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Sample records for general relativity theory

  1. Gravity, general relativity theory and alternative theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.; Grishchuk, L.P.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1986-01-01

    The main steps in plotting the current gravitation theory and some prospects of its subsequent development are reviewed. The attention is concentrated on a comparison of the relativistic gravitational field with other physical fields. Two equivalent formulations of the general relativity (GR) - geometrical and field-theoretical - are considered in detail. It is shown that some theories of gravity constructed as the field theories at a flat background space-time are in fact just different formulations of GR and not alternative theories

  2. Simple recursion relations for general field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Shen, Chia-Hsien; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    On-shell methods offer an alternative definition of quantum field theory at tree-level, replacing Feynman diagrams with recursion relations and interaction vertices with a handful of seed scattering amplitudes. In this paper we determine the simplest recursion relations needed to construct a general four-dimensional quantum field theory of massless particles. For this purpose we define a covering space of recursion relations which naturally generalizes all existing constructions, including those of BCFW and Risager. The validity of each recursion relation hinges on the large momentum behavior of an n-point scattering amplitude under an m-line momentum shift, which we determine solely from dimensional analysis, Lorentz invariance, and locality. We show that all amplitudes in a renormalizable theory are 5-line constructible. Amplitudes are 3-line constructible if an external particle carries spin or if the scalars in the theory carry equal charge under a global or gauge symmetry. Remarkably, this implies the 3-line constructibility of all gauge theories with fermions and complex scalars in arbitrary representations, all supersymmetric theories, and the standard model. Moreover, all amplitudes in non-renormalizable theories without derivative interactions are constructible; with derivative interactions, a subset of amplitudes is constructible. We illustrate our results with examples from both renormalizable and non-renormalizable theories. Our study demonstrates both the power and limitations of recursion relations as a self-contained formulation of quantum field theory.

  3. Generalized string theory mapping relations between gravity and gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    A previous study of the Kawai, Lewellen and Tye (KLT) relations between gravity and gauge theories, imposed by the relationship of closed and open strings, are here extended in the light of general relativity and Yang-Mills theory as effective field theories. We discuss the possibility of generalizing the traditional KLT mapping in this effective setting. A generalized mapping between the effective Lagrangians of gravity and Yang-Mills theory is presented, and the corresponding operator relations between gauge and gravity theories at the tree level are further explored. From this generalized mapping remarkable diagrammatic relations are found, linking diagrams in gravity and Yang-Mills theory, as well as diagrams in pure effective Yang-Mills theory. Also the possibility of a gravitational coupling to an antisymmetric field in the gravity scattering amplitude is considered, and shown to allow for mixed open-closed string solutions, i.e., closed heterotic strings

  4. Between general relativity and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayski, J.

    1982-01-01

    Some possibilities of reconciling general relativity with quantum theory are discussed. The procedure of quantization is certainly not unique, but depends upon the choice of the coordinate conditions. Most versions of quantization predict the existence of gravitons, but it is also possible to formulate a quantum theory with a classical gravity whereby the expectation values of Tsub(μν) constitute the sources of the classical metric field. (author)

  5. Development of Einstein's general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.K.

    1980-01-01

    Starting from Poincare's Lorentz-invariant theory of gravity formulated in 1906, development of Einstein's general theory of relativity during 1906-1916 is discussed. Three stages in this development are recognised. In the first stage during 1907-1914, Einstein tried to extend the relativity principle of uniform motion to the frames in non-uniform motion. For this purpose, he introduced the principle of equivalence which made it possible to calculate the effect of homogeneous gravitational field on arbitrary physical processes. During the second stage comprising years 1912-1914 overlapping the first stage, Einstein and Grossmann were struggling to translate physical postulates into the language of the absolute differential calculus. In the period 1915-1916, Einstein formulated the field equations of general relativity. While discussing these developmental stages, theories of gravitation formulated by Abraham, Nordstroem and Mie are also discussed. (M.G.B.)

  6. Victories and defeats in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, C.

    1977-01-01

    Only within the last 20 years has it been possible to conduct far-reaching experimental tests of the validity of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. Experimental confirmation in some fields is embarrassed by considerable difficulties in applying the theory to cosmic systems, which indicate that such major systems lie at the limit of the theory's applicability. The lecture here reproduced discusses both the successes and the limitations of the theory, starting with its replacement of the absolute space-time theory of Newton and its historical replacement by the relativistic gravitational postulates of Einstein which, in spite of its more complicated postulates, nevertheless introduced a great simplicity and comprehensiveness into the overall conception of nature. This theoretical 'beauty', however, can only be trusted if vindicated experimentally, which has to a considerable extent proved to be the case. For weak fields Newtonian and Einsteinian concepts coincide, while for stronger fields, and velocities not far from that of light, Einstein's theory is superior, giving,for example, an excellent correspondence with the precession of the perehelion of Mercury. On a larger scale, however, the theory appears to lead to conclusions which would invalidate the very concepts of space and time, even within a finite time-interval. A more generalized theory seems to be required. (A.D.N.)

  7. Relativity the special and the general theory

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2015-01-01

    After completing the final version of his general theory of relativity in November 1915, Albert Einstein wrote a book about relativity for a popular audience. His intention was "to give an exact insight into the theory of relativity to those readers who, from a general scientific and philosophical point of view, are interested in the theory, but who are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics." The book remains one of the most lucid explanations of the special and general theories ever written. In the early 1920s alone, it was translated into ten languages, and fifteen editions in the original German appeared over the course of Einstein's lifetime. This new edition of Einstein's celebrated book features an authoritative English translation of the text along with an introduction and a reading companion by Hanoch Gutfreund and Jürgen Renn that examines the evolution of Einstein's thinking and casts his ideas in a broader present-day context. A special chapter explores the history...

  8. Canonical perturbation theory in linearized general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, R.; Pavlenko, Yu.G.

    1986-01-01

    Canonical perturbation theory in linearized general relativity theory is developed. It is shown that the evolution of arbitrary dynamic value, conditioned by the interaction of particles, gravitation and electromagnetic fields, can be presented in the form of a series, each member of it corresponding to the contribution of certain spontaneous or induced process. The main concepts of the approach are presented in the approximation of a weak gravitational field

  9. A general theory of quantum relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minic, Djordje; Tze, C.-H.

    2004-01-01

    The geometric form of standard quantum mechanics is compatible with the two postulates: (1) the laws of physics are invariant under the choice of experimental setup and (2) every quantum observation or event is intrinsically statistical. These postulates remain compatible within a background independent extension of quantum theory with a local intrinsic time implying the relativity of the concept of a quantum event. In this extension the space of quantum events becomes dynamical and only individual quantum events make sense observationally. At the core of such a general theory of quantum relativity is the three-way interplay between the symplectic form, the dynamical metric and non-integrable almost complex structure of the space of quantum events. Such a formulation provides a missing conceptual ingredient in the search for a background independent quantum theory of gravity and matter. The crucial new technical element in our scheme derives from a set of recent mathematical results on certain infinite-dimensional almost Kahler manifolds which replace the complex projective spaces of standard quantum mechanics

  10. General relativity invariance and string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref'eva, I.Ya.; Volovich, I.V.

    1987-04-01

    The general covariance principle in the string field theory is considered. The algebraic properties of the string Lie derivative are discussed. The string vielbein and spin connection are introduced and an action invariant under general co-ordinate transformation is proposed. (author). 18 refs

  11. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H.H.v.; Treder, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper concerns Einstein's general relativity, wave mechanics and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations. The principle of equivalence and its association with both wave mechanics and quantum gravity, is discussed. (U.K.)

  12. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H. von; Treder, H.

    1982-01-01

    We dicusss the meaning and prove the accordance of general relativity, wave mechanics, and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations themselves. Firstly, we have the problem of the influence of gravitational fields on the de Broglie waves, which influence is in accordance with Einstein's weak principle of equivalence and the limitation of measurements given by Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. Secondly, the quantization of the gravitational fields is a ''quantization of geometry.'' However, classical and quantum gravitation have the same physical meaning according to limitations of measurements given by Einstein's strong principle of equivalence and the Heisenberg uncertainties for the mechanics of test bodies

  13. The mathematical theory of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Katkar, L N

    2014-01-01

    This book is prepared for M. Sc. Students of Mathematics and Physics. The aim of writing this book is to give the reader a feeling for the necessity and beauty of the laws of general relativity. The contents of the book will attract both mathematicians and physicists which provides motivation and applications of many ideas and powerful mathematical methods of modern analysis and differential geometry. An attempt has been made to make the presentation comprehensive, rigorous and yet simple. Most calculations and transformations have been carried out in great detail. KEY FEATURE: Numerous solved examples using the well known mathematical techniques viz., the tensors and the differential forms in each chapter.

  14. Can one tell Einstein's unimodular theory from Einstein's general relativity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The so called unimodular theory of gravitation is compared with general relativity in the quadratic (Fierz-Pauli) regime, using a quite broad framework, and it is argued that quantum effects allow in principle to discriminate between both theories.

  15. The role of Einstein's general relativity theory in today's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    The relationships are discussed of the general relativity theory to other fields of today's physics. Recent results are reported of studies into gravitational radiation, relativistic astrophysics, cosmology and the quantum theory. (Z.M.)

  16. 70 years of the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Diaz-Balart, F.; Cabezas Solorzano, R.

    1986-06-01

    In view of the 70th anniversary of the discovery of the General Theory of Relativity, an analysis was made of the special and general theories. The basic postulates, their consequences in the formulation of the theories, the main results, some aspects related to the experimental verification and its applications are presented, as are some elements of the mathematical formalism of the theories, to facilitate the logical interrelationships between its results and consequences. (author)

  17. DSR Theories, Conformal Group and Generalized Commutation Relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the relationship of DSR theories and Conformal Group is reviewed. On the other hand, the relation between DSR Magueijo Smolin generators and generalized commutation relations is also shown

  18. On the relation of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The specific content of the present thesis is presented in the following way. First the most important contents of quantum theory and general relativity theory are presented. In connection with the general relativity theory the mathematical property of the diffeomorphism invariance plays the deciding role, while concerning the quantum theory starting from the Copenhagen interpretation first the measurement problem is treated, before basing on the analysis of concrete phenomena and the mathematical apparatus of quantum theory the nonlocality is brought into focus as an important property. This means that both theories suggest a relationalistic view of the nature of the space. This analysis of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory in relation to the nature of the space obtains only under inclusion of Kant's philosophy and his analysis of the terms space and time as fundamental forms of perception its full persuasive power. Then von Weizsaeckers quantum theory of the ur-alternatives is presented. Finally attempts are made to apply the obtained knowledge to the question of the quantum-theoretical formulation of general relativity theory.

  19. Singularities in the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    'Regular solutions of Einstein's equations' mean very different things. In the case of the empty-space equations, Rsub(ik) = o, such solutions must be metrics gsub(ik)(xsup(l)) without additionaly singular 'field sources' (Einstein's 'Particle problem'). However the 'phenomenological matter' is defined by the Einstein equations Rsub(ik) - 1/2gsub(ik)R = -kappaTsub(ik) itselves. Therefore if 10 regular functions gsub(ik)(xsup(l)) are given (which the inequalities of Lorentz-signature fulfil) then these gsub(ik) define 10 functions Tsub(ik)(xsup(l)) without singularities. But, the matter-tensor Tsub(ik) must fulfil the two inequalities T >= o, T 0 0 >= 1/2 T only and therefore the Einstein-equations with 'phenomenological matter' mean the two inequalities R >= o, R 0 0 <= o which are incompatible with a permanently regular metric with Lorentz-signature, generally. (author)

  20. Generalization of the test theory of relativity to noninertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolghasem, G.H.; Khajehpour, M.R.H.; Mansouri, R.

    1988-08-01

    We present a generalized test theory of special relativity, using a noninertial frame. Within the framework of the special theory of relativity the transport- and Einstein-synchronizations are equivalent on a rigidly rotating disk. But in any theory with a preferred frame such an equivalence does not hold. The time difference resulting from the two synchronization procedures is a measurable quantity within the reach of existing clock systems on the earth. The final result contains a term which depends on the angular velocity of the rotating system, and hence measures an absolute effect. This term is of crucial importance in our test theory of the special relativity. (author). 13 refs

  1. Test theories of special relativity: a general critique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, A.K.A.; Tiomno, J.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute Spacetime Theories conceived for the purpose of testing Special Relativity (SR) are reviewed. It is found that most theories proposed were in fact SR in different coordinate systems, since in general no specific SR violations were introduced. Models based on possible SR violating mechanisms are considered. Misconceptions in recently published papers are examined. (author) [pt

  2. A theory of strong interactions ''from'' general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldirola, P.; Recami, E.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a previous letter (where, among other things, a classical ''quark confinement'' was derived from general relativity plus dilatation-covariance), is completed by showing that the theory is compatible also with quarks ''asymptotic freedom''. Then -within a bi-scale theory of gravitational and strong interactions- a classical field theory is proposed for the (strong) interactions between hadrons. Various consequences are briefly analysed

  3. On the mathematical theory of classical fields and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Klainerman, S

    1993-01-01

    From the perspective of an analyst, like myself, the General Theory of Relativity provides an extrordinary rich and vastly virgin territory. It is the aim of my lecture to provide, first, an account of those aspects of the theory which attract me most and second a perspective of what has been accomplished so far in that respect. In trying to state our main objectives it helps to view General Relativity in the broader context of Classical Field Theory. EinsteiniVacuum equations, or shortly E—V, is already sufficiently complicated. I will thus restrict my attention to them.

  4. Equivalence of the theories of reciprocity and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.

    1976-01-01

    Khan's theory (Nuovo Cimento; 57B:321 (1968) and Int. J. Theor. Phys.; 6:383 (1972)) of reciprocity has been shown to be equivalent to the theory of general relativity (in a conformally flat space-time) in that the same predictions are made physically. It is is proved that, since 'centrifugal forces' are used by Khan, gravitational phenomena are being considered equal in status to electromagnetic phenomena, and hence the difference claimed to exist between Milne's theory and Khan's theory disappears. (author)

  5. Derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Richard

    2015-04-01

    General relativity cannot describe exchange of classical intrinsic angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. Einstein-Cartan theory fixes this problem in the least invasive way. In the late 20th century, the consensus view was that Einstein-Cartan theory requires inclusion of torsion without adequate justification, it has no empirical support (though it doesn't conflict with any known evidence), it solves no important problem, and it complicates gravitational theory with no compensating benefit. In 1986 the author published a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, with no additional assumptions or parameters. Starting without torsion, Poincaré symmetry, classical or quantum spin, or spinors, it derives torsion and its relation to spin from a continuum limit of general relativistic solutions. The present work makes the case that this computation, combined with supporting arguments, constitutes a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, not just a plausibility argument. This paper adds more and simpler explanations, more computational details, correction of a factor of 2, discussion of limitations of the derivation, and discussion of some areas of gravitational research where Einstein-Cartan theory is relevant.

  6. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1978-01-01

    The canonical commutation relations are analyzed in detail in the manifestly covariant quantum field theory of general relativity proposed previously. It is explicitly proved that the BRS charge is indeed the generator of the BRS transformation both in the Landau gauge and in the non-Landau one. The equivalence between the field equations and the Heisenberg equations is confirmed. (author)

  7. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1978-01-01

    Quantum field theory of Einstein's general relativity is formulated in the indefinitemetric Hilbert space in such a way that asymptotic fields are manifestly Lorentz covariant and the physical S-matrix is unitary. The general coordinate transformation is transcribed into a q-number transformation, called the BRS transformation. Its abstract definition is presented on the basis of the BRS transformation for the Yang-Mills theory. The BRS transformation for general relativity is then explicitly constructed. The gauge-fixing Lagrangian density and the Faddeev-Popov one are introduced in such a way that their sum behaves like a scalar density under the BRS transformation. One can then proceed in the same way as in the Kugo-Ojima formalism of the Yang-Mills theory to establish the unitarity of the physical S-matrix. (author)

  8. An experiment designed to verify the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdin, Maurice

    1960-01-01

    The project for an experiment which uses the effect of gravitation on Maser-type clocks placed on the ground at two different heights and which is designed to verify the general theory of relativity. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 299-301, sitting of 11 January 1960 [fr

  9. General relativity and gauge gravity theories of higher order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, N.P.

    1998-01-01

    It is a short review of today's gauge gravity theories and their relations with Einstein General Relativity. The conceptions of construction of the gauge gravity theories with higher derivatives are analyzed. GR is regarded as the gauge gravity theory corresponding to the choice of G ∞4 as the local gauge symmetry group and the symmetrical tensor of rank two g μν as the field variable. Using the mathematical technique, single for all fundamental interactions (namely variational formalism for infinite Lie groups), we can obtain Einstein's theory as the gauge theory without any changes. All other gauge approaches lead to non-Einstein theories of gravity. But above-mentioned mathematical technique permits us to construct the gauge gravity theory of higher order (for instance SO (3,1)-gravity) so that all vacuum solutions of Einstein equations are the solutions of the SO (3,1)-gravity theory. The structure of equations of SO(3,1)-gravity becomes analogous to Weeler-Misner geometrodynamics one

  10. On the equivalence of vacuum equations of gauge quadratic theory of gravity and general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitnikov, V.V.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to compare the solution of field equations, corresponding to quadratic equations for the fields (g μν , Γ μν α ) in gauge gravitation theory (GGT) with general relativity theory solutions. Without restrictions for a concrete type of metrics only solutions of equations, for which torsion turns to zero, are considered. Equivalence of vacuum equations of gauge quadratic theory of gravity and general relativity theory is proved using the Newman-Penrose formalism

  11. Iz ''general relativity'' necessary for the Einstein gravitation theory gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Main principles of relativity and gravitation theories are deeply analyzed. Problems of boundaries of applicability for these theories and possible ways of their change and generalization are discussed. It is shown that the notion of general relativity does not introduce any post-newton physics - it only deals with coordinate transformations. It is supposed that ''general relativity'' is a physically senseless phrase which can be considered only as a historical remainder of an interesting philosophic discourse. The paper reveals that there exists appropriate physical substantiation of the Einstein gravitation theory not including a physically senseless concept of general relativity and promoting its fundamental relations with the experiment

  12. On complicated continuum models in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsypkin, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    A set of Euler's equations is obtained in the framework of the general relativity theory from the variational equation in the supposition that lagrangian of the material depends on additional (in comparison with classical theories) thermodynamic parameters and taking into account possible irreversible processes. Momentum equations for continuous medium of a thermodynamic closed set are shown to be the consequence of field equations. The problem about the type of energy-momentum material tensor in the presence of derivatives from additional thermodynamic parameters in the number of lagrangian arguments is considered

  13. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1979-01-01

    The indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity is extended to the coupled system of the gravitational field and a Dirac field on the basis of the vierbein formalism. The six extra degrees of freedom involved in vierbein are made unobservable by introducing an extra subsidiary condition Q sub(s) + phys> = 0, where Q sub(s) denotes a new BRS charge corresponding to the local Lorentz invariance. It is shown that a manifestly covariant, unitary, canonical theory can be constructed consistently on the basis of the vierbein formalism. (author)

  14. Theory of Nonlocal Point Transformations in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tessarotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of the functional setting customarily adopted in General Relativity (GR is proposed. This is based on the introduction of the notion of nonlocal point transformations (NLPTs. While allowing the extension of the traditional concept of GR-reference frame, NLPTs are important because they permit the explicit determination of the map between intrinsically different and generally curved space-times expressed in arbitrary coordinate systems. For this purpose in the paper the mathematical foundations of NLPT-theory are laid down and basic physical implications are considered. In particular, explicit applications of the theory are proposed, which concern (1 a solution to the so-called Einstein teleparallel problem in the framework of NLPT-theory; (2 the determination of the tensor transformation laws holding for the acceleration 4-tensor with respect to the group of NLPTs and the identification of NLPT-acceleration effects, namely, the relationship established via general NLPT between particle 4-acceleration tensors existing in different curved space-times; (3 the construction of the nonlocal transformation law connecting different diagonal metric tensors solution to the Einstein field equations; and (4 the diagonalization of nondiagonal metric tensors.

  15. General Theory of Relativity: Will It Survive the Next Decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Paramos, Jorge; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of gravity is fundamental to our understanding of our own solar system, the galaxy and the structure and evolution of the Universe. Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard model that is used for almost ninety years to describe gravitational phenomena on these various scales. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss the recent progress in the tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for high-accuracy gravitational experiments in space. We also summarize the science objectives and technology needs for the laboratory experiments in space with laboratory being the entire solar system. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics anticipated in the near future and evaluate discovery potential for the recently proposed gravitational experiments.

  16. On special and general relativity theory. 24. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The present booklet shall mediate to such an as possible exact view in relativity theory, who are especially interested for the theory from a generally scientific, philosophical, point of view, without mastering the mathematical apparatus. The lecture presupposes some maturity knowledge and - in spite of the shortness of the booklet - quite much perseverance and strength of mind. The author has token very much efforts in order to present the main thoughts as distinctly and simply as possible, in the whole in such a sequence and in such connection, as it has really been arose. With the aim of distinctiveness it seemed to me unavoidable to repeat myself frequently without paying the smallest regard to the elegance of the presentation; I maintained conscientiously the prescription of the ingenious theoretician L. Boltzmann, elegance should by the object of the taylors ans shoemakers [de

  17. The general class of the vacuum spherically symmetric equations of the general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karbanovski, V. V.; Sorokin, O. M.; Nesterova, M. I.; Bolotnyaya, V. A.; Markov, V. N.; Kairov, T. V.; Lyash, A. A.; Tarasyuk, O. R.

    2012-01-01

    The system of the spherical-symmetric vacuum equations of the General Relativity Theory is considered. The general solution to a problem representing two classes of line elements with arbitrary functions g 00 and g 22 is obtained. The properties of the found solutions are analyzed.

  18. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    The proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalizations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients. These theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum. The Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor.

  19. Unification of General Relativity with Quantum Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Jun

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of quantum field theory, instead of using the action principle, we deduce the Einstein equation from purely the general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime. The Einstein equation is shown to be the gauge equation to guarantee the local symmetry of spacetime translation. Gravity is an apparent force due to the curvature of spacetime resulted from the conservation of energy-momentum. In the action of quantum field theory, only electroweak-strong interactions should be considered with the curved spacetime metric determined by the Einstein equation. (general)

  20. Relativistic theory of gravitation and nonuniqueness of the predictions of general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Loskutov, Yu.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that while the predictions of relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) for the gravitational effects are unique and consistent with the experimental data available, the relevant predictions of general relativity theory are not unique. Therewith the above nonuniqueness manifests itself in some effects in the first order in the gravitational interaction constant in others in the second one. The absence in GRT of the energy-momentum and angular momentum conservation laws for the matter and gravitational field taken together and its inapplicability to give uniquely determined predictions for the gravitational phenomena compel to reject GRT as a physical theory

  1. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1979-01-01

    The canonical commutation relations are analyzed in detail in the indefinite-metric quantum field theory of gravity based on the vierbein formalism. It is explicitly verified that the BRS charge, the local-Lorentz-BRS charge and the Poincare generators satisfy the expected commutation relations. (author)

  2. Theory and experiments in general relativity and other metric theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, I.

    1984-01-01

    In Chapter I, after an introduction to theories of gravity alternative to general relativity, metric theories, and the post-Newtonian parameterized (PNN) formalism, a new class of metric theories of gravity is defined. As a result the post-Newtonian approximation of the new theories is not described by the PPN formalism. In fact under the weak field and slow motion hypothesis, the post-Newtonian expression of the metric tensor contains an infinite set of new terms and correspondingly an infinite set of new PPN parameters. Chapter II, III, and IV are devoted to new experiments to test general relativity and other metric theories of gravity. In particular, in chapter IV, it is shown that two general relativistics effects, the Lense-Thirring and De Sitter-Fokker precessions of the nodal lines of an Earth artificial satellite are today detectable using high altitude laser ranged artificial satellites such as Lageos. The orbit of this satellite is known with unprecedented accuracy. The author then describes a method of measuring these relativistic precessions using Lageos together with another high altitude laser ranged similar satellite with appropriately chosen orbital parameters

  3. Nonextensive kinetic theory and H-theorem in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. P.; Silva, R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2017-11-01

    The nonextensive kinetic theory for degenerate quantum gases is discussed in the general relativistic framework. By incorporating nonadditive modifications in the collisional term of the relativistic Boltzmann equation and entropy current, it is shown that Tsallis entropic framework satisfies a H-theorem in the presence of gravitational fields. Consistency with the 2nd law of thermodynamics is obtained only whether the entropic q-parameter lies in the interval q ∈ [ 0 , 2 ] . As occurs in the absence of gravitational fields, it is also proved that the local collisional equilibrium is described by the extended Bose-Einstein (Fermi-Dirac) q-distributions.

  4. Survey on Dirac equation in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, P.

    1984-10-01

    Starting from an infinitesimal transformation expressed with a Killing vector and using systematically the formalism of the local tetrades, we show that, in the area of the general relativity, the Dirac equation may be formulated only versus the four local vectors which determine the gravitational potentials, their gradients and the 4-vector potential of the electromagnetic field [fr

  5. Generalized virial relations and the theory of subdynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obcemea, Ch.; Froelich, P.; Braandas, E.J.

    1981-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the implication of the generalized virial relations in the spectral analysis of Liouville operators. In particular, we refer to the existence problem of the analytic continuation of these super-operators and their resolvents occurring in the reduced dynamics description of open systems. For completeness, we outline the main ideas of the subdynamics approach. (author)

  6. The general theory of relativity: the first thirty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The principal landmarks in the development of general relativity (exclusive of cosmology) during the first 30 years after its founding are presented. The emergence of the new gravitational laws, their experimental consequences and the consequent growth of the present concern with gravitational collapse and black holes are traced. (U.K.)

  7. Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malament, David B

    2012-01-01

    In Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory, David B. Malament presents the basic logical-mathematical structure of general relativity and considers a number of special topics concerning the foundations of general relativity and its relation to Newtonian gravitation theory. These special topics include the geometrized formulation of Newtonian theory (also known as Newton-Cartan theory), the concept of rotation in general relativity, and Gödel spacetime. One of the highlights of the book is a no-go theorem that can be understood to show that there is

  8. General relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.R.

    1990-01-01

    General relativity is discussed in this book at a level appropriate to undergraduate students of physics and astronomy. It describes concepts and experimental results, and provides a succinct account of the formalism. A brief review of special relativity is followed by a discussion of the equivalence principle and its implications. Other topics covered include the concepts of curvature and the Schwarzschild metric, test of the general theory, black holes and their properties, gravitational radiation and methods for its detection, the impact of general relativity on cosmology, and the continuing search for a quantum theory of gravity. (author)

  9. Does general relativity theory possess the classical newtonian limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed comparison of newtonian approximation of the Einstein theory and the Newton theory of gravity is made. A difference of principle between these two theories is clarified at the stage of obtaining integrals of motion. Exact eqautions of motion and Einstein equations shows the existence only zero integrals of motion as well as in the newtonian approximation. A conclusion is that GRT has no classical newtonian limit, since the integrals of motion in the Newton theory of gravity and in the newtonian approximation of the Einstein theory do not coincide [ru

  10. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  11. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.; Alabama Univ., Huntsville

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that (1) the proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalisations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients; 2) these theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum; and (3) the Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor. (author)

  12. Relation of a unified quantum field theory of spinors to the structure of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified quantum field theory of spinors assumed to describe all matter fields and their interactions we construct the space-time structure of general relativity according to a general connection within the corresponding spinor space. The tetrad field and the corresponding metric field are composed from a space-time dependent basis of spinors within the internal space of the fundamental matter field. Similar to twistor theory the Minkowski signature of the space-time metric is related to this spinor nature of elementary matter, if we assume the spinor space to be endowed with a symplectic structure. The equivalence principle and the property of background independence arise from the fact that all elementary fields are composed from the fundamental spinor field. This means that the structure of space-time according to general relativity seems to be a consequence of a fundamental theory of matter fields and not a presupposition as in the usual setting of relativistic quantum field theories.

  13. Principles of general relativity theory in terms of the present day physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    A hystory of gradual unification of general relativity theory and quantum field theory on the basis of unified geometrical principles is detected. The gauge invariance principles became universal for construction of all physical theories. Quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and Einstein gravitation theory were used to form geometrical principles. Identity of inertial and gravitational masses is an experimental basis of the general relativity theory (GRT). It is shown that correct understanding of GRT bases is a developing process related to the development of the present physics and stimulating this development

  14. GRG computer algebra system in gravitation and general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitnikov, V.V.; Obukhova, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The main concepts and capabilities of the GRG specialized computer agebra system intended for performing calculations in the gravitation theory are described. The GRG system is written in the STANDARD LISP language. The program consists of two parts: the first one - for setting initial data, the second one - for specifying a consequence of calculations. The system can function in three formalisms: a coordinate, a tetradic with the Lorentz basis and a spinor ones. The major capabilities of the GRG system are the following: calculation of connectivity and curvature according to the specified metrics, tetrad and torsion; metric type determination according to Petrov; calculation of the Bianchi indentities; operation with an electromagnetic field; tetradic rotations; coordinate conversions

  15. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1982-01-01

    In the manifestly covariant canonical formalism of quantum gravity, it is known that the equal-time commutator between a tensor field and the B field b sub(rho) is consistent with the rules of tensor analysis. Another tensorlike commutation relation is shown to exist for the equal-time commutator between a tensor and b sub(rho), but at the same time its limitation is clarified. The quantum-gravity extension of the invariant D function is defined and provied to be affine-invariant. The four-dimensional commutation relation between a tensor and b sub(rho) is investigated, and it is shown that the commutator consists of a completely tensorlike, manifestly affine-covariant part and a remainder, which is clearly distinguishable from the former. (author)

  16. About the origins of the general theory of relativity: Einstein's search for the truth

    OpenAIRE

    Trainer, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the 20th June 1933 Professor Einstein addressed a large and enthusiastic audience in the Victorian Gothic Bute Hall of the University of Glasgow. Einstein spoke 'About the Origins of the General Theory of Relativity'. In 1905 Einstein had changed the face of physics forever with the publication of his radical new ideas on special relativity. His general theory of relativity was introduced to the world in 1915. However in 1933, Einstein faced another challenge—survival in a world of change....

  17. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in the general theory of relativity. I. A general formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, W.; Kandrup, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers, the overall objective of which is the formulation of a new covariant approach to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in classical general relativity. The objecct here is the development of a tractable theory for self-gravitating systems. It is argued that the ''state'' of an N-particle system may be characterized by an N-particle distribution function, defined in an 8N-dimensional phase space, which satisfies a collection of N conservation equations. By mapping the true physics onto a fictitious ''background'' spacetime, which may be chosen to satisfy some ''average'' field equations, one then obtains a useful covariant notion of ''evolution'' in response to a fluctuating ''gravitational force.'' For many cases of practical interest, one may suppose (i) that these fluctuating forces satisfy linear field equations and (ii) that they may be modeled by a direct interaction. In this case, one can use a relativistic projection operator formalism to derive exact closed equations for the evolution of such objects as an appropriately defined reduced one-particle distribution function. By capturing, in a natural way, the notion of a dilute gas, or impulse, approximation, one is then led to a comparatively simple equation for the one-particle distribution. If, furthermore, one treats the effects of the fluctuating forces as ''localized'' in space and time, one obtains a tractable kinetic equation which reduces, in the Newtonian limit, to the stardard Landau equation

  18. General relativity: An introduction to the theory of the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephani, H.

    1985-01-01

    The entire treatment presented here is framed by questions which led to and now lead out of the general theory of relativity: can an absolute acceleration be defined meaningfully? Do gravitational effects propagate with infinite velocity as Newton required? Can the general theory correctly reflect the dynamics of the whole universe while consistently describing stellar evolution? Can a theory which presupposes measurement of properties of space through the interaction of matter be made compatible with a theory in which dimensions of the objects measured are so small that location loses meaning? The book gives the mathematics necessary to understand the theory and begins in Riemannian geometry. Contents, abridged: Foundations of Riemannian geometry. Foundations of Einstein's theory of gravitation. Linearised theory of gravitation, far fields and gravitational waves. Invariant characterisation of exact solutions. Gravitational collapse and black holes. Cosmology. Non-Einsteinian theories of gravitation. Index

  19. 4-dimensional General Relativity from the instrinsic spatial geometry of SO(3) Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, Eyo Eyo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we derive 4-dimensional General Relativity from three dimensions, using the intrinsic spatial geometry inherent in Yang-Mills theory which has been exposed by previous authors as well as some properties of the Ashtekar variables. We provide various interesting relations, including the fact that General Relativity can be written as a Yang-Mills theory where the antiself-dual Weyl curvature replaces the Yang-Mills coupling constant. We have generalized the results of some previous authors, covering Einstein's spaces, to include more general spacetime geometries.

  20. Why are predictions of general relativity theory for gravitational effects non-unique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskutov, Yu.M.

    1990-01-01

    Reasons of non-uniqueness of predictions of the general relativity theory (GRT) for gravitational effects are analyzed in detail. To authors' opinion, the absence of comparison mechanism of curved and plane metrics is the reason of non-uniqueness

  1. On the question of establishing the equivalence of general relativity and relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulyabov, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: (author)In the construction of physical theories are several paradigms (according to Vladimirov Yu. S.). Depending on the number of entities are used paradigms include trialist (3 entities), dualist (2 entities) and monistic (1 entity). In trialist paradigm uses the following entities: geometry (G), particle (P) and field (F). Go to the dualist paradigms performed in the following ways: two entities take over the functions of the third, two entities merged into a single synthesis. Is also possible to limit the dualistic theory, which summarized the essence in addition assume the functions of a third. In turn, by way of grouping the entities dualistic theory can be divided into geometric (unification of geometry and field), relational (unification of geometry and particles) and field (unification of fields and particles). For the connection of the two theories should be to go to the common denominator: to trialist or monistic theories. Since the monistic theory at the moment completely unknown, may be used only trialist theory. General relativity is a typical representative of the geometric dualistic paradigm. However geometrized only gravity. Other fields non-geometrized. In turn, the relativistic theory of gravitation is a typical trialist theory. To establish a correspondence between theories should to geometrize material field in the general theory of relativity. It is proposed to implement this on the basis of a multi-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory

  2. Theoretical general relativity: 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, O.

    1979-01-01

    The metric and field equations of Einstein's general relativity theory are written down. Solutions to the equations are discussed. Connection is made between relativity theory and elementary particle theory. Possibilities for a unified field theory are considered

  3. General relativity the most beautiful of theories : applications and trends after 100 years

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Generalising Newton's law of gravitation, general relativity is one of the pillars of modern physics. On the occasion of general relativity's centennial, leading scientists in the different branches of gravitational research review the history and recent advances in the main fields of applications of the theory, which was referred to by Lev Landau as “the most beautiful of the existing physical theories”.

  4. Resolution of a cosmological paradox using concepts from general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    According to the big bang theory, the universe began about 15 billion years ago and has been continually expanding ever since. If certain elementary physical concepts are naively applied to this cosmological theory, it can lead to a paradox in which distant astronomical objects seem to have lain at distances from the Earth larger than the possible size of the universe. The paradox is resolved by using concepts from general relativity theory. These concepts may appear startling to some readers

  5. Generally covariant gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capovilla, R.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of generally covariant gauge theories in four space-time dimensions is investigated. The field variables are taken to be a Lie algebra valued connection 1-form and a scalar density. Modulo an important degeneracy, complex [euclidean] vacuum general relativity corresponds to a special case in this class. A canonical analysis of the generally covariant gauge theories with the same gauge group as general relativity shows that they describe two degrees of freedom per space point, qualifying therefore as a new set of neighbors of general relativity. The modification of the algebra of the constraints with respect to the general relativity case is computed; this is used in addressing the question of how general relativity stands out from its neighbors. (orig.)

  6. Plane symmetric cosmological micro model in modified theory of Einstein’s general relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi U.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated an anisotropic homogeneous plane symmetric cosmological micro-model in the presence of massless scalar field in modified theory of Einstein's general relativity. Some interesting physical and geometrical aspects of the model together with singularity in the model are discussed. Further, it is shown that this theory is valid and leads to Ein­stein's theory as the coupling parameter λ →>• 0 in micro (i.e. quantum level in general.

  7. Freud's superpotential in general relativity and in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Christian G.; Hehl, Friedrich W.

    2018-02-01

    The identification of a suitable gravitational energy in theories of gravity has a long history, and it is well known that a unique answer cannot be given. In the first part of this paper we present a streamlined version of the derivation of Freud's superpotential in general relativity. It is found if we once integrate the gravitational field equation by parts. This allows us to extend these results directly to the Einstein-Cartan theory. Interestingly, Freud's original expression, first stated in 1939, remains valid even when considering gravitational theories in Riemann-Cartan or, more generally, in metric-affine spacetimes.

