of recursion relations which naturally generalizes all existing constructions, including those of BCFW and Risager. The validity of each recursion relation hinges on the large momentum behavior of an n-point scattering amplitude under an m-line momentum shift, which we determine solely from dimensional analysis, Lorentz invariance, and locality. We show that all amplitudes in a renormalizable theory are 5-line constructible. Amplitudes are 3-line constructible if an external particle carries spin or if the scalars in the theory carry equal charge under a global or gauge symmetry. Remarkably, this implies the 3-...

  16. Dual Foliation Formulations of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hilditch, David

    2015-01-01

    A dual foliation treatment of General Relativity is presented. The basic idea of the construction is to consider two foliations of a spacetime by spacelike hypersurfaces and relate the two geometries. The treatment is expected to be useful in various situations, and in particular whenever one would like to compare objects represented in different coordinates. Potential examples include the construction of initial data and the study of trapped tubes. It is common for studies in mathematical relativity to employ a double-null gauge. In such studies local well-posedness is treated by referring back, for example, to the generalized harmonic formulation, global properties of solutions being treated in a separate formalism. As a first application of the dual foliation formulation we find that one can in fact obtain local well-posedness in the double-null coordinates directly, which should allow their use in numerical relativity with standard methods. With due care it is expected that practically any coordinates can...

  17. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first....... The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...

  18. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; 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Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Campanelli, M; Hemberger, D A; Kidder, L E; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-03

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 10^{13}  km. In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  19. Conformal general relativity contains the quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Bonal, R; Cardenas, R

    2000-01-01

    Based on the de Broglie-Bohm relativistic quantum theory of motion we show that the conformal formulation of general relativity, being linked with a Weyl-integrable geometry, may implicitly contain the quantum effects of matter. In this context the Mach's principle is discussed.

  20. The rocket problem in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques, Pedro G

    2011-01-01

    We derive the covariant optimality conditions for rocket trajectories in general relativity, with and without a bound on the magnitude of the proper acceleration. The resulting theory is then applied to solve two specific problems: the minimum fuel consumption transfer between two galaxies in a FLRW model, and between two stable circular orbits in the Schwarzschild spacetime.

  1. Generalization of Gibbs Entropy and Thermodynamic Relation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun Chul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we extend Gibbs's approach of quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic processes, and calculate the microscopic expression of entropy for general non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes. Also, we analyze the formal structure of thermodynamic relation in non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes.

  2. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 1013 km . In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  3. General relativity and gravitation a centennial perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Beverly K; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Explore spectacular advances in cosmology, relativistic astrophysics, gravitational wave science, mathematics, computational science, and the interface of gravitation and quantum physics with this unique celebration of the centennial of Einstein's discovery of general relativity. Twelve comprehensive and in-depth reviews, written by a team of world-leading international experts, together present an up-to-date overview of key topics at the frontiers of these areas, with particular emphasis on the significant developments of the last three decades. Interconnections with other fields of research are also highlighted, making this an invaluable resource for both new and experienced researchers. Commissioned by the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation, and including accessible introductions to cutting-edge topics, ample references to original research papers, and informative colour figures, this is a definitive reference for researchers and graduate students in cosmology, relativity, and grav...

  4. General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Observational and experimental data pertaining to gravity and cosmology are changing our view of the Universe. General relativity is a fundamental key for the understanding of these observations and its theory is undergoing a continuing enhancement of its intersection with observational and experimental data. These data include direct observations and experiments carried out in our solar system, among which there are direct gravitational wave astronomy, frame dragging and tests of gravitational theories from solar system and spacecraft observations. This book explores John Archibald Wheeler's seminal and enduring contributions in relativistic astrophysics and includes: the General Theory of Relativity and Wheeler's influence; recent developments in the confrontation of relativity with experiments; the theory describing gravitational radiation, and its detection in Earth-based and space-based interferometer detectors as well as in Earth-based bar detectors; the mathematical description of the initial value pro...

  5. Mass and Angular Momentum in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, J L

    2010-01-01

    We present an introduction to mass and angular momentum in General Relativity. After briefly reviewing energy-momentum for matter fields, first in the flat Minkowski case (Special Relativity) and then in curved spacetimes with or without symmetries, we focus on the discussion of energy-momentum for the gravitational field. We illustrate the difficulties rooted in the Equivalence Principle for defining a local energy-momentum density for the gravitational field. This leads to the understanding of gravitational energy-momentum and angular momentum as non-local observables that make sense, at best, for extended domains of spacetime. After introducing Komar quantities associated with spacetime symmetries, it is shown how total energy-momentum can be unambiguously defined for isolated systems, providing fundamental tests for the internal consistency of General Relativity as well as setting the conceptual basis for the understanding of energy loss by gravitational radiation. Finally, several attempts to formulate q...

  6. Leibnizian relationalism for general relativistic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Vassallo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    An ontology of Leibnizian relationalism, consisting in distance relations among sparse matter points and their change only, is well recognized as a serious option in the context of classical mechanics. In this paper, we investigate how this ontology fares when it comes to general relativistic physics. Using a Humean strategy, we regard the gravitational field as a means to represent the overall change in the distance relations among point particles in a way that achieves the best combination of being simple and being informative.

  7. Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-09-07

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein-Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory. (book review)

  8. Reduced Quantum General Relativity in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, Lukasz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The higher dimensional Quantum General Relativity of a Riemannian manifold being an embedded space in a space-time being a Lorentzian manifold is investigated. The model of quantum geometrodynamics, based on the Wheeler-DeWitt equation reduced to a first order functional quantum evolution supplemented through an additional eigenequation for the scalar curvature, is formulated. Furthermore, making use of the objective quantum gravity and global one-dimensional conjecture, the general wave function beyond the Feynman path integral technique is derived. The resulting quantum gravity model creates the opportunity of potentially new theoretical and phenomenological applications for astrophysics, cosmology, and physics.

  9. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford M. Will

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse–Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  10. Geoids in General Relativity: Geoid Quasilocal Frames

    CERN Document Server

    Oltean, Marius; McGrath, Paul L; Mann, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We develop, in the context of general relativity, the notion of a geoid -- a surface of constant "gravitational potential". In particular, we show how this idea naturally emerges as a specific choice of a previously proposed, more general and operationally useful construction called a quasilocal frame -- that is, a choice of a two-parameter family of timelike worldlines comprising the worldtube boundary of the history of a finite spatial volume. We study the geometric properties of these geoid quasilocal frames, and construct solutions for them in some simple spacetimes. We then compare these results -- focusing on the computationally tractable scenario of a non-rotating body with a quadrupole perturbation -- against their counterparts in Newtonian gravity (the setting for current applications of the geoid), and we compute general-relativistic corrections to some measurable geometric quantities.

  11. Modelling anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic anisotropic fluid sphere, (spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully modelled by suitable linear combinations of quite ordinary classical matter: an isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field, and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model that is used to mimic the anisotropic fluid sphere. Consequently, we can build physically reasonable matter models for almost any spherically symmetric spacetime.

  12. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves arise in many area of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. In this paper, we numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited to deal with such artificial singularities related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object is rotating like for instance a star, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. In order to study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity as well as quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we compute the spindown luminosity exp...

  13. General Relativity and Gravitation: A Centennial Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm A H

    2014-01-01

    To commemorate the 100th anniversary of general relativity, the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation (ISGRG) commissioned a Centennial Volume, edited by the authors of this article. We jointly wrote introductions to the four Parts of the Volume which are collected here. Our goal is to provide a bird's eye view of the advances that have been made especially during the last 35 years, i.e., since the publication of volumes commemorating Einstein's 100th birthday. The article also serves as a brief preview of the 12 invited chapters that contain in-depth reviews of these advances. The volume will be published by Cambridge University Press and released in June 2015 at a Centennial conference sponsored by ISGRG and the Topical Group of Gravitation of the American Physical Society.

  14. Solar system dynamics in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the literature has advocated using the Earth-Moon-planetoid Lagrangian points as observables, in order to test general relativity and effective field theories of gravity in the solar system. However, since the three-body problem of classical celestial mechanics is just an approximation of a much more complicated setting, where all celestial bodies in the solar system are subject to their mutual gravitational interactions, while solar radiation pressure and other sources of nongravitational perturbations also affect the dynamics, it is conceptually desirable to improve the current understanding of solar system dynamics in general relativity, as a first step towards a more accurate theoretical study of orbital motion in the weak-gravity regime. For this purpose, starting from the Einstein equations in the de Donder-Lanczos gauge, this paper arrives first at the Levi-Civita Lagrangian for the geodesic motion of celestial bodies, showing in detail under which conditions the effects of internal stru...

  15. Probing General Relativity with Accreting Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C

    2012-01-01

    Most of the X-ray emission from luminous accreting black holes emerges from within 20 gravitational radii. The effective emission radius is several times smaller if the black hole is rapidly spinning. General Relativistic effects can then be very important. Large spacetime curvature causes strong lightbending and large gravitational redshifts. The hard X-ray, power-law-emitting corona irradiates the accretion disc generating an X-ray reflection component. Atomic features in the reflection spectrum allow gravitational redshifts to be measured. Time delays between observed variations in the power-law and the reflection spectrum (reverberation) enable the physical scale of the reflecting region to be determined. The relative strength of the reflection and power-law continuum depends on light bending. All of these observed effects enable the immediate environment of the black hole where the effects of General Relativity are on display to be probed and explored.

  16. General Relativity, Cosmological Constant and Modular Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kraniotis, G V

    2001-01-01

    Strong field (exact) solutions of the gravitational field equations of General Relativity in the presence of a Cosmological Constant are investigated. In particular, a full exact solution is derived within the inhomogeneous Szekeres-Szafron family of space-time line element with a nonzero Cosmological Constant. The resulting solution connects, in an intrinsic way, General Relativity with the theory of modular forms and elliptic curves and thus to the theory of Taniyama-Shimura.The homogeneous FLRW limit of the above space-time elements is recovered and we solve exactly the resulting Friedmann Robertson field equation with the appropriate matter density for generic values of the Cosmological Constant $ \\Lambda $ and curvature constant $K$. A formal expression for the Hubble constant is derived. The cosmological implications of the resulting non-linear solutions are systematically investigated. Two particularly interesting solutions i) the case of a flat universe $K=0,\\Lambda \

  17. Probing the Higgs vacuum with general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Philip D.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the structure of the Higgs vacuum can be revealed in gravitational experiments which probe the Schwarzschild geometry to only one order in MG/r beyond that needed for the classical tests of general relativity. The possibility that deviations from the conventional geometry are at least theoretically conceivable is explored. The deviations obtained provide a diagnostic test for searching for the existence of macroscopic scalar fields and open up the possiblity for further exploring the Higgs mechanism.

  18. Fuzzballs in general relativity: a missed opportunity

    CERN Document Server

    Pieri, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Recently some 4d asymptotically $AdS_2 \\times S^2$ regular bubbling solutions written in terms of an arbitrary profile function has appeared in literature. We discuss the possibility of extending these solutions to asymptotically flat spaces, therefore building a model for an horizonless and singularity-free fuzzball with the same asymptotic charges of the associated black hole, directly in general relativity. A negative conclusion is reached within an axial-symmetric ansatz inside the IWP family.

  19. The generic model of General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsamparlis, Michael, E-mail: mtsampa@phys.uoa.g [Department of Physics, Section Astrophysics Astronomy Mechanics, University of Athens, University of Athens, Zografos 15783, Athens (Greece)

    2009-10-01

    We develop a generic spacetime model in General Relativity from which all existing model results are produced under specific assumptions, depending on the case. We classify each type of possible assumption, especially the role of observers and that of symmetries, and discuss their role in the development of a model. We apply the results in a step by step approach to the case of a Bianchi I spacetime and a string fluid.

  20. Genesis of general relativity - a concise exposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2016-01-01

    This short exposition starts with a brief discussion of situation before the completion of special relativity (Le Verrier's discovery of the Mercury perihelion advance anomaly, Michelson-Morley experiment, E\\"otv\\"os experiment, Newcomb's improved observation of Mercury perihelion advance, the proposals of various new gravity theories and the development of tensor analysis and differential geometry) and accounts for the main conceptual developments leading to the completion of the general rel...

  1. Relativity the special and the general theory

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2015-01-01

    After completing the final version of his general theory of relativity in November 1915, Albert Einstein wrote a book about relativity for a popular audience. His intention was "to give an exact insight into the theory of relativity to those readers who, from a general scientific and philosophical point of view, are interested in the theory, but who are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics." The book remains one of the most lucid explanations of the special and general theories ever written. In the early 1920s alone, it was translated into ten languages, and fifteen editions in the original German appeared over the course of Einstein's lifetime. This new edition of Einstein's celebrated book features an authoritative English translation of the text along with an introduction and a reading companion by Hanoch Gutfreund and Jürgen Renn that examines the evolution of Einstein's thinking and casts his ideas in a broader present-day context. A special chapter explores the history...

  2. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  3. General Relativity As an Aether Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dupre, Maurice J

    2010-01-01

    Most early twentieth century relativists --- Lorentz, Einstein, Eddington, for examples --- claimed that general relativity was merely a theory of the aether. We shall confirm this claim by deriving the Einstein equations using aether theory. We shall use a combination of Lorentz's and Kelvin's conception of the aether. Our derivation of the Einstein equations will not use the vanishing of the covariant divergence of the stress-energy tensor, but instead equate the Ricci tensor to the sum of the usual stress-energy tensor and a stress-energy tensor for the aether, a tensor based on Kelvin's aether theory. A crucial first step is generalizing the Cartan formalism of Newtonian gravity to allow spatial curvature, as conjectured by Gauss and Riemann.

  4. Von Neumann's Quantization of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B; Cirilo-Lombardo, D J; Nazmitdinov, R G; Han, Nguyen Suan; Pavlov, A E; Pervushin, V N; Zakharov, A F

    2015-01-01

    Von Neumann's procedure is applied for quantization of General Relativity. We quantize the initial data of dynamical variables at the Planck epoch, where the Hubble parameter coincides with the Planck mass. These initial data are defined via the Fock simplex in the tangent Minkowskian space-time, the Dirac conformal interval. The Einstein cosmological principle is applied for the average of the spatial metric determinant logarithm over the spatial volume of the visible Universe. We derive the splitting of the general coordinate transformations into the diffeomorphisms (as the object of the second Noether theorem) and the initial data transformations (as objects of the first Noether theorem). Following von Neumann, we suppose that the vacuum state is a quantum ensemble. The vacuum state is degenerated with respect to quantum numbers of non-vacuum states with the distribution function that yields the Casimir effect in gravidynamics in analogy to the one in electrodynamics. The generation functional of the pertu...

  5. Premetric equivalent of general relativity: Teleparallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, Yakov; Hehl, Friedrich W.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2017-04-01

    In general relativity (GR), the metric tensor of spacetime is essential since it represents the gravitational potential. In other gauge theories (such as electromagnetism), the so-called premetric approach succeeds in separating the purely topological field equation from the metric-dependent constitutive law. We show here that GR allows for a premetric formulation, too. For this purpose, we apply the teleparallel approach of gravity, which represents GR as a gauge theory based on the translation group. We formulate the metric-free topological field equation and a general linear constitutive law between the basic field variables. The requirement of local Lorentz invariance turns the model into a full equivalent of GR. Our approach opens a way for a natural extension of GR to diverse geometrical structures of spacetime.

  6. The premetric equivalent of general relativity: teleparallelism

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, Yakov; Obukhov, Yuri N

    2016-01-01

    In general relativity (GR), the metric tensor of spacetime is essential since it represents the gravitational potential. In other gauge theories (such as electromagnetism), the so-called premetric approach succeeds in separating the purely topological field equation from the metric-dependent constitutive law. We show here that GR allows for a premetric formulation, too. For this purpose, we apply the teleparallel approach of gravity, which represents GR as a gauge theory based on the translation group. We formulate the metric-free topological field equation and a general linear constitutive law between the basic field variables. The requirement of local Lorentz invariance turns the model into a full equivalent of GR. Our approach opens a way for a natural extension of GR to diverse geometrical structures of spacetime.

  7. Numerical Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of numerical hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD in general relativity. Some significant additions have been incorporated with respect to the previous two versions of this review (2000, 2003, most notably the coverage of general-relativistic MHD, a field in which remarkable activity and progress has occurred in the last few years. Correspondingly, the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general-relativistic hydrodynamics is enlarged to account for recent relevant advances, while those dealing with general-relativistic MHD are amply covered in this review for the first time. The basic outline of this article is nevertheless similar to its earlier versions, save for the addition of MHD-related issues throughout. Hence, different formulations of both the hydrodynamics and MHD equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of numerical approaches for solving such hyperbolic systems of equations is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. As previously stated, a comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is also presented. These are detailed in three basic sections, namely gravitational collapse, black-hole accretion, and neutron-star evolutions; despite the boundaries, these sections may (and in fact do overlap throughout the discussion. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances in the formulation of the gravitational field, hydrodynamics and MHD equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them. To keep the length of this article reasonable

  8. A Machian Approach to General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Vishwakarma, Ram Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Mach's principle is surely one of those tantalizingly beautiful concepts in physics which remain elusive. Though General Relativity (GR) was conceived in the spirit of realizing it, the theory failed to fulfill this expectation. Here a study on the implications of imposing Mach's principle on GR with an insight that spacetime has no independent existence without a material background, is presented. This inclusion of the principle in GR turns out to be unexpectedly rewarding. The resulting theory solves many mysteries and averts lingering problems of the conventional forms of GR and cosmology.

  9. General Relativity in Post Independence India

    CERN Document Server

    Dadhich, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    The most outstanding contribution to general relativity in this era came in 1953 (published in 1955 \\cite{akr}) in the form of the Raychaudhri equation. It is in 1960s that the observations began to confront the eupherial theory and thus began exploration of GR as a legitimate physical theory in right earnest. The remarkable discoveries of cosmic microwave background radiation, quasars, rotating Kerr black hole and the powerful singularity theorems heralded a new canvas of relativistic astrophysics and cosmology. I would attempt to give a brief account of Indian participation in these exciting times.

  10. From General Relativity to Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Rovelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    In general relativity (GR), spacetime geometry is no longer just a background arena but a physical and dynamical entity with its own degrees of freedom. We present an overview of approaches to quantum gravity in which this central feature of GR is at the forefront. However, the short distance dynamics in the quantum theory are quite different from those of GR and classical spacetimes and gravitons emerge only in a suitable limit. Our emphasis is on communicating the key strategies, the main results and open issues. In the spirit of this volume, we focus on a few avenues that have led to the most significant advances over the past 2-3 decades.

  11. New Area Law in General Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Engelhardt, Netta

    2015-08-21

    We report a new area law in general relativity. A future holographic screen is a hypersurface foliated by marginally trapped surfaces. We show that their area increases monotonically along the foliation. Future holographic screens can easily be found in collapsing stars and near a big crunch. Past holographic screens exist in any expanding universe and obey a similar theorem, yielding the first rigorous area law in big bang cosmology. Unlike event horizons, these objects can be identified at finite time and without reference to an asymptotic boundary. The Bousso bound is not used, but it naturally suggests a thermodynamic interpretation of our result.

  12. Weak 'Antigravity' Fields in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, F S

    2005-01-01

    Within the weak-field approximation of general relativity, new exact solutions are derived for the gravitational field of a mass moving with arbitrary velocity and acceleration. Owing to an inertial-pushing effect, a mass having a constant velocity greater than 3^-1/2 times the speed of light gravitationally repels other masses at rest within a narrow cone. At high Lorentz factors (gamma >> 1), the force of repulsion in the forward direction is about -8(gamma^5) times the Newtonian force, offering opportunities for laboratory tests of gravity at extreme velocities.

  13. The mathematical theory of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Katkar, L N

    2014-01-01

    This book is prepared for M. Sc. Students of Mathematics and Physics. The aim of writing this book is to give the reader a feeling for the necessity and beauty of the laws of general relativity. The contents of the book will attract both mathematicians and physicists which provides motivation and applications of many ideas and powerful mathematical methods of modern analysis and differential geometry. An attempt has been made to make the presentation comprehensive, rigorous and yet simple. Most calculations and transformations have been carried out in great detail. KEY FEATURE: Numerous solved examples using the well known mathematical techniques viz., the tensors and the differential forms in each chapter.

  14. Uncertainty relations for general unitary operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Shrobona; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2016-10-01

    We derive several uncertainty relations for two arbitrary unitary operators acting on physical states of a Hilbert space. We show that our bounds are tighter in various cases than the ones existing in the current literature. Using the uncertainty relation for the unitary operators, we obtain the tight state-independent lower bound for the uncertainty of two Pauli observables and anticommuting observables in higher dimensions. With regard to the minimum-uncertainty states, we derive the minimum-uncertainty state equation by the analytic method and relate this to the ground-state problem of the Harper Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the higher-dimensional limit of the uncertainty relations and minimum-uncertainty states are explored. From an operational point of view, we show that the uncertainty in the unitary operator is directly related to the visibility of quantum interference in an interferometer where one arm of the interferometer is affected by a unitary operator. This shows a principle of preparation uncertainty, i.e., for any quantum system, the amount of visibility for two general noncommuting unitary operators is nontrivially upper bounded.

  15. Taming Tree Amplitudes In General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, Paolo; Cachazo, Freddy; 10.1088/1126-6708/2007/11/057

    2008-01-01

    We give a proof of BCFW recursion relations for all tree-level amplitudes of gravitons in General Relativity. The proof follows the same basic steps as in the BCFW construction and it is an extension of the one given for next-to-MHV amplitudes by one of the authors and P. Svr\\v{c}ek in hep-th/0502160. The main obstacle to overcome is to prove that deformed graviton amplitudes vanish as the complex variable parameterizing the deformation is taken to infinity. This step is done by first proving an auxiliary recursion relation where the vanishing at infinity follows directly from a Feynman diagram analysis. The auxiliary recursion relation gives rise to a representation of gravity amplitudes where the vanishing under the BCFW deformation can be directly proven. Since all our steps are based only on Feynman diagrams, our proof completely establishes the validity of BCFW recursion relations. This means that many results in the literature that were derived assuming their validity become true statements.

  16. Taming tree amplitudes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Boucher-Veronneau, Camille; Cachazo, Freddy

    2007-11-01

    We give a proof of BCFW recursion relations for all tree-level amplitudes of gravitons in General Relativity. The proof follows the same basic steps as in the BCFW construction and it is an extension of the one given for next-to-MHV amplitudes by one of the authors and P. Svrcek in hep-th/0502160. The main obstacle to overcome is to prove that deformed graviton amplitudes vanish as the complex variable parameterizing the deformation is taken to infinity. This step is done by first proving an auxiliary recursion relation where the vanishing at infinity follows directly from a Feynman diagram analysis. The auxiliary recursion relation gives rise to a representation of gravity amplitudes where the vanishing under the BCFW deformation can be directly proven. Since all our steps are based only on Feynman diagrams, our proof completely establishes the validity of BCFW recursion relations. This means that many results in the literature that were derived assuming their validity become true statements.

  17. Free Embedding Potentials in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M D; Brachet, M E; Bustamante, Miguel D.; Debbasch, Fabrice; Brachet, Marc-Etienne

    2005-01-01

    The embedding approach to General Relativity (GR), in which the 4-dimensional space-time is embedded in a N-dimensional ($N\\geq 10$) flat host space with hyperbolic signature, is reconsidered. All objections raised by previous authors against this approach are answered. The equations for the embedding potentials are shown to be completely equivalent to the standard GR Einstein equations for the metric, provided that two conditions are met. The first condition is that the embedding fulfills a property closely related to Nash's freeness and the second that physically consistent boundary conditions are considered in the Einstein-Hilbert action. Explicit examples of embeddings whose deformations DO describe gravitational waves around their respective backgrounds are given for both (4-D) cases of flat space-time and Schwarzschild black hole. Beside the Einstein-Hilbert action, a new action principle is considered that is also equivalent to standard GR at both levels of equations of motion and perturbations (waves)...

