WorldWideScience

Sample records for general practice study

  1. A qualitative study of collaboration in general practice: understanding the general practice nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives. Eight general practitioners and fourteen registered nurses working in general practice were purposefully recruited. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews during February to May 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Data revealed three overarching themes. This study presents the data for the overarching theme 'Understanding the general practice registered nurse's role'. Many general practitioner participants lacked clarity around the role and scope of practice of the registered nurse. At the same time, nursing participants often articulated their role as an assistant rather than as an independent health professional. This limited collaboration and the nurses' role within the team. Collaboration was enhanced when general practitioners actively sought an understanding of the registered nurses scope of practice. Clarifying the nurses' role promotes collaboration and supports nurses to work to the full extent of their practice. This is important in terms of optimising the nurses' role within the team and reinforcing their professional identity. Identification of key issues around understanding the nurses' role may help inform strategies that improve collaboration and workplace relations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Stakeholder experiences with general practice pharmacist services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edwin C K; Stewart, Kay; Elliott, Rohan A; George, Johnson

    2013-09-11

    To explore general practice staff, pharmacist and patient experiences with pharmacist services in Australian general practice clinics within the Pharmacists in Practice Study. Qualitative study. Two general practice clinics in Melbourne, Australia, in which pharmacists provided medication reviews, patient and staff education, medicines information and quality assurance services over a 6-month period. Patients, practice staff and pharmacists. Semi-structured telephone interviews with patients, focus groups with practice staff and semi-structured interviews and periodic narrative reports with practice pharmacists. Data were analysed thematically and theoretical frameworks used to explain the findings. 34 participants were recruited: 18 patients, 14 practice staff (9 general practitioners, 4 practice nurses, 1 practice manager) and 2 practice pharmacists. Five main themes emerged: environment; professional relationships and integration; pharmacist attributes; staff and patient benefits and logistical challenges. Participants reported that colocation and the interdisciplinary environment of general practice enabled better communication and collaboration compared to traditional community and consultant pharmacy services. Participants felt that pharmacists needed to possess certain attributes to ensure successful integration, including being personable and proactive. Attitudinal, professional and logistical barriers were identified but were able to be overcome. The findings were explained using D'Amour's structuration model of collaboration and Roger's diffusion of innovation theory. This is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of general practice staff, pharmacists and patients on their interactions within the Australian general practice environment. Participants were receptive of colocated pharmacist services, and various barriers and facilitators to integration were identified. Future research should investigate the feasibility and sustainability of

  3. Integrating postgraduate and undergraduate general practice education: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Andrew; Culhane, Aidan; Dunne, Colum; Griffin, Michael; McGrath, Deirdre; Meagher, David; O'Dwyer, Pat; Cullen, Walter

    2013-05-01

    Educational activity in general practice has increased considerably in the past 20 years. Vertical integration, whereby practices support students and trainees at different stages, may enhance general practices' capacity to fulfil this role. To explore the potential for vertical integration in undergraduate and postgraduate education in general practice, by describing the experience of (and attitudes towards) 'vertical integration in general practice education' among key stakeholder groups. Qualitative study of GPs, practice staff, GPs-in-training and medical students involving focus groups which were thematically analysed. We identified four overarching themes: (1) Important practical features of vertical integration are interaction between learners at different stages, active involvement in clinical teams and interagency collaboration; (2) Vertical integration may benefit GPs/practices, students and patients through improved practice systems, exposure to team-working and multi-morbidity and opportunistic health promotion, respectively; (3) Capacity issues may challenge its implementation; (4) Strategies such as recognising and addressing diverse learner needs and inter-agency collaboration can promote vertical integration. Vertical integration, whereby practices support students and trainees at different stages, may enhance general practices' teaching capacity. Recognising the diverse educational needs of learners at different stages and collaboration between agencies responsible for the planning and delivery of specialist training and medical degree programmes would appear to be important.

  4. A critical incident study of general practice trainees in their basic general practice term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, M R; Kamien, M; Sim, M G; Davis, J

    1995-03-20

    To obtain information on the experiences of general practice (GP) trainees during their first general practice (GP) attachment. Critical incident technique--a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews about incidents which describe competent or poor professional practice. Thirty-nine Western Australian doctors from the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners' (RACGP) Family Medicine Program who were completing their first six months of general practice in 1992. Doctors reported 180 critical incidents, of which just over 50% involved problems (and sometimes successes) with: difficult patients; paediatrics; the doctor-patient relationship; counselling skills; obstetrics and gynaecology; relationships with other health professionals and practice staff; and cardiovascular disorders. The major skills associated with both positive and negative critical incidents were: the interpersonal skills of rapport and listening; the diagnostic skills of thorough clinical assessment and the appropriate use of investigations; and the management skills of knowing when and how to obtain help from supervisors, hospitals and specialists. Doctors reported high levels of anxiety over difficult management decisions and feelings of guilt over missed diagnoses and inadequate management. The initial GP term is a crucial transition period in the development of the future general practitioner. An analysis of commonly recurring positive and negative critical incidents can be used by the RACGP Training Program to accelerate the learning process of doctors in vocational training and has implications for the planning of undergraduate curricula.

  5. Job satisfaction of practice assistants in general practice in Germany: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Brodowski, Marc; Steinhaeuser, Jost; Wensing, Michel; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    Job satisfaction of practice staff is important for optimal health care delivery and for minimizing the turnover of non-medical professions. To document the job satisfaction of practice assistants in German general practice and to explore associations between job satisfaction, staff characteristics and culture in general practice organizations. The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment accreditation scheme for general practices and used an observational design. The study population consisted of 1158 practice assistants from 345 general practices across Germany. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-item Warr-Cook-Wall questionnaire. Organizational culture was evaluated with four items. A linear regression analysis was performed in which each of the job satisfaction items was handled as dependent variable. Out of 1716 staff member questionnaires handed out to practice assistants, 1158 questionnaires were completed (response rate: 67.5%). Practice assistants were most satisfied with their colleagues and least satisfied with their income. Higher job satisfaction was associated with issues of organizational culture, particularly a good working atmosphere, opportunities to suggest and influence areas for improvement and clear responsibilities within the practice team. Prioritizing initiatives to maintain high levels of, or to improve the job satisfaction of practice assistants, is important for recruitment and retention. It will also help to improve working conditions for both practice assistants and GPs and create an environment to provide better quality care.

  6. Understanding "revolving door" patients in general practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrea E; Mullen, Kenneth; Wilson, Philip

    2014-02-13

    'Revolving door' patients in general practice are repeatedly removed from general practitioners' (GP) lists. This paper reports a qualitative portion of the first mixed methods study of these marginalised patients. We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with six practitioner services staff and six GPs in Scotland, utilizing Charmazian grounded theory to characterise 'revolving door' patients and their impact from professionals' perspectives. 'Revolving door' patients were reported as having three necessary characteristics; they had unreasonable expectations, exhibited inappropriate behaviours and had unmet health needs. A range of boundary breaches were reported too when 'revolving door' patients interacted with NHS staff. We utilise the 'sensitising concepts' of legitimacy by drawing on literature about 'good and bad' patients and 'dirty work designations.' We relate these to the core work of general practice and explore the role that medical and moral schemas have in how health service professionals understand and work with 'revolving door' patients. We suggest this may have wider relevance for the problem doctor patient relationship literature.

  7. The South African Stroke Risk in General Practice Study | Connor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred general practices were randomly selected from lists provided by pharmaceutical .representatives. Each GP approached 50 consecutive patients aged 30 years and older. Patients completed an information sheet and the GP documented the patient's risk factors. The resulting sample is relevant.if not necessarily ...

  8. Respiratory Diseases in Children: studies in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis covers various aspects of the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of various respiratory symptoms and diseases in children frequently encountered in general practice. These respiratory tract symptoms and diseases can be categorized into symptoms and

  9. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches.  Approach: I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations...... theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject...... in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become...

  10. Influences of peer facilitation in general practice - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2018-01-01

    of the visited practices to gain a more detailed understanding of how peer facilitation influenced practices and how they valued the facilitation. METHODS: The facilitation intervention was conducted in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark with the purpose of supporting the implementation of chronic...... visits had increased their knowledge and skills as well as their motivation and confidence to change. These positive influences were ascribed to a) the facilitation approach b) the credibility and know-how associated with the facilitators' being peers c) the recurring visits providing protected time...... and invoking a sense of commitment. Despite these positive influences, both the facilitation and the change process were impeded by several challenges, e.g. competing priorities, heavy workload, problems with information technology and in some cases inadequate facilitation. CONCLUSION: Practice facilitation...

  11. Job satisfaction of practice assistants in general practice in Germany: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goetz, K.; Campbell, S.; Broge, B.; Brodowski, M.; Steinhaeuser, J.; Wensing, M.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Job satisfaction of practice staff is important for optimal health care delivery and for minimizing the turnover of non-medical professions. OBJECTIVE: To document the job satisfaction of practice assistants in German general practice and to explore associations between job satisfaction,

  12. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Methods Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Results and discussion Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance. Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16. After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45. When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care. Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21 and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25. Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35. Conclusion Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using

  13. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hombergh, Pieter; Künzi, Beat; Elwyn, Glyn; van Doremalen, Jan; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel

    2009-07-15

    The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. Secondary analysis of data from 239 general practices, collected in practice visits between 2003 to 2006 in the Netherlands using a comprehensive set of measures of practice management. Data were collected by a practice visitor, a trained non-physician observer using patients questionnaires, doctors and staff. For this study we selected five measures of practice performance as outcomes and six measures of GP workload and job stress as predictors. A total of 79 indicators were used out of the 303 available indicators. Random coefficient regression models were applied to examine associations. Workload and job stress are associated with practice performance.Workload: Working more hours as a GP was associated with more positive patient experiences of accessibility and availability (b = 0.16). After list size adjustment, practices with more GP-time per patient scored higher on GP care (b = 0.45). When GPs provided more than 20 hours per week per 1000 patients, patients scored over 80% on the Europep questionnaire for quality of GP care.Job stress: High GP job stress was associated with lower accessibility and availability (b = 0.21) and insufficient practice management (b = 0.25). Higher GP commitment and more satisfaction with the job was associated with more prevention and disease management (b = 0.35). Providing more time in the practice, and more time per patient and experiencing less job stress are all associated with perceptions by patients of better care and better practice performance. Workload and job stress should be assessed by using list size adjusted data in order to realise better quality of care. Organisational development using this kind of data feedback could benefit both patients and GP.

  14. High workload and job stress are associated with lower practice performance in general practice: an observational study in 239 general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hombergh, P. van den; Kunzi, B.; Elwyn, G.; Doremalen, J.H.M. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of high physician workload and job stress on quality and outcomes of healthcare delivery is not clear. Our study explored whether high workload and job stress were associated with lower performance in general practices in the Netherlands. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data

  15. Provision of medical student teaching in UK general practices: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alex; Rosenthal, Joe; Al-Seaidy, Marwa; Gray, Denis Pereira; McKinley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care is increasingly provided in general practice. To meet this demand, the English Department of Health recommends that 50% of all medical students should train for general practice after qualification. Currently 19% of medical students express general practice as their first career choice. Undergraduate exposure to general practice positively influences future career choice. Appropriate undergraduate exposure to general practice is therefore highly relevant to workforce planning Aim This study seeks to quantify current exposure of medical students to general practice and compare it with past provision and also with postgraduate provision. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire in the UK. Method A questionnaire regarding provision of undergraduate teaching was sent to the general practice teaching leads in all UK medical schools. Information was gathered on the amount of undergraduate teaching, how this was supported financially, and whether there was an integrated department of general practice. The data were then compared with results from previous studies of teaching provision. The provision of postgraduate teaching in general practice was also examined. Results General practice teaching for medical students increased from teaching in 1968 to 13.0% by 2008; since then, the percentage has plateaued. The total amount of general practice teaching per student has fallen by 2 weeks since 2002. Medical schools providing financial data delivered 14.6% of the clinical curriculum and received 7.1% of clinical teaching funding. The number of departments of general practice has halved since 2002. Provision of postgraduate teaching has tripled since 2000. Conclusion Current levels of undergraduate teaching in general practice are too low to fulfil future workforce requirements and may be falling. Financial support for current teaching is disproportionately low and the mechanism counterproductive. Central intervention may be required to solve

  16. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women in general practice: observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Seim, A.; Sivertsen, B.; Eriksen, B. C.; Hunskaar, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine what is attainable when treating urinary incontinence in women in general practice. DESIGN--Observational study with 12 months' follow up. Interview and clinical examination before, during, and after treatment of women seeking help for urinary incontinence in general practice. SETTING--General practice in the rural district of Rissa, Norway. SUBJECTS--105 women aged 20 or more with urinary incontinence. INTERVENTIONS--Treatment with pelvic floor exercises, electrostimula...

  17. Diagnostic approach to urinary tract infections in male general practice patients: a national surveillance study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Dongen, M.C.J.M. van; Donker, G.A.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic urinary tract infection (UTI) studies have primarily been performed among female patients. Aim: To create a diagnostic algorithm for male general practice patients suspected of UTI. Design and setting: Surveillance study in the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network. Method:

  18. Perceptions of the role of general practice and practical support measures for carers of stroke survivors: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal carers frequently suffer adverse consequences from caring. General practice teams are well positioned to support them. However, what carers of stroke survivors want and expect from general practice, and the practical support measures they might like, remain largely unexplored. The aims of this study are twofold. Firstly it explores both the support stroke carers would like from general practice and their reactions to the community based support proposed in the New Deal. Secondly, perceptions of a general practice team are investigated covering similar topics to carer interviews but from their perspective. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 stroke carers and 10 members of a general practice team. Carers' experiences and expectations of general practice and opinions of support measures from recent government policy were explored. General practice professionals were asked about their perceived role and their perceptions of carers' support needs. Interviews were content analysed. Results Carers' expectations of support from general practice were low and they neither received nor expected much support for themselves. General practice was seen as reactive primarily because of time constraints. Some carers would appreciate emotional support but others did not want additional services. Responses to recent policy initiatives were mixed with carers saying these might benefit other carers but not themselves. General practice professionals' opinions were broadly similar. They recognise carers' support needs but see their role as reactive, focussed on stroke survivors, rather than carers. Caring was recognised as challenging. Providing emotional support and referral were seen as important but identification of carers was considered difficult. Time constraints limit their support. Responses to recent policy initiatives were positive. Conclusions Carers' expectations of support from general practice for

  19. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: A descriptive study from Norwegian general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aamland, Aase; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients’ characteristics and...

  20. Recruitment of general practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2016-01-01

    -factors as determinants for successfully recruiting healthcare professionals: relationships, reputation, requirements, rewards, reciprocity, resolution, and respect. Method: This is a process evaluation of the seven R-factors. We applied these factors to guide the design of our recruitment strategy as well as to make......Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R...... adjustments when recruiting general practices in a guideline implementation study. In the guideline implementation study, we studied the effect of outreach visits, quality reports, and new patient stratification tools for low back pain patients. Results: During a period of 15 months, we recruited 60 practices...

  1. Case Studies of Mental Health in General practice(28)---HIV and Mood Disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fiona Judd; Leon Piterman; Grant Blashki; Hui Yang

    2014-01-01

    The Journal presents the Column of Case Studies of Mental Health in General Practice;with aca-demic support from Australian eXperts in general practice,psychology and psychiatry from Monash University and the University of Mel-bourne. The Columnˊs purpose is to respond to the increasing need for the development of mental health services in China. Through study and analysis of mental health cases,we hope to improve understanding of mental illnesses in Chinese primary health settings,and to build capaci-ty amongst community health professionals in managing mental illnesses and psychological problems in general practice. A patient - centred whole - person approach in general practice is the best way to maintain and improve the physical and mental health of residents. Our hope is that these case studies will lead the new wave of general practice and mental health service development both in practice and research. A num-ber of Australian eXperts from the disciplines of general practice,mental health and psychiatry will contribute to the Column. Professor Blash-ki,Professor Judd and Professor Piterman are authors of the teXt General Practice Psychiatry;the Chinese version of the book to be published in 2014. The Journal cases are helping to prepare for the translation and publication of a Chinese version of the book in China. We believe Chi-nese mental health in primary health care will reach new heights under this international cooperation.

  2. Understanding general practice: a conceptual framework developed from case studies in the UK NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath

    2007-01-01

    General practice in the UK is undergoing a period of rapid and profound change. Traditionally, research into the effects of change on general practice has tended to regard GPs as individuals or as members of a professional group. To understand the impact of change, general practices should also be considered as organisations. To use the organisational studies literature to build a conceptual framework of general practice organisations, and to test and develop this empirically using case studies of change in practice. This study used the implementation of National Service Frameworks (NSFs) and the new General Medical Services (GMS) contract as incidents of change. In-depth, qualitative case studies. The design was iterative: each case study was followed by a review of the theoretical ideas. The final conceptual framework was the result of the dynamic interplay between theory and empirical evidence. Five general practices in England, selected using purposeful sampling. Semi-structured interviews with all clinical and managerial personnel in each practice, participant and nonparticipant observation, and examination of documents. A conceptual framework was developed that can be used to understand how and why practices respond to change. This framework enabled understanding of observed reactions to the introduction of NSFs and the new GMS contract. Important factors for generating responses to change included the story that the practice members told about their practice, beliefs about what counted as legitimate work, the role played by the manager, and previous experiences of change. Viewing general practices as small organisations has generated insights into factors that influence responses to change. Change tends to occur from the bottom up and is determined by beliefs about organisational reality. The conceptual framework suggests some questions that can be asked of practices to explain this internal reality.