  8. Cosmological term in general relativity theory and localization of de Sitter and Einstein groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunyak, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of gauge gravitational field with the de Sitter group localization is formulated. proceeding from the de Sitter Universe tetrad components the relationship between Riemann metrics and de Sitter gauge field is established. It is shown that General relativity theory (GRT) with a cosmological term is the simplest variant of the de Sitter gauge gravitation theory passing in the limit of infinite curvature radius of the de Sitter Universe into the Poincare - invariant GRT without cosmological term. Similarly the theory of gauge gravitational field at localization of the dynamical group of the Einstein homogeneous static Universe (Einstein group RxSO(4)) is formulated

  9. Minimally modified theories of gravity: a playground for testing the uniqueness of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Rubio, Ra{úl; Di Filippo, Francesco; Liberati, Stefano

    2018-06-01

    In a recent paper [1], it was introduced a new class of gravitational theories with two local degrees of freedom. The existence of these theories apparently challenges the distinctive role of general relativity as the unique non-linear theory of massless spin-2 particles. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis of these theories with the aim of (i) understanding whether or not these are actually equivalent to general relativity, and (ii) finding the root of the variance in case these are not. We have found that a broad set of seemingly different theories actually pass all the possible tests of equivalence to general relativity (in vacuum) that we were able to devise, including the analysis of scattering amplitudes using on-shell techniques. These results are complemented with the observation that the only examples which are manifestly not equivalent to general relativity either do not contain gravitons in their spectrum, or are not guaranteed to include only two local degrees of freedom once radiative corrections are taken into account. Coupling to matter is also considered: we show that coupling these theories to matter in a consistent way is not as straightforward as one could expect. Minimal coupling, as well as the most straightforward non-minimal couplings, cannot be used. Therefore, before being able to address any issues in the presence of matter, it would be necessary to find a consistent (and in any case rather peculiar) coupling scheme.

  10. Parametrizations in scalar-tensor theories of gravity and the limit of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Järv, L; Kuusk, P; Saal, M; Vilson, O

    2014-01-01

    We consider a general scalar-tensor theory of gravity and review briefly different forms it can be presented (different conformal frames and scalar field parametrizations). We investigate the conditions under which its field equations and the parametrized post-Newtonian parameters coincide with those of general relativity. We demonstrate that these so-called limits of general relativity are independent of the parametrization of the scalar field, although the transformation between scalar fields may be singular at the corresponding value of the scalar field. In particular, the limit of general relativity can equivalently be determined and investigated in the commonly used Jordan and Einstein frames.

  11. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a completely revised and expanded version of the previous classic edition ‘General Relativity and Relativistic Astrophysics’. In Part I the foundations of general relativity are thoroughly developed, while Part II is devoted to tests of general relativity and many of its applications. Binary pulsars – our best laboratories for general relativity – are studied in considerable detail. An introduction to gravitational lensing theory is included as well, so as to make the current literature on the subject accessible to readers. Considerable attention is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes. This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel’s proof of his uniqueness theorem, and a derivation of the basic laws of black hole physics. Part II ends with Witten’s proof of the positive energy theorem, which is presented in detail, together with the required tools on spin structures and spinor analysis. In Part III, all of the differential geomet...

  12. Extension of Loop Quantum Gravity to Metric Theories beyond General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yongge

    2012-01-01

    The successful background-independent quantization of Loop Quantum Gravity relies on the key observation that classical General Relativity can be cast into the connection-dynamical formalism with the structure group of SU(2). Due to this particular formalism, Loop Quantum Gravity was generally considered as a quantization scheme that applies only to General Relativity. However, we will show that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of Loop Quantum Gravity can be extended to a rather general class of metric theories of gravity, which have received increased attention recently due to motivations coming form cosmology and astrophysics. In particular, we will first introduce how to reformulate the 4-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity, as well as Brans-Dicke theory, into connection-dynamical formalism with real SU(2) connections as configuration variables. Through these formalisms, we then outline the nonpertubative canonical quantization of the f(R) theories and Brans-Dicke theory by extending the loop quantization scheme of General Relativity.

  13. Structure of the generalized momentum of a test charged particle and the inverse problem in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.V.; Singatullin, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The inverse problem is solved in general relativity theory (GRT) consisting in determining the metric and potentials of an electromagnetic field by their values in the nonsingular point of the V 4 space and present functions, being the generalized momenta of a test charged particle. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a test charged particle in GRT is used. The general form of the generalized momentum dependence on the initial values is determined. It is noted that the inverse problem solution of dynamics in GRT contains arbitrariness which depends on the choice of the metric and potential values of the electromagnetic field in the nonsingular point [ru

  14. A generalized DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient for an indirect relation matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hsiang-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient of indirect relation matrix is proposed, and a useful validity index, called Liu’s validity index, is also proposed for evaluating the performance of any DEMATEL model. If the shrinkage coefficient of an indirect relation matrix is equal to 1, then this new theory is identical to the traditional theory; in other words, it is a generalization of the traditional theory. Furthermore, the indirect relation is always considerably greater than the direct one in traditional DEMATEL theory, which is unreasonable and unfair because it overemphasizes the influence of the indirect relation. We prove in this paper that if the shrinkage coefficient is equal to 0.5, then the indirect relation is less than its direct relation. Because the shrinkage coefficient belongs to [0.5, 1], according to Liu’s validity index, we can find a more appropriate shrinkage coefficient to obtain a more efficient DEMATEL method. Some crucial properties of this new theory are discussed, and a simple example is provided to illustrate the advantages of the proposed theory.

  15. On the relation of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory; Ueber die Beziehung der begrifflichen Grundlagen der Quantentheorie und der Allgemeinen Relativitaetstheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Martin

    2010-07-01

    The specific content of the present thesis is presented in the following way. First the most important contents of quantum theory and general relativity theory are presented. In connection with the general relativity theory the mathematical property of the diffeomorphism invariance plays the deciding role, while concerning the quantum theory starting from the Copenhagen interpretation first the measurement problem is treated, before basing on the analysis of concrete phenomena and the mathematical apparatus of quantum theory the nonlocality is brought into focus as an important property. This means that both theories suggest a relationalistic view of the nature of the space. This analysis of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory in relation to the nature of the space obtains only under inclusion of Kant's philosophy and his analysis of the terms space and time as fundamental forms of perception its full persuasive power. Then von Weizsaeckers quantum theory of the ur-alternatives is presented. Finally attempts are made to apply the obtained knowledge to the question of the quantum-theoretical formulation of general relativity theory.

  16. Einstein in matrix form exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2013-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the "Black Hole" phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  17. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludyk, Guenter [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Physics and Electrical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  18. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludyk, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  19. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, A; Alimi, J-M; Navarro, A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function α (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field (φ) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, α 0 , strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by α ∝ |φ| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on α 0 (∼ -19 ). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by α ∝ φ much larger limits on α 0 (∼ -7 ) are found

  20. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, A [Dept. Fisica y Computacion, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E03202-Elche (Spain); Alimi, J-M [LAEC, CNRS-UMR 8631, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F92195-Meudon (France); Navarro, A [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E30071-Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-07

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function {alpha} (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field ({phi}) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, {alpha}{sub 0}, strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} |{phi}| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -19}). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} {phi} much larger limits on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -7}) are found.

  1. A Theory of Evolving Natural Constants Based on the Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Dirac's Large Number Hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huanwu

    2005-01-01

    Taking Dirac's large number hypothesis as true, we have shown [Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 42 (2004) 703] the inconsistency of applying Einstein's theory of general relativity with fixed gravitation constant G to cosmology, and a modified theory for varying G is found, which reduces to Einstein's theory outside the gravitating body for phenomena of short duration in small distances, thereby agrees with all the crucial tests formerly supporting Einstein's theory. The modified theory, when applied to the usual homogeneous cosmological model, gives rise to a variable cosmological tensor term determined by the derivatives of G, in place of the cosmological constant term usually introduced ad hoc. Without any free parameter the theoretical Hubble's relation obtained from the modified theory seems not in contradiction to observations, as Dr. Wang's preliminary analysis of the recent data indicates [Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 42 (2004) 703]. As a complement to Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 42 (2004) 703 we shall study in this paper the modification of electromagnetism due to Dirac's large number hypothesis in more detail to show that the approximation of geometric optics still leads to null geodesics for the path of light, and that the general relation between the luminosity distance and the proper geometric distance is still valid in our theory as in Einstein's theory, and give the equations for homogeneous cosmological model involving matter plus electromagnetic radiation. Finally we consider the impact of the modification to quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, and arrive at a systematic theory of evolving natural constants including Planck's h-bar as well as Boltzmann's k B by finding out their cosmologically combined counterparts with factors of appropriate powers of G that may remain truly constant to cosmologically long time.

  2. The perfect theory a century of geniuses and the battle over general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Pedro G

    2014-01-01

    Physicists have been exploring, debating, and questioning the general theory of relativity ever since Albert Einstein first presented it in 1915. Their work has uncovered a number of the universe’s more surprising secrets, and many believe further wonders remain hidden within the theory’s tangle of equations, waiting to be exposed. In this sweeping narrative of science and culture, astrophysicist Pedro Ferreira brings general relativity to life through the story of the brilliant physicists, mathematicians, and astronomers who have taken up its challenge. For these scientists, the theory has been both a treasure trove and an enigma, fueling a century of intellectual struggle and triumph.. Einstein’s theory, which explains the relationships among gravity, space, and time, is possibly the most perfect intellectual achievement of modern physics, yet studying it has always been a controversial endeavor. Relativists were the target of persecution in Hitler’s Germany, hounded in Stalin’s Russia, and disdai...

  3. General Theory of Duality. A proposal to unifiy relativity theory, quantum mechanics and string theory - cognition for a new dynamic world view in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, M.

    2005-01-01

    The chase after a world formula is presently the most iridescent task for natural science. By the development of a radical new scientistic theory, unifying not only relativity and quantum theory as also astrophysics and string theory to a common view, the author lances the first serious candidate for a TOE (Theory of Everything) in the scientific discussion. The General Theory of Duality (GDT) offers not only surprising answers to fundamental questions of physics, but also discovers the smallest component of our universe, which is still known since a longer time, which we ignored: Planck's Constant. May be possible that by this book a new world view in physics can be created. (GL)

  4. Generalized etale cohomology theories

    CERN Document Server

    Jardine, John F

    1997-01-01

    A generalized etale cohomology theory is a theory which is represented by a presheaf of spectra on an etale site for an algebraic variety, in analogy with the way an ordinary spectrum represents a cohomology theory for spaces. Examples include etale cohomology and etale K-theory. This book gives new and complete proofs of both Thomason's descent theorem for Bott periodic K-theory and the Nisnevich descent theorem. In doing so, it exposes most of the major ideas of the homotopy theory of presheaves of spectra, and generalized etale homology theories in particular. The treatment includes, for the purpose of adequately dealing with cup product structures, a development of stable homotopy theory for n-fold spectra, which is then promoted to the level of presheaves of n-fold spectra.   This book should be of interest to all researchers working in fields related to algebraic K-theory. The techniques presented here are essentially combinatorial, and hence algebraic. An extensive background in traditional stable hom...

  5. Experimental test of General Relativity theory by radar observations of planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, T.I.; Kislik, M.D.; Kolyuka, Yu.F.; Tikhonov, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    Basing on the radar observations of planets, carried out in the USSR and USA in 1964-1986, a particular relativistic effect has been tested, namely the (O-C) discrepancies in radar distances, arising in the construction of a unified theory of motion on interior planets in the Newtonian approximation. The results obtained confirm the validity of General Relativity to an accuracy of about 10 -2

  6. Adiposopathy, metabolic syndrome, quantum physics, general relativity, chaos and the Theory of Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold

    2005-05-01

    Excessive fat (adiposity) and dysfunctional fat (adiposopathy) constitute the most common worldwide epidemics of our time -- and perhaps of all time. Ongoing efforts to explain how the micro (adipocyte) and macro (body organ) biologic systems interact through function and dysfunction in promoting Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia are not unlike the mechanistic and philosophical thinking processes involved in reconciling the micro (quantum physics) and macro (general relativity) theories in physics. Currently, the term metabolic syndrome refers to a constellation of consequences often associated with excess body fat and is an attempt to unify the associations known to exist between the four fundamental metabolic diseases of obesity, hyperglycemia (including Type 2 diabetes mellitus), hypertension and dyslipidemia. However, the association of adiposity with these metabolic disorders is not absolute and the metabolic syndrome does not describe underlying causality, nor does the metabolic syndrome necessarily reflect any reasonably related pathophysiologic process. Just as with quantum physics, general relativity and the four fundamental forces of the universe, the lack of an adequate unifying theory of micro causality and macro consequence is unsatisfying, and in medicine, impairs the development of agents that may globally improve both obesity and obesity-related metabolic disease. Emerging scientific and clinical evidence strongly supports the novel concept that it is not adiposity alone, but rather it is adiposopathy that is the underlying cause of most cases of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Adiposopathy is a plausible Theory of Everything for mankind's greatest metabolic epidemics.

  7. Distinguishing f(R) theories from general relativity by gravitational lensing effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongguang [Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Aix Marseille Universite et Universite de Toulon, Centre de Physique Theorique (UMR 7332), Marseille (France); Wang, Xin; Li, Haida; Ma, Yongge [Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-11-15

    The post-Newtonian formulation of a general class of f(R) theories is set up in a third-order approximation. It turns out that the information of a specific form of f(R) gravity is encoded in the Yukawa potential, which is contained in the perturbative expansion of the metric components. Although the Yukawa potential is canceled in the second-order expression of the effective refraction index of light, detailed analysis shows that the difference of the lensing effect between the f(R) gravity and general relativity does appear at the third order when √(f''(0)/f{sup '}(0)) is larger than the distance d{sub 0} to the gravitational source. However, the difference between these two kinds of theories will disappear in the axially symmetric spacetime region. Therefore only in very rare case the f(R) theories are distinguishable from general relativity by gravitational lensing effect in a third-order post-Newtonian approximation. (orig.)

  8. IS IT NECESSARY TO TEACH THE THEORY OF RELATIVITY IN GENERAL PHYSICS COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Kolgatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to discuss and study the general structure of the course of Physics at the high school in an extended sense. In a narrower sense, the author wonders about the necessity for inclusion of the section «Theory of Relativity» in the General Physics course, and discusses the possible site of this issue in the order of presentation.Methods. A method for designing Physics course in modern conditions requires certain sophistication from a lecturer. This is due to the strong reduction of Physics course occurred in recent years, and due to a number of objective and subjective reasons. Planning the course structure, one has to make the selection of most significant questions sacrificing minor and less significant issues. This process is particularly exacerbated by severe restrictions on the time allowed for the subject. It is necessary to re-examine the content of the course due to the recent reduction in lecture hours on Physics. In this case, it would be undesirable to neglect the substantial parts of the subject content which are important conceptually or in its applications, e.g. the Relativity Theory. The author discusses two ways of disposition of the relevant material in the course structure, and correlates them with the required level of Physics teaching. In the first approach the Relativity Theory course is considered as a part of Modern Mechanics and is placed in the first semester immediately following Kinematics. In the second approach, Relativistic Physics is presented as a result of deduction, as a generalized theory explaining the unity of the world and the objective existence of physical laws; in this case, the section is better to locate after Optics, immediately before Atomic Physics.Results. As a result of consideration, the author proves the conclusion that the inclusion of the Relativistic Theory course in a number of sections of General Physics is necessary. The author offers a list of

  9. General Relativity and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  10. General relativity and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Damour, T.

    1994-01-01

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  11. Einstein's creative thinking and the general theory of relativity: a documented report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    1979-01-01

    A document written by Albert Einstein has recently come to light in which the eminent scientist described the actual sequence of his thoughts leading to the development of the general theory of relativity. The key creative thought was an instance of a type of creative cognition the author has previously designated "Janusian thinking," Janusian thinking consists of actively conceiving two or more opposite or antithetical concepts, ideas, or images simultaneously. This form of high-level secondary process cognition has been found to operate widely in art, science, and other fields.

  12. Equations for the gravitational field and local conserved quantities in the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoff, S.

    1979-07-01

    By utilization of the method of Lagrangians with covariant derivatives (MLCD) the different energy-momentum tensors (canonical, generalized canonical, symmetrical) and the relations between them are considered. On this basis, Einstein's theory of gravitation is studied as a field theory with a Lagrangian density of the type Lsub(g)=√-g.Lsub(g)(gsub(ij),Rsub(A)), (Rsub(A)=Rsub(ijkl)). It is shown that the energy-momentum tensors of the gravitational field can be defined for this theory. The symmetrical energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i), which in the general case is not a local conserved quantity (sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i)sub(;i) unequal 0) (in contrast to the material fields satisfying condition sub(Ms)Tsub(k)sup(i)sub(;i) = 0), is equal to zero for the gravitational field in vacuum (cosmological constant Λ = 0). Equations of the gravitational field of a new type are suggested, leading to equations of motion (sub(Ms)Tsub(k)sup(i) + sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i))sub(;i) = 0. The equations corresponding to the Lagrangian density Lsub(g)=(√-g/kappasub(o)) (R - lambda approximately), lambda approximately = const., are considered. The equations of Einstein Rsub(ij) = 0 are obtained in the case of gravitational field in vacuum. Some particular cases are examined as an illustration to material fields and the corresponding gravitational equations. (author)

  13. Quantum fields on manifolds: an interplay between quantum theory, statistical thermodynamics and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The author shows how the basic axioms of quantum field theory, general relativity and statistical thermodynamics lead, in a model-independent way, to a generalized Hawking-Unruh effect, whereby the gravitational fields carried by a class of space-time manifolds with event horizons thermalize ambient quantum fields. The author is concerned with a quantum field on a space-time x containing a submanifold X' bounded by event horizons. The objective is to show that, for a wide class of space-times, the global vacuum state of the field reduces, in X', to a thermal state, whose temperature depends on the geometry. The statistical thermodynaical, geometrical, and quantum field theoretical essential ingredients for the reduction of the vacuum state are discussed

  14. On the role of the equivalence principle in the general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsenshtein, M.E.; Stanyukovich, K.P.; Pogosyan, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions under which the solutions of the general relativity theory equations satisfy the correspondence principle are considered. It is shown that in general relativity theory, as in a plane space any systems of coordinates satisfying the topological requirements of continuity and uniqueness are admissible. The coordinate transformations must be mutually unique, and the following requirements must be met: the transformations of the coordinates xsup(i)=xsup(i)(anti xsup(k)) must preserve the class of the function, while the transformation jacobian must be finite and nonzero. The admissible metrics in the Tolmen problem for a vacuum are considered. A prohibition of the vacuum solution of the Tolmen problem is obtained from the correspondence principle. The correspondence principle is applied to the solution of the Friedmann problem by constructing a spherical symmetric self-similar solution, in which replacement of compression by expansion occurs at a finite density. The examples adduced convince that the application of the correspondence principle makes it possible to discard physically inadmissible solutions and obtained new physical results

  15. Matter in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  16. General relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The author proposes a course on general relativity. He first presents a geometrical framework by addressing, presenting and discussion the following notions: the relativistic space-time, the metric tensor, Universe lines, observers, principle of equivalence and geodesics. In the next part, he addresses gravitational fields with spherical symmetry: presentation of the Schwarzschild metrics, radial light geodesics, gravitational spectral shift (Einstein effect), orbitals of material objects, photon trajectories. The next parts address the Einstein equation, black holes, gravitational waves, and cosmological solutions. Appendices propose a discussion of the relationship between relativity and GPS, some problems and their solutions, and Sage codes

  17. General relativity with small cosmological constant from spontaneous compactification of Lovelock theory in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Willison, Steven; Giacomini, Alex; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that Einstein gravity in four dimensions with small cosmological constant and small extra dimensions can be obtained by spontaneous compactification of Lovelock gravity in vacuum. Assuming that the extra dimensions are compact spaces of constant curvature, general relativity is recovered within a certain class of Lovelock theories possessing necessarily cubic or higher order terms in curvature. This bounds the higher dimension to at least 7. Remarkably, the effective gauge coupling and Newton constant in four dimensions are not proportional to the gravitational constant in higher dimensions, but are shifted with respect to their standard values. This effect opens up new scenarios where a maximally symmetric solution in higher dimensions could decay into the compactified spacetime either by tunneling or through a gravitational analog of ghost condensation. Indeed, this is what occurs requiring both the extra dimensions and the four-dimensional cosmological constant to be small.

  18. Bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1979-01-01

    A modification of general relativity is proposed involving a second metric tensor describing a space-time of constant curvature and associated with the fundamental rest-frame of the universe. The theory generally agrees with the Einstein theory, but gives cosmological models without singularities which can account for present observation, including helium abundance

  19. Perspectiva internacional del uso de la teoría general de Orem International perspective relative to Orem General Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Lucero López Díaz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: caracterizar y analizar artículos que utilizan la Teoría General de Enfermería de Orem en el período de 1992 a 2001. Diseño y metodología: estudio documental sobre 108 artículos encontrados en las bases de datos: MEDLINE, OVID, PROQUEST y el Catálogo Colectivo Nacional de Publicaciones Seriadas- Hemeroteca Nacional (Colombia. Fueron seleccionados 74 artículos que utilizaron alguna de las teorías de Orem o conceptos de la Teoría General de Orem. Resultados: la Teoría General de Orem ha sido utilizada en cuatro continentes; 38 (51,3% estudios la aplican en el ámbito institucional y 21 (28,4% en la comunidad. Los adultos y ancianos son los grupos de edad con mayor reporte en los estudios (47,3%. Los métodos cuantitativos de investigación son los más utilizados (69 estudios, 93,2%. Conclusión: los estudios exploran o correlacionan conceptos de la Teoría General de Orem, el desarrollo de instrumentos y la validación de constructos teóricos. La evidencia empírica sobre la aplicación de la Teoría General de Orem muestra su importancia en el desarrollo del conocimiento en enfermería e indica su gran utilidad para la investigación y práctica de enfermería.Objective: analysis and characterization of articles about Orem General Theory used between 1992 to 2001. Methodology and Materials: documental study about 108 articles recorded in Medline, Ovid, Proquest databases and in the National Colective Catalogue of Periodicals Colombian newspapers library. Seventy four articles using some Orem’s General Theory were selected. Results: Orem’s General Theory has been applied in four continents. Thirty eight studies (51.3% use it in the institutional environment and 21 (28.4% in the community. Adults and senior citizens are the age groups more reported (47.3%. Quantitative research methods are the most common. Conclusions: sixty nine studies explore or correlate concepts from Orem’s General Theory, the development of

  20. Einstein's General Theory of Relativity-with Modern Applications in Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrabes, C

    2008-01-01

    The increasing prominence of general relativity in astrophysics and cosmology is reflected in the growing number of texts, particularly at the undergraduate level. A natural attitude before opening a new one is to ask i) what makes this different from those already published? And ii) does it follow the 'physics-first approach' as for instance the book by Hartle where the basic physical concepts are introduced first with as little formalism as possible, or does it follow the more traditional 'math-first approach' for which the mathematical formalism comes first and is then applied to phyics? As announced in the title, a distinctive feature of the book by Gron and Hervik is the space (almost half the book) devoted to cosmology and in particular to some of the most recent developments in this rapidly evolving field. It is also apparent that the authors have chosen, like the majority of current books on general relativity, the 'math-first approach'. The book is divided into six parts, each of them subdivided into chapters with part VI containing a few short technical appendices. The first part of the book briefly presents in chapter I the principles of relativity, Newtonian mechanics and the Newtonian theory of gravity. In chapter II, a short introduction to special relativity is given. It seems at first surprising that the four-dimensional structure of space-time is not more fully exploited so that the reader would gain familiarity early on with notions like 4-velocity, 4-momentum and the stress-energy tensor. This is in fact postponed to part II as an illustration of the mathematical formalism. The second part is devoted to those elements of differential geometry needed in this kind of course. The authors' presentation is somewhat similar to that of the books by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and by Straumann (2nd edition). Vectors and forms are treated separately and the formalism of differential forms is introduced in detail. The various kinds of differentiation on

  1. Elements of relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawden, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    The book on elements of relativity theory is intended for final year school students or as an early university course in mathematical physics. Special principle of relativity, lorentz transformation, velocity transformations, relativistic mechanics, and general theory of relativity, are all discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Generalized chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, M.; Stern, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Generalized Chiral Perturbation Theory enlarges the framework of the standard χPT (Chiral Perturbation Theory), relaxing certain assumptions which do not necessarily follow from QCD or from experiment, and which are crucial for the usual formulation of the low energy expansion. In this way, experimental tests of the foundations of the standard χPT become possible. Emphasis is put on physical aspects rather than on formal developments of GχPT. (author). 31 refs

  3. Generalized G-theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladkowski, J.

    1991-01-01

    Various attempts to formulate the fundamental physical interactions in the framework of unified geometric theories have recently gained considerable success (Kaluza, 1921; Klein, 1926; Trautmann, 1970; Cho, 1975). Symmetries of the spacetime and so-called internal spaces seem to play a key role in investigating both the fundamental interactions and the abundance of elementary particles. The author presents a category-theoretic description of a generalization of the G-theory concept and its application to geometric compactification and dimensional reduction. The main reasons for using categories and functors as tools are the clearness and the level of generalization one can obtain

  4. Age- and Parkinson's disease-related evaluation of gait by General Tau Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shutao; Qian, Jinwu; Zhang, Zhen; Shen, Linyong; Wu, Xi; Hu, Xiaowu

    2016-10-01

    The degeneration of postural control in the elderly and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be debilitating and may lead to increased fall risk. This study evaluated the changes in postural control during gait affected by PD and aging using a new method based on the General Tau Theory. Fifteen patients with PD, 11 healthy old adults (HOs), and 15 healthy young adults (HYs) were recruited. Foot trajectories of each participant were monitored during walking by a three-camera Optotrak Certus(®) motion capture system. The anteroposterior direction of foot movement during stepping was analyzed by tau-G and tau-J guidance strategies. Two linear regression analyses suggested that the tau of the step-gap was strongly coupled onto the tau-J guidance during walking. The regression slope K could estimate the coupling ratio in the tau-coupling equation which reflects the performance of postural control during gait. The mean K value for the PD group, which was highest among the three groups, was approximately 0.5. Therefore, participants in the PD group walked with the poorest postural control and exhibited a relatively hard contact with the endpoint during stepping when compared with those in the HO and HY groups. The HY and HO groups obtained mean K values significantly lower than 0.5, which indicated that the gait was well controlled and ended at low speed with low deceleration. However, the HO group showed a decreased tendency for postural control, in which the mean K value was significantly higher than that of the HY group. The K value was moderately positively correlated with the double support time and negatively correlated with the stride length and walking speed. The tau-J coupling ratio can provide additional insight into gait disturbances and may serve as a reliable, objective, and quantitative tool to evaluate dynamic postural control during walking.

  5. Relativity theory - topical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutzer, E.

    1979-01-01

    Issued on the occasion of Albert Einstein's 100th birthday the book deals topically with the special and general relativity theory. The latest experiments to confirm the relativity theory are described and the historical development of the theory is presented in detail. Emphasis is given to the disclosure of deep insights into the nature of matter. Of interest to experts in physical and natural sciences and to mathematicians

  6. A general theory to explain the relatively high cost of environmental restoration at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental Restoration costs for Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have been the subject of much scrutiny and concern for several years. General opinion is that DOE clean-up costs are as much as three times higher than costs for similar clean-up projects in the private sector. Consequently, DOE Environmental Restoration professionals are continually under pressure to do more with less, which, ironically, can lead to additional inefficiencies in the system. This paper proposes a general theory as to why DOE costs are higher, explains the reasons why current conditions will make it difficult to realize any pervasive or significant decreases in clean-up costs, and presents some general changes that need to take place in the DOE system in order to bring about conditions that will allow more efficient clean-up to occur. The theory is based on a simple economic model that describes the balance between the resources spent for risk avoidance and the corresponding changes in overall productivity as a function of risk. The elementary concepts illustrated with the economic model, when refined and specifically applied, have the potential to become the catalyst for significant change-change that is absolutely necessary if we truly intend to conduct environmental clean-up with the same efficiencies as private industry

  7. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The General Theory of Relativity (GR), created by Albert Einstein between 1907 and 1915, is a theory both of gravitation and of spacetime structure. It is based on the assumption that matter, via its energy-momentum, interacts with the metric of spacetime, which is considered (in contrast to Newtonian physics and SPECIAL RELATIVITY) as a dynamical field having degrees of freedom of its own (GRAVI...

  8. The classification of the Ricci tensor in the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, W.J.

    1979-10-01

    A comprehensive classification of the Ricci tensor in General Relativity using several techniques is given and their connection with existing classification studied under the headings; canonical forms for the Ricci tensor, invariant 2-spaces in the classification of the Ricci tensor, Riemannian curvature and the classification of the Riemann and Ricci tensors, and spinor classifications of the Ricci tensor. (U.K.)

  9. Relativity theory and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on relativity theory and gravitation is presented as a preface to the first of the articles submitted to the Journal on general relativity. Newtonian gravitation and and observation, relativity, and the sources of the gravitational field, are all discussed. (UK)

  10. Theory of pairwise coupling embedded in more general local dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.; Bers, A.; Harten, L.

    1985-01-01

    Earlier work on the mode conversion theory by Fuchs, Ko, and Bers is detailed and expanded upon, and its relation to energy conservation is discussed. Given a local dispersion relation, D(ω; k, z) = 0, describing stable waves excited at an externally imposed frequency ω, a pairwise mode-coupling event embedded therein is extracted by expanding D(k, z) around a contour k = k/sub c/(z) given by partialD/partialk = 0. The branch points of D(k, z) = 0 are the turning points of a second-order differential-equation representation. In obtaining the fraction of mode-converted energy, the connection formula and conservation of energy must be used together. Also, proper attention must be given to distinguish cases for which the coupling disappears or persists upon confluence of the branches, a property which is shown to depend on the forward (v/sub g/v/sub ph/>0) or backward (v/sub g/v/sub ph/<0) nature of the waves. Examples occurring in ion-cyclotron and lower-hybrid heating are presented, illustrating the use of the theory

  11. New general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Shirafuji, T.

    1979-01-01

    A gravitational theory is formulated on the Weitzenboeck space-time, characterized by the vanishing curvature tensor (absolute parallelism) and by the torsion tensor formed of four parallel vector fields. This theory is called new general relativity, since Einstein in 1928 first gave its original form. New general relativity has three parameters c 1 , c 2 , and lambda, besides the Einstein constant kappa. In this paper we choose c 1 = 0 = c 2 , leaving open lambda. We prove, among other things, that (i) a static, spherically symmetric gravitational field is given by the Schwarzschild metric, that (ii) in the weak-field approximation an antisymmetric field of zero mass and zero spin exists, besides gravitons, and that (iii) new general relativity agrees with all the experiments so far carried out

  12. General covariance and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1986-01-01

    The extension of the principle of relativity to general coordinate systems is based on the hypothesis that an accelerated observer is locally equivalent to a hypothetical inertial observer with the same velocity as the noninertial observer. This hypothesis of locality is expected to be valid for classical particle phenomena as well as for classical wave phenomena but only in the short-wavelength approximation. The generally covariant theory is therefore expected to be in conflict with the quantum theory which is based on wave-particle duality. This is explicitly demonstrated for the frequency of electromagnetic radiation measured by a uniformly rotating observer. The standard Doppler formula is shown to be valid only in the geometric optics approximation. A new definition for the frequency is proposed, and the resulting formula for the frequency measured by the rotating observer is shown to be consistent with expectations based on the classical theory of electrons. A tentative quantum theory is developed on the basis of the generalization of the Bohr frequency condition to include accelerated observers. The description of the causal sequence of events is assumed to be independent of the motion of the observer. Furthermore, the quantum hypothesis is supposed to be valid for all observers. The implications of this theory are critically examined. The new formula for frequency, which is still based on the hypothesis of locality, leads to the observation of negative energy quanta by the rotating observer and is therefore in conflict with the quantum theory

  13. Gravitation Theory: Empirical Status from Solar System Experiments: All observations to date are consistent with Einstein's general relativity theory of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtvedt, K L

    1972-12-15

    I have reviewed the historical and contemporary experiments that guide us in choosing a post-Newtonian, relativistic gravitational theory. The foundation experiments essentially constrain gravitation theory to be a metric theory in which matter couples solely to one gravitational field, the metric field, although other cosmological gravitational fields may exist. The metric field for any metric theory can be specified (for the solar system, for our present purposes) by a series of potential terms with several parameters. A variety of experiments specify (or put limits on) the numerical values of the seven parameters in the post-Newtonian metric field, and other such experiments have been planned. The empirical results, to date, yield values of the parameters that are consistent with the predictions of Einstein's general relativity.

  14. Elementary general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.

    1979-01-01

    The plan of the book is as follows: Chapter 1 develops special relativity in a setting and notation that can immediately be transferred to general relativity. Most of the fundamental geometrical ideas are established here. Chapter 2 gives a more conventional account of some selected applications of special relativity. Chapter 3 is the heart of the book. A geometrical model of space-time is progressively built up, motivated by physical arguments stemming from the equivalence principle, leading to Einstein's field equations. Chapter 4 deals very quickly with the simplest form of weak-field theory with application to gravitational radiation. Chapter 5 concludes the book with a fairly detailed analysis of the Schwarzschild solution, plane fronted gravitational waves, and the Robertson-Walker cosmological solutions. Exercises at the end of each chapter extend the general theory into particular applications, giving a broader picture of the scope of the subject. (author)

  15. Theory of relations

    CERN Document Server

    Fraïssé, R

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this book concerns the present state of the theory of chains (= total or linear orderings), in connection with some refinements of Ramsey's theorem, due to Galvin and Nash-Williams. This leads to the fundamental Laver's embeddability theorem for scattered chains, using Nash-Williams' better quasi-orderings, barriers and forerunning.The second part (chapters 9 to 12) extends to general relations the main notions and results from order-type theory. An important connection appears with permutation theory (Cameron, Pouzet, Livingstone and Wagner) and with logics (existence criter

  16. General volumes in the Orlicz-Brunn-Minkowski theory and a related Minkowski Problem I

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Richard J.; Hug, Daniel; Weil, Wolfgang; Xing, Sudan; Ye, Deping

    2018-01-01

    The general volume of a star body, a notion that includes the usual volume, the $q$th dual volumes, and many previous types of dual mixed volumes, is introduced. A corresponding new general dual Orlicz curvature measure is defined that specializes to the $(p,q)$-dual curvature measures introduced recently by Lutwak, Yang, and Zhang. General variational formulas are established for the general volume of two types of Orlicz linear combinations. One of these is applied to the Minkowski problem f...

  17. Trace Formulae of Characteristic Polynomial and Cayley-Hamilton's Theorem, and Applications to Chiral Perturbation Theory and General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honghao; Yan Wenbin; Li Xuesong

    2008-01-01

    By using combinatorics, we give a new proof for the recurrence relations of the characteristic polynomial coefficients, and we further obtain an explicit expression for the generic term of the coefficient sequence, which yields the trace formulae of the Cayley-Hamilton's theorem with all coefficients explicitly given. This implies a byproduct, a complete expression for the determinant of any finite-dimensional matrix in terms of the traces of its successive powers. And we discuss some of their applications to chiral perturbation theory and general relativity

  18. A Theory of Gravity and General Relativity based on Quantum Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2018-02-01

    Based on first principles solutions in a unified framework of quantum mechanics and electromagnetism we predict the presence of a universal attractive depolarisation radiation (DR) Lorentz force (F) between quantum entities, each being either an IED matter particle or light quantum, in a polarisable dielectric vacuum. Given two quantum entities i = 1, 2 of either kind, of characteristic frequencies ν _i^0, masses m_i0 = hν _i^0/{c^2} and separated at a distance r 0, the solution for F is F = - G}m_1^0m_2^0/{≤ft( {{r^2}} \\right)^2}, where G} = χ _0^2{e^4}/12{π ^2} \\in _0^2{ρ _λ };{χ _0} is the susceptibility and π λ is the reduced linear mass density of the vacuum. This force F resembles in all respects Newton’s gravity and is accurate at the weak F limit; hence ℊ equals the gravitational constant G. The DR wave fields and hence the gravity are each propagated in the dielectric vacuum at the speed of light c; these can not be shielded by matter. A test particle µ of mass m 0 therefore interacts gravitationally with all of the building particles of a given large mass M at r 0 apart, by a total gravitational force F = -GMm 0/(r 0)2 and potential V = -∂F/∂r 0. For a finite V and hence a total Hamiltonian H = m 0 c 2 + V, solution for the eigenvalue equation of µ presents a red-shift in the eigen frequency ν = ν 0(1 - GM/r 0 c 2) and hence in other wave variables. The quantum solutions combined with the wave nature of the gravity further lead to dilated gravito optical distance r = r 0/(1 - GM/r 0 c 2) and time t = t 0/(1 - GM/r 0 c 2), and modified Newton’s gravity and Einstein’s mass energy relation. Applications of these give predictions of the general relativistic effects manifested in the four classical test experiments of Einstein’s general relativity (GR), in direct agreement with the experiments and the predictions given based on GR.