  18. Operational General Relativity: Possibilistic, Probabilistic, and Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Lucien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we develop an operational formulation of General Relativity similar in spirit to existing operational formulations of Quantum Theory. To do this we introduce an operational space (or op-space) built out of scalar fields. A point in op-space corresponds to some nominated set of scalar fields taking some given values in coincidence. We assert that op-space is the space in which we observe the world. We introduce also a notion of agency (this corresponds to the ability to set knob settings just like in Operational Quantum Theory). The effects of agents' actions should only be felt to the future so we introduce also a time direction field. Agency and time direction can be understood as effective notions. We show how to formulate General Relativity as a possibilistic theory and as a probabilistic theory. In the possibilistic case we provide a compositional framework for calculating whether some operationally described situation is possible or not. In the probabilistic version we introduce probabiliti...

  19. Mechanics of extended masses in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Harte, Abraham I

    2011-01-01

    The "external" or "bulk" motion of extended bodies is studied in general relativity. Material objects of arbitrary shape, spin, internal composition, and velocity are allowed as long as the metric remains near a vacuum solution (with a possible cosmological constant). Under this restriction, physically reasonable linear and angular momenta are proposed that evolve as though they were the momenta of an extended test body moving in an effective vacuum metric. This result holds to all multipole orders. The portion of the physical metric that does not directly affect the motion is a slightly generalized form of the Detweiler-Whiting S-field originally introduced in the context of self-force. This serves only to (finitely) renormalize the "bare" multipole moments of the object's stress-energy tensor. The MiSaTaQu expression for the gravitational self-force is recovered as a simple application. A gravitational self-torque is obtained as well. Lastly, a certain exact result is derived that may provide a basis for un...

  20. Rapidly rotating polytropes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1994-01-01

    We construct an extensive set of equilibrium sequences of rotating polytropes in general relativity. We determine a number of important physical parameters of such stars, including maximum mass and maximum spin rate. The stability of the configurations against quasi-radial perturbations is diagnosed. Two classes of evolutionary sequences of fixed rest mass and entropy are explored: normal sequences which behave very much like Newtonian evolutionary sequences, and supramassive sequences which exist solely because of relativistic effects. Dissipation leading to loss of angular momentum causes a star to evolve in a quasi-stationary fashion along an evolutionary sequence. Supramassive sequences evolve towards eventual catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Prior to collapse, the star must spin up as it loses angular momentum, an effect which may provide an observational precursor to gravitational collapse to a black hole.

  1. Synchronous Lagrangian variational principles in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating synchronous variational principles in the context of General Relativity is discussed. Based on the analogy with classical relativistic particle dynamics, the existence of variational principles is pointed out in relativistic classical field theory which are either asynchronous or synchronous. The historical Einstein-Hilbert and Palatini variational formulations are found to belong to the first category. Nevertheless, it is shown that an alternative route exists which permits one to cast these principles in terms of equivalent synchronous Lagrangian variational formulations. The advantage is twofold. First, synchronous approaches allow one to overcome the lack of gauge symmetry of the asynchronous principles. Second, the property of manifest covariance of the theory is also restored at all levels, including the symbolic Euler-Lagrange equations, with the variational Lagrangian density being now identified with a $4-$scalar. As an application, a joint synchronous variational principle...

  2. Stably stratified magnetized stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Shijun; Shibata, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    We construct magnetized stars composed of a fluid stably stratified by entropy gradients in the framework of general relativity, assuming ideal magnetohydrodynamics and employing a barotropic equation of state. We first revisit basic equations for describing stably-stratified stationary axisymmetric stars containing both poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields. As sample models, the magnetized stars considered by Ioka and Sasaki (2004), inside which the magnetic fields are confined, are modified to the ones stably stratified. The magnetized stars newly constructed in this study are believed to be more stable than the existing relativistic models because they have both poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields with comparable strength, and magnetic buoyancy instabilities near the surface of the star, which can be stabilized by the stratification, are suppressed.

  3. Black hole mergers: beyond general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Leo; Okounkova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    One hundred years after the birth of general relativity, advanced LIGO has finally directly detected gravitational waves. The source: two black holes merging into one. Advanced LIGO will soon provide the opportunity to test GR, using gravitational waves, in the dynamical strong-field regime-a setting where GR has not yet been tested. GR has passed all weak-field tests with flying colors. Yet it should eventually break down, so we must look to the strong-field. To perform strong-field tests of GR, we need waveform models from theories beyond GR. To date there are no numerical simulations of black hole mergers in theories which differ from GR. The main obstacle is the mathematical one of well-posedness. I will explain how to overcome this obstacle, and demonstrate the success of this approach by presenting the first numerical simulations of black hole mergers in a theory beyond GR.

  4. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  5. Motivations for antigravity in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardin, G.

    1997-08-01

    We present arguments showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, we conjecture a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows General Relativity to mimic antigravity. Kerr wormholes would then act as “supermirrors” reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subject to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the “CP” violation observed in the neutral kaon system.

  6. Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, T F

    2003-01-01

    The Friedmann equation can be derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the...

  7. Manifest Covariant Hamiltonian Theory of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating a manifest covariant Hamiltonian theory of General Relativity in the presence of source fields is addressed, by extending the so-called "DeDonder-Weyl" formalism to the treatment of classical fields in curved space-time. The theory is based on a synchronous variational principle for the Einstein equation, formulated in terms of superabundant variables. The technique permits one to determine the continuum covariant Hamiltonian structure associated with the Einstein equation. The corresponding continuum Poisson bracket representation is also determined. The theory relies on first-principles, in the sense that the conclusions are reached in the framework of a non-perturbative covariant approach, which allows one to preserve both the 4-scalar nature of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian densities as well as the gauge invariance property of the theory.

  8. Mass and Motion in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc; Whiting, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    From the infinitesimal scale of particle physics to the cosmic scale of the universe, research is concerned with the nature of mass. While there have been spectacular advances in physics during the past century, mass still remains a mysterious entity at the forefront of current research. Our current perspective on gravitation has arisen over millennia, through the contemplation of falling apples, lift thought experiments and notions of stars spiraling into black holes.  In this volume, the world’s leading scientists offer a multifaceted approach to mass by giving a concise and introductory presentation based on insights from their respective fields of research on gravity. The main theme is mass and its motion within general relativity and other theories of gravity, particularly for compact bodies. Within this framework, all articles are tied together coherently, covering post-Newtonian and related methods as well as the self-force approach to the analysis of motion in curved space-time, closing with an ove...

  9. What Did Kramers and Kronig Do and How Did They Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2010-01-01

    Over time the account of how the Kramers-Kronig (dispersion) relations between the real and imaginary parts of response functions were derived in 1926 and 1927 has been transmogrified into anecdotes about what might have been done but was not. Although Kramers obtained both members of a pair of relations, Kronig obtained only one. Both authors…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches—loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. In his own words: 'loop quantum gravity is an attempt to construct a mathematically rigorous, background-independent, non-perturbative quantum field theory of Lorentzian general relativity and all known matter in four spacetime dimensions, not more and not less'. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to

  11. Implications of the causality principle for ultra chiral metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkunov, Maxim V.; Dmitrienko, Vladimir E.; Ezhov, Alexander A.; Artemov, Vladimir V.; Rogov, Oleg Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chiral metamaterials – artificial subwavelength structures with broken mirror symmetry – demonstrate outstanding degree of optical chirality that exhibits sophisticated spectral behavior and can eventually reach extreme values. Based on the fundamental causality principle we show how one can unambiguously relate the metamaterial circular dichroism and optical activity by the generalized Kramers-Kronig relations. Contrary to the conventional relations, the generalized ones provide a unique opportunity of extracting information on material-dependent zeroes of transmission coefficient in the upper half plane of complex frequency. We illustrate the merit of the formulated relations by applying them to the observed ultra chiral optical transmission spectra of subwavelength arrays of chiral holes in silver films. Apart from the possibility of precise verification of experimental data, the relations enable resolving complex eigenfrequencies of metamaterial intrinsic modes and resonances. PMID:25787007

  12. Particle Pair Production in Cosmological General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Firmin J

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmological General Relativity of Carmeli, a 5-dimensional theory of time, space and velocity, predicts the existence of an acceleration $a_0 = c / \\tau$ due to the expansion of the universe, where $c$ is the speed of light in vacuum, $\\tau = 1/h$ is the Hubble-Carmeli time constant, where $h$ is the Hubble constant at zero distance and no gravity. The Carmeli force on a particle of mass $m$ is $F_c = m a_0$, a fifth force in nature. The fields resulting from the solution of the Einstein field equations in 5-D CGR and the Carmeli force are used to hypothesize the production of a particle and its antiparticle. The mass of each particle is found to be $m=\\tau c^3 / 4 G$, where $G$ is Newton's constant. The vacuum mass density derived from the physics is $\\rho_{vac} = -3/8 \\pi G \\tau^2$. The cosmological constant is then given by $\\Lambda = 3 / \\tau^2$. We derive an expression for $\\tau$ given by $\\tau = \\sqrt{(45 \\zeta (1 - g) c^3 \\hbar^3) / (4\\pi^3 G \\mu \\alpha^2 k^3 \\beta^3 T^3)}$, where $\\zeta$ is the b...

  13. Inflation and bubbles in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Castillo, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A.

    1986-11-01

    Following Israel's study of singular hypersurfaces and thin shells in general relativity, the complete set of Einstein's field equations in the presence of a bubble boundary SIGMA is reviewed for all spherically symmetric embedding four-geometries M+/-. The mapping that identifies points between the boundaries Σ+ and Σ- is obtained explicitly when the regions M+ and M- are described by a de Sitter and a Minkowski metric, respectively. In addition, the evolution of a bubble with vanishing surface energy density is studied in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker space-time, for region M- radiation dominated with a vanishing cosmological constant, and an energy equation in M+ determined by the matching. It is found that this type of bubble leads to a ``worm-hole'' matching; that is, an infinite extent exterior of a sphere is joined across the wall to another infinite extent exterior of a sphere. Interior-interior matches are also possible. Under this model, solutions for a bubble following a Hubble law are analyzed. Numerical solutions for bubbles with constant tension are also obtained.

  14. On Dispersion in Visual Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Barneveld, H.H. van

    1975-01-01

    An idealized visual pigment absorbance spectrum is used together with a Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation to calculate the contribution of the visual pigment to the refractive index of the fly photoreceptor. It appears that an absorption coefficient of 0.010 µm-1 results in a refractive index varia

  15. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  16. All-frequency reflectionlessness

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2016-01-01

    We derive planar permittivity profiles that do not reflect perpendicularly exiting radiation of any frequency. The materials obey the Kramers-Kronig relations and have no regions of gain. Reduction of the Casimir force by means of such materials is also discussed.

  17. How to Be Causal: Time, Spacetime and Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    I explain a simple definition of causality in widespread use, and indicate how it links to the Kramers-Kronig relations. The specification of causality in terms of temporal differential equations then shows us the way to write down dynamical models so that their causal nature "in the sense used here" should be obvious to all. To extend existing…

  18. Gamma and Related Functions Generalized for Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Given a sequence g[subscript k] greater than 0, the "g-factorial" product [big product][superscript k] [subscript i=1] g[subscript i] is extended from integer k to real x by generalizing properties of the gamma function [Gamma](x). The Euler-Mascheroni constant [gamma] and the beta and zeta functions are also generalized. Specific examples include…

  19. General Relativity Revisited: Generalized Nordstr\\"om Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bengtsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In 1945 Einstein concluded that [1]: 'The present theory of relativity is based on a division of physical reality into a metric field (gravitation) on the one hand, and into an electromagnetic field and matter on the other hand. In reality space will probably be of a uniform character and the present theory be valid only as a limiting case. For large densities of field and of matter, the field equations and even the field variables which enter into them will have no real significance.'. The dichotomy can be resolved by introducing a scalar field/potential algebraically related to the Ricci tensor for which the corresponding metric is free of additional singularities. Hence, although a fundamentally nonlinear theory, the scalar field/potential provides an analytic framework for interacting particles; described by linear superposition. The stress tensor for the scalar field includes both the sources of and the energy-momentum for the gravitational field, and has zero covariant and ordinary divergence. Hence, th...

  20. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  1. Sensory Discrimination as Related to General Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G. Scott; Schroeder, David H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempted to replicate the pitch discrimination findings of previous research and expand them to the modality of color discrimination in a sample of 899 teenagers and adults by correlating 2 sensory discrimination measures with the general factor from a battery of 13 cognitive ability tests. Results suggest that sensory discrimination is…

  2. On the classical theory of molecular optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles of classical and semi-classical theories of molecular optical activity are discussed. These theories are valid for dilute solutions of optically active organic molecules. It is shown that all phenomena known in the classical theory of molecular optical activity can be described with the use of one pseudo-scalar which is a uniform function of the incident light frequency $\\omega$. The relation between optical rotation and circular dichroism is derived from the basic Kramers-Kronig relations. In our discussion of the general theory of molecular optical activity we introduce the tensor of molecular optical activity. It is shown that to evaluate the optical rotation and circular dichroism at arbitrary frequencies one needs to know only nine (3 + 6) molecular tensors. The quantum (or semi-classical) theory of molecular optical activity is also briefly discussed. We also raise the possibility of measuring the optical rotation and circular dichroism at wavelengths which correspond to the vacuum ...

  3. Beyond Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gregori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In this note I present the main ideas of my proposal about the theoretical framework that could underlie, and therefore "unify", Quantum Mechanics and Relativity, and I briefly summarize the implications and predictions.

  4. Satellite Laser Ranging and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L

    2001-01-01

    In this work some aspects of the detection of certain general relativistic effects in the weak gravitational field of the Earth via laser-ranged data to some existing or proposed geodetic satellites are examined. The focus is on the Lense-Thirring drag of the orbit of a test body, the gravitomagnetic clock effect and the gravitoelectric perigee shift. The impact of some sources of systematic errors is investigated. An experiment whose goal is the measurement of the PPN parameters beta and gamma in the terrestrial field with LAGEOS satellites at a level of 10^(-3)is presented. A modified version of the proposed LARES mission is examined.

  5. Matroidal Structure of Generalized Rough Sets Based on Tolerance Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    of the generalized rough set based on the tolerance relation. The matroid can also induce a new relation. We investigate the connection between the original tolerance relation and the induced relation.

  6. Physics and mathematical tools methods and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Alastuey, Angel; Magro, Marc; Pujol, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods and tools which are useful for physicists and engineers: response functions, Kramers-Kronig relations, Green's functions, saddle point approximation. The derivations emphasize the underlying physical arguments and interpretations without any loss of rigor. General introductions describe the main features of the methods, while connections and analogies between a priori different problems are discussed. They are completed by detailed applications in many topics including electromagnetism, hydrodynamics, statistical physics, quantum mechanics, etc. Exercises are also proposed, and their solutions are sketched. A self-contained reading of the book is favored by avoiding too technical derivations, and by providing a short presentation of important tools in the appendices. It is addressed to undergraduate and graduate students in physics, but it can also be used by teachers, researchers and engineers.

  7. Exactly Solvable Dielectrics and the Abraham-Minkowskii Controversy

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We present an exactly solvable model of a classical dielectric medium that gives an unambiguous local decomposition of field and charge motion and their contribution to the conserved quantities. This is done with special care to the forces that exist at surfaces, coatings and the ends of packets. The result is a mathematically simpler and more intuitive understand- ing of causality in media than the Brillouin and Sommerfeld theories and an understanding of the Kramers-Kronig relations in terms of dynamics and conservation laws. The Abraham-Minkowskii paradox is clarified from this point of view and the export of such notions to realistic media and metamaterials are discussed. This model can be extended to manifestly maintain these features as general nonlinear and time and space dependent changes in medium response are introduced and provides a universal description for all dielectrics.

  8. Giving freedom and physical meaning to the effective parameters of metamaterials for all frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Dirdal, Christopher A; Skaar, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Metamaterial effective parameters may exhibit freedom from dispersion constraints owing to their loss of physical meaning outside a subset of frequencies and wave numbers $(\\omega, k)$. For instance, effective parameters $\\epsilon_\\text{eff}$ and $\\mu_\\text{eff}$ can have a negative imaginary part for passive metamaterial systems, or may not tend to unity when analytically continued to high frequencies. We characterize this freedom through generalized Kramers-Kronig relations, and allocate alternative meaning to the effective parameters that remains valid for all $(\\omega, k)$. There exists several alternative definitions for $\\mu_\\text{eff}$ or $\\epsilon_\\text{eff}$, thereby giving different frequency variations for high frequencies, while nevertheless converging to the same dispersion for long wavelengths.

  9. Quantum dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2012-01-01

    The quantum theory of the damped harmonic oscillator has been a subject of continual investigation since the 1930s. The obstacle to quantization created by the dissipation of energy is usually dealt with by including a discrete set of additional harmonic oscillators as a reservoir. But a discrete reservoir cannot directly yield dynamics such as Ohmic damping (proportional to velocity) of the oscillator of interest. By using a continuum of oscillators as a reservoir, we canonically quantize the harmonic oscillator with Ohmic damping and also with general damping behaviour. The dynamics of a damped oscillator is determined by an arbitrary effective susceptibility that obeys Kramers-Kronig relations. This approach offers an alternative description of nano-mechanical oscillators and opto-mechanical systems.

  10. Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, H

    2005-01-01

    Physics cannot determine what mass is; it can only normalize it - by a given volume: one liter of water corresponds to one kilogram, and so does everything else that shows the same inertia or weight - whatever mass itself was. In the same manner physics is not able to explain inertia or gravity, or to specify the reasons for a constant speed of light, a fundament of special relativity, or the Einstein-De Broglie relations, the basis of quantum mechanics. Even its very core, the Schroedinger Equation, is introduced into the world of physics as a good guess. Would we picture the universe itself as a continuum in space-time all these questions are solved automatically.

  11. Linear derivative Cartan formulation of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kummer, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Beside diffeomorphism invariance also manifest SO(3,1) local Lorentz invariance is implemented in a formulation of Einstein Gravity (with or without cosmological term) in terms of initially completely independent vielbein and spin connection variables and auxiliary two-form fields. In the systematic study of all possible embeddings of Einstein gravity into that formulation with auxiliary fields, the introduction of a ``bi-complex'' algebra possesses crucial technical advantages. Certain components of the new two-form fields directly provide canonical momenta for spatial components of all Cartan variables, whereas the remaining ones act as Lagrange multipliers for a large number of constraints, some of which have been proposed already in different, less radical approaches. The time-like components of the Cartan variables play that role for the Lorentz constraints and others associated to the vierbein fields. Although also some ternary ones appear, we show that relations exist between these constraints, and how...

  12. Large-Scale Tides in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ip, Hiu Yan

    2016-01-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation ...

  13. Linear derivative Cartan formulation of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, W.; Schütz, H.

    2005-07-01

    Beside diffeomorphism invariance also manifest SO(3,1) local Lorentz invariance is implemented in a formulation of Einstein gravity (with or without cosmological term) in terms of initially completely independent vielbein and spin connection variables and auxiliary two-form fields. In the systematic study of all possible embeddings of Einstein gravity into that formulation with auxiliary fields, the introduction of a “bi-complex” algebra possesses crucial technical advantages. Certain components of the new two-form fields directly provide canonical momenta for spatial components of all Cartan variables, whereas the remaining ones act as Lagrange multipliers for a large number of constraints, some of which have been proposed already in different, less radical approaches. The time-like components of the Cartan variables play that role for the Lorentz constraints and others associated to the vierbein fields. Although also some ternary ones appear, we show that relations exist between these constraints, and how the Lagrange multipliers are to be determined to take care of second class ones. We believe that our formulation of standard Einstein gravity as a gauge theory with consistent local Poincaré algebra is superior to earlier similar attempts.

  14. GENERAL RELATIVITY AND THEORY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theory of the electromagnetic type of rocket motor. The apparatus consists of a magnetron and a conical cavity in which electromagnetic oscillations are excited. We explain the mechanism of trust in such a device based on Maxwell's theory and the Abraham force. We built a dynamic model of the motor and calculated the optimal parameters. It is shown, that the laws of conservation of momentum and energy for the rocket motor of electromagnetic type are true, taking into account the gravitational field. In simulation, the movement used the theory of relativity. The source of the motion in an electromagnetic drive is the mass conversion in various kinds of radiation. The optimization of the operating parameters of the device is done, namely by the excitation frequency, the magnitude of heat losses of electromagnetic energy by thermal radiation in the IR spectrum, the parameters of heat transfer and forced from the temperature dependence of the resistance of the material of the cavity walls. It was found that the effective conversion of electromagnetic energy in the trust force necessary to minimize the deviation of the excitation frequency of the primary resonance frequency of the cavity. The mechanism of formation of trust under change the metrics of space-time, taking into account the contribution of the Yang-Mills theory and electromagnetic field tensor of energymomentum has been proposed

  15. Linear derivative Cartan formulation of general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummer, W.; Schuetz, H. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    Beside diffeomorphism invariance also manifest SO(3,1) local Lorentz invariance is implemented in a formulation of Einstein gravity (with or without cosmological term) in terms of initially completely independent vielbein and spin connection variables and auxiliary two-form fields. In the systematic study of all possible embeddings of Einstein gravity into that formulation with auxiliary fields, the introduction of a ''bi-complex'' algebra possesses crucial technical advantages. Certain components of the new two-form fields directly provide canonical momenta for spatial components of all Cartan variables, whereas the remaining ones act as Lagrange multipliers for a large number of constraints, some of which have been proposed already in different, less radical approaches. The time-like components of the Cartan variables play that role for the Lorentz constraints and others associated to the vierbein fields. Although also some ternary ones appear, we show that relations exist between these constraints, and how the Lagrange multipliers are to be determined to take care of second class ones. We believe that our formulation of standard Einstein gravity as a gauge theory with consistent local Poincare algebra is superior to earlier similar attempts. (orig.)

  16. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  18. Directions in General Relativity, Vol. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B. L.; Ryan, M. P., Jr.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    2005-10-01

    1. Remarks concerning the geometrics of gravity, gauge fields and quantum theory J. S. Anandan; 2. Gravity and the unification of fundamental interactions R. L. Arnowitt and P. Nath; 3. Minisuperspaces: symmetrics and quantization A. Ashtekar, R. S. Tate and C. Uggla; 4. Quantum cosmology B. K. Berger; 5. A pictorial history of some gravitational instanton D. Brill and K.- T. Pirk; 6. No time machines from lightlike sources in 2+1 gravity S. Deser and A. R. Steif; 7. Inhomogeneity and anisotropy genertation in FRW cosmologies G. F. R. Ellis and D. R. Matravers; 8. Misner, kinks and Black Holes D. Finkelstein; 9. The quantum mechanics of closed systems J. B. Hartle; 10. Cosmological vacuum open system W. A. Hiscock and D. A. Samuel; 11. Minisuperspace as a quantum open system B. L. Hu, J. P. Paz and S. Sinha; 12. Ricci flow on minisuperspaces and the geometry-topology problem J. Isenberg and M. Jackson; 13. Classical and quantum dynamics of Black Hole interiors W. Israel; 14. Matter time in canonical quantum gravity K. V. Kuchar; 15. The isotropy and homogeneity of the universe R. A. Matzner; 16. Recent advances in ADM reduction V. Moncrief; 17. Some progress in classical canonical gravity J. M. Nester; 18. Harmonic map formulation of colliding electrovac place waves Y. Nutku; 19. Geometry, the renormalization groups and gravity D. J. O'Connor and C. R. Stephens; 20. An example of the indeterminacy of the already-unified theory R. Penrose; 21. Nonstatic metric of Hiscock-Gott type A. K. Raychaudhuri; 22. Non-standard phase space variables, quantization and path-integrals, or little ado about much M. P. Ryan, Jr. and Sergio Hojmann; 23. The present status of the decaying neutrino theory D. W. Sciama; 24. Exploiting the computer to investigate Black Holes and cosmic censorship S. L. Shapiro and S. A. Teukolsky; 25. Misner space as a prototype for almost any pathology K. S. Thorne; 26. Relativity and rotation C. V. Vishveshwara; 27. The first law of Black Hole

  19. 29 CFR 778.5 - Relation to other laws generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION General Considerations..., and the payment of overtime compensation computed on bases different from those set forth in the...