  3. A qualitative study of the barriers and enablers to fertility-awareness education in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Kerry D; Newton, Jennifer M; Parker, Rhian; Mazza, Danielle

    2016-07-01

    To understand the barriers and enablers to fertility-awareness education in general practice. Most women along with their primary care practitioners - general practitioners and practice nurses - believe that women should be educated about fertility-awareness when first reporting trouble conceiving. To date, no in-depth study has examined the enablers and challenges of this type of education in general practice. A descriptive exploratory qualitative study using deductive content analysis. General practitioners (N = 11) and practice nurses (N = 20) were recruited from general practices in three socioculturally diverse areas in Victoria, Australia. Data were collected through semistructured interviews based on the 12 domains of a theoretical behaviour change framework from April-August 2012. The participants' responses were organized into themes that fall under the framework domains. The biggest barriers to fertility-awareness education in general practice were short consultations and time constraints faced by general practitioners together with a lack of patient educational materials and remuneration to support its delivery. The biggest enablers were a greater use of nurses trained in fertility-awareness in a collaborative team care arrangement with general practitioners. This study has identified several important barriers and enablers to fertility-awareness education in general practice. Translation into practice of our findings is imperative as the first step in establishing a primary care model in fertility-awareness. This would fill an important gap in the primary care of infertile women and build capacity in general practice to reduce infertility through women's enhanced fertility knowledge. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Private or salaried practice: how do young general practitioners make their career choice? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouani, Shérazade; Boukhors, Gary; Luaces, Baptiste; Durieux, William; Cadwallader, Jean-Sébastien; Aubin-Auger, Isabelle; Gay, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Young French postgraduates in general practice increasingly prefer salaried practice to private practice in spite of the financial incentives offered by the French government or local communities to encourage the latter. This study aimed to explore the determinants of choice between private or salaried practice among young general practitioners. A qualitative study was conducted in the South West of France. Semi-structured interviews of young general practitioners were audio-recorded until data saturation. Recordings were transcribed and then analyzed according to Grounded Theory by three researchers working independently. Sixteen general practitioners participated in this study. For salaried and private doctors, the main factors governing their choice were occupational factors: working conditions, need of varied scope of practice, quality of the doctor-patient relationship or career flexibility. Other factors such as postgraduate training, having worked as a locum or self-interest were also determining. Young general practitioners all expected a work-life balance. The fee-for-service scheme or home visits may have discouraged young general practitioners from choosing private practice. National health policies should increase the attractiveness of ambulatory general practice by promoting the diversification of modes of remuneration and encouraging the organization of group exercises in multidisciplinary medical homes and community health centers.

  5. ["General Practice is a great job anyway" - a qualitative study with vocational trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhäuser, Jost; Paulus, Jan; Roos, Marco; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Ledig, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Joos, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing lack of physicians, an ageing and thus multi-morbid society and a misdistribution of physicians in Germany primary care provided by general practitioners is at risk. Therefore, approaches to recruit more physicians for general practice are being sought. The aim of the present study was to explore individual motivations for choosing a career in general practice, vocational trainees' perspectives on the current situation of vocational training and to identify possible approaches to improve the situation with suggestions from vocational trainees in Germany. A qualitative study was conducted by interviewing 13 trainees. The interviews that were based on a predefined interview guideline were recorded and transcribed. The analysis was performed according to Mayring supported by the software Atlas.ti. In general, the reasons given for choosing general practice include the holistic view towards patients, the opportunity to see the direct impact of therapies and self-employment. Furthermore, general practice was perceived as a job with a positive work-life balance. Barriers to vocational training are the lack of structure of individual rotations and the low salaries during the rotation in practice. Furthermore, the basic conditions for working as a self-employed general practitioner in Germany were described as being a disincentive. A general suggestion for improvement was to promote professional recognition of general practice at universities. A qualification of vocational trainers was requested. Specific suggestions were: better payment, better-structured rotations and a specific preparation for the self-employed general practitioner. The results of this study reveal that a single measure is insufficient for recruiting more young doctors for general practice. In fact, a package of measures is necessary to improve aspects of the vocational training but also general conditions for the profession. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Attitudes of newly qualified doctors towards a career in general practice: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Alexandra; Jones, Daniel; Sein, Kim; Green, Trish; Macleod, Una

    2017-04-01

    A key element of the NHS is universal access to a GP. Recently, UK general practice has been described as being in crisis, with training places unfilled and multiple practices reporting vacancies or facing closure. The recruitment of GPs continues to be a key focus for both the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and the government. To understand the attitudes of newly qualified doctors towards a career in general practice, to appreciate potential reasons for the crisis in GP recruitment, and to recommend ways to improve recruitment. A qualitative study comprising five focus groups with 74 Foundation Year 1 (FY1) doctors from one Yorkshire deanery. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis undertaken. Foundation Year 1 doctors' thoughts towards a career in general practice were summarised in four themes: quality of life, job satisfaction, uncertainty surrounding the future of general practice, and the lack of respect for GPs among both doctors and the public. Participants felt that general practice could provide a good work-life balance, fair pay, and job stability. Job satisfaction, with the ability to provide care from the cradle to the grave, and to work within a community, was viewed positively. Uncertainties around future training, skill levels, pay, and workload, together with a perceived stigma experienced in medical schools and hospitals, were viewed as a deterrent to a career in general practice. This study has gathered the opinions of doctors at a critical point in their careers, before they choose a future specialty. Findings highlight areas of concern and potential deterrents to a career in general practice, together with recommendations to address these issues. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  7. The process of patient enablement in general practice nurse consultations: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Jane; Banfield, Michelle; Phillips, Christine; Mills, Jane

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the process of patient enablement in general practice nursing consultations. Enhanced roles for general practice nurses may benefit patients through a range of mechanisms, one of which may be increasing patient enablement. In studies with general practitioners enhanced patient enablement has been associated with increases in self-efficacy and skill development. This study used a constructivist grounded theory design. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 general practice nurses and 23 patients from 21 general practices between September 2013 - March 2014. Data generation and analysis were conducted concurrently using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling focussing on the process and outcomes of patient enablement. Use of the storyline technique supported theoretical coding and integration of the data into a theoretical model. A clearly defined social process that fostered and optimised patient enablement was constructed. The theory of 'developing enabling healthcare partnerships between nurses and patients in general practice' incorporates three stages: triggering enabling healthcare partnerships, tailoring care and the manifestation of patient enablement. Patient enablement was evidenced through: 1. Patients' understanding of their unique healthcare requirements informing their health seeking behaviours and choices; 2. Patients taking an increased lead in their partnership with a nurse and seeking choices in their care and 3. Patients getting health care that reflected their needs, preferences and goals. This theoretical model is in line with a patient-centred model of health care and is particularly suited to patients with chronic disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  9. Managing patient demand: a qualitative study of appointment making in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M; Pearson, P; Drinkwater, C; Guy, J

    2001-04-01

    Managing patients' requests for appointments is an important general practice activity. No previous research has systematically observed how patients and receptionists negotiate appointments. To observe appointment making and investigate patients' and professionals' experiences of appointment negotiations. A qualitative study using participant observation. Three general practices on Tyneside; a single-handed practice, a practice comprising three doctors, and a seven-doctor practice. Participant observation sessions, consisting of 35 activity recordings and 34 periods of observation and 38 patient and 15 professional interviews, were set up. Seven groups of patients were selected for interview. These included patients attending an 'open access' surgery, patients who complained about making an appointment, and patients who complimented the receptionists. Appointment making is a complex social process. Outcomes are dependent on the process of negotiation and factors, such as patients' expectations and appointment availability. Receptionists felt that patients in employment, patients allocated to the practice by the Health Authority, and patients who did not comply with practice appointment rules were most demanding. Appointment requests are legitimised by receptionists enforcing practice rules and requesting clinical information. Patients volunteer information to provide evidence that their complaint is appropriate and employ strategies, such as persistence, assertiveness, and threats, to try and persuade receptionists to grant appointments. Appointment making is a complex social process where outcomes are negotiated. Receptionists have an important role in managing patient demand. Practices should be explicit about how appointments are allocated, including publishing practice criteria.

  10. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elaine; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Oliver, Isabel; Randall, Sarah; Ford-Young, William; Beckwith, Philippa; McNulty, Cliodna

    2009-10-12

    General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP), have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. The NCSP should consider developing a range of more discrete but eye

  11. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice - a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elaine; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Oliver, Isabel; Randall, Sarah; Ford-Young, William; Beckwith, Philippa; McNulty, Cliodna

    2009-01-01

    Background General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP), have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Methods Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Results Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. Conclusion The NCSP should consider developing

  12. Promoting chlamydia screening with posters and leaflets in general practice - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford-Young William

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practice staff are reluctant to discuss sexual health opportunistically in all consultations. Health promotion materials may help alleviate this barrier. Chlamydia screening promotion posters and leaflets, produced by the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP, have been available to general practices, through local chlamydia screening offices, since its launch. In this study we explored the attitudes of general practice staff to these screening promotional materials, how they used them, and explored other promotional strategies to encourage chlamydia screening. Methods Twenty-five general practices with a range of screening rates, were purposively selected from six NCSP areas in England. In focus groups doctors, nurses, administrative staff and receptionists were encouraged to discuss candidly their experiences about their use and opinions of posters, leaflets and advertising to promote chlamydia screening. Researchers observed whether posters and leaflets were on display in reception and/or waiting areas. Data were collected and analysed concurrently using a stepwise framework analytical approach. Results Although two-thirds of screening practices reported that they displayed posters and leaflets, they were not prominently displayed in most practices. Only a minority of practices reported actively using screening promotional materials on an ongoing basis. Most staff in all practices were not following up the advertising in posters and leaflets by routinely offering opportunistic screening to their target population. Some staff in many practices thought posters and leaflets would cause offence or embarrassment to their patients. Distribution of chlamydia leaflets by receptionists was thought to be inappropriate by some practices, as they thought patients would be offended when being offered a leaflet in a public area. Practice staff suggested the development of pocket-sized leaflets. Conclusion The NCSP

  13. Alternatives to the face-to-face consultation in general practice: focused ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Brant, Heather; Ziebland, Sue; Bikker, Annemieke; Campbell, John; Gibson, Andy; McKinstry, Brian; Porqueddu, Tania; Salisbury, Chris

    2018-04-01

    NHS policy encourages general practices to introduce alternatives to the face-to-face consultation, such as telephone, email, e-consultation systems, or internet video. Most have been slow to adopt these, citing concerns about workload. This project builds on previous research by focusing on the experiences of patients and practitioners who have used one or more of these alternatives. To understand how, under what conditions, for which patients, and in what ways, alternatives to face-to-face consultations present benefits and challenges to patients and practitioners in general practice. Focused ethnographic case studies took place in eight UK general practices between June 2015 and March 2016. Non-participant observation, informal conversations with staff, and semi-structured interviews with staff and patients were conducted. Practice documents and protocols were reviewed. Data were analysed through charting and the 'one sheet of paper' mind-map method to identify the line of argument in each thematic report. Case study practices had different rationales for offering alternatives to the face-to-face consultation. Beliefs varied about which patients and health issues were suitable. Co-workers were often unaware of each other's practice; for example, practice policies for use of e-consultations systems with patients were not known about or followed. Patients reported benefits including convenience and access. Staff and some patients regarded the face-to-face consultation as the ideal. Experience of implementing alternatives to the face-to-face consultation suggests that changes in patient access and staff workload may be both modest and gradual. Practices planning to implement them should consider carefully their reasons for doing so and involve the whole practice team. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  14. Patient and professional attitudes towards research in general practice: the RepR qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwallader, Jean-Sébastien; Lebeau, Jean-Pierre; Lasserre, Evelyne; Letrilliart, Laurent

    2014-07-21

    Since the 1990s, professional institutions worldwide have emphasised the need to develop research in general practice to improve the health of the population. The recent creation of professorships in general practice in French Universities should foster research in this field. Our aim was to explore the views of patients and relevant professionals on research in general practice. Qualitative study, using the grounded theory approach according to Strauss and Corbin, conducted in 2010 in three French regions. Nine focus groups were run to data saturation, and included 57 participants in four different categories: patients, non-academic GPs, academic GPs, academics in other disciplines. Most of the participants in the four categories described research in general practice as specific to the population managed and relevant for health care. They considered that its grounding in day-to-day practice enabled pragmatic approaches. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry, rivalries between university disciplines and a possible gap between research and practice were considered as pitfalls. The barriers identified were representations of the medical researcher as a "laboratory worker", the lack of awareness of any research in the discipline, and lack of time and training. While the views of patients and non-academic GPs are mostly focused on professional issues and the views of academics other than GPs on technical issues, academic GPs are in a position to play a role of interface between the universities and general practices. Although the role of GPs in research is perceived differently by the various protagonists, research in general practice has an undisputed legitimacy in France. Solutions for overcoming the identified barriers include research networks with appropriate resources and training and scientifically sound collaborative research projects, as already implemented in leading countries.

  15. Patients' evaluations of patient safety in English general practices: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Marsden, Kate S; Avery, Anthony J; Bell, Brian G; Kadam, Umesh T; Reeves, David; Slight, Sarah P; Perryman, Katherine; Barnett, Jane; Litchfield, Ian; Thomas, Sally; Campbell, Stephen M; Doos, Lucy; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2017-07-01

    Description of safety problems and harm in general practices has previously relied on information from health professionals, with scarce attention paid to experiences of patients. To examine patient-reported experiences and outcomes of patient safety in primary care. Cross-sectional study in 45 general practices across five regions in the north, centre, and south of England. A version of the Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care (PREOS-PC) questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 6736 patients. Main outcome measures included 'practice activation' (what a practice does to create a safe environment); 'patient activation' (how proactive are patients in ensuring safe healthcare delivery); 'experiences of safety events' (safety errors); 'outcomes of safety' (harm); and 'overall perception of safety' (how safe patients rate their practice). Questionnaires were returned by 1244 patients (18.4%). Scores were high for 'practice activation' (mean [standard error] = 80.4 out of 100 [2.0]) and low for 'patient activation' (26.3 out of 100 [2.6]). Of the patients, 45% reported experiencing at least one safety problem in the previous 12 months, mostly related to appointments (33%), diagnosis (17%), patient provider communication (15%), and coordination between providers (14%). Twenty-three per cent of the responders reported some degree of harm in the previous 12 months. The overall assessment of level of safety of practices was generally high (86.0 out of 100 [16.8]). Priority areas for patient safety improvement in general practices in England include appointments, diagnosis, communication, coordination, and patient activation. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  16. Theory and interpretation in qualitative studies from general practice: Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches. I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations of the interpretative paradigm. Associations between paradigms, philosophies, methodologies and methods are examined and different strategies for theoretical commitment presented. Finally, I discuss the impact of theory for interpretation and the development of general practice knowledge. A scientific theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject positions. Basic theoretical features from the philosophy of science explain why and how this is different from positivism. Reflexivity, including theoretical awareness and consistency, demonstrates interpretative assumptions, accounting for situated knowledge. Different types of theoretical commitment in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become a philosopher. Qualitative studies from general practice deserve stronger theoretical awareness and commitment than what is currently established. Persistent attention to and respect for the distinctive domain of knowledge and practice where the research deliveries are targeted is necessary to choose adequate theoretical endeavours. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  17. Can we import quality tools? a feasibility study of European practice assessment in a country with less organised general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pestiaux Dominique

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality is on the agenda of European general practice (GP. European researchers have, in collaboration, developed tools to assess quality of GPs. In this feasibility study, we tested the European Practice Assessment (EPA in a one-off project in Belgium, where general practice has a low level of GP organisation. Methods A framework for feasibility analysis included describing the recruiting of participants, a brief telephone study survey among non-responders, organisational and logistic problems. Using field notes and focus groups, we studied the participants' opinions. Results In this study, only 36 of 1000 invited practices agreed to participate. Co-ordination, administrative work, practice visits and organisational problems required several days per practice. The researchers further encountered technical problems, for instance when entering the data and uploading to the web-based server. In subsequent qualitative analysis using two focus groups, most participant GPs expressed a positive feeling after the EPA procedure. In the short period of follow-up, only a few GPs reported improvements after the visit. The participant GPs suggested that follow-up and coaching would probably facilitate the implementation of changes. Conclusion This feasibility study shows that prior interest in EPA is low in the GP community. We encountered a number of logistic and organisational problems. It proved attractive to participants, but it can be augmented by coaching of participants in more than a one-off project to identify and achieve targets for quality improvement. In the absence of commitment of the government, a network of universities and one scientific organisation will offer EPA as a service to training practices.

  18. Early detection of COPD: a case finding study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevoorde, Jan; Verbanck, Sylvia; Gijssels, Lieve; Schuermans, Daniel; Devroey, Dirk; De Backer, Joan; Kartounian, Jan; Vincken, Walter

    2007-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a population of general practice patients at risk for developing COPD. A further aim was to evaluate the presence of respiratory symptoms as a predictor for the diagnosis of COPD. This study was conducted by eight general practitioners (GP) in six semi-rural general practices. During two consecutive months all patients attending their GP were included if they met the following criteria: current smokers between 40 and 70 yr of age, and a smoking history of at least 15 pack-years. A questionnaire regarding smoking history, respiratory symptoms, exposure to dust or chemical fumes, and history of respiratory diseases was completed for all patients. Subjects without known COPD were invited for spirometric testing. Off the 146 general practice patients included, 17.1% already had an established COPD diagnosis. Screening by spirometry revealed a 46.6% prevalence of COPD. Underdiagnosis of COPD was more frequent in the younger age categories (40-49 Yr; 50-59 Yr). Objective wheezing was the only sign that was significantly more frequent in COPD patients than in non-COPD patients (Pfatigue than newly detected patients. Almost half of a general practice population of current smokers between 40 and 70 years of age, with a smoking history of at least 15 pack-years, was diagnosed with COPD, and roughly two thirds of these were newly detected as a result of the case finding programme.

  19. The causes of prescribing errors in English general practices: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slight, Sarah P; Howard, Rachel; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Barber, Nick; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Avery, Anthony J

    2013-10-01

    Few detailed studies exist of the underlying causes of prescribing errors in the UK. To examine the causes of prescribing and monitoring errors in general practice and provide recommendations for how they may be overcome. Qualitative interview and focus group study with purposive sampling of English general practices. General practice staff from 15 general practices across three PCTs in England participated in a combination of semi-structured interviews (n = 34) and six focus groups (n = 46). Thematic analysis informed by Reason's Accident Causation Model was used. Seven categories of high-level error-producing conditions were identified: the prescriber, the patient, the team, the working environment, the task, the computer system, and the primary-secondary care interface. These were broken down to reveal various error-producing conditions: the prescriber's therapeutic training, drug knowledge and experience, knowledge of the patient, perception of risk, and their physical and emotional health; the patient's characteristics and the complexity of the individual clinical case; the importance of feeling comfortable within the practice team was highlighted, as well as the safety implications of GPs signing prescriptions generated by nurses when they had not seen the patient for themselves; the working environment with its extensive workload, time pressures, and interruptions; and computer-related issues associated with mis-selecting drugs from electronic pick-lists and overriding alerts were all highlighted as possible causes of prescribing errors and were often interconnected. Complex underlying causes of prescribing and monitoring errors in general practices were highlighted, several of which are amenable to intervention.