  19. A kinetic theory of diffusion in general relativity with cosmological scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calogero, Simone

    2011-01-01

    A new model to describe the dynamics of particles undergoing diffusion in general relativity is proposed. The evolution of the particle system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation without friction on the tangent bundle of spacetime. It is shown that the energy-momentum tensor for this matter model is not divergence-free, which makes it inconsistent to couple the Fokker-Planck equation to the Einstein equations. This problem can be solved by postulating the existence of additional matter fields in spacetime or by modifying the Einstein equations. The case of a cosmological scalar field term added to the left hand side of the Einstein equations is studied in some details. For the simplest cosmological model, namely the flat Robertson-Walker spacetime, it is shown that, depending on the initial value of the cosmological scalar field, which can be identified with the present observed value of the cosmological constant, either unlimited expansion or the formation of a singularity in finite time will occur in the future. Future collapse into a singularity also takes place for a suitable small but positive present value of the cosmological constant, in contrast to the standard diffusion-free scenario

  20. Relational regulation theory and the role of social support and organisational fairness for nurses in a general acute context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Munro, Louise

    2013-11-01

    To present a novel approach to nurse stress by exploring the demand-control-support model with organisational justice through the lens of relational regulation theory. Nursing is often stressful due to high demands and dissatisfaction with pay, which impacts the mental well-being and productivity of nurses. A cross-sectional design. A validated questionnaire was sent to the work addresses of all nursing and midwifery staff in a medium-sized general acute hospital in Australia. A total of 190 nurses and midwives returned completed questionnaires for the analyses. The multiple regression analyses demonstrated that the model applies to the prototypical context of a general acute hospital and that job control, supervisor support and outside work support improve the job satisfaction and mental health of nurses. Most importantly, supervisor support was found to buffer the impact of excessive work demands. Fairness of procedures, distribution of resources and the quality and consistency of information are also beneficial. Relational regulation theory is applied to these findings as a novel way to conceptualise the mechanisms of support and fairness in nursing. The importance of nurses' well-being and job satisfaction is a priority for improving clinical outcomes. Practically, this means nurse managers should be encouraging nurses in the pursuit of diverse relational activities both at work and outside work. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. General relativity 50 years old

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    In May 1916, 'The Foundations of General Relativity Theory' by Albert Einstein was published in 'Annalen der Physik'. Fifty years later, this major contribution to scientific thought still has a rather isolated position with respect to the main-stream of scientific theory. (In contrast, the Special Theory of Relativity is one of the cornerstones of sub-nuclear physics.) To mark the anniversary of the publication of Einstein's paper a theoretician from CERN discusses the theory and its present status.

  2. The theories of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deruelle, N.; Uzan, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    This book is a quite complete route towards general relativity via special relativity with a start point at Newton's mechanics. The mathematical formulation is based on tensors. All the relativistic aspects of only classical physics - it means no quantum mechanics - are exposed. This book is divided into 3 books and each book represents a consistent knowledge of physics at a certain time in the past: in Newton's time, in the second half of the 19. century and today. The advantage of this presentation is to make the reader feels the changes over time in the concepts of time, space, gravity, cosmology. Each book is divided into 3, 4 and 5 parts which are sub-divided into numerous chapters. Book 1: Space, time and gravity in Newton's theory, with part 1: kinematics, part 2: dynamics and part 3: gravity. Book 2: Special relativity and Maxwell's theory, with part 1: kinematics, part 2: dynamics, part 3: electromagnetism and part 4: electrodynamics. And Book 3: General relativity and gravity, with part 1: curved space-time and gravity, part 2: Schwarzschild solution and black holes, part 3: general relativity and experiments, part 4: Friedman-Lemaitre solutions and cosmology, and part 5: elements or Riemann geometry. The 3. book dedicated to general relativity, tackles topics like the relationships between space-time curvature and gravity, Schwarzschild solutions and black holes, gravitational waves, Friedmann-Lemaitre solutions and cosmology, and Riemann geometry. (A.C.)

  3. 3D numerical surface charge model including relative permeability : the general theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteren, van D.T.E.H.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the still "open" issues within low-frequency magnetics is the inclusion of µr in the calculations using the magnetic charge method. In this paper a new iterative method to take the relative permeability into account is investigated. Results show that the model accurately accounts for the

  4. First-person visualizations of the special and general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, U

    2008-01-01

    Visualizations that adopt a first-person point of view allow observation and, in the case of interactive simulations, experimentation with relativistic scenes. This paper gives examples of three types of first-person visualizations: watching objects that move at nearly the speed of light, being a high-speed observer looking at a static environment and having a look-around near a compact object. I illustrate and explain the main aspects of the visual observations, outline their use in teaching relativity and report on teaching experiences. For teaching purposes, our visualization work is available on the website www.spacetimetravel.org and its German counterpart www.tempolimit-lichtgeschwindigkeit.de. This paper assumes some basic knowledge about relativity on the part of the reader. It addresses instructors of physics at the undergraduate and advanced secondary school level as well as their students

  5. An experiment designed to verify the general theory of relativity; Une experience destinee a verifier la theorie de la relativite generalisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdin, Maurice [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France)

    1960-07-01

    The project for an experiment which uses the effect of gravitation on Maser-type clocks placed on the ground at two different heights and which is designed to verify the general theory of relativity. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 299-301, sitting of 11 January 1960 [French] Projet d'une experience, utilisant l'effet de gravitation sur des horloges du type Maser placees sur la terre a deux altitudes differentes, et destinee a verifier la theorie de la relativite generalisee. Reproduction d'un article publie dans les Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 299-301, seance du 11 janvier 1960.

  6. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  7. Introduction to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarthy, R

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL RELATIVITY begins with a description of the geometry of curved space, explaining geodesics, parallel transport, covariant differentiation, geodesic deviation and spacetime symmetry by killing vectors. It then introduces Einstein's theory of gravitation followed by Schwarzschild solution with its relevance to Positive Mass theorem. The three tests for Einstein's gravity are explained. Other exact solutions such as Vaidya, Kerr and Reisner - Nordstrom metric are included. In the Chapter on cosmological solutions, a detailed description of Godel metric is provided. It then introduces five dimensional spacetime of Kaluza showing the unification of gravity with electromagnetism. This is extended to include non-Abelian gauge theory by invoking compact extra dimensions. Explicit expressions in this case for Christoffel connections and ricci tensor are derived and the higher dimensional gravity action is shown to compactification are given.

  8. Modern canonical quantum general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This is an introduction to the by now fifteen years old research field of canonical quantum general relativity, sometimes called "loop quantum gravity". The term "modern" in the title refers to the fact that the quantum theory is based on formulating classical general relativity as a theory of connections rather than metrics as compared to in original version due to Arnowitt, Deser and Misner. Canonical quantum general relativity is an attempt to define a mathematically rigorous, non-perturbative, background independent theory of Lorentzian quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions in the continuum. The approach is minimal in that one simply analyzes the logical consequences of combining the principles of general relativity with the principles of quantum mechanics. The requirement to preserve background independence has lead to new, fascinating mathematical structures which one does not see in perturbative approaches, e.g. a fundamental discreteness of spacetime seems to be a prediction of the theory provi...

  9. Strains in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, Donato; Felice, Fernando de; Geralico, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The definition of relative accelerations and strains among a set of comoving particles is studied in connection with the geometric properties of the frame adapted to a 'fiducial observer'. We find that a relativistically complete and correct definition of strains must take into account the transport law of the chosen spatial triad along the observer's congruence. We use special congruences of (accelerated) test particles in some familiar spacetimes to elucidate such a point. The celebrated idea of Szekeres' compass of inertia, arising when studying geodesic deviation among a set of free-falling particles, is here generalized to the case of accelerated particles. In doing so we have naturally contributed to the theory of relativistic gravity gradiometer. Moreover, our analysis was made in an observer-dependent form, a fact that would be very useful when thinking about general relativistic tests on space stations orbiting compact objects like black holes and also in other interesting gravitational situations

  10. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  11. Generalized quantum sine-Gordon equation and its relation to the Thirring model in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagerstam, B.K.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss a generalization of the conventional sine-Gordon quantum field theory by using methods recently developed by Coleman. As a result we can argue that the equivalence between the sine-Gordon theory and the massive Thirring model is unaffected if we perturb the sine-Gordon Hamiltonian by a bounded perturbation consisting of a continuous sum of sine-Gordon type interactions

  12. General relativity basics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2015-01-01

    A Broad Perspective on the Theory of General Relativity and Its Observable Implications General Relativity: Basics and Beyond familiarizes students and beginning researchers with the basic features of the theory of general relativity as well as some of its more advanced aspects. Employing the pedagogical style of a textbook, it includes essential ideas and just enough background material needed for readers to appreciate the issues and current research. Basics The first five chapters form the core of an introductory course on general relativity. The author traces Einstein’s arguments and presents examples of space-times corresponding to different types of gravitational fields. He discusses the adaptation of dynamics in a Riemannian geometry framework, the Einstein equation and its elementary properties, and different phenomena predicted or influenced by general relativity. Beyond Moving on to more sophisticated features of general relativity, the book presents the physical requirements of a well-defined de...

  13. Generalized field theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that if, on empirical grounds, one rules out the existence of cosmic fields of Dicke-Brans (scalar) and Will Nordvedt (vector, tensor) type, then the most general experimentally viable and theoretically reasonable theory of gravitation seems to be a LAMBDA-dependent generalization of Einstein and Yilmez theories, which reduces to the former for LAMBDA=0 and to the latter for LAMBDA=1

  14. Modified General Relativity and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, A.-M. M.

    1997-10-01

    Aspects of the modified general relativity theory of Rastall, Al-Rawaf and Taha are discussed in both the radiation- and matter-dominated flat cosmological models. A nucleosynthesis constraint on the theory's free parameter is obtained and the implication for the age of the Universe is discussed. The consistency of the modified matter- dominated model with the neoclassical cosmological tests is demonstrated.

  15. Essays in general equilibrium theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konovalov, A.

    2001-01-01

    The thesis focuses on various issues of general equilibrium theory and can approximately be divided into three parts. The first part of the thesis studies generalized equilibria in the Arrow-Debreu model in the situation where the strong survival assumption is not satisfied. Chapter four deals with

  16. Special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kilmister, Clive William

    1970-01-01

    Special Theory of Relativity provides a discussion of the special theory of relativity. Special relativity is not, like other scientific theories, a statement about the matter that forms the physical world, but has the form of a condition that the explicit physical theories must satisfy. It is thus a form of description, playing to some extent the role of the grammar of physics, prescribing which combinations of theoretical statements are admissible as descriptions of the physical world. Thus, to describe it, one needs also to describe those specific theories and to say how much they are limit

  17. The Electromagnetic Conception of Nature at the Root of the Special and General Relativity Theories and Its Revolutionary Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, Enrico R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The revolution in XX century physics, induced by relativity theories, had its roots within the electromagnetic conception of Nature. It was developed through a tradition related to Brunian and Leibnizian physics, to the German "Naturphilosophie" and English XIXth physics. The electromagnetic conception of Nature was in some way realized by the…

  18. General Relativity Theory Explains the Shnoll Effect and Makes Possible Forecasting Earthquakes and Weather Cataclysms (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Shnoll effect manifests itself in the fine structure of the noise registered in very sta- ble processes, where the magnitude of signal and the average noise remain unchanged. It is found in the periodic fluctuation of the fine structure of the noise according to the cosmic cycles connected with stars, the Sun, and the Moon. Th e Shnoll effect is ex- plained herein, employing the framework of General Relativity, as the twin / entangled synchronization states of the observer’s reference frame. The states are repeated while the observer travels, in common with the Earth, through the c osmic grid of the geodesic synchronization paths that connect his local reference fra me with the reference frames of other cosmic bodies. These synchronization periods matc h the periods that are man- ifested due to the Shnoll e ff ect, regardless of which process produces the noise. These synchronization periods are expected to exist in the noise o f natural processes of any type (physics, biology, social, etc. as well as in such arti ficial processes as computer- software random-number generation. This conclusion accor ds with what was registered according the Shnoll effect. The theory not only explains the Shnoll effect but also al- lows for forecasting fluctuations in the stock exchange mark et, fluctuations of weather, earthquakes, and other cataclysms.

  19. Advanced mechanics and general relativity an introduction to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Aimed at advanced undergraduates with background knowledge of classical mechanics and electricity and magnetism, this textbook presents both the particle dynamics relevant to general relativity, and the field dynamics necessary to understand the theory. Focusing on action extremization, the book develops the structure and predictions of general relativity by analogy with familiar physical systems. Topics ranging from classical field theory to minimal surfaces and relativistic strings are covered in a homogeneous manner. Nearly 150 exercises and numerous examples throughout the textbook enable students to test their understanding of the material covered.

  20. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  1. Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Gouesbet, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    The Lorenz-Mie theory, describing the interaction between a homogeneous sphere and an electromagnetic plane wave, is likely to be one of the most famous theories in light scattering. But, with the advent of lasers and their increasing development in various fields, it has become too old-fashioned to meet most of the modern requisites. The book deals with generalized Lorenz-Mie theories when the illuminating beam is an electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beam, relying on the method of separation of variables. A particular emphasis is stressed on the case of the homogeneous sphere but other regular particles are considered too. An extensive discussion of the methods available to the evaluation of beam shape coefficients describing the illuminating beam is provided, and several methods are discussed. Applications concern many fields such as optical particle sizing and, more generally, optical particle characterization, morphology-dependent resonances, or mechanical effects of light for optical trapping, optical twe...

  2. General relativity and mathematics; Relatividad General y Matematicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars, M.

    2015-07-01

    General relativity is more than a theory of gravity, since any physical process occupies space and lasts for a time, forcing to reconcile that physical theory that describes what the dynamic nature of space-time itself. (Author)

  3. Canonical formulation of general-relativistic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    With the birth of quantum field theory in the late twenties physicists decided that nature could not be half classical and half quantum, and that the gravitational field ought to be quanticized, just as the electromagnetic field had been. One could accept the group of differomorphisms as a fundamental characteristic of general relativity (and indeed of all general-relativistic theories), and proceed to construct a quantum field-theory that was adapted to that group. Quantization would be attempted by way of a Hamiltonian formulation of the (classical) theory, and quantum commutation relations be patterned after the Poisson brackets arising in that formulation. This program is usually called the canonical quantization program, whereas the weak-field approach is known as covariant quantization. The first steps, conceived entirely within the framework of the classical theory, turned out to be beset with technical and conceptual difficulties, which today are essentially resolved. In this paper the author traces out these initial steps

  4. The power of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, Timothy; Barrow, John D.

    2005-01-01

    We study the cosmological and weak-field properties of theories of gravity derived by extending general relativity by means of a Lagrangian proportional to R 1+δ . This scale-free extension reduces to general relativity when δ→0. In order to constrain generalizations of general relativity of this power class, we analyze the behavior of the perfect-fluid Friedmann universes and isolate the physically relevant models of zero curvature. A stable matter-dominated period of evolution requires δ>0 or δ -19 assuming that Mercury follows a timelike geodesic. The combination of these observational constraints leads to the overall bound 0≤δ -19 on theories of this type

  5. Relative Thinking Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ofer H. Azar

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a theory that I denote “Relative Thinking Theory,” which claims that people consider relative differences and not only absolute differences when making various economics decisions, even in those cases where the rational model dictates that people should consider only absolute differences. The article reviews experimental evidence for this behavior, summarizing briefly several experiments I conducted, as well as some earlier related literature. It then discusses how we can...

  6. General Relativity: horizons for tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Vavilova, I. B.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Zhuk, A. I.; Kudrya, Yu. N.; Parnovsky, S. L.; Fedorova, E. V.; Khmil, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical basis of the General Relativity Theory (GRT), its experimental tests as well as GRT applications are briefly summarized taking into account the results of the last decade. The monograph addresses scientists, post-graduated students, and students specialized in the natural sciences as well as everyone who takes an interest in GRT.

  7. Forces in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridgely, Charles T

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  8. Generalized structural theory of freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1980-10-01

    The first-principles order parameter theory of freezing, proposed in an earlier work, has been successful in yielding quantitative agreement with known freezing parameters for monoatomic liquids forming solids with one atom per unit cell. A generalization of this theory is presented here to include the effects of a basis set of many atoms per unit cell. The basic equations get modified by the 'density structure factors' fsub(i) which arise from the density variations within the unit cell. Calculations are presented for the important case of monoatomic liquids freezing into hexagonal close packed solids. It is concluded that all freezing transitions can be described by using structural correlations in the liquid instead of the pair potential; and that the three body correlations are important in deciding the type of solid formed after freezing. (author)

  9. Cosmological tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hut, P.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the general relativity theory could be tested on a cosmological scale by measuring the Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter, if, in addition, everything could be known about the matter filling the universe. If, on the other hand, nothing could be presupposed about the matter content of the universe general relativity could not be tested by measuring any number of time derivatives of the scale factor. But upon making the assumption of a universe filled with non-interacting mixture of non-relativistic matter and radiation general relativity can in principle be tested by measuring the first five derivatives of the scale factor. Some general relations are here presented using this assumption. (author)

  10. Compact objects in bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpaz, A.; Rosen, N.

    1985-01-01

    The field equations of the bimetric general relativity theory proposed by one of the authors (N. Rosen), in the static form, are solved in order to investigate the structure of a star. It is found that for an ordinary star the bimetric theory gives the same results as the Einstein general relativity theory. However, for a collapsed star the two theories give different results. In the bimetric theory a configuration in hydrostatic equilibrium exists for a collapsed star filling its Schwarzschild sphere. In general relativity no equilibrium configuration exists in this region, and the star shrinks to a point singularity to form a black hole

  11. Gestalt Therapy and General System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitner, Phillip A.

    While General Systems Theory (GST) concepts appear to be applicable in explaining some of the phenomena that occur in a Gestalt Therapy group, research is needed to support this assumption. General Systems Theory may not be a group theory per se. Instead, GST may be a theory about groups. A meta-theory exists where its value and usefulness is…

  12. Quantum relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banai, M.

    1983-11-01

    A quantum relativity theory formulated in terms of Davis' quantum relativity principle is outlined. The first task in this theory as in classical relativity theory is to model space-time, the arena of natural processes. It is argued that the quantum space-time models of Banai introduced in an earlier paper is formulated in terms of Davis' quantum relativity. Then it is shown that the recently proposed classical relativistic quantum theory of Prugovecki and his corresponding classical relativistic quantum model of space-time open the way to introduce in a consistent way the quantum space-time model (the 'canonically quantized Minkowski space') proposed by Banai earlier. The main new aspect of the quantum mechanics of the quantum relativistic particles is, in this model of space-time, that it provides a true mass eigenvalue problem and, that the excited mass states of such particles can be interpreted as classifically relativistic (massive) quantum particles ('elementary particles'). The question of field theory over quantum relativistic models of space-time is also discussed. Finally, it is suggested that 'quarks' should be considered as quantum relativistic particles. (author)

  13. The renaissance of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, C.

    1989-01-01

    A historical evaluation of Einstein's theory of general relativity is presented, including the three classical tests of the theory. Gravitation is shown to be a ''curved spacetime'' phenomenon, particularly if the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) is true. The article traces the success and failures of the theory over the years and up to the present. The concept of gravitation waves was, for example, strengthened by the discovery of a binary pulsar in 1974. The author describes the theory's relevance to neutron stars and black holes and its role in establishing the hot big bang model of cosmological evolution. The article concludes by considering the possibility of antigravity and how gravitational calculations can be done by computer because of the large number of variables in the calculations. (U.K.)

  14. Theory of generalized Bessel functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.; Torre, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper it is discussed the theory of generalized Bessel functions which are of noticeable importance in the analysis of scattering processes for which the dipole approximation cannot be used. These functions have been introduced in their standard form and their modified version. The relevant generating functions and Graf-type addition theorems have been stated. The usefulness of the results to construct a fast algorithm for their quantitative computation is also devised. It is commented on the possibility of getting two-index generalized Bessel functions in e.g. the study of sum rules of the type Σ n=-∞ ∞ t n J n 3 (x), where J n is the cylindrical Bessel function of the first kind. The usefulness of the results for problems of practical interest is finally commented on. It is shown that a modified Anger function can be advantageously introduced to get an almost straightforward computation of the Bernstein sum rule in the theory of ion waves

  15. Brane world black holes in teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity and their Killing vectors, energy, momentum and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashed, Gamal G. L.

    2010-01-01

    The energy–momentum tensor, which is coordinate-independent, is used to calculate energy, momentum and angular momentum of two different tetrad fields. Although, the two tetrad fields reproduce the same space-time their energies are different. Therefore, a regularized expression of the gravitational energy–momentum tensor of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR), is used to make the energies of the two tetrad fields equal. The definition of the gravitational energy–momentum is used to investigate the energy within the external event horizon. The components of angular momentum associated with these space–times are calculated. In spite of using a static space–time, we get a non-zero component of angular momentum! Therefore, we derive the Killing vectors associated with these space–times using the definition of the Lie derivative of a second rank tensor in the framework of the TEGR to make the picture more clear. (general)

  16. Quantum information and relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Asher; Terno, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the intimate relationship between quantum mechanics, information theory, and relativity theory. Taken together these are the foundations of present-day theoretical physics, and their interrelationship is an essential part of the theory. The acquisition of information from a quantum system by an observer occurs at the interface of classical and quantum physics. The authors review the essential tools needed to describe this interface, i.e., Kraus matrices and positive-operator-valued measures. They then discuss how special relativity imposes severe restrictions on the transfer of information between distant systems and the implications of the fact that quantum entropy is not a Lorentz-covariant concept. This leads to a discussion of how it comes about that Lorentz transformations of reduced density matrices for entangled systems may not be completely positive maps. Quantum field theory is, of course, necessary for a consistent description of interactions. Its structure implies a fundamental tradeoff between detector reliability and localizability. Moreover, general relativity produces new and counterintuitive effects, particularly when black holes (or, more generally, event horizons) are involved. In this more general context the authors discuss how most of the current concepts in quantum information theory may require a reassessment

  17. Generalized locally Toeplitz sequences theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Garoni, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Based on their research experience, the authors propose a reference textbook in two volumes on the theory of generalized locally Toeplitz sequences and their applications. This first volume focuses on the univariate version of the theory and the related applications in the unidimensional setting, while the second volume, which addresses the multivariate case, is mainly devoted to concrete PDE applications. This book systematically develops the theory of generalized locally Toeplitz (GLT) sequences and presents some of its main applications, with a particular focus on the numerical discretization of differential equations (DEs). It is the first book to address the relatively new field of GLT sequences, which occur in numerous scientific applications and are especially dominant in the context of DE discretizations. Written for applied mathematicians, engineers, physicists, and scientists who (perhaps unknowingly) encounter GLT sequences in their research, it is also of interest to those working in the fields of...

  18. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  19. The use of generalized functions and distributions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbauer, R; Vickers, J A

    2006-01-01

    We review the extent to which one can use classical distribution theory in describing solutions of Einstein's equations. We show that there are a number of physically interesting cases which cannot be treated using distribution theory but require a more general concept. We describe a mathematical theory of nonlinear generalized functions based on Colombeau algebras and show how this may be applied in general relativity. We end by discussing the concept of singularity in general relativity and show that certain solutions with weak singularities may be regarded as distributional solutions of Einstein's equations. (topical review)

  20. Adler Function, Bjorken Sum Rule, and the Crewther Relation to Order αs4 in a General Gauge Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikov, P. A.; Chetyrkin, K. G.; Kuehn, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We compute, for the first time, the order α s 4 contributions to the Bjorken sum rule for polarized electron-nucleon scattering and to the (nonsinglet) Adler function for the case of a generic color gauge group. We confirm at the same order a (generalized) Crewther relation which provides a strong test of the correctness of our previously obtained results: the QCD Adler function and the five-loop β function in quenched QED. In particular, the appearance of an irrational contribution proportional to ζ 3 in the latter quantity is confirmed. We obtain the commensurate scale equation relating the effective strong coupling constants as inferred from the Bjorken sum rule and from the Adler function at order α s 4 .

  1. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  2. Generalized continued fractions and ergodic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustyl'nikov, L D

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a new theory of generalized continued fractions is constructed and applied to numbers, multidimensional vectors belonging to a real space, and infinite-dimensional vectors with integral coordinates. The theory is based on a concept generalizing the procedure for constructing the classical continued fractions and substantially using ergodic theory. One of the versions of the theory is related to differential equations. In the finite-dimensional case the constructions thus introduced are used to solve problems posed by Weyl in analysis and number theory concerning estimates of trigonometric sums and of the remainder in the distribution law for the fractional parts of the values of a polynomial, and also the problem of characterizing algebraic and transcendental numbers with the use of generalized continued fractions. Infinite-dimensional generalized continued fractions are applied to estimate sums of Legendre symbols and to obtain new results in the classical problem of the distribution of quadratic residues and non-residues modulo a prime. In the course of constructing these continued fractions, an investigation is carried out of the ergodic properties of a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are also of independent interest

  3. General Relativity in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a theory of gravity in (1 + 1) dimensions that can be thought of as a toy model of general relativity. The theory should be a useful pedagogical tool, because it is mathematically much simpler than general relativity but shares much of the same conceptual structure; in particular, it gives a simple illustration of how gravity arises…

  4. Quantum information and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Quantum information and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, A. [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2004-12-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Quantum information and general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Peres, Asher

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  7. Quantum information and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, A.

    2004-11-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  8. Global general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.

    1979-01-01

    Much theoretical work in General Relativity has been concerned with finding explicit solutions of Einstein field equations. Exact solutions must involve simplifying procedures which in the case of strong gravitational fields may not be valid. Computers can help but complementary to these are the global qualitative mathematics that have been introduced into relativity over the past years. These have shown that Einstein's equations together with suitable inequalities on the energy-momentum tensor can lead inevitably to space-time singularities arising, provided that some qualitative geometric criterion is satisfied. It seems that in suitable situations of gravitational collapse this criterion will be satisfied. Similarly in a cosmological setting the criterion can be applied in the reverse direction in time. There is, however, the unsolved problem in general relativity of cosmic censorship and this is discussed as a consequence of Einstein's equations. (UK)

  9. Pseudo-complex general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Peter O; Greiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents an pseudo-complex extension of General Relativity which addresses these issues and presents proposals for experimental examinations in strong fields near a large mass. General Relativity is a beautiful and well tested theory of gravitation. Nevertheless, it implies conceptual problems like the creation of singularities (Black Holes) as a result of the collapse of large masses, or the appearance of event horizons which exclude parts of the space-time from the observation of external observers. The mathematical and geometrical foundations of this extension are displayed in detail, and applications including orbits and accretion disks around large central masses, neutron stars or cosmological models are introduced. Calculations both for classical and extended applications are often executed in the form of problems with extensive solutions, which makes this volume also a valuable resource for any student of General Relativity.

  10. A generalized Principle of Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, Fernando de; Preti, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The Theory of Relativity stands as a firm groundstone on which modern physics is founded. In this paper we bring to light an hitherto undisclosed richness of this theory, namely its admitting a consistent reformulation which is able to provide a unified scenario for all kinds of particles, be they lightlike or not. This result hinges on a generalized Principle of Relativity which is intrinsic to Einstein's theory - a fact which went completely unnoticed before. The road leading to this generalization starts, in the very spirit of Relativity, from enhancing full equivalence between the four spacetime directions by requiring full equivalence between the motions along these four spacetime directions as well. So far, no measurable spatial velocity in the direction of the time axis has ever been defined, on the same footing of the usual velocities - the 'space-velocities' - in the local three-space of a given observer. In this paper, we show how Relativity allows such a 'time-velocity' to be defined in a very natural way, for any particle and in any reference frame. As a consequence of this natural definition, it also follows that the time- and space-velocity vectors sum up to define a spacelike 'world-velocity' vector, the modulus of which - the world-velocity - turns out to be equal to the Maxwell's constant c, irrespective of the observer who measures it. This measurable world-velocity (not to be confused with the space-velocities we are used to deal with) therefore represents the speed at which all kinds of particles move in spacetime, according to any observer. As remarked above, the unifying scenario thus emerging is intrinsic to Einstein's Theory; it extends the role traditionally assigned to Maxwell's constant c, and can therefore justly be referred to as 'a generalized Principle of Relativity'.

  11. Generalized IIB supergravity from exceptional field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baguet, Arnaud; Magro, Marc; Samtleben, Henning [Laboratoire de Physique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Ens de Lyon, CNRS,F-69342 Lyon (France)

    2017-03-20

    The background underlying the η-deformed AdS{sub 5}×S{sup 5} sigma-model is known to satisfy a generalization of the IIB supergravity equations. Their solutions are related by T-duality to solutions of type IIA supergravity with non-isometric linear dilaton. We show how the generalized IIB supergravity equations can be naturally obtained from exceptional field theory. Within this manifestly duality covariant formulation of maximal supergravity, the generalized IIB supergravity equations emerge upon imposing on the fields a simple Scherk-Schwarz ansatz which respects the section constraint.

  12. Einstein algebras and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.

    1992-01-01

    A purely algebraic structure called an Einstein algebra is defined in such a way that every spacetime satisfying Einstein's equations is an Einstein algebra but not vice versa. The Gelfand representation of Einstein algebras is defined, and two of its subrepresentations are discussed. One of them is equivalent to the global formulation of the standard theory of general relativity; the other one leads to a more general theory of gravitation which, in particular, includes so-called regular singularities. In order to include other types of singularities one must change to sheaves of Einstein algebras. They are defined and briefly discussed. As a test of the proposed method, the sheaf of Einstein algebras corresponding to the space-time of a straight cosmic string with quasiregular singularity is constructed. 22 refs

  13. Quantum mechanics from general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, M.

    1986-01-01

    A generalization of quantum mechanics is demonstrated in the context of general relativity, following from a generally covariant field theory of inertia. Nonrelativistically, the formalism corresponds with linear quantum mechanics. In the limit of special relativity, nonlinearity remains and several new features are derived: (1) Particle-antiparticle pairs do not annihilate; an exact bound state solution is derived corresponding with all experimental facts about annihilation/creation - which, in approximation, gives the blackbody radiation spectrum for a sea of such pairs. (2) A result is proven, without approximation, that is physically equivalent to the Pauli exclusion principle - which, in linear approximation, gives the totally antisymmetrised many-body wave function and Fermi-Dirac statistics. (3) The hydrogen spectrum is derived, including the Lamb shifts, in agreement with experiment; new results are found for high energy electron-proton scattering. (4) Finally, several applications to the elementary particle domain are demonstrated, in agreement with results from experimental high energy physics. (Auth.)

  14. General relativity and gravitation, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Bartlett, D.F.; Wyss, W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume records the lectures and symposia of the 12th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation. Plenary lecturers reviewed the major advances since the previous conference in 1986. The reviews cover classical and quantum theory of gravity, colliding gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, relativistic effects on pulsars, tests of the inverse square law, numerical relativity, cosmic microwave background radiation, experimental tests of gravity theory, gravitational wave detectors, and cosmology. The plenary lectures are complemented by summaries of symposia, provided by the chairmen. Almost 700 contributed papers were presented at these and they cover an even wider range of topics than the plenary talks. The book provides a comprehensive guide to research activity in both experimental and theoretical gravitation and its applications in astrophysics and cosmology. It will be essential reading for research workers in these fields, as well as theoretical and experimental physicists, astronomers, and mathematicians who wish to be acquainted with modern developments in gravitational theory and general relativity. All the papers and summaries of the workshop sessions are indexed separately. (16 united talks, 20 workshop sessions). (author)

  15. Gravitation. [Book on general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, C. W.; Thorne, K. S.; Wheeler, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    This textbook on gravitation physics (Einstein's general relativity or geometrodynamics) is designed for a rigorous full-year course at the graduate level. The material is presented in two parallel tracks in an attempt to divide key physical ideas from more complex enrichment material to be selected at the discretion of the reader or teacher. The full book is intended to provide competence relative to the laws of physics in flat space-time, Einstein's geometric framework for physics, applications with pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, gravitational waves, experimental tests of Einstein's theory, and mathematical concepts of differential geometry.

  16. The genesis of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Renn, Jürgen; Sauer, Tilman; Stachel, John

    2007-01-01

    This four-volume work represents the most comprehensive documentation and study of the creation of general relativity; one of the fundamental physical theories of the 20th century. It comprises key sources from Einstein and others who from the late 19th to the early 20th century contributed to this monumental development. Some of these sources are presented here in translation for the first time. Einstein’s famous Zurich notebook, which documents the pivotal steps toward general relativity, is reproduced here for the first time and transcribed in its entirety. The volumes offer detailed commentaries and analyses of these sources that are based on a close reading of these documents supplemented by interpretations by the leading historians of relativity. All in all, the facets of this work, based on more than a decade of research, combine to constitute one of the most in-depth studies of a scientific revolution ever written.

  17. Bimetric general relativity and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1980-01-01

    A modification of the general relativity theory is proposed (bimetric general relativity) in which, in addition to the usual metric tensor gsub(μupsilon) describing the space-time geometry and gravitation, there exists also a background metric tensor γsub(μupsilon). The latter describes the space-time of the universe if no matter were present and is taken to correspond to a space-time of constant curvature with positive spatial curvature (k = 1). Field equations are obtained, and these agree with the Einstein equations for systems that are small compared to the size of the universe, such as the solar system. Energy considerations lead to a generalized form of the De Donder condition. Simple isotropic closed models of the universe can be set up which first contract and then expand without going through a singular state. It is suggested that the maximum density of the universe was of the order of c 5 -h -1 G -2 approximately 10 93 g/cm 3 . The expansion from such a high-density state is similar to that from the singular state ('big bang') of the general relativity models. In the case of the dust-filled model the parameters can be fitted to present cosmological data. Using the radiation-filled model to describe the early history of the universe, the cosmic abundance of helium and other light elements can be accounted for in the same way as in ordinary general relativity. (author)

  18. Investigations into quantum theory and relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, I.D.

    1982-03-01

    This thesis falls into two parts. The first is concerned with damping theory as a particular approach to the description of the dynamical evolution of non-closed systems. Appealing ultimately to the Liouville/Von-Neuman equation in the weak coupling regime, the current-voltage characteristics of both the normal and Josephson tunnelling junctions, treated as open systems are obtained. It is then shown that the same results may be obtained via the combined scattering and density matrix formalism (which does not appeal to the Liouville/Von-Neuman equation), and that this method has certain advantages over the conventional formalism. In the second part an extended (non-quantum) theory of relativity in a five dimensional space is developed and a number of interesting consequences thereof obtained. In particular a generalised set of Maxwell equations for electro-dynamics is derived, and some of the implications of the new set of equations are described. Furthermore a treatment of the five-dimensional analogue of the Schwarzschild problem in general relativity is given, together with the resulting implications for planetary motion. (author)

  19. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w eff has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w eff from -1. Taking into account current limits on w eff and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w eff form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory

  20. Generalized inverses theory and computations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guorong; Qiao, Sanzheng

    2018-01-01

    This book begins with the fundamentals of the generalized inverses, then moves to more advanced topics. It presents a theoretical study of the generalization of Cramer's rule, determinant representations of the generalized inverses, reverse order law of the generalized inverses of a matrix product, structures of the generalized inverses of structured matrices, parallel computation of the generalized inverses, perturbation analysis of the generalized inverses, an algorithmic study of the computational methods for the full-rank factorization of a generalized inverse, generalized singular value decomposition, imbedding method, finite method, generalized inverses of polynomial matrices, and generalized inverses of linear operators. This book is intended for researchers, postdocs, and graduate students in the area of the generalized inverses with an undergraduate-level understanding of linear algebra.

  1. Particle field in bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falik, D.; Rosen, N.

    1980-01-01

    The field equations of the bimetric general relativity theory proposed recently by one of the authors (N. Rosen) are put into a static form. The equations are solved near the Schwarzschild sphere, and it is found that the field differs from that of the Einstein general relativity theory: instead of a black hole, one has an impenetrable sphere. For larger distances the field is found to agree with that of ordinary general relativity, so that solar system observations cannot distinguish between the two theories. For very large distances one gets a cosmic contribution to the field which may affect the dynamics of clusters of galaxies

  2. On the general theory of quantized fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredenhagen, K.

    1991-10-01

    In my lecture I describe the present stage of the general theory of quantized fields on the example of 5 subjects. They are ordered in the direction from large to small distances. The first one is the by now classical problem of the structure of superselection sectors. It involves the behavior of the theory at spacelike infinity and is directly connected with particle statistics and internal symmetries. It has become popular in recent years by the discovery of a lot of nontrivial models in 2d conformal-field theory, by connections to integrable models and critical behavior in statistical mechanics and by the relations to the Jones' theory of subfactors in von Neumann algebras and to the corresponding geometrical objects (braids, knots, 3d manifolds, ...). At large timelike distances the by far most important feature of quantum field theory is the particle structure. This will be the second subject of my lecture. It follows the technically most involved part which is concerned with the behavior at finite distances. Two aspets, nuclearity which emphasizes the finite density of states in phase space, and the modular structure which relies on the infinite number of degrees of freedom present even locally, and their mutual relations will be treated. The next point, involving the structure at infinitesimal distances, is the connection between the Haag-Kastler framework of algebras of local and the framework of Wightman fields. Finally, problems in approaches to quantum gravity will be discussed, as far as they are accessible by the methods of the general theory of quantized fields. (orig.)