  20. Summary of the workshop: Classical general relativity and gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingan, Sanjay [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, Delhi 110025 (India); Ghosh, S G [BITS - Pilani DUBAI, P.B. 500022, Dubai International Academic City, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: sjhingan@iucaa.enet.in, E-mail: ghosh@bitsdubai.com

    2008-11-01

    In the workshop, classical general relativity and gravitational waves at ICGC-2007, eleven lectures were presented on classical general relativity and nine on gravitational waves. Lectures covered diverse topics in these areas during the three days of parallel sessions. We classify and summarize here the research work and results of the oral presentations made.

  1. Differential forms and the geometry of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dray, Tevian

    2015-01-01

    Differential Forms and the Geometry of General Relativity provides readers with a coherent path to understanding relativity. Requiring little more than calculus and some linear algebra, it helps readers learn just enough differential geometry to grasp the basics of general relativity.The book contains two intertwined but distinct halves. Designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate students in mathematics or physics, most of the text requires little more than familiarity with calculus and linear algebra. The first half presents an introduction to general relativity that describes

  2. 6th International Conference on the History of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean; The Universe of General Relativity; GR 6

    2005-01-01

    This volume from the Einstein Studies Series is based largely on papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on the History of General Relativity, held in Amsterdam on June 26-29, 2002. These contributions from notable experts offer both new and historical insights on gravitation, general relativity, cosmology, unified field theory, and the history of science. Topics discussed include the prehistory of special relativity, early attempts at a relativistic theory of gravitation, the beginnings of general relativity, the problem of motion in the context of relativity, conservation laws, the axiomatization of relativity, classical and contemporary cosmology, gravitation and electromagnetism, quantum gravity, and relativity as seen through the eyes of the public and renowned relativists. Contributors: K. Brading; G. Gale; H.F.M. Goenner; J. Goldberg; S. Katzir; D. Kennefick; H. Kragh; C. Lehner; U. Majer; J. Mattingly; E.T. Newman; J.D. Norton; J. Renn; R. Rynasiewicz; J.M. Sánchez-Ron; T. Sauer; C. Sm...

  3. Newton's Theorem of Revolving Orbits in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Newton's theorem of revolving orbits states that one can multiply the angular speed of a Keplerian orbit by a factor $k$ by applying a radial inverse cubed force proportional to $(1-k^2)$. In this paper we derive two generalizations of this theorem in general relativity, valid for the motion of massive particles in any static, spherically symmetric metrics. The first generalization, which we named the "force" picture, generalizes Newton's radial inverse cubed force by a corresponding four-force. The second generalization, which we named the "metric" picture, instead modifies the metric of the system to produce the multiplication in angular speed. Further, we verify the Newtonian limits of both generalizations and demonstrate that there is no such generalization for rotating metrics.

  4. Anderson-Witting transport coefficients for flows in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrus, Victor E

    2016-01-01

    The transport coefficients induced by the Anderson-Witting approximation of the collision term in the relativistic Boltzmann equation are derived for close to equilibrium flows in general relativity. Using the tetrad formalism, it is shown that the expression for these coefficients is the same as that obtained on flat space-time, in agreement with the generalized equivalence principle.

  5. Curvature-based Hyperbolic Systems for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Y; Anderson, A; Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; York, James W.; Anderson, Arlen

    1998-01-01

    We review curvature-based hyperbolic forms of the evolution part of the Cauchy problem of General Relativity that we have obtained recently. We emphasize first order symmetrizable hyperbolic systems possessing only physical characteristics.

  6. Gravitational duality in General Relativity and Supergravity theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehouck, F. [Service de physique mathematique et interactions fondamentales. Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine CP-231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-07-15

    We quickly review the current status of gravitational duality in General Relativity. We summarize and comment some recent work on constructing dual (topological) charges and understanding how this duality acts in supergravity theories.

  7. A century of general relativity: astrophysics and cosmology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blandford, R D

    2015-01-01

    .... General relativity is the essential foundation of the standard model of cosmology and underlies our description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most...

  8. Is the cosmological singularity really unavoidable in general relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Quirós, I

    2000-01-01

    The initial singularity problem in standard general relativity is treated on the light of a viewpoint asserting that this formulation of Einstein's theory and its conformal formulations are physically equivalent. We show that flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes and open dust-filled and radiation-filled universes are singularity free when described in terms of the formulation of general relativity conformal to the canonical one.

  9. Implications of a positive cosmological constant for general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2017-08-29

    Most of the literature on general relativity over the last century assumes that the cosmological constant [Formula: see text] is zero. However, by now independent observations have led to a consensus that the dynamics of the universe is best described by Einstein's equations with a small but positive [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, this requires a drastic revision of conceptual frameworks commonly used in general relativity, no matter how small [Formula: see text] is. We first explain why, and then summarize the current status of generalizations of these frameworks to include a positive [Formula: see text], focusing on gravitational waves.

  10. The use of Generalised Functions and Distributions in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbauer, R; Steinbauer, Roland; Vickers, James A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the extent to which one can use classical distribution theory in describing solutions of Einstein's equations. We show that there are a number of physically interesting cases which cannot be treated using distribution theory but require a more general concept. We describe a mathematical theory of nonlinear generalised functions based on Colombeau algebras and show how this may be applied in general relativity. We end by discussing the concept of singularity in general relativity and show that certain solutions with weak singularities may be regarded as distributional solutions of Einstein's equations.

  11. Neutrino Radiation Showing a Christodoulou Memory Effect in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bieri, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We describe neutrino radiation in general relativity by introducing the energy-momentum tensor of a null fluid into the Einstein equations. Investigating the geometry and analysis at null infinity, we prove that a component of the null fluid enlarges the Christodoulou memory effect of gravitational waves. The description of neutrinos in general relativity as a null fluid can be regarded as a limiting case of a more general description using the massless limit of the Einstein-Vlasov system. The present authors with co-authors have work in progress to generalize the results of this paper using this more general description. Gigantic neutrino bursts occur in our universe in core-collapse supernovae and in the mergers of neutron star binaries.

  12. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  13. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  14. The general theory of relativity a mathematical exposition

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Anadijiban

    2012-01-01

     The General Theory of Relativity: A Mathematical Exposition will serve readers as a modern mathematical introduction to the general theory of relativity. Throughout the book, examples, worked-out problems, and exercises (with hints and solutions) are furnished. Topics in this book include, but are not limited to: • tensor analysis • the special theory of relativity • the general theory of relativity and Einstein’s field equations • spherically symmetric solutions and experimental confirmations • static and stationary space-time domains • black holes • cosmological models • algebraic classifications and the Newman-Penrose equations • the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations • appendices covering mathematical supplements and special topics Mathematical rigor, yet very clear presentation of the topics make this book a unique text for both university students and research scholars. Anadijiban Das has taught courses on Relativity Theory at The University College of Dublin, Irelan...

  15. Introduction to General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Matzner, Richard

    John Archibald Wheeler was born on July 9, 1911, in Jacksonville, Florida, and passed away on April 13, 2008, in Hightstown, New Jersey; his influence on gravitational physics and science in general will remain forever. Among his many and important contributions to physics, he was one of the fathers of the renaissance of General Relativity. After a golden starting age of General Relativity, a few years after the Einstein's papers of 1915-1916, Einstein's gravitational theory was for many years, to quote the preface of a 1960 book of General Relativity [1], confined to "an ivory tower…and no doubt many a relativist looks forward to the day when the governments will seek his opinion on important questions".

  16. Relative Entropy and Variational Properties of Generalized Gibbsian Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Külske, Christof; Ny, Arnaud Le; Redig, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We study the relative entropy density for generalized Gibbs measures. We first show its existence and obtain a familiar expression in terms of entropy and relative energy for a class of “almost Gibbsian measures” (almost sure continuity of conditional probabilities). For quasilocal measures, we obta

  17. METRIC OF ACCELERATING AND ROTATING REFERENCE SYSTEMS IN GENERAL RELATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metric describing the accelerated and rotating reference system in general relativity in the case of an arbitrary dependence of acceleration and angular velocity on time has been proposed. It is established that the curvature tensor in such metrics is zero, which corresponds to movement in the flat spaces. It is shown that the motion of test bodies in the metric accelerated and rotating reference system in general relativity is similarly to the classical motion in non-inertial reference frame. Consequently, there exist a metric in general relativity, in which the Coriolis theorem and classic velocity-addition formula are true. This means that classical mechanics is accurate rather than approximate model in general relativity. A theory of potential in non-inertial reference systems in general relativity is considered. The numerical model of wave propagation in non-inertial reference frames in the case when potential depending of one, two and three spatial dimensions has been developed. It is shown in numerical experiment that the acceleration of the reference system leads to retardation effects, as well as to a violation of the symmetry of the wave front, indicating that there is local change of wave speed

  18. Black Hole Spectroscopy: Testing General Relativity through Gravitational Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, O; Krishnan, B; Finn, L S; Garrison, D; López-Aleman, R; Dreyer, Olaf; Kelly, Bernard; Krishnan, Badri; Finn, Lee Samuel; Garrison, David; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong field limit, can gravitational wave observations distinguish between black hole and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originated from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistica...

  19. Construction of Regular Black Holes in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Zhong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    We present a general procedure for constructing exact black hole solutions with electric/magnetic charges in General Relativity coupled to a nonlinear electrodynamics. We obtain a variety of two-parameter family spherically symmetric black hole solutions. In particular, the singularity at the central of the space-time can be cancelled in the parameters space and the black hole solutions become regular everywhere in the space-time. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics. We also generalize the procedure to include a cosmological constant and construct regular black hole solutions that are asymptotic to anti-de Sitter space-time.

  20. Construction of regular black holes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Wang, Xiaobao

    2016-12-01

    We present a general procedure for constructing exact black hole solutions with electric or magnetic charges in general relativity coupled to a nonlinear electrodynamics. We obtain a variety of two-parameter family spherically symmetric black hole solutions. In particular, the singularity at the center of the space-time can be canceled in the parameter space and the black hole solutions become regular everywhere in space-time. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics. We also generalize the procedure to include a cosmological constant and construct regular black hole solutions that are asymptotic to anti-de Sitter space-time.

  1. Introduction to general relativity, black holes and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    General Relativity is a beautiful geometric theory, simple in its mathematical formulation but leading to numerous consequences with striking physical interpretations: gravitational waves, black holes, cosmological models, and so on. This introductory textbook is written for mathematics students interested in physics and physics students interested in exact mathematical formulations (or for anyone with a scientific mind who is curious to know more of the world we live in), recent remarkable experimental and observational results which confirm the theory are clearly described and no specialised physics knowledge is required. The mathematical level of Part A is aimed at undergraduate students and could be the basis for a course on General Relativity. Part B is more advanced, but still does not require sophisticated mathematics. Based on Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat's more advanced text, General Relativity and the Einstein Equations, the aim of this book is to give with precision, but as simply as possible, the found...

  2. Canonical Noncommutativity Algebra for the Tetrad Field in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kober, Martin

    2011-01-01

    General relativity under the assumption of noncommuting components of the tetrad field is considered in this paper. Since the algebraic properties of the tetrad field representing the gravitational field are assumed to correspond to the noncommutativity algebra of the coordinates in the canonical case of noncommutative geometry, this idea is closely related to noncommutative geometry as well as to canonical quantization of gravity. According to this presupposition there are derived generalized field equations for general relativity which are obtained by replacing the usual tetrad field by the tetrad field operator within the actions and then building expectation values of the corresponding field equations between coherent states. These coherent states refer to creation and annihilation operators created from the components of the tetrad field operator. In this sense the obtained theory could be regarded as a kind of semiclassical approximation of a complete quantum description of gravity. The consideration pr...

  3. Testing General Relativity with Present and Future Astrophysical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Sperhake, Ulrich; Stein, Leo C; Wex, Norbert; Yagi, Kent; Baker, Tessa; Burgess, C P; Coelho, Flávio S; Doneva, Daniela; De Felice, Antonio; Ferreira, Pedro G; Freire, Paulo C C; Healy, James; Herdeiro, Carlos; Horbatsch, Michael; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Klein, Antoine; Kokkotas, Kostas; Kunz, Jutta; Laguna, Pablo; Lang, Ryan N; Li, Tjonnie G F; Littenberg, Tyson; Matas, Andrew; Mirshekari, Saeed; Okawa, Hirotada; Radu, Eugen; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore S; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Winther, Hans A; Witek, Helvi; Aghili, Mir Emad; Alsing, Justin; Bolen, Brett; Bombelli, Luca; Caudill, Sarah; Chen, Liang; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Fujita, Ryuichi; Gao, Caixia; Gerosa, Davide; Kamali, Saeed; Silva, Hector O; Rosa, João G; Sadeghian, Laleh; Sampaio, Marco; Sotani, Hajime; Zilhao, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most (if not all) of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the poten...

  4. A Possible Modification of Einstein's Theory of General Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests a new metric theory of gravitation, in which metric field is determined not only by matter and nongravitational field but also by vector graviton field, and in principle there is no need to introduce the Einstein's tensor. In order to satisfy automatically the geodesic postulate, an additional coordinate condition is needed.For the spherically symmetric static field, it leads us to quite different conclusions from those of Einstein's general relativity in the interior region of the surface of infinite redshift. Accurate to the first order of GM/r, it obtains the same results about the four experimental tests of general relativity.

  5. Essays in general relativity a Festschrift for Abraham Taub

    CERN Document Server

    Tipler, Frank J

    1981-01-01

    Essays in General Relativity: A Festschrift for Abraham Taub is collection of essays to honor Professor Abraham H. Taub on the occasion of his retirement from the mathematics faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. Relativistic hydrodynamics has always been a subject dear to Taub's heart. In fact, many basic results on special relativistic fluid flows are due to him, and he has been a major contributor to the study of fluid flows near shocks. The book contains 16 chapters and begins with a discussion of a geometrical approach to general relativity. This is followed by separate cha

  6. On Global One-Dimensionality proposal in Quantum General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, L A

    2008-01-01

    Quantum General Relativity, better known as Quantum Gravity with additional epithets, currently is faraway from phenomenology. This mental crisis leads at most to empty hypotheses, but not to realistic physics. However, there exists the way, investigated by Dirac, which is constructive for experimental data predictions in astrophysics, high energy physics, and condensed matter physics. It is Field Theory. This article presents certain proposal for new discussion. General Relativity in 3+1 metric field gauge and its canonical quantization is developed. Reduction of the quantum geometrodynamics to Global One-Dimensional bosonic field theory, its quantization, and some conclusions are presented.

  7. Cartan's Equivalence Method and Null coframes in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, E; Kozameh, C; Gallo, Emanuel; Iriondo, Mirta; Kozameh, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Using Cartan's equivalence method for point transformations we obtain from first principles the conformal geometry associated with third order ODEs and a special class of PDEs in two dimensions. We explicitly construct the null tetrads of a family of Lorentzian metrics, the conformal group in three and four dimensions and the so called normal metric connection. A special feature of this connection is that the non vanishing components of its torsion depend on one relative invariant, the (generalized) W\\"unschmann Invariant. We show that the above mentioned construction naturally contains the Null Surface Formulation of General Relativity.

  8. Oscillatory Universe, dark energy equation of state and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Usmani, A A; Mukhopadhyay, Utpal

    2012-01-01

    The concept of oscillatory Universe appears to be realistic and buried in the dynamic dark energy equation of state. We explore its evolutionary history under the frame work of general relativity. We observe that oscillations do not go unnoticed with such an equation of state and that their effects persist later on in cosmic evolution. The `classical' general relativity seems to retain the past history of oscillatory Universe in the form of increasing scale factor as the classical thermodynamics retains this history in the form of increasing cosmological entropy.

  9. Centripetal Acceleration and Centrifugal Force in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, D.; de Felice, F.; Jantzen, R. T.

    2003-05-01

    In nonrelativistic mechanics noninertial observers studying accelerated test particle motion experience a centripetal acceleration which, once interpreted as a centrifugal force acting on the particle, allows writing the particle's equation of motion in a Newtonian form, simply by adding the inertial force contribution to that of the external forces in the acceleration-equals-force equation. In general relativity centripetal and centrifugal acceleration generalizing the classical concepts must be properly (geometrically) defined. This requires a relative Frenet-Serret frame approach based on a family of test observers.

  10. New Superpotential in Conservation Laws in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Adamek, J

    2016-01-01

    This work refers to the new formula for the superpotential Uikl in conservation laws in general relativity satisfying the integral and differential conservation laws within the Schwarzschild metric. The new superpotential is composed of two terms. The first term is based on Mollers concept and its a function of the metric gik and its first derivative only. The second term is the antisymmetric tensor density of weight plus one and it consists of higher derivatives of the metric gik. Although the new superpotential consists of higher derivatives of the metric gik it might bring a new evaluation of the conservative quantities in general relativity

  11. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  12. Generalized entropies and logarithms and their duality relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan; Gell-Mann, Murray

    2012-11-20

    For statistical systems that violate one of the four Shannon-Khinchin axioms, entropy takes a more general form than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The framework of superstatistics allows one to formulate a maximum entropy principle with these generalized entropies, making them useful for understanding distribution functions of non-Markovian or nonergodic complex systems. For such systems where the composability axiom is violated there exist only two ways to implement the maximum entropy principle, one using escort probabilities, the other not. The two ways are connected through a duality. Here we show that this duality fixes a unique escort probability, which allows us to derive a complete theory of the generalized logarithms that naturally arise from the violation of this axiom. We then show how the functional forms of these generalized logarithms are related to the asymptotic scaling behavior of the entropy.

  13. Generalized entropies and logarithms and their duality relations

    CERN Document Server

    Hanel, Rudolf; Gell-Mann, Murray; 10.1073/pnas.1216885109

    2012-01-01

    For statistical systems that violate one of the four Shannon-Khinchin axioms, entropy takes a more general form than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The framework of superstatistics allows one to formulate a maximum entropy principle with these generalized entropies, making them useful for understanding distribution functions of non-Markovian or non-ergodic complex systems. For such systems where the composability axiom is violated there exist only two ways to implement the maximum entropy principle, one using escort probabilities, the other not. The two ways are connected through a duality. Here we show that this duality fixes a unique escort probability, which allows us to derive a complete theory of the generalized logarithms that naturally arise from the violation of this axiom. We then show how the functional forms of these generalized logarithms are related to the asymptotic scaling behavior of the entropy.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halburd, Rodney G.

    2008-11-01

    Although many books on general relativity contain an overview of the relevant background material from differential geometry, very little attention is usually paid to background material from the theory of differential equations. This is understandable in a first course on relativity but it often limits the kinds of problems that can be studied rigorously. Einstein's field equations lie at the heart of general relativity. They are a system of partial differential equations (PDEs) relating the curvature of spacetime to properties of matter. A central part of most problems in general relativity is to extract information about solutions of these equations. Most standard texts achieve this by studying exact solutions or numerical and analytical approximations. In the book under review, Alan Rendall emphasises the role of rigorous qualitative methods in general relativity. There has long been a need for such a book, giving a broad overview of the relevant background from the theory of partial differential equations, and not just from differential geometry. It should be noted that the book also covers the basic theory of ordinary differential equations. Although there are many good books on the rigorous theory of PDEs, methods related to the Einstein equations deserve special attention, not only because of the complexity and importance of these equations, but because these equations do not fit into any of the standard classes of equations (elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic) that one typically encounters in a course on PDEs. Even specifying exactly what ones means by a Cauchy problem in general relativity requires considerable care. The main problem here is that the manifold on which the solution is defined is determined by the solution itself. This means that one does not simply define data on a submanifold. Rendall's book gives a good overview of applications and results from the qualitative theory of PDEs to general relativity. It would be impossible to give detailed

  15. Cosmological General Relativity With Scale Factor and Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Firmin J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the four-dimensional space-velocity Cosmological General Relativity of Carmeli is developed by a general solution to the Einstein field equations. The metric is given in the Tolman form and the vacuum mass density is included in the energy-momentum tensor. The scale factor redshift equation is obtained, forming the basis for deriving the various redshift-distance relations of cosmological analysis. A linear equation of state dependent on the scale factor is assumed to account for the effects of an evolving dark energy in the expansion of the universe. Modeling simulations are provided for a few combinations of mass density, vacuum density and state parameter values over a sample of high redshift SNe Ia data. Also, the Carmeli cosmological model is derived as a special case of the general solution.

  16. Dynamical Gravitational Coupling as a Modified Theory of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Finster, Felix

    2016-01-01

    A modified theory of general relativity is proposed, where the gravitational constant is replaced by a dynamical variable in space-time. The dynamics of the gravitational coupling is described by a family of parametrized null geodesics, implying that the gravitational coupling at a space-time point is determined by solving transport equations along all null geodesics through this point. General relativity with dynamical gravitational coupling (DGC) is introduced. We motivate DGC from general considerations and explain how it arises in the context of causal fermion systems. The underlying physical idea is that the gravitational coupling is determined by microscopic structures on the Planck scale which propagate with the speed of light. In order to clarify the mathematical structure, we analyze the conformal behavior and prove local existence and uniqueness of the time evolution. The differences to Einstein's theory are worked out in the examples of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and the spherically symme...

  17. Probing Students' Understanding of Some Conceptual Themes in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    This work is an attempt to see how physics undergraduates view the basic ideas of general relativity when they are exposed to the topic in a standard introductory course. Since the subject is conceptually and technically difficult, we adopted a "case studies" approach, focusing in depth on about six students who had just finished a one semester…

  18. Testing general relativity: from local to cosmological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-28

    I summarize various tests of general relativity on astrophysical scales, based on the large-scale structure of the universe but also on other systems, in particular the constants of physics. I emphasize the importance of hypotheses on the geometric structures of our universe while performing such tests and discuss their complementarity as well as their possible extensions.

  19. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Shuchi Dave

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type IX string cosmological models in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition ρ= i.e. rest energy density for a cloud of strings is equal to the string tension density. The various physical and geometrical aspects of the models are also discussed.

  20. Related General-Vocabulary Knowledge Transfers to Learning Technical Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William R.

    2015-01-01

    In a classroom experiment during the first week of an introductory psychology course, randomly assigned students received a pretest and then a brief training on the definitions of general-vocabulary words either related (e.g., "facilitation") or unrelated (e.g., "rendition") to 16 technical terms (e.g., "social…

  1. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...

  2. Probing Students' Understanding of Some Conceptual Themes in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    This work is an attempt to see how physics undergraduates view the basic ideas of general relativity when they are exposed to the topic in a standard introductory course. Since the subject is conceptually and technically difficult, we adopted a "case studies" approach, focusing in depth on about six students who had just finished a one semester…

  3. Galileons as the Scalar Analogue of General Relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Remko; Ozkan, Mehmet; Roest, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between general relativity with diffeomorphism invariance and scalar field theories with Galilean invariance: notions such as the Levi-Civita connection and the Riemann tensor have a Galilean counterpart. This suggests Galilean theories as the unique nontrivial

  4. Reformulation of QCD in the language of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lunev, F A

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that there exists such collection of variables that the standard QCD Lagrangian can be represented as the sum of usual Palatini Lagrangian for Einstein general relativity and the Lagrangian of matter and some other fields where the tetrad fields and the metric are constructed from initial SU(3) Yang - Mills fields.

  5. Galileons as the Scalar Analogue of General Relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Remko; Ozkan, Mehmet; Roest, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between general relativity with diffeomorphism invariance and scalar field theories with Galilean invariance: notions such as the Levi-Civita connection and the Riemann tensor have a Galilean counterpart. This suggests Galilean theories as the unique nontrivial alternat

  6. Radiation dominated era and the power of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2012-01-01

    An analysis in the framework of the radiation dominated era permits to put bounds on the weak modification of general relativity which arises from the Lagrangian R^{1+epsilon}. Such a theory has been recently discussed in various papers in the literature. The new bounds together with previous ones in the literature rule out this theory in an ultimate way.

  7. Factors Affecting the Relative Efficiency of General Acid Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Eugene E.

    2005-01-01

    A simple framework for evaluating experimental kinetic data to provide support for Specific Acid Catalysis (SAC) and General Acid Catalysis (GAC) is described based on the factors affecting their relative efficiency. Observations reveal that increasing the SAC-to-GAC rate constant ratio reduces the effective pH range for GAC.

  8. Counter-term for the Palatini action of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analysis the counter-term for the general relativity in the Palatini framework. The expression is valid for both the null boundary and non-null boundary. We show that final results coincide with that in Ref.\\cite{pad1} which starts form the Einstein-Hilbert action.