  20. Feasibility and acceptance of electronic quality of life assessment in general practice: an implementation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochen Michael M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' health related quality of life (HRQoL has rarely been systematically monitored in general practice. Electronic tools and practice training might facilitate the routine application of HRQoL questionnaires. Thorough piloting of innovative procedures is strongly recommended before the conduction of large-scale studies. Therefore, we aimed to assess i the feasibility and acceptance of HRQoL assessment using tablet computers in general practice, ii the perceived practical utility of HRQoL results and iii to identify possible barriers hindering wider application of this approach. Methods Two HRQoL questionnaires (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire SGRQ and EORTC QLQ-C30 were electronically presented on portable tablet computers. Wireless network (WLAN integration into practice computer systems of 14 German general practices with varying infrastructure allowed automatic data exchange and the generation of a printout or a PDF file. General practitioners (GPs and practice assistants were trained in a 1-hour course, after which they could invite patients with chronic diseases to fill in the electronic questionnaire during their waiting time. We surveyed patients, practice assistants and GPs regarding their acceptance of this tool in semi-structured telephone interviews. The number of assessments, HRQoL results and interview responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Over the course of 1 year, 523 patients filled in the electronic questionnaires (1–5 times; 664 total assessments. On average, results showed specific HRQoL impairments, e.g. with respect to fatigue, pain and sleep disturbances. The number of electronic assessments varied substantially between practices. A total of 280 patients, 27 practice assistants and 17 GPs participated in the telephone interviews. Almost all GPs (16/17 = 94%; 95% CI = 73–99%, most practice assistants (19/27 = 70%; 95% CI = 50–86% and the majority of

  1. Experiences of using email for general practice consultations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Pappas, Yannis; Heneghan, Carl; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    Reports suggest approximately 21-23% of GPs in the UK have consulted with patients using email, but little is known about the nature of this use and what it means for clinicians and patients in general practice. To understand the use of email consultation in general practice by investigating the experiences of existing users and views of experts. A qualitative study conducted in 2010 using purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews in general practice and community settings in some London boroughs. A maximum variation sample of GPs and patients who had used email for consultation in general practice were recruited, as were policy and/or implementation experts. Interviews continued until saturation was achieved. In total 10 GPs, 14 patients, and six experts were interviewed. Consultation by email was often triggered by logistic or practical issues; motivators for ongoing use were the benefits, such as convenience, for GPs and patients. Both GPs and patients reported concerns about safety and lack of guidance about the 'rules of engagement' in email consultations, with GPs also concerned about workload. In response, both groups attempted to introduce their own rules, although this only went some way to addressing uncertainty. Long term, participants felt there was a need for regulation and guidance. Consultations by email in general practice occur in an unregulated and unstructured way. Current UK policy is to promote consultations by email, making it crucial to consider the responsibility and workload faced by clinicians, and the changes required to ensure safe use; not doing so may risk safety breaches and result in suboptimal care for patients.

  2. [Changing to a career in general practice - a qualitative study reveals motives of specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwill, Simon; Magez, Julia; Jäger, Cornelia; von Meißner, Wolfgang Cg; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Flum, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    In 2011, the national German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published guidelines for a slim-lined training program in general practice (Quereinstieg) for qualified medical specialists in other fields (e. g., surgeons, internists or anesthesiologists). This step is part of a strategy to prevent further shortages of general practitioners in Germany. In the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg, qualified medical specialists are allowed to complete their general practice training in approximately two years instead of five. The aim of this study was to understand the reasons of specialists for changing to a career in general practice. The postgraduate training program Verbundweiterbildung plus Baden-Württemberg had 597 trainees at the time of the study in December 2015. Previously qualified specialists in another medical discipline were identified and invited to participate in this study. Qualitative data was gathered using semi-structured interviews with content analysis of the interviews performed by three independent members of the research team. In total, 36 out of 597 trainees were identified as previously qualified specialists in another medical discipline. All 36 were invited to take part and 15 agreed to participate in this study. Overall, 15 interviews were performed, with a mean time of 24.19minutes. Participants with a median age of 40 years (33-59 years) - mainly anesthesiologists (n=7), surgeons (n=3) and internists (n=3) - presented with an average of 6.5 years of professional experience in their specialty. First, the participants' motivation to switch career arose from the wish to intensify the quality of patient contacts with a holistic approach including family and social background and from the infinite variety of general practice. Another reason given for a career change was self-employment opportunities. Finally, feelings of frustration over poor working conditions in hospitals resulted in a job search elsewhere in medicine, taking account of

  3. Nurse prescribing in general practice: a qualitative study of job satisfaction and work-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Rosanna; Donnell, Christine

    2012-04-01

    Studies examining the impact nurse prescribing have largely focused on the efficacy of the service. It was suggested in pro-prescribing policy arguments that extending the nursing role to include prescribing would increase job satisfaction. This assertion has not been fully explored. To investigate the impact of independent prescribing for experienced nurse practitioners (NPs) working in general practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with six NPs who each had at least 3 years experience of independent prescribing in a busy inner city general practice. Analysis of interview data yielded two main themes: as independent prescribers NPs experienced increased levels of both job satisfaction and work-related stress. Increased satisfaction was associated with having greater autonomy and being able to provide more holistic care. Increased work-related stress emerged from greater job demands, perceived insufficient support and perceived effort-reward imbalance that centred upon the enhanced role not being recognized in terms of an increase in grade and pay. Independent prescribing increases job satisfaction for NPs in general practice, but there is also evidence of stressors associated with the role. It is important that NPs in general practice are encouraged and supported towards providing the effective patient-centred care in the community envisaged by current UK government. We acknowledge that the results presented in this paper are based on a sample limited to one city; however, it provides information that has important implications for the well being of NPs and ultimately patient care.

  4. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aertgeerts Bert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. Methods We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. Results A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice, commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community. Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. Conclusion In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  5. Subjective memory complaints in general practice predicts future dementia: a 4-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Vogel, Asmus Mejling; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Many older patients in general practice have subjective memory complaints (SMC); however, not all share this information with their general practitioner (GP). The association between SMC and future cognitive decline or dementia is not clear, especially in a general practice population. The aim...

  6. Maintaining capacity for in-practice teaching and supervision of students and general practice trainees: a cross-sectional study of early career general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catzikiris, Nigel; Tapley, Amanda; Morgan, Simon; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Ball, Jean; Henderson, Kim; Elliott, Taryn; Spike, Neil; Regan, Cathy; Magin, Parker

    2017-08-10

    Objectives Expanding learner cohorts of medical students and general practitioner (GP) vocational trainees and the impending retirement of the 'baby boomer' GP cohort threaten the teaching and supervisory capacity of the Australian GP workforce. Engaging newly qualified GPs is essential to sustaining this workforce training capacity. The aim of the present study was to establish the prevalence and associations of in-practice clinical teaching and supervision in early career GPs. Methods The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of recent (within 5 years) alumni of three of Australia's 17 regional general practice training programs. The outcome factor was whether the alumnus taught or supervised medical students, GP registrars or other learners in their current practice. Logistic regression analysis was used to establish associations of teaching and supervision with independent variables comprising alumnus demographics, current practice characteristics and vocational training experiences. Results In all, 230 alumni returned questionnaires (response rate 37.4%). Of currently practising alumni, 52.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 45.6-59.0%) reported current teaching or supervisory activities. Factors significantly (Pinterest in and undertaking of teaching roles have been documented for GP or family medicine trainees, studies investigating the engagement in these clinical roles by GPs during their early post-training period are lacking. What does this paper add? This paper is the first to document the prevalence of teaching and supervision undertaken by early career GPs as part of their regular clinical practice. We also demonstrate associations of practice rurality, country of medical graduation and undertaking non-practice-based clinical roles with GPs' engagement in teaching and supervisory roles. What are the implications for practitioners? Establishing current teaching patterns of GPs enables appropriate targeting of new strategies to

  7. Prospective, observational study comparing automated and visual point-of-care urinalysis in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, Sanne; Goedhart, Annelijn; Spigt, Mark; van Pinxteren, Bart; de Wit, Niek; Hopstaken, Rogier

    2016-08-08

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) urinalysis might reduce errors in (subjective) reading, registration and communication of test results, and might also improve diagnostic outcome and optimise patient management. Evidence is lacking. In the present study, we have studied the analytical performance of automated urinalysis and visual urinalysis compared with a reference standard in routine general practice. The study was performed in six general practitioner (GP) group practices in the Netherlands. Automated urinalysis was compared with visual urinalysis in these practices. Reference testing was performed in a primary care laboratory (Saltro, Utrecht, The Netherlands). Analytical performance of automated and visual urinalysis compared with the reference laboratory method was the primary outcome measure, analysed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and Cohen's κ coefficient for agreement. Secondary outcome measure was the user-friendliness of the POCT analyser. Automated urinalysis by experienced and routinely trained practice assistants in general practice performs as good as visual urinalysis for nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes. Agreement for nitrite is high for automated and visual urinalysis. κ's are 0.824 and 0.803 (ranked as very good and good, respectively). Agreement with the central laboratory reference standard for automated and visual urinalysis for leucocytes is rather poor (0.256 for POCT and 0.197 for visual, respectively, ranked as fair and poor). κ's for erythrocytes are higher: 0.517 (automated) and 0.416 (visual), both ranked as moderate. The Urisys 1100 analyser was easy to use and considered to be not prone to flaws. Automated urinalysis performed as good as traditional visual urinalysis on reading of nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes in routine general practice. Implementation of automated urinalysis in general practice is justified as automation is expected to reduce

  8. Compatibility of scientific research and specialty training in general practice. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötter, Thomas; Carmienke, Solveig; Herrmann, Wolfram J

    2014-01-01

    In many departments of General Practice (GP) in Germany, young doctors who are trainees also work as researchers. Often these trainees work part time at the university and part time as a trainee in clinical practice. However, little is known about the situation of the actors involved. The aim of the study was to investigate the perspectives of GP trainees, heads of departments and GP trainers regarding the combination of research and GP training. We conducted a web-based survey with the heads of all German departments of General Practice, GP trainees who also conduct research and their GP trainers. The questionnaires consisted of open and closed questions. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative methods. 28 heads of GP departments and 20 GP trainees responded. The trainees were mostly very satisfied with their situation as a trainee. However, the trainees considered the combination of research and GP training as difficult. The respondents name as problems the coordination of multiple jobs and the lack of credibility given to research in General Practice. They name as solutions research-enabling training programs and uniform requirements in training regarding research. The combination of GP training and scientific research activity is perceived as difficult. However, well-organized and designed programs can improve the quality of the combination.

  9. Medical students' perceptions of general practice as a career; a phenomenological study using socialisation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Katherine; Alberti, Hugh

    2018-04-23

    The ageing population and push to community care has significantly increased the workload of General Practitioners (GPs) in the UK and internationally. In an attempt to tackle this, NHS England has promised 5000 more GPs by 2020/21; however, recruitment is in crisis with GP training posts remaining unfilled. Little research has been carried out to assess the fundamental questions of what medical students' perceptions of General Practice are and what shapes their perceptions at medical school. We aimed to explore medical students' conceptualisations of being a GP and specifically the role of the medical school in shaping their perceptions. Two focus groups of year one and year four medical students were undertaken using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Our study has revealed that medical students perceive General Practice to lack prestige and challenge. These perceptions come, at least in part, from a process of socialisation within medical school, whereby medical students internalise and adopt their role models' perceptions and values, and the values portrayed by the hidden curriculum in their medical school culture. Perceived external pressures to pursue a career in General Practice can have a negative influence and medical schools should be made aware of this.

  10. Travel Medicine Encounters of Australian General Practice Trainees-A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim M; Tapley, Amanda; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L; Spike, Neil A; McArthur, Lawrie A; Davey, Andrew R; Catzikiris, Nigel F; Magin, Parker J

    2015-01-01

    Travel medicine is a common and challenging area of clinical practice and practitioners need up-to-date knowledge and experience in a range of areas. Australian general practitioners (GPs) play a significant role in the delivery of travel medicine advice. We aimed to describe the rate and nature of travel medicine consultations, including both the clinical and educational aspects of the consultations. A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of GP trainees' clinical consultations was performed. Trainees contemporaneously recorded demographic, clinical, and educational details of consecutive patient consultations. Proportions of all problems/diagnoses managed in these consultations that were coded "travel-related" and "travel advice" were both calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Associations of a problem/diagnosis being "travel-related" or "travel advice" were tested using simple logistic regression within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. A total of 856 trainees contributed data on 169,307 problems from 108,759 consultations (2010-2014). Travel-related and travel advice problems were managed at a rate of 1.1 and 0.5 problems per 100 encounters, respectively. Significant positive associations of travel-related problems were younger trainee and patient age; new patient to the trainee and practice; privately billing, larger, urban, and higher socioeconomic status practices; and involvement of the practice nurse. Trainees sought in-consultation information and generated learning goals in 34.7 and 20.8% of travel advice problems, respectively, significantly more than in non-travel advice problems. Significant positive associations of travel advice problems were seeking in-consultation information, generation of learning goals, longer consultation duration, and more problems managed. Our findings reinforce the importance of focused training in travel medicine for GP trainees and adequate exposure to patients in the practice

  11. Sickness certification in the general practice consultation: the patients' perspective, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kathryn; Cadbury, Naomi; Rollnick, Stephen; Wood, Fiona

    2008-02-01

    Up to a third of general practice consultations involve issuing sickness certificates. Recent research has looked at the GPs' perspective of sickness certification but there has been no in-depth research exploring patients' views of these consultations. To explore patients' views of sickness certification within general practice consultations, and how these could be improved. A qualitative study was carried out with 12 general practices in South Wales; interview study of 19 patients who had recently received a sick note from a GP. Patients rarely attended just for a sick note, more often wanting advice or an opportunity to ask questions. Patients valued continuity of care, a good doctor-patient relationship, adequate consultation time and discussion about their illness, social situation and work-related issues when consulting with their GP for a sick note. Many patients felt doctors did not have enough time or knowledge of the patient to the able to address this issue adequately and this increased feelings of anxiety. Patients did not feel that being questioned by their GP or discussing return to work threatened the doctor-patient relationship. GPs who simply give out sick notes without question or discussion are not necessarily giving the patient what they want. More time should be spent discussing work and illness-related issues. Policy makers should recognize that continuity of care a good doctor-patient relationship and adequate consultation time are important to patients and any initiatives aimed at GPs to improve return to work rates should take these into consideration.

  12. Adoption of telemedicine in Scottish remote and rural general practices: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gerry; Richards, Helen; Godden, David

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative interview study to explore the factors that have facilitated and prevented the adoption of telemedicine in general practice in remote and rural Scotland. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses in 26 of Scotland's most remote practices and five of the seven most rural health boards. The interview study found that GPs were more positive about the use of computers and telemedicine than nurses. Although electronic access to simple data, such as laboratory results, had become widely accepted, most respondents had very little experience of more sophisticated telemedicine applications, such as videoconferencing. There was widespread scepticism about the potential usefulness of clinical applications of telemedicine, although it was perceived to have potential benefit in facilitating access to educational resources. A number of barriers to the adoption of telemedicine were reported, including concerns that videoconferencing could diminish the quality of communication in educational and clinical settings, and that telemedicine would not fit easily with the organizational routines of the practices. Policy-makers should prioritize strategies to develop educational programmes, as these are more likely to succeed than clinical initiatives. It may then follow that clinicians will see opportunities for use in their clinical work.

  13. MR imaging in patients with knee injury: an observational study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Boks (Simone)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractKnee trauma is often seen in general practice. The availability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has improved the diagnostic possibilities after knee trauma. Nevertheless, little is known about the findings on MR imaging after knee trauma in general practice. Especially, there is

  14. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.M.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without

  15. Inter-practice variation in diagnosing hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.M.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of inter-practice variation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed wide variations between practices. However, in these studies inter-practice variation was calculated without controlling for clustering of patients within practices and without

  16. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  17. Receptionist input to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in UK general practice: ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Myall, Michelle

    2011-11-03

    To describe, explore, and compare organisational routines for repeat prescribing in general practice to identify contributors and barriers to safety and quality. Ethnographic case study. Four urban UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics using electronic patient records that supported semi-automation of repeat prescribing. 395 hours of ethnographic observation of staff (25 doctors, 16 nurses, 4 healthcare assistants, 6 managers, and 56 reception or administrative staff), and 28 documents and other artefacts relating to repeat prescribing locally and nationally. Potential threats to patient safety and characteristics of good practice. Observation of how doctors, receptionists, and other administrative staff contributed to, and collaborated on, the repeat prescribing routine. Analysis included mapping prescribing routines, building a rich description of organisational practices, and drawing these together through narrative synthesis. This was informed by a sociological model of how organisational routines shape and are shaped by information and communications technologies. Results Repeat prescribing was a complex, technology-supported social practice requiring collaboration between clinical and administrative staff, with important implications for patient safety. More than half of requests for repeat prescriptions were classed as "exceptions" by receptionists (most commonly because the drug, dose, or timing differed from what was on the electronic repeat list). They managed these exceptions by making situated judgments that enabled them (sometimes but not always) to bridge the gap between the idealised assumptions about tasks, roles, and interactions that were built into the electronic patient record and formal protocols, and the actual repeat prescribing routine as it played out in practice. This work was creative and demanded both explicit and tacit knowledge. Clinicians were often unaware of this input and it did not feature in policy

  18. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in general practice: Current practice and drivers for change in a French study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gignon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The fight against Healthcare-associated infections is a public health priority and a major challenge for the safety and quality of care. The objective was to assess hygiene in general practitioners′ (GPs′ office and identify barriers to and drivers for better practice. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected, representative sample of 800 GPs. We used a self-administered questionnaire. The first part assessed current practice and the second part focused on barriers and motivating factors for better practice. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis of the responses to closed questions and a qualitative analysis of the responses to open-ended questions. Results: Only a third of the GPs were aware of the current guidelines. Disposable equipment was used by 31% of the GPs. For the remainder, only 38% complied with the recommended procedures for sterilisation or disinfection. Seventy-two percent of the GPs washed their hands between consultations in the office. A significant minority of physicians disregarded the guidelines by never wearing gloves to perform sutures (11%, treat wounds (10%, fit intrauterine devices (18% or perform injections (18%. The main barriers to good practice were the high cost of modifications and lack of time/space. Two third of the GPs did not intend to change their practices. The drivers for change were pressure from patients (4.8 on a scale of 1 to 7, inspection by the health authorities (4.8 and the fear of legal action (4.4. Conclusions: Our results show that there are significant differences between current practice and laid-down professional guidelines. Policies for improvement of hygiene must take into account barriers and motivating factors.

  19. Investigation of fatigue by Australian general practice registrars: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim M; Tapley, Amanda; Thomson, Allison; Wilson, Jessica; Scott, John; Spike, Neil A; McArthur, Lawrie; van Driel, Mieke L; Magin, Parker J

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue is the most common undifferentiated problem presenting in general practice. Previous studies have shown that this presentation leads to multiple investigations. There is no published literature describing the management of patients with fatigue by general practice (GP) registrars. To document the investigation-ordering behaviour of GP registrars in managing patients with a new diagnosis of unexplained fatigue. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT), an ongoing cohort study of GP registrars' consultations. We established the prevalence of new diagnoses of unexplained fatigue and associations with that diagnosis, the rate of test ordering and the number and types of investigations ordered. 644 registrars contributed data from 68 986 encounters. In 0.78% of patient encounters, a new diagnosis of unexplained fatigue was made. Pathology was ordered in 78.4% of these problems (versus 18.1% in non-fatigue problems), at a rate of 488 tests per 100 new fatigue problems. Our study suggests that unexplained fatigue elicits a non-rational approach to test ordering by registrars. These findings contribute to the understanding of GP registrar management of fatigue, and undifferentiated presentations more broadly, and suggest educational approaches to improve practice, including dealing with uncertainty.