  3. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar–tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory. (paper)

  4. Data management and language enhancement for generalized set theory computer language for operation of large relational databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Gail T.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the study of the relational database implementation in the NASCAD computer program system. The existing system is used primarily for computer aided design. Attention is also directed to a hidden-surface algorithm for final drawing output.

  5. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  6. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  7. Relativity. The theory and its philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide a completely self-contained treatment of the philosophical foundations of the theory of relativity. The chapter headings are: mathematical preliminaries; relativity and Newtonian mechanics; the principle of special relativity; empiricism, rationalism and special relativity; special relativity and conventionalism; the commensurability of classical and relativistic mechanics; more mathematics; the path to general relativity; an outline of general relativity; relativity and covariance; spacetime and geometry. (U.K.)

  8. Generalized Lorentz transformation in the general relativity theory and the behaviour of some physical quantities at the boundary of R and T regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasov, A.G.; Mikhal'chuk, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Transition between diagonal metrics is considered. The transformations are written in the generalized Lorentz form. On the basis of the thus introduced form of transformations of coordinates the transformations for velocity, acceleration, force, momentum, energy and energy-momentum tensor components have been obtained. The resultant relationships are used for the estimation of physical values at the R and T region boundaries

  9. Module theory, extending modules and generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tercan, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this monograph is to offer a comprehensive presentation of known and new results on various generalizations of CS-modules and CS-rings. Extending (or CS) modules are generalizations of injective (and also semisimple or uniform) modules. While the theory of CS-modules is well documented in monographs and textbooks, results on generalized forms of the CS property as well as dual notions are far less present in the literature. With their work the authors provide a solid background to module theory, accessible to anyone familiar with basic abstract algebra. The focus of the book is on direct sums of CS-modules and classes of modules related to CS-modules, such as relative (injective) ejective modules, (quasi) continuous modules, and lifting modules. In particular, matrix CS-rings are studied and clear proofs of fundamental decomposition results on CS-modules over commutative domains are given, thus complementing existing monographs in this area. Open problems round out the work and establish the...

  10. General Systems Theory and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David F.

    The use of general systems theory in the field of instructional systems design (ISD) is explored in this paper. Drawing on work by Young, the writings of 12 representative ISD writers and researchers were surveyed to determine the use of 60 general systems theory concepts by the individual authors. The average number of concepts used by these…

  11. Generalized Field Theory and Kasner universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the only Kasner-like solution of the Generalized Field Theory field equations with a nonzero electromagnetic field corresponds to an empty field geometry of the space-time. In this case, the electromagnetic field tensors of the theory coincide as could be expected from general considerations. 6 refs. (author)

  12. The relation between the general maxim of causality and the principle of uniformity in hume's theory of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Oscar de Almeida Marques

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT When Hume, in the Treatise on Human Nature, began his examination of the relation of cause and effect, in particular, of the idea of necessary connection which is its essential constituent, he identified two preliminary questions that should guide his research: (1 For what reason we pronounce it necessary that every thing whose existence has a beginning should also have a cause and (2 Why we conclude that such particular causes must necessarily have such particular effects? (1.3.2, 14-15 Hume observes that our belief in these principles can result neither from an intuitive grasp of their truth nor from a reasoning that could establish them by demonstrative means. In particular, with respect to the first, Hume examines and rejects some arguments with which Locke, Hobbes and Clarke tried to demonstrate it, and suggests, by exclusion, that the belief that we place on it can only come from experience. Somewhat surprisingly, however, Hume does not proceed to show how that derivation of experience could be made, but proposes instead to move directly to an examination of the second principle, saying that, "perhaps, be found in the end, that the same answer will serve for both questions" (1.3.3, 9. Hume's answer to the second question is well known, but the first question is never answered in the rest of the Treatise, and it is even doubtful that it could be, which would explain why Hume has simply chosen to remove any mention of it when he recompiled his theses on causation in the Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. Given this situation, an interesting question that naturally arises is to investigate the relations of logical or conceptual implication between these two principles. Hume seems to have thought that an answer to (2 would also be sufficient to provide an answer to (1. Henry Allison, in his turn, argued (in Custom and Reason in Hume, p. 94-97 that the two questions are logically independent. My proposal here is to try to show

  13. Centennial of general relativity a celebration

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    It has been over 100 years since the presentation of the Theory of General Relativity by Albert Einstein, in its final formulation, to the Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences. To celebrate 100 years of general relativity, World Scientific publishes this volume with a dual goal: to assess the current status of the field of general relativity in broad terms, and discuss future directions. The volume thus consists of broad overviews summarizing major developments over the past decades and their perspective contributions.

  14. Weak lensing in generalized gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Perrotta, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    We extend the theory of weak gravitational lensing to cosmologies with generalized gravity, described in the Lagrangian by a generic function depending on the Ricci scalar and a nonminimal coupled scalar field. We work out the generalized Poisson equations relating the dynamics of the fluctuating components to the two gauge-invariant scalar gravitational potentials, fixing the contributions from the modified background expansion and fluctuations. We show how the lensing equation gets modified by the cosmic expansion as well as by the presence of anisotropic stress, which is non-null at the linear level both in scalar-tensor gravity and in theories where the gravitational Lagrangian term features a nonminimal dependence on the Ricci scalar. Starting from the geodesic deviation, we derive the generalized expressions for the shear tensor and projected lensing potential, encoding the spacetime variation of the effective gravitational constant and isolating the contribution of the anisotropic stress, which introduces a correction due to the spatial correlation between the gravitational potentials. Finally, we work out the expressions of the lensing convergence power spectrum as well as the correlation between the lensing potential and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect affecting cosmic microwave background total intensity and polarization anisotropies. To illustrate phenomenologically the effects, we work out approximate expressions for the quantities above in extended quintessence scenarios where the scalar field coupled to gravity plays the role of the dark energy

  15. Parallel Evolution in Science: The Historical Roots and Central Concepts of General Systems Theory; and "General Systems Theory,""Modern Organizational Theory," and Organizational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Linda Costigan; Rogers, Don

    The two papers in this document focus on general systems theory. In her paper, Linda Lederman discusses the emergence and evolution of general systems theory, defines its central concepts, and draws some conclusions regarding the nature of the theory and its value as an epistemology. Don Rogers, in his paper, relates some of the important features…

  16. Conformally Coupled General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Arbuzov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The gravity model developed in the series of papers (Arbuzov et al. 2009; 2010, (Pervushin et al. 2012 is revisited. The model is based on the Ogievetsky theorem, which specifies the structure of the general coordinate transformation group. The theorem is implemented in the context of the Noether theorem with the use of the nonlinear representation technique. The canonical quantization is performed with the use of reparametrization-invariant time and Arnowitt– Deser–Misner foliation techniques. Basic quantum features of the models are discussed. Mistakes appearing in the previous papers are corrected.

  17. A Theory of the Podkletnov Effect based on General Relativity: Anti-Gravity Force due to the Perturbed Non-Holonomic Background of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Podkletnov effect — the weight loss of an object located over a superconducting disc in air due to support by an alternating magnetic field. We consider this problem using the mathematical methods of General Relativity. We show via Einstein’s equations and the geodesic equations in a space perturbed by a disc undergoing oscillatory bounces orthogonal to its own plane, that there is no r ˆ ole of superconductivity; the Podkletnov effect is due to the fact that the field of the background space non-holonomity (the basic non-othogonality of time lines to the spatial section, being perturbed by such an oscillating disc produces energy and momentum flow in order to compensate the perturbation in itself. Such a momentum flow is directed above the disc in Podkletnov’s experiment, so it works like negative gravity (anti-gravity. We propose a simple mechanical system which, simulating the Podkletnov effect, is an experimental test of the whole theory. The theory allows for other “anti-gravity devices”, which simulate the Podkletnov effect without use of very costly superconductor technology. Such devices could be applied to be used as a cheap source of new energy, and could have implications to air and space travel.

  18. Einstein and the history of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Stachel, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a collection of essays by the authors and other people that deal with scientific opinions that led Einstein and his contemporaries to their views of general relativity. Some of the essays explore Einstein's passage from the special theory through a sequence of gravitational theories to the discovery of the field equations of the grand theory in November 1915. Two other essays discuss Einstein's public and private exchanges with Max Abraham and Tullio Levi-Civita in 1913 and 1914. A sympathetic picture of H.A. Lorentz's reaction to the general theory of relativity is included, and a careful and insightful essay on the early understanding of the Schwarzschild-Droste solution to the field equations of general relativity is presented. One paper presents a discussion on the state of the enterprise of general relativity between 1925 and 1928, and a short essay details the history of steps toward quantum gravitational through canonical quantization. A discussion of the history of derivations of the geodesic equation of motion from the field equation and conservation laws of the general theory is presented. The early history of geometrical unified field theories is included

  19. Einstein and general relativity: historical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1978-01-01

    The place of Einstein in 20th-century physics is discussed. The basic ideas that led Einstein to his theory of gravitation by the sheer power of speculative thought are described in the most general terms. The prediction of the bending of starlight by the Sun and the eclipse expedition of 1919 are recounted. The author feels that ''the general theory of relativity is incredibly rich in its content;...one finds a glittering face at almost every turn.'' The prediction of black holes by general relativity is noted

  20. Axisymmetric solution with charge in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, G.G.; Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of generating solutions to the equations of general relativity from known solutions of the generalized theory of gravitation and vice versa is proved. An electrovac solution to Einstein's equations that describes a static axisymmetric gravitational field is found. 14 refs

  1. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity;

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-01-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches-loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang-Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to the geometrical nature of gravity, no such background exists in quantum gravity. Instead, the notion of a background is supposed to emerge a posteriori as an approximate notion from quantum states of geometry. As a consequence, the standard ultraviolet divergences of

  2. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact...... oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics....

  3. The general physics theory for 21 century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassym, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    By solving the coupled system of kinetic equations for interacting system of electrons positrons (holes) and photons (phonons) at high external electric, arbitrary magnetic and at the propagation of strong electromagnetic waves non-equilibrium and non-stationary distribution function of photons (phonons) and charge carriers by taking into account of arbitrary heating and mutual drag of carriers and photons (phonons) was found. Author was sure that received him in 1976 distribution function of photons (phonons) must lay on the basis of Theoretical Physics of 21 Century, as the equilibrium Planck's distribution function of black-body radiation received in 1900 lied on the basis of Quantum Physics of 20 Century. Authors many years mental work (from 1976 till today) confirmed the rightness of searched him way and leads to the conclusion that Kinetic Theory is more general and fundamental theory of nature, which unificated Non-stationary Dynamics (the left-hand side) with Non-stationary Statistical Mechanics (the right-hand side) of Kinetic Equation. It is shown that other sections of Theoretical Physics such as Newtonian, Hamiltonian and Relativistic Classical Mechanics, Quantum Physics, Optics, Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Particle Physics may be received from Kinetic Theory under the special conditions and are the special parts of this theory. The problems such as the irreversibility and instability, the paradox of time, quantum paradox and others are solved. This new General Theory explains all the problems and troubles contents with the foundations and interpretation of quantum mechanics and relativity. It was found the mechanism of quantization and transition from one energetic level to another,the squeezed effect, the transition of particles wave-packets through the energetic barriers. It is shown the possibility of superluminal motion of light pulses and wave-packets through the medium and photonic barriers. It is well known that the experiments

  4. Twistors in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.

    1987-01-01

    The two most significant definitions of a twistor in (conformally) flat space-time are that given by solutions of the twistor equation and that given by α-planes in the complexification of the space-time. It is shown that these concepts are naturally dual to one another, and that they give rise to various different twistor concepts in curved space-time when referred to submanifolds of differing dimension. One of these concepts, that of 2-surface twistors, gives rise to a quasi-local definition of mass (and angular momentum). The status of this definition is explored in relation to various examples. (author)

  5. Toward a generalized probability theory: conditional probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassinelli, G.

    1979-01-01

    The main mathematical object of interest in the quantum logic approach to the foundations of quantum mechanics is the orthomodular lattice and a set of probability measures, or states, defined by the lattice. This mathematical structure is studied per se, independently from the intuitive or physical motivation of its definition, as a generalized probability theory. It is thought that the building-up of such a probability theory could eventually throw light on the mathematical structure of Hilbert-space quantum mechanics as a particular concrete model of the generalized theory. (Auth.)

  6. General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Observational and experimental data pertaining to gravity and cosmology are changing our view of the Universe. General relativity is a fundamental key for the understanding of these observations and its theory is undergoing a continuing enhancement of its intersection with observational and experimental data. These data include direct observations and experiments carried out in our solar system, among which there are direct gravitational wave astronomy, frame dragging and tests of gravitational theories from solar system and spacecraft observations. This book explores John Archibald Wheeler's seminal and enduring contributions in relativistic astrophysics and includes: the General Theory of Relativity and Wheeler's influence; recent developments in the confrontation of relativity with experiments; the theory describing gravitational radiation, and its detection in Earth-based and space-based interferometer detectors as well as in Earth-based bar detectors; the mathematical description of the initial value pro...

  7. A nonlinear theory of generalized functions

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a simple introduction to a nonlinear theory of generalized functions introduced by J.F. Colombeau, which gives a meaning to any multiplication of distributions. This theory extends from pure mathematics (it presents a faithful generalization of the classical theory of C? functions and provides a synthesis of most existing multiplications of distributions) to physics (it permits the resolution of ambiguities that appear in products of distributions), passing through the theory of partial differential equations both from the theoretical viewpoint (it furnishes a concept of weak solution of pde's leading to existence-uniqueness results in many cases where no distributional solution exists) and the numerical viewpoint (it introduces new and efficient methods developed recently in elastoplasticity, hydrodynamics and acoustics). This text presents basic concepts and results which until now were only published in article form. It is in- tended for mathematicians but, since the theory and applicati...

  8. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2013-01-01

    in molecular fluids. To discuss these phenomena in detail, molecular dynamics simulations of molecular chlorine are performed for three different state points. In general, the theory captures the behavior for small wavevector and frequencies as expected. For example, in the hydrodynamic regime......The extended Navier-Stokes theory accounts for the coupling between the translational and rotational molecular degrees of freedom. In this paper, we generalize this theory to non-zero frequencies and wavevectors, which enables a new study of spatio-temporal correlation phenomena present...... and for molecular fluids with small moment of inertia like chlorine, the theory predicts that the longitudinal and transverse intrinsic angular velocity correlation functions are almost identical, which is also seen in the molecular dynamics simulations. However, the theory fails at large wavevector and frequencies...

  9. Relativity: Special, General, and Cosmological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, G F R

    2005-01-01

    considered study of the properties of horizons. Linearized relativity is dealt with in depth leading to the standard weak field gravitational wave formulae and a study of their effects on test particles, together with a very useful discussion of the analogy between weak gravity and the electromagnetic field. Thus this is a straightforward detailed presentation of both special and general relativity theory and their applications. It has many examples and is well suited as a text on these topics, giving a clear relativists' view all the way through. It does not go into astrophysical or particle physics aspects, which is fine given its focus. Personally I would have liked a bit more emphasis on the geodesic deviation equation on the one hand, and on holonomy (which provides a link into particle gauge theories) on the other. But that is a matter of taste. This is an excellent book, which can be highly recommended. Just one quibble: what is the reason for the blurred picture of Einstein on the cover? The whole point of the book is its clarity: why the implication of this picture that it presents a blurred vision? (book review)

  10. Book Review: "Inside Stars. A Theory of the Internal Constitution of Stars, and the Sources of Stellar Energy According to General Relativity" (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This book provides a general relativistic theory of the internal constitution of liquid stars. It is a solid contribution to our understanding of stellar structure from a general relativistic perspective. It raises new ideas on the constitution of stars and planetary systems, and proposes a new approach to stellar structure an d stellar energy generation which is bound to help us better understand stellar astrophysics.

  11. General theory of the plasmoid instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comisso, L.; Lingam, M.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-01-01

    In a general theory of the onset and development of the plasmoid instability is formulated by means of a principle of least time. We derive and show the scaling relations for the final aspect ratio, transition time to rapid onset, growth rate, and number of plasmoids that depend on the initial perturbation amplitude (ŵ_0), the characteristic rate of current sheet evolution (1/τ), and the Lundquist number (S). They are not simple power laws, and are proportional to S"ατ"β[ln f(S,τ,ŵ_0)]"σ. Finally, the detailed dynamics of the instability is also elucidated, and shown to comprise of a period of quiescence followed by sudden growth over a short time scale.

  12. Teaching General Relativity to the Layperson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a lay course on general relativity (GR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Florida International University. It is presented in six hour-and-a-half weekly sessions. Other courses offered by the author include special relativity (which precedes the course described here), quantum theory, and cosmology. Students…

  13. Machian effects in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embacher, F.

    1988-01-01

    As a consequence of Mach's principle, rotating matter should cause local inertial frames or gyroscopes in its vicinity to undergo a small rotation which is not present in the Newtonian picture. H. Thirring and J. Lense were the first to derive similar predictions from the field equations of general relativity. Since these early days of relativity, a lot of exact and approximate solutions to Einstein's equations have been examined under this point of view. The qualitative features of Machian effects are most easily demonstrated in the cylinder symmetric case, where some exact results are available. For example, space-time is flat inside a uniformly rotating matter shell, and the rotation of this interior with respect to 'infinity' (the distant stars) has a clear meaning. In the more realistic case of what happens near a massive rotating star, one is forced to perform certain approximations. In modern language, Machian effects are described in terms of the twist of timelike killing vector fields. In the linearized theory, the equations that determine the Machian structure generated by a given matter distribution, resemble to some extent those of classical electrodynamics. This correspondence provides a pedagogical approach how to compute the quantitative extent of inertial frame 'dragging'. 6 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  14. New view of relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Luiz Cesar

    2014-01-01

    This article results from Introducing the Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory that was published in reference 1. The Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory shows a series of facts relative to matter, energy, space and concludes that empty space is inelastic, absolutely stationary, motionless, perpetual, without possibility of deformation neither can it be destroyed or created. A elementary cell of empty space or a certain amount of empty space can be occupied by any quantity of energy or matter without any alteration or deformation. As a consequence of these properties and being a integral part of the theory, the principles of Relativity Theory must be changed to become simple and intuitive.

  15. Diffusion in the special theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    The Markovian diffusion theory is generalized within the framework of the special theory of relativity. Since the velocity space in relativity is a hyperboloid, the mathematical stochastic calculus on Riemanian manifolds can be applied but adopted here to the velocity space. A generalized Langevin equation in the fiber space of position, velocity, and orthonormal velocity frames is defined from which the generalized relativistic Kramers equation in the phase space in external force fields is derived. The obtained diffusion equation is invariant under Lorentz transformations and its stationary solution is given by the Jüttner distribution. Besides, a nonstationary analytical solution is derived for the example of force-free relativistic diffusion.

  16. Relativity the theory and its philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Angel, Roger B

    1980-01-01

    Relativity: The Theory and its Philosophy provides a completely self-contained treatment of the philosophical foundations of the theory of relativity. It also surveys the most essential mathematical techniques and concepts that are indispensable to an understanding of the foundations of both the special and general theories of relativity. In short, the book includes a crash course in applied mathematics, ranging from elementary trigonometry to the classical tensor calculus.Comprised of 11 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts such as sets, relatio

  17. A generalization of the Newton-Cartan theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsure, Nitin

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that even in the absence of the equivalence principle, the Newtonian theory of gravitation can be given a geometric form in a five-dimensional manifold. The fifth dimension is taken as the ratio of gravitational and inertial mass, which is allowed to be different for different particles. The resulting pondoromotive and field equations in this 5-dimensional space (which are generalizations of Cartan's formulation of Newtonian gravitation) are formulated and their consequences are discussed. It is argued that as general relativity is a 'metric' theory, a similar generalization of general relativity is not possible. (author)

  18. General Theory of Absorption in Porous Materials: Restricted Multilayer Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduenko, Alexander A; Murray, Andy; Mendoza-Cortes, Jose L

    2018-04-18

    In this article, we present an approach for the generalization of adsorption of light gases in porous materials. This new theory goes beyond Langmuir and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theories, which are the standard approaches that have a limited application to crystalline porous materials by their unphysical assumptions on the amount of possible adsorption layers. The derivation of a more general equation for any crystalline porous framework is presented, restricted multilayer theory. Our approach allows the determination of gas uptake considering only geometrical constraints of the porous framework and the interaction energy of the guest molecule with the framework. On the basis of this theory, we calculated optimal values for the adsorption enthalpy at different temperatures and pressures. We also present the use of this theory to determine the optimal linker length for a topologically equivalent framework series. We validate this theoretical approach by applying it to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and show that it reproduces the experimental results for seven different reported materials. We obtained the universal equation for the optimal linker length, given the topology of a porous framework. This work applied the general equation to MOFs and H 2 to create energy-storage materials; however, this theory can be applied to other crystalline porous materials and light gases, which opens the possibility of designing the next generations of energy-storage materials by first considering only the geometrical constraints of the porous materials.

  19. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory - General theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A formal theory is developed for the scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from impenetrable immobile obstacles with given linear, homogeneous, and generally nonlocal boundary conditions of Leontovich (impedance) type for the wave of the obstacle's surface. The theory is modeled on the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator in time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. An expression for the differential scattering cross section for plane electromagnetic waves is derived in terms of certain matrix elements of the T operator for the obstacle.

  20. Client-controlled case information: a general system theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-07-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of controller and controlled system, as well as entropy and negentropy, are applied to the information flow and autopoietic behavior as they relate to the boundary-maintaining functions of today's organizations. The author's conclusions synthesize general system theory and human services values to lay the foundation for an information-sharing framework for human services in the 21st century.

  1. Geometric quantization and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of geometric quantization is to give a rigorous mathematical content to the 'correspondence principle' between classical and quantum mechanics. The main tools are borrowed on one hand from differential geometry and topology (differential manifolds, differential forms, fiber bundles, homology and cohomology, homotopy), on the other hand from analysis (functions of positive type, infinite dimensional group representations, pseudo-differential operators). Some satisfactory results have been obtained in the study of dynamical systems, but some fundamental questions are still waiting for an answer. The 'geometric quantization of fields', where some further well known difficulties arise, is still in a preliminary stage. In particular, the geometric quantization on the gravitational field is still a mere project. The situation is even more uncertain due to the fact that there is no experimental evidence of any quantum gravitational effect which could give us a hint towards what we are supposed to look for. The first level of both Quantum Theory, and General Relativity describes passive matter: influence by the field without being a source of it (first quantization and equivalence principle respectively). In both cases this is only an approximation (matter is always a source). But this approximation turns out to be the least uncertain part of the description, because on one hand the first quantization avoids the problems of renormalization and on the other hand the equivalence principle does not imply any choice of field equations (it is known that one can modify Einstein equations at short distances without changing their geometrical properties). (Auth.)

  2. Generalized quantum theory of recollapsing homogeneous cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, David; Hartle, James B.

    2004-01-01

    A sum-over-histories generalized quantum theory is developed for homogeneous minisuperspace type A Bianchi cosmological models, focusing on the particular example of the classically recollapsing Bianchi type-IX universe. The decoherence functional for such universes is exhibited. We show how the probabilities of decoherent sets of alternative, coarse-grained histories of these model universes can be calculated. We consider in particular the probabilities for classical evolution defined by a suitable coarse graining. For a restricted class of initial conditions and coarse grainings we exhibit the approximate decoherence of alternative histories in which the universe behaves classically and those in which it does not. For these situations we show that the probability is near unity for the universe to recontract classically if it expands classically. We also determine the relative probabilities of quasiclassical trajectories for initial states of WKB form, recovering for such states a precise form of the familiar heuristic 'J·dΣ' rule of quantum cosmology, as well as a generalization of this rule to generic initial states

  3. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics. (paper)

  4. Algebraic K-theory of generalized schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anevski, Stella Victoria Desiree

    and geometry over the field with one element. It also permits the construction of important Arakelov theoretical objects, such as the completion \\Spec Z of Spec Z. In this thesis, we prove a projective bundle theorem for the eld with one element and compute the Chow rings of the generalized schemes Sp\\ec ZN......Nikolai Durov has developed a generalization of conventional scheme theory in which commutative algebraic monads replace commutative unital rings as the basic algebraic objects. The resulting geometry is expressive enough to encompass conventional scheme theory, tropical algebraic geometry......, appearing in the construction of \\Spec Z....

  5. Basic statements of relativity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Muschik

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Some basic statements of relativity theory, starting out with geometry and observers up to Einstein's field equations, are collected in a systematical order without any proof, to serve as a short survey of tools and results.

  6. Generalized interferometry - I: theory for interstation correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Stehly, Laurent; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian

    2017-02-01

    We develop a general theory for interferometry by correlation that (i) properly accounts for heterogeneously distributed sources of continuous or transient nature, (ii) fully incorporates any type of linear and nonlinear processing, such as one-bit normalization, spectral whitening and phase-weighted stacking, (iii) operates for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media, (iv) enables the exploitation of complete correlation waveforms, including seemingly unphysical arrivals, and (v) unifies the earthquake-based two-station method and ambient noise correlations. Our central theme is not to equate interferometry with Green function retrieval, and to extract information directly from processed interstation correlations, regardless of their relation to the Green function. We demonstrate that processing transforms the actual wavefield sources and actual wave propagation physics into effective sources and effective wave propagation. This transformation is uniquely determined by the processing applied to the observed data, and can be easily computed. The effective forward model, that links effective sources and propagation to synthetic interstation correlations, may not be perfect. A forward modelling error, induced by processing, describes the extent to which processed correlations can actually be interpreted as proper correlations, that is, as resulting from some effective source and some effective wave propagation. The magnitude of the forward modelling error is controlled by the processing scheme and the temporal variability of the sources. Applying adjoint techniques to the effective forward model, we derive finite-frequency Fréchet kernels for the sources of the wavefield and Earth structure, that should be inverted jointly. The structure kernels depend on the sources of the wavefield and the processing scheme applied to the raw data. Therefore, both must be taken into account correctly in order to make accurate inferences on

  7. Stochastic quantization of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1986-01-01

    Following an elementary exposition of the basic mathematical concepts used in the theory of stochastic relaxation processes the stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu is briefly reviewed. The method is applied to Einstein's theory of gravitation using a formalism that is manifestly covariant with respect to field redefinitions. This requires the adoption of Ito's calculus and the introduction of a metric in field configuration space, for which there is a unique candidate. Due to the indefiniteness of the Euclidean Einstein-Hilbert action stochastic quantization is generalized to the pseudo-Riemannian case. It is formally shown to imply the DeWitt path integral measure. Finally a new type of perturbation theory is developed. (Author)

  8. The generalized second law of thermodynamics in generalized gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaofeng; Yang Guohong; Wang Bin; Zhang Pengming

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSL) in generalized theories of gravity. We examine the total entropy evolution with time including the horizon entropy, the non-equilibrium entropy production, and the entropy of all matter, field and energy components. We derive a universal condition to protect the generalized second law and study its validity in different gravity theories. In Einstein gravity (even in the phantom-dominated universe with a Schwarzschild black hole), Lovelock gravity and braneworld gravity, we show that the condition to keep the GSL can always be satisfied. In f(R) gravity and scalar-tensor gravity, the condition to protect the GSL can also hold because the temperature should be positive, gravity is always attractive and the effective Newton constant should be an approximate constant satisfying the experimental bounds

  9. The confrontation between general relativity and experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and tests of gravity at short distance to look for extra spatial dimensions could further constrain alternatives to general relativity. Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories on Earth and in space may provide new tests of scalar–tensor gravity and graviton-mass theories via the properties of gravitational waves.

  10. Generalized semilocal theories and higher Hopf maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindmarsh, M.; Holman, R.; Kephart, T.W.; Vachaspati, T.

    1993-01-01

    In semilocal theories, the vacuum manifold is fibered in a non-trivial way by the action of the gauge group. Here we generalize the original semilocal theory (which was based on the Hopf bundle S 3 → S1 S 2 ) to realize the next Hopf bundle S 7 →S 3 S 4 , and its extensions S 2n+1 → S3 HP n . The semilocal defects in this class of theories are classified by π 3 (S 3 ), and are interpreted as constrained instantons or generalized sphaleron configurations. We fail to find a field theoretic realization of the final Hopf bundle S 15 →S 7 S 8 , but are able to construct other semilocal spaces realizing Stiefel bundles over grassmannian spaces. (orig.)

  11. General Systems Theory and Counterplan Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Arnie

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the trend in academic debate on policy questions toward a wide acceptance of counterplans, encouraging combinations of proposals which appear at face value able to coexist but upon deeper analysis are incompatible. Argues in opposition to this trend by applying concepts from general systems theory to competition. (KEH)

  12. Educational Interpretations of General Systems Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William E.; King, James E.

    This chapter discusses General Systems Theory as it applies to education, classrooms, innovations, and instructional design. The principles of equifinality, open and closed systems, the individual as the key system, hierarchical structures, optimization, stability, cooperation, and competition are discussed, and their relationship to instructional…

  13. General Systems Theory and Instructional Systems Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and identifies commonalities that exist between GST and instructional systems design (ISD). Models and diagrams that depict system elements in ISD are presented, and two matrices that show how GST has been used in ISD literature are included. (11 references) (LRW)

  14. Schumpeter's general theory of social evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    The recent neo-Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics appears to cover a much smaller range of topics than Joseph Schumpeter confronted. Thus, it has hardly been recognised that Schumpeter wanted to develop a general theory that served the analysis of evolution in any sector of social life...

  15. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency...

  16. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...

  17. Performativity: The Special and the General Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Reverter-Bañón

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available If in Gender Trouble (1990 Butler presented a proposal of the theory of performativity of speech acts applied to the construction of gender, in her last book, Notes towards a Performative Theory of Assembly (2015, she articulates a theory of performativity applied to collective and concerted action of minorities or populations that are estimated to be “disposable”. The interest of the proposal that we present in this paper is to analyze how the theory of performativity of gender is now extended to the forms of democratic action; going from being a structure that explains the possibilities of gender to explain the possibilities for a livable life. It is what we call here the extension of performativity, from the special case of gender to the general case of a livable life.

  18. A general sensitivity theory for simulations of nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenton, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A general sensitivity theory is developed for nonlinear lumped-parameter system simulations. The point-of-departure is general perturbation theory, which has long been used for linear systems in nuclear engineering and reactor physics. The theory allows the sensitivity of particular figures-of-merit of the system behavior to be calculated with respect to any parameter.An explicit procedure is derived for applying the theory to physical systems undergoing sudden events (e.g., reactor scrams, tank ruptures). A related problem, treating figures-of-merit defined as functions of extremal values of system variables occurring at sudden events, is handled by the same procedure. The general calculational scheme for applying the theory to numerical codes is discussed. It is shown that codes which use pre-packaged implicit integration subroutines can be augmented to include sensitivity theory: a companion set of subroutines to solve the sensitivity problem is listed. This combined system analysis code is applied to a simple model for loss of post-accident heat removal in a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. The uses of the theory for answering more general sensitivity questions are discussed. One application of the theory is to systematically determine whether specific physical processes in a model contribute significantly to the figures-of-merit. Another application of the theory is for selecting parameter values which enable a model to match experimentally observed behavior

  19. REQUIREMENTS FOR A GENERAL INTERPRETATION THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda Laura Lungu Petruescu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Time has proved that Economic Analysis is not enough as to ensure all the needs of the economic field. The present study wishes to propose a new approach method of the economic phenomena and processes based on the researches made outside the economic space- a new general interpretation theory- which is centered on the human being as the basic actor of economy. A general interpretation theory must assure the interpretation of the causalities among the economic phenomena and processes- causal interpretation; the interpretation of the correlations and dependencies among indicators- normative interpretation; the interpretation of social and communicational processes in economic organizations- social and communicational interpretation; the interpretation of the community status of companies- transsocial interpretation; the interpretation of the purposes of human activities and their coherency – teleological interpretation; the interpretation of equilibrium/ disequilibrium from inside the economic systems- optimality interpretation. In order to respond to such demands, rigor, pragmatism, praxiology and contextual connectors are required. In order to progress, the economic science must improve its language, both its syntax and its semantics. The clarity of exposure requires a language clarity and the scientific theory progress asks for the need of hypotheses in the building of the theories. The switch from the common language to the symbolic one means the switch from ambiguity to rigor and rationality, that is order in thinking. But order implies structure, which implies formalization. Our paper should be a plea for these requirements, requirements which should be fulfilled by a modern interpretation theory.

  20. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Loinger, A.

    2006-01-01

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  1. A general theory for gauge-free lifting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    A theory for lifting equations of motion for charged particle dynamics, subject to given electromagnetic like forces, up to a gauge-free system of coupled Hamiltonian Vlasov-Maxwell like equations is given. The theory provides very general expressions for the polarization and magnetization vector fields in terms of the particle dynamics description of matter. Thus, as is common in plasma physics, the particle dynamics replaces conventional constitutive relations for matter. Several examples are considered including the usual Vlasov-Maxwell theory, a guiding center kinetic theory, Vlasov-Maxwell theory with the inclusion of spin, and a Vlasov-Maxwell theory with the inclusion of Dirac's magnetic monopoles. All are shown to be Hamiltonian field theories and the Jacobi identity is proven directly.

  2. Cosmic frontiers of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.J. III.

    1977-01-01

    All relevant topics in general astronomy are covered including orientation in space--time, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity, stars and stellar evolution, white dwarfs, pulsars, neutron stars, the black hole, the geometry of the Schwarzschild solution, and electrically charged and rotating black holes. Also the geometry of the Kerr solution, observations of black holes, white holes and particle creation, gravitational waves and lenses, exploding galaxies and massive and primordial black holes are discussed

  3. A general theory for the Uranian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general analytical theory of the five main satellites of Uranus, including the secular and short period terms hereafter denoted by GUST, is presented. A comparison is made with an internal numerical integration with nominal masses of Veillet (1983). The precision of the theory goes from about 10 km for Miranda to 100 km for Oberon. The short period terms in the motions of Titania and Oberon are larger than 500 km. They should make possible the determination of the masses of the outer satellites through the optical data of Voyager encounter.

  4. General very special relativity in Finsler cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouretsis, A. P.; Stathakopoulos, M.; Stavrinos, P. C.

    2009-01-01

    General very special relativity (GVSR) is the curved space-time of very special relativity (VSR) proposed by Cohen and Glashow. The geometry of general very special relativity possesses a line element of Finsler geometry introduced by Bogoslovsky. We calculate the Einstein field equations and derive a modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology for an osculating Riemannian space. The Friedmann equation of motion leads to an explanation of the cosmological acceleration in terms of an alternative non-Lorentz invariant theory. A first order approach for a primordial-spurionic vector field introduced into the metric gives back an estimation of the energy evolution and inflation.

  5. Toward a general evolutionary theory of oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Paul W; Swain Ewald, Holly A

    2013-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary framework, the barrier theory of cancer, which is based on the distinction between barriers to oncogenesis and restraints. Barriers are defined as mechanisms that prevent oncogenesis. Restraints, which are more numerous, inhibit but do not prevent oncogenesis. Processes that compromise barriers are essential causes of cancer; those that interfere with restraints are exacerbating causes. The barrier theory is built upon the three evolutionary processes involved in oncogenesis: natural selection acting on multicellular organisms to mold barriers and restraints, natural selection acting on infectious organisms to abrogate these protective mechanisms, and oncogenic selection which is responsible for the evolution of normal cells into cancerous cells. The barrier theory is presented as a first step toward the development of a general evolutionary theory of cancer. Its attributes and implications for intervention are compared with those of other major conceptual frameworks for understanding cancer: the clonal diversification model, the stem cell theory and the hallmarks of cancer. The barrier theory emphasizes the practical value of distinguishing between essential and exacerbating causes. It also stresses the importance of determining the scope of infectious causation of cancer, because individual pathogens can be responsible for multiple essential causes in infected cells.