  9. Lessons from Einstein's 1915 discovery of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-01-01

    There is a myth that Einstein's discovery of general relativity was due to his following beautiful mathematics to discover new insights about nature. I argue that this is an incorrect reading of the history and that what Einstein did was to follow physical insights which arose from asking that the story we tell of how nature works be coherent.

  10. The extended Kerr-Schild approach to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xun

    2016-01-01

    We study in some detail the "extended Kerr-Schild" formulation of general relativity, which decomposes the gauge-independent degrees of freedom of a generic metric into two arbitrary functions and the choice of a flat background tetrad. We recast Einstein's equations and spacetime curvatures in the extended Kerr-Schild form and discuss their properties, illustrated with simple examples.

  11. On the perturbations on satellites probing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, S; Mirzoyan, S

    2013-01-01

    Non-gravitational Yarkovsky-Rubincam effect for LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 satellites used to probe General Relativity has been revealed by means of the Kolmogorov analysis of their perturbations. We present the method and its efficiency at modeling of generated systems with properties expected at the satellite laser ranging measurements and then at satellite residual data analysis.

  12. Strange Horizons: Understanding Causal Barriers Beyond General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cropp, Bethan

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores two avenues into understanding the physics of black holes and horizons beyond general relativity, via analogue models and Lorentz violating theories. Analogue spacetimes have wildly different dynamics to general relativity; this allows the possibility of non-Killing horizons in stationary solutions. In the case of non-Killing horizons different definitions of surface gravity are truly different quantities. This also has application to modified theories of gravity, where there is no reason to expect all horizons to be Killing horizons. In Lorentz violating theories, the situation becomes even stranger, as Killing horizons are at best low energy barriers, but for superluminal dispersion relations a true causal barrier, the universal horizon, may be present. We investigate the nature of these universal horizons via a ray tracing study, and delve into what happens near both the universal and Killing horizons. From this study we determine the surface gravity of universal horizons by the peelin...

  13. Teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and local Lorentz transformation: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Nashed, Gamal G L

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the field equations of teleparallel theory which is equivalent to general relativity (TEGR) completely agree with the field equation of general relativity (GR). However, TEGR has six extra degrees of freedom which spoil the true physics. These extra degrees are related to the local Lorentz transformation. In this study, we give three different tetrads of flat horizon space-time that depend only on the radial coordinate. One of these tetrads contains an arbitrary function which comes from local Lorentz transformation. We show by explicate calculations that this arbitrary function spoils the calculations of the conserved charges. We formulate {\\it a skew-symmetric tensor} whose vanishing value put a constraint on the arbitrary function. This constraint makes the conserved charges are free from the arbitrary function.

  14. General Relativity as AN ÆTHER Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Maurice J.; Tipler, Frank J.

    Most early twentieth century relativists — Lorentz, Einstein, Eddington, for examples — claimed that general relativity was merely a theory of the æther. We shall confirm this claim by deriving the Einstein equations using æther theory. We shall use a combination of Lorentz's and Kelvin's conception of the æther. Our derivation of the Einstein equations will not use the vanishing of the covariant divergence of the stress-energy tensor, but instead equate the Ricci tensor to the sum of the usual stress-energy tensor and a stress-energy tensor for the æther, a tensor based on Kelvin's æther theory. A crucial first step is generalizing the Cartan formalism of Newtonian gravity to allow spatial curvature, as conjectured by Gauss and Riemann. In essence, we shall show that the Einstein equations are a special case of Newtonian gravity coupled to a particular type of luminiferous æther. Our derivation of general relativity is simple, and it emphasizes how inevitable general relativity is, given the truth of Newtonian gravity and the Maxwell equations.

  15. Reformulation of the symmetries of first-order general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Merced; González, Diego; Celada, Mariano; Díaz, Bogar

    2017-10-01

    We report a new internal gauge symmetry of the n-dimensional Palatini action with cosmological term (n>3 ) that is the generalization of three-dimensional local translations. This symmetry is obtained through the direct application of the converse of Noether’s second theorem on the theory under consideration. We show that diffeomorphisms can be expressed as linear combinations of it and local Lorentz transformations with field-dependent parameters up to terms involving the variational derivatives of the action. As a result, the new internal symmetry together with local Lorentz transformations can be adopted as the fundamental gauge symmetries of general relativity. Although their gauge algebra is open in general, it allows us to recover, without resorting to the equations of motion, the very well-known Lie algebra satisfied by translations and Lorentz transformations in three dimensions. We also report the analog of the new gauge symmetry for the Holst action with cosmological term, finding that it explicitly depends on the Immirzi parameter. The same result concerning its relation to diffeomorphisms and the open character of the gauge algebra also hold in this case. Finally, we consider the non-minimal coupling of a scalar field to gravity in n dimensions and establish that the new gauge symmetry is affected by this matter field. Our results indicate that general relativity in dimension greater than three can be thought of as a gauge theory.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-09-01

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory.

  17. Practical definition of averages of tensors in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boero, Ezequiel F

    2016-01-01

    We present a definition of tensor fields which are average of tensors over a manifold, with a straightforward and natural definition of derivative for the averaged fields; which in turn makes a suitable and practical construction for the study of averages of tensor fields that satisfy differential equations. Although we have in mind applications to general relativity, our presentation is applicable to a general n-dimensional manifold. The definition is based on the integration of scalars constructed from a physically motivated basis, making use of the least amount of geometrical structure. We also present definitions of covariant derivative of the averaged tensors and Lie derivative.

  18. Extent of the Immirzi Ambiguity in Quantum General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Mena-Marugán, G A

    2002-01-01

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function, instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number.

  19. Extent of the Immirzi ambiguity in quantum general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marugan, Guillermo A Mena [Centro de Fisica Miguel A Catalan, IMAFF, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-04-21

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number. (letter to the edit0008.

  20. Ambiguous Tests of General Relativity on Cosmological Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe; Ferreira, Pedro; Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using Parameterized Post-Friedmann (PPF) methods. It is generally assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we show that this is not so by taking two particular parameterizations and analyzing a subset of the current cosmological data. We argue that any PPF approach should always be accompanied by a characterization of the class of modified gravity models it is seeking to approximate.

  1. Towards a general solution of the Hamiltonian constraints of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tiemblo, A

    2005-01-01

    The present work has a double aim. On the one hand we call attention on the relationship existing between the Ashtekar formalism and other gauge-theoretical approaches to gravity, in particular the Poincar\\'e Gauge Theory. On the other hand we reduce the constraints of General Relativity to a single scalar condition on the three-metric.

  2. Differential Forms and Wave Equations for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, S R

    1996-01-01

    Recently, Choquet-Bruhat and York and Abrahams, Anderson, Choquet-Bruhat, and York (AACY) have cast the 3+1 evolution equations of general relativity in gauge-covariant and causal ``first-order symmetric hyperbolic form,'' thereby cleanly separating physical from gauge degrees of freedom in the Cauchy problem for general relativity. A key ingredient in their construction is a certain wave equation which governs the light-speed propagation of the extrinsic curvature tensor. Along a similar line, we construct a related wave equation which, as the key equation in a system, describes vacuum general relativity. Whereas the approach of AACY is based on tensor-index methods, the present formulation is written solely in the language of differential forms. Our approach starts with Sparling's tetrad-dependent differential forms, and our wave equation governs the propagation of Sparling's 2-form, which in the ``time-gauge'' is built linearly from the ``extrinsic curvature 1-form.'' The tensor-index version of our wave e...

  3. Analytic properties of the electromagnetic Green's function

    CERN Document Server

    Gralak, Boris; Soriano, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A general expression of the electromagnetic Green's function is derived from the inverse Helmholtz operator, where a second frequency has been introduced as a new degree of freedom. The first frequency results from the frequency decomposition of the electromagnetic field while the second frequency is associated with the dispersion of the dielectric permittivity. Then, it is shown that the electromagnetic Green's function is analytic with respect to these two complex frequencies as soon as they have positive imaginary part. Such analytic properties are also extended to complex wavevectors. Next, Kramers-Kronig expressions for the inverse Helmholtz operator and the electromagnetic Green's function are derived. In addition, these Kramers-Kronig expressions are shown to correspond to the well-known eigengenmodes expansion of the Green's function established in simple situations. Finally, the second frequency introduced as a new degree of freedom is exploited to characterize non-dispersive systems.

  4. Isotropic extensions of the vacuum solutions in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Martin-Moruno, Prado [Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Spacetimes described by spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations are of paramount importance both in astrophysical applications and theoretical considerations. And among those, black holes are highlighted. In vacuum, Birkhoff's theorem and its generalizations to non-asymptotically flat cases uniquely fix the metric as the Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter or Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter geometries, the vacuum solutions of the usual general relativity with zero, positive or negative values for the cosmological constant, respectively. In this work we are mainly interested in black holes in a cosmological environment. Of the two main assumptions of the cosmological principle, homogeneity is lost when compact objects are considered. Nevertheless isotropy is still possible, and we enforce this condition. Within this context, we investigate spatially isotropic solutions close - continuously deformable - to the usual vacuum solutions. We obtain isotropic extensions of the usual spherically symmetric vacuum geometries in general relativity. Exact and perturbative solutions are derived. Maximal extensions are constructed and their causal structures are discussed. The classes of geometries obtained include black holes in compact and non-compact universes, wormholes in the interior region of cosmological horizons, and anti-de Sitter geometries with excess/deficit solid angle. The tools developed here are applicable in more general contexts, with extensions subjected to other constraints. (author)

  5. A century of general relativity: Astrophysics and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    One hundred years after its birth, general relativity has become a highly successful physical theory in the sense that it has passed a large number of experimental and observational tests and finds extensive application to a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. It remains an active area of research as new tests are on the way, epitomized by the exciting prospect of detecting gravitational waves from merging black holes. General relativity is the essential foundation of the standard model of cosmology and underlies our description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most powerful and dramatic cosmic sources. Its interface with physics on the smallest and largest scales will continue to provide fertile areas of investigation in its next century.

  6. General Theory of Relativity: Will It Survive the Next Decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Paramos, Jorge; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of gravity is fundamental to our understanding of our own solar system, the galaxy and the structure and evolution of the Universe. Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard model that is used for almost ninety years to describe gravitational phenomena on these various scales. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss the recent progress in the tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for high-accuracy gravitational experiments in space. We also summarize the science objectives and technology needs for the laboratory experiments in space with laboratory being the entire solar system. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics anticipated in the near future and evaluate discovery potential for the recently proposed gravitational experiments.

  7. Energy, momentum, and center of mass in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    These notions in the title are of fundamental importance in any branch of physics. However, there have been great difficulties in finding physically acceptable definitions of them in general relativity since Einstein's time. I shall explain these difficulties and progresses that have been made. In particular, I shall introduce new definitions of center of mass and angular momentum at both the quasi-local and total levels, which are derived from first principles in general relativity and by the method of geometric analysis. With these new definitions, the classical formula p=mv is shown to be consistent with Einstein's field equation for the first time. This paper is based on joint work [14][15] with Po-Ning Chen and Shing-Tung Yau.

  8. A student's manual for A first course in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive student manual has been designed to accompany the leading textbook by Bernard Schutz, A First Course in General Relativity, and uses detailed solutions, cross-referenced to several introductory and more advanced textbooks, to enable self-learners, undergraduates and postgraduates to master general relativity through problem solving. The perfect accompaniment to Schutz's textbook, this manual guides the reader step-by-step through over 200 exercises, with clear easy-to-follow derivations. It provides detailed solutions to almost half of Schutz's exercises, and includes 125 brand new supplementary problems that address the subtle points of each chapter. It includes a comprehensive index and collects useful mathematical results, such as transformation matrices and Christoffel symbols for commonly studied spacetimes, in an appendix. Supported by an online table categorising exercises, a Maple worksheet and an instructors' manual, this text provides an invaluable resource for all students and in...

  9. Gaining confidence on general relativity with cosmic polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Alighieri, Sperello di Serego

    2016-01-01

    The theory of general relativity, for which we celebrate the centennial at this Symposium, is based on the Einstein equivalence principle. This principle could be violated through a pseudoscalar-photon interaction, which would also produce a rotation of the polarization angle for radiation traveling over very long distances. Therefore, if we could show that this cosmic polarization rotation does not exist, our confindence in general relativity would be greatly increased. We review here the astrophysical searches for cosmic polarization rotation, which have been made in the past 26 years using the polarization of radio galaxies and of the cosmic microwave background. So far no rotation has been detected within about 1 degree. We discuss current problems and future prospects for cosmic polarization rotation measurements.

  10. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A(*).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-22

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A^{*} (Sgr A^{*}) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A^{*} with an uncertainty of ∼1.5  μas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  11. A century of general relativity: astrophysics and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, R D

    2015-03-06

    One hundred years after its birth, general relativity has become a highly successful physical theory in the sense that it has passed a large number of experimental and observational tests and finds extensive application to a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. It remains an active area of research as new tests are on the way, epitomized by the exciting prospect of detecting gravitational waves from merging black holes. General relativity is the essential foundation of the standard model of cosmology and underlies our description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most powerful and dramatic cosmic sources. Its interface with physics on the smallest and largest scales will continue to provide fertile areas of investigation in its next century. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Remarks on Definitions of Perturbation in General Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ping

    2009-01-01

    There axe two kinds of definitions of perturbation of physical quantities in the framework of general relativity: one is direct, the other is geometrical.Correspondingly, there axe two types of gauge transformation related with these two definitions.The passive approach is based on the property of general covariance, and the active one is through the action of Lie-derivative.Although under a proper coordinate choice, the two approaches seem to agree with each other, they axe different in nature.The geometrical definition of relativistic perturbation and the active approach for gauge transformation axe more rigorous in mathematics and less confusing in physical explanation.The direct definition, however, seems to be plagued with difficulties in physical meaning, and the passive approach is more awkward to use, especially for high-order gauge transformations.

  13. Academic Training: Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity by N. Straumann / Institut fur theoretische physics, Univ. Zürich We review the enduring achievements of Einstein's papers of 1905 and their impact on the further developments in physics. Program : Lectures I and II:Einstein's Contributions to Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Theory Lecture III:Einstein's Thesis at the University of Zürich Lecture IV: From Special to General Relativity Lecture V: The History and the Mystery of the Cosmological Constant ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  14. Macrostate equivalence of two general ensembles and specific relative entropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    The two criteria of ensemble equivalence, i.e., macrostate equivalence and measure equivalence, are investigated for a general pair of states. Macrostate equivalence implies the two ensembles are indistinguishable by the measurement of macroscopic quantities obeying the large-deviation principle, and measure equivalence means that the specific relative entropy of these two states vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. It is shown that measure equivalence implies a macrostate equivalence for a general pair of states by deriving an inequality connecting the large-deviation rate functions to the specific relative Renyi entropies. The result is applicable to both quantum and classical systems. As applications, a sufficient condition for thermalization, the time scale of quantum dynamics of macrovariables, and the second law with strict irreversibility in a quantum quench are discussed.

  15. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A* with an uncertainty of ~1.5 uas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  16. Analytical properties of the effective refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzko, R. S.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a plane wave through a periodic layered system is considered in terms of the effective parameters. The problem of introduction of effective parameters is discussed. It was demonstrated that although the effective admittance cannot be introduced, it is possible to introduce the effective refractive index, which tends toward the Rytov value when the system size increases. It was shown that the effective wave vector derivative is an analytical function of frequency. In particular, the Kramers-Kronig-like relations for real and imaginary parts of the effective wave vector derivative were obtained. The Kramers-Kronig-like relations for the effective refractive index were also considered. The results obtained numerically were proved by exact solution of Maxwell's equations in the specific case of an "equi-impedance" system.

  17. Perfect Dispersive Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shulabh

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion is at the heart of all ultrafast real-time signal processing systems across the entire electromagnetic spectrum ranging from radio-frequencies to optics. However, following Kramer-Kronig relations, these signal processing systems have been plagued with the parasitic amplitude distortions due to frequency dependent, and non-flat amplitude transmission of naturally dispersive media. This issue puts a serious limitation on the applicability and performance of these signal processing systems. To solve the above mentioned issue, a perfect dispersive medium is proposed in this work, which artificially violates the Kramer-Kronig relations, while satisfying all causality requirements. The proposed dispersive metamaterial is based on loss-gain metasurface pairs and exhibit a perfectly flat transmission response along with arbitrary dispersion in a broad bandwidth, thereby solving a seemingly unavoidable issue in all ultrafast signal processing systems. Such a metamaterial is further shown using sub-waveleng...

  18. Einstein-Bianchi Hyperbolic System for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, A; York, J W; Anderson, Arlen; Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; York, James W.

    1997-01-01

    By employing the Bianchi identities for the Riemann tensor in conjunction with the Einstein equations, we construct a first order symmetric hyperbolic system for the evolution part of the Cauchy problem of general relativity. In this system, the metric evolves at zero speed with respect to observers at rest in a foliation of spacetime by spacelike hypersurfaces while the curvature and connection propagate at the speed of light. The system has no unphysical characteristics, and matter sources can be included.

  19. Simplifying and generalizing some efficient frontier and CAPM related results

    OpenAIRE

    Ekern, Steinar

    2007-01-01

    This paper simplifies, generalizes, extends, surveys and unifies results related to the efficient frontier in portfolio analysis and to asset pricing formulations of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) type. It derives the composition and properties of many central portfolios in portfolio analysis. It also discusses and provides several CAPM type formulations involving different portfolios. In particular, the tangency portfolio properties are presented in an instructive and ...

  20. Quasiequilibrium sequences of binary strange quark stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, F; Gourgoulhon, E; Limousin, Francois; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota; Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries are expected to be the strongest sources of gravitational waves for VIRGO, LIGO and other laser interferometers. We present the first computations of quasi-equilibrium sequences of compact binaries containing two strange quark stars (which are currently considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars). We study a precoalescing stage in the conformal flatness approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is irrotational.

  1. On the unitarity of linearized General Relativity coupled to matter

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We consider the unitarity of the S-matrix for linearized General Relativity coupled to particle physics models. Taking renormalization group effects of the Planck mass into account, we find that the scale at which unitarity is violated is strongly dependent on the particle content of the theory. We find that the requirement that the S-matrix be unitary up to the scale at which quantum gravitational effects become strong implies a bound on the particle content of the model.

  2. Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar Yadav; Vineet Kumar Yadav; Lallan Yadav

    2011-04-01

    Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity are investigated. To get the exact solution of Einstein’s field equations, we have taken some scale transformations used by Camci et al [Astrophys. Space Sci. 275, 391 (2001)]. It is shown that Einstein’s field equations are solvable for any arbitrary cosmic scale function. Solutions for particular forms of cosmic scale functions are also obtained. Some physical and geometrical aspects of the models are discussed.

  3. Classical and Quantum Two-Body Problem in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Maheshwari, Amar; Todorov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The two-body problem in general relativity is reduced to the problem of an effective particle (with an energy-dependent relativistic reduced mass) in an external field. The effective potential is evaluated from the Born diagram of the linearized quantum theory of gravity. It reduces to a Schwarzschild-like potential with two different `Schwarzschild radii'. The results derived in a weak field approximation are expected to be relevant for relativistic velocities.

  4. General relativity from three-forms in seven dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2017-09-01

    We consider a certain theory of 3-forms in 7 dimensions, and study its dimensional reduction to 4D, compactifying the 7-dimensional manifold on the 3-sphere of a fixed radius. We show that the resulting 4D theory is (Riemannian) General Relativity (GR) in Plebanski formulation, modulo corrections that are negligible for curvatures smaller than Planckian. Possibly the most interesting point of this construction is that the dimensionally reduced theory is GR with a non-zero cosmological constant, and the value of the cosmological constant is directly related to the size of S3. Realistic values of Λ correspond to S3 of Planck size.

  5. General Relativity from Three-Forms in Seven Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    We consider a certain theory of 3-forms in 7 dimensions, and study its dimensional reduction to 4D, compactifying the 7-dimensional manifold on the 3-sphere of a fixed radius. We show that the resulting 4D theory is General Relativity (GR) in Plebanski formulation, modulo corrections that are negligible for curvatures smaller than Planckian. Possibly the most interesting point of this construction is that the dimensionally reduced theory is GR with a non-zero cosmological constant, and the value of the cosmological constant is directly related to the size of S^3. Realistic values of Lambda correspond to S^3 of Planck size.

  6. Causality and Micro-Causality in Curved Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Shore, Graham M.

    2007-01-01

    We consider how causality and micro-causality are realised in QED in curved spacetime. The photon propagator is found to exhibit novel non-analytic behaviour due to vacuum polarization, which invalidates the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation and calls into question the validity of micro-causality in curved spacetime. This non-analyticity is ultimately related to the generic focusing nature of congruences of geodesics in curved spacetime, as implied by the null energy condition, and the exist...

  7. LARES Satellite Thermal Forces and a Test of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, Richard; Brooks, Jason; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We summarize a laser-ranged satellite test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames, and then describe the modeling of an important perturbing effect, thermally induced forces, on the satellite. The frame dragging result is obtained by using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. It produces a result in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity: $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error. The thermal force model assumes heat flow from the sun (visual) and from Earth (IR) to the satellite core and to the fused silica reflectors on the satellite, and reradiation into space. For a roughly current epoch (days 1460 - 1580 after launch) we c...

  8. Gravitation experiments at Stanford. [using general relativity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental situation in post-Newtonian gravitation is briefly reviewed in order to reexamine the extent to which experiment supports or refutes general relativity. A description is given of the equivalence principle project, the gyroscope experiment, and the search for gravity waves. It is noted that even though some doubt has been cast on the value of the perihelion advance and the gravitational redshift as precise tests of general relativity in the past few years, many competing theories have been ruled out; in particular, the results from the Viking mission significantly reduce the credibility of the Brans-Dicke theory (Brans and Dicke, 1961). The dimensionless constant omega in this theory is now forced to exceed 50, while the value originally proposed was 6 (omega being infinity in general relativity). It is noted that the gyro experiment described is capable of putting much tighter limits on this parameter, and together with the other experiments in progress will help place gravitational theory on a firmer experimental footing.

  9. Scalar torsion and a new symmetry of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca-Neto, J B; Martinez, S P G

    2012-01-01

    We reformulate the general theory of relativity in the language of Riemann-Cartan geometry. We start from the assumption that the space-time can be described as a non-Riemannian manifold, which, in addition to the metric field, is endowed with torsion. In this new framework, the gravitational field is represented not only by the metric, but also by the torsion, which is completely determined by a geometric scalar field. We show that in this formulation general relativity has a new kind of invariance, whose invariance group consists of a set of conformal and gauge transformations, called Cartan transformations. These involve both the metric tensor and the torsion vector field, and are similar to the well known Weyl gauge transformations. By making use of the concept of Cartan gauges, we show that, under Cartan transformations, the new formalism leads to different pictures of the same gravitational phenomena. We show that in an arbitrary Cartan gauge general relativity has the form of a scalar-tensor theory. In...

  10. Explanatory and illustrative visualization of special and general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Borchers, Marc; Ertl, Thomas; Falk, Martin; Fechtig, Oliver; Frank, Regine; Grave, Frank; King, Andreas; Kraus, Ute; Müller, Thomas; Nollert, Hans-Peter; Rica Mendez, Isabel; Ruder, Hanns; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Schär, Sonja; Zahn, Corvin; Zatloukal, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes methods for explanatory and illustrative visualizations used to communicate aspects of Einstein's theories of special and general relativity, their geometric structure, and of the related fields of cosmology and astrophysics. Our illustrations target a general audience of laypersons interested in relativity. We discuss visualization strategies, motivated by physics education and the didactics of mathematics, and describe what kind of visualization methods have proven to be useful for different types of media, such as still images in popular science magazines, film contributions to TV shows, oral presentations, or interactive museum installations. Our primary approach is to adopt an egocentric point of view: The recipients of a visualization participate in a visually enriched thought experiment that allows them to experience or explore a relativistic scenario. In addition, we often combine egocentric visualizations with more abstract illustrations based on an outside view in order to provide several presentations of the same phenomenon. Although our visualization tools often build upon existing methods and implementations, the underlying techniques have been improved by several novel technical contributions like image-based special relativistic rendering on GPUs, special relativistic 4D ray tracing for accelerating scene objects, an extension of general relativistic ray tracing to manifolds described by multiple charts, GPU-based interactive visualization of gravitational light deflection, as well as planetary terrain rendering. The usefulness and effectiveness of our visualizations are demonstrated by reporting on experiences with, and feedback from, recipients of visualizations and collaborators.