  20. The role of the General Practitioner in weight management in primary care – a cross sectional study in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Doris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has become a global pandemic, considered the sixth leading cause of mortality by the WHO. As gatekeepers to the health system, General Practitioners are placed in an ideal position to manage obesity. Yet, very few consultations address weight management. This study aims to explore reasons why patients attending General Practice appointments are not engaging with their General Practitioner (GP for weight management and their perception of the role of the GP in managing their weight. Methods In February 2006, 367 participants aged between 17 and 64 were recruited from three General Practices in Melbourne to complete a waiting room self – administered questionnaire. Questions included basic demographics, the role of the GP in weight management, the likelihood of bringing up weight management with their GP and reasons why they would not, and their nominated ideal person to consult for weight management. Physical measurements to determine weight status were then completed. The statistical methods included means and standard deviations to summarise continuous variables such as weight and height. Sub groups of weight and questionnaire answers were analysed using the χ2 test of significant differences taking p as Results The population sample had similar obesity co-morbidity rates to the National Heart Foundation data. 74% of patients were not likely to bring up weight management when they visit their GP. Negative reasons were time limitation on both the patient's and doctor's part and the doctor lacking experience. The GP was the least likely person to tell a patient to lose weight after partner, family and friends. Of the 14% that had been told by their GP to lose weight, 90% had cardiovascular obesity related co-morbidities. GPs (15% were 4th in the list of ideal persons to manage weight after personal trainer Conclusion Patients do not have confidence in their GPs for weight management, preferring other health

  1. Patients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: a descriptive study from Norwegian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamland, Aase; Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L

    2014-05-29

    Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients' characteristics and symptom pattern, employment status and use of social benefits, and the general practitioners' (GPs) management strategy. During a four-week period the participating Norwegian GPs (n=84) registered all consultations with patients who met a strict definition of MUPS (>3 months duration and function loss), using a questionnaire with simple tick-off questions. Analyses were performed with descriptive statistics for all variables and split analysis on gender and age. The GPs registered 526 patients among their total of 17 688 consultations, giving a consultation prevalence of persistent MUPS of 3%. The mean age of patients was 46 years, and 399 (76%) were women. The most frequent group of symptoms was musculoskeletal problems, followed by asthenia/fatigue. There was no significant gender difference in symptom pattern. Almost half of the patients were currently working (45%), significantly more men. The major GP management strategy was supportive counseling. A consultation prevalence rate of 3% implies that patients with persistent MUPS are common in general practice. Our study disclosed heterogeneity among the patients such as differences in employment status, which emphasizes the importance of personalized focus rather than unsubstantiated stereotyping of "MUPS patients" as a group.

  2. Do patient and practice characteristics confound age-group differences in preferences for general practice care? A quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research showed inconsistent results regarding the relationship between the age of patients and preference statements regarding GP care. This study investigates whether elderly patients have different preference scores and ranking orders concerning 58 preference statements for GP care than younger patients. Moreover, this study examines whether patient characteristics and practice location may confound the relationship between age and the categorisation of a preference score as very important. Methods Data of the Consumer Quality Index GP Care were used, which were collected in 32 general practices in the Netherlands. The rank order and preference score were calculated for 58 preference statements for four age groups (0–30, 31–50, 51–74, 75 years and older). Using chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses, it was investigated whether a significant relationship between age and preference score was confounded by patient characteristics and practice location. Results Elderly patients did not have a significant different ranking order for the preference statements than the other three age groups (r = 0.0193; p = 0.41). However, in 53% of the statements significant differences were found in preference score between the four age groups. Elderly patients categorized significantly less preference statements as ‘very important’. In most cases, the significant relationships were not confounded by gender, education, perceived health, the number of GP contacts and location of the GP practice. Conclusion The preferences of elderly patients for GP care concern the same items as younger patients. However, their preferences are less strong, which cannot be ascribed to gender, education, perceived health, the number of GP contacts and practice location. PMID:23800156

  3. Ethnographic study of ICT-supported collaborative work routines in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Health informatics research has traditionally been dominated by experimental and quasi-experimental designs. An emerging area of study in organisational sociology is routinisation (how collaborative work practices become business-as-usual). There is growing interest in the use of ethnography and other in-depth qualitative approaches to explore how collaborative work routines are enacted and develop over time, and how electronic patient records (EPRs) are used to support collaborative work practices within organisations. Methods/design Following Feldman and Pentland, we will use 'the organisational routine' as our unit of analysis. In a sample of four UK general practices, we will collect narratives, ethnographic observations, multi-modal (video and screen capture) data, documents and other artefacts, and analyse these to map and compare the different understandings and enactments of three common routines (repeat prescribing, coding and summarising, and chronic disease surveillance) which span clinical and administrative spaces and which, though 'mundane', have an important bearing on quality and safety of care. In a detailed qualitative analysis informed by sociological theory, we aim to generate insights about how complex collaborative work is achieved through the process of routinisation in healthcare organisations. Discussion Our study offers the potential not only to identify potential quality failures (poor performance, errors, failures of coordination) in collaborative work routines but also to reveal the hidden work and workarounds by front-line staff which bridge the model-reality gap in EPR technologies and via which "automated" safety features have an impact in practice. PMID:21190583

  4. Ethnographic study of ICT-supported collaborative work routines in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Myall, Michelle; Russell, Jill

    2010-12-29

    Health informatics research has traditionally been dominated by experimental and quasi-experimental designs. An emerging area of study in organisational sociology is routinisation (how collaborative work practices become business-as-usual). There is growing interest in the use of ethnography and other in-depth qualitative approaches to explore how collaborative work routines are enacted and develop over time, and how electronic patient records (EPRs) are used to support collaborative work practices within organisations. Following Feldman and Pentland, we will use 'the organisational routine' as our unit of analysis. In a sample of four UK general practices, we will collect narratives, ethnographic observations, multi-modal (video and screen capture) data, documents and other artefacts, and analyse these to map and compare the different understandings and enactments of three common routines (repeat prescribing, coding and summarising, and chronic disease surveillance) which span clinical and administrative spaces and which, though 'mundane', have an important bearing on quality and safety of care. In a detailed qualitative analysis informed by sociological theory, we aim to generate insights about how complex collaborative work is achieved through the process of routinisation in healthcare organisations. Our study offers the potential not only to identify potential quality failures (poor performance, errors, failures of coordination) in collaborative work routines but also to reveal the hidden work and workarounds by front-line staff which bridge the model-reality gap in EPR technologies and via which "automated" safety features have an impact in practice.

  5. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA in general practice: Results from a pilot study in Vorarlberg, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Eva

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA programs refer to hospital-based settings. However the body of geriatric healthcare is provided by general practitioners in their office. Structured geriatric problem detection by means of assessment instruments is crucial for efficient geriatric care giving in the community. Methods We developed and pilot tested a German language geriatric assessment instrument adapted for general practice. Nine general practices in a rural region of Austria participated in this cross-sectional study and consecutively enrolled 115 persons aged over 75 years. The prevalence of specific geriatric problems was assessed, as well as the frequency of initiated procedures following positive and negative tests. Whether findings were new to the physician was studied exemplarily for the items visual and hearing impairment and depression. The acceptability was recorded by means of self-administered questionnaires. Results On average, each patient reported 6.4 of 14 possible geriatric problems and further consequences resulted in 43.7% (27.5% to 59.8% of each problem. The items with either the highest prevalence and/or the highest number of initiated actions by the GPs were osteoporosis risk, urinary incontinence, decreased hearing acuity, missing pneumococcal vaccination and fall risk. Visual impairment was newly detected in only 18% whereas hearing impairment and depression was new to the physician in 74.1% and 76.5%, respectively. A substantial number of interventions were initiated not only following positive tests (43.7% per item; 95% CI 27.5% to 59.8%, but also as a consequence of negative test results (11.3% per item; 95% CI 1.7% to 20.9%. The mean time expenditure to accomplish the assessment was 31 minutes (SD 10 min. Patients (89% and all physicians confirmed the CGA to provide new information in general on the patient's health status. All physicians judged the CGA to be feasible in everyday

  6. Why general practitioners and consultants change their clinical practice: a critical incident study.

    OpenAIRE

    Allery, L. A.; Owen, P. A.; Robling, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the complete range of factors which doctors recognise as changing their clinical practice and provide a measure of how often education is involved in change. DESIGN: Interviews using the critical incident technique. SETTING: Primary and secondary care. SUBJECTS: Random sample of 50 general practitioners and 50 consultants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Categories of reasons for change in clinical practice. RESULTS: Doctors described 361 changes in clinical practice, with an av...

  7. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Slotman, F.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. Aim: To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Design and setting: Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire

  8. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Slotman, F.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. Aim: To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Design and setting: Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire

  9. Relational coordination is associated with productivity in general practice: a survey and register based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Reventlow, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the association between relational coordination among the practice team in general practice and number of consultations performed in a general practice per staff, i.e. a proxy of productivity. We measured relational coordination using the Relational Coordination Survey...... and combined the results with register data. We found that relational coordination was statistically significant associated with number of consultation per staff per year. We later divided consultations in to three types: Face-to-face, Email and phone consultations. We found a statistically significant...... associating between relational coordination and with number of face-to-face consultation per staff per year....

  10. Organisational determinants of production and efficiency in general practice: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose Olsen, Kim; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Sørensen, Torben Højmark

    2013-01-01

    Shortage of general practitioners (GPs) and an increased political focus on primary care have enforced the interest in efficiency analysis in the Danish primary care sector. This paper assesses the association between organisational factors of general practices and production and efficiency. We a...

  11. Barriers, facilitators and attitudes influencing health promotion activities in general practice: an explorative pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geense Wytske W

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of chronically ill patients increases every year. This is partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. However, the frequency and quality of (evidence-based health promotion activities conducted by Dutch general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses (PNs are limited. The aim of this pilot study was to explore which lifestyle interventions Dutch GPs and PNs carry out in primary care, which barriers and facilitators can be identified and what main topics are with respect to attitudes towards health promoting activities. These topic areas will be identified for a future, larger scale study. Method This qualitative study consisted of 25 semi-structured interviews with sixteen GPs and nine PNs. ATLAS.ti was used to analyse the transcripts of the interviews. Results All GPs and PNs said they discuss lifestyle with their patients. Next to this, GPs and PNs counsel patients, and/or refer them to other disciplines. Only few said they refer patients to specific lifestyle programs or interventions in their own practice or in the neighbourhood. Several barriers and facilitators were identified. The main topics as barriers are: a lack of patients’ motivation to make lifestyle changes, insufficient reimbursement, a lack of proven effectiveness of interventions and a lack of overview of health promoting programs in their neighbourhood. The most cited facilitators are availability of a PN, collaboration with other disciplines and availability of interventions in their own practice. With respect to attitudes, six different types of GPs were identified reflecting the main topics that relate to attitudes, varying from ‘ignorer’ to ‘nurturer’. The topics relating to PNs attitudes towards health promotion activities, were almost unanimously positive. Conclusion GPs and PNs all say they discuss lifestyle issues with their patients, but the health promotion activities that are organized in their practice vary. Main topics that hinder

  12. Work motivation, task delegation and job satisfaction of general practice staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Søndergaard, Jens; Munch, Maria; Le, Jette V; Ledderer, Loni; Pedersen, Line B; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a high degree of task delegation is associated with the practise staff's overall job satisfaction, and this association is important to explore since job satisfaction is related to medical as well as patient-perceived quality of care. This study aimed: (1) to investigate associations between degrees of task delegation in the management of chronic disease in general practice, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a case and the staff's work motivation, (2) to investigate associations between the work motivation of the staff and their job satisfaction. The study was based on a questionnaire to which 621 members of the practice staff responded. The questionnaire consisted of a part concerning degree of task delegation in the management of COPD in their respective practice and another part being about their job satisfaction and motivation to work. In the first analysis, we found that 'maximal degree' of task delegation was significantly associated with the staff perceiving themselves to have a large degree of variation in tasks, odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, confidence interval (CI) = 1.09, 16.62. In the second analysis, we found that this perceived large degree of variation in tasks was significantly associated with their overall job satisfaction, OR = 2.81, confidence interval = 1.71, 4.61. The results suggest that general practitioners could delegate highly complex tasks in the management of COPD to their staff without influencing the staff's work motivation, and thereby their job satisfaction, negatively, as long as they ensure sufficient variation in the tasks. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darker, C; Martin, C; O'Dowd, T; O'Kelly, F; O'Shea, B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380/527).The majority of GPs (240/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267/380; 71%), asthma / COPD (279/380; 74%) and hypertension (297/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  14. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Darker, C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380\\/527).The majority of GPs (240\\/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95\\/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267\\/380; 71%), asthma \\/ COPD (279\\/380; 74%) and hypertension (297\\/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379\\/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286\\/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244\\/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  15. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  16. Diagnostic approach to urinary tract infections in male general practice patients: a national surveillance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Heijer, Casper DJ; van Dongen, Martien CJM; Donker, Gé A; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnostic urinary tract infection (UTI) studies have primarily been performed among female patients. Aim To create a diagnostic algorithm for male general practice patients suspected of UTI. Design and setting Surveillance study in the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network. Method Clinical information and dipstick results were collected from 603 patients. Algorithm-predicted care was compared with care as usual in terms of sensitivity (antibiotic recommended when UTI was confirmed) and specificity (no antibiotic recommended when no UTI was observed). Results Complete information was available from 490/603 (81%) males, of whom 66% (321/490) had a UTI. A diagnostic algorithm recommending antimicrobial prescription in the case of a positive nitrite test or a positive leukocyte esterase test in males aged ≥60 years, had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 78 to 87) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 60% (95% CI = 52 to 66), respectively (area under the ROC curve: 0.78, 95% CI = 0.74 to 0.82). When both dipstick results were positive in males aged ≥60 years, PPV increased to 90% (95% CI = 83 to 94), whereas NPV was highest in males Sensitivity and specificity of predicted UTI care and usual care did not differ (75% versus 79%, P = 0.30, and 70% versus 63%, P = 0.17, respectively). Conclusion UTI care provided to Dutch male GP patients is as accurate as predicted care from a diagnostic algorithm. The studied clinical information and dipstick tests are useful for ruling in UTI in males, but have limited value in ruling out this diagnosis. PMID:23211182

  17. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-08-31

    Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high quality care. As it is mainly conceptualised and

  18. Impetigo in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently

  19. Medical termination of pregnancy in general practice in Australia: a descriptive-interpretive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angela J; Nicolls, Rachel; Bateson, Deborah; Doab, Anna; Estoesta, Jane; Brassil, Ann; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-14

    Australian Government approval in 2012 for the use of mifepristone and misoprostol for medical termination of pregnancy (MTOP) allows general practitioners (GPs) to provide early gestation abortion in primary care settings. However, uptake of the MTOP provision by GPs appears to be low and the reasons for this have been unclear. This study investigated the provision of and referral for MTOP by GPs. We undertook descriptive-interpretive qualitative research and selected participants for diversity using a matrix. Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews and one focus group (N = 4), were conducted with 32 GPs (8 MTOP providers, 24 non MTOP providers) in New South Wales, Australia. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A framework to examine access to abortion services was used to develop the interview questions and emergent themes identified thematically. Three main themes emerged: scope of practice; MTOP demand, care and referral; and workforce needs. Many GPs saw abortion as beyond the scope of their practice (i.e. a service others provide in specialist private clinics). Some GPs had religious or moral objections; others regarded MTOP provision as complicated and difficult. While some GPs expressed interest in MTOP provision they were concerned about stigma and the impact it may have on perceptions of their practice and the views of colleagues. Despite a reported variance in demand most MTOP providers were busy but felt isolated. Difficulties in referral to a local public hospital in the case of complications or the provision of surgical abortion were noted. Exploring the factors which affect access to MTOP in general practice settings provides insights to assist the future planning and delivery of reproductive health services. This research identifies the need for support to increase the number of MTOP GP providers and for GPs who are currently providing MTOP. Alongside these actions provision in the public sector is required. In addition

  20. A Comparison Study of Communication Skills between General Surgery and General Practice Residents on First-time Patient Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al Ansari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is little published research about differences in doctor-patient communication of different specialties. Accordingly, we compared doctor-patient communication skills in two different specialties, general surgery (GS and general practice (GP. Methods: Twenty residents training at the Bahrain Defence Force Hospital (10 men and 10 women; mean age 28 years; 10 GS and 10 GP participated in 200 patient first visit consultations. The consultations were video-recorded and analysed by four trained observers using the MAAS Global scale. Results: 1 Internal consistency reliability of the MAAS Global (> 0.91 and Ep2 = 0.84 for raters was high, 2 GP residents spent more time (12 minutes than GS residents (7 minutes, in the visits, 3 There were several differences on the MAAS Global items between GP and GS residents (GS > GP, p GS, p < 0.05 on information giving, and 4 The present participants performed well compared to normative samples as well as to criterion-referenced cut-off scores. The general level of communication skills in both specialties, however, was ‘unsatisfactory’ and ‘doubtful’, as it is for normative samples. Conclusion: Excellent doctor-patient communication is essential but does not appear to receive the amount of attention that it deserves in practice settings. There are some differences between specialties as well as unsatisfactory communication skills for both specialties, since residents from both programs spent less time than recommended on each consultation. Our findings emphasize the need to improve the communication skills of physicians in general and for surgeons in particular.

  1. Impetigo in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, Sander

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImpetigo is a common skin infection, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus that mainly occurs in children. Patients with impetigo usually consult their general practitioner, who also treats the vast majority of cases. Impetigo is considered highly infectious, and consequently children are often barred from schools. Patients and doctors seek prompt treatment. Although we know the causative bacteria, we do not know what factors promote contagiousness or severity of impetigo. There...