  6. Lagrangians for generalized Argyres-Douglas theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Giacomelli, Simone

    2017-10-01

    We continue the study of Lagrangian descriptions of N=2 Argyres-Douglas theories. We use our recent interpretation in terms of sequential confinement to guess the Lagrangians of all the Argyres-Douglas models with Abelian three dimensional mirror. We find classes of four dimensional N=1 quivers that flow in the infrared to generalized Argyres-Douglas theories, such as the ( A k , A kN + N -1) models. We study in detail how the N=1 chiral rings map to the Coulomb and Higgs Branches of the N=2 CFT's. The three dimensional mirror RG flows are shown to land on the N=4 complete graph quivers. We also compactify to three dimensions the gauge theory dual to ( A 1, D 4), and find the expected Abelianization duality with N=4 SQED with 3 flavors.

  7. Towards a general theory of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and evaluating the implementation of complex interventions in practice is an important problem for healthcare managers and policy makers, and for patients and others who must operationalize them beyond formal clinical settings. It has been argued that this work should be founded on theory that provides a foundation for understanding, designing, predicting, and evaluating dynamic implementation processes. This paper sets out core constituents of a general theory of implementation, building on Normalization Process Theory and linking it to key constructs from recent work in sociology and psychology. These are informed by ideas about agency and its expression within social systems and fields, social and cognitive mechanisms, and collective action. This approach unites a number of contending perspectives in a way that makes possible a more comprehensive explanation of the implementation and embedding of new ways of thinking, enacting and organizing practice. PMID:23406398

  8. Generalized Moshinsky bracket recurrence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recurrence relations for generalized Talmi-Moshinsky brackets are derived. These relations permit the generation of transformation brackets once appropriate starting brackets are determined. The savings in computer time, when compared with generating brackets individually, is at least a factor of 10 for brackets with radial quantum numbers as large as 9 and angular quantum numbers as large as 2. (author)

  9. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  10. The Faraday effect revisited General theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornean, H D; Pedersen, T G

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field $B$. Then the linear term in $B$ of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in $B$ of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work.

  11. Sturmians and generalized sturmians in quantum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, John Scales; Avery, James Emil

    2012-01-01

    The theory of Sturmians and generalized Sturmians is reviewed. It is shown that when generalized Sturmians are used as basis functions, calculations on the spectra and physical properties of few-electron atoms can be performed with great ease and good accuracy. The use of many-center Coulomb Stur...... Sturmians as basis functions in calculations on N-electron molecules is also discussed. Basis sets of this type are shown to have many advantages over other types of ETO’s, especially the property of automatic scaling....

  12. Analysis of General Power Counting Rules in Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gavela, B M; Manohar, A V; Merlo, L

    2016-01-01

    We derive the general counting rules for a quantum effective field theory (EFT) in $\\mathsf{d}$ dimensions. The rules are valid for strongly and weakly coupled theories, and predict that all kinetic energy terms are canonically normalized. They determine the energy dependence of scattering cross sections in the range of validity of the EFT expansion. The size of cross sections is controlled by the $\\Lambda$ power counting of EFT, not by chiral counting, even for chiral perturbation theory ($\\chi$PT). The relation between $\\Lambda$ and $f$ is generalized to $\\mathsf{d}$ dimensions. We show that the naive dimensional analysis $4\\pi$ counting is related to $\\hbar$ counting. The EFT counting rules are applied to $\\chi$PT, to Standard Model EFT and to the non-trivial case of Higgs EFT, which combines the $\\Lambda$ and chiral counting rules within a single theory.

  13. Verifying the Theory of Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1975-01-01

    This article, based on a talk the author gave to the 'Innominates', an interdisciplinary faculty group at the University of Chicago, focuses on events of the years surrounding the British Expeditions to Brazil and West Africa in 1919 that led to the confirmation of Einstein's theory of relativity. (BT)

  14. The Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cial theory of relativity were published in the journal. Annalen der Physik, and were titled 'On the electro- dynamics of ... Historical Background. In order to set Einstein's work in proper perspective, re- call that, in ... ideas of absolute space and time firmly entrenched, most physicists thought that this speed was correct only in.

  15. Conformal covariance of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Pallas, N.; Gottlieb, I.

    1980-01-01

    The Einstein's equations of General Relativity are written in a conformal metric, resulting as a consequence of geometrizing the pressure forces. Accordingly, the trajectory of a test body pursues a geodetic line even inside the source of gravitational field. Moreover, the pressure, entering the perfect fluid scheme, may be replaced by a certain scalar interaction. This new manner of interpreting General Relativity is then applied to Cosmology, in order to build up a model of Universe whose static limit should coincide with that of Einstein. At the same time, the cosmological constant is connected to the scalar interaction acquiring a plausible explanation. (author)

  16. The gauge in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, J.

    1975-01-01

    The view is taken that the field equations of General Relativity, without a definition of congruence of length and time intervals at different events, are without physical content. The possibility is explored that the customary Einstein field equations are to be used but with a different congruence definition than is customary. When these resulting equations are, in turn, expressed with the customary congruence, they comprise a new set of field equations physically not equivalent to either Einstein's or Brans-Dicke's formulations of general relativity. Similarities with Einstein's and Brans-Dicke's formulations are discussed, and the possibility of experimental confirmation of these new equations is also briefly considered. (author)

  17. General relativity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Johanna

    1961-01-01

    An internationally famous physicist and electrical engineer, the author of this text was a pioneer in the investigation of gravitational waves. Joseph Weber's General Relativity and Gravitational Waves offers a classic treatment of the subject. Appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text remains ever relevant. Brief but thorough in its introduction to the foundations of general relativity, it also examines the elements of Riemannian geometry and tensor calculus applicable to this field.Approximately a quarter of the contents explores theoretical and experimenta

  18. Advances in heuristically based generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1994-01-01

    A distinctive feature of heuristically based generalized perturbation theory methodology consists in the systematic use of importance conservation concepts. As well known, this use leads to fundamental reciprocity relationship. Instead, the alternative variational and differential one approaches make a consistent use of the properties and adjoint functions. The equivalence between the importance and the adjoint functions have been demonstrated in important cases. There are some instances, however, in which the commonly known operator governing the adjoint function are not adequate. In this paper ways proposed to generalize this rules, as adopted with the heuristic generalized perturbation theory methodology, are illustrated. When applied to the neutron/nuclide field characterizing the core evolution in a power reactor system, in which also an intensive control variable (ρ) is defined, these rules leas to an orthogonality relationship connected to this same control variable. A set of ρ-mode eigenfunctions may be correspondingly defined and an extended concept of reactivity (generalizing that commonly associated with the multiplication factor) proposed as more directly indicative of the controllability of a critical reactor system. (author). 25 refs

  19. Conformal methods in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Valiente Kroon, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a systematic exposition of conformal methods and how they can be used to study the global properties of solutions to the equations of Einstein's theory of gravity. It shows that combining these ideas with differential geometry can elucidate the existence and stability of the basic solutions of the theory. Introducing the differential geometric, spinorial and PDE background required to gain a deep understanding of conformal methods, this text provides an accessible account of key results in mathematical relativity over the last thirty years, including the stability of de Sitter and Minkowski spacetimes. For graduate students and researchers, this self-contained account includes useful visual models to help the reader grasp abstract concepts and a list of further reading, making this the perfect reference companion on the topic.

  20. Canonical quantization of general relativity in discrete space-times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-01-17

    It has long been recognized that lattice gauge theory formulations, when applied to general relativity, conflict with the invariance of the theory under diffeomorphisms. We analyze discrete lattice general relativity and develop a canonical formalism that allows one to treat constrained theories in Lorentzian signature space-times. The presence of the lattice introduces a "dynamical gauge" fixing that makes the quantization of the theories conceptually clear, albeit computationally involved. The problem of a consistent algebra of constraints is automatically solved in our approach. The approach works successfully in other field theories as well, including topological theories. A simple cosmological application exhibits quantum elimination of the singularity at the big bang.

  1. Introduction to the theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Peter Gabriel

    1976-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage of special theory (frames of reference, Lorentz transformation, more), general theory (principle of equivalence, more) and unified theory (Weyl's gauge-invariant geometry, more.) Foreword by Albert Einstein.

  2. Generalized metric formulation of double field theory on group manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Bosque, Pascal du; Hassler, Falk; Lüst, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We rewrite the recently derived cubic action of Double Field Theory on group manifolds http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)001 in terms of a generalized metric and extrapolate it to all orders in the fields. For the resulting action, we derive the field equations and state them in terms of a generalized curvature scalar and a generalized Ricci tensor. Compared to the generalized metric formulation of DFT derived from tori, all these quantities receive additional contributions related to the non-trivial background. It is shown that the action is invariant under its generalized diffeomorphisms and 2D-diffeomorphisms. Imposing additional constraints relating the background and fluctuations around it, the precise relation between the proposed generalized metric formulation of DFT WZW and of original DFT from tori is clarified. Furthermore, we show how to relate DFT WZW of the WZW background with the flux formulation of original DFT.

  3. Generalized metric formulation of double field theory on group manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik,Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Bosque, Pascal du [Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center für Theoretische Physik,Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,Theresienstraße 37, 80333 München (Germany); Hassler, Falk [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik,Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Lüst, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik,Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center für Theoretische Physik,Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,Theresienstraße 37, 80333 München (Germany); CERN, PH-TH,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-08-13

    We rewrite the recently derived cubic action of Double Field Theory on group manifolds http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)001 in terms of a generalized metric and extrapolate it to all orders in the fields. For the resulting action, we derive the field equations and state them in terms of a generalized curvature scalar and a generalized Ricci tensor. Compared to the generalized metric formulation of DFT derived from tori, all these quantities receive additional contributions related to the non-trivial background. It is shown that the action is invariant under its generalized diffeomorphisms and 2D-diffeomorphisms. Imposing additional constraints relating the background and fluctuations around it, the precise relation between the proposed generalized metric formulation of DFT{sub WZW} and of original DFT from tori is clarified. Furthermore, we show how to relate DFT{sub WZW} of the WZW background with the flux formulation of original DFT.

  4. Perturbative Gravity and Gauge Theory Relations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Søndergaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the amazing Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations, connecting perturbative gravity and gauge theories at tree level. The main focus is on n-point derivations and general properties both from a string theory and pure field theory point of view. In particular, the field theory part is based on some very recent developments.

  5. A thermodynamically general theory for convective vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Nilton O.

    2008-08-01

    Convective vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb lower-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject higher-entropy-energy to space. These vortices range from small to large-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective vortices is important to our understanding of some of the basic features of planetary atmospheres. The heat engine framework is a useful tool for studying convective vortices. However, current theories assume that convective vortices are reversible heat engines. Since there are questions about how reversible real atmospheric heat engines are, their usefulness for studying real atmospheric vortices is somewhat controversial. In order to reduce this problem, a theory for convective vortices that includes irreversible processes is proposed. The paper's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines that includes the effects of irreversible processes. It is shown that a simplified version of this expression is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. It is speculated that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also sheds light on other basic features of convective vortices such as their physical appearance.

  6. General relativity with applications to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    This text provides a comprehensive and timely introduction to general relativity The foundations of the theory in Part I are thoroughly developed together with the required mathematical background from differential geometry in Part III The six chapters in Part II are devoted to tests of general relativity and to many of its applications Binary pulsars are studied in considerable detail Much space is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel's proof of his uniqueness theorem, and derivations of the basic laws of black hole physics The final chapter of this part contains Witten's proof of the positive energy theorem The book addresses undergraduate and graduate students in physics, astrophysics and mathematics It is very well structured and should become a standard text for a modern treatment of gravitational physics The clear presentation of differential geometry makes it also useful for string theory and other fields of ...

  7. General relativity and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that from the first principles of General Relativity it follows that there exists a new type of interactions which are tightly connected with the gravitational interactions. New particles representing a new form of interactions do not interact electromagnetically, strongly and weakly with the known elementary particles. Physics of the new particles is defined by the Planck scales. (author.). 9 refs

  8. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  9. Algebraic computing in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Inverno, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring to the attention of potential users the existence of algebraic computing systems, and to illustrate their use by reviewing a number of problems for which such a system has been successfully used in General Relativity. In addition, some remarks are included which may be of help in the future design of these systems. (author)

  10. Cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmological models in general relativity. B B PAUL. Department of Physics, Nowgong College, Nagaon, Assam, India. MS received 4 October 2002; revised 6 March 2003; accepted 21 May 2003. Abstract. LRS Bianchi type-I space-time filled with perfect fluid is considered here with deceler- ation parameter as variable.

  11. Dimensional Analysis and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Newton's law of gravitation is a central topic in the first-year physics curriculum. A lecturer can go beyond the physical details and use the history of gravitation to discuss the development of scientific ideas; unfortunately, the most recent chapter in this history, general relativity, is not covered in first-year courses. This paper discusses…

  12. Interacting electromagnetic waves in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The problem is considered of finding exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations which describe the physical situation of two colliding and subsequently interacting electromagnetic waves. The general theory of relativity predicts a nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic waves. The situation is described using an approximate geometrical method, and a new exact solution describing two interacting electromagnetic waves is given. This describes waves emitted from two sources mutually focusing each other on the opposite source. (author)

  13. Testing General Relativity with Pulsar Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stairs Ingrid H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars of very different types, including isolated objects and binaries (with short- and long-period orbits, and white-dwarf and neutron-star companions provide the means to test both the predictions of general relativity and the viability of alternate theories of gravity. This article presents an overview of pulsars, then discusses the current status of and future prospects for tests of equivalence-principle violations and strong-field gravitational experiments.

  14. A generalized Yang-Mills Theory I: general aspects of the classical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, C.A.P.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized Yang-Mills theory which is the non-Abelian version of the generalized eletrodinamics proposed by Podolsky is analysed both in the Lagrangian an Hamiltonian formulation. A simple class of solutions to the Euler-Lagrange equations is presented and the structure of the Hamiltonian constraints is studied in details. (Author) [pt

  15. On generally covariant quantum field theory and generalized causal and dynamical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannier, U.

    1988-01-01

    We give an example of a generally covariant quasilocal algebra associated with the massive free field. Maximal, two-sided ideals of this algebra are algebraic representatives of external metric fields. In some sense, this algebra may be regarded as a concrete realization of Ekstein's ideas of presymmetry in quantum field theory. Using ideas from our example and from usual algebraic quantum field theory, we discuss a generalized scheme, in which maximal ideals are viewed as algebraic representatives of dynamical equations or Lagrangians. The considered frame is no quantum gravity, but may lead to further insight into the relation between quantum theory and space-time geometry. (orig.)

  16. Some remarks on general covariance of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutzer, E.

    1977-01-01

    If one accepts Einstein's general principle of relativity (covariance principle) also for the sphere of microphysics (quantum, mechanics, quantum field theory, theory of elemtary particles), one has to ask how far the fundamental laws of traditional quantum physics fulfil this principle. Attention is here drawn to a series of papers that have appeared during the last years, in which the author criticized the usual scheme of quantum theory (Heisenberg picture, Schroedinger picture etc.) and presented a new foundation of the basic laws of quantum physics, obeying the 'principle of fundamental covariance' (Einstein's covariance principle in space-time and covariance principle in Hilbert space of quantum operators and states). (author)

  17. Possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Patten, R.A.; Everitt, C.W.F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon orbiting a rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect to 1% with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit. In addition to tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken near the poles. New geophysical information is inherent in the polar data

  18. General quadratic gauge theory: constraint structure, symmetries and physical functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D M [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tyutin, I V [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-17

    How can we relate the constraint structure and constraint dynamics of the general gauge theory in the Hamiltonian formulation to specific features of the theory in the Lagrangian formulation, especially relate the constraint structure to the gauge transformation structure of the Lagrangian action? How can we construct the general expression for the gauge charge if the constraint structure in the Hamiltonian formulation is known? Whether we can identify the physical functions defined as commuting with first-class constraints in the Hamiltonian formulation and the physical functions defined as gauge invariant functions in the Lagrangian formulation? The aim of the present paper is to consider the general quadratic gauge theory and to answer the above questions for such a theory in terms of strict assertions. To fulfil such a programme, we demonstrate the existence of the so-called superspecial phase-space variables in terms of which the quadratic Hamiltonian action takes a simple canonical form. On the basis of such a representation, we analyse a functional arbitrariness in the solutions of the equations of motion of the quadratic gauge theory and derive the general structure of symmetries by analysing a symmetry equation. We then use these results to identify the two definitions of physical functions and thus prove the Dirac conjecture.

  19. String theory compactifications with fluxes, and generalized geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassani, D.

    2009-06-01

    The topic of this thesis is compactifications in string theory and supergravity. We study dimensional reductions of type II theories on backgrounds with fluxes, using the techniques of Hitchin's generalized geometry. We start with an introduction of the needed mathematical tools, focusing on SU(3)xSU(3) structures on the generalized tangent bundle T+T * , and analyzing their deformations. Next we study the four dimensional N equals 2 gauged supergravity which can be defined reducing type II theories on SU(3)*SU(3) structure backgrounds with general NSNS and RR fluxes: we establish the complete bosonic action, and we show how its data are related to the generalized geometry formalism on T+T * . In particular, we derive a geometric expression for the full N = 2 scalar potential. Then we focus on the relations between the 10d and 4d descriptions of supersymmetric flux backgrounds: we spell out the N = 1 vacuum conditions within the 4d N = 2 theory, as well as from its N = 1 truncation, and we establish a precise matching with the equations characterizing the N = 1 backgrounds at the ten dimensional level. We conclude by presenting some concrete examples, based on coset spaces with SU(3) structure. We establish for these spaces the consistency of the truncation based on left-invariance, and we explore the landscape of vacua of the corresponding theory, taking string loop corrections into account. (author)

  20. On the ultrarelativistic limit of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautcourt, G.

    1998-01-01

    As is well-known, Newton's gravitational theory can be formulated as a four-dimensional space-time theory and follows as singular limit from Einstein's theory, if the velocity of light tends to the infinity. Here 'singular' stands for the fact, that the limiting geometrical structure differs from a regular Riemannian space-time. Geometrically, the transition Einstein → Newton can be viewed as an 'opening' of the light cones. This picture suggests that there might be other singular limits of Einstein's theory: Let all light cones shrink and ultimately become part of a congruence of singular world lines. The limiting structure may be considered as a null hypersurface embedded in a five-dimensional spacetime. While the velocity of light tends to zero here, all other velocities tend to the velocity of light. Thus one may speak of an ultrarelativistic limit of General Relativity. The resulting theory is as simple as Newton's gravitational theory, with the basic difference, that Newton's elliptic differential equation is replaced by essentially ordinary differential equations, with derivatives tangent to the generators of the singular congruence. The Galilei group is replaced by the Carroll group introduced by Levy-Leblond. We suggest to study near ultrarelativistic situations with a perturbational approach starting from the singular structure, similar to post-Newtonian expansions in the c → ∞ case. (author)

  1. Toward a holographic theory for general spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Salzetta, Nico; Sanches, Fabio; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2017-04-01

    We study a holographic theory of general spacetimes that does not rely on the existence of asymptotic regions. This theory is to be formulated in a holographic space. When a semiclassical description is applicable, the holographic space is assumed to be a holographic screen: a codimension-1 surface that is capable of encoding states of the gravitational spacetime. Our analysis is guided by conjectured relationships between gravitational spacetime and quantum entanglement in the holographic description. To understand basic features of this picture, we catalog predictions for the holographic entanglement structure of cosmological spacetimes. We find that qualitative features of holographic entanglement entropies for such spacetimes differ from those in AdS/CFT but that the former reduce to the latter in the appropriate limit. The Hilbert space of the theory is analyzed, and two plausible structures are found: a direct-sum and "spacetime-equals-entanglement" structure. The former preserves a naive relationship between linear operators and observable quantities, while the latter respects a more direct connection between holographic entanglement and spacetime. We also discuss the issue of selecting a state in quantum gravity, in particular how the state of the multiverse may be selected in the landscape.

  2. General Relativity solutions in modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2018-06-01

    Recent gravitational wave observations of binary black hole mergers and a binary neutron star merger by LIGO and Virgo Collaborations associated with its optical counterpart constrain deviation from General Relativity (GR) both on strong-field regime and cosmological scales with high accuracy, and further strong constraints are expected by near-future observations. Thus, it is important to identify theories of modified gravity that intrinsically possess the same solutions as in GR among a huge number of theories. We clarify the three conditions for theories of modified gravity to allow GR solutions, i.e., solutions with the metric satisfying the Einstein equations in GR and the constant profile of the scalar fields. Our analysis is quite general, as it applies a wide class of single-/multi-field scalar-tensor theories of modified gravity in the presence of matter component, and any spacetime geometry including cosmological background as well as spacetime around black hole and neutron star, for the latter of which these conditions provide a necessary condition for no-hair theorem. The three conditions will be useful for further constraints on modified gravity theories as they classify general theories of modified gravity into three classes, each of which possesses i) unique GR solutions (i.e., no-hair cases), ii) only hairy solutions (except the cases that GR solutions are realized by cancellation between singular coupling functions in the Euler-Lagrange equations), and iii) both GR and hairy solutions, for the last of which one of the two solutions may be selected dynamically.

  3. General Relativistic Mean Field Theory for rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madokoro, Hideki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Matsuzaki, Masayuki

    1998-03-01

    The {sigma}-{omega} model Lagrangian is generalized to an accelerated frame by using the technique of general relativity which is known as tetrad formalism. We apply this model to the description of rotating nuclei within the mean field approximation, which we call General Relativistic Mean Field Theory (GRMFT) for rotating nuclei. The resulting equations of motion coincide with those of Munich group whose formulation was not based on the general relativistic transformation property of the spinor fields. Some numerical results are shown for the yrast states of the Mg isotopes and the superdeformed rotational bands in the A {approx} 60 mass region. (author)

  4. Bubble collisions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siklos, S.T.C.; Wu, Z.C.; University of Science and Technology of China, Hofei, Anhwei)

    1983-01-01

    The collision of two bubbles of true vacuum in a background of false vacuum is considered in the context of General Relativity. It is found that in the thin wall approximation, the problem, can be solved exactly. The region to the future of the collision is described by the pseudo-Schwarzschild de Sitter metric. The parameters in this metric are found by solving the junction conditions at each collision. (author)

  5. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  6. The special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Devanathan, V

    2015-01-01

    THE SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY, designed as a text book for undergraduate and postgraduate students, deals with the Michelson-Morley experiment, the concept of unified space and time, the Lorentz transformation of physical quantities, length contraction, time dilation, the Minkowski space, the mass-energy relation, the concept of four-vectors, the relativistic mechanics, the laws of transformation between centre of momentum and laboratory systems, the relativistic kinematics, the unification of laws of electricity and magnetism into laws of electromagnetism, the invariance of Maxwell's equations under Lorentz transformation and the Lorentz transformation of electromagnetic quantities. KEY FEATURES: * Review Questions * Problems * Solutions to Problems * Multiple Choice Questions

  7. Relativity and equivalence principles in the gauge theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.; Sardanashvili, G.

    1981-01-01

    Roles of relativity (RP) and equivalence principles (EP) in the gauge theory of gravity are shown. RP in the gravitational theory in formalism of laminations can be formulated as requirement of covariance of equations relative to the GL + (4, R)(X) gauge group. In such case RP turns out to be identical to the gauge principle in the gauge theory of a group of outer symmetries, and the gravitational theory can be directly constructed as the gauge theory. In general relativity theory the equivalence theory adds RP and is intended for description of transition to a special relativity theory in some system of reference. The approach described takes into account that in the gauge theory, besides gauge fields under conditions of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the Goldstone and Higgs fields can also arise, to which the gravitational metric field is related, what is the sequence of taking account of RP in the gauge theory of gravitation [ru

  8. Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein-Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory. (book review)

  9. Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-09-07

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein-Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory. (book review)

  10. On the de Sitter and Nariai spacetimes in a generalized theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1985-07-01

    A possibility of obtaining the de Sitter and Nariai spacetimes in a generalized theory of gravitation (which was in succession proposed by Utiyama-DeWitt, Parker-Fulling-Hu and Gurovich-Starobinski) is examined. It is shown that the generalized theory with a suitable fixation of three parameters admit both spacetimes, just like the general theory of relativity. (author)

  11. Generalized detailed balance theory of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchartz, Thomas

    2009-12-12

    compatible with the Shockley-Queisser limit and the classical diode theory. For organic solar cells, exciton binding energies are sufficiently high, so that purely bipolar models are no longer applicable. Instead, excitonic transport has to be included. Thus, the inclusion of exciton transport into the bipolar detailed balance model leads to a generalized detailed balance model that simulates solar cells with predominantly bipolar transport, with predominantly excitonic transport and with every combination of both. Due to low exciton diffusion lengths, organic solar cells are usually combined with a specific device geometry, the bulk heterojunction. In a bulk heterojunction device, the whole bulk of the absorber is made up of distributed heterojunctions, where the exciton is transferred to a bound pair at the interface, which is then split into free electron and hole. The assumption that exciton transport is only relevant towards the next heterointerface allows to develop also a version of the detailed balance model that is applicable to bulk heterojunction cells. The last variation of the detailed balance model includes the process of impact ionisation as a means to generate more than one exciton from a single high energy photon. The model for multiple exciton generating absorbers identifies possible bottlenecks as well as maximum efficiencies of future solar cells that use this concept. Another direct consequence of the principle of detailed balance is a reciprocity theorem between electroluminescence and solar cell quantum efficiency. The theoretical part of this thesis discusses the validity range of this reciprocity and checks for each version of the model, whether the relation between electroluminescence and quantum efficiency is still applicable. The main result shows that voltage dependent carrier collection as encountered in low mobility pin-junction devices leads to deviations from the reciprocity, while it still holds for most pn-junction solar cells. The

  12. General projective relativity and the vector-tensor gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcidiacono, G.

    1986-01-01

    In the general projective relativity, the induced 4-dimensional metric is symmetric in three cases, and we obtain the vector-tensor, the scalar-tensor, and the scalar-vector-tensor theories of gravitation. In this work we examine the vector-tensor theory, similar to the Veblen's theory, but with a different physical interpretation

  13. Relational Compositions in Fuzzy Class Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhounek, Libor; Daňková, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 8 (2009), s. 1005-1036 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Pro jects: GA AV ČR KJB100300502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : fuzzy relation * sup-T-composition * inf-R-composition * BK- pro duct * fuzzy class theory * formal truth value Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.138, year: 2009

  14. Homothetic motions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, C.B.G.

    1976-01-01

    Properties of homothetic or self-similar motions in general relativity are examined with particular reference to vacuum and perfect-fluid space-times. The role of the homothetic bivector with components Hsub((a;b)) formed from the homothetic vector H is discussed in some detail. It is proved that a vacuum space-time only admits a nontrivial homothetic motion if the homothetic vector field is non-null and is not hypersurface orthogonal. As a subcase of a more general result it is shown that a perfect-fluid space-time cannot admit a non-trivial homothetic vector which is orthogonal to the fluid velocity 4-vector. (author)

  15. Introduction to general relativity and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Mitchell A

    2018-01-01

    The textbook aims to present general relativity and modern cosmology in a friendly form suitable for advanced undergraduates. The text begins with a self-contained introduction to the theory of manifolds and then develops the tools needed to understand curved spaces and curved spacetimes. Special relativity can then be understood in a geometrical context, bypassing some of the difficulties students have when encountering relativistic effects (e.g. time dilation and length contraction) for the first time. The theory of curvature and its effects leads to the Einstein field equations and its classic tests in the precession of Mercury and the deflection of starlight. The second part of the book covers modern cosmology, starting with the evolution equations for the expansion of the universe. The microwave background, evidence for dark matter, and the clustering of galaxies are examined in detail.

  16. A general theory of sexual differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Arthur P

    2017-01-02

    A general theory of mammalian sexual differentiation is proposed. All biological sex differences are the result of the inequality in effects of the sex chromosomes, which are the only factors that differ in XX vs. XY zygotes. This inequality leads to male-specific effects of the Y chromosome, including expression of the testis-determining gene Sry that causes differentiation of testes. Thus, Sry sets up lifelong sex differences in effects of gonadal hormones. Y genes also act outside of the gonads to cause male-specific effects. Differences in the number of X chromosomes between XX and XY cells cause sex differences in expression (1) of Xist, (2) of X genes that escape inactivation, and (3) of parentally imprinted X genes. Sex differences in phenotype are ultimately the result of multiple, independent sex-biasing factors, hormonal and sex chromosomal. These factors act in parallel and in combination to induce sex differences. They also can offset each other to reduce sex differences. Other mechanisms, operating at the level of populations, cause groups of males to differ on average from groups of females. The theory frames questions for further study, and directs attention to inherent sex-biasing factors that operate in many tissues to cause sex differences, and to cause sex-biased protection from disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Nonlinear generalization of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1985-01-01

    In Poincares axiomatic formulation special relativity is a derived consequence of a true Lorentz contraction, for a rod in absolute motion through a substratum. Furthermore, Lorentz had shown that the rod contraction can be understood by an inverse square law interaction and therefore special relativity derived from more fundamental principles. The derivation by Lorentz shows that the root of the divergence problems is the singular inverse square law. By replacing the inverse square law with a regular one through the introduction of a finite length, the author has succeeded in deriving a nonlinear generalization of special relativity which eliminates all infinities. Besides the relative velocities, these nonlinear transformation equations also contain absolute velocities against a substratum, but in the limit of small energies they go over into the linear Lorentz transformations. Depending on the smallness of the fundamental length, departures from special relativity can be observed only at very high energies. The theorem that the velocity of light is the same in all reference systems still holds and likewise the conservation laws for energy and momentum

  18. A possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect by means of two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar orbit about the earth. For a 2-1/2 year experiment, the measurement should approach an accuracy of 1%. An independent measurement of the geodetic precession of the orbit plane due to the motion about the sun may also be possible to about 10% accuracy. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler data are taken at points of passing near the poles to yield an accurate measurement of the separation distance between the two satellites. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in this polar ranging data.

  19. General time-dependent formulation of quantum scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2004-01-01

    We derive and explain the key ideas behind a time-dependent formulation of quantum scattering theory, applicable generally to systems with a finite-range scattering potential. The scattering is initiated and probed by plane wave packets, which are localized just outside the range of the potential. The asymptotic limits of conventional scattering theory (initiation in the remote past; detection in the remote future) are not taken. Instead, the differential cross section (DCS) is obtained by projecting the scattered wave packet onto the probe plane wave packets. The projection also yields a time-dependent version of the DCS. Cuts through the wave packet, just as it exits the scattering potential, yield time-dependent and time-independent angular distributions that give a close-up picture of the scattering which complements the DCS. We have previously applied the theory to interpret experimental cross sections of chemical reactions [e.g., S. C. Althorpe, F. Fernandez-Alonso, B. D. Bean, J. D. Ayers, A. E. Pomerantz, R. N. Zare, and E. Wrede, Nature (London) 416, 67 (2002)]. This paper gives the derivation of the theory, and explains its relation to conventional scattering theory. For clarity, the derivation is restricted to spherical-particle scattering, though it may readily be extended to general multichannel systems. We illustrate the theory using a simple application to hard-sphere scattering

  20. A precise extragalactic test of General Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Thomas E; Oldham, Lindsay J; Smith, Russell J; Auger, Matthew W; Westfall, Kyle B; Bacon, David; Nichol, Robert C; Masters, Karen L; Koyama, Kazuya; van den Bosch, Remco

    2018-06-22

    Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, has been precisely tested on Solar System scales, but the long-range nature of gravity is still poorly constrained. The nearby strong gravitational lens ESO 325-G004 provides a laboratory to probe the weak-field regime of gravity and measure the spatial curvature generated per unit mass, γ. By reconstructing the observed light profile of the lensed arcs and the observed spatially resolved stellar kinematics with a single self-consistent model, we conclude that γ = 0.97 ± 0.09 at 68% confidence. Our result is consistent with the prediction of 1 from General Relativity and provides a strong extragalactic constraint on the weak-field metric of gravity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. General relativity: An erfc metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Réjean

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes an erfc potential to incorporate in a symmetric metric. One key feature of this model is that it relies on the existence of an intrinsic physical constant σ, a star-specific proper length that scales all its surroundings. Based thereon, the new metric is used to study the space-time geometry of a static symmetric massive object, as seen from its interior. The analytical solutions to the Einstein equation are presented, highlighting the absence of singularities and discontinuities in such a model. The geodesics are derived in their second- and first-order differential formats. Recalling the slight impact of the new model on the classical general relativity tests in the solar system, a number of facts and open problems are briefly revisited on the basis of a heuristic definition of σ. A special attention is given to gravitational collapses and non-singular black holes.

  2. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  3. Energy conditions and stability in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant energy condition in general relativity theory, which says that every observer measures a nonnegative local energy density and a nonspacelike local energy flow, is examined in connection with the types of energy-momentum tensor it permits. The condition that the energy-momentum tensor be ''stable'' in obeying the dominant energy conditions is then defined in terms of a suitable topology on the set of energy-momentum tensors on space-time and the consequences are evaluated and discussed. (author)

  4. An elementary course on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regge, T.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives an informal account of the theory of general relativity, for non-specialists. It does not contain any detailed technical expose of tensor calculus but relies instead on a number of intuitive arguments. After a brief historical introduction the notion of curvature is developed, first in two dimensions (as done originally by Gauss) and then in higher dimensions, following the ideas of Riemann. This curvature is then related to quantities of physical interest through the following steps: i) The equality of gravitational and inertial masses is discussed and presented as the ''weak equivalence principle''. ii) This is then extended to the ''strong equivalence principle'' according to the original programme of Einstein. iii) The ''strong equivalence principle'' implies the existence of a local inertial observer in any point of space-time. In a sufficiently small region of space-time this observer will not sense any gravitational field. iv) In a larger region the observer will, however, sense residual tidal forces. These forces are identified with the curvature of spacetime, to achieve a direct geometrical interpretation of gravity. v) Finally certain curvature components are related to the distribution of matter through Einstein's field equations. Section 4 contains a discussion of the classical tests of the theory and of the possibility of detecting gravitational waves. Sections 5 and 6 deal with cosmology and with the possible extension of the theory along the lines of the original ideas of Einstein, with emphasis on the dimensional reduction techniques of current interest. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear phenomena in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2018-04-01

    The perturbation theory plays an important role in studying structure formation in cosmology and post-Newtonian physics, but not all phenomena can be described by the linear perturbation theory. Thus, it is necessary to study exact solutions or higher-order perturbations. Specifically, we study black hole (apparent) horizons and the cosmological event horizon formation in the perturbation theory. We emphasize that in the perturbative regime of the gravitational potential these horizons cannot form in the lower order. Studying the infinite plane metric, we show that, to capture the cosmological constant effect, we need at least a second-order expansion.

  6. Stability analysis of black holes via a catastrophe theory and black hole thermodynamics in generalized theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Torii, Takashi; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2003-01-01

    We perform a linear perturbation analysis for black hole solutions with a 'massive' Yang-Mills field (the Proca field) in Brans-Dicke theory and find that the results are quite consistent with those via catastrophe theory where thermodynamic variables play an intrinsic role. Based on this observation, we show the general relation between these two methods in generalized theories of gravity which are conformally related to the Einstein-Hilbert action

  7. Potential Performance Theory (PPT): A General Theory of Task Performance Applied to Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafimow, David; Rice, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    People can use a variety of different strategies to perform tasks and these strategies all have two characteristics in common. First, they can be evaluated in comparison with either an absolute or a relative standard. Second, they can be used at varying levels of consistency. In the present article, the authors develop a general theory of task…

  8. Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Stichtenoth, Henning; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998......Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998...