  11. Standard general relativity from Chern-Simons gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurieta, F. [Departamento de Matematica y Fisica Aplicadas, Universidad, Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Alonso de Rivera 2850, Concepcion (Chile); Minning, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Perez, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein, Institut. Am Muehlenberg1, D-14476 Golm bei Potsdam (Germany); Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Matematica y Fisica Aplicadas, Universidad, Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Alonso de Rivera 2850, Concepcion (Chile); Salgado, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: pasalgad@udec.cl

    2009-07-13

    Chern-Simons models for gravity are interesting because they provide a truly gauge-invariant action principle in the fiber-bundle sense. So far, their main drawback has largely been its perceived remoteness from standard General Relativity, based on the presence of higher powers of the curvature in the Lagrangian (except, remarkably, for three-dimensional spacetime). Here we report on a simple model that suggests a mechanism by which standard General Relativity in five-dimensional spacetime may indeed emerge at a special critical point in the space of couplings, where additional degrees of freedom and corresponding 'anomalous' Gauss-Bonnet constraints drop out from the Chern-Simons action. To achieve this goal, both the Lie algebra g and the symmetric g-invariant tensor that define the Chern-Simons Lagrangian are constructed by means of the Lie algebra S-expansion method with a suitable finite Abelian semigroup S. The results are generalized to arbitrary odd dimensions, and the possible extension to the case of eleven-dimensional supergravity is briefly discussed.

  12. Mimicking static anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic static anisotropic fluid sphere, (static and spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully mimicked by suitable linear combinations of theoretically attractive and quite simple classical matter: a classical (charged) isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore, we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of both electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model. The generalized TOV equation implies that the perfect fluid component in this model is automatically in internal equilibrium, with pressure forces, electric forces, and scalar forces balancing the gravitational pseudo-force. Consequently, we can build theoretically attractive matter models that can be used to mimic almost any static spherically symmetric spacetime.

  13. Testing general relativity using golden black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhirup; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Nielsen, Alex B; Berry, Christopher P L; London, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The coalescences of stellar-mass black-hole binaries through their inspiral, merger, and ringdown are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. If a GW signal is observed with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the masses and spins of the black holes can be estimated from just the inspiral part of the signal. Using these estimates of the initial parameters of the binary, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be uniquely predicted making use of general-relativistic numerical simulations. In addition, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be independently estimated from the merger-ringdown part of the signal. If the binary black hole dynamics is correctly described by general relativity, these independent estimates have to be consistent with each other. We present a Bayesian implementation of such a test of general relativity, and outline the expected constraints from upcoming GW observations using the second-generation of ground-based GW detectors.

  14. Generalized de Broglie Relations for Dirac Equations in Curved Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Arminjon, Mayeul

    2011-01-01

    One may ask whether the special relativistic relations between energy and frequency and between momentum and wave vector, introduced for matter waves by de Broglie, are rigorously valid in the presence of gravity. In this paper, we show this to be true for Dirac equations in a background of gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We do this by applying Whitham's Lagrangian method to derive covariant equations describing wave packet motion which preserve the symmetries of the Dirac Lagrangian, and in particular, conserve the probability current. We show that generalized de Broglie relations emerge from the Whitham equations after transforming each Dirac equation into a canonical form via a local similarity transformation of the type first introduced by Pauli. This gives the de Broglie relations a universal character for spin-half particles in a curved spacetime. We show that COW and Sagnac type terms also appear in the Whitham equations. We further discuss the classical-quantum correspondence in a curved spa...

  15. The Generalized Scheme-Independent Crewther Relation in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Jian-Ming; Ma, Yang; Brodsky, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    The Principle of Maximal Conformality (PMC) provides a systematic way to set the renormalization scales order-by-order for any perturbative QCD process. The resulting predictions are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a requirement of renormalization group invariance. The Crewther relation, which was originally derived for conformal theory, provides a remarkable connection between two observables when the $\\beta$ function vanishes. The "Generalized Crewther Relation" relates these two observables for physical QCD with nonzero $\\beta$ function; specifically, it connects the non-singlet Adler function ($D^{\\rm ns}$) to the Bjorken sum rule coefficient for polarized deep-inelastic electron scattering ($C_{\\rm Bjp}$) at leading twist. A scheme-dependent $\\Delta_{\\rm CSB}$-term appears in the analysis in order to compensate for the conformal symmetry breaking (CSB) terms from perturbative QCD. In conventional analyses, this normally leads to unphysical dependence in both the choice of the renorma...

  16. Comment on "Saturation of the All-Optical Kerr Effect"

    CERN Document Server

    Wahlstrand, J K

    2011-01-01

    Br\\'ee, Demircan, and Steinmeyer [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 183902 (2011)] recently calculated higher-order Kerr effect (HOKE) coefficients using the nonlinear Kramers-Kronig relations. We show that the saturated and negative nonlinear index of refraction obtained by Br\\'ee et al. is an artifact of their use of a perturbative theory of ionization in an intensity region where it breaks down.

  17. Canonical quantization of macroscopic electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, T G, E-mail: tgp3@st-andrews.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Application of the standard canonical quantization rules of quantum field theory to macroscopic electromagnetism has encountered obstacles due to material dispersion and absorption. This has led to a phenomenological approach to macroscopic quantum electrodynamics where no canonical formulation is attempted. In this paper macroscopic electromagnetism is canonically quantized. The results apply to any linear, inhomogeneous, magnetodielectric medium with dielectric functions that obey the Kramers-Kronig relations. The prescriptions of the phenomenological approach are derived from the canonical theory.

  18. Canonical quantization of macroscopic electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2010-01-01

    Application of the standard canonical quantization rules of quantum field theory to macroscopic electromagnetism has encountered obstacles due to material dispersion and absorption. This has led to a phenomenological approach to macroscopic quantum electrodynamics where no canonical formulation is attempted. In this paper macroscopic electromagnetism is canonically quantized. The results apply to any linear, inhomogeneous, magnetoelectric medium with dielectric functions that obey the Kramers-Kronig relations. The prescriptions of the phenomenological approach are derived from the canonical theory.

  19. Refraction index modulation induced with transverse electric field in double tunnel-coupled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, A. A.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya; Balagula, R. M.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Firsov, D. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil'iev, A. P.; Duque, C. A.; Tiutiunnyk, A.; Akimov, V.; Restrepo, R. L.; Tulupenko, V. N.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Modulation of refraction index under transverse electric field was studied in structures with multiple tunnel-coupled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells in the spectral range corresponding to intersubband light absorption. The change of refraction index in electric field was calculated using Kramers-Kronig relation and experimentally determined spectra of intersubband light absorption in equilibrium conditions and under transverse electric field.

  20. How to be causal

    CERN Document Server

    Kinsler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    I explain a simple definition of causality in widespread use, and indicate how it links to the Kramers Kronig relations. The specification of causality in terms of temporal differential eqations then shows us the way to write down dynamical models so that their causal nature in the sense used here should be obvious to all. In particular, I apply this reasoning to Maxwell's equations, which is an instructive example since their casual properties are sometimes debated.

  1. On virtual states and generalized completeness relation in Friedrichs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    We study the well-known Friedrichs model, in which a discrete state is coupled to a continuum state. By examining the pole behaviors of the Friedrichs model in a specific form factor thoroughly, we find that, in general, when the bare discrete state is below the threshold of the continuum state, there should also be a virtual-state pole accompanying the bound-state pole originating from the bare discrete state as the coupling is turned on. There are also other second-sheet poles originating from the singularities of the form factor. We give a general argument for the existence of these two kinds of states. As the coupling is increased to a certain value, the second-sheet poles may merge and become higher-order poles. We then discuss the completeness relations incorporating bound states, virtual states, and resonant states corresponding to higher-order poles.

  2. Boundary and Corner Terms in the Action for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Jubb, Ian; Sorkin, Rafael; Surya, Sumati

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the action principle for general relativity motivated by the path integral approach to quantum gravity. We consider a spacetime region whose boundary has piecewise $C^2$ components, each of which can be spacelike, timelike or null and consider metric variations in which only the pullback of the metric to the boundary is held fixed. Allowing all such metric variations we present a unified treatment of the spacelike, timelike and null boundary components using Cartan's tetrad formalism. Apart from its computational simplicity, this formalism gives us a simple way of identifying corner terms. We also discuss "creases" which occur when the boundary is the event horizon of a black hole. Our treatment is geometric and intrinsic and we present our results both in the computationally simpler tetrad formalism as well as the more familiar metric formalism. We recover known results from a simpler and more general point of view and find some new ones.

  3. Structures of General Relativity in Dilaton-Maxwell Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kechkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell's electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a point-like sourse of the Coulomb type. It is shown that this source is characterized by asymptotical freedom of the electrostatic interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  4. Structures of general relativity in dilaton-Maxwell electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechkin, O. V.; Mosharev, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell’s electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a pointlike source of the Coulomb type. It is demonstrated that this source is characterized by finite and singularity-free interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  5. Boundary and corner terms in the action for general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Ian; Samuel, Joseph; Sorkin, Rafael D.; Surya, Sumati

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the action principle for general relativity, motivated by the path integral approach to quantum gravity. We consider a spacetime region whose boundary has piecewise C 2 components, each of which can be spacelike, timelike or null and consider metric variations in which only the pullback of the metric to the boundary is held fixed. Allowing all such metric variations we present a unified treatment of the spacelike, timelike and null boundary components using Cartan’s tetrad formalism. Apart from its computational simplicity, this formalism gives us a simple way of identifying corner terms. We also discuss ‘creases’ which occur when the boundary is the event horizon of a black hole. Our treatment is geometric and intrinsic and we present our results both in the computationally simpler tetrad formalism as well as the more familiar metric formalism. We recover known results from a simpler and more general point of view and find some new ones.

  6. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THE ROLE OF GENERAL RELATIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Cerutti, Benoit; Spitkovsky, Anatoly [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tchekhovskoy, Alexander, E-mail: sashaph@princeton.edu [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    It has recently been demonstrated that self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of low-obliquity pulsar magnetospheres in flat spacetime show weak particle acceleration and no pair production near the poles. We investigate the validity of this conclusion in a more realistic spacetime geometry via general-relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the aligned pulsar magnetosphere with pair formation. We find that the addition of the frame-dragging effect makes the local current density along the magnetic field larger than the Goldreich–Julian value, which leads to unscreened parallel electric fields and the ignition of a pair cascade. When pair production is active, we observe field oscillations in the open field bundle, which could be related to pulsar radio emission. We conclude that general-relativistic effects are essential for the existence of the pulsar mechanism in low-obliquity rotators.

  7. Black Hole Formation and Growth: Simulations in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Stuart L

    2007-01-01

    Black holes are popping up all over the place: in compact binary X-ray sources and GRBs, in quasars, AGNs and the cores of all bulge galaxies, in binary black holes and binary black hole-neutron stars, and maybe even in the LHC! Black holes are strong-field objects governed by Einstein's equations of general relativity. Hence general relativistic, numerical simulations of dynamical phenomena involving black holes may help reveal ways in which black holes can form, grow and be detected in the universe. To convey the state-of-the art, we summarize several representative simulations here, including the collapse of a hypermassive neutron star to a black hole following the merger of a binary neutron star, the magnetorotational collapse of a massive star to a black hole, and the formation and growth of supermassive black hole seeds by relativistic MHD accretion in the early universe.

  8. Quantum general relativity and the classification of smooth manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H

    2004-01-01

    The gauge symmetry of classical general relativity under space-time diffeomorphisms implies that any path integral quantization which can be interpreted as a sum over space-time geometries, gives rise to a formal invariant of smooth manifolds. This is an opportunity to review results on the classification of smooth, piecewise-linear and topological manifolds. It turns out that differential topology distinguishes the space-time dimension d=3+1 from any other lower or higher dimension and relates the sought-after path integral quantization of general relativity in d=3+1 with an open problem in topology, namely to construct non-trivial invariants of smooth manifolds using their piecewise-linear structure. In any dimension d<=5+1, the classification results provide us with triangulations of space-time which are not merely approximations nor introduce any physical cut-off, but which rather capture the full information about smooth manifolds up to diffeomorphism. Conditions on refinements of these triangulations...

  9. Kramers-Kronig Integral Transformation Method for Measuring Rust of Rebar in Concrete%混凝土中钢筋锈蚀测定的Kramers-Kronig积分变换法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺鸿珠; 范立础

    2005-01-01

    钢筋锈蚀的电化学测量一般采用线性极化法,而Kramers-Kronig积分变换法通过阻抗虚部Im Z(ω)随频率的变化了解影响钢筋极化电阻Rp的各种因素及其变化规律,便于采取对策来改善钢筋的抗锈蚀能力.结果表明:两种不同方法所得结果的差异在5%~15%范围之内;在C30和C40两种混凝土中抑制锈蚀的机理不同,C30混凝土主要是钝化膜的介电抑制,C40混凝土为孔隙率下降,主要是扩散抑制.

  10. The Validity and Application of Kramers-Kronig Transform for Electrochemical Impedance%Kramers-Kronig转换在电化学阻抗中的适用性及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘福国; 张有慧; 马桂君; 陆长山

    2009-01-01

    探讨了Kramers-Kronig转换对交流阻抗典型的数学模型的适用性,提出一种新的用于Kramers-Kronig转换进行数值解析的方法-牛顿-科茨公式法,并对Q235钢在添加咪唑啉缓蚀剂的饱和CO2盐水中的交流阻抗数据进行Kramers-Kronig转换.结果表明典型的数学模型适用于Kramers-Kronig转换,Q235钢分别在空白盐水中和添加25 ppm缓蚀剂144 h的体系中,试验数据符合阻抗的四个基本条件,而在添加缓蚀剂1 h时不符合,体系不稳定.

  11. On the center of mass in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lan-Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    The classical notion of center of mass for an isolated system in general relativity is derived from the Hamiltonian formulation and represented by a flux integral at infinity. In contrast to mass and linear momentum which are well-defined for asymptotically flat manifolds, center of mass and angular momentum seem less well-understood, mainly because they appear as the lower order terms in the expansion of the data than those which determine mass and linear momentum. This article summarizes some of the recent developments concerning center of mass and its geometric interpretation using the constant mean curvature foliation near infinity. Several equivalent notions of center of mass are also discussed.

  12. Strong Gravity Approach to QCD and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Akinto, O F

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of the Weyl-type / Yang-Mills-type action possessing local conformal invariance and quadratic curvature is undertaken. The dynamical breaking of this conformal invariance / scale invariance induces general relativity (GR) as an effective long distance limit of the theory. We prove that the corresponding field equations of the theory have the linearly rising potential, which naturally possesses asymptotic freedom and color confinement properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Solutions to the neutrino mass and dark energy problems come as free gifts of this formulation. This approach provides a strong gravity basis for the unification of quantum Yang-Mills theory (QYMT) with Einstein GR.

  13. Expanding General Relativity's Space by S-Denying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabounski, Dmitri; Smarandache, Florentins; Borissova, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    Applying the S-denying procedure to signature conditions in a four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space - i.e. changing one (or even all) of the conditions to be partially true and partially false. Obtaining five kinds of expanded space-time for General Relativity. Kind I permits the space-time to be in collapse. Kind II permits the space-time to change its own signature. Kind III has peculiarities, linked to the third signature condition. Kind IV permits regions where the metric fully degenerates: there may be non-quantum teleportation, and a home for virtual photons. Kind V is common for kinds I, II, III, and IV.

  14. Remarks on the consistency of minimal deviations from General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, Josep M

    2010-01-01

    We study the consequences of the modification of the phase space structure of General Relativity imposed by breaking the full diffeomorphism invariance but retaining the time foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We examine the different sectors in phase space that satisfy the new structure of constraints. For some sectors we find an infinite tower of constraints. In spite of that, we also show that these sectors allow for solutions, among them some well known families of black hole and cosmologies which fulfill all the constraints. We raise some physical concerns on the consequences of an absolute Galilean time, on the thermodynamical pathologies of such models and on their unusual vacuum structure.

  15. General Video Game Evaluation Using Relative Algorithm Performance Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thorbjørn; Barros, Gabriella; Togelius, Julian;

    2015-01-01

    In order to generate complete games through evolution we need generic and reliably evaluation functions for games. It has been suggested that game quality could be characterised through playing a game with different controllers and comparing their performance. This paper explores that idea through...... investigating the relative performance of different general game-playing algorithms. Seven game-playing algorithms was used to play several hand-designed, mutated and randomly generated VGDL game descriptions. Results discussed appear to support the conjecture that well-designed games have, in average, a higher...... performance difference between better and worse game-playing algorithms....

  16. Minimum length from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D H

    2004-11-19

    We derive fundamental limits on measurements of position, arising from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. First, we show that any primitive probe or target used in an experiment must be larger than the Planck length lP. This suggests a Planck-size minimum ball of uncertainty in any measurement. Next, we study interferometers (such as LIGO) whose precision is much finer than the size of any individual components and hence are not obviously limited by the minimum ball. Nevertheless, we deduce a fundamental limit on their accuracy of order lP. Our results imply a device independent limit on possible position measurements.

  17. Evolving black hole horizons in General Relativity and alternative gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    From the microscopic point of view, realistic black holes are time-dependent and the teleological concept of event horizon fails. At present, the apparent or the trapping horizon seem its best replacements in various areas of black hole physics. We discuss the known phenomenology of apparent and trapping horizons for analytical solutions of General Relativity and alternative theories of gravity. These specific examples (we focus on spherically symmetric inhomogeneities in a background cosmological spacetime) may be useful as toy models for research on various aspects of black hole physics.

  18. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  19. Neo-Newtonian cosmology: An intermediate step towards General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, J C

    2012-01-01

    Cosmology is a field of physics in which the use of General Relativity theory is indispensable. However, a cosmology based on Newtonian gravity theory for gravity is possible in certain circumstances. The applicability of Newtonian theory can be substantially extended if it is modified in such way that pressure has a more active role as source of the gravitational field. This was done in the neo-Newtonian cosmology. The limitation on the construction of a Newtonian cosmology, and the need for a relativistic theory in cosmology are reviewed. The neo-Newtonian proposal is presented, and its consequences for cosmology are discussed.

  20. Bitopological spaces theory, relations with generalized algebraic structures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dvalishvili, Badri

    2005-01-01

    This monograph is the first and an initial introduction to the theory of bitopological spaces and its applications. In particular, different families of subsets of bitopological spaces are introduced and various relations between two topologies are analyzed on one and the same set; the theory of dimension of bitopological spaces and the theory of Baire bitopological spaces are constructed, and various classes of mappings of bitopological spaces are studied. The previously known results as well the results obtained in this monograph are applied in analysis, potential theory, general topology, a

  1. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  2. Theory of Nonlocal Point Transformations in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tessarotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of the functional setting customarily adopted in General Relativity (GR is proposed. This is based on the introduction of the notion of nonlocal point transformations (NLPTs. While allowing the extension of the traditional concept of GR-reference frame, NLPTs are important because they permit the explicit determination of the map between intrinsically different and generally curved space-times expressed in arbitrary coordinate systems. For this purpose in the paper the mathematical foundations of NLPT-theory are laid down and basic physical implications are considered. In particular, explicit applications of the theory are proposed, which concern (1 a solution to the so-called Einstein teleparallel problem in the framework of NLPT-theory; (2 the determination of the tensor transformation laws holding for the acceleration 4-tensor with respect to the group of NLPTs and the identification of NLPT-acceleration effects, namely, the relationship established via general NLPT between particle 4-acceleration tensors existing in different curved space-times; (3 the construction of the nonlocal transformation law connecting different diagonal metric tensors solution to the Einstein field equations; and (4 the diagonalization of nondiagonal metric tensors.

  3. Gauge stability of 3+1 formulations of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khokhlov, A M

    2002-01-01

    We present a general approach to the analysis of gauge stability of 3+1 formulations of General Relativity (GR). Evolution of coordinate perturbations and the corresponding perturbations of lapse and shift can be described by a system of eight quasi-linear partial differential equations. Stability with respect to gauge perturbations depends on a choice of gauge and a background metric, but it does not depend on a particular form of a 3+1 system if its constrained solutions are equivalent to those of the Einstein equations. Stability of a number of known gauges is investigated in the limit of short-wavelength perturbations, and a physical meaning of gauge instabilities is discussed. All fixed gauges except a synchronous gauge are found to be ill-posed. A necessary condition is derived for well-posedness of metric-dependent algebraic gauges. These gauges are found, however, to be generally unstable with respect to perturbations of physical accelerations caused by deformations of reference frames. A maximal slic...

  4. A new family of gauges in linearized general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Stornaiolo, Cosimo

    2000-05-01

    For vacuum Maxwell theory in four dimensions, a supplementary condition exists (due to Eastwood and Singer) which is invariant under conformal rescalings of the metric, in agreement with the conformal symmetry of the Maxwell equations. Thus, starting from the de Donder gauge, which is not conformally invariant but is the gravitational counterpart of the Lorenz gauge, one can consider, led by formal analogy, a new family of gauges in general relativity, which involve fifth-order covariant derivatives of metric perturbations. The admissibility of such gauges in the classical theory is first proven in the cases of linearized theory about flat Euclidean space or flat Minkowski spacetime. In the former, the general solution of the equation for the fulfillment of the gauge condition after infinitesimal diffeomorphisms involves a 3-harmonic 1-form and an inverse Fourier transform. In the latter, one needs instead the kernel of powers of the wave operator, and a contour integral. The analysis is also used to put restrictions on the dimensionless parameter occurring in the DeWitt supermetric, while the proof of admissibility is generalized to a suitable class of curved Riemannian backgrounds. Eventually, a non-local construction of the tensor field is obtained which makes it possible to achieve conformal invariance of the above gauges.

  5. Kerr-Taub-NUT General Frame, Energy, and Momentum in Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal G. L. Nashed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new exact solution describing a general stationary and axisymmetric object of the gravitational field in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR is derived. The solution is characterized by three parameters “the gravitational mass M, the rotation a, and the NUT L.” The vierbein field is axially symmetric, and the associated metric gives the Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime. Calculation of the total energy using two different methods, the gravitational energy momentum and the Riemannian connection 1-form Γα̃β, is carried out. It is shown that the two methods give the same results of energy and momentum. The value of energy is shown to depend on the mass M and the NUT parameter L. If L is vanishing, then the total energy reduced to the energy of Kerr black hole.

  6. Process Physics From Quantum Foam to General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, R T

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the new information-theoretic process physics is reported in which the link to the phenomenology of general relativity is made. In process physics the fundamental assumption is that reality is to be modelled as self-organising semantic (or internal or relational) information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. Previous progress in process physics included the demonstration that space and quantum physics are emergent and unified, with time a distinct non-geometric process, that quantum phenomena are caused by fractal topological defects embedded in and forming a growing three-dimensional fractal process-space, which is essentially a quantum foam. Other features of the emergent physics were: quantum field theory with emergent flavour and confined colour, limited causality and the Born quantum measurement metarule, inertia, time-dilation effects, gravity and the equivalence principle, a growing universe with a cosmological constant, black holes and event horizons, and the emergen...

  7. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette;

    2016-01-01

    practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... relevance of the retrieved articles was evaluated by title and abstract by the first author, and papers that seemed to meet the aim of the review were then fully read by first author and last author independently judging the eligibility of content. RESULTS: We included four studies in the review...

  8. Einstein and Beyond: A Critical Perspective on General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alternative approach to Einstein’s theory of General Relativity (GR is reviewed, which is motivated by a range of serious theoretical issues inflicting the theory, such as the cosmological constant problem, presence of non-Machian solutions, problems related with the energy-stress tensor T i k and unphysical solutions. The new approach emanates from a critical analysis of these problems, providing a novel insight that the matter fields, together with the ensuing gravitational field, are already present inherently in the spacetime without taking recourse to T i k . Supported by lots of evidence, the new insight revolutionizes our views on the representation of the source of gravitation and establishes the spacetime itself as the source, which becomes crucial for understanding the unresolved issues in a unified manner. This leads to a new paradigm in GR by establishing equation R i k = 0 as the field equation of gravitation plus inertia in the very presence of matter.