  2. Chronic care management in Danish general practice - a cross‒sectional study of workload and multimorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moth Grete

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 30% of the Danish population has one or more chronic conditions, and general practitioners (GPs play a key role in effective chronic care management. However, little is known about these encounters in general practice. The aim was to describe the frequency of patients with one or more chronic conditions in general practice and how these consultations were experienced by the GPs. Methods All GPs in the Central Denmark Region were invited to register all contacts during one day in the 12‒month study period from December; 404 (46% accepted. For each patient contact, the GPs were asked to fill in a one‒page registration form covering information on chronic disease, reason for encounter, diagnosis, number of additional psychosocial problems raised by the patient during the consultation, time consumption, experienced burden of the consultation, referral to specialized care, and whether a nurse could have substituted the GP. Patients were categorized according to the number of chronic conditions (none, one, two, three or more and the categories compared with regard to the GP‒experienced burden of the contacts. Moreover, we examined which chronic conditions posed the the greatest challenge to the GPs. Results Patients aged 40 years or more had a total of 8,236 contacts. Among these patients 2,849 (34.6%; 95% CI 33.6‒35.6 had one and 2,596 (31.5%; CI 30.5‒32.5 had more than one chronic disease. The time consumption and the burden of their contacts tended to rise with the number of chronic conditions. Being present in 22.9% (CI 21.6‒24.3 of all face‒to‒face contacts, hypertension was the most common chronic condition. The burden of the contacts was experienced as particularly heavy for patients with depression and dementia due to more additional psychosocial problems and the time consumption. Conclusion General practitioners considered consultations with multimorbid patients demanding and not easily delegated to

  3. Differences in medical services in Nordic general practice: a comparative survey from the QUALICOPC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Torunn Bjerve; Straand, Jørund; Björkelund, Cecilia; Kosunen, Elise; Thorgeirsson, Ofeigur; Vedsted, Peter; Rosvold, Elin Olaug

    2017-06-01

    We aim to describe medical services provided by Nordic general practitioners (GPs), and to explore possible differences between the countries. We did a comparative analysis of selected data from the Nordic part of the study Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe (QUALICOPC). A total of 875 Nordic GPs (198 Norwegian, 80 Icelandic, 97 Swedish, 212 Danish and 288 Finnish) answered identical questionnaires regarding their practices. The GPs indicated which equipment they used in practice, which procedures that were carried out, and to what extent they were involved in treatment/follow-up of a selection of diagnoses. The Danish GPs performed minor surgical procedures significantly less frequent than GPs in all other countries, although they inserted IUDs significantly more often than GPs in Iceland, Sweden and Finland. Finnish GPs performed a majority of the medical procedures more frequently than GPs in the other countries. The GPs in Iceland reported involvement in a more narrow selection of conditions than the GPs in the other countries. The Finnish GPs had more advanced technical equipment than GPs in all other Nordic countries. GPs in all Nordic countries are well equipped and offer a wide range of medical services, yet with a substantial variation between countries. There was no clear pattern of GPs in one country doing consistently more procedures, having consistently more equipment and treating a larger diversity of medical conditions than GPs in the other countries. However, structural factors seemed to affect the services offered.

  4. Behavioural science in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D R

    1979-10-01

    Dr Peter Sowerby has written an important criticism of Michael Balint's work based on his understanding of Karl Popper's writings. I dispute Sowerby's interpretation of Popper and disagree with his conclusions, which I suggest would lead general practice into a retreat. I believe Balint made a major contribution to general practice and has helped us towards practising whole-person medicine.

  5. Trends in suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice 1983–2013: a retrospective observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Hooiveld, M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyse trends in suicidal behaviour as reported by the Dutch sentinel general practices from 1983 to 2013. Second, to examine the relationship between suicidal behaviour and several patient characteristics. Finally, to compare the relationship between suicidal

  6. Cancer Investigation in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Reinholdt; Møller, Henrik; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of cancer investigations in general practice Background Close to 90% of all cancers are diagnosed because the patient presents symptoms and signs. Of these patients, 85% initiate the diagnostic pathway in general practice. Therefore, the initiation of a diagnostic pathway in general...... practice becomes extremely important. On average, a general practitioner (GP) is involved in 7500 consultations each year, and in the diagnostic process of 8-10 incident cancers. One half of cancer patients consult their GP with either general symptoms, which are not indicative of cancer, or vague and non......-specific symptoms. The other half present with what the GP assess as alarm symptoms. Three months prior to diagnosis, patients who are later diagnosed with cancer have twice as many GP consultations than a comparable reference population. Thus the complex diagnostic process in general practice requires the GP...

  7. Evaluation of job satisfaction of practice staff and general practitioners: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Katja

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care teams' job satisfaction is an important issue in quality of care. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the job satisfaction of general practitioners (GPs and non-physician staff and to explore the elements that may impact on overall job satisfaction for GPs and non-physician staff separately. Methods The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-items Warr-Cook-Wall questionnaire with 7-point-Likert scales. Job satisfaction of GPs and non-physician staff was compared and impact on overall job satisfaction was analysed with stepwise linear regression analyses for both samples separately. Results The study population consisted of 2878 non-physician staff (mean age: 38 years and 676 GPs (mean age: 50 years. The actual mean working time per week of GPs was 50.0 hours and of practice staff 26.0 hours. Both were satisfied with colleagues and fellow workers (mean = 5.99 and mean = 6.18 respectively and mostly dissatisfied with their income (mean = 4.40 and mean = 4.79 respectively. For GPs the opportunity to use their abilities (β = 0.638 and for non-physician staff recognition for their work (β = 0.691 showed the highest scores of explained variance (R2 = 0.406 and R2 = 0.477 respectively regarding overall job satisfaction. Conclusions Non-physician staff evaluate their job satisfaction higher than GPs except recognition for work. Job satisfaction of members of primary care teams is important because poor satisfaction is associated with suboptimal healthcare delivery, poor clinical outcomes and higher turnover of staff.

  8. Social capital and frequent attenders in general practice: a register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasgaard, Alexander A; Mæhlisen, Maiken H; Overgaard, Charlotte; Ejlskov, Linda; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Bøggild, Henrik

    2018-03-02

    Frequent attendance to primary care constitutes a large use of resources for the health care system. The association between frequent attendance and illness-related factors has been examined in several studies, but little is known about the association between frequent attendance and individual social capital. The aim of this study is to explore this association. The analysis is conducted on responders to the North Denmark Region Health Profile 2010 (n = 23,384), individually linked with information from administrative registers. Social capital is operationalized at the individual level, and includes cognitive (interpersonal trust and norms of reciprocity) as well as structural (social network and civic engagement) dimensions. Frequent attendance is defined as the upper-quartile of the total number of measured consultations with a general practitioner over a period of 148 weeks. Using multiple logistic regression, we found that frequent attendance was associated with a lower score in interpersonal trust [OR 0.86 (0.79-0.94)] and social network [OR 0.88 (0.79-0.98)] for women, when adjusted for age, education, income and SF12 health scores. Norms of reciprocity and civic engagement were not significantly associated with frequent attendance for women [OR 1.05 (0.99-1.11) and OR 1.01 (0.92-1.11) respectively]. None of the associations were statistically significant for men. This study suggests that for women, some aspects of social capital are associated with frequent attendance in general practice, and the statistically significant dimensions belonged to both cognitive and structural aspects of social capital. This association was not seen for men. This indicates a multifaceted and heterogeneous relationship between social capital and frequent attendance among genders.

  9. The Identity Crisis of Osteoarthritis in General Practice: A Qualitative Study Using Video-Stimulated Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskins, Zoe; Sanders, Tom; Croft, Peter R; Hassell, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Patients and doctors report marked disenchantment with primary care consultation experiences relating to osteoarthritis. This study aimed to observe and analyze interactions between general practitioners (GPs) and patients presenting with osteoarthritis (OA) to identify how to improve care for OA. We conducted an observational study in general practices in the United Kingdom using video-recorded real-life consultations of unselected patients and their GPs. Postconsultation interviews were conducted using video-stimulated recall. Both consultations and interviews were analyzed thematically. Three key themes were identified in an analysis of 19 OA consultations and the matched GP and patient interviews: complexity, dissonance, and prioritization. The topic of osteoarthritis arises in the consultation in complex contexts of multimorbidity and multiple, often not explicit, patient agendas. Dissonance between patient and doctor was frequently observed and reported; this occurred when GPs normalized symptoms of OA as part of life and reassured patients who were not seeking reassurance. GPs used wear and tear in preference to osteoarthritis or didn't name the condition at all. GPs subconsciously made assumptions that patients did not consider OA a priority and that symptoms raised late in the consultation were not troublesome. The lack of a clear illness profile results in confusion between patients and doctors about what OA is and its priority in the context of multimorbidity. This study highlights generic communication issues regarding the potential negative consequences of unsought reassurance and the importance of validation of symptoms and raises new arguments for tackling OA's identity crisis by developing a clearer medical language with which to explain OA. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Musical Practices and Methods in Music Lessons: A Comparative Study of Estonian and Finnish General Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp, Anu; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Ruismäki, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    This article reveals the results of a comparative study of Estonian and Finnish general music education. The aim was to find out what music teaching practices and approaches/methods were mostly used, what music education perspectives supported those practices. The data were collected using questionnaires and the results of 107 Estonian and 50…

  11. Experiences of occupational violence in Australian urban general practice: a cross-sectional study of GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David W; Joy, Elyssa; Ireland, Malcolm C

    2005-10-03

    To establish the prevalence and characteristics of occupational violence in Australian urban general practice, and examine practitioner correlates of violence. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey mailed to all members (n = 1085) of three urban divisions of general practice in New South Wales in August and September 2004. The three divisions were chosen to provide a range of socioeconomic status (SES) demographics. Occupational violence towards general practitioners during the previous 12 months. 528 GPs returned questionnaires (49% response rate). Of these, 63.7% had experienced violence in the previous year. The most common forms of violence were "low level" violence - verbal abuse (42.1%), property damage/theft (28.6%) and threats (23.1%). A smaller proportion of GPs had experienced "high level" violence, such as sexual harassment (9.3%) and physical abuse (2.7%). On univariate analysis, violence was significantly more likely towards female GPs (P working in a lower SES status area (P disadvantage (P = 0.006), mental health problems (P home visits). On multivariate analysis, a significant association persisted between high level violence and lower SES area (odds ratio [OR], 2.86), being female (OR, 5.87), having practice populations with more drug-related problems (OR, 5.77), and providing home visits during business hours (OR, 4.76). More experienced GPs encountered less violence (OR, 0.77) for every additional 5 years of practice. Occupational violence is a considerable problem in Australian urban general practice. Formal education programs in preventing and managing violence would be appropriate for GPs and doctors-in-training.

  12. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice: a modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    was achieved in both Delphi rounds. A total of 41 of the proposed 59 quality indicators attained consensus. None of the quality indicators focusing on the diagnostic process achieved consensus. Consensus was attained for 14 quality indicators focusing on the decision regarding antibiotic treatment and for 27...... quality indicators focusing on the choice of antibiotics. CONCLUSION: This study resulted in a final set of 41 quality indicators concerning respiratory tract infections in general practice. These quality indicators may be used to strengthen general practitioners' focus on their management of patients......OBJECTIVE: To develop a set of quality indicators focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice. DESIGN: A modified 2-round Delphi study. SETTING: General practice. SUBJECTS: A panel of 27 experts (13 countries) comprising mainly general practitioners...

  13. Meningococcal vaccination in primary care amongst adolescents in North West England: an ecological study investigating associations with general practice characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagden, Sarah; Hungerford, Daniel; Limmer, Mark

    2018-01-27

    In 2015 the meningococcal ACWY (MenACWY) vaccination was introduced amongst adolescents in England following increased incidence and mortality associated with meningococcal group W. MenACWY vaccination uptake data for 17-18 years old and students delivered in primary care were obtained for 20 National Health Service clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) via the ImmForm vaccination system. Data on general practice characteristics, encompassing demographics and patient satisfaction variables, were extracted from the National General Practice Profiles resource. Univariable analysis of the associations between practice characteristics and vaccination was performed, followed by multivariable negative binomial regression. Data were utilized from 587 general practices, accounting for ~8% of all general practices in England. MenACWY vaccination uptake varied from 20.8% to 46.8% across the CCGs evaluated. Upon multivariable regression, vaccination uptake increased with increasing percentage of patients from ethnic minorities, increasing percentage of patients aged 15-24 years, increasing percentage of patients that would recommend their practice and total Quality and Outcomes Framework achievement for the practice. Conversely, vaccination uptake decreased with increasing deprivation. This study has identified several factors independently associated with MenACWY vaccination in primary care. These findings will enable a targeted approach to improve general practice-level vaccination uptake. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. GPs' views of health policy changes: a qualitative 'netnography' study of UK general practice online magazine commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvey, Rebecca; Voorhees, Jennifer; Bailey, Simon; Burns, Taylor; Hodgson, Damian

    2018-06-01

    Shifts in health policy since 2010 have brought major structural changes to the English NHS, with government stating intentions to increase GPs' autonomy and improve access to care. Meanwhile, GPs' levels of job satisfaction are low, while stress levels are high. PulseToday is a popular UK general practice online magazine that provides a key discussion forum on news relevant to general practice. To analyse readers' reactions to news stories about health policy changes published in an online general practice magazine. A qualitative 'netnography' was undertaken of readers' comments to PulseToday. METHOD: A sample of readers' comments on articles published in PulseToday was collated and subjected to thematic analysis. Around 300 comments on articles published between January 2012 and March 2016 were included in the analysis, using 'access to care' as a tracer theme. Concern about the demand and strain on general practice was perhaps to be expected. However, analysis revealed various dimensions to this concern: GPs' underlying feelings about their work and place in the NHS; constraints to GPs' control of their own working practices; a perceived loss of respect for the role of GP; and disappointment with representative bodies and GP leadership. This study shows a complex mix of resistance and resignation in general practice about the changing character of GPs' roles. This ambivalence deserves further attention because it could potentially shape responses to further change in primary care in ways that are as yet unknown. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  15. Computer templates in chronic disease management: ethnographic case study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Roberts, Celia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how electronic templates shape, enable and constrain consultations about chronic diseases. Ethnographic case study, combining field notes, video-recording, screen capture with a microanalysis of talk, body language and data entry-an approach called linguistic ethnography. Two general practices in England. Ethnographic observation of administrative areas and 36 nurse-led consultations was done. Twenty-four consultations were directly observed and 12 consultations were video-recorded alongside computer screen capture. Consultations were transcribed using conversation analysis conventions, with notes on body language and the electronic record. The analysis involved repeated rounds of viewing video, annotating field notes, transcription and microanalysis to identify themes. The data was interpreted using discourse analysis, with attention to the sociotechnical theory. Consultations centred explicitly or implicitly on evidence-based protocols inscribed in templates. Templates did not simply identify tasks for completion, but contributed to defining what chronic diseases were, how care was being delivered and what it meant to be a patient or professional in this context. Patients' stories morphed into data bytes; the particular became generalised; the complex was made discrete, simple and manageable; and uncertainty became categorised and contained. Many consultations resembled bureaucratic encounters, primarily oriented to completing data fields. We identified a tension, sharpened by the template, between different framings of the patient-as 'individual' or as 'one of a population'. Some clinicians overcame this tension, responding creatively to prompts within a dialogue constructed around the patient's narrative. Despite their widespread implementation, little previous research has examined how templates are actually used in practice. Templates do not simply document the tasks of chronic disease management but profoundly change the nature of this work

  16. Methodological practicalities in analytical generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2011-01-01

    generalization. Theoretically, the argumentation in the article is based on practice theory. The main part of the article describes three different examples of ways of generalizing on the basis of the same qualitative data material. There is a particular focus on describing the methodological strategies......In this article, I argue that the existing literature on qualitative methodologies tend to discuss analytical generalization at a relatively abstract and general theoretical level. It is, however, not particularly straightforward to “translate” such abstract epistemological principles into more...... operative methodological strategies for producing analytical generalizations in research practices. Thus, the aim of the article is to contribute to the discussions among qualitatively working researchers about generalizing by way of exemplifying some of the methodological practicalities in analytical...

  17. Frequent attenders in general practice and immigrant status in Norway: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Esperanza; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis-Andrés; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    To compare the likelihood of being a frequent attender (FA) to general practice among native Norwegians and immigrants, and to study socioeconomic and morbidity factors associated with being a FA for natives and immigrants. Linked register data for all inhabitants in Norway with at least one visit to the general practitioner (GP) in 2008 (2 967 933 persons). Immigrants were grouped according to their country of origin into low- (LIC), middle- (MIC), and high-income countries (HIC). FAs were defined as patients whose attendance rate ranked in the top 10% (cut-off point > 7 visits). FAs were compared with other GP users by means of multivariate binary logistic analyses adjusting for socioeconomic and morbidity factors. Among GP users during the daytime, immigrants had a higher likelihood of being a FA compared with natives (OR (95% CI): 1.13 (1.09-1.17) and 1.15 (1.12-1.18) for HIC, 1.84 (1.78-1.89) and 1.66 (1.63-1.70) for MIC, and 1.77 (1.67-1.89) and 1.65 (1.57-1.74) for LIC for men and women respectively). Pregnancy, middle income earned in Norway, and having cardiologic and psychiatric problems were the main factors associated with being a FA. Among immigrants, labour immigrants and the elderly used GPs less often, while refugees were overrepresented among FAs. Psychiatric, gastroenterological, endocrine, and non-specific drug morbidity were relatively more prevalent among immigrant FA compared with natives. Although immigrants account for a small percentage of all FAs, GPs and policy-makers should be aware of differences in socioeconomic and morbidity profiles to provide equality of health care.

  18. Child overweight in general practice - parents' beliefs and expectations - a questionnaire survey study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Care for overweight children in general practice involves collaboration with parents. Acknowledging the parents' frames of references is a prerequisite for successful management. We therefore aimed to analyse parental beliefs about the presumed causes and consequences of overweight in children...... and expectations towards the GP. Moreover, we aimed at comparing the beliefs and expectations of parents of non-overweight children (NOWC) and parents of overweight children (OWC)....

  19. Child overweight in general practice ? parents? beliefs and expectations ? a questionnaire survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Merethe K; Christensen, Bo; S?ndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background Care for overweight children in general practice involves collaboration with parents. Acknowledging the parents? frames of references is a prerequisite for successful management. We therefore aimed to analyse parental beliefs about the presumed causes and consequences of overweight in children and expectations towards the GP. Moreover, we aimed at comparing the beliefs and expectations of parents of non-overweight children (NOWC) and parents of overweight children (OWC). Methods A ...

  20. Nigerian Journal of General Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of General Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. How do general practice registrars learn from their clinical experience? A critical incident study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmwood, C

    1997-01-01

    This preliminary study of RACGP registrars in the period of subsequent general practice experience examines the types of clinical experiences from which registrars learn, what they learn from the experiences and the process of learning from such experiences. A critical incident method was used on a semi structured interview process. Registrars were asked to recall clinical incidents where they had learnt something of importance. Data were sorted and categorised manually. Nine registrars were interviewed before new categories of data ceased to develop. Registrars learnt from the opportunity to follow up patients. An emotional response to the interaction was an important part of the learning process. Learning from such experiences is haphazard and unstructured. Registrars accessed human resources in response to their clinical difficulties rather than text or electronic based information sources. Registrars should be aware of their emotional responses to interactions with patients; these emotional responses often indicate important learning opportunities. Clinical interactions and resultant learning could be made less haphazard by structuring consultations with patients with specific problems. These learning opportunities should be augmented by the promotion of follow up of patients.