  9. New ghost-free extensions of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The method of algebraic extension is shown to yield a large class of gravitational theories which are extensions of general relativity. Requiring positivity of energy in the flat-space limit of such theories provides some constraints, but a large set of theories of potential phenomenological interest survives this condition. Explicit examples of such theories include the non-symmetric gravitational theory, algebraically extended Hilbert gravity and a one-parameter family of theories with dynamical torsion. In general such theories do not alter general relativistic post-Newtonian predictions for time delay experiments; rather they alter the non-linearities of the post-Newtonian gravitational potential. Such effects may be probed by measuring periastron shifts, as in the eclipsing binary systems Di Her and As Cam, as well as in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 (author)

  10. Gravity: An Introduction to Einstein's General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, Julio C

    2004-01-01

    General relativity is one of the cornerstones of modern physics. In spite of this, the teaching of general relativity at undergraduate level remains quite marginal. The reasons for this particular situation are quite well known. We can quote, for example, two of them: general relativity requires specific mathematical tools that are somehow outside the mainstream of undergraduate technical development; moreover, this is a branch of physics whose observational and experimental applications have remained rare until recent times, and even though this scenario has changed dramatically in the last few years, the new situation has not yet been absorbed into undergraduate teaching. In this new book, Hartle attempts to address the difficulties that must be faced by anyone who teaches general relativity at undergraduate level. In order to not scare the student with the hard technical preparation needed to obtain the basic equations of general relativity, Einstein's equations, he simply gives up the idea of introducing these equations at the very beginning. Instead, he chooses to present Einstein's equations, with most of the mathematics needed to do them, in the last part of the book. This delicate (and of course dangerous) choice has the advantage of introducing the reader first to the physical aspects of general relativity. This approach can be dangerous because the relevant solutions of the equations necessary to discuss the physical content of general relativity are presented first without a formal derivation. The book is divided into three parts. In the first, covering five chapters of the 24 in the whole book, Newtonian physics and special relativity are reviewed. This review is done in a manner that prepares the reader for the subsequent discussion of general relativity itself. The principle of relativity, the variational principle, the geometrical content of Newtonian theory and the main ideas behind special relativity are all presented. The heart of the book is, in

  11. Angular momentum in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The definition of angular momentum proposed in part I of this series (Prior. Proc. R. Soc. Lond.; A354:379 (1977)) is investigated when applied to rotating black holes. It is shown how to use the formula to evaluate the angular momentum of a stationary black hole. This acts as a description of a background space on which the effect of first matter and then gravitational perturbations is considered. The latter are of most interest and the rate of change of angular momentum, dJ/dt, is found as an expression in the shear induced in the event horizon by the perturbation and in its time integral. Teukolsky's solutions (Astrophys. J.; 185:635 (1973)) for the perturbed component of the Weyl tensor are then used to find this shear and hence to give an exact answer for dJ/dt. One of the implications of the result is a direct verification of Bekenstein's formula (Phys. Rev.; 7D:949 (1973)) relating in a simple way the rate of change of angular momentum to the rate of change of mass caused by a plane wave. A more general expression is also given for dM/dt. Considering only stationary perturbations, it is shown how to generalize the definition of angular momentum so as to include information about its direction as well. Three problems are particularly discussed - a single moon, two or more moons and a ring of matter causing the perturbation - since they provide illustrations of all the main features of the black hole's behaviour. In every case it is found that the black hole realigns its axis of rotation so that the final configuration is axisymmetric if possible; otherwise is slows down completely to reach a static state. (author)

  12. Renormalization in general theories with inter-generation mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Sirlin, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    We derive general and explicit expressions for the unrenormalized and renormalized dressed propagators of fermions in parity-nonconserving theories with inter-generation mixing. The mass eigenvalues, the corresponding mass counterterms, and the effect of inter-generation mixing on their determination are discussed. Invoking the Aoki-Hioki-Kawabe-Konuma-Muta renormalization conditions and employing a number of very useful relations from Matrix Algebra, we show explicitly that the renormalized dressed propagators satisfy important physical properties. (orig.)

  13. Theory of generalized Bessel functions: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.; Chiccoli, C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the systematic study of the generalized Bessel functions (GBF), recently introduced and often encountered in problems of scattering for which the dipole approximation is inadequate, is continuated. The relations among different GBF are analysed and their importance for the solution of differential finite-difference equation of the Raman-Nath type is discussed. Numerical results for the first-kind cylinder GBF in the preasymptotic region and also a preliminary analysis of the asymptotic properties of the modified GBF are presented

  14. Double Exponential Relativity Theory Coupled Theoretically with Quantum Theory?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Here the problem of special relativity is analyzed into the context of a new theoretical formulation: the Double Exponential Theory of Special Relativity with respect to which the current Special or Restricted Theory of Relativity (STR) turns to be a particular case only

  15. Kinematics in special and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodside, R.W.M.

    1979-05-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of motion for extended bodies from the viewpoint of classical field theory, where the classical field is the body's energy-momentum or matter tensor. In special relativity a symmetric and divergence-free matter tensor combined with inertial frames is used to generate a kinematics for extended bodies. In general relativity the author suggests an analogous kinematics and applies it to the simplest non-trivial example of static, spherical stars, looking for special sets of vector fields whose matter currents are conserved. Such a set of ten vector fields defines a special frame, and integrals of the conserved matter currents define ten momenta whcih give the kinematics. Application of de Rham cohomology theory shows that the conserved matter currents for isolated bodies will have mechanical potentials which enable the momenta to be found from flux integrals evaluated in the vacuum region surrounding the body. These potentials contain the full Riemann curvature, allowing a body's general relativistic momenta to be determined by its vacuum graviational field

  16. A few comments on general theory of quantized fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    Several important comments on General Theory of Quantized Fields shall be supplemented here. Our theory is based on (Riemannian) momentum spaces with finite volumes. Our theory is formulated in the specific inertial frame, i.e., the rest frame of the cosmic back-ground radiation (RF-CBR). To go to other reference frame, we reply on general co-ordinate (in our case, energy and momentum variables, p-representation) transformations and the principle of general relativity. We find the degeneracy on energy levels of all elementary particles (same values of all particle energies appear twice) (as compared to the conventional field theories). This doubling of energy levels might be important at the beginning (very early stage) of our evolutional universe. However, we may not wish to have such a doubling at the present epoch. We can avoid the doubling by introducing appropriate (natural and rational, of course) Yukawa interactions among fermions and bosons. Then it is easy to realize the situation in which elementary particles populated in the half of the energy levels (called 'our particles' having normal spin multiplicity) shall not 'interact' with particles populated in the other half of energy levels except gravity. The particles in the latter group may be called 'dark matter particles', which give the most natural candidates of dark matter. We have already emphasized that other candidates of dark matter are zero-point vibration energy of all elementary particles and the energy of the vacuum due to interaction Hamiltonians. (author)

  17. Ghost properties of generalized theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.; Moffat, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate theories of gravitation, in which spacetime is non-Riemannian and the metric g/sub munu/ is nonsymmetric, for ghosts and tachyons, using a spin-projection operator formalism. Ghosts are removed not by gauge invariance but by a Lagrange multiplier W/sub μ/, which occurs due to the breaking of projective invariance in the theory. Unified theories based on a Lagrangian containing a term lambdag/sup munu/g/sub / are proved to contain ghosts or tachyons

  18. Supergravity and Yang-Mills theories as generalized topological fields with constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Yi; Tung Rohsuan; Guo Hanying

    2004-01-01

    We present a general approach to construct a class of generalized topological field theories with constraints by means of generalized differential calculus and its application to connection theory. It turns out that not only the ordinary BF formulations of general relativity and Yang-Mills theories, but also the N=1,2 chiral supergravities can be reformulated as these constrained generalized topological field theories once the free parameters in the Lagrangian are specially chosen. We also show that the Chern-Simons action on the boundary may naturally be induced from the generalized topological action in the bulk, rather than introduced by hand

  19. Generalized second law of thermodynamic in modified teleparallel theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, M. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Bahamonde, Sebastian [University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom); Jamil, Mubasher [National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Department of Mathematics, School of Natural Sciences (SNS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-07-15

    This study is conducted to examine the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) in flat FRW for modified teleparallel gravity involving coupling between a scalar field with the torsion scalar T and the boundary term B = 2∇{sub μ}T{sup μ}. This theory is very useful, since it can reproduce other important well-known scalar field theories in suitable limits. The validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics at the apparent horizon is discussed for any coupling. As examples, we have also explored the validity of those thermodynamics laws in some new cosmological solutions under the theory. Additionally, we have also considered the logarithmic entropy corrected relation and discuss the GSLT at the apparent horizon. (orig.)

  20. Generalized second law of thermodynamic in modified teleparallel theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, M.; Bahamonde, Sebastian; Jamil, Mubasher

    2017-01-01

    This study is conducted to examine the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) in flat FRW for modified teleparallel gravity involving coupling between a scalar field with the torsion scalar T and the boundary term B = 2∇ μ T μ . This theory is very useful, since it can reproduce other important well-known scalar field theories in suitable limits. The validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics at the apparent horizon is discussed for any coupling. As examples, we have also explored the validity of those thermodynamics laws in some new cosmological solutions under the theory. Additionally, we have also considered the logarithmic entropy corrected relation and discuss the GSLT at the apparent horizon. (orig.)

  1. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  2. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederik eAerts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper.

  3. From twistor string theory to recursion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2009-01-01

    Witten's twistor string theory gives rise to an enigmatic formula 1 known as the 'connected prescription' for tree-level Yang-Mills scattering amplitudes. We derive a link representation for the connected prescription by Fourier transforming it to mixed coordinates in terms of both twistor and dual twistor variables. We show that it can be related to other representations of amplitudes by applying the global residue theorem to deform the contour of integration. For six and seven particles we demonstrate explicitly that certain contour deformations rewrite the connected prescription as the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten representation, thereby establishing a concrete link between Witten's twistor string theory and the dual formulation for the S matrix of the N=4 SYM recently proposed by Arkani-Hamed et al. Other choices of integration contour also give rise to 'intermediate prescriptions'. We expect a similar though more intricate structure for more general amplitudes.

  4. On Palacios-Gordon's theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    Since the early days of Einstein's special theory of relativity (1905), it is known that this theory suffers from some epistemological problems. Over the years, many theoreticians have endeavored to overcome these problems, rejecting either the 'Principle of Relativity' or the 'Light Principle'. Palacios and Gordon rejected the former and advanced an alternative theory governed by Voigt's transformation equations (1887). In the present paper, Palacios-Gordon's theory has been critically examined and some of its drawbacks are discovered. It becomes obvious that neither Einstein's special theory of relativity nor Palacios-Gordon's theory of relativity provides a flawless fit to the real world. It is speculated that suitable synthesis of these two theories might resolve all the controversial issues of special theory of relativity. (author)

  5. General relativity with spin and torsion: Foundations and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; von der Heyde, P.; Kerlick, G.D.; Nester, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A generalization of Einstein's gravitational theory is discussed in which the spin of matter as well as its mass plays a dynamical role. The spin of matter couples to a non-Riemannian structure in space-time, Cartan's torsion tensor. The theory which emerges from taking this coupling into account, the U 4 theory of gravitation, predicts, in addition to the usual infinite-range gravitational interaction mediated by the metric field, a new, very weak, spin contact interaction of gravitational origin. We summarize here all the available theoretical evidence that argues for admitting spin and torsion into a relativistic gravitational theory. Not least among this evidence is the demonstration that the U 4 theory arises as a local gauge theory for the Poincare group in space-time. The deviations of the U 4 theory from standard general relativity are estimated, and the prospects for further theoretical development are assessed

  6. N =1 Lagrangians for generalized Argyres-Douglas theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Prarit; Sciarappa, Antonio; Song, Jaewon

    2017-10-01

    We find N = 1 Lagrangian gauge theories that flow to generalized ArgyresDouglas theories with N = 2 supersymmetry. We find that certain SU quiver gauge theories flow to generalized Argyres-Douglas theories of type ( A k-1 , A mk-1) and ( I m,km , S). We also find quiver gauge theories of SO/Sp gauge groups flowing to the ( A 2 m-1 , D 2 mk+1), ( A 2 m , D 2 m( k-1)+ k ) and D m(2 k + 2) m(2 k + 2) [ m] theories.

  7. Albert Einstein's 1916 Review Article on General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Tilman

    2004-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of the final version of the general theory of relativity was published by Einstein in 1916 after several expositions of preliminary versions and latest revisions of the theory in November 1915. A historical account of this review paper is given, of its prehistory, including a discussion of Einstein's collaboration with Marcel Grossmann, and of its immediate reception.

  8. Proceedings of the third Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ning

    1983-01-01

    This book contains 64 session papers presented at the 3rd Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity. The papers are divided into 10 sections including: classical problem in gravitation; alternative approaches to gravitational theory; supergravity; quantum gravity and quantum field theory in curved space; cosmology; early universe; physics of compact bodies; gravitational wave experiments; gravitational experiments; miscellaneous. (Auth.)

  9. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The general theory of relativity, which is a field theory of gravitation, is described by the Einstein field equations. These equations whose fundamental constituent is the space-time metric gij, are highly non-linear partial differential equations and, therefore it is very difficult to obtain exact solutions. They become still more diffi-.

  10. Galileons as the Scalar Analogue of General Relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Remko; Ozkan, Mehmet; Roest, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between general relativity with diffeomorphism invariance and scalar field theories with Galilean invariance: notions such as the Levi-Civita connection and the Riemann tensor have a Galilean counterpart. This suggests Galilean theories as the unique nontrivial

  11. Spring School on Superstring Theory and Related Topics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    ICTP's annual Spring School on Superstring Theory and Related Topics provides pedagogical treatment of these subjects through lectures by some of the world's top string theorists. The activity is intended for theoretical physicists or mathematicians with knowledge of quantum field theory, general relativity and string theory. It is organized in collaboration with the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP) and the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN).

  12. Towards a General Theory of Immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard; Pradeu, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Theories are indispensable to organize immunological data into coherent, explanatory, and predictive frameworks. We propose to combine different models to develop a unifying theory of immunity which situates immunology in the wider context of physiology. We believe that the immune system will be increasingly understood as a central component of a network of partner physiological systems that interconnect to maintain homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vantage Theory and Linguistic Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Rob MacLaury's Vantage Theory, VT, models the way in which a cognizer constructs, recalls, uses, and modifies a category in terms of point of view or vantage. Alongside of VT, there is place for the kind of semantic specification found in the lexicon. VT2 [Allan, Keith, 2002. "Vantage theory, VT2, and number." "Language Sciences" 24(5-6), 679-703…

  14. Action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J. David

    2011-01-01

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela action is discussed in detail.

  15. Finsler geometry, relativity and gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asanov, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained account of the Finslerian techniques which aim to synthesize the ideas of Finslerian metrical generalization of Riemannian geometry to merge with the primary physical concepts of general relativity and gauge field theories. The geometrization of internal symmetries in terms of Finslerian geometry, as well as the formulation of Finslerian generalization of gravitational field equations and equations of motion of matter, are two key points used to expound the techniques. The Clebsch representation of the canonical momentum field is used to formulate the Hamilton-Jacobi theory for homogeneous Lagrangians of classical mechanics. As an auxillary mathematical apparatus, the author uses invariance identities which systematically reflect the covariant properties of geometrical objects. The results of recent studies of special Finsler spaces are also applied. The book adds substantially to the mathematical monographs by Rund (1959) and Rund and Bear (1972), all basic results of the latter being reflected. It is the author's hope that thorough exploration of the materrial presented will tempt the reader to revise the habitual physical concepts supported conventionally by Riemannian geometry. (Auth.)

  16. Stringy horizons and generalized FZZ duality in perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giribet, Gaston [Martin Fisher School of Physics, Brandeis University,Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Buenos Aires FCEN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET,Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-02-14

    We study scattering amplitudes in two-dimensional string theory on a black hole bakground. We start with a simple derivation of the Fateev-Zamolodchikov-Zamolodchikov (FZZ) duality, which associates correlation functions of the sine-Liouville integrable model on the Riemann sphere to tree-level string amplitudes on the Euclidean two-dimensional black hole. This derivation of FZZ duality is based on perturbation theory, and it relies on a trick originally due to Fateev, which involves duality relations between different Selberg type integrals. This enables us to rewrite the correlation functions of sine-Liouville theory in terms of a special set of correlators in the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) theory, and use this to perform further consistency checks of the recently conjectured Generalized FZZ (GFZZ) duality. In particular, we prove that n-point correlation functions in sine-Liouville theory involving n−2 winding modes actually coincide with the correlation functions in the SL(2,ℝ)/U(1) gauged WZW model that include n−2 oscillator operators of the type described by Giveon, Itzhaki and Kutasov in reference https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP10(2016)157. This proves the GFZZ duality for the case of tree level maximally winding violating n-point amplitudes with arbitrary n. We also comment on the connection between GFZZ and other marginal deformations previously considered in the literature.

  17. A generalized theory of preferential linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Guo, Jinli; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-12-01

    There are diverse mechanisms driving the evolution of social networks. A key open question dealing with understanding their evolution is: How do various preferential linking mechanisms produce networks with different features? In this paper we first empirically study preferential linking phenomena in an evolving online social network, find and validate the linear preference. We propose an analyzable model which captures the real growth process of the network and reveals the underlying mechanism dominating its evolution. Furthermore based on preferential linking we propose a generalized model reproducing the evolution of online social networks, and present unified analytical results describing network characteristics for 27 preference scenarios. We study the mathematical structure of degree distributions and find that within the framework of preferential linking analytical degree distributions can only be the combinations of finite kinds of functions which are related to rational, logarithmic and inverse tangent functions, and extremely complex network structure will emerge even for very simple sublinear preferential linking. This work not only provides a verifiable origin for the emergence of various network characteristics in social networks, but bridges the micro individuals' behaviors and the global organization of social networks.

  18. Zorn algebra in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.G.; Maia, M.D.

    The covariant differential properties of the split Cayley subalgebra of local real quaternion tetrads is considered. Referred to this local quaternion tetrad several geometrical objects are given in terms of Zorn-Weyl matrices. Associated to a pair of real null vectors we define two-component spinor fields over the curved space and the associated Zorn-Weyl matrices which satisfy the Dirac equation written in terms of the Zorn algebra. The formalism is generalized by considering a field of complex tetrads defining a Hermitian second rank tensor. The real part of this tensor describes the gravitational potentials and the imaginary part the electromagnetic potentials in the Lorentz gauge. The motion of a charged spin zero test body is considered. The Zorn-Weyl algebra associated to this generalized formalism has elements belonging to the full octonion algebra [pt

  19. On the Generalized Geometry Origin of Noncommutative Gauge Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jurco, Branislav; Vysoky, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We discuss noncommutative gauge theory from the generalized geometry point of view. We argue that the equivalence between the commutative and semiclassically noncommutative DBI actions is naturally encoded in the generalized geometry of D-branes.

  20. Roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation for people with type 2 diabetes in the general practice setting: a qualitative study drawing on relational coordination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Furler, John; Blackberry, Irene; Young, Doris; O'Neal, David; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2014-01-31

    The majority of care for people with type 2 diabetes occurs in general practice, however when insulin initiation is required it often does not occur in this setting or in a timely manner and this may have implications for the development of complications. Increased insulin initiation in general practice is an important goal given the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and a relative shortage of specialists. Coordination between primary and secondary care, and between medical and nursing personnel, may be important in achieving this. Relational coordination theory identifies key concepts that underpin effective interprofessional work: communication which is problem solving, timely, accurate and frequent and relationships between professional roles which are characterized by shared goals, shared knowledge and mutual respect. This study explores roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation in order to gain an understanding of factors which may impact on this task being carried out in the general practice setting. 21 general practitioners, practice nurses, diabetes nurse educators and physicians were purposively sampled to participate in a semi-structured interview. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using framework analysis. There were four closely interlinked themes identified which impacted on how health professionals worked together to initiate people with type 2 diabetes on insulin: 1. Ambiguous roles; 2. Uncertain competency and capacity; 3. Varying relationships and communication; and 4. Developing trust and respect. This study has shown that insulin initiation is generally recognised as acceptable in general practice. The role of the DNE and practice nurse in this space and improved communication and relationships between health professionals across organisations and levels of care are factors which need to be addressed to support this clinical work. Relational coordination provides a useful framework for

  1. Isotropic stars in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, M.K.; Harko, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a general solution of the Einstein gravitational field equations for the static spherically symmetric gravitational interior space-time of an isotropic fluid sphere. The solution is obtained by transforming the pressure isotropy condition, a second order ordinary differential equation, into a Riccati type first order differential equation, and using a general integrability condition for the Riccati equation. This allows us to obtain an exact non-singular solution of the interior field equations for a fluid sphere, expressed in the form of infinite power series. The physical features of the solution are studied in detail numerically by cutting the infinite series expansions, and restricting our numerical analysis by taking into account only n=21 terms in the power series representations of the relevant astrophysical parameters. In the present model all physical quantities (density, pressure, speed of sound etc.) are finite at the center of the sphere. The physical behavior of the solution essentially depends on the equation of state of the dense matter at the center of the star. The stability properties of the model are also analyzed in detail for a number of central equations of state, and it is shown that it is stable with respect to the radial adiabatic perturbations. The astrophysical analysis indicates that this solution can be used as a realistic model for static general relativistic high density objects, like neutron stars. (orig.)

  2. Relationalism or why diplomats find international relations theory strange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In this conclusion, which reflects critically on the relational approach to diplomacy and its wider consequences, I argue that diplomats are estranged from IR theory and vice versa - because International Relations scholars generally subscribe to substantialism, whereas diplomats tend to think...... by diplomatic scholars). Relationalism takes as its point of departure the idea that social phenomena making up world politics always develop in relation to other social phenomena. Thus, for example, states are not born into' this world as fully developed states that then "exist"; states are made in continuous...... scholarship and diplomatic knowledge and practice are important for how we understand (and construct) world politics, including war, international cooperation, and responses to human and natural catastrophes....

  3. AN EDUCATIONAL THEORY MODEL--(SIGGS), AN INTEGRATION OF SET THEORY, INFORMATION THEORY, AND GRAPH THEORY WITH GENERAL SYSTEMS THEORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACCIA, ELIZABETH S.; AND OTHERS

    AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 20 ITEMS AND A DISCUSSION OF ITS SIGNIFICANCE WAS PRESENTED TO DESCRIBE CURRENT UTILIZATION OF SUBJECT THEORIES IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF AN EDUCATIONAL THEORY. ALSO, A THEORY MODEL WAS USED TO DEMONSTRATE CONSTRUCTION OF A SCIENTIFIC EDUCATIONAL THEORY. THE THEORY MODEL INCORPORATED SET THEORY (S), INFORMATION THEORY…

  4. The general theory of convolutional codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Stanley, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a self-contained introduction to the algebraic theory of convolutional codes. This introduction is partly a tutorial, but at the same time contains a number of new results which will prove useful for designers of advanced telecommunication systems. Among the new concepts introduced here are the Hilbert series for a convolutional code and the class of compact codes.

  5. Hispanic Culture and Relational Cultural Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Traditional personality theories do not consider the impact of culture on personality development. Yet, to provide culturally relevant services to the increasing Hispanic population in the U.S., more culturally relevant theories must be identified. This paper presents Relational Cultural Theory (RCT) as an alternative model to understanding…

  6. Chaos Theory and International Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    King Oscar II 12 James E. Glenn, Chaos Theory: The Essentials for Military Applications (Newport, RI...Adolf Hitler in Germany, Alexander’s conquest of the Persian Empire, the arrival of Attila to Europe, the onset of the two Gulf Wars, the Arab Spring

  7. The Lorentz Theory of Electrons and Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Stanley

    1969-01-01

    Traces the development of Lorentz's theory of electrons as applied to the problem of the electrodynamics of moving bodies. Presents evidence that the principle of relativity did not play an important role in Lorentz's theory, and that though Lorentz eventually acknowledged Einstein's work, he was unwilling to completely embrace the Einstein…

  8. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. With respect to an earlier version of the article, the present update provides additional information on numerical schemes, and extends the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general relativistic hydrodynamics. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of available numerical schemes is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is presented. These include gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes, and hydrodynamical evolutions of neutron stars. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances on the formulation of the gravitational field and hydrodynamic equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them.

  9. Special theory of relativity: lectures and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Y.

    2004-01-01

    This book is a clear and complete presentation of restricted relativity in which the author follows the historical path from puzzling experimental facts to the building of a new theory. It is shown how scientists had to challenge intuitive notions of time and space to explain and give consistency to experimental results. The text is spread with a lot of explanatory notes that contribute to a better understanding of the topic. This book aims at an audience of people already acquainted with general physics: students, scientists or teachers looking for a pedagogical reference book. This work is divided into 10 chapters: 1) The speed of light; 2) The Galilean transformation and optics; 3) Michelson's experiment and the relativity principle; 4) The Lorentz transformation; 5) Lorentz contraction and time dilation; 6) Relativistic kinematics; 7) Energy and momentum; 8) Relativistic dynamics; 9) Tensor calculus - Space-time, and 10) The invariance of Maxwell equations. (A.C.)

  10. Client-Controlled Case Information: A General System Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-01-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of…

  11. A QCD Model Using Generalized Yang-Mills Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dianfu; Song Heshan; Kou Lina

    2007-01-01

    Generalized Yang-Mills theory has a covariant derivative, which contains both vector and scalar gauge bosons. Based on this theory, we construct a strong interaction model by using the group U(4). By using this U(4) generalized Yang-Mills model, we also obtain a gauge potential solution, which can be used to explain the asymptotic behavior and color confinement.

  12. A general theory of comic entertainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2014-01-01

    The article claims that comic entertainment consists of five elements 1. priming of the comic events to come 2. some comic entertainment inputs that creates arousal 3. Entertainment-internal signals of the playful nature of the comic input 4. Appraisal processes in audience members that evaluate...... the input as 'not real but playful', 5. this leads to a change in hedonic tone, and arousal is combined with the release of endorphins (a morphine-based neurotransmitter) that makes the arousal pleasant. The theory of comic entertainment accords with the PECMA flow theory proposed in Grodal: Embodied...... Visions, because the evaluation: playful, not real, influences the muscular directness towards the world that drops. Comic entertainment is further linked to human bonding....

  13. The Concept of General Relativity is not Related to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    The concept of general relativity is not related to reality. It is not real or factual Science. GR cannot account for objects falling to earth or for the weight of objects sitting on the earth. The Cavendish demonstration showing the attraction between two masses at right angles to earth's gravity, is not explained by GR. No one can prove the existence of ``space fabric.'' The concept of ``space time'' effects causing gravitational attraction between masses is wrong. Conservation law of energy - momentum does not exist in GR. LIGO fails in detecting ``gravity waves'' because there is no ``space fabric'' to transmit them. The Gravity B Probe data manipulated to show some effects, is not proof of ``space fabric.'' It is Nuclear Quantum Gravitation that provides clear definitive explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 clear, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli-foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics, by Paul Marmet http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  14. A logic road from special relativity to general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Andréka, Hajnal; Madarász, Judit X.; Németi, István; Székely, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    We present a streamlined axiom system of special relativity in first-order logic. From this axiom system we "derive" an axiom system of general relativity in two natural steps. We will also see how the axioms of special relativity transform into those of general relativity. This way we hope to make general relativity more accessible for the non-specialist.

  15. General Theory versus ENA Theory: Comparing Their Predictive Accuracy and Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lee; Hoskin, Anthony; Hartley, Richard; Walsh, Anthony; Widmayer, Alan; Ratnasingam, Malini

    2015-12-01

    General theory attributes criminal behavior primarily to low self-control, whereas evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory envisions criminality as being a crude form of status-striving promoted by high brain exposure to androgens. General theory predicts that self-control will be negatively correlated with risk-taking, while ENA theory implies that these two variables should actually be positively correlated. According to ENA theory, traits such as pain tolerance and muscularity will be positively associated with risk-taking and criminality while general theory makes no predictions concerning these relationships. Data from Malaysia and the United States are used to test 10 hypotheses derived from one or both of these theories. As predicted by both theories, risk-taking was positively correlated with criminality in both countries. However, contrary to general theory and consistent with ENA theory, the correlation between self-control and risk-taking was positive in both countries. General theory's prediction of an inverse correlation between low self-control and criminality was largely supported by the U.S. data but only weakly supported by the Malaysian data. ENA theory's predictions of positive correlations between pain tolerance, muscularity, and offending were largely confirmed. For the 10 hypotheses tested, ENA theory surpassed general theory in predictive scope and accuracy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. General Open Systems Theory and the Substrata-Factor Theory of Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Martin

    This study was designed to extend the generality of the Substrata-Factor Theory by two methods of investigation: (1) theoretically, to est"blish the validity of the hypothesis that an isomorphic relationship exists between the Substrata-Factor Theory and the General Open Systems Theory, and (2) experimentally, to disc"ver through a…

  17. The end of International Relations theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunne, Tim; Hansen, Lene; Wight, Colin

    2013-01-01

    With a view to providing contextual background for the Special Issue, this opening article analyses several dimensions of ‘The end of International Relations theory?’ It opens with a consideration of the status of different types of theory. Thereafter, we look at the proliferation of theories...... to the alternatives currently being practised: integrative pluralism. The article ends on a cautiously optimistic note: given the disciplinary competition that now exists in relation to explaining and understanding global social forces, International Relations may find resilience because it has become theory...

  18. Experimental tests of general relativity: recent progress and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turyshev, S G

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard theory of gravity, especially where the needs of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory is used for many practical purposes involving spacecraft navigation, geodesy, and time transfer. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss recent progress in tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy tests of new physics beyond general relativity. Space-based experiments in fundamental physics are presently capable of uniquely addressing important questions related to the fundamental laws of nature. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics that are anticipated in the near future and evaluate the discovery potential of a number of recently proposed space-based gravitational experiments. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Kinematical Test Theories for Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; Braxmaier, Claus; Dittus, Hansjörg; Müller, Holger; Peters, Achim; Schiller, Stephan

    A comparison of certain kinematical test theories for Special Relativity including the Robertson and Mansouri-Sext test theories is presented and the accuracy of the experimental results testing Special Relativity are expressed in terms of the parameters appearing in these test theories. The theoretical results are applied to the most precise experimental results obtained recently for the isotropy of light propagation and the constancy of the speed of light.

  20. Generalized Jacobi identities in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, F.M.P.

    1990-01-01

    A spatial generalized Jacobi identity obeyed by the polarization-dependent factors of the vertices in a q q-bar - Wγ process is studied. The amplitude of a scattering gluon-gluon with five particles is worked out. By reorganizing this amplitude in analogy with an interaction process photon-pion, the non existence of the spatial generalized Jacobi identity, but instead many spatial partial identities that compose themselves, in the case of a four particle process, in one single identity is shown. A process with four particles, three of them scalar fields, but in the one loop approximation is studied. In this case also, the non existence of the spatial generalized Jacobi identity is demonstrated. (author)

  1. Relational quadrilateralland II: The Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward; Kneller, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    We provide the quantum treatment of the relational quadrilateral. The underlying reduced configuration spaces are ℂℙ2 and the cone over this. We consider exact free and isotropic HO potential cases and perturbations about these. Moreover, our purely relational kinematical quantization is distinct from the usual one for ℂℙ2, which turns out to carry absolutist connotations instead. Thus, this paper is the first to note absolute-versus-relational motion distinctions at the kinematical rather than dynamical level. It is also an example of value to the discussion of kinematical quantization along the lines of Isham, 1984. The relational quadrilateral is the simplest RPM whose mathematics is not standard in atomic physics (the triangle and four particles on a line are both based on 𝕊2 and ℝ3 mathematics). It is far more typical of the general quantum relational N-a-gon than the previously studied case of the relational triangle. We consider useful integrals as regards perturbation theory and the peaking interpretation of quantum cosmology. We subsequently consider problem of time (PoT) applications of this: quantum Kuchař beables, the Machian version of the semiclassical approach and the timeless naïve Schrödinger interpretation. These go toward extending the combined Machian semiclassical-Histories-Timeless Approach of [Int. J. Mod. Phys. D23 (2014) 1450014] to the case of the quadrilateral, which will be treated in subsequent papers.

  2. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  3. An Introduction to General Relativity and Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, John

    2007-01-01

    The present volume is an introduction to general relativity and cosmology, at a level suitable for beginning graduate students or advanced undergraduates. The book consists of two main parts, the first entitled 'Elements of differential geometry', and the second 'The theory of gravitation'. Chapters 2-7, part I, introduce the basic ideas of differential geometry in a general setting, and are based on previously unpublished notes by one of the authors. On the one hand, the treatment is modern in that it uses a 'top-down' approach, i.e. starting with general differentiable manifolds, and deferring the introduction of a metric tensor until after the notions of affine connection and curvature have been introduced. On the other hand, the treatment is classical in that it relies heavily, though not exclusively, on index notation. The general material, chapters 1-7, is then followed by four more specialized chapters dealing with matters of specific interest for general relativity. Part II deals with general relativity and cosmology. The basic assumptions of the theory and its application to spherically symmetric gravitational fields are discussed in two chapters, and there is some historical material and motivation for the basic assumptions at the beginning of the book. The final chapter contains a detailed discussion of the Kerr solution. But the main emphasis in part II is on relativistic cosmology, in particular the analysis of cosmological models more general than the familiar Friedmann-Lemaitre (FL) models. The material on cosmology begins with a discussion of relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics. The kinematical quantities (rate of expansion, shear, etc, of a timelike congruence) are introduced and their evolution equations are derived. There follows a description of the fluid model of the Universe and optical observations in such a model, within the framework of a general spacetime geometry. The discussion is subsequently specialized to the Robertson

  4. The Nature of Living Systems: An Exposition of the Basic Concepts in General Systems Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James G.

    General systems theory is a set of related definitions, assumptions, and propositions which deal with reality as an integrated hierarchy of organizations of matter and energy. In this paper, the author defines the concepts of space, time, matter, energy, and information in terms of their meaning in general systems theory. He defines a system as a…

  5. 6th International Conference on the History of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean; The Universe of General Relativity; GR 6

    2005-01-01

    This volume from the Einstein Studies Series is based largely on papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on the History of General Relativity, held in Amsterdam on June 26-29, 2002. These contributions from notable experts offer both new and historical insights on gravitation, general relativity, cosmology, unified field theory, and the history of science. Topics discussed include the prehistory of special relativity, early attempts at a relativistic theory of gravitation, the beginnings of general relativity, the problem of motion in the context of relativity, conservation laws, the axiomatization of relativity, classical and contemporary cosmology, gravitation and electromagnetism, quantum gravity, and relativity as seen through the eyes of the public and renowned relativists. Contributors: K. Brading; G. Gale; H.F.M. Goenner; J. Goldberg; S. Katzir; D. Kennefick; H. Kragh; C. Lehner; U. Majer; J. Mattingly; E.T. Newman; J.D. Norton; J. Renn; R. Rynasiewicz; J.M. Sánchez-Ron; T. Sauer; C. Sm...

  6. How I Created the Theory of Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshimasa A.

    1982-01-01

    This translation of a lecture given in Kyoto (Japan) on 14 December l922 sheds light on Einstein's path to the theory of relativity and offers insights into many other aspects of his work on relativity. (Author/JN)

  7. Quantum Networks: General theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, A.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Chiribella, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a general mathematical framework to deal with Quantum Networks, i.e. networks resulting from the interconnection of elementary quantum circuits. The cornerstone of our approach is a generalization of the Choi isomorphism that allows one to efficiently represent any given Quantum Network in terms of a single positive operator. Our formalism allows one to face and solve many quantum information processing problems that would be hardly manageable otherwise, the most relevant of which are reviewed in this work: quantum process tomography, quantum cloning and learning of transformations, inversion of a unitary gate, information-disturbance tradeoff in estimating a unitary transformation, cloning and learning of a measurement device (Authors)

  8. Some relations between twisted K-theory and E8 gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathai, Varghese; Sati, Hisham

    2004-01-01

    Recently, Diaconescu, Moore and Witten provided a nontrivial link between K-theory and M-theory, by deriving the partition function of the Ramond-Ramond fields of Type IIA string theory from an E8 gauge theory in eleven dimensions. We give some relations between twisted K-theory and M-theory by adapting the method of Diaconescu-Moore-Witten and Moore-Saulina. In particular, we construct the twisted K-theory torus which defines the partition function, and also discuss the problem from the E8 loop group picture, in which the Dixmier-Douady class is the Neveu-Schwarz field. In the process of doing this, we encounter some mathematics that is new to the physics literature. In particular, the eta differential form, which is the generalization of the eta invariant, arises naturally in this context. We conclude with several open problems in mathematics and string theory. (author)

  9. A general field-covariant formulation of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2013-01-01

    In all nontrivial cases renormalization, as it is usually formulated, is not a change of integration variables in the functional integral, plus parameter redefinitions, but a set of replacements, of actions and/or field variables and parameters. Because of this, we cannot write simple identities relating bare and renormalized generating functionals, or generating functionals before and after nonlinear changes of field variables. In this paper we investigate this issue and work out a general field-covariant approach to quantum field theory, which allows us to treat all perturbative changes of field variables, including the relation between bare and renormalized fields, as true changes of variables in the functional integral, under which the functionals Z and W=lnZ behave as scalars. We investigate the relation between composite fields and changes of field variables, and we show that, if J are the sources coupled to the elementary fields, all changes of field variables can be expressed as J-dependent redefinitions of the sources L coupled to the composite fields. We also work out the relation between the renormalization of variable-changes and the renormalization of composite fields. Using our transformation rules it is possible to derive the renormalization of a theory in a new variable frame from the renormalization in the old variable frame, without having to calculate it anew. We define several approaches, useful for different purposes, in particular a linear approach where all variable changes are described as linear source redefinitions. We include a number of explicit examples. (orig.)