  9. Einstein and Beyond: A Critical Perspective on General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Vishwakarma, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    An alternative approach to Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) is reviewed, which is motivated by a range of serious theoretical issues inflicting the theory, such as the cosmological constant problem, presence of non-Machian solutions, problems related with the energy-stress tensor $T^{ik}$ and unphysical solutions. The new approach emanates from a critical analysis of these problems, providing a novel insight that the matter fields, together with the ensuing gravitational field, are already present inherently in the spacetime without taking recourse to $T^{ik}$. Supported by numerous evidences, the new insight revolutionizes our views on the representation of the source of gravitation and establishes the spacetime itself as the source, which becomes crucial for understanding the unresolved issues in a unified manner. This leads to a new paradigm in GR by establishing equation $R^{ik}=0$ as the field equation of gravitation plus inertia in the very presence of matter.

  10. The problem of time quantum mechanics versus general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2017-01-01

    This book is a treatise on time and on background independence in physics. It first considers how time is conceived of in each accepted paradigm of physics: Newtonian, special relativity, quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR). Substantial differences are moreover uncovered between what is meant by time in QM and in GR. These differences jointly source the Problem of Time: Nine interlinked facets which arise upon attempting concurrent treatment of the QM and GR paradigms, as is required in particular for a background independent theory of quantum gravity. A sizeable proportion of current quantum gravity programs - e.g. geometrodynamical and loop quantum gravity approaches to quantum GR, quantum cosmology, supergravity and M-theory - are background independent in this sense. This book's foundational topic is thus furthermore of practical relevance in the ongoing development of quantum gravity programs. This book shows moreover that eight of the nine facets of the Problem of Time already occur upon ...

  11. Galactic mapping with general relativity and the observed rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Magalhaes, Nadja S

    2015-01-01

    Typically, stars in galaxies have higher velocities than predicted by Newtonian gravity in conjunction with observable galactic matter. To account for the phenomenon, some researchers modified Newtonian gravitation; others introduced dark matter in the context of Newtonian gravity. We employed general relativity successfully to describe the galactic velocity profiles of four galaxies: NGC 2403, NGC 2903, NGC 5055 and the Milky Way. Here we map the density contours of the galaxies, achieving good concordance with observational data. In our Solar neighbourhood, we found a mass density and density fall-off fitting observational data satisfactorily. From our GR results, using the threshold density related to the observed optical zone of a galaxy, we had found that the Milky Way was indicated to be considerably larger than had been believed to be the case. To our knowledge, this was the only such existing theoretical prediction ever presented. Very recent observational results by Xu et al. have confirmed our predi...

  12. New Probe of Departures from General Relativity Using Minkowski Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenjuan; Li, Baojiu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-05-05

    The morphological properties of the large scale structure of the Universe can be fully described by four Minkowski functionals (MFs), which provide important complementary information to other statistical observables such as the widely used 2-point statistics in configuration and Fourier spaces. In this work, for the first time, we present the differences in the morphology of the large scale structure caused by modifications to general relativity (to address the cosmic acceleration problem), by measuring the MFs from N-body simulations of modified gravity and general relativity. We find strong statistical power when using the MFs to constrain modified theories of gravity: with a galaxy survey that has survey volume ∼0.125(h^{-1}  Gpc)^{3} and galaxy number density ∼1/(h^{-1}  Mpc)^{3}, the two normal-branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models and the F5 f(R) model that we simulated can be discriminated from the ΛCDM model at a significance level ≳5σ with an individual MF measurement. Therefore, the MF of the large scale structure is potentially a powerful probe of gravity, and its application to real data deserves active exploration.

  13. Is General Relativity a (partial) Return of Aristotelian Physics?

    CERN Document Server

    Pietschmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Aristotle has split physics at the sphere of the moon; above this sphere there is no change except eternal spherical motion, below are two different kinds of motion: Natural motion (without specific cause) and enforced motion. In modern view motion is caused by gravity and by other forces. The split at the sphere of the moon has been definitely overcome through the observation of a supernova and several comets by Tycho Brahe. The second distinction was eradicated by Isaak Newton who showed that gravitational motion was caused by a force proportional to the inverse square of the distance. By the theory of General Relativity, Albert Einstein showed that there is no gravitational force but motion under gravity (i.e. Aristotles ) is caused by the curved geometry of spacetime. In this way, the Aristotelian distinction between natural motion and enforced motion has come back in the form of two great theories: General Relativity and Quantum Field Theory which are today incompatible. To find a way out of this dilemma...

  14. Parameterizing and constraining scalar corrections to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Leo C

    2013-01-01

    We parameterize a large class of corrections to general relativity which include a long-ranged gravitational scalar field as a dynamical degree of freedom in two ways: parameterizing the structure of the correction to the action, and parameterizing the scalar hair (multipole structure) that compact objects and black holes attain. The presence of this scalar hair violates the no-hair theorems present in general relativity, which leads to several important effects. The effects we consider are i) the interaction between an isolated body and an external scalar field, ii) the scalar multipole-multipole interaction between two bodies in a compact binary, iii) the additional pericenter precession of a binary, iv) the scalar radiation from a binary, and v) the modification to the gravitational wave phase from a binary. We apply this framework to example theories including Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, and estimate the size of the effects. Finally we estimate the bounds that...

  15. General relativity without calculus a concise introduction to the geometry of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Natario, José

    2011-01-01

    "General Relativity Without Calculus" offers a compact but mathematically correct introduction to the general theory of relativity, assuming only a basic knowledge of high school mathematics and physics. Targeted at first year undergraduates (and advanced high school students) who wish to learn Einstein's theory beyond popular science accounts, it covers the basics of special relativity, Minkowski space-time, non-Euclidean geometry, Newtonian gravity, the Schwarzschild solution, black holes and cosmology. The quick-paced style is balanced by over 75 exercises (including full solution

  16. Generalized Field Theoretical Approach to General Relativity and Conserved Quantities in Anti-de Sitter Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto-Neto, N

    2000-01-01

    A new prescription to calculate the total energies and angular momenta of asymptotically $(d+1)$-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetimes is proposed. The method is based on an extension of the field theoretical approach to General Relativity to the case where there is an effective cosmological constant. A $(d-1)$-form $\\Omega$ is exhibited which, when integrated on asymptotic $(d-1)$-dimensional boundary surfaces, yields the values of those conserved quantities. The calculations are gauge independent once asymptotic conditions are not violated . Total energies and angular momenta of some known solutions in four and five dimensions are calculated agreeing with standard results.

  17. Evaluation of algorithms for calculating bioimpedance phase angle values from measured whole-body impedance modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Bernt J; Tronstad, Christian; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Grimnes, Sverre

    2011-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of calculating the bioimpedance phase angle from measurements of impedance modulus. A complete impedance measurement was performed on altogether 20 healthy persons using a Solatron 1260/1294 system. The obtained impedance modulus (absolute impedance value) values were used to calculate the Cole parameters and from them the phase angles. In addition, the phase angles were also calculated using a Kramers-Kronig approach. A correlation analysis for all subjects at each frequency (5, 50, 100 and 200 kHz) for both methods gave R(2) values ranging from 0.7 to 0.96 for the Cole approach and from 0.83 to 0.96 for the Kramers-Kronig approach; thus, both methods gave good results compared with the complete measurement results. From further statistical significance testing of the absolute value of the difference between measured and calculated phase angles, it was found that the Cole equation method gave significantly better agreement for the 50 and 100 kHz frequencies. In addition, the Cole equation method gives the four Cole parameters (R(0), R(∞), τ(z) and α) using measurements at frequencies up to 200 kHz while the Kramers-Kronig method used frequencies up to 500 kHz to reduce the effect of truncation on the calculated results. Both methods gave results that can be used for further bioimpedance calculations, thus improving the application potential of bioimpedance measurement results obtained using relatively inexpensive and portable measurement equipment.

  18. Testing consistency of general relativity with kinematic and dynamical probes

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we test consistency relations between a kinematic probe, the observational Hubble data, and a dynamical probe, the growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, which should hold if general relativity is the correct theory of gravity on cosmological scales. Moreover, we summarize the development history of parametrization in testings and make an improvement of it. Taking advantage of the Hubble parameter given from both parametric and non-parametric methods, we propose three equations and test two of them performed by means of two-dimensional parameterizations, including one using trigonometric functions we propose. As a result, it is found that the consistency relations satisfies well at $1\\sigma$ CL and trigonometric functions turn out to be efficient tools in parameterizations. Furthermore, in order to confirm the validity of our test, we introduce a model of modified gravity, DGP model and compare the testing results in the cases of $\\Lambda$CDM, "DGP in GR" and DGP model with mock data. It...

  19. Einstein's general theory of relativity with modern applications in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Grøn, Øyvind

    2007-01-01

    Many of us have experienced the same; fallen and broken something. Yet supposedly, gravity is the weakest of the fundamental forces; it is claimed to be 10-15 times weaker than electromagnetism. Still, every one of us has more or less had a personal relationship with gravity. Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity: With Modern Applications in Cosmology by Oyvind Gron and Sigbjorn Hervik is about gravity and the concept of gravity as Albert Einstein saw it- curved spaces, four-dimensional manifolds and geodesics. The book starts with the 1st principals of relativity and an introduction to Einstein’s field equations. Next up are the three classical tests of the relativity theory and an introduction to black holes. The book contains several topics not found in other textbooks, such as Kaluza-Klein theory, anisotropic models of the universe, and new developments involving brane cosmology. Gron and Hervik have included a part in the book called "Advanced Topics." These topics range from the very edge of resea...

  20. Junction conditions in General Relativity with spin sources

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, A; Willison, S; Giacomini, Alex; Troncoso, Ricardo; Willison, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The junction conditions for General Relativity in the presence of domain walls with intrinsic spin are derived in three and higher dimensions. A stress tensor and a spin current can be defined just by requiring the existence of a well defined volume element instead of an induced metric, so as to allow for generic torsion sources. In general, when the torsion is localized on the domain wall, it is necessary to relax the continuity of the tangential components of the vielbein. In fact it is found that the spin current is proportional to the jump in the vielbein and the stress-energy tensor is proportional to the jump in the spin connection. The consistency of the junction conditions implies a constraint between the direction of flow of energy and the orientation of the spin. As an application, we derive the circularly symmetric solutions for both the rotating string with tension and the spinning dust string in three dimensions. The rotating string with tension generates a rotating truncated cone outside and a f...

  1. A New Family of Gauges in Linearized General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, G; Esposito, Giampiero; Stornaiolo, Cosimo

    2000-01-01

    For vacuum Maxwell theory in four dimensions, a supplementary condition exists (due to Eastwood and Singer) which is invariant under conformal rescalings of the metric, in agreement with the conformal symmetry of the Maxwell equations. Thus, starting from the de Donder gauge, which is not conformally invariant but is the gravitational counterpart of the Lorenz gauge, one can consider, led by formal analogy, a new family of gauges in general relativity, which involve fifth-order covariant derivatives of metric perturbations. The admissibility of such gauges in the classical theory is here proven in the cases of linearized theory about flat Euclidean space or flat Minkowski space-time. In the former, the general solution of the equation for the fulfillment of the gauge condition after infinitesimal diffeomorphisms involves a 3-harmonic function and an inverse Fourier transform. In the latter, one needs instead the kernel of powers of the wave operator, and a contour integral. The analysis is also used to put re...

  2. The Hamiltonian formulation of General Relativity: myths and reality

    CERN Document Server

    Kiriushcheva, N

    2008-01-01

    A conventional wisdom often perpetuated in the literature states that: (i) a 3+1 decomposition of space-time into space and time is synonymous with the canonical treatment and this decomposition is essential for any Hamiltonian formulation of General Relativity (GR); (ii) the canonical treatment unavoidably breaks the symmetry between space and time in GR and the resulting algebra of constraints is not the algebra of four-dimensional diffeomorphism; (iii) according to some authors this algebra allows one to derive only spatial diffeomorphism or, according to others, a specific field-dependent and non-covariant four-dimensional diffeomorphism; (iv) the analyses of Dirac [Proc. Roy. Soc. A 246 (1958) 333] and of ADM [Arnowitt, Deser and Misner, in "Gravitation: An Introduction to Current Research" (1962) 227] of the canonical structure of GR are equivalent. We provide some general reasons why these statements should be questioned. Points (i-iii) have been shown to be incorrect in [Kiriushcheva et al., Phys. Let...

  3. Cosmological Constant Implementing Mach Principle in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Namavarian, Nadereh

    2016-01-01

    We consider the fact that noticing on the operational meaning of the physical concepts played an impetus role in the appearance of general relativity (GR). Thus, we have paid more attention to the operational definition of the gravitational coupling constant in this theory as a dimensional constant which is gained through an experiment. However, as all available experiments just provide the value of this constant locally, this coupling constant can operationally be meaningful only in a local area. Regarding this point, to obtain an extension of GR for the large scale, we replace it by a conformal invariant model and then, reduce this model to a theory for the cosmological scale via breaking down the conformal symmetry through singling out a specific conformal frame which is characterized by the large scale characteristics of the universe. Finally, we come to the same field equations that historically were proposed by Einstein for the cosmological scale (GR plus the cosmological constant) as the result of his ...

  4. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Villata, M

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  5. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  6. Commutative deformations of general relativity: nonlocality, causality, and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vegvar, P.G.N. [SWK Research, Bellingham, WA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Hopf algebra methods are applied to study Drinfeld twists of (3+1)-diffeomorphisms and deformed general relativity on commutative manifolds. A classical nonlocality length scale is produced above which microcausality emerges. Matter fields are utilized to generate self-consistent Abelian Drinfeld twists in a background independent manner and their continuous and discrete symmetries are examined. There is negligible experimental effect on the standard model of particles. While baryonic twist producing matter would begin to behave acausally for rest masses above ∝1-10 TeV, other possibilities are viable dark matter candidates or a right-handed neutrino. First order deformed Maxwell equations are derived and yield immeasurably small cosmological dispersion and produce a propagation horizon only for photons at or above Planck energies. This model incorporates dark matter without any appeal to extra dimensions, supersymmetry, strings, grand unified theories, mirror worlds, or modifications of Newtonian dynamics. (orig.)

  7. General Relativity and Cosmology: Unsolved Questions and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Ivan; Smoot, George F.

    2016-09-01

    For the last 100 years, General Relativity (GR) has taken over the gravitational theory mantle held by Newtonian Gravity for the previous 200 years. This article reviews the status of GR in terms of its self-consistency, completeness, and the evidence provided by observations, which have allowed GR to remain the champion of gravitational theories against several other classes of competing theories. We pay particular attention to the role of GR and gravity in cosmology, one of the areas in which one gravity dominates and new phenomena and effects challenge the orthodoxy. We also review other areas where there are likely conflicts pointing to the need to replace or revise GR to represent correctly observations and consistent theoretical framework. Observations have long been key both to the theoretical liveliness and viability of GR.We conclude with a discussion of the likely developments over the next 100 years.

  8. Motivations for anti-gravity in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardin, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-05-01

    Arguments are presented showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows general relativity to mimic anti-gravity is conjectured. Kerr wormholes would then act as `super-mirrors` reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subjected to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the `CP`-violation observed in the neutral kaon system. (K.A.). 37 refs.

  9. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the determinants related to gender differences in the GP utilization in Danish population aged 50-65 years. DESIGN: Cohort-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish general practice. SUBJECTS: Totally, 54,849 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer...... explain a large proportion, but not all of the gender difference in GP utilization. Medical conditions (somatic and mental) and unemployment are the main determinants of GP utilization in men and women, while lifestyle has minor effect. Key points: Female gender remained a dominant determinant of GP...... utilization, after adjustment for lifestyle, socio-demography, medical and gender specific factors, with females consulting their GP 18% more often than males. Female reproductive factors (use of postmenopausal hormone therapy and gravidity) explained a large proportion of the gender variation in use of GP...

  10. Cosmological nonlinear structure formation in full general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Jose M; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Nunez, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We perform numerical evolutions of cosmological scenarios using a standard general relativistic code in spherical symmetry. We concentrate on two different situations: initial matter distributions that are homogeneous and isotropic, and perturbations to those that respect the spherical symmetry. As matter models we consider the case of a pressureless perfect fluid, i.e. dust, and the case of a real massive scalar field oscillating around the minimum of the potential. Both types of matter have been considered as possible dark matter candidates in the cosmology literature, dust being closely related to the standard cold dark matter paradigm. We confirm that in the linear regime the perturbations associated with these types of matter grow in essentially the same way, the main difference being that in the case of a scalar field the dynamics introduce a cut-off in the power spectrum of the density perturbations at scales comparable with the Compton wavelength of the field. We also follow the evolutions well beyond...

  11. Observations of General Relativity at strong and weak limits

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, Gene; Teerikorpi, Pekka; Valtonen, Mauri

    2014-01-01

    Einstein's General Relativity theory has been tested in many ways during the last hundred years as reviewed in this chapter. Two tests are discussed in detail in this article: the concept of a zero gravity surface, the roots of which go back to J\\"arnefelt, Einstein and Straus, and the no-hair theorem of black holes, first proposed by Israel, Carter and Hawking. The former tests the necessity of the cosmological constant Lambda, the latter the concept of a spinning black hole. The zero gravity surface is manifested most prominently in the motions of dwarf galaxies around the Local Group of galaxies. The no-hair theorem is testable for the first time in the binary black hole system OJ287. These represent stringent tests at the limit of weak and strong gravitational fields, respectively. In this article we discuss the current observational situation and future possibilities.

  12. Potential-Dependent Generalized Einstein Relation in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-Hong; SUN Jiu-Xun; GUO Yang; ZHANG Da

    2009-01-01

    The generalized Einstein relation (GER) is extended to consider the potential energy of carriers in an electric field (PDGER).It can be equivalently seen as the GER having position-dependent Fermi energy,and implies the organic semiconductor is in non-equilibrium under an electric field.The distribution of the carrier density with position is solved for two polymer layers.The numerical results are used to evaluate the PDGER.It is shown that the ratio of diffusion coefficient to mobility,μ/D,increases with Fermi energy and decreases with carrier density.The PDGER gives non-traditional values for the two polymer layers;the value of μ/D is small near the surface,and slightly increases as the position departs from the surface.

  13. Cosmological perturbations of unimodular gravity and general relativity are identical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Abhishek; Fabre, Ophélia; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Unimodular gravity (UG) is a restricted version of general relativity (GR) in which the variation of the metric determinant is set to zero and the field equations are given by the trace-free part of the full Einstein equations. The background equations in UG and GR are identical. It was recently claimed that the first order contribution in the temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in UG is different from GR. In this work, we calculate the first order perturbation equations in UG and show that the Sachs-Wolfe effect in UG, in terms of gauge invariant variables, is identical to GR. We also show that the second order perturbation equation of Mukhanov-Sasaki variable in UG, is identical to GR. The only difference comes from the gauge choices due the constraint on the metric determinant. Hence, UG and GR are identical and indistinguishable in CMB data on large scales.

  14. Modified Newtonian dynamics as a prediction of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, S

    2006-01-01

    We treat the physical vacuum as a featureless relativistic continuum in motion, and explore its consequences. Proceeding in a step-by-step manner, we are able to show that the equations of classical electrodynamics follow from the motion of a space-filling fluid of neutral spinors which we identify with neutrinos. The model predicts that antimatter has negative mass, and that neutrinos are matter-antimatter dipoles. Together these suffice to explain the presence of modified Newtonian dynamics as a gravitational polarisation effect. The existence of antigravity could resolve other major outstanding issues in cosmology, including the rate of expansion of the universe and its flatness, the origin of gamma ray bursts, and the smallness of the cosmological constant. If our model is correct then all of these observations are non-trivial predictions of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  15. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  16. A stellar model with diffusion in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Alho, Artur

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric stellar model in general relativity whose interior consists of a pressureless fluid undergoing microscopic velocity diffusion in a cosmological scalar field. We show that the diffusion dynamics compel the interior to be spatially homogeneous, by which one can infer immediately that within our model, and in contrast to the diffusion-free case, no naked singularities can form in the gravitational collapse. We then study the problem of matching an exterior Bondi type metric to the surface of the star and find that the exterior can be chosen to be a modified Vaidya metric with variable cosmological constant. Finally, we study in detail the causal structure of an explicit, self-similar solution.

  17. General Relativity and Cosmology: Unsolved Questions and Future Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Debono, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    For the last 100 years, General Relativity (GR) has taken over the gravitational theory mantle held by Newtonian Gravity for the previous 200 years. This article reviews the status of GR in terms of its self-consistency, completeness, and the evidence provided by observations, which have allowed GR to remain the champion of gravitational theories against several other classes of competing theories. We pay particular attention to the role of GR and gravity in cosmology, one of the areas in which one gravity dominates and new phenomena and effects challenge the orthodoxy. We also review other areas where there are likely conflicts pointing to the need to replace or revise GR to represent correctly observations and consistent theoretical framework. Observations have long been key both to the theoretical liveliness and viability of GR. We conclude with a discussion of the likely developments over the next 100 years.

  18. Cosmology in time asymmetric extensions of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Genly

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological behavior in a universe governed by time asymmetric extensions of general relativity, which is a novel modified gravity based on the addition of new, time-asymmetric, terms on the Hamiltonian framework, in a way that the algebra of constraints and local physics remain unchanged. Nevertheless, at cosmological scales these new terms can have significant effects that can alter the universe evolution, both at early and late times, and the freedom in the choice of the involved modification function makes the scenario able to produce a huge class of cosmological behaviors. For basic ansatzes of modification, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis, extracting the stable late time solutions. Amongst others, we find that the universe can result in dark-energy dominated, accelerating solutions, even in the absence of an explicit cosmological constant, in which the dark energy can be quintessence-like, phantom-like, or behave as an effective cosmological constant. Moreover, it can result...

  19. Commutative deformations of general relativity: nonlocality, causality, and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    de Vegvar, P G N

    2016-01-01

    Hopf algebra methods are applied to study Drinfeld twists of (3+1)-diffeomorphisms and deformed general relativity on \\emph{commutative} manifolds. A classical nonlocality length scale is produced above which standard light cone causality emerges. We introduce a sector of matter fields to generate selfconsistent Abelian Drinfeld twists in a background independent manner and study their discrete and gauge symmetries. They naturally give rise to dark matter candidates, possibly including ground state condensates. First order deformed Maxwell equations are derived and yield negligible cosmological dispersion and produce a propagation horizon only for photons approaching Planck energies. This model incorporates dark matter without any appeal to extra dimensions, supersymmetry, strings, branes, mirror worlds, or modifications of Newtonian dynamics.

  20. Gravitating vortons as ring solitons in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Jutta; Subagyo, Bintoro

    2013-01-01

    Vortons can be viewed as (flat space-) field theory analogs of black rings in general relativity. They are made from loops of vortices, being sustained against collapse by the centrifugal force. In this work we discuss such configurations in the global version of Witten's U(1)xU(1) theory. We first consider solutions in a flat spacetime background and show their non-uniqueness. The inclusion of gravity leads to new features. In particular, an ergoregion can occur. Also, similar to boson stars, we show that the vortons exist only in a limited frequency range. The coupling to gravity gives rise to a spiral-like frequency dependence of the mass and charge. New solutions of the model describing 'semitopological vortons' and 'di-vortons' are also discussed.

  1. General Relativity and Cosmology: Unsolved Questions and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Debono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the last 100 years, General Relativity (GR has taken over the gravitational theory mantle held by Newtonian Gravity for the previous 200 years. This article reviews the status of GR in terms of its self-consistency, completeness, and the evidence provided by observations, which have allowed GR to remain the champion of gravitational theories against several other classes of competing theories. We pay particular attention to the role of GR and gravity in cosmology, one of the areas in which one gravity dominates and new phenomena and effects challenge the orthodoxy. We also review other areas where there are likely conflicts pointing to the need to replace or revise GR to represent correctly observations and consistent theoretical framework. Observations have long been key both to the theoretical liveliness and viability of GR. We conclude with a discussion of the likely developments over the next 100 years.