  2. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how...... the GPs’ prescribing behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Method The study consists of a register-based study and a questionnaire study. The register-based study is based on data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (prescribed antibiotics), Statistics Denmark (socio-demographic data...

  3. Emergency medicine and general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Abela, Gunther

    2005-01-01

    Emergency Medicine and Immediate Medical Care are relatively new specialties. In Malta, there is quite a considerable area of overlap between these specialties and general practice. Indeed, the family physician is confronted with some sort of medical emergency quite regularly. The brief of this article is to go through recent developments in Emergency Medicine as applied to General Practice. The areas considered are Basic Life Support, Head Injury, Asthma, Anaphylaxis, Community Acquired Pneu...

  4. The role of general practice in routes to diagnosis of lung cancer in Denmark: a population-based study of general practice involvement, diagnostic activity and diagnostic intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldbrandt, Louise Mahncke; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Jensen, Henry; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-22

    Lung cancer stage at diagnosis predicts possible curative treatment. In Denmark and the UK, lung cancer patients have lower survival rates than citizens in most other European countries, which may partly be explained by a comparatively longer diagnostic interval in these two countries. In Denmark, a pathway was introduced in 2008 allowing general practitioners (GPs) to refer patients suspected of having lung cancer directly to fast-track diagnostics. However, symptom presentation of lung cancer in general practice is known to be diverse and complex, and systematic knowledge of the routes to diagnosis is needed to enable earlier lung cancer diagnosis in Denmark. This study aims to describe the routes to diagnosis, the diagnostic activity preceding diagnosis and the diagnostic intervals for lung cancer in the Danish setting. We conducted a national registry-based cohort study on 971 consecutive incident lung cancer patients in 2010 using data from national registries and GP questionnaires. GPs were involved in 68.3% of cancer patients' diagnostic pathways, and 27.4% of lung cancer patients were referred from the GP to fast-track diagnostic work-up. A minimum of one X-ray was performed in 85.6% of all cases before diagnosis. Patients referred through a fast-track route more often had diagnostic X-rays (66.0%) than patients who did not go through fast-track (49.4%). Overall, 33.6% of all patients had two or more X-rays performed during the 90 days before diagnosis. Patients whose symptoms were interpreted as non-alarm symptoms or who were not referred to fast-track were more likely to experience a long diagnostic interval than patients whose symptoms were interpreted as alarm symptoms or who were referred to fast-track. Lung cancer patients followed several diagnostic pathways. The existing fast-track pathway must be supplemented to ensure earlier detection of lung cancer. The high incidence of multiple X-rays warrants a continued effort to develop more accurate lung

  5. Weight Changes in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This PhD thesis is about weight changes. What determines long-term weight changes in the adult general population? Is it possible that weight loss may not always be healthy? The present clinical guidelines for general practice advice most overweight persons and patients with type 2 ...... lifestyle changes like for instance Mediterranean diet and increased exercise....

  6. Computer templates in chronic disease management: ethnographic case study in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Roberts, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate how electronic templates shape, enable and constrain consultations about chronic diseases. Design Ethnographic case study, combining field notes, video-recording, screen capture with a microanalysis of talk, body language and data entry—an approach called linguistic ethnography. Setting Two general practices in England. Participants and methods Ethnographic observation of administrative areas and 36 nurse-led consultations was done. Twenty-four consultations were directly observed and 12 consultations were video-recorded alongside computer screen capture. Consultations were transcribed using conversation analysis conventions, with notes on body language and the electronic record. The analysis involved repeated rounds of viewing video, annotating field notes, transcription and microanalysis to identify themes. The data was interpreted using discourse analysis, with attention to the sociotechnical theory. Results Consultations centred explicitly or implicitly on evidence-based protocols inscribed in templates. Templates did not simply identify tasks for completion, but contributed to defining what chronic diseases were, how care was being delivered and what it meant to be a patient or professional in this context. Patients’ stories morphed into data bytes; the particular became generalised; the complex was made discrete, simple and manageable; and uncertainty became categorised and contained. Many consultations resembled bureaucratic encounters, primarily oriented to completing data fields. We identified a tension, sharpened by the template, between different framings of the patient—as ‘individual’ or as ‘one of a population’. Some clinicians overcame this tension, responding creatively to prompts within a dialogue constructed around the patient's narrative. Conclusions Despite their widespread implementation, little previous research has examined how templates are actually used in practice. Templates do not simply document the

  7. The complexity of managing COPD exacerbations: a grounded theory study of European general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Mette Bech; Spigt, Mark; Iversen, R; Godycki-Cwirko, M; Francis, N; Altiner, A; Andreeva, E; Kung, K; Melbye, H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand the concerns and challenges faced by general practitioners (GPs) and respiratory physicians about primary care management of acute exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design 21 focus group discussions (FGDs) were performed in seven countries with a Grounded Theory approach. Each country performed three rounds of FGDs. Setting Primary and secondary care in Norway, Germany, Wales, Poland, Russia, The Netherlands, China (Hong Kong). Participants 142 GPs and respiratory physicians were chosen to include urban and rural GPs as well as hospital-based and out patient-clinic respiratory physicians. Results Management of acute COPD exacerbations is dealt with within a scope of concerns. These concerns range from ‘dealing with comorbidity’ through ‘having difficult patients’ to ‘confronting a hopeless disease’. The first concern displays medical uncertainty regarding diagnosis, medication and hospitalisation. These clinical processes become blurred by comorbidity and the social context of the patient. The second concern shows how patients receive the label ‘difficult’ exactly because they need complex attention, but even more because they are time consuming, do not take responsibility and are non-compliant. The third concern relates to the emotional reactions by the physicians when confronted with ‘a hopeless disease’ due to the fact that most of the patients do not improve and the treatment slows down the process at best. GPs and respiratory physicians balance these concerns with medical knowledge and practical, situational knowledge, trying to encompass the complexity of a medical condition. Conclusions Knowing the patient is essential when dealing with comorbidities as well as with difficult relations in the consultations on exacerbations. This study suggests that it is crucial to improve the collaboration between primary and secondary care, in terms of, for example, shared consultations

  8. A study of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding hair dye use among general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hair dye usage is extremely common all over the world. Hair dyes have been reported to cause a wide range of adverse effects, therefore, the consumer’s knowledge about hair dyeing and related side effects are important. Aim: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of general population towards the use of hair dyes. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty consecutive persons using hair dyes were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: These 250 patients comprised 141 men (56.4% and 109 women (43.6% (M: F 1.29:1, aged between 16 and 74 (mean 47.13 years. The majority, 212 patients (84.8% were aged between 20–60 years and 66.4% (n=166 belonged to an urban background. When asked about the reason for using hair color, the principle reason was “to look younger” (59.6%, n=149. Most of the respondents were using synthetic hair dye preparations (55.2%, n=138 and when asked about the brand of hair dye being used, 25.2% (n=63 did not know about the brand they were using. When asked about their perception regarding safety of HD, 61% (n=152 respondents agreed that hair dyes are not safe and on being asked about the carcinogenic potential of HD, only 24% (n=60 respondents agreed. When enquired about the safest variety of HD, majority of respondents (52.4%, n=131 believed that plant based hair colors are the safest. When asked about the safety of HD during pregnancy and lactation, 68% (n=168 of the respondents were unaware regarding this aspect. 14.4% of the respondents reported suffering from some adverse effects due to hair dye use but only 11.11% (n=4 of those stopped using hair dyes. Conclusions: There is lack of awareness about the hair dyes and their adverse effects in the general population. There is an urgent need to increase awareness among consumers regarding the adverse effects of hair dyes and the available safer alternatives. Limitations: Small number of respondents and

  9. Using MIQUEST in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Hammersley

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes ten months' experience with MIQUEST software used for the collection of data from computerised databases in General Practice. We report on the following: the MIQUEST software in use, the time costs to the practice, the completeness of confidentiality barriers and the accuracy of data collected using MIQUEST compared with similar data collected by the practice system (EMIS. There were no problems encountered with installation of MIQUEST-related software. With experience, MIQUEST was equal to the practice system for speed and ease of use. The confidentiality safeguards were found to be in accordance with the GMSC/RCGP Guidelines - patients could not be directly, or indirectly, identified from the data extracted by external searches. Inaccuracies in the data collected using MIQUEST were identified, but these were largely attributable to problems with the EMIS-written interpreter available on the practice system at the time, or with the coding schemes used by the practice. In an individual practice, MIQUEST represents an alternative data collection method to the practice-based software. For data collection from multiple general practices it should prove an invaluable tool for Health Authorities and research organisations.

  10. Factors influencing career intentions on completion of general practice vocational training in England: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Russell, Rachel; Scott, Emma; Owen, Katherine

    2017-08-17

    General practice is experiencing a growing crisis with the numbers of doctors who are training and then entering the profession in the UK failing to keep pace with workforce needs. This study investigated the immediate to medium term career intentions of those who are about to become general practitioners (GPs) and the factors that are influencing career plans. Online questionnaire survey, with quantitative answers analysed using descriptive statistics and free text data analysed using a thematic framework approach. Doctors approaching the end of 3-year GP vocational training in the West Midlands, England. 178 (57.2%) doctors completed the survey. Most participants planned to work as salaried GPs or locums rather than entering a general practice partnership for at least the first 5 years post-completion of training; others failed to express a career plan or planned to leave general practice completely or work overseas. Many were interested in developing portfolio careers.The quality of general practice experience across undergraduate, foundation and vocational training were reported as influencing personal career plans, and in particular perceptions about workload pressure and morale within the training practices in which they had been placed. Experience of a poor work-life balance as a trainee had a negative effect on career intentions, as did negative perceptions about how general practice is portrayed by politicians and the media. This study describes a number of potentially modifiable factors related to training programmes that are detrimentally influencing the career plans of newly trained GPs. In addition, there are sociodemographic factors, such as age, gender and having children, which are also influencing career plans and so need to be accommodated. With ever-increasing workload in general practice, there is an urgent need to understand and where possible address these issues at national and local level. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  11. Text-Messaging Practices and Links to General Spelling Skill: A Study of Australian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Catherine; Kemp, Nenagh; Martin, Frances Heritage

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated 10- to 12-year-old Australian children's text-messaging practices and their relationship to traditional spelling ability. Of the 227 children tested, 82% reported sending text-messages; a median of 5 per day. Use of predictive and multi-press entry methods was roughly equal. Children produced a wide range of text-message…

  12. Health improvement and prevention study (HIPS - evaluation of an intervention to prevent vascular disease in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Gawaine

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Improvement and Prevention Study (HIPS study aims to evaluate the capacity of general practice to identify patients at high risk for developing vascular disease and to reduce their risk of vascular disease and diabetes through behavioural interventions delivered in general practice and by the local primary care organization. Methods/Design HIPS is a stratified randomized controlled trial involving 30 general practices in NSW, Australia. Practices are randomly allocated to an 'intervention' or 'control' group. General practitioners (GPs and practice nurses (PNs are offered training in lifestyle counselling and motivational interviewing as well as practice visits and patient educational resources. Patients enrolled in the trial present for a health check in which the GP and PN provide brief lifestyle counselling based on the 5As model (ask, assess, advise, assist, and arrange and refer high risk patients to a diet education and physical activity program. The program consists of two individual visits with a dietician or exercise physiologist and four group sessions, after which patients are followed up by the GP or PN. In each practice 160 eligible patients aged between 40 and 64 years are invited to participate in the study, with the expectation that 40 will be eligible and willing to participate. Evaluation data collection consists of (1 a practice questionnaire, (2 GP and PN questionnaires to assess preventive care attitudes and practices, (3 patient questionnaire to assess self-reported lifestyle behaviours and readiness to change, (4 physical assessment including weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure, (5 a fasting blood test for glucose and lipids, (6 a clinical record audit, and (7 qualitative data collection. All measures are collected at baseline and 12 months except the patient questionnaire which is also collected at 6 months. Study outcomes before and after the

  13. The search for person-related information in general practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrans, Diego; Avonts, Dirk; Christiaens, Thierry; Willems, Sara; de Smet, Kaat; van Boven, Kees; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Kühlein, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    General practice is person-focused. Contextual information influences the clinical decision-making process in primary care. Currently, person-related information (PeRI) is neither recorded in a systematic way nor coded in the electronic medical record (EMR), and therefore not usable for scientific use. To search for classes of PeRI influencing the process of care. GPs, from nine countries worldwide, were asked to write down narrative case histories where personal factors played a role in decision-making. In an inductive process, the case histories were consecutively coded according to classes of PeRI. The classes found were deductively applied to the following cases and refined, until saturation was reached. Then, the classes were grouped into code-families and further clustered into domains. The inductive analysis of 32 case histories resulted in 33 defined PeRI codes, classifying all personal-related information in the cases. The 33 codes were grouped in the following seven mutually exclusive code-families: 'aspects between patient and formal care provider', 'social environment and family', 'functioning/behaviour', 'life history/non-medical experiences', 'personal medical information', 'socio-demographics' and 'work-/employment-related information'. The code-families were clustered into four domains: 'social environment and extended family', 'medicine', 'individual' and 'work and employment'. As PeRI is used in the process of decision-making, it should be part of the EMR. The PeRI classes we identified might form the basis of a new contextual classification mainly for research purposes. This might help to create evidence of the person-centredness of general practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Child overweight in general practice - parents' beliefs and expectations - a questionnaire survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-10-11

    Care for overweight children in general practice involves collaboration with parents. Acknowledging the parents' frames of references is a prerequisite for successful management. We therefore aimed to analyse parental beliefs about the presumed causes and consequences of overweight in children and expectations towards the GP. Moreover, we aimed at comparing the beliefs and expectations of parents of non-overweight children (NOWC) and parents of overweight children (OWC). A cross-sectional survey. Data were obtained from a questionnaire exploring parents' beliefs and expectations regarding overweight in children. The questionnaires were completed by parents following their child's participation in the five-year preventive child health examination (PCHE).Parental agreement upon statements concerning beliefs and expectations regarding overweight in children was measured on a Likert scale. Differences in levels of agreement between parents of non-overweight children and parents of overweight children were analysed using Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Parents of 879 children completed and returned questionnaires. Around three fourths of the parents agreed that overweight was a health problem. A majority of parents (93%) agreed that the GP should call attention to overweight in children and offer counselling on diet and exercise. Almost half of the parents expected a follow-up programme. Parents of overweight children seemed to agree less upon some of the proposed causes of overweight, e.g. inappropriate diet and lack of exercise. These parents also had stronger beliefs about overweight disappearing by itself as the child grows up. According to parental beliefs and expectations, general practice should have an important role to play in the management of child overweight. Moreover, our findings suggest that GPs should be aware of the particular beliefs that parents of overweight children may have regarding causes of overweight in their child.

  15. Child overweight in general practice – parents’ beliefs and expectations – a questionnaire survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Care for overweight children in general practice involves collaboration with parents. Acknowledging the parents’ frames of references is a prerequisite for successful management. We therefore aimed to analyse parental beliefs about the presumed causes and consequences of overweight in children and expectations towards the GP. Moreover, we aimed at comparing the beliefs and expectations of parents of non-overweight children (NOWC) and parents of overweight children (OWC). Methods A cross-sectional survey. Data were obtained from a questionnaire exploring parents’ beliefs and expectations regarding overweight in children. The questionnaires were completed by parents following their child’s participation in the five-year preventive child health examination (PCHE). Parental agreement upon statements concerning beliefs and expectations regarding overweight in children was measured on a Likert scale. Differences in levels of agreement between parents of non-overweight children and parents of overweight children were analysed using Chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test. Results Parents of 879 children completed and returned questionnaires. Around three fourths of the parents agreed that overweight was a health problem. A majority of parents (93%) agreed that the GP should call attention to overweight in children and offer counselling on diet and exercise. Almost half of the parents expected a follow-up programme. Parents of overweight children seemed to agree less upon some of the proposed causes of overweight, e.g. inappropriate diet and lack of exercise. These parents also had stronger beliefs about overweight disappearing by itself as the child grows up. Conclusions According to parental beliefs and expectations, general practice should have an important role to play in the management of child overweight. Moreover, our findings suggest that GPs should be aware of the particular beliefs that parents of overweight children may have regarding causes

  16. Periodontal Emergencies in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Reena; Ide, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Diagnosing and managing periodontal emergencies is a common part of general dental practice. This article summarises the presentation, aetiology and management of the key periodontal emergencies, including gingival abscess, periodontal abscess, peri-coronitis/peri-coronal abscess, perio-endo lesion/ abscess, necrotising gingivitis and periodontitis, acute herpetic gingivostomatitis, acute physical/chemical/thermal injury and subgingival root fracture.

  17. Vaginal symptoms of unknown etiology - a study in dutch general-practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Janny H.; Boeke, A. Joan P.; Janssens, J; van Eijk, J.Th.M.

    Vaginal symptoms are frequently presented by women to general practitioners. In many cases, the aetiology of these symptoms remains unknown. This study focused on the factors associated with microbiologically unexplained vaginal symptoms, the course of symptoms and signs in these cases, and factors

  18. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  19. General Considerations on Leadership in the Hospitality Industry. Conceptual Analysis and Practical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia ISPAS

    2010-01-01

    Leadership in the hospitality industry is still an open research field especially in describing the effects of leadership style on hotel employees. The purpose of the paper is to present and analyze the following concepts: leadership and leadership style, hospitality industry; the practical aspects of leadership in the hospitality industry and to identify relevant studies regarding the importance of leadership styles applied in this industry. The research methodology consists of analyzing the...

  20. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Gé A; Slotman, Frank G; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Francke, Anneke L

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire data of Dutch GPs. Method Data collected in the years from 2005 until 2011 in the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network were analysed. Trends and reasons for use of palliative sedation were analysed using multilevel analyses to control for clustering of observations within general practices. From 2005-2011, 183 cases were reported from 56 general practices. The incidence of palliative sedation fluctuated between 33.7 per 100 000 patients in 2006 and 15.2 in 2011. No rise or decline during the period was observed. Palliative sedation was applied in 5.7% of all deaths and most frequently used in younger patients with cancer. The mean number of refractory symptoms was 2.6 (SD 1.2); pain (69.4%), dyspnoea (53.0%), and fear (39.3%). Patient involvement in decision making before the start of palliative sedation (87.4%) was less frequently present in patients suffering from cardiovascular or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in older patients compared to patients with cancer (Ppalliative sedation in these cases was clearly motivated. Palliative sedation is performed in a small proportion of dying patients in Dutch general practice, without a rise or decline observed from 2005 to 2011. Patients with non-cancer diseases are less frequently involved in decision making than patients with cancer, possibly related to sudden deterioration.