  10. The general theory of quantized fields in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wightman, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    This review describes developments in theoretical particle physics in the 1950s which were important in the race to develop a putative general theory of quantized fields, especially ideas that offered a mathematically rigorous theory. Basic theoretical concepts then available included the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum dynamics, canonical quantization, perturbative renormalization theory and the theory of distributions. Following a description of various important theoretical contributions of this era, the review ends with a summary of the most important contributions of axiomatic field theory to concrete physics applications. (UK)

  11. Generalized probabilistic theories and conic extensions of polytopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Samuel; Massar, Serge; Patra, Manas K.; Tiwary, Hans Raj

    2015-01-01

    Generalized probabilistic theories (GPT) provide a general framework that includes classical and quantum theories. It is described by a cone C and its dual C*. We show that whether some one-way communication complexity problems can be solved within a GPT is equivalent to the recently introduced cone factorization of the corresponding communication matrix M. We also prove an analogue of Holevo's theorem: when the cone C is contained in {{{R}}n}, the classical capacity of the channel realized by sending GPT states and measuring them is bounded by log n. Polytopes and optimising functions over polytopes arise in many areas of discrete mathematics. A conic extension of a polytope is the intersection of a cone C with an affine subspace whose projection onto the original space yields the desired polytope. Extensions of polytopes can sometimes be much simpler geometric objects than the polytope itself. The existence of a conic extension of a polytope is equivalent to that of a cone factorization of the slack matrix of the polytope, on the same cone. We show that all 0/1 polytopes whose vertices can be recognized by a polynomial size circuit, which includes as a special case the travelling salesman polytope and many other polytopes from combinatorial optimization, have small conic extension complexity when the cone is the completely positive cone. Using recent exponential lower bounds on the linear extension complexity of polytopes, this provides an exponential gap between the communication complexity of GPT based on the completely positive cone and classical communication complexity, and a conjectured exponential gap with quantum communication complexity. Our work thus relates the communication complexity of generalizations of quantum theory to questions of mainstream interest in the area of combinatorial optimization.

  12. Generalized probabilistic theories and conic extensions of polytopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Samuel; Massar, Serge; Patra, Manas K; Tiwary, Hans Raj

    2015-01-01

    Generalized probabilistic theories (GPT) provide a general framework that includes classical and quantum theories. It is described by a cone C and its dual C*. We show that whether some one-way communication complexity problems can be solved within a GPT is equivalent to the recently introduced cone factorization of the corresponding communication matrix M. We also prove an analogue of Holevo's theorem: when the cone C is contained in R n , the classical capacity of the channel realized by sending GPT states and measuring them is bounded by logn. Polytopes and optimising functions over polytopes arise in many areas of discrete mathematics. A conic extension of a polytope is the intersection of a cone C with an affine subspace whose projection onto the original space yields the desired polytope. Extensions of polytopes can sometimes be much simpler geometric objects than the polytope itself. The existence of a conic extension of a polytope is equivalent to that of a cone factorization of the slack matrix of the polytope, on the same cone. We show that all 0/1 polytopes whose vertices can be recognized by a polynomial size circuit, which includes as a special case the travelling salesman polytope and many other polytopes from combinatorial optimization, have small conic extension complexity when the cone is the completely positive cone. Using recent exponential lower bounds on the linear extension complexity of polytopes, this provides an exponential gap between the communication complexity of GPT based on the completely positive cone and classical communication complexity, and a conjectured exponential gap with quantum communication complexity. Our work thus relates the communication complexity of generalizations of quantum theory to questions of mainstream interest in the area of combinatorial optimization. (paper)

  13. Generalized Einstein-Aether theories and the Solar System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvin, Camille; Durrer, Ruth; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Zlosnik, Tom G.; Starkman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that generalized Einstein-Aether theories may lead to significant modifications to the nonrelativistic limit of the Einstein equations. In this paper we study the effect of a general class of such theories on the Solar System. We consider corrections to the gravitational potential in negative and positive powers of distance from the source. Using measurements of the perihelion shift of Mercury and time delay of radar signals to Cassini, we place constraints on these corrections. We find that a subclass of generalized Einstein-Aether theories is compatible with these constraints

  14. Nurse-led home visitation programme to improve health-related quality of life and reduce disability among potentially frail community-dwelling older people in general practice: a theory-based process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijnen, Mandy M N; Jansen, Maria W J; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2014-10-25

    Population ageing fosters new models of care delivery for older people that are increasingly integrated into existing care systems. In the Netherlands, a primary-care based preventive home visitation programme has been developed for potentially frail community-dwelling older people (aged ≥75 years), consisting of a comprehensive geriatric assessment during a home visit by a practice nurse followed by targeted interdisciplinary care and follow-up over time. A theory-based process evaluation was designed to examine (1) the extent to which the home visitation programme was implemented as planned and (2) the extent to which general practices successfully redesigned their care delivery. Using a mixed-methods approach, the focus was on fidelity (quality of implementation), dose delivered (completeness), dose received (exposure and satisfaction), reach (participation rate), recruitment, and context. Twenty-four general practices participated, of which 13 implemented the home visitation programme and 11 delivered usual care to older people. Data collection consisted of semi-structured interviews with practice nurses (PNs), general practitioners (GPs), and older people; feedback meetings with PNs; structured registration forms filled-out by PNs; and narrative descriptions of the recruitment procedures and registration of inclusion and drop-outs by members of the research team. Fidelity of implementation was acceptable, but time constraints and inadequate reach (i.e., the relatively healthy older people participated) negatively influenced complete delivery of protocol elements, such as interdisciplinary cooperation and follow-up of older people over time. The home visitation programme was judged positively by PNs, GPs, and older people. Useful tools were offered to general practices for organising proactive geriatric care. The home visitation programme did not have major shortcomings in itself, but the delivery offered room for improvement. General practices received

  15. On skein relations in class S theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Yuji; Watanabe, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Loop operators of a class S theory arise from networks on the corresponding Riemann surface, and their operator product expansions are given in terms of the skein relations, that we describe in detail in the case of class S theories of type A. As two applications, we explicitly determine networks corresponding to dyonic loops of N=4SU(3) super Yang-Mills, and compute the superconformal index of a nontrivial network operator of the T 3 theory.

  16. General algebraic theory of identical particle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencze, G.; Redish, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    We consider the nonrelativistic N-body scattering problem for a system of particles in which some subsets of the particles are identical. We demonstrate how the particle identity can be included in a general class of linear integral equations for scattering operators or components of scattering operators. The Yakubovskii, Yakubovskii--Narodestkii, Rosenberg, and Bencze--Redish--Sloan equations are included in this class. Algebraic methods are used which rely on the properties of the symmetry group of the system. Operators depending only on physically distinguishable labels are introduced and linear integral equations for them are derived. This procedure maximally reduces the number of coupled equations while retaining the connectivity properties of the original equations

  17. Gauge theories under incorporation of a generalized uncertainty principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There is considered an extension of gauge theories according to the assumption of a generalized uncertainty principle which implies a minimal length scale. A modification of the usual uncertainty principle implies an extended shape of matter field equations like the Dirac equation. If there is postulated invariance of such a generalized field equation under local gauge transformations, the usual covariant derivative containing the gauge potential has to be replaced by a generalized covariant derivative. This leads to a generalized interaction between the matter field and the gauge field as well as to an additional self-interaction of the gauge field. Since the existence of a minimal length scale seems to be a necessary assumption of any consistent quantum theory of gravity, the gauge principle is a constitutive ingredient of the standard model, and even gravity can be described as gauge theory of local translations or Lorentz transformations, the presented extension of gauge theories appears as a very important consideration.

  18. JIT supply chain; an investigation through general system theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Mishra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains theoretical approach of the four theories of General system Theory (GST developed by Yourdon (1989 [Yourdon, E. (1989. Modern Structured Analysis. Yourdon Press, Prentice-Hall International, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Senge] while applying it in information technology and subsequently used by caddy (2007 [Caddy I.N., & Helou, M.M. (2007. Supply chains and their management: Application of general systems theory. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 14, 319–327.] in field of supply chain and management. JIT philosophy in core activities of supply chain i.e. procurement, production processes, and logistics are discussed through general system theory. The growing structure of the supply chain poses the implication restrictions and requires a heavy support system, many times a compromise is done while implementing JIT. The study would be useful to understand the general trends generated naturally regarding the adoption of the JIT philosophy in the supply chain.

  19. A generalized theory of chromatography and multistep liquid extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhkov, V. P.; Boitsov, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    A generalized theory of chromatography and multistep liquid extraction is developed. The principles of highly efficient processes for fine preparative separation of binary mixture components on a fixed sorbent layer are discussed.

  20. Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Graham

    2008-05-28

    This paper presents a brief history of electromagnetic theory from ancient times up to the work of Maxwell and the advent of Einstein's special theory of relativity. It is divided into five convenient periods and the intention is to describe these developments for the benefit of a lay scientific audience and with the minimum of technical detail.

  1. Possible violations of the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiomno, J.

    1985-01-01

    A review of previous works of the author and collaborators on possible violations of the Theory of Relativity (SR) is made. It is shown that there is no contradiction of the predictions of the Lorentz Aether Theory, in the form presented in these papers, with existing experiments. Further experiments to detect these violations (or to confirm SR) are indicated. (Author) [pt

  2. General Systems Theory Approaches to Organizations: Some Problems in Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Newman S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Considers the limitations of General Systems Theory (GST) as a major paradigm within administrative theory and concludes that most systems formulations overemphasize growth and show little appreciation for intraorganizational conflict, diversity of values, and political action within organizations. Suggests that these limitations are mainly due to…

  3. Get with the System: General Systems Theory for Business Officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Sandra L.

    1993-01-01

    An introduction to general systems theory and an overview of vocabulary and concepts are presented to introduce school business officials to systems thinking and to foster its use as an analytical tool. The theory is then used to analyze a sample problem: planning changes to a district's administrative computer system. (eight references) (MLF)

  4. A simplified approach to general scalar-tensor theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon

    2013-01-01

    The most general covariant action describing gravity coupled to a scalar field with only second order equations of motion, Horndeski's theory (also known as ''Generalized Galileons''), provides an all-encompassing model in which single scalar dark energy models may be constrained. However, the generality of the model makes it cumbersome to manipulate. In this paper, we demonstrate that when considering linear perturbations about a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background, the theory is completely specified by only six functions of time, two of which are constrained by the background evolution. We utilise the ideas of the Effective Field Theory of Inflation/Dark Energy to explicitly construct these six functions of time in terms of the free functions appearing in Horndeski's theory. These results are used to investigate the behavior of the theory in the quasistatic approximation. We find that only four functions of time are required to completely specify the linear behavior of the theory in this limit, which can further be reduced if the background evolution is fixed. This presents a significantly reduced parameter space from the original presentation of Horndeski's theory, giving hope to the possibility of constraining the parameter space. This work provides a cross-check for previous work on linear perturbations in this theory, and also generalizes it to include spatial curvature

  5. Generalized algebra-valued models of set theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwe, B.; Tarafder, S.

    2015-01-01

    We generalize the construction of lattice-valued models of set theory due to Takeuti, Titani, Kozawa and Ozawa to a wider class of algebras and show that this yields a model of a paraconsistent logic that validates all axioms of the negation-free fragment of Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory.

  6. General Strain Theory, Peer Rejection, and Delinquency/Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, George E.; Piquero, Nicole L.; Piquero, Alex R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of general strain theory (GST) has led to a renewed focus on the influence of negative life experiences on antisocial behavior. Although a number of studies have generated an impressive array of support for the theory, several avenues remain open for research. In this article, we examine how a specific noxious stimuli, peer…

  7. On the Finsler relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asanov, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    Possibility for revealing the Finsler metric space-time properties in kinematics and dynamics of local nonprobe particles is investigated. Spherically-symmetric S particle in a static gravitational field is considered. It is shown that S particle follows S line of a ''renormalized'' gravitational field. The situation is alternative to the case of a probe particle. It is also shown that the Finsler properties of real space-time can be revealed in kinematic and ''dynamics of S particles relative to a ''nonrenormalization'' field. So, the Finsler kinematic dualism is the geometrical analogue of physical dualism between probe particles and S particles. Noted are difficulties related to problems of determining the Lagrangian density for the gravitational field which leads to the Finsler geodesic ones

  8. Magnetic fields, special relativity and potential theory elementary electromagnetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Kilmister, C W

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic Fields, Special Relativity and Potential Theory is an introduction to electromagnetism, special relativity, and potential theory, with emphasis on the magnetic field of steady currents (magnetostatics). Topics covered range from the origin of the magnetic field and the magnetostatic scalar potential to magnetization, electromagnetic induction and magnetic energy, and the displacement current and Maxwell's equations. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with an overview of magnetostatics, followed by a chapter on the methods of solving potential problems drawn from elec

  9. Direction dependent structures in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberthson, M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis deals with, within the theory of general relativity, asymptotic properties of certain types of space-times. Using conformal transformations, it is possible to describe asymptotic properties of a physical space-time in terms of the local behaviour of the new, rescaled space-time. One then uses so called direction dependent structures. We present two such structures and applications to them. One structure is used in the study of spacelike (or spatial) infinity. We discuss the asymptotic conditions on the gravitational and the electromagnetic field, especially the conditions put on directions corresponding to future and past null infinity. It is shown that these fields have desired physical properties. The other structure is used in connection with timelike infinity. Using this structure, we suggest a new definition of timelike infinity. This definition differs significantly from earlier definitions, and leads to the concept of asymptotically stationary space-times. We also suggest a definition of asymptotic flatness at future null infinity, and a definition of a black hole which is, in a sense, local. Both of these definitions fit nicely into the structure. (24 refs.)

  10. On hypermomentum in general relativity. Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; Kerlick, G.D.; Heyde, P. von der

    1976-01-01

    In this series of notes, we introduce a new quantity into the theory of classical matter fields. Besides the usual energy-momentum tensor, we postulate the existence of a further dynamical attribute of matter, the 3rd rank tensor Δsup(ijk) of hypermomentum. Subsequently, a general relativistic field theory of energy-momentum and hypermomentum is outlined. In Part I we motivate the need for hypermomentum. We split it into spin angular momentum, the dilatation hypermomentum, and traceless proper hypermomentum and discuss their physical meanings and conservation laws. (orig.) [de

  11. Modern approach to relativity theory (radar formulation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1991-01-01

    The main peculiarities of the radar formulation of the relativity theory are presented. This formulation operates with the retarded (light) distances and relativistic or radar length introduced on their basis. 21 refs.; 1 tab

  12. Axially symmetric Lorentzian wormholes in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, F.

    1997-11-01

    The field equations of Einstein's theory of general relativity, being local, do not fix the global structure of space-time. They admit topologically non-trivial solutions, including spatially closed universes and the amazing possibility of shortcuts for travel between distant regions in space and time - so-called Lorentzian wormholes. The aim of this thesis is to (mathematically) construct space-times which contain traversal wormholes connecting arbitrary distant regions of an asymptotically flat or asymptotically de Sitter universe. Since the wormhole mouths appear as two separate masses in the exterior space, space-time can at best be axially symmetric. We eliminate the non-staticity caused by the gravitational attraction of the mouths by anchoring them by strings held at infinity or, alternatively, by electric repulsion. The space-times are obtained by surgically grafting together well-known solutions of Einstein's equations along timelike hypersurfaces. This surgery naturally concentrates a non-zero stress-energy tensor on the boundary between the two space-times which can be investigated by using the standard thin shell formalism. It turns out that, when using charged black holes, the provided constructions are possible without violation of any of the energy conditions. In general, observers living in the axially symmetric, asymptotically flat (respectively asymptotically de Sitter) region axe able to send causal signals through the topologically non-trivial region. However, the wormhole space-times contain closed timelike curves. Because of this explicit violation of global hyperbolicity these models do not serve as counterexamples to known topological censorship theorems. (author)

  13. Implementation of static generalized perturbation theory for LWR design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byron, R.F.; White, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized perturbation theory (GPT) formulation is developed for application to light water reactor (LWR) design. The extensions made to standard generalized perturbation theory are the treatment of thermal-hydraulic and fission product poisoning feedbacks, and criticality reset. This formulation has been implemented into a standard LWR design code. The method is verified by comparing direct calculations with GPT calculations. Data are presented showing that feedback effects need to be considered when using GPT for LWR problems. Some specific potential applications of this theory to the field of LWR design are discussed

  14. Do People Use Their Implicit Theories of Creativity as General Theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong; Kim, Jungsik; Ryu, Yeonjae; Song, Seokjong

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether people use the general implicit theories of creativity or not when applying them to themselves and others. On the basis of the actor-observer asymmetry theory, the authors propose that conception of creativity would be differently constructed depending on the targets of attention: general, self, and other. Three studies…

  15. Sequential approach to Colombeau's theory of generalized functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    J.F. Colombeau's generalized functions are constructed as equivalence classes of the elements of a specially chosen ultrapower of the class of the C ∞ -functions. The elements of this ultrapower are considered as sequences of C ∞ -functions, so in a sense, the sequential construction presented here refers to the original Colombeau theory just as, for example, the Mikusinski sequential approach to the distribution theory refers to the original Schwartz theory of distributions. The paper could be used as an elementary introduction to the Colombeau theory in which recently a solution was found to the problem of multiplication of Schwartz distributions. (author). Refs

  16. Sp(2) covariant quantisation of general gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Bello, J L

    1994-11-01

    The Sp(2) covariant quantization of gauge theories is studied. The geometrical interpretation of gauge theories in terms of quasi principal fibre bundles Q(M{sub s}, G{sub s}) is reviewed. It is then described the Sp(2) algebra of ordinary Yang-Mills theory. A consistent formulation of covariant Lagrangian quantisation for general gauge theories based on Sp(2) BRST symmetry is established. The original N = 1, ten dimensional superparticle is considered as an example of infinitely reducible gauge algebras, and given explicitly its Sp(2) BRST invariant action. (author). 18 refs.

  17. Sp(2) covariant quantisation of general gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Bello, J.L.

    1994-11-01

    The Sp(2) covariant quantization of gauge theories is studied. The geometrical interpretation of gauge theories in terms of quasi principal fibre bundles Q(M s , G s ) is reviewed. It is then described the Sp(2) algebra of ordinary Yang-Mills theory. A consistent formulation of covariant Lagrangian quantisation for general gauge theories based on Sp(2) BRST symmetry is established. The original N = 1, ten dimensional superparticle is considered as an example of infinitely reducible gauge algebras, and given explicitly its Sp(2) BRST invariant action. (author). 18 refs

  18. Evolution of curvature perturbation in generalized gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Using the cosmological perturbation theory in terms of the δN formalism, we find the simple formulation of the evolution of the curvature perturbation in generalized gravity theories. Compared with the standard gravity theory, a crucial difference appears in the end-boundary of the inflationary stage, which is due to the non-ideal form of the energy-momentum tensor that depends explicitly on the curvature scalar. Recent study shows that ultraviolet-complete quantum theory of gravity (Horava-Lifshitz gravity) can be approximated by using a generalized gravity action. Our paper may give an important step in understanding the evolution of the curvature perturbation during inflation, where the energy-momentum tensor may not be given by the ideal form due to the corrections from the fundamental theory.

  19. Whiteheadian approach to quantum theory and the generalized bell's theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    The model of the world proposed by Whitehead provides a natural theoretical framework in which to imbed quantum theory. This model accords with the ontological ideas of Heisenberg, and also with Einstein's view that physical theories should refer nominally to the objective physical situation, rather than our knowledge of that system. Whitehead imposed on his model the relativistic requirement that what happens in any given spacetime region be determined only by what has happened in its absolute past, i.e., in the backward light-cone drawn from that region. This requirement must be modified, for it is inconsistent with the implications of quantum theory expressed by a generalized version of Bell's theorem. Revamping the causal spacetime structure of the Whitehead-Heisenberg ontology to bring it into accord with the generalized Bell's theorem creates the possibility of a nonlocal causal covariant theory that accords with the statistical prediction of quantum theory

  20. The special theory of relativity bound with relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dingle, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The Special Theory of Relativity:Based on a short course of lectures delivered in the late 1930s, this short book presents the theory of Special Relativity by formulating a redefinition of the measurement of length, and thus will appeal to students of physics who wish to think through Einstein's thought without the encumbrance of quasi-scientific concepts and language. Relativity: A Very Elementary Exposition:This brief lecture, delivered in October 1921 and published for the first time in 1925, offers an explanation of Einstein's theory of Special Relativity for the non-scientist, giving a ge

  1. Proceedings of the fourth Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffini, R.

    1986-01-01

    The Marcel Grossmann meetings were conceived with the aim of reviewing recent advances in gravitation and general relativity with the major emphasis on their mathematical foundations and physical predictions. Their main objective is to elicit contributions which deepen our understanding of space-time structures as well as to review the status of experiments verifying Einstein's Theory of Gravitation. It has been demonstrated by the previous meetings that these sessions provide physicists from various countries who are involved in research on general relativity with a unique opportunity to exchange experiences and enhance co-operation in fields of common interest. The meeting was essentially divided into 3 sub-areas; interplay between elementary particle physics and cosmology and relativistic astrophysics, classical relativity, and experimental relativity. Among the topics covered were supergravity and superstrings, bar gravitational wave detectors, black holes, classical relativity, computer relativity, cosmology and inos, early cosmology, exact solutions, Kaluza Klein theories, relativistic self-gravitating systems and quantum gravity. (Auth.)

  2. Generalized force in classical field theory. [Euler-Lagrange equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, J [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas

    1976-02-01

    The source strengths of the Euler-Lagrange equations, for a system of interacting fields, are heuristically interpreted as generalized forces. The canonical form of the energy-momentum tensor thus consistently appears, without recourse to space-time symmetry arguments. A concept of 'conservative' generalized force in classical field theory is also briefly discussed.

  3. Theory of mind: A foundational component of human general intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, David; Bartsch, Karen

    2017-01-01

    To understand the evolution of general intelligence, Burkart et al. endorse a "cultural intelligence approach," which emphasizes the critical importance of social interaction. We argue that theory of mind provides an essential foundation and shared perspective for the efficient ontogenetic transmission of crucial knowledge and skills during human development and, together with language, can account for superior human general intelligence.

  4. Einstein and Hilbert: The creation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, I.T.

    1992-12-01

    It took eight years after Einstein announced the basic physical ideas behind the relativistic gravity theory before the proper mathematical formulation of general-relativity was mastered. The efforts of the greatest physicist and of the greatest mathematician of the time was involved and reached a breathtaking concentration during the last month of the work. (author)

  5. Dynamics of relative motion of test particles in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazanski, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Several variational principles which lead to the first and the second geodesic deviation equations, recently formulated by the author and used for the description of the relative motion of test particles in general relativity are presented. Relations between these principles are investigated and exhibited. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation is also studied for these generalized deviations and the conservation laws appearing here are discussed

  6. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analysing them are reviewed. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Future tests of EEP and of the inverse square law will search for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and new binary pulsar systems may yield further improvements.When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  7. Introduction to general relativity, black holes and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    General Relativity is a beautiful geometric theory, simple in its mathematical formulation but leading to numerous consequences with striking physical interpretations: gravitational waves, black holes, cosmological models, and so on. This introductory textbook is written for mathematics students interested in physics and physics students interested in exact mathematical formulations (or for anyone with a scientific mind who is curious to know more of the world we live in), recent remarkable experimental and observational results which confirm the theory are clearly described and no specialised physics knowledge is required. The mathematical level of Part A is aimed at undergraduate students and could be the basis for a course on General Relativity. Part B is more advanced, but still does not require sophisticated mathematics. Based on Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat's more advanced text, General Relativity and the Einstein Equations, the aim of this book is to give with precision, but as simply as possible, the found...

  8. O(3)-invariant tunneling in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, V.A.; Tkachev, I.I.; Kuzmin, V.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij)

    1987-12-01

    We derived a general formula for the action for any O(3)-invariant tunneling processes in false vacuum decay in general relativity. The general classification of the bubble Euclidean trajectories is elaborated and explicit expressions for bounces for some processes like the vacuum creation of a double bubble, in particular in the vicinity of a black hole; the subbarrier creation of the Einstein-Rosen bridge, creation from nothing of two Minkowski worlds connected by a shell etc., are given. (orig.)

  9. Geometrical determination of the constant of motion in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catoni, F.; Cannata, R.; Zampetti, P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent time a theorem, due to E. Beltrami, through which the integration of the geodesic equations of a curved manifold is obtained by means of a merely geometric method, has been revisited. This way of dealing with the problem is well in accordance with the geometric spirit of the Theory of General Relativity. In this paper we show another relevant consequence of this method. Actually, the constants of the motion, introduced in this geometrical way that is completely independent of Newton theory, are related to the conservation laws for test particles in the Einstein theory. These conservation laws may be compared with the conservation laws of Newton. In particular, by the conservation of energy (E) and the L z component of angular momentum, the equivalence of the conservation laws for the Schwarzschild field is verified and the difference between Newton and Einstein theories for the rotating bodies (Kerr metric) is obtained in a straightforward way.

  10. Quadratic mass relations in topological bootstrap theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Uschersohn, J.

    1980-01-01

    From the requirement of reality of discontinuities of scattering amplitudes at the spherical level of the topological bootstrap theory, a large number of mass relations for hadrons is derived. Quadratic mass formulas for the symmetry-breaking pattern of both mesons and baryon is obtained and their relation to conventional models of symmetry breaking is briefly discussed

  11. General theory of light propagation and imaging through the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    McKechnie, T Stewart

    2016-01-01

    This book lays out a new, general theory of light propagation and imaging through Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. Current theory is based on the – now widely doubted – assumption of Kolmogorov turbulence. The new theory is based on a generalized atmosphere, the turbulence characteristics of which can be established, as needed, from readily measurable properties of point-object, or star, images. The pessimistic resolution predictions of Kolmogorov theory led to lax optical tolerance prescriptions for large ground-based astronomical telescopes which were widely adhered to in the 1970s and 1980s. Around 1990, however, it became clear that much better resolution was actually possible, and Kolmogorov tolerance prescriptions were promptly abandoned. Most large telescopes built before 1990 have had their optics upgraded (e.g., the UKIRT instrument) and now achieve, without adaptive optics (AO), almost an order of magnitude better resolution than before. As well as providing a more comprehensive and precise under...

  12. A Thermodynamically General Theory for Convective Circulations and Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, N. O.

    2007-12-01

    Convective circulations and vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb low-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject high-entropy-energy to space. These circulations range from small to planetary-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective phenomena is important to our understanding of many basic features of planetary atmospheres. A thermodynamically general theory for convective circulations and vortices is proposed. The theory includes irreversible processes and quantifies the pressure drop between the environment and any point in a convective updraft. The article's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines or streamtubes that is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. We speculate that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also shed light on other basic features of convective circulations and vortices.

  13. Gravitational Wave in Linear General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    General relativity is the best theory currently available to describe the interaction due to gravity. Within Albert Einstein's field equations this interaction is described by means of the spatiotemporal curvature generated by the matter-energy content in the universe. Weyl worked on the existence of perturbations of the curvature of space-time that propagate at the speed of light, which are known as Gravitational Waves, obtained to a first approximation through the linearization of the field equations of Einstein. Weyl's solution consists of taking the field equations in a vacuum and disturbing the metric, using the Minkowski metric slightly perturbed by a factor ɛ greater than zero but much smaller than one. If the feedback effect of the field is neglected, it can be considered as a weak field solution. After introducing the disturbed metric and ignoring ɛ terms of order greater than one, we can find the linearized field equations in terms of the perturbation, which can then be expressed in terms of the Dalambertian operator of the perturbation equalized to zero. This is analogous to the linear wave equation in classical mechanics, which can be interpreted by saying that gravitational effects propagate as waves at the speed of light. In addition to this, by studying the motion of a particle affected by this perturbation through the geodesic equation can show the transversal character of the gravitational wave and its two possible states of polarization. It can be shown that the energy carried by the wave is of the order of 1/c5 where c is the speed of light, which explains that its effects on matter are very small and very difficult to detect.

  14. Black hole dynamics in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Basic features of dynamical black holes in full, non-linear general relativity are summarized in a pedagogical fashion. Qualitative properties of the evolution of various horizons follow directly from the celebrated Raychaudhuri equation.

  15. Chiral perturbation theory for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Manashov, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik]|[Sankt-Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Schaefer, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik

    2006-08-15

    We analyze the moments of the isosinglet generalized parton distributions H, E, H, E of the nucleon in one-loop order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. We discuss in detail the construction of the operators in the effective theory that are required to obtain all corrections to a given order in the chiral power counting. The results will serve to improve the extrapolation of lattice results to the chiral limit. (orig.)

  16. Classical Belief Conditioning and its Generalization to DSm Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2008), s. 267-279 ISSN 1752-8917 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : belief functions * Dempster-Shafer theory * belief conditioning * DSm theory * overlapping elements * hyper-power set * DSm model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.worldacademicunion.com/journal/jus/jusVol02No4paper04.pdf

  17. General coupled mode theory in non-Hermitian waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-08-24

    In the presence of loss and gain, the coupled mode equation on describing the mode hybridization of various waveguides or cavities, or cavities coupled to waveguides becomes intrinsically non-Hermitian. In such non-Hermitian waveguides, the standard coupled mode theory fails. We generalize the coupled mode theory with a properly defined inner product based on reaction conservation. We apply our theory to the non-Hermitian parity-time symmetric waveguides, and obtain excellent agreement with results obtained by finite element fullwave simulations. The theory presented here is typically formulated in space to study coupling between waveguides, which can be transformed into time domain by proper reformulation to study coupling between non-Hermitian resonators. Our theory has the strength of studying non-Hermitian optical systems with inclusion of the full vector fields, thus is useful to study and design non-Hermitian devices that support asymmetric and even nonreciprocal light propagations.

  18. Fixing extensions to general relativity in the nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuso, Juan; Ortiz, Néstor; Lehner, Luis

    2017-10-01

    The question of what gravitational theory could supersede General Relativity has been central in theoretical physics for decades. Many disparate alternatives have been proposed motivated by cosmology, quantum gravity and phenomenological angles, and have been subjected to tests derived from cosmological, solar system and pulsar observations typically restricted to linearized regimes. Gravitational waves from compact binaries provide new opportunities to probe these theories in the strongly gravitating/highly dynamical regimes. To this end however, a reliable understanding of the dynamics in such a regime is required. Unfortunately, most of these theories fail to define well posed initial value problems, which prevents at face value from meeting such challenge. In this work, we introduce a consistent program able to remedy this situation. This program is inspired in the approach to "fixing" viscous relativistic hydrodynamics introduced by Israel and Stewart in the late 70's. We illustrate how to implement this approach to control undesirable effects of higher order derivatives in gravity theories and argue how the modified system still captures the true dynamics of the putative underlying theories in 3 +1 dimensions. We sketch the implementation of this idea in a couple of effective theories of gravity, one in the context of Noncommutative Geometry, and one in the context of Chern-Simons modified General Relativity.

  19. A general theory for radioactive processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, R.; Meruane, T.

    1998-01-01

    The formal theory of radiative processes in centrosymmetric coordination compounds of the Ln X 3+ is a trivalent lanthanide ion and X -1 =Cl -1 , Br -1 ) is put forward based on a symmetry vibronic crystal field-ligand polarisation model. This research considers a truncated basis set for the intermediate states of the central metal ion and have derived general master equations to account for both the overall observed spectral intensities and the measured relative vibronic intensity distributions for parity forbidden but vibronically allowed electronic transitions. In addition, a procedure which includes the closure approximation over the intermediate electronic states is included in order to estimate quantitative crystal field contribution to the total transition dipole moments of various and selected electronic transitions. This formalism is both general and flexible and it may be employed in any electronic excitations involving f N type configurations for the rare earths in centrosymmetric co-ordination compounds in cubic environments and also in doped host crystals belonging to the space group Fm 3m. (author)

  20. Energy and Uncertainty in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperstock, F. I.; Dupre, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The issue of energy and its potential localizability in general relativity has challenged physicists for more than a century. Many non-invariant measures were proposed over the years but an invariant measure was never found. We discovered the invariant localized energy measure by expanding the domain of investigation from space to spacetime. We note from relativity that the finiteness of the velocity of propagation of interactions necessarily induces indefiniteness in measurements. This is because the elements of actual physical systems being measured as well as their detectors are characterized by entire four-velocity fields, which necessarily leads to information from a measured system being processed by the detector in a spread of time. General relativity adds additional indefiniteness because of the variation in proper time between elements. The uncertainty is encapsulated in a generalized uncertainty principle, in parallel with that of Heisenberg, which incorporates the localized contribution of gravity to energy. This naturally leads to a generalized uncertainty principle for momentum as well. These generalized forms and the gravitational contribution to localized energy would be expected to be of particular importance in the regimes of ultra-strong gravitational fields. We contrast our invariant spacetime energy measure with the standard 3-space energy measure which is familiar from special relativity, appreciating why general relativity demands a measure in spacetime as opposed to 3-space. We illustrate the misconceptions by certain authors of our approach.

  1. Singular Null Hypersurfaces in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dray, T

    2006-01-01

    test particles in such a spacetime, in an initial attempt to outline a framework for the detection of impulsive gravitational waves. Subsequent chapters describe the singular null hypersurfaces obtained by boosting isolated gravitational sources, building on the work of Aichelburg and Sexl, and by colliding impulsive waves, building on the work of Khan and Penrose. In between, the special case of spherical symmetry is considered, both with and without collisions. There is also a short chapter discussing the effect of replacing GR by alternative theories of gravity, and an appendix which briefly summarizes the non-null case. The references are reasonably complete, from Synge and Penrose to the recent work of the authors. However, there are a few relatively minor errors and omissions. For instance, the results in chapter 3 about shells of matter in both Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstroem geometries are presented without reference or derivation. And I was disappointed to see that my own work with 't Hooft on the horizon shift due to the impulsive wave of a massless particle at the horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole-a direct generalization of the work by Aichelburg and Sexl-is not mentioned. But none of these minor complaints detracts from my appreciation of having a complete discussion of singular null hypersurfaces all in one place. The three fundamental papers which started this area of research all appeared at essentially the same time, 35 years ago; it is high time there was a unified presentation of the entire field. This book fills that need admirably, and could serve as the core of a graduate seminar for students having already taken a course in general relativity, or as a reference. My copy will have a treasured place in my library. References Penrose R 1972 The geometry of impulsive gravitational waves General Relativity: Papers in Honour of J L Synge ed L O Raifeartaigh (Oxford: Clarendon) pp 101-30 Aichelburg P C and Sexl R U 1971 On the gravitational

  2. Interacting bosons model and relation with BCS theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Nambu mechanism for BCS theory is extended with inclusion of quadrupole pairing in addition to the usual monopole pairing. An effective Hamiltonian is constructed and its relation to the IBM is discussed. The faced difficulties and a possible generalization of this model are discussed. (author)

  3. The program ORTOCARTAN for applications in the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasinski, A.

    1985-01-01

    A general outline of the program ORTOCARTAN for algebraic computing in the relativity theory is presented. A short history of the program is given. The base-programming language is LISP. The details of the calculation are presented. An example of application of the ORTOCARTAN is given

  4. Keynes's theories of money and banking in the Treatise and The General Theory

    OpenAIRE

    John Smithin

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies what seem to have been the five main issues in contention in monetary theory, both historically and in the current era, and discusses the view that J.M. Keynes took on each of them in the Treatise on Money and The General Theory. The key issues in monetary theory are the ontology of money, endogenous versus exogenous money, interest-rate determination, the choice of the monetary policy instrument, and the neutrality versus non-neutrality of money.

  5. Supersymmetry, General Relativity and Unity of Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Kazunari; Tsuda, Motomu

    2008-01-01

    The basic idea and some physical implications of nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity (NLSUSY GR) are presented. NLSUSY GR may give new insights into the origin of mass and the mysterious relations between the cosmology and the low energy particle physics, e.g. the spontaneous SUSY breaking scale, the cosmological constant, the (dark) energy density of the universe and the neutrino mass.

  6. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M

    2014-01-01

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  7. Tests of general relativity from timing the double pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M; Stairs, I H; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A; Lyne, A G; Ferdman, R D; Burgay, M; Lorimer, D R; Possenti, A; D'Amico, N; Sarkissian, J M; Hobbs, G B; Reynolds, J E; Freire, P C C; Camilo, F

    2006-10-06

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is unique in that both neutron stars are detectable as radio pulsars. They are also known to have much higher mean orbital velocities and accelerations than those of other binary pulsars. The system is therefore a good candidate for testing Einstein's theory of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. We report on precision timing observations taken over the 2.5 years since its discovery and present four independent strong-field tests of general relativity. These tests use the theory-independent mass ratio of the two stars. By measuring relativistic corrections to the Keplerian description of the orbital motion, we find that the "post-Keplerian" parameter s agrees with the value predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 0.05%, the most precise test yet obtained. We also show that the transverse velocity of the system's center of mass is extremely small. Combined with the system's location near the Sun, this result suggests that future tests of gravitational theories with the double pulsar will supersede the best current solar system tests. It also implies that the second-born pulsar may not have formed through the core collapse of a helium star, as is usually assumed.