  2. Spherically symmetric steady states of elastic bodies in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of static spherically symmetric elastic bodies in general relativity using both analytical and numerical tools. The materials considered belong to the class of John elastic materials and reduce to perfect fluids when the rigidity parameter is set to zero. We find numerical support that such elastic bodies exist with different possible shapes (balls, single shells and multiple shells) and that their gravitational redshift can be very large ($z\\approx 2.8$) without violating the dominant energy condition. Moreover we show that the elastic body has finite radius even in the case when the constitutive equation of the elastic material is a perturbation of a polytropic fluid without finite radius, thereby concluding that such fluids are structurally unstable within the larger class of elastic matter models under study.

  3. Gravitational waves astronomy: the ultimate test for Einstein's General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Einstein's General Relativity (GR) achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests. On the other hand, GR also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this review we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, understanding if Einstein's GR is the correct and definitive theory of gravity will be possible. For this goal, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. GR and Extended Theories of Gravity will have to be used. This review is founded on the Essay which won an Honorable Mention at the the 2009 Gravity Research Foundation Awards.

  4. Discrete fields, general relativity, other possible implications and experimental evidences

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    2001-01-01

    The physical meaning, the properties and the consequences of a discrete scalar field are discussed; limits for the validity of a mathematical description of fundamental physics in terms of continuous fields are a natural outcome of discrete fields with discrete interactions. The discrete scalar field is ultimately the gravitational field of general relativity, necessarily, and there is no place for any other fundamental scalar field, in this context. Part of the paper comprehends a more generic discussion about the nature, if continuous or discrete, of fundamental interactions. There is a critical point defined by the equivalence between the two descriptions. Discrepancies between them can be observed far away from this point as a continuous-interaction is always stronger below it and weaker above it than a discrete one. It is possible that some discrete-field manifestations have already been observed in the flat rotation curves of galaxies and in the apparent anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer spacecrafts...

  5. The generalized scheme-independent Crewther relation in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-07-01

    The Principle of Maximal Conformality (PMC) provides a systematic way to set the renormalization scales order-by-order for any perturbative QCD calculable processes. The resulting predictions are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a requirement of renormalization group invariance. The Crewther relation, which was originally derived as a consequence of conformally invariant field theory, provides a remarkable connection between two observables when the β function vanishes: one can show that the product of the Bjorken sum rule for spin-dependent deep inelastic lepton–nucleon scattering times the Adler function, defined from the cross section for electron–positron annihilation into hadrons, has no pQCD radiative corrections. The “Generalized Crewther Relation” relates these two observables for physical QCD with nonzero β function; specifically, it connects the non-singlet Adler function (Dns) to the Bjorken sum rule coefficient for polarized deep-inelastic electron scattering (CBjp) at leading twist. A scheme-dependent ΔCSB-term appears in the analysis in order to compensate for the conformal symmetry breaking (CSB) terms from perturbative QCD. In conventional analyses, this normally leads to unphysical dependence in both the choice of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial scale at any finite order. However, by applying PMC scale-setting, we can fix the scales of the QCD coupling unambiguously at every order of pQCD. The result is that both Dns and the inverse coefficient CBjp-1 have identical pQCD coefficients, which also exactly match the coefficients of the corresponding conformal theory. Thus one obtains a new generalized Crewther relation for QCD which connects two effective charges, αˆd(Q)=Σi≥1αˆg1i(Qi), at their respective physical scales. This identity is independent of the choice of the renormalization scheme at any finite order, and the dependence on the choice of the initial scale is negligible. Similar

  6. The generalized scheme-independent Crewther relation in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ming Shen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Principle of Maximal Conformality (PMC provides a systematic way to set the renormalization scales order-by-order for any perturbative QCD calculable processes. The resulting predictions are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a requirement of renormalization group invariance. The Crewther relation, which was originally derived as a consequence of conformally invariant field theory, provides a remarkable connection between two observables when the β function vanishes: one can show that the product of the Bjorken sum rule for spin-dependent deep inelastic lepton–nucleon scattering times the Adler function, defined from the cross section for electron–positron annihilation into hadrons, has no pQCD radiative corrections. The “Generalized Crewther Relation” relates these two observables for physical QCD with nonzero β function; specifically, it connects the non-singlet Adler function (Dns to the Bjorken sum rule coefficient for polarized deep-inelastic electron scattering (CBjp at leading twist. A scheme-dependent ΔCSB-term appears in the analysis in order to compensate for the conformal symmetry breaking (CSB terms from perturbative QCD. In conventional analyses, this normally leads to unphysical dependence in both the choice of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial scale at any finite order. However, by applying PMC scale-setting, we can fix the scales of the QCD coupling unambiguously at every order of pQCD. The result is that both Dns and the inverse coefficient CBjp−1 have identical pQCD coefficients, which also exactly match the coefficients of the corresponding conformal theory. Thus one obtains a new generalized Crewther relation for QCD which connects two effective charges, αˆd(Q=∑i≥1αˆg1i(Qi, at their respective physical scales. This identity is independent of the choice of the renormalization scheme at any finite order, and the dependence on the choice of the initial scale is

  7. General scaling relations for locomotion in granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, James; Motley, D Carrington; Zhang, Qiong; Townsend, Stephen; Senatore, Carmine; Iagnemma, Karl; Kamrin, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Inspired by dynamic similarity in fluid systems, we have derived a general dimensionless form for locomotion in granular materials, which is validated in experiments and discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The form instructs how to scale size, mass, and driving parameters in order to relate dynamic behaviors of different locomotors in the same granular media. The scaling can be derived by assuming intrusion forces arise from resistive force theory or equivalently by assuming the granular material behaves as a continuum obeying a frictional yield criterion. The scalings are experimentally confirmed using pairs of wheels of various shapes and sizes under many driving conditions in a common sand bed. We discuss why the two models provide such a robust set of scaling laws even though they neglect a number of the complexities of granular rheology. Motivated by potential extraplanetary applications, the dimensionless form also implies a way to predict wheel performance in one ambient gravity based on tests in a different ambient gravity. We confirm this using DEM simulations, which show that scaling relations are satisfied over an array of driving modes even when gravity differs between scaled tests.

  8. Nonlinear hidden symmetries in General Relativity and String Theory: a matrix generalization of the Ernst potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barbosa-Cendejas, Nandinii; Kanakoglou, Konstantinos; Paschalis, Joannis E

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we recall a simple formulation of the stationary electrovacuum theory in terms of the famous complex Ernst potentials, a pair of functions which allows one to generate new exact solutions from known ones by means of the so-called nonlinear hidden symmetries of Lie-Backlund type. This formalism turned out to be very useful to perform a complete classification of all 4D solutions which present two spacetime symmetries or possess two Killing vectors. Curiously enough, the Ernst formalism can be extended and applied to stationary General Relativity as well as the effective heterotic string theory reduced down to three spatial dimensions by means of a (real) matrix generalization of the Ernst potentials. Thus, in this theory one can also make use of nonlinear matrix hidden symmetries in order to generate new exact solutions from seed ones. Due to the explicit independence of the matrix Ernst potential formalism of the original theory (prior to dimensional reduction) on the dimension D, in the case wh...

  9. Genesis of general relativity — A concise exposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    This short exposition starts with a brief discussion of situation before the completion of special relativity (Le Verrier’s discovery of the Mercury perihelion advance anomaly, Michelson-Morley experiment, Eötvös experiment, Newcomb’s improved observation of Mercury perihelion advance, the proposals of various new gravity theories and the development of tensor analysis and differential geometry) and accounts for the main conceptual developments leading to the completion of the general relativity (CGR): gravity has finite velocity of propagation; energy also gravitates; Einstein proposed his equivalence principle and deduced the gravitational redshift; Minkowski formulated the special relativity in four-dimentional spacetime and derived the four-dimensional electromagnetic stress-energy tensor; Einstein derived the gravitational deflection from his equivalence principle; Laue extended Minkowski’s method of constructing electromagnetic stress-energy tensor to stressed bodies, dust and relativistic fluids; Abraham, Einstein, and Nordström proposed their versions of scalar theories of gravity in 1911-13; Einstein and Grossmann first used metric as the basic gravitational entity and proposed a “tensor” theory of gravity (the “Entwurf” theory, 1913); Einstein proposed a theory of gravity with Ricci tensor proportional to stress-energy tensor (1915); Einstein, based on 1913 Besso-Einstein collaboration, correctly derived the relativistic perihelion advance formula of his new theory which agreed with observation (1915); Hilbert discovered the Lagrangian for electromagnetic stress-energy tensor and the Lagrangian for the gravitational field (1915), and stated the Hilbert variational principle; Einstein equation of GR was proposed (1915); Einstein published his foundation paper (1916). Subsequent developments and applications in the next two years included Schwarzschild solution (1916), gravitational waves and the quadrupole formula of gravitational

  10. The Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity: myths and reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriushcheva, Natalia; Kuzmin, Sergei

    2011-06-01

    A conventional wisdom often perpetuated in the literature states that: (i) a 3 + 1 decomposition of spacetime into space and time is synonymous with the canonical treatment and this decomposition is essential for any Hamiltonian formulation of General Relativity (GR); (ii) the canonical treatment unavoidably breaks the symmetry between space and time in GR and the resulting algebra of constraints is not the algebra of four-dimensional diffeomorphism; (iii) according to some authors this algebra allows one to derive only spatial diffeomorphism or, according to others, a specific field-dependent and non-covariant four-dimensional diffeomorphism; (iv) the analyses of Dirac [21] and of ADM [22] of the canonical structure of GR are equivalent. We provide some general reasons why these statements should be questioned. Points (i-iii) have been shown to be incorrect in [45] and now we thoroughly re-examine all steps of the Dirac Hamiltonian formulation of GR. By direct calculation we show that Dirac's references to space-like surfaces are inessential and that such surfaces do not enter his calculations. In addition, we show that his assumption g 0k = 0, used to simplify his calculation of different contributions to the secondary constraints, is unwarranted; yet, remarkably his total Hamiltonian is equivalent to the one computed without the assumption g 0k = 0. The secondary constraints resulting from the conservation of the primary constraints of Dirac are in fact different from the original constraints that Dirac called secondary (also known as the "Hamiltonian" and "diffeomorphism" constraints). The Dirac constraints are instead particular combinations of the constraints which follow directly from the primary constraints. Taking this difference into account we found, using two standard methods, that the generator of the gauge transformation gives diffeomorphism invariance in four-dimensional space-time; and this shows that points (i-iii) above cannot be attributed to the

  11. Cosmological applications of singular hypersurfaces in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Castillo, Pablo

    Three applications to cosmology of surface layers, based on Israel's formalism of singular hypersurfaces and thin shells in general relativity, are presented. Einstein's field equations are analyzed in the presence of a bubble nucleated in vacuum phase transitions within the context of the old inflationary universe scenario. The evolution of a bubble with vanishing surface energy density is studied. It is found that such bubbles lead to a worm-hole matching. Next, the observable four-dimensional universe is considered as a singular hypersurface of discontinuity embedded in a five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein cosmology. It is possible to rewrite the projected five-dimensional Einstein equations on the surface layer in a similar way to the four-dimensional Robertson-Walker cosmology equations. Next, a model is described for an infinite-length, straight U(1) cosmic string as a cylindrical, singular shell enclosing a region of false vacuum. A set of equations is introduced which are required to develop a three-dimensional computer code whose purpose is to study the process of intercommuting cosmic strings with the inclusion of gravitational effects. The outcome is evolution and constraint equations for the gravitational, scalar and gauge field of two initially separated, perpendicular, cosmic strings.

  12. Static axisymmetric rings in general relativity: How diverse they are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerák, O.

    2016-11-01

    Three static and axially symmetric (Weyl-type) ring singularities—the Majumdar-Papapetrou-type (extremally charged) ring, the Bach-Weyl ring, and the Appell ring—are studied in general relativity in order to show how remarkably the geometries in their vicinity differ from each other. This is demonstrated on basic measures of the rings and on invariant characteristics given by the metric and by its first and second derivatives (lapse, gravitational acceleration, and curvature), and also on geodesic motion. The results are also compared against the Kerr space-time which possesses a ring singularity too. The Kerr solution is only stationary, not static, but in spite of the consequent complication by dragging, its ring appears to be simpler than the static rings. We show that this mainly applies to the Bach-Weyl ring, although this straightforward counterpart of the Newtonian homogeneous circular ring is by default being taken as the simplest ring solution, and although the other two static ring sources may seem more "artificial." The weird, directional deformation around the Bach-Weyl ring probably indicates that a more adequate coordinate representation and interpretation of this source should exist.

  13. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  14. LARES: A New Satellite Specifically Designed for Testing General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paolozzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that today several hundred operational satellites are orbiting Earth while many more either have already reentered the atmosphere or are no longer operational. On the 13th of February 2012 one more satellite of the Italian Space Agency has been successfully launched. The main difference with respect to all other satellites is its extremely high density that makes LARES not only the densest satellite but also the densest known orbiting object in the solar system. That implies that the nongravitational perturbations on its surface will have the smallest effects on its orbit. Those design characteristics are required to perform an accurate test of frame dragging and specifically a test of Lense-Thirring effect, predicted by General Relativity. LARES satellite, although passive, with 92 laser retroreflectors on its surface, was a real engineering challenge in terms of both manufacturing and testing. Data acquisition and processing are in progress. The paper will describe the scientific objectives, the status of the experiment, the special feature of the satellite and separation system including some manufacturing issues, and the special tests performed on its retroreflectors.

  15. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signa...

  16. Kubo Fluctuation Relations in the Generalized Elastic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Taloni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized elastic model encompasses several linear stochastic models describing the dynamics of polymers, membranes, rough surfaces, and fluctuating interfaces. In this paper we show that the Fractional Langevin Equation (FLE is a suitable framework for the study of the tracer (probe particle dynamics, when an external force acts only on a single point x→⋆ (tagged probe belonging to the system. With the help of the Fox function formalism we study the scaling behaviour of the noise- and force-propagators for large and short times (distances. We show that the Kubo fluctuation relations are exactly fulfilled when a time periodic force is exerted on the tagged probe. Most importantly, by studying the large and low frequency behaviour of the complex mobility we illustrate surprising nontrivial physical scenarios. Our analysis shows that the system splits into two distinct regions whose size depends on the applied frequency, characterized by very different response to the periodic perturbation exerted, both in the phase shift and in the amplitude.

  17. OPTIS - A satellite test of Special and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, H.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Peters, A.; Schiller, S.

    OPTIS has been proposed as a small satellite platform in a high elliptical orbit (apogee 40,000 km, perigee 10,000 km) and is designed for high precision tests of foundations of Special and General Relativity. The experimental set-up consists of two ultrastable Nd:YAG lasers, two crossed optical resonators (monolithic cavities), an atomic clock, and an optical comb generator. OPTIS enables (1) a Michelson- Morley experiment to test the isotropy of light propagation (constancy of light speed, dc/c) with an accuracy of 1 part in 101 8 , (2) a Kennedey-Thorndike experiment to measure the independence of the light speed from the velocity of the laboratory in the order of 1 part in 101 6 , and (3) a test of the gravitational red shift by comparing the atomic clock and an optical clock on a precision level of 1 part in 104 . To avoid any influence from atmospheric drag, solar radiation, or earth albedo, the satellite needs drag free control, to depress the residual acceleration down to 10-14 m/s 2 in the frequency range between 100 to 1,000 Hz, and thermal control to stabilize the cavity temperature variation, dT/T, to 1 part in 107 during 100 s and to 1 part in 105 during 1 orbit.

  18. Cosmological constant implementing Mach principle in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavarian, Nadereh; Farhoudi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    We consider the fact that noticing on the operational meaning of the physical concepts played an impetus role in the appearance of general relativity (GR). Thus, we have paid more attention to the operational definition of the gravitational coupling constant in this theory as a dimensional constant which is gained through an experiment. However, as all available experiments just provide the value of this constant locally, this coupling constant can operationally be meaningful only in a local area. Regarding this point, to obtain an extension of GR for the large scale, we replace it by a conformal invariant model and then, reduce this model to a theory for the cosmological scale via breaking down the conformal symmetry through singling out a specific conformal frame which is characterized by the large scale characteristics of the universe. Finally, we come to the same field equations that historically were proposed by Einstein for the cosmological scale (GR plus the cosmological constant) as the result of his endeavor for making GR consistent with the Mach principle. However, we declare that the obtained field equations in this alternative approach do not carry the problem of the field equations proposed by Einstein for being consistent with Mach's principle (i.e., the existence of de Sitter solution), and can also be considered compatible with this principle in the Sciama view.

  19. One interpretation for both Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halewijn, Ewoud

    2014-07-01

    In reconciling General Relativity with Quantum Mechanics, it is challenging to resolve the combined mathematical equations and to find an interpretation that makes sense ontologically. Such an interpretation has been developed by quantizing descriptive components in both the theories and other views. The resulting micro-components have been re-integrated within the scope of known gaps between science and 'the real world'. The odd peculiarities in these theories have been made look 'normal' by fully untraditionally answering fundamental questions. The interpretation is suggesting that we define time as a discrete operator and its eigenvalues as constraints on space-time manifolds, in order to reconcile the mathematical equations. Outside the mathematical arena we suggest reconsidering the concepts of Black Holes, the Big Bang, the epistemological problem of perception in philosophy and the supposed clash between scientific and the spiritual worldviews. It is concluded that developing one consistent ontological interpretation for both theorie is possible. It is a weird story, but it is making powerful suggestions for reviewing some of our fundamental convictions.

  20. Preferred Spatial Directions in the Universe: a General Relativity Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein is constructed, using General Relativity, the space metric along the Earth’s trajectory in the Galaxy, where the Earth traces outs a complicated spiral in its orbital motion around the Sun and its concomitant motion with the solar system around the centre of the Galaxy. It is deduced herein that this space is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. The observable properties of the space, characterizing its gravitation, rotation, deformation, and curvature, are obtained. The theory predicts that the observable velocity of light is anisotropic, due to the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of space caused by the presence of gravitation and the space rotation, despite the world-invariance of the velocity of light remaining unchanged. It is calculated that two pairs of synchronised clocks should record a different speed of light for light beams travelling towards the Sun and orthogonal to this direction, of about 4×10−4 c (i. e. 120 km/sec, 0.04% of the measured velocity of light c. This effect should have oscillations with a 12-hour period (due to the daily rotation of the Earth and 6 month period (due to the motion of the Earth around the Sun. The best equipment for detecting the effect is that being used by R. T. Cahill (Flinders University, Australia in his current experiments measuring the velocity of light in an RF coaxial-cable equipped with a pair of high precision synchronized Rb atomic clocks.

  1. Gauge formulation of general relativity using conformal and spin symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charles H-T

    2008-05-28

    The gauge symmetry inherent in Maxwell's electromagnetics has a profound impact on modern physics. Following the successful quantization of electromagnetics and other higher order gauge field theories, the gauge principle has been applied in various forms to quantize gravity. A notable development in this direction is loop quantum gravity based on the spin-gauge treatment. This paper considers a further incorporation of the conformal gauge symmetry in canonical general relativity. This is a new conformal decomposition in that it is applied to simplify recently formulated parameter-free construction of spin-gauge variables for gravity. The resulting framework preserves many main features of the existing canonical framework for loop quantum gravity regarding the spin network representation and Thiemann's regularization. However, the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is converted into the conformal factor as a canonical variable. It behaves like a scalar field but is somehow non-dynamical since the Hamiltonian constraint does not depend on its momentum. The essential steps of the mathematical derivation of this parameter-free framework for the spin-gauge variables of gravity are spelled out. The implications for the loop quantum gravity programme are briefly discussed.

  2. General Relativity as a SO(3) Gauge-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mattes, M

    2003-01-01

    The Einsteinian Theory of Gravitation ("General Theory of Relativity") is founded essentially; on the reception that the geometrical properties of the 4-dimensional space-time continuum are defined from the matter in it. Contrary to this, in the Newtonian Mechanics space and time obey a absolute, matter-independent meaning. This thesis offers a compromise between the two conceptions: The spontaneous splitting of space-time in a "universal time" and a "absolute space" in the sense of Newton is accepted, but this (1+3)-splitting will receive the status of a dynamical object in the sense of Einstein. Herein, the (large scale) dynamics of the (1+3) splitting is coupled only weakly to the (local) fluctuation of the matter density with the help of the Einsteinian equations, so that these will keep their validity, regarding the gravitational phenomena, in a bounded domain of space (planets, stars, galaxies). However, at a cosmic scale, the properties of the universe as whole will be determined essentially from the s...

  3. Static axisymmetric rings in general relativity: How diverse they are

    CERN Document Server

    Semerák, O

    2016-01-01

    Three static and axially symmetric (Weyl-type) ring singularities -- the Majumdar-Papapetrou--type (extremally charged) ring, the Bach-Weyl ring and the Appell ring -- are studied in general relativity in order to show how remarkably the geometries in their vicinity differ from each other. This is demonstrated on basic measures of the rings and on invariant characteristics given by the metric and by its first and second derivatives (lapse, gravitational acceleration and curvature), and also on geodesic motion. The results are also compared against the Kerr space-time which possesses a ring singularity too. The Kerr solution is only stationary, not static, but in spite of the consequent complication by dragging, its ring appears to be simpler than the static rings. We show that this mainly applies to the Bach-Weyl ring, although this straightforward counter-part of the Newtonian homogeneous circular ring is by default being taken as the simplest ring solution, and although the other two static ring sources may...