  1. Weight Changes in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus

    2017-06-01

    This PhD thesis is about weight changes. What determines long-term weight changes in the adult general population? Is it possible that weight loss may not always be healthy? The present clinical guidelines for general practice advice most overweight persons and patients with type 2 diabetes to lose weight. Are the guidelines based on firm evidence?   METHODS: The back-bone of the thesis is constituted by three scientific articles based on three different population based cohort studies. Multivariable modeling and other epidemiological methods were used.   RESULTS: Article 1 examined weight changes in the general population in relation to smoking status, and proposed a graphical 'smoking cessation weight change model', demonstrating the importance of time, age and smoking status in relation to long-term weight changes. Article 2 suggested new methods to improve the processing of dietary data. It was demonstrated how median imputation for missing values and assumptions about standard portion sizes were inferior to stochastic methods conditioning on information about physiology of the individual. Article 3 evaluated the influence of prospectively planned intentional weight loss on long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therapeutic intentional weight loss supervised by a medical doctor was not associated with reduced morbidity or mortality. In the general population the dietary intake of fructose and soft drinks sweetened with sugar was not associated with weight change over 9 years. Weight gain rates were large in young adults and incrementally smaller in middle aged adults. Subjects more than 60 years lost weight on average. Historical weight data suggest that the body weight increases throughout life to the age of 60-65years. A study with simulated data indicates that bias in baseline BMI may misleadingly have favored weight loss in earlier cohort studies of intentional weight loss and mortality.   DISCUSSION: The findings regarding

  2. General practitioners’ assessment practices of patients' need for lifestyle intervention. A vignette study on the impact of social distance on general practitioners’ patient assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsvard, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    discretion, especially in preventive contexts with no clear-cut guidelines. However, despite its potential influence, few studies have focused on whether social distance has an impact on general practitioners’ assessment practices of patients, which thus seems to be a blind spot in the literature. To study...... the mechanisms facilitating the process of social distance systematically, I apply the vignette method. Drawing on Bourdieu’s theoretical framework of social distance, I examine how general practitioners assess different socially positioned patients as needy for preventive lifestyle intervention. I expect social...

  3. Biomarkers in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in general practice: A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Halling, Anders; Ledderer, Loni

    Introduction: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common chronic disease primarily treated in primary care. It is a complex and heterogeneous disease and the trajectory is difficult to predict. The overall aim of this study is to investigate predictors of the trajectory of COPD...... were a diagnosis of COPD (ICPC code R95-), age ≥ 40 years, Danish language speaking, no severe psychiatric or cognitive disease and ability to visit the GP surgery. Prevalent as well as incident patients diagnosed with COPD were eligible. Baseline data included a patient questionnaire and validated...... treated in primary care and to determine the added value of selected biomarkers such as microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and surfactant protein D (SP-D). Methods: Prospective cohort study comprising COPD patients. A total of 38 Danish practices were included in the study. Criteria for inclusion...

  4. Perceptions of primary care staff on a regional data quality intervention in Australian general practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijeet; McCarthy, Sandra; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2016-04-26

    Technological advances in clinical data capturing and storage systems have led to recent attempts at disease surveillance and region specific population health planning through regularly collected primary care administrative clinical data. However the accuracy and comprehensiveness of primary care health records remain questionable. We aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of general practice staff in maintaining accurate patient health data within clinical software used in primary care settings of regional NSW. Focus groups were conducted with general practitioners, practice nurses and practice administrative staff from 17 practices in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven region of the state of New South Wales (NSW) in Australia that had participated in the Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing (SPDS) project - a general practice based chronic disease surveillance and data quality improvement study. A total of 25 respondents that included 12 general practitioners (GPs) and 13 practice staff participated in the 6 focus groups. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Five key themes emerged from the data. Firstly, the theme of resourcing data management raised issues of time constraints, the lack of a dedicated data management role and the importance of multidisciplinary involvement, including a data champion. The need for incentives was identified as being important to motivate ongoing commitment to maintaining data quality. However, quality of software packages, including coding issues and software limitations and information technology skills were seen as key barriers. The final theme provided insight into the lessons learnt from the project and the increased awareness of the importance of data quality amongst practice staff. The move towards electronic methods of maintaining general practice patient records offers significant potential benefits in terms of both patient care and monitoring of health

  5. Compliance with referrals to medical specialist care: patient and general practice determinants: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; de Jong, Judith D; Verheij, Robert A; Jansen, Tessa; Korevaar, Joke C; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2016-02-01

    In a gatekeeper system, primary care physicians and patients jointly decide whether or not medical specialist care is needed. However, it is the patient who decides to actually use the referral. Referral non-compliance could delay diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to assess patient compliance with a referral to medical specialist care and identify patient and practice characteristics that are associated with it. Observational study using data on 48,784 referrals to medical specialist care derived from electronic medical records of 58 general practices for the period 2008-2010. Referral compliance was based on claims data of medical specialist care. Logistic multilevel regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between patient and general practice characteristics and referral compliance. In 86.6% of the referrals, patients complied. Patient and not practice characteristics were significantly associated with compliance. Patients from deprived urban areas and patients aged 18-44 years were less likely to comply, whereas patients aged 65 years and older were more likely to comply. About 1 in 8 patients do not use their referral. These patients may not receive adequate care. Demographic and socio-economic factors appear to affect compliance. The results of this study may be used to make general practitioners more aware that some patients are more likely to be noncompliant with referrals.

  6. Preventive evidence into practice (PEP study: implementation of guidelines to prevent primary vascular disease in general practice protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are significant gaps in the implementation and uptake of evidence-based guideline recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes in Australian general practice. This study protocol describes the methodology for a cluster randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a model that aims to improve the implementation of these guidelines in Australian general practice developed by a collaboration between researchers, non-government organisations, and the profession. Methods We hypothesise that the intervention will alter the behaviour of clinicians and patients resulting in improvements of recording of lifestyle and physiological risk factors (by 20% and increased adherence to guideline recommendations for: the management of CVD and diabetes risk factors (by 20%; and lifestyle and physiological risk factors of patients at risk (by 5%. Thirty-two general practices will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation to receive either the intervention or continue with usual care, after stratification by state. The intervention will be delivered through: small group education; audit of patient records to determine preventive care; and practice facilitation visits adapted to the needs of the practices. Outcome data will be extracted from electronic medical records and patient questionnaires, and qualitative evaluation from provider and patient interviews. Discussion We plan to disseminate study findings widely and directly inform implementation strategies by governments, professional bodies, and non-government organisations including the partner organisations.

  7. Guidelines for computer security in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Peter; Pleteshner, Catherine; Bhend, Heinz; Brouns, Johan

    2007-01-01

    As general practice becomes increasingly computerised, data security becomes increasingly important for both patient health and the efficient operation of the practice. To develop guidelines for computer security in general practice based on a literature review, an analysis of available information on current practice and a series of key stakeholder interviews. While the guideline was produced in the context of Australian general practice, we have developed a template that is also relevant for other countries. Current data on computer security measures was sought from Australian divisions of general practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with general practitioners (GPs), the medical software industry, senior managers within government responsible for health IT (information technology) initiatives, technical IT experts, divisions of general practice and a member of a health information consumer group. The respondents were asked to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of potential risks in computer security being breached. The study suggested that the most important computer security issues in general practice were: the need for a nominated IT security coordinator; having written IT policies, including a practice disaster recovery plan; controlling access to different levels of electronic data; doing and testing backups; protecting against viruses and other malicious codes; installing firewalls; undertaking routine maintenance of hardware and software; and securing electronic communication, for example via encryption. This information led to the production of computer security guidelines, including a one-page summary checklist, which were subsequently distributed to all GPs in Australia. This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making

  8. Prevention of NSAID gastropathy in elderly patients. An observational study in general practice and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leen, M W F; van der Eijk, I; Schols, J M G A

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) survey the risk factors for NSAID gastropathy in outpatients (elderly patients in the community), compared to those living in old people's homes or nursing homes, (ii) study the prescription of medication prophylaxis during use of NSAIDs conform the current national guidelines and (iii) survey the influence on gastrointestinal symptoms and safety of pantoprazole 20 mg as prophylaxis for NSAID gastropathy. Patients over 65 years of age, using an NSAID without prophylaxis or newly starting NSAID treatment were included in the study. Pantoprazole 20 mg was prescribed as prophylaxis. Patients using an NSAID with prophylaxis being a proton pump inhibitor at the first visit were registered for epidemiological reasons. Demographic data, risk factors, gastrointestinal complaints, and adverse events were collected at t = 0, t = 2 weeks, t = 3 months and t = 6 months. Differences between groups were analysed with Chi-square tests and Mann-Whitney U tests; changes in time in GI symptoms were tested using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests and McNemar tests. One hundred eighty one general practitioners (treating outpatients and patients in old people's homes)and five nursing home physicians participated in the study and a total of 615 patients were included (522 patients treated by general practitioners (GP) and 93 patients in nursing homes). Four hundred thirty two patients were using NSAIDs without prophylaxis or started using an NSAID at the first visit; 269 (62.1%) and 163 (37.9%) patients respectively. 65.3% of the outpatients (224 out of 343) did not receive indicated prophylaxis, versus 76.2% (16 out of 21) in old people's homes and 42.6% in nursing homes (29 out of 69) (P NSAID prior to the study complained of gastrointestinal symptoms compared to new users (P NSAIDs caused these symptoms. After 2 weeks of treatment with pantoprazole, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. Moreover, both groups showed improvement

  9. Use of hyperlinks in electronic test result communication: a survey study in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukai Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information is essential in healthcare. Recording, handling and sharing healthcare information is important in order to ensure high quality of delivered healthcare. Information and communication technology (ICT may be a valuable tool for handling these challenges. One way of enhancing the exchange of information could be to establish a link between patient-specific and general information sent to the general practitioner (GP. The aim of the present paper is to study GPs' use of a hyperlink inserted into electronic test result communication. Methods We inserted a hyperlink into the electronic test result communication sent to the patients’ GPs who participated in a regional, systematic breast cancer screening program. The hyperlink target was a web-site with information on the breast cancer screening program and breast cancer in general. Different strategies were used to increase the GPs’ use of this hyperlink. The outcome measure was the GPs’ self-reported use of the link. Data were collected by means of a one-page paper-based questionnaire. Results The response rate was 73% (n=242. In total, 108 (45% of the GPs reported to have used the link. In all, 22% (n=53 of the GPs used the web-address from a paper letter and 37% (n=89 used the hyperlink in the electronic test result communication (Δ = 15%[95%confidence  int erval(CI = 8 − 22%P  Conclusions The results suggest that hyperlinks in electronic test result communication could be a feasible strategy for combining and sharing different types of healthcare information.

  10. Characteristics of general practice care: What do senior citizens value? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaak Peter FM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the increasing number of senior citizens in our society who are likely to consult their GP with age-related health problems, it is important to identify and understand the preferences of this group in relation to the non-medical attributes of GP care. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding about preferences of this group of patients in relation to non-medical attributes of primary health care. This may help to develop strategies to improve the quality of care that senior citizens receive from their GP. Methods Semi-structured interviews (N = 13 with senior citizens (65-91 years in a judgement sample were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis was conducted according to qualitative research methodology and the frame work method. Results Continuity of care providers, i.e. GP and practice nurses, GPs' expertise, trust, free choice of GP and a kind open attitude were highly valued. Accessibility by phone did not meet the expectations of the interviewees. The interviewees had difficulties with the GP out-of-office hours services. Spontaneous home visits were appreciated by some, but rejected by others. They preferred to receive verbal information rather than collecting information from leaflets. Distance to the practice and continuity of caregiver seemed to conflict for respondents. Conclusions Preferences change in the process of ageing and growing health problems. GPs and their co-workers should be also aware of the changing needs of the elderly regarding non-medical attributes of GP care. Meeting their needs regarding non-medical attributes of primary health care is important to improve the quality of care.

  11. Identifying context factors explaining physician's low performance in communication assessment: an explorative study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essers, Geurt; van Dulmen, Sandra; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees; Kramer, Anneke

    2011-12-13

    Communication is a key competence for health care professionals. Analysis of registrar and GP communication performance in daily practice, however, suggests a suboptimal application of communication skills. The influence of context factors could reveal why communication performance levels, on average, do not appear adequate. The context of daily practice may require different skills or specific ways of handling these skills, whereas communication skills are mostly treated as generic. So far no empirical analysis of the context has been made. Our aim was to identify context factors that could be related to GP communication. A purposive sample of real-life videotaped GP consultations was analyzed (N = 17). As a frame of reference we chose the MAAS-Global, a widely used assessment instrument for medical communication. By inductive reasoning, we analyzed the GP behaviour in the consultation leading to poor item scores on the MAAS-Global. In these cases we looked for the presence of an intervening context factor, and how this might explain the actual GP communication behaviour. We reached saturation after having viewed 17 consultations. We identified 19 context factors that could potentially explain the deviation from generic recommendations on communication skills. These context factors can be categorized into doctor-related, patient-related, and consultation-related factors. Several context factors seem to influence doctor-patient communication, requiring the GP to apply communication skills differently from recommendations on communication. From this study we conclude that there is a need to explicitly account for context factors in the assessment of GP (and GP registrar) communication performance. The next step is to validate our findings.

  12. Subjective memory impairment in general practice : Short overview and design of a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentzek, Michael; Leve, Verena; Leucht, Verena

    2017-05-01

    Public awareness for dementia is rising and patients with concerns about forgetfulness are not uncommon in general practice. For the general practitioner (GP) subjectively perceived memory impairment (SMI) also offers a chance to broach the issue of cognitive function with the patient. This may support GPs' patient-centered care in terms of a broader frailty concept. What is SMI (definition, operationalization, prevalence and burden)? Which conceptions and approaches do GPs have regarding SMI? Narrative overview of recent SMI criteria and results, selective utilization of results from a systematic literature search on GP dementia care, non-systematic search regarding SMI in general practice, deduction of a study design from the overview and development according to international standards. Studies revealed that approximately 60% of GP patients aged >74 reported a declining memory, every sixth person had concerns about this aspect and only relatively few seek medical advice. Concerns about SMI are considered a risk factor for future dementia. Specific general practice conceptions about SMI could not be identified in the literature. Using guidelines for mixed methods research, the design of an exploratory sequential mixed methods study is presented, which should reveal different attitudes of GPs towards SMI. Subjective memory impairment (SMI) is a common feature and troubles a considerable proportion of patients. Neuropsychiatric research is progressing, but for the transfer of the SMI concept into routine practice, involvement of GP research is necessary. A new study aims to make a contribution to this.

  13. The impact of pay-for-performance on professional boundaries in UK general practice: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne; Huby, Guro; Watkins, Francis; Checkland, Kath; McDonald, Ruth; Davies, Huw; Guthrie, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    The 2004 new General Medical Services (nGMS) contract exemplifies trends across the public services towards increased definition, measurement and regulation of professional work, with general practice income now largely dependent on the quality of care provided across a range of clinical and organisational indicators known collectively as the 'Quality and Outcomes Framework' (QOF). This paper reports an ethnographically based study of the impact of the new contract and the financial incentives contained within it on professional boundaries in UK general practice. The distribution of clinical and administrative work has changed significantly and there has been a new concentration of authority, with QOF decision making and monitoring being led by an internal QOF team of clinical and managerial staff who make the major practice-level decisions about QOF, monitor progress against targets, and intervene to resolve areas or indicators at risk of missing targets. General practitioners and nurses, however, appear to have accommodated these changes by re-creating long established narratives on professional boundaries and clinical hierarchies. This paper is concerned with the impact of these new arrangements on existing clinical hierarchies.

  14. Population health needs as predictors of variations in NHS practice payments: a cross-sectional study of English general practices in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Louis S; Baker, Richard; Wilson, Andrew; Walker, Nicola; Boomla, Kambiz; Bankart, M John G

    2017-01-01

    NHS general practice payments in England include pay for performance elements and a weighted component designed to compensate for workload, but without measures of specific deprivation or ethnic groups. To determine whether population factors related to health needs predicted variations in NHS payments to individual general practices in England. Cross-sectional study of all practices in England, in financial years 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. Descriptive statistics, univariable analyses (examining correlations between payment and predictors), and multivariable analyses (undertaking multivariable linear regressions for each year, with logarithms of payments as the dependent variables, and with population, practice, and performance factors as independent variables) were undertaken. Several population variables predicted variations in adjusted total payments, but inconsistently. Higher payments were associated with increases in deprivation, patients of older age, African Caribbean ethnic group, and asthma prevalence. Lower payments were associated with an increase in smoking prevalence. Long-term health conditions, South Asian ethnic group, and diabetes prevalence were not predictive. The adjusted R 2 values were 0.359 (2013-2014) and 0.374 (2014-2015). A slightly different set of variables predicted variations in the payment component designed to compensate for workload. Lower payments were associated with increases in deprivation, patients of older age, and diabetes prevalence. Smoking prevalence was not predictive. There was a geographical differential. Population factors related to health needs were, overall, poor predictors of variations in adjusted total practice payments and in the payment component designed to compensate for workload. Revising the weighting formula and extending weighting to other payment components might better support practices to address these needs. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  15. General practices as emergent research organizations: a qualitative study into organizational development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Fraser; Shaw, Sara; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Carter, Yvonne H

    2005-06-01

    An increasing proportion of research in primary care is locally undertaken in designated research practices. Capacity building to support high quality research at these grass roots is urgently needed and is a government priority. There is little previously published research on the process by which GP practices develop as research organizations or on their specific support needs at organizational level. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with 28 key informants in 11 research practices across the UK, we explored their historical accounts of the development of research activity. We analysed the data with reference to contemporary theories of organizational development. Participants identified a number of key events and processes, which allowed us to produce a five-phase model of practice development in relation to research activity (creative energy, concrete planning, transformation/differentiation, consolidation and collaboration). Movement between these phases was not linear or continuous, but showed emergent and adaptive properties in which specific triggers and set-backs were often critical. This developmental model challenges previous categorical taxonomies of research practices. It forms a theory-driven framework for providing appropriate support at the grass roots of primary care research, based on the practice's phase of development and the nature of external triggers and potential setbacks. Our findings have important implications for the strategic development of practice-based research in the UK, and could serve as a model for the wider international community.

  16. Identifying context factors explaining physician's low performance in communication assessment: an explorative study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, G.; Dulmen, S. van; Weel, C. van; Vleuten, C. van der; Kramer, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication is a key competence for health care professionals. Analysis of registrar and GP communication performance in daily practice, however, suggests a suboptimal application of communication skills. The influence of context factors could reveal why communication performance

  17. Identifying context factors explaining physician's low performance in communication assessment: an explorative study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, G.T.J.M.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Weel, C. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Kramer, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Communication is a key competence for health care professionals. Analysis of registrar and GP communication performance in daily practice, however, suggests a suboptimal application of communication skills. The influence of context factors could reveal why communication

  18. "Saying no is no easy matter" A qualitative study of competing concerns in rationing decisions in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim Ole

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general practitioner in Norway is expected to ensure equity and effectiveness through fair rationing. At the same time, due to recent reforms of the Norwegian health care sector, both the role of economic incentives and patient autonomy have been strengthened. Studies indicate that modern general practitioners, both in Norway and in other countries are uncomfortable with the gatekeeper role, but there is little knowledge about how general practitioners experience rationing in practice. Methods Through focus group interviews with Norwegian general practitioners, we explore physicians' attitudes toward factors of influence on medical decision making and how rationing dilemmas are experienced in everyday practice. Results Four major concerns appeared in the group discussions: The obligation to ration health care, professional autonomy, patient autonomy, and competition. A central finding was that the physicians find rationing difficult because saying no in face to face relations often is felt uncomfortable and in conflict with other important objectives for the general practitioner. Conclusion It is important to understand the association between using economic incentives in the management of health care, increasing patient autonomy, and the willingness among physicians to contribute to efficient, fair and legitimate resource allocation.

  19. STP Position Paper: Recommended Practices for Sampling and Processing the Nervous System (Brain, Spinal Cord, Nerve, and Eye) during Nonclinical General Toxicity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology charged a Nervous System Sampling Working Group with devising recommended practices to routinely screen the central and peripheral nervous systems in Good Laboratory Practice-type nonclinical general toxicity studies. Brains should be trimmed ...

  20. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  1. The lesser evil? Initiating a benzodiazepine prescription in general practice: a qualitative study on GPs' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthierens, Sibyl; Habraken, Hilde; Petrovic, Mirko; Christiaens, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    Chronic benzodiazepine (BZD) use is widespread and linked with adverse effects. There is consensus concerning the importance of initiating BZD as a crucial moment. Nevertheless specific research in this field is lacking. This paper addresses the views of GPs on why they start prescribing BZDs to first-time users. Qualitative study with five focus groups analysed using a systematic content analysis. Regions of Ghent and Brussels in Belgium. A total of 35 general practitioners. The GPs' perspective on their initiating of BZD prescribing. GPs reported that they are cautious in initiating BZD usage. At the same time, GPs feel overwhelmed by the psychosocial problems of their patients. They show empathy by prescribing. They feel in certain situations there are no other solutions and they experience BZDs as the lesser evil. They admit to resorting to BZDs because of time restraint and lack of alternatives. GPs do not perceive the addictive nature of BZD consumption as a problem with first-time users. GPs do not specifically mention patients' demand as an element for starting. The main concern of GPs is to help the patient. GPs should be aware of the addictive nature of BZD even in low doses and a non-pharmacological approach should be seen as the best first approach. If GPs decide to prescribe a BZD they should make plain to the patient that the medication is only a "temporary" solution with clear agreements with regard to medication withdrawal.

  2. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, Jean-François; Becker, Annette; Leonhardt, Corinna; Keller, Stefan; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Baum, Erika; Pfingsten, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; Kochen, Michael M

    2007-12-18

    Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs) recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months A total of 691 (51%) respectively 928 (69%) out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM.

  3. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in general practice – a prospective, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Skok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of dyspeptic patients is a diagnostic and therapeutic problem frequently encountered by general and family practitioners, by internists and gastroenterologists.Aims: In our study we attempted to assess the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients over 60 who are regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.Patients and methods: This is a prospective cohort study based on an interview during examination in the OPC, the results obtained by the diagnostic procedures and follow-up. It was carried out between 1999 and 2003 at a family practitioner’s and a gastroenterologic OPC. In patients who were regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, we established the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms, the most often used drugs and the type of diagnostic procedure applied to define the cause of dyspepsia. The control group was composed of patients over 60 who were also exhibiting dyspeptic symptoms but not using any NSAID.Results: The study comprised 50 patients, 27 women and 23 men, the mean age was 67.3 years, the range 60–80 years. The control group comprised 50 patients, 28 women and 22 men, the mean age was 66.6 years, the range 61–80 years. All patients of the study group had used NSAR or preparations of acetylsalicylic acid during the past 3 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients of both groups as regards the number and use of other drugs, p = 0.65. The average score of dyspeptic complaints in our study group was 3.02, SD ± 0.6, and 70% of patients wished to use H2 antagonists or proton pump inhibitors for these complaints. In patients of the control group, the average score of complaints was 2.72, SD ± 0.7, and they also took drugs for the alleviation of their complaints more rarely.Conclusions: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs belong among the important causes of dyspepsia in the elderly. When making decisions about the various diagnostic procedures for

  4. Quality improvement training for core medical and general practice trainees: a pilot study of project participation, completion and journal publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Duncan; McKay, John; Bowie, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Small-scale quality improvement projects are expected to make a significant contribution towards improving the quality of healthcare. Enabling doctors-in-training to design and lead quality improvement projects is important preparation for independent practice. Participation is mandatory in speciality training curricula. However, provision of training and ongoing support in quality improvement methods and practice is variable. We aimed to design and deliver a quality improvement training package to core medical and general practice specialty trainees and evaluate impact in terms of project participation, completion and publication in a healthcare journal. A quality improvement training package was developed and delivered to core medical trainees and general practice specialty trainees in the west of Scotland encompassing a 1-day workshop and mentoring during completion of a quality improvement project over 3 months. A mixed methods evaluation was undertaken and data collected via questionnaire surveys, knowledge assessment, and formative assessment of project proposals, completed quality improvement projects and publication success. Twenty-three participants attended the training day with 20 submitting a project proposal (87%). Ten completed quality improvement projects (43%), eight were judged as satisfactory (35%), and four were submitted and accepted for journal publication (17%). Knowledge and confidence in aspects of quality improvement improved during the pilot, while early feedback on project proposals was valued (85.7%). This small study reports modest success in training core medical trainees and general practice specialty trainees in quality improvement. Many gained knowledge of, confidence in and experience of quality improvement, while journal publication was shown to be possible. The development of educational resources to aid quality improvement project completion and mentoring support is necessary if expectations for quality improvement are to be

  5. Patient information materials in general practices and promotion of health literacy: an observational study of their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Joanne; Estacio, Emee Vida; Saidy-Khan, Sirandou

    2015-03-01

    Government policy in the UK emphasises providing patients with good health information to encourage participation in their health care. Patient information leaflets (PILs) form part of this policy and have been shown to affect patient health outcomes; however, many are poorly written. To describe the PILs in general practice surgeries in Stoke-on-Trent in terms of readability and variety of content. An observational study of randomly selected GP practices (n = 17) across Stoke-on-Trent. PILs were assessed for readability (Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level) and compared with national skills level data and with the recommended level for medical information. The PILs were also categorised for content using the Rudd (2007) health material classification framework. A total of 345 PILs were collected and assessed. Only 24.3% meet recommended reading-level criteria. Compared with national skills levels, over 75% of the PILs collected were too complex for at least 15% of the English population. Of the PILs, 47.8% were classified as 'systems navigation' (information regarding services); 22.9% were disease prevention (screening and immunisations); 14.2% personal and public safety; and less than 10% were for managing illness or health promotion. Current PILs in general practices do not all promote health literacy. Information only accessible to a proportion of higher skilled patients may increase inequalities in health. Less than 10% of PILs promote managing illness or healthy lifestyles. Processes must be put in place to improve the readability and variety of content of PILs in GP practices. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  6. Prevalence of urinary tract infection in acutely unwell children in general practice: a prospective study with systematic urine sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kathryn; Edwards, Adrian; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C

    2013-02-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children may be associated with long-term complications that could be prevented by prompt treatment. To determine the prevalence of UTI in acutely ill children ≤ 5 years presenting in general practice and to explore patterns of presenting symptoms and urine sampling strategies. Prospective observational study with systematic urine sampling, in general practices in Wales, UK. In total, 1003 children were recruited from 13 general practices between March 2008 and July 2010. The prevalence of UTI was determined and multivariable analysis performed to determine the probability of UTI. Out of 597 (60.0%) children who provided urine samples within 2 days, the prevalence of UTI was 5.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.3% to 8.0%) overall, 7.3% in those UTI (P = 0.64; P = 0.69, respectively). The probability of UTI in children aged ≥3 years without increased urinary frequency or dysuria was 2%. The probability of UTI was ≥5% in all other groups. Urine sampling based purely on GP suspicion would have missed 80% of UTIs, while a sampling strategy based on current guidelines would have missed 50%. Approximately 6% of acutely unwell children presenting to UK general practice met the criteria for a laboratory diagnosis of UTI. This higher than previously recognised prior probability of UTI warrants raised awareness of the condition and suggests clinicians should lower their threshold for urine sampling in young children. The absence of fever or presence of an alternative source of infection, as emphasised in current guidelines, may not rule out UTI in young children with adequate certainty.

  7. Academic impact of a public electronic health database: bibliometric analysis of studies using the general practice research database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies that use electronic health databases as research material are getting popular but the influence of a single electronic health database had not been well investigated yet. The United Kingdom's General Practice Research Database (GPRD is one of the few electronic health databases publicly available to academic researchers. This study analyzed studies that used GPRD to demonstrate the scientific production and academic impact by a single public health database. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: A total of 749 studies published between 1995 and 2009 with 'General Practice Research Database' as their topics, defined as GPRD studies, were extracted from Web of Science. By the end of 2009, the GPRD had attracted 1251 authors from 22 countries and been used extensively in 749 studies published in 193 journals across 58 study fields. Each GPRD study was cited 2.7 times by successive studies. Moreover, the total number of GPRD studies increased rapidly, and it is expected to reach 1500 by 2015, twice the number accumulated till the end of 2009. Since 17 of the most prolific authors (1.4% of all authors contributed nearly half (47.9% of GPRD studies, success in conducting GPRD studies may accumulate. The GPRD was used mainly in, but not limited to, the three study fields of "Pharmacology and Pharmacy", "General and Internal Medicine", and "Public, Environmental and Occupational Health". The UK and United States were the two most active regions of GPRD studies. One-third of GRPD studies were internationally co-authored. CONCLUSIONS: A public electronic health database such as the GPRD will promote scientific production in many ways. Data owners of electronic health databases at a national level should consider how to reduce access barriers and to make data more available for research.

  8. Academic Impact of a Public Electronic Health Database: Bibliometric Analysis of Studies Using the General Practice Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Wu, Jau-Ching; Haschler, Ingo; Majeed, Azeem; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies that use electronic health databases as research material are getting popular but the influence of a single electronic health database had not been well investigated yet. The United Kingdom's General Practice Research Database (GPRD) is one of the few electronic health databases publicly available to academic researchers. This study analyzed studies that used GPRD to demonstrate the scientific production and academic impact by a single public health database. Methodology and Findings A total of 749 studies published between 1995 and 2009 with ‘General Practice Research Database’ as their topics, defined as GPRD studies, were extracted from Web of Science. By the end of 2009, the GPRD had attracted 1251 authors from 22 countries and been used extensively in 749 studies published in 193 journals across 58 study fields. Each GPRD study was cited 2.7 times by successive studies. Moreover, the total number of GPRD studies increased rapidly, and it is expected to reach 1500 by 2015, twice the number accumulated till the end of 2009. Since 17 of the most prolific authors (1.4% of all authors) contributed nearly half (47.9%) of GPRD studies, success in conducting GPRD studies may accumulate. The GPRD was used mainly in, but not limited to, the three study fields of “Pharmacology and Pharmacy”, “General and Internal Medicine”, and “Public, Environmental and Occupational Health”. The UK and United States were the two most active regions of GPRD studies. One-third of GRPD studies were internationally co-authored. Conclusions A public electronic health database such as the GPRD will promote scientific production in many ways. Data owners of electronic health databases at a national level should consider how to reduce access barriers and to make data more available for research. PMID:21731733

  9. Chinese Elders' views on their interactions in general practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenmi; Beaver, Kinta; Speed, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese ethnic population are among the UK's largest visible minority but there is limited evidence about this population, their views about their interactions with General Practitioners (GPs) and how this impacts on their health. This study aimed to explore Chinese Elders' experiences of and attitudes towards the provision of health services in primary care. The method of investigation was a Grounded Theory study using open-ended in-depth interviews. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to recruit thirty-three Chinese Elders from Chinese communities in the North West of England. Face-to-face interviews were conducted and audio-recorded; transcripts were translated, back translated, analysed and coded by all members of the research team to identify concepts following the Grounded Theory approach. Themes were generated from the data and were used to guide the study into the theoretical sampling phase of the investigation. Chinese Elders were inclined to present to GPs only when health concerns were perceived as serious. This was defined as being beyond their ability to self-manage. Elders tended to adopt self-management strategies rather than follow professional advice. This was mainly due to communication difficulties, poor understanding of the advice doctors gave, and the way that Chinese patients interpreted and used the advice they were given. Chinese Elders reported that the purpose of contacting doctors was to obtain medicines. They presumed that once medication had been prescribed their symptoms would be cured, and then they believed that they could self-manage their health, usually without further GP or other medical follow up. These data suggest that significant misunderstandings between Chinese Elders and GPs exist. The findings highlight the dissatisfaction expressed by Elders regarding their interactions with UK health professionals. Chinese Elders' perceptions are influenced by the way Chinese people think about health and illness, and also

  10. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, Jean-François; Becker, Annette; Leonhardt, Corinna; Keller, Stefan; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Baum, Erika; Pfingsten, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; Kochen, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    Background Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. Methods This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs) recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months Results A total of 691 (51%) respectively 928 (69%) out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. Conclusion The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM. PMID:18088435

  11. Use of complementary alternative medicine for low back pain consulting in general practice: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum Erika

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although back pain is considered one of the most frequent reasons why patients seek complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies little is known on the extent patients are actually using CAM for back pain. Methods This is a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort study embedded in a RCT. General practitioners (GPs recruited consecutively adult patients presenting with LBP. Data on physical function, on subjective mood, and on utilization of health services was collected at the first consultation and at follow-up telephone interviews for a period of twelve months Results A total of 691 (51% respectively 928 (69% out of 1,342 patients received one form of CAM depending on the definition. Local heat, massage, and spinal manipulation were the forms of CAM most commonly offered. Using CAM was associated with specialist care, chronic LBP and treatment in a rehabilitation facility. Receiving spinal manipulation, acupuncture or TENS was associated with consulting a GP providing these services. Apart from chronicity disease related factors like functional capacity or pain only showed weak or no association with receiving CAM. Conclusion The frequent use of CAM for LBP demonstrates that CAM is popular in patients and doctors alike. The observed association with a treatment in a rehabilitation facility or with specialist consultations rather reflects professional preferences of the physicians than a clear medical indication. The observed dependence on providers and provider related services, as well as a significant proportion receiving CAM that did not meet the so far established selection criteria suggests some arbitrary use of CAM.

  12. Teaching points-do they occur and what do they contain? An observation study concerning the general practice rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gertrude Florence; Roth, Lisa Marie; Donner-Banzhoff, Nobert; Boesner, Stefan

    2016-04-18

    A general practice rotation is mandatory in most undergraduate medical education programs. However, little is known about the student-teacher interaction which takes place in this setting. In this study we analyzed occurrence and content of teaching points. From April to December 2012, 410 individual patient consultations were observed in twelve teaching practices associated with the Philipps University Marburg, Germany. Material was collected using structured field-note forms and videotaping. Data analysis was descriptive in form. A teaching point is defined here as a general rule or specific, case-related information divulged by the teaching practitioner. According to the analysis of 410 consultations, teaching points were made in 66.3% of consultations. During these consultations, 74.3% general- and 46.3% case related teaching points occurred; multiple categorizations were possible. Of seven possible topics, therapy was most common, followed, in frequency of occurrence, by patient history, diagnostic procedure, physical examination, disease pathology, differential diagnosis, risk factors and case presentation. The majority of consultations conducted within student presence contained teaching points, most frequently concerning therapy. General teaching points were more common than specific teaching points. Whilst it is encouraging that most consultations included teaching points, faculty development aimed at raising awareness for teaching and learning techniques is important.

  13. Nigerian Journal of General Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Nigerian Journal of General Practice is the Official Publication of the Association of General and Private Medical Practitioners of Nigeria [AGPMPN] and a forum for family private/general practice medicine education and research. The Nigerian Journal of General Practice invites scholarly manuscripts ...

  14. General practice on-the-job training in Chinese urban community: a qualitative study on needs and challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: On-the-job training is an important strategy for general practitioners to deliver appropriately community health services in China. The development of basic professional competence for general practitioners is the main goal of on-the-job training program. The aim of this study was to explore the needs of and the challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners, and to provide advices for policy-makers to carry out this program more effectively. METHODS: We conducted 3 nominal group techniques, 17 in-depth interviews and 3 focus groups to identify the status of, needs of and challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners in Liaoning, Ningxia, and Fujian provinces from September 2011 until December 2011. Audiotapes and transcripts were analyzed to identify major themes. Content analysis of the data was completed from January 2012 to March 2012. RESULTS: Basic theoretical knowledge and clinical skills were the main needs for general practitioners during on-the-job training. The challenges during training included the time contradiction between work and training, deficiencies of qualified preceptors, and lack of training funds. Participants gave recommendations how to resolve the above problems. CONCLUSIONS: In order to improve the outcomes of general practice on-the-job training, it is necessary for government officials to resolve the contradiction between work and training, train preceptors continuously, and increase financial support in the training program.

  15. General Practice On-the-Job Training in Chinese Urban Community: A Qualitative Study on Needs and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wu, Tao; Huang, Yafang; Guo, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Background On-the-job training is an important strategy for general practitioners to deliver appropriately community health services in China. The development of basic professional competence for general practitioners is the main goal of on-the-job training program. The aim of this study was to explore the needs of and the challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners, and to provide advices for policy-makers to carry out this program more effectively. Methods We conducted 3 nominal group techniques, 17 in-depth interviews and 3 focus groups to identify the status of, needs of and challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners in Liaoning, Ningxia, and Fujian provinces from September 2011 until December 2011. Audiotapes and transcripts were analyzed to identify major themes. Content analysis of the data was completed from January 2012 to March 2012. Results Basic theoretical knowledge and clinical skills were the main needs for general practitioners during on-the-job training. The challenges during training included the time contradiction between work and training, deficiencies of qualified preceptors