  8. Reasonable fermionic quantum information theories require relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friis, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    We show that any quantum information theory based on anticommuting operators must be supplemented by a superselection rule deeply rooted in relativity to establish a reasonable notion of entanglement. While quantum information may be encoded in the fermionic Fock space, the unrestricted theory has a peculiar feature: the marginals of bipartite pure states need not have identical entropies, which leads to an ambiguous definition of entanglement. We solve this problem, by proving that it is removed by relativity, i.e., by the parity superselection rule that arises from Lorentz invariance via the spin-statistics connection. Our results hence unveil a fundamental conceptual inseparability of quantum information and the causal structure of relativistic field theory. (paper)

  9. On generalization uniaxial stress-strain relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahay, C.; Dubey, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Different forms of constitutive relations have been advanced for elastic, plastic and elastic-plastic behaviour of materials. It is shown that the various forms of the stress-strain relationship are specialized forms of generalization of a single stress-strain relation. For example, it is shown how the laws of elastic deformation, and the incremental and total deformation relationship for plastic behaviour are derivable from the Ramberg-Osgood relation. (orig.)

  10. Generalized perturbation theory (GPT) methods. A heuristic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1987-01-01

    Wigner first proposed a perturbation theory as early as 1945 to study fundamental quantities such as the reactivity worths of different materials. The first formulation, CPT, for conventional perturbation theory is based on universal quantum mechanics concepts. Since that early conception, significant contributions have been made to CPT, in particular, Soodak, who rendered a heuristic interpretation of the adjoint function, (referred to as the GPT method for generalized perturbation theory). The author illustrates the GPT methodology in a variety of linear and nonlinear domains encountered in nuclear reactor analysis. The author begins with the familiar linear neutron field and then generalizes the methodology to other linear and nonlinear fields, using heuristic arguments. The author believes that the inherent simplicity and elegance of the heuristic derivation, although intended here for reactor physics problems might be usefully adopted in collateral fields and includes such examples

  11. Generalized ensemble theory with non-extensive statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ke-Ming; Zhang, Ben-Wei; Wang, En-Ke

    2017-12-01

    The non-extensive canonical ensemble theory is reconsidered with the method of Lagrange multipliers by maximizing Tsallis entropy, with the constraint that the normalized term of Tsallis' q -average of physical quantities, the sum ∑ pjq, is independent of the probability pi for Tsallis parameter q. The self-referential problem in the deduced probability and thermal quantities in non-extensive statistics is thus avoided, and thermodynamical relationships are obtained in a consistent and natural way. We also extend the study to the non-extensive grand canonical ensemble theory and obtain the q-deformed Bose-Einstein distribution as well as the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution. The theory is further applied to the generalized Planck law to demonstrate the distinct behaviors of the various generalized q-distribution functions discussed in literature.

  12. Consistency relations in effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Dipak; Regan, Donough, E-mail: D.Munshi@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: D.Regan@sussex.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-01

    The consistency relations in large scale structure relate the lower-order correlation functions with their higher-order counterparts. They are direct outcome of the underlying symmetries of a dynamical system and can be tested using data from future surveys such as Euclid. Using techniques from standard perturbation theory (SPT), previous studies of consistency relation have concentrated on continuity-momentum (Euler)-Poisson system of an ideal fluid. We investigate the consistency relations in effective field theory (EFT) which adjusts the SPT predictions to account for the departure from the ideal fluid description on small scales. We provide detailed results for the 3D density contrast δ as well as the scaled divergence of velocity θ-bar . Assuming a ΛCDM background cosmology, we find the correction to SPT results becomes important at k ∼> 0.05 h/Mpc and that the suppression from EFT to SPT results that scales as square of the wave number k , can reach 40% of the total at k ≈ 0.25 h/Mpc at z = 0. We have also investigated whether effective field theory corrections to models of primordial non-Gaussianity can alter the squeezed limit behaviour, finding the results to be rather insensitive to these counterterms. In addition, we present the EFT corrections to the squeezed limit of the bispectrum in redshift space which may be of interest for tests of theories of modified gravity.

  13. Einstein and the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    some detail how Einstein evolved this theory and get a glimpse of his unique ... The Principle of Relativity: The laws of physics are the same in all inertial frames. .... ing on the railway platform will see them occur at different places. However ...

  14. Connecting and unmasking relativity and quantum theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de W.L.; Willigenburg, van L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The answer lies right in front of us, but we refuse to see it. Both relativity and quantum theory, the two pillars of fundamental physics, are modified in this paper to make them also explain the physical phenomena they describe. With this explanation, all current inconsistencies between the two

  15. Albert Einstein and the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlickova, E.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is presented of Albert Einstein's works, listing his correspondence, biographical literature, articles on A. Einstein published in Czech journals, principal relativity theory monographs and popular, historical and philosophical publications. The bibliographical records are listed alphabetically. Most references give the abbreviations of libraries where the publications are available. (J.P.)

  16. Hundres Years of Theory of Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Franek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, all civilised worl will remind the 100 years anniversary of Publishing the original work on special theory of relativity by Albert Einstein. This contribution is a brief review of its principial ideas in the field of electrodynamics.

  17. A test theory of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, R.; Sexl, R.U.

    1977-01-01

    Various second-order optical tests of special relativity are discussed within the framework of a test theory developed previously. Owing to the low accuracy of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment, the Lorentz contraction is known by direct experiments only to an accuracy of a few percent. To improve this accuracy several experiments are suggested. (author)

  18. Relativity theory (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1970--Feb 77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, D.W.

    1977-04-01

    Research studies are presented on special and general relativity. Gravitational theory, field theory, and space--time studies are included, as are studies involving the Minkowski space, the Schrodinger equations, the Dirac equations, and the Lorentz transformations

  19. Anisotropic cosmological models and generalized scalar tensor theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper generalized scalar tensor theory has been considered in the background of anisotropic cosmological models, namely, axially symmetric Bianchi-I, Bianchi-III and Kortowski–. Sachs space-time. For bulk viscous fluid, both exponential and power-law solutions have been stud- ied and some assumptions ...

  20. Anisotropic cosmological models and generalized scalar tensor theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper generalized scalar tensor theory has been considered in the background of anisotropic cosmological models, namely, axially symmetric Bianchi-I, Bianchi-III and Kortowski–Sachs space-time. For bulk viscous fluid, both exponential and power-law solutions have been studied and some assumptions among the ...

  1. Variational analysis and generalized differentiation I basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mordukhovich, Boris S

    2006-01-01

    Contains a study of the basic concepts and principles of variational analysis and generalized differentiation in both finite-dimensional and infinite-dimensional spaces. This title presents many applications to problems in optimization, equilibria, stability and sensitivity, control theory, economics, mechanics, and more.

  2. Anmeldelse: Whitney Davis A General Theory of Visual Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    Whitney Davis bog A General Theory of Visual Culture vil utvivlsomt blive opfattet som en provokation af mange deltagere i forskningsdebatterne om visuel kultur. At basere en »generel« teori om visuel kultur – dvs. en teori, som benytter sig af termer som »visualitet« – på et kerneargument de facto...

  3. Application of generalized perturbation theory to flux disadvantage factor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, O.H.; Akimov, I.S.; Naguib, K.; Hamouda, I.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of using the generalized perturbation theory to calculate the perturbation of the flux disadvantage factors of reactor cell, resulting from the variation of the cell parameters, is studied. For simplicity the one-group diffusion approximation is considered. All necessary equations are derived for variations both of the cell dimensions. Numerical results are presented in the paper

  4. Gender, General Strain Theory, Negative Emotions, and Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquero, Nicole Leeper; Fox, Kristan; Piquero, Alex R.; Capowich, George; Mazerolle, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Much of the prior work on General Strain Theory (GST) has focused on how strain and negative emotions interrelate to produce criminal--especially violent--activity. Very little research has extended GST to examine other types of non-criminal, negative behavior, such as self-harming behaviors associated with disordered eating, a traditionally…

  5. On the general theory of thermo-elastic friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alblas, J.B.

    1961-01-01

    A theory of the thermo-elastic dissipation in vibrating bodies is developed, starting from the three-dimensional thermo-elastic equations. After a discussion of the basic thermodynamical foundations, some general considerations on the problem of the conversion of mechanical energy into heat are

  6. An Application of General System Theory (GST) to Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Charles O.

    1992-01-01

    Demonstrates the compatibility of General System Theory (GST) with the traditional counseling literature in explicating a therapy group's progression through Tuckman's (1965, 1977) developmental stages (forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning). Description uses both traditional group literature and GST concepts. (Author/NB)

  7. What Should Instructional Designers Know about General Systems Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and explains the relationship between instructional systems design (ISD) and GST. Benefits of integrating GST into the curriculum of ISD graduate programs are discussed, and a short bibliography on GST is included. (LRW)

  8. Membrane models and generalized Z2 gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.; Wallace, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    We consider models of (d-n)-dimensional membranes fluctuating in a d-dimensional space under the action of surface tension. We investigate the renormalization properties of these models perturbatively and in 1/n expansion. The potential relationships of these models to generalized Z 2 gauge theories are indicated. (orig.)

  9. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M.; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  10. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  11. Generalized Disjunctions in (Infinitary) Structural Consequence Relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2012), s. 442-443 ISSN 1079-8986. [Logic Colloquium 2011. 11.07.2011-16.07.2011, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Abstract Algebraic Logic * Generalized disjunction * Proof by cases properties * Consequence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.ucla.edu/~asl/bsl/1803- toc .htm

  12. A general mixture theory. I. Mixtures of spherical molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Esam Z.

    1996-08-01

    We present a new general theory for obtaining mixture properties from the pure species equations of state. The theory addresses the composition and the unlike interactions dependence of mixture equation of state. The density expansion of the mixture equation gives the exact composition dependence of all virial coefficients. The theory introduces multiple-index parameters that can be calculated from binary unlike interaction parameters. In this first part of the work, details are presented for the first and second levels of approximations for spherical molecules. The second order model is simple and very accurate. It predicts the compressibility factor of additive hard spheres within simulation uncertainty (equimolar with size ratio of three). For nonadditive hard spheres, comparison with compressibility factor simulation data over a wide range of density, composition, and nonadditivity parameter, gave an average error of 2%. For mixtures of Lennard-Jones molecules, the model predictions are better than the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson perturbation theory.

  13. General theory of spontaneous emission near exceptional points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Adi; Zhen, Bo; Miller, Owen D; Hsu, Chia W; Hernandez, Felipe; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2017-05-29

    We present a general theory of spontaneous emission at exceptional points (EPs)-exotic degeneracies in non-Hermitian systems. Our theory extends beyond spontaneous emission to any light-matter interaction described by the local density of states (e.g., absorption, thermal emission, and nonlinear frequency conversion). Whereas traditional spontaneous-emission theories imply infinite enhancement factors at EPs, we derive finite bounds on the enhancement, proving maximum enhancement of 4 in passive systems with second-order EPs and significantly larger enhancements (exceeding 400×) in gain-aided and higher-order EP systems. In contrast to non-degenerate resonances, which are typically associated with Lorentzian emission curves in systems with low losses, EPs are associated with non-Lorentzian lineshapes, leading to enhancements that scale nonlinearly with the resonance quality factor. Our theory can be applied to dispersive media, with proper normalization of the resonant modes.

  14. Kinetic theory of nonequilibrium ensembles, irreversible thermodynamics, and generalized hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the fundamentals of irreversible thermodynamics for nonlinear transport processes in gases and liquids, as well as for generalized hydrodynamics extending the classical hydrodynamics of Navier, Stokes, Fourier, and Fick. Together with its companion volume on relativistic theories, it provides a comprehensive picture of the kinetic theory formulated from the viewpoint of nonequilibrium ensembles in both nonrelativistic and, in Vol. 2, relativistic contexts. Theories of macroscopic irreversible processes must strictly conform to the thermodynamic laws at every step and in all approximations that enter their derivation from the mechanical principles. Upholding this as the inviolable tenet, the author develops theories of irreversible transport processes in fluids (gases or liquids) on the basis of irreversible kinetic equations satisfying the H theorem. They apply regardless of whether the processes are near to or far removed from equilibrium, or whether they are linear or nonlinear with respe...

  15. On the generalization of the Kaluza-Klein theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosu, Ion

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the Kaluza-Klein theory. In the first part we will discuss the theory elaborated by Kaluza and Klein, in a Riemann space with five dimensions, which unifies the gravitation with electromagnetism. The second part debates the generalization of this theory in a space with 4+n dimensions. This is a mathematical product between the Riemann 4-dimension variety and the G/H n-dimensional homogenous space. In the last part we will propose a theory Kaluza-Klein like in the fiber bundle space with 4+n dimensions. Every part is structured as follows: the metric tensor G will be identified for the gravitation and the potentials Yang-Mills; then the equations of geodesics and the equations of the field will be deduced. (author)

  16. Testing special relativity theory using Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras S, H.; Hernandez A, L.; Baltazar R, A.; Escareno J, E.; Mares E, C. A.; Hernandez V, C.; Vega C, H. R.

    2010-10-01

    The validity of the special relativity theory has been tested using the Compton scattering. Since 1905 several experiments has been carried out to show that time, mass, and length change with the velocity, in this work the Compton scattering has been utilized as a simple way to show the validity to relativity. The work was carried out through Monte Carlo calculations and experiments with different gamma-ray sources and a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 x 3 NaI (Tl) detector. The pulse-height spectra were collected and the Compton edge was observed. This information was utilized to determine the relationship between the electron's mass and energy using the Compton -knee- position, the obtained results were contrasted with two collision models between photon and electron, one model was built using the classical physics and another using the special relativity theory. It was found that calculations and experiments results fit to collision model made using the special relativity. (Author)

  17. New relations for gauge-theory amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J. J. M.; Johansson, H.

    2008-01-01

    We present an identity satisfied by the kinematic factors of diagrams describing the tree amplitudes of massless gauge theories. This identity is a kinematic analog of the Jacobi identity for color factors. Using this we find new relations between color-ordered partial amplitudes. We discuss applications to multiloop calculations via the unitarity method. In particular, we illustrate the relations between different contributions to a two-loop four-point QCD amplitude. We also use this identity to reorganize gravity tree amplitudes diagram by diagram, offering new insight into the structure of the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) relations between gauge and gravity tree amplitudes. This insight leads to similar but novel relations. We expect this to be helpful in higher-loop studies of the ultraviolet properties of gravity theories.

  18. Generalized information theory: aims, results, and open problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klir, George J.

    2004-01-01

    The principal purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive overview of generalized information theory (GIT): a research program whose objective is to develop a broad treatment of uncertainty-based information, not restricted to classical notions of uncertainty. After a brief overview of classical information theories, a broad framework for formalizing uncertainty and the associated uncertainty-based information of a great spectrum of conceivable types is sketched. The various theories of imprecise probabilities that have already been developed within this framework are then surveyed, focusing primarily on some important unifying principles applying to all these theories. This is followed by introducing two higher levels of the theories of imprecise probabilities: (i) the level of measuring the amount of relevant uncertainty (predictive, retrodictive, prescriptive, diagnostic, etc.) in any situation formalizable in each given theory, and (ii) the level of some methodological principles of uncertainty, which are contingent upon the capability to measure uncertainty and the associated uncertainty-based information. Various issues regarding both the measurement of uncertainty and the uncertainty principles are discussed. Again, the focus is on unifying principles applicable to all the theories. Finally, the current status of GIT is assessed and future research in the area is discussed

  19. Generalized perturbation theory using two-dimensional, discrete ordinates transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Perturbation theory for changes in linear and bilinear functionals of the forward and adjoint fluxes in a critical reactor has been implemented using two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory. The computer program DOT IV was modified to calculate the generalized functions Λ and Λ*. Demonstration calculations were performed for changes in a reaction-rate ratio and a reactivity worth caused by system perturbations. The perturbation theory predictions agreed with direct calculations to within about 2%. A method has been developed for calculating higher lambda eigenvalues and eigenfunctions using techniques similar to those developed for generalized functions. Demonstration calculations have been performed to obtain these eigenfunctions

  20. Gravitational radiation and the validity of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The regular observation of gravitational radiation by a world-wide network of resonant and laser-interferometric detectors will usher in a new form of astronomy. At the same time, it will provide new and interesting tests of general relativity. We review the current empirical status of general relativity, and discuss three areas in which direct observation of gravitational radiation could test the theory further: polarization of the waves, speed of the waves, and back-reaction of the waves on the evolution of the source. (author)

  1. Special relativity and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman are back. This time, they introduce readers to Einstein's special relativity and Maxwell's classical field theory. Using their typical brand of real math, enlightening drawings, and humor, Susskind and Friedman walk us through the complexities of waves, forces, and particles by exploring special relativity and electromagnetism. It's a must-read for both devotees of the series and any armchair physicist who wants to improve their knowledge of physics' deepest truths.

  2. Generalized Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    The Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation treats a pair of rank one projection valued measures and imposes a restriction on their probability distributions. It gives a nontrivial bound for summation of their maximum values. We give a generalization of this bound (weak version of the Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation). Our generalization covers a pair of positive operator valued measures. A nontrivial but slightly weak inequality that can treat an arbitrary number of positive operator valued measures is also presented. A possible application to the problem of separability criterion is also suggested

  3. Scalar-tensor theory of gravitation: generalizations and experimental limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duruisseau, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Several theories with scalar field can be derived from different variational principles. Here a very general variational principle is considered and it is proved that, in the exterior case without electromagnetic field, the solution for a particular case generates the set of solutions for the general case. This is applied to the exterior solution in the static case with spherical symmetry without electromagnetic field. The predictions are investigated for the classic effects and the event horizons and some limitations for the variational principles which generalize the usual limitations are obtained. In all these cases the Schwarzschild solution with his horizon appears as a very particular case. (author)

  4. General definition of the concept of "sport" as one of the basic constructs of the general theory of physical culture and sports theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil Sutula

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to reveal modern ideas about the essence of the concept of "sport" and determine its role in the development of the general theory of physical culture and sports theory. Material & Methods: analysis of specialized literature, which highlights various aspects of the development of the field of people's activities related to the use of physical exercises. Results: in today's society there is an objective sphere of human activity related to the use of physical exercises, for which the name in domestic and foreign scientific and social practice is most often used the term "physical culture". Conclusion: the constitutive conditions of the process of developing a general theory of physical culture are singled out, it is shown that sport, as a special socio-cultural phenomenon, is a historically conditioned activity of people associated with the use of physical exercises, aimed at preparing and participating in competitions, as well as individual and socially significant results of such activity.

  5. Generalized diffusion theory for calculating the neutron transport scalar flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcouffe, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A generalization of the neutron diffusion equation is introduced, the solution of which is an accurate approximation to the transport scalar flux. In this generalization the auxiliary transport calculations of the system of interest are utilized to compute an accurate, pointwise diffusion coefficient. A procedure is specified to generate and improve this auxiliary information in a systematic way, leading to improvement in the calculated diffusion scalar flux. This improvement is shown to be contingent upon satisfying the condition of positive calculated-diffusion coefficients, and an algorithm that ensures this positivity is presented. The generalized diffusion theory is also shown to be compatible with conventional diffusion theory in the sense that the same methods and codes can be used to calculate a solution for both. The accuracy of the method compared to reference S/sub N/ transport calculations is demonstrated for a wide variety of examples. (U.S.)

  6. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and other binary pulsar systems have yielded other tests, especially of strong-field effects. When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  7. The consistency assessment of topological relations in cartographic generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunyan; Guo, Qingsheng; Du, Xiaochu

    2006-10-01

    The field of research in the generalization assessment has been less studied than the generalization process itself, and it is very important to keep topological relation consistency for meeting generalization quality. This paper proposes a methodology to assess the quality of generalized map from topological relations consistency. Taking roads (including railway) and residential areas for examples, from the viewpoint of the spatial cognition, some issues about topological consistency in different map scales are analyzed. The statistic information about the inconsistent topological relations can be obtained by comparing the two matrices: one is the matrix for the topological relations in the generalized map; the other is the theoretical matrix for the topological relations that should be maintained after generalization. Based on the fuzzy set theory and the classification of map object types, the consistency evaluation model of topological relations is established. The paper proves the feasibility of the method through the example about how to evaluate the local topological relations between simple roads and residential area finally.

  8. Constructing a chinese international relations theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.M.; Nielsen, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Chinese scholars are debating whether, and how, to innovate a Chinese theory of International Relations (IR). This article examines the driving forces behind this theoretical debate. It challenges the commonsensical link between external events in the subject matter (i.r.) and theorizing (IR......), which suggests that the innovation of a Chinese IR theory is a natural product of China's geopolitical rise, its growing political ambitions, and discontent with Western hegemony. We propose instead a sociological approach to intellectual innovation which opens the black box of knowledge production...... attention from their peers-theorizing a Chinese IR theory being one important way of doing this. The external layer-which ranges from power politics to sociopolitical developments-affects this process indirectly by providing more research funds and autonomy to the more immediate institutional environment...

  9. Nonlinear generalization of special relativity at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown, that the introduction of a fundamental length constant into the operator representation of the quantum mechanical commutation relations, as suggested by Bagge, leads to a nonlinear generalization of the Lorentz transformations. The theory requires the introduction of a substratum (ether) and which can be identified as the zero point vacuum energy. At very high energies a non-Lorentz invariant behaviour for the cross sections between elementary particles is predicted. Using the Einstein clock synchronisation definition, the velocity of light is also constant and equal to c in the new theory, but the zero point vacuum energy becomes finite, as are all other quantities which are divergent in Lorentz invariant quantum field theories. In the limiting case where the length constant is set equal to zero, the zero point vacuum energy diverges and special relativity is recovered. (orig.) [de

  10. General fluid theories, variational principles and self-organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports two distinct but related advances: (1) The development and application of fluid theories that transcend conventional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in particular, theories that are valid in the long-mean-free-path limit and in which pressure anisotropy, heat flow, and arbitrarily strong sheared flows are treated consistently. (2) The discovery of new pressure-confining plasma configurations that are self-organized relaxed states. (author)

  11. The curious history of relativity how Einstein's theory of gravity was lost and found again

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Black holes may obliterate most things that come near them, but they saved the theory of general relativity. Einstein's theory was quickly accepted as the true theory of gravity after its publication in 1915, but soon took a back seat in physics to quantum mechanics and languished for decades on the blackboards of mathematicians. Not until the existence of black holes by Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose in the 1960s, after Einstein's death, was the theory revived. Almost one hundred years after general relativity replaced Newton's theory of gravitation, The Curious History of Relativity tells the story of both events surrounding general relativity and the techniques employed by Einstein and the relativists to construct, develop, and understand his almost impenetrable theory. Jean Eisenstaedt, one of the world's leading experts on the subject, also discusses the theory's place in the evolution of twentieth-century physics. He describes the main stages in the development of general relativity: its beginnings,...

  12. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    . The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...... and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first...

  13. A general theory of multimetric indices and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Grace, James B.; Schweiger, E. William

    2012-01-01

    1. Stewardship of biological and ecological resources requires the ability to make integrative assessments of ecological integrity. One of the emerging methods for making such integrative assessments is multimetric indices (MMIs). These indices synthesize data, often from multiple levels of biological organization, with the goal of deriving a single index that reflects the overall effects of human disturbance. Despite the widespread use of MMIs, there is uncertainty about why this approach can be effective. An understanding of MMIs requires a quantitative theory that illustrates how the properties of candidate metrics relates to MMIs generated from those metrics. 2. We present the initial basis for such a theory by deriving the general mathematical characteristics of MMIs assembled from metrics. We then use the theory to derive quantitative answers to the following questions: Is there an optimal number of metrics to comprise an index? How does covariance among metrics affect the performance of the index derived from those metrics? And what are the criteria to decide whether a given metric will improve the performance of an index? 3. We find that the optimal number of metrics to be included in an index depends on the theoretical distribution of signal of the disturbance gradient contained in each metric. For example, if the rank-ordered parameters of a metric-disturbance regression can be described by a monotonically decreasing function, then an optimum number of metrics exists and can often be derived analytically. We derive the conditions by which adding a given metric can be expected to improve an index. 4. We find that the criterion defining such conditions depends nonlinearly of the signal of the disturbance gradient, the noise (error) of the metric and the correlation of the metric errors. Importantly, we find that correlation among metric errors increases the signal required for the metric to improve the index. 5. The theoretical framework presented in this

  14. On a Geometric Theory of Generalized Chiral Elasticity with Discontinuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we develop, in a somewhat extensive manner, a geometric theory of chiral elasticity which in general is endowed with geometric discontinuities (sometimes referred to as defects. By itself, the present theory generalizes both Cosserat and void elasticity theories to a certain extent via geometrization as well as by taking intoaccount the action of the electromagnetic field, i.e., the incorporation of the electromagnetic field into the description of the so-called microspin (chirality also forms the underlying structure of this work. As we know, the description of the electromagnetic field as a unified phenomenon requires four-dimensional space-time rather than three-dimensional space as its background. For this reason we embed the three-dimensional material space in four-dimensional space-time. This way, the electromagnetic spin is coupled to the non-electromagnetic microspin, both being parts of the completemicrospin to be added to the macrospin in the full description of vorticity. In short, our objective is to generalize the existing continuum theories by especially describing microspin phenomena in a fully geometric way.

  15. On a Geometric Theory of Generalized Chiral Elasticity with Discontinuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we develop, in a somewhat extensive manner, a geometric theory of chiral elasticity which in general is endowed with geometric discontinuities (sometimes re- ferred to as defects . By itself, the present theory generalizes both Cosserat and void elasticity theories to a certain extent via geometrization as well as by taking into ac- count the action of the electromagnetic field, i.e., the incorporation of the electromag- netic field into the description of the so-called microspin ( chirality also forms the un- derlying structure of this work. As we know, the description of the electromagnetic field as a unified phenomenon requires four-dimensional space-time rather than three- dimensional space as its background. For this reason we embed the three-dimensional material space in four-dimensional space-time. This way, the electromagnetic spin is coupled to the non-electromagnetic microspin, both being parts of the complete mi- crospin to be added to the macrospin in the full description of vorticity. In short, our objective is to generalize the existing continuum theories by especially describing mi- crospin phenomena in a fully geometric way.

  16. Entropy and information causality in general probabilistic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnum, Howard; Leifer, Matthew; Spekkens, Robert; Barrett, Jonathan; Clark, Lisa Orloff; Stepanik, Nicholas; Wilce, Alex; Wilke, Robin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the concept of entropy in probabilistic theories more general than quantum mechanics, with particular reference to the notion of information causality (IC) recently proposed by Pawlowski et al (2009 arXiv:0905.2292). We consider two entropic quantities, which we term measurement and mixing entropy. In the context of classical and quantum theory, these coincide, being given by the Shannon and von Neumann entropies, respectively; in general, however, they are very different. In particular, while measurement entropy is easily seen to be concave, mixing entropy need not be. In fact, as we show, mixing entropy is not concave whenever the state space is a non-simplicial polytope. Thus, the condition that measurement and mixing entropies coincide is a strong constraint on possible theories. We call theories with this property monoentropic. Measurement entropy is subadditive, but not in general strongly subadditive. Equivalently, if we define the mutual information between two systems A and B by the usual formula I(A: B)=H(A)+H(B)-H(AB), where H denotes the measurement entropy and AB is a non-signaling composite of A and B, then it can happen that I(A:BC)< I(A:B). This is relevant to IC in the sense of Pawlowski et al: we show that any monoentropic non-signaling theory in which measurement entropy is strongly subadditive, and also satisfies a version of the Holevo bound, is informationally causal, and on the other hand we observe that Popescu-Rohrlich boxes, which violate IC, also violate strong subadditivity. We also explore the interplay between measurement and mixing entropy and various natural conditions on theories that arise in quantum axiomatics.

  17. The generalized Crewther relation in QCD and its experimental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Gabadadze, G.T.; Kataev, A.L.; Lu, H.J.

    1995-12-01

    We use the BLM scale-fixing prescription to derive a renormalization-scheme invariant relation between the coefficient function for the Bjorken sum rule for polarized deep inelastic scattering and the R-ratio for the e + e - annihilation cross section. This relation provides a generalization of the Crewther relation to non-conformally invariant gauge theories. The derived relations allow one to calculate unambiguously without renormalization scale or scheme ambiguity the effective charges of the polarized Bjorken and the Gross-Llewellen Smith sum rules from the experimental value for the effective charge associated with R-ratio. Present data are consistent with the generalized Crewther relations, but measurements at higher precision and energies will be needed to decisively test these fundamental relations in QCD. (orig.)

  18. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-06-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild’s 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star—a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density—the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres.

  19. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-01-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild's 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star--a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density--the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres

  20. Recursive relations for a quiver gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jaemo; Sim, Woojoo

    2006-01-01

    We study the recursive relations for a quiver gauge theory with the gauge group SU(N 1 ) x SU(N 2 ) with bifundamental fermions transforming as (N 1 , N-bar 2 ). We work out the recursive relation for the amplitudes involving a pair of quark and antiquark and gluons of each gauge group. We realize directly in the recursive relations the invariance under the order preserving permutations of the gluons of the first and the second gauge group. We check the proposed relations for MHV, 6-point and 7-point amplitudes and find the agreements with the known results and the known relations with the single gauge group amplitudes. The proposed recursive relation is much more efficient in calculating the amplitudes than using the known relations with the amplitudes of the single gauge group

  1. Formal framework for a nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, Friedrich W.; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2009-01-01

    The analogy between electrodynamics and the translational gauge theory of gravity is employed in this paper to develop an ansatz for a nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation. Working in the linear approximation, we show that the resulting nonlocal theory is equivalent to general relativity with 'dark matter'. The nature of the predicted dark matter, which is the manifestation of the nonlocal character of gravity in our model, is briefly discussed. It is demonstrated that this approach can provide a basis for the Tohline-Kuhn treatment of the astrophysical evidence for dark matter.

  2. Cognitive performance modeling based on general systems performance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondraske, George V

    2010-01-01

    General Systems Performance Theory (GSPT) was initially motivated by problems associated with quantifying different aspects of human performance. It has proved to be invaluable for measurement development and understanding quantitative relationships between human subsystem capacities and performance in complex tasks. It is now desired to bring focus to the application of GSPT to modeling of cognitive system performance. Previous studies involving two complex tasks (i.e., driving and performing laparoscopic surgery) and incorporating measures that are clearly related to cognitive performance (information processing speed and short-term memory capacity) were revisited. A GSPT-derived method of task analysis and performance prediction termed Nonlinear Causal Resource Analysis (NCRA) was employed to determine the demand on basic cognitive performance resources required to support different levels of complex task performance. This approach is presented as a means to determine a cognitive workload profile and the subsequent computation of a single number measure of cognitive workload (CW). Computation of CW may be a viable alternative to measuring it. Various possible "more basic" performance resources that contribute to cognitive system performance are discussed. It is concluded from this preliminary exploration that a GSPT-based approach can contribute to defining cognitive performance models that are useful for both individual subjects and specific groups (e.g., military pilots).

  3. Generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lensky, Vadim [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Cluster of Excellence PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Cluster of Excellence PRISMA, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The nucleon generalized polarizabilities (GPs), probed in virtual Compton scattering (VCS), describe the spatial distribution of the polarization density in a nucleon. They are accessed experimentally via the process of electron-proton bremsstrahlung (ep → epγ) at electron-beam facilities, such as MIT-Bates, CEBAF (Jefferson Lab), and MAMI (Mainz). We present the calculation of the nucleon GPs and VCS observables at next-to-leading order in baryon chiral perturbation theory (BχPT), and confront the results with the empirical information. At this order our results are predictions, in the sense that all the parameters are well known from elsewhere. Within the relatively large uncertainties of our calculation we find good agreement with the experimental observations of VCS and the empirical extractions of the GPs. We find large discrepancies with previous chiral calculations - all done in heavy-baryon χPT (HBχPT) - and discuss the differences between BχPT and HBχPT responsible for these discrepancies. (orig.)

  4. Generalized absorber theory and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized form of Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory is used to explain the quantum-mechanical paradox proposed by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR). The advanced solutions of the electromagnetic wave equation and of relativistic quantum-mechanical wave equations are shown to play the role of ''verifier'' in quantum-mechanical ''transactions,'' providing microscopic communication paths between detectors across spacelike intervals in violation of the EPR locality postulate. The principle of causality is discussed in the context of this approach, and possibilities for experimental tests of the theory are examined

  5. General scalar-tensor theories for induced gravity inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaleb J, H.; Marrakchi, A.L.

    1992-07-01

    Some cosmological implications of a general scalar-tensor theory for induced gravity are discussed. The model exhibits a slow-rolling phase provided that the coupling function ε(φ) varies slowly enough such that φ dlnε(φ)/dφ much less than 2 during almost the inflationary epoch. It is then shown that, as in the ordinary induced gravity inflation, the chaotic scenario is more natural than the new scenario which proves to be even not self-consistent. The results are applied, for illustration, to a scalar-tensor theory of the Barker type. (author). 25 refs

  6. Generalization of Gibbs Entropy and Thermodynamic Relation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun Chul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we extend Gibbs's approach of quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic processes, and calculate the microscopic expression of entropy for general non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes. Also, we analyze the formal structure of thermodynamic relation in non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes.

  7. Summary of classical general relativity workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the classical general relativity workshop, ten lectures were presented on various topics. The topics included aspects of black-hole physics, gravitational collapse and the formation of black holes, specific stellar models like a superdense star, method of extracting solutions by exploiting Noether symmetry, brane world and.

  8. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, M. K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Hemberger, D. A.; Kidder, L. E.; Ossokine, S.; Scheel, M. A.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific; Virgo Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 1013 km . In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  9. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Campanelli, M; Hemberger, D A; Kidder, L E; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-03

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 10^{13}  km. In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES: Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 February ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes by T.DAMOUR, IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F - Physical motivation behind Einstein's theory. - Mathematical formalism of General Relativity. - Experimental confirmations of Einstein's theory. - Introduction to Black Holes physics.

  11. Generalized canonical formalism and the S-matrix of theories with constraints of the general type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkina, T.Ye.

    1987-01-01

    A canonical quantization method is given for systems with first and second class constraints of arbitrary rank. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated using sample Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. A correct expression is derived for the S-matrix of theories that are momentum-quadratic within the scope of canonical gauges, including ghost fields. Generalized quantization is performed and the S-matrix is derived in configurational space for theories of relativistic membranes representing a generalization of theories of strings to the case of an extended spatial implementation. It is demonstrated that the theory of membranes in n+l-dimensional space is a system with rank-n constraints

  12. A General Framework for Portfolio Theory. Part I: theory and various models

    OpenAIRE

    Maier-Paape, Stanislaus; Zhu, Qiji Jim

    2017-01-01

    Utility and risk are two often competing measurements on the investment success. We show that efficient trade-off between these two measurements for investment portfolios happens, in general, on a convex curve in the two dimensional space of utility and risk. This is a rather general pattern. The modern portfolio theory of Markowitz [H. Markowitz, Portfolio Selection, 1959] and its natural generalization, the capital market pricing model, [W. F. Sharpe, Mutual fund performance , 1966] are spe...

  13. On the geometry of null congruences in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, Zafar; Malik, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some theorems for the null congruences within the framework of general theory of relativity are given. These theorems are important in themselves as they illustrate the geometric meaning of the spin coefficients. The newly developed Geroch-Held-Penrose (GHP) formalism has been used throughout the investigations. The salient features of GHP formalism that are necessary for the present work are given and these techniques are applied to a pair of null congruences C(l) and C(n). (author)

  14. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (5/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  15. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (3/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  16. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (1/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  17. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (2/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  18. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (4/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  19. Fuzzy relational calculus theory, applications and software

    CERN Document Server

    Peeva, Ketty

    2004-01-01

    This book examines fuzzy relational calculus theory with applications in various engineering subjects. The scope of the text covers unified and exact methods with algorithms for direct and inverse problem resolution in fuzzy relational calculus. Extensive engineering applications of fuzzy relation compositions and fuzzy linear systems (linear, relational and intuitionistic) are discussed. Some examples of such applications include solutions of equivalence, reduction and minimization problems in fuzzy machines, pattern recognition in fuzzy languages, optimization and inference engines in textile and chemical engineering, etc. A comprehensive overview of the authors' original work in fuzzy relational calculus is also provided in each chapter. The attached CD-Rom contains a toolbox with many functions for fuzzy calculations, together with an original algorithm for inverse problem resolution in MATLAB. This book is also suitable for use as a textbook in related courses at advanced undergraduate and graduate level...

  20. General relativity and gravitation a centennial perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Beverly K; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Explore spectacular advances in cosmology, relativistic astrophysics, gravitational wave science, mathematics, computational science, and the interface of gravitation and quantum physics with this unique celebration of the centennial of Einstein's discovery of general relativity. Twelve comprehensive and in-depth reviews, written by a team of world-leading international experts, together present an up-to-date overview of key topics at the frontiers of these areas, with particular emphasis on the significant developments of the last three decades. Interconnections with other fields of research are also highlighted, making this an invaluable resource for both new and experienced researchers. Commissioned by the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation, and including accessible introductions to cutting-edge topics, ample references to original research papers, and informative colour figures, this is a definitive reference for researchers and graduate students in cosmology, relativity, and grav...