  4. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  5. Dynamics of spinning compact binaries in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Michael David

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of binary systems composed of spinning compact objects in the context of general relativity. Compact binaries are promising sources of gravitational radiation for both ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If the dynamics of these systems were chaotic, the number of waveform templates needed to match a given gravitational-wave signal would grow exponentially with increasing detection sensitivity, rendering the preferred matched filter detection method computationally impractical. It is therefore urgent to understand whether the binary dynamics can be chaotic, and, if so, how prevalent this chaos is. We first consider the dynamics of a spinning compact object orbiting a much more massive rotating black hole, as modeled by the Papapetrou equations in Kerr spacetime. We find that many initial conditions lead to positive Lyapunov exponents, indicating chaotic dynamics. Despite the formal existence of chaotic solutions, we find that chaos occurs only for physically unrealistic values of the small body's spin. As a result, chaos will not affect theoretical templates in the extreme mass-ratio limit for which the Papapetrou equations are valid. We next consider the dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries, as modeled by the post-Newtonian (PN) equations, which are valid for orbital velocities much smaller than the speed of light. We study thoroughly the special case of quasi-circular orbits with comparable mass ratios. Our survey shows that chaos occurs in a negligible fraction of possible configurations, and only for such small radii that the PN approximation is likely to be invalid. As a result, at least in the case of comparable mass black-hole binaries, theoretical templates will not be significantly affected by chaos. In a final, self-contained chapter, we discuss various methods for the calculation of Lyapunov exponents in systems of ordinary differential equations. We introduce several new techniques applicable

  6. Probing General Relativity and New Physics with Lunar Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, S.; Maiello, M.; Currie, D. G.; Boni, A.; Berardi, S.; Cantone, C.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Intaglietta, N.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Vittori, R.; Bianco, G.; Coradini, A.; Dionisio, C.; March, R.; Bellettini, G.; Tauraso, R.; Chandler, J.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past 40 years, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR, developed by the Univ. of Maryland (PI) and INFN-LNF (Co-PI)) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) arrays have supplied almost all the significant tests of General Relativity (Currie et al., 2009 [12]). LLR can evaluate the PPN (Post Newtonian Parameters), addressing this way both the possible changes in the gravitational constant and the self-energy properties of the gravitational field. In addition, the LLR has provided significant information on the composition and origin of the Moon. This is the only Apollo experiment that is still in operation. Initially the Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Over the decades, the ranging capabilities of the ground stations have improved by more than two orders of magnitude. Now, because of the lunar librations, the existing Apollo retroreflector arrays contribute a significant fraction of the limiting errors in the range measurements. We built a new experimental apparatus (the ‘Satellite/Lunar Laser Ranging Characterization Facility', SCF) and created a new test procedure (the SCF-Test) to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of cube corner laser retroreflectors in space for industrial and scientific applications (Dell'Agnello et al., 2011 [13]). Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the SLR retroreflector payload under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator. The apparatus includes infrared cameras for non-invasive thermometry, thermal control and real-time movement of the payload to experimentally simulate satellite orientation on orbit with respect to both solar illumination and laser interrogation beams. These unique capabilities provide experimental validation of the space segment for SLR and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR). The

  7. Probing General Relativity and New Physics with Lunar Laser Ranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Agnello, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Maiello, M., E-mail: mauro.maiello@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Currie, D.G. [University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, MD (United States); Boni, A.; Berardi, S.; Cantone, C.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Intaglietta, N.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Tibuzzi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Vittori, R. [Aeronautica Militare Italiana (AMI), Rome (Italy); Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), Rome (Italy); Bianco, G. [ASI-Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, Matera (Italy); Coradini, A. [INAF-Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dionisio, C. [Rheinmetall Italia S.p.A., Via Affile 102, 00131 Rome (Italy); March, R. [INFN-LNF and CNR-Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo (IAC), Viale del Policlinico 137, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bellettini, G. [INFN-LNF and Department of Mathematics, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-11-11

    Over the past 40 years, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR, developed by the Univ. of Maryland (PI) and INFN-LNF (Co-PI)) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) arrays have supplied almost all the significant tests of General Relativity (Currie et al., 2009 [12]). LLR can evaluate the PPN (Post Newtonian Parameters), addressing this way both the possible changes in the gravitational constant and the self-energy properties of the gravitational field. In addition, the LLR has provided significant information on the composition and origin of the Moon. This is the only Apollo experiment that is still in operation. Initially the Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Over the decades, the ranging capabilities of the ground stations have improved by more than two orders of magnitude. Now, because of the lunar librations, the existing Apollo retroreflector arrays contribute a significant fraction of the limiting errors in the range measurements. We built a new experimental apparatus (the 'Satellite/Lunar Laser Ranging Characterization Facility', SCF) and created a new test procedure (the SCF-Test) to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of cube corner laser retroreflectors in space for industrial and scientific applications (Dell'Agnello et al., 2011 [13]). Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the SLR retroreflector payload under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator. The apparatus includes infrared cameras for non-invasive thermometry, thermal control and real-time movement of the payload to experimentally simulate satellite orientation on orbit with respect to both solar illumination and laser interrogation beams. These unique capabilities provide experimental validation of the space segment for SLR and Lunar Laser Ranging

  8. Radiation reaction in binary systems in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennefick, Daniel John

    1997-09-01

    This thesis is concerned with current problems in, and historical aspects of, the problem of radiation reaction in stellar binary systems in general relativity. Part I addresses current issues in the orbital evolution due to gravitational radiation damping of compact binaries. A particular focus is on the inspiral of small bodies orbiting large black holes, employing a perturbation formalism. In addition, the merger, at the end of the insprial, of comparable mass compact binaries, such as neutron star binaries is also discussed. The emphasis of Part I is on providing detailed descriptions of sources and signals with a view to optimising signal analysis in gravitational wave detectors, whether ground- or space- based interferometers, or resonant mass detectors. Part II of the thesis examines the historical controversies surrounding the problem of gravitational waves, and gravitational radiation damping in stellar binaries. In particular, it focuses on debates in the mid 20th-century on whether binary star systems would really exhibit this type of damping and emit gravitational waves, and on the 'quadrupole formula controversy' of the 1970s and 1980s, on the question whether the standard formular describing energy loss due to emission of gravitational waves was correctly derived for such systems. The study shed light on the role of analogy in science, especially where its use is controversial, on the importance of style in physics and on the problem of identity in science, as the use of history as a rhetorical device in controversial debate is examined. The concept of the Theoretician's Regress is introduced to explain the difficulty encountered by relativists in closing debate in this controversy, which persisted in one forms or another for several decades.

  9. Disseminating General Relativity for 21st century astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Mariateresa

    2015-08-01

    The talk aims to present two outreach projects - initially developed for the ESA Gaia satellite, a multidisciplinary mission launched on December 19, 2013 - available to the OAD community: NeST and "The Meaning of Light".NeST is an interactive educational tool, that displays how the theory of GR rules the Universe, it creates a performance physically "belonging" to the exhibition space and moving through it, materializing what J.A. Wheeler said "mass tells space-time how to curve, and space-time tells mass how to move"."The Meaning of Light" is a short motion comics, part of an extensive outreach program called "The History of Photons" whose main theme is the story of a beam of stellar photons that, after leaving the progenitor star, propagates through the Universe and, once intercepted come into contact with a team of scientists: here begins their adventure to be taken "back" home and in doing so the scientists, and the spectators, are driven to discover the wonders of which the light are the bearers.The description of the journey of the photons becomes, therefore, an opportunity to easily tell the fascinating topics of Astrophysics and General Relativity, i.e. the complexity and the infinite beauty of the Universe in which we live.For this movie a new theme song was produced, "Singing the Stars", whose refrain (Oh Be A Fine Girl / Guy Kiss Me Little Thing, Yeah) adds to the famous mnemonic for stellar classification (OBAFGKM) the new stellar types LTY discovered in recent years.

  10. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  11. Generalized Equilibrium Problems Related to Ky Fan Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Rovenţa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a generalized equilibrium problem by using a nonsymmetric extension of Ky Fan’s inequality. As an application, we present a fixed point type algorithm inspired by a model from Tada and Takahashi (2007.

  12. BOOK REVIEW: A First Course in General Relativity (Second Edition) A First Course in General Relativity (Second Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2010-05-01

    A few years ago, in my review of Sean Carroll's book in Classical and Quantum Gravity [1], I wrote that while the 1970s was the decade of Weinberg [2] and Misner, Thorne and Wheeler [3], and while the eighties was the decade of Schutz [4] and Wald [5], the 2000s was clearly the decade of Hartle [6] and Carroll [7]. In my opinion, these books continue to stand out in the surprisingly dense crowd of introductory textbooks on general relativity. At the dawn of this new decade I look forward to see what fresh pedagogical insights will be produced next, and who will be revealed as the winners of the 2010s. It is, of course, much too early to tell, but Schutz is back, and he will set the standard just as he did back in 1985. This is the long-awaited second edition of his `First Course', a short, accessible, and very successful introduction to general relativity. The changes from the first edition are modest: Schutz wisely refrained from bloating the text with new topics, and limited himself to updating his discussion of gravitational-wave sources and detectors, neutron-star and black-hole astrophysics, and suggestions for further reading. Most importantly, he completely rewrote the chapter on cosmology, a topic that has evolved enormously since the first edition. The book begins in chapter 1 with a beautiful review of special relativity that emphasizes spacetime geometry and stays away from an algebraic approach based on the Lorentz transformation, which appears only later in the chapter. This is followed up in chapters 2 and 3 with an introduction to vector and tensor analysis in flat spacetime. The point of view is modern (tensors are defined as linear mapping of vectors and one-forms into real numbers) but the presentation is very accessible and avoids an overload of mathematical fine print. In chapter 4 the book introduces the spacetime description of fluids; it is here that the energy-momentum tensor makes its first appearance. The move to curved spacetime is

  13. Cancer-related false knowledge in relatives of cancer patients and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhal, N S; Dane, F; Ulus, C; Sari, S; Senturk, N; Bingol, D

    2010-01-01

    Although there are many myths about cancer in Turkey, there is no study evaluating Turkish public's knowledge about cancer. The goals of our research were to: 1) measure the extent of knowledge of cancer among the Turkish public; 2) determine the differences in extent of cancer-related knowledge between participants who have relatives with cancer and those who do not; and 3) determine the sources of knowledge possessed. Data were obtained from a total of 415 participants (244 female, 171 male), all of them sitting at the Marmara University Faculty of Medicine Hospital (MUFMH) outpatient clinic waiting area for non-cancer-related reasons. Each participant completed a 3-part questionnaire. Appropriate statistical tests were used for comparison. The mean age was 41 years. Of 415 participants, 65.3% stated that they had one or more cancer patient in their immediate family; 70.1% of the participants had a high-school education or greater. The questionnaire showed that, depending on the question, anywhere from 1.7% to 88.5% of the general public possesses some false information; furthermore, the difference in accuracy between relatives of cancer patients and non-relatives was marginal. Only 3 specific questions, related to the following ideas, rendered answers that were statistically significantly different between these 2 groups: breast cancer is only seen in females (p cancer (p cancer is always very painful (p knowledge about cancer was unacceptably high in our cohort. Broader efforts should be made to inform the Turkish public about cancer.

  14. Matrices Totally Positive Relative to a General Tree

    CERN Document Server

    Costas-Santos, R S

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we prove that for a general tree $T$, if $A$ is T-TP, all the submatrices of $A$ associated with the deletion of pendant vertices are $P$-matrices, and $\\det A>0$, then the smallest eigenvalue has an eigenvector signed according to $T$.

  15. On Generalized Bazilevic Functions Related with Conic Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalida Inayat Noor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We define and study some generalized classes of Bazilevic functions associated with convex domains. These convex domains are formed by conic regions which are included in the right half plane. Such results as inclusion relationships and integral-preserving properties are proved. Some interesting special cases of the main results are also pointed out.

  16. Einstein's Unification: General Relativity and the Quest for Mathematical Naturalness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the thesis has been to understand Einstein's development and see the historical coherence in his later attitude in physics. The lesson we learned has been straightforward: the key that unlocks the later Einstein lies in the road by which he arrived at the field equations of general relati

  17. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deruelle, Nathalie [APC, CNRS-Université Paris 7, 75205 Paris CEDEX 13 (France); Rua, Josephine, E-mail: deruelle@ihes.fr, E-mail: rua@cbpf.br [Instituto de Cosmologia, Relatividade e Astrofísica—ICRA/CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  18. Charged Analogues of Henning Knutsen Type Solutions in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y. K.; Kumar, Sachin; Pratibha

    2011-11-01

    In the present article, we have found charged analogues of Henning Knutsen's interior solutions which join smoothly to the Reissner-Nordstrom metric at the pressure free interface. The solutions are singularity free and analyzed numerically with respect to pressure, energy-density and charge-density in details. The solutions so obtained also present the generalization of A.L. Mehra's solutions.

  19. General and special education teachers' relations within teamwork ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    education teachers within teamwork and to define socio-demographic factors .... The team approach of general and special education teachers proved to be useful ..... encourage cohesion are trust, openness, willingness for cooperation and .... enduring mental illness engaged in a physical activity programme integrated ...

  20. The generalized minimum spanning tree polytope and related polytopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree problem denoted by GMST is a variant of the classical Minimum Spanning Tree problem in which nodes are partitioned into clusters and the problem calls for a minimum cost tree spanning at least one node from each cluster. A different version of the problem, calle

  1. Einstein's Unification: General Relativity and the Quest for Mathematical Naturalness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the thesis has been to understand Einstein's development and see the historical coherence in his later attitude in physics. The lesson we learned has been straightforward: the key that unlocks the later Einstein lies in the road by which he arrived at the field equations of general

  2. The generalized minimum spanning tree polytope and related polytopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree problem denoted by GMST is a variant of the classical Minimum Spanning Tree problem in which nodes are partitioned into clusters and the problem calls for a minimum cost tree spanning at least one node from each cluster. A different version of the problem, calle

  3. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related adverse events: general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) represents a monumental advance in the management of patients with pancreaticobiliary diseases, but is a complex and technically demanding procedure with the highest inherent risk of adverse events of all routine endoscopic procedures. Overall adverse event rates for ERCP are typically reported as 5-10%. The most commonly reported adverse events include post-ERCP pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, infection (cholangitis), and cardiopulomary or "sedation related" events. This article evaluates patient-related and procedure-related risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events, and discusses strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and management of these events.

  4. Some Modal Relations and Generalized Velocity Method in State Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Real mode theory in configuration space has shown that the mode acceleration method converges faster than the mode displacement method. This paper demonstrates a similar conclusion in the state space. Some new expressions on modal parameter matrices were set up first. A generalized velocity method (GVM) is then demonstrated in a systematic way. This method is the so-called complex mode velocity method, but the expressions and schemes are given in terms of parametric matrices in configuration space. Theoretical comparison of this GVM with the traditional complex mode method shows some interesting conclusions. The latter approach is actually a generalized displacement method (GDM). Without mode reduction, the displacement responses of the concerned system resulting from both approaches are identical. On the other hand, both approaches have to adopt mode reduction to become practical. Under this situation, GVM has advantages because it compensates for the contribution of the omitted high-order modes to the displacement responses.

  5. Momentum in general relativity: local versus quasilocal conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Richard J.; McGrath, Paul L.; Mann, Robert B.

    2013-10-01

    We construct a general relativistic conservation law for linear and angular momentum for matter and gravitational fields in a finite volume of space that does not rely on any spacetime symmetries. This work builds on our previous construction of a general relativistic energy conservation law with the same features (McGrath et al 2012 Class. Quantum Grav. 29 215012). Our approach uses the Brown and York (1993 Phys. Rev. D 47 1407-19) quasilocal stress-energy-momentum tensor for matter and gravitational fields, plus the concept of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF) introduced in (Epp et al 2009 Class. Quantum Grav. 26 035015; 2012 Classical and Quantum Gravity: Theory, Analysis, and Applications (Nova Science)). The RQF approach allows us to construct, in a generic spacetime, frames of reference whose boundaries are rigid (their shape and size do not change with time), and that have precisely the same six arbitrary time-dependent degrees of freedom as the accelerating and tumbling rigid frames we are familiar with in Newtonian mechanics. These RQFs, in turn, give rise to a completely general conservation law for the six components of momentum (three linear and three angular) of a finite system of matter and gravitational fields. We compare in detail this quasilocal RQF approach to constructing conservation laws with the usual local one based on spacetime symmetries, and discuss the shortcomings of the latter. These RQF conservation laws lead to a deeper understanding of physics in the form of simple, exact, operational definitions of gravitational energy and momentum fluxes, which in turn reveal, for the first time, the exact, detailed mechanisms of gravitational energy and momentum transfer taking place in a wide variety of physical phenomena, including a simple falling apple. As a concrete example, we derive a general relativistic version of Archimedes’ law that we apply to understand electrostatic weight and buoyant force in the context of a Reissner

  6. Limits of the energy-momentum tensor in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, F M; Hall, G S; MacCallum, M A H; Paiva, Filipe M.; Reboucas, Marcelo J.; Hall, Graham S.; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac

    1998-01-01

    A limiting diagram for the Segre classification of the energy-momentum tensor is obtained and discussed in connection with a Penrose specialization diagram for the Segre types. A generalization of the coordinate-free approach to limits of Paiva et al. to include non-vacuum space-times is made. Geroch's work on limits of space-times is also extended. The same argument also justifies part of the procedure for classification of a given spacetime using Cartan scalars.

  7. Positive representations of general commutation relations allowing Wick ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, P E T; Werner, R F

    1993-01-01

    where the $T_{ij}^{k\\ell}$ are essentially arbitrary scalar coefficients. Examples comprise the $q$-canonical commutation relations introduced by Greenberg, Bozejko, and Speicher, and the twisted canonical (anti-)commutation relations studied by Pusz and Woronowicz, as well as the quantum group S$_\

  8. Momentum in General Relativity: Local versus Quasilocal Conservation Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Epp, Richard J; Mann, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    We construct a general relativistic conservation law for linear and angular momentum for matter and gravitational fields in a finite volume of space that does not rely on any spacetime symmetries. This work builds on our previous construction of a general relativistic energy conservation law with the same features. Our approach uses the Brown and York quasilocal stress-energy-momentum tensor for matter and gravitational fields, plus the concept of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF) introduced in previous work. The RQF approach allows us to construct, in a generic spacetime, frames of reference whose boundaries are rigid (their shape and size do not change with time), and that have precisely the same six arbitrary time-dependent degrees of freedom as the accelerating and tumbling rigid frames we are familiar with in Newtonian mechanics. These RQFs, in turn, give rise to a completely general conservation law for the six components of momentum (three linear and three angular) of a finite system of matter and gravita...

  9. Non-adiabatic oscillations of compact stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Miniutti, G

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a formalism to study non-adiabatic, non-radial oscillations of compact stars in the frequency domain including the effects of thermal diffusion in a general relativistic framework. When a general equation of state depending on temperature is used, the perturbations of the fluid result in heat flux which is coupled with the spacetime geometry through the Einstein field equations. Our results show that the frequency of the first pressure (p) and gravity (g) oscillation modes is significantly affected by thermal diffusion, while that of the fundamental (f) mode is basically unaltered due to the global nature of that oscillation. The damping time of the oscillations is generally much smaller than in the adiabatic case (more than two orders of magnitude for the p- and g-modes) reflecting the effect of thermal dissipation. Both the isothermal and adiabatic limits are recovered in our treatment and we study in more detail the intermediate regime. Our formalism finds its natural astrophysical applic...

  10. String theory, scale relativity and the generalized uncertainty principle

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    1995-01-01

    An extension/ modification of the Stringy Heisenberg Uncertainty principle is derived within the framework of the theory of Special Scale-Relativity proposed by Nottale. Based on the fractal structure of two dimensional Quantum Gravity which has attracted considerable interest recently we conjecture that the underlying fundamental principle behind String theory should be based on an extension of Scale Relativity where both dynamics as well as scales are incorporated in the same footing.

  11. New solutions of initial conditions in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tafel, J

    2013-01-01

    We find new classes of exact solutions of the initial momentum constraint for vacuum Einstein's equations. They are either axially symmetric or the exterior curvature tensor has a simple algebraic structure. In general the mean curvature $H$ is non-constant and initial metric is not conformally flat. Solutions depend on several free functions. The conformal method of Lichnerowicz, Choquet-Bruhat and York is used to prove solvability of the Hamiltonian constraint if $H$ vanishes. The existence of marginally trapped surfaces in initial manifold is discussed.

  12. A Gluing Construction Regarding Point Particles in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Iva Stavrov

    2009-01-01

    We develop a gluing construction which adds scaled and truncated asymptotically Euclidean solutions of the Einstein constraint equations to compact solutions with potentially non-trivial cosmological constants. The result is a one-parameter family of initial data which has ordinary and scaled "point-particle" limits analogous to those of Gralla and Wald ("A rigorous derivation of gravitational self-force," Class. Quantum Grav. 2008). In particular, we produce examples of initial data which generalize Schwarzschild - de Sitter initial data and gluing theorems of IMP-type.

  13. Tropical disturbances in relation to general circulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoque, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial results of an evaluation of the performance of the Goddard Laboratory of Atmospheric Simulation general circulation model depicting the tropical atmosphere during the summer are presented. Because the results show the existence of tropical wave disturbances throughout the tropics, the characteristics of synoptic disturbances over Africa were studied and a synoptic case study of a selected disturbance in this area was conducted. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wave type synoptic disturbances in the tropics. The findings show that, in one of the summers simulated, the disturbances are predominantly closed vortices; in another summer, the predominant disturbances are open waves.

  14. Conformally invariant gauge conditions in electromagnetism and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Stornaiolo, Cosimo

    2000-06-01

    The construction of conformally invariant gauge conditions for Maxwell and Einstein theories on a manifold M is found to involve two basic ingredients. First, covariant derivatives of a linear gauge (e.g. Lorenz or de Donder), completely contracted with the tensor field representing the metric on the vector bundle of the theory. Second, the addition of a compensating term, obtained by covariant differentiation of a suitable tensor field built from the geometric data of the problem. The existence theorem for such a gauge in gravitational theory is here proved when the manifold M is endowed with a m-dimensional positive-definite metric g. An application to a generally covariant integral formulation of the Einstein equations is also outlined.

  15. Are Singularities Integral to General Theory of Relativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krori, K.; Dutta, S.

    2011-11-01

    Since the 1960s the general relativists have been deeply obsessed with the possibilities of GTR singularities - blackhole as well as cosmological singularities. Senovilla, for the first time, followed by others, showed that there are cylindrically symmetric cosmological space-times which are free of singularities. On the other hand, Krori et al. have presently shown that spherically symmetric cosmological space-times - which later reduce to FRW space-times may also be free of singularities. Besides, Mitra has in the mean-time come forward with some realistic calculations which seem to rule out the possibility of a blackhole singularity. So whether singularities are integral to GTR seems to come under a shadow.

  16. Quantum electrodynamical corrections to a magnetic dipole in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pétri, J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars are privileged places where strong electromagnetic fields as high as $\\BQ=4.4\\times10^9$~T exist, giving rise to non-linear corrections to Maxwell equations described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). These corrections need to be included to the general relativistic (GR) description of a magnetic dipole supposed to be anchored in the neutron star. In this paper, these QED and GR perturbations to the standard flat space-time dipole are calculated to the lowest order in the fine structure constant~$\\alpha_{\\rm sf}$ and to any order in the ratio $\\Rs/R$ where $R$ is the neutron star radius and $\\Rs$ its Schwarzschild radius. Following our new 3+1~formalism developed in a previous work, we compute the multipolar non-linear corrections to this dipole and demonstrate the presence of a small dipolar~$\\ell=1$ and hexapolar~$\\ell=3$ component.

  17. Scale invariant alternatives to General Relativity II: Dilaton properties

    CERN Document Server

    Karananas, Georgios K

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we revisit gravitational theories which are invariant under TDiffs - transverse (volume preserving) diffeomorphisms and global scale transformations. It is known that these theories can be rewritten in an equivalent diffeomorphism-invariant form with an action including an integration constant (cosmological constant for the particular case of non scale-invariant unimodular gravity). The presence of this integration constant, in general, breaks explicitly scale invariance and induces a run-away potential for (otherwise massless) dilaton, associated with the determinant of the metric tensor. We show, however, that if the metric carries mass dimension $\\left[\\text{GeV}\\right]^{-2}$, the scale invariance of the system is preserved, unlike the situation in theories in which the metric has mass dimension different from $-2$. The dilaton remains massless and couples to other fields only through derivatives, without any conflict with observations. We observe that one can define a specific limit f...

  18. On the gravitational field of compact objects in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-01-01

    We study some exact and approximate solutions of Einstein's equations that can be used to describe the gravitational field of astrophysical compact objects in the limiting case of slow rotation and slight deformation. First, we show that none of the standard models obtained by using Fock's method can be used as an interior source for the approximate exterior Kerr solution. We then use Fock's method to derive a generalized interior solution, and also an exterior solution that turns out to be equivalent to the exterior Hartle-Thorne approximate solution that, in turn, is equivalent to an approximate limiting case of the exact Quevedo-Mashhoon solution. As a result we obtain an analytic approximate solution that describes the interior and exterior gravitational field of a slowly rotating and slightly deformed astrophysical object.

  19. Exponential stretch-rotation (ESR) formulation of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khokhlov, A M

    2003-01-01

    We study a tensorial exponential transformation of a three-dimensional metric of space-like hypersurfaces embedded in a four-dimensional space-time, $\\gamma_{ij} = e^{\\epsilon_{ikm}\\theta_m} e^{\\phi_k} e^{-\\epsilon_{jkn}\\theta_n}$, where $\\phi_k$ are logarithms of the eigenvalues of $\\gamma_{ij}$, $\\theta_k$ are rotation angles, and $\\epsilon_{ijk}$ is a fully anti-symmetric symbol. Evolution part of Einstein's equations, formulated in terms of $\\phi_k$ and $\\theta_k$, describes time evolution of the metric at every point of a hyper-surface as a continuous stretch and rotation of a local coordinate system in a tangential space. The exponential stretch-rotation (ESR) transformation generalizes particular exponential transformations used previously in cases of spatial symmetry. The ESR 3+1 formulation of Einstein's equations may have certain advantages for long-term stable integration of these equations.

  20. Energy density and spatial curvature in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, T.; Galloway, G.J.

    1981-04-01

    Positive energy density tends to limit the size of space. This effect is studied within several contexts. We obtain sufficient conditions (which involve the energy density in a crucial way) for the compactness of spatial hypersurfaces in space-time. We then obtain some results concerning static or, more generally, stationary space-times. The Schwarzchild solution puts an upper bound on the size of a static spherically symmetric fluid with density bounded from below. We derive a result of roughly the same nature which, however, requires no symmetry and allows for rotation. Also, we show that static or rotating universes with L = 0 require that the density along some spatial geodesic must fall off rapidly with distance from a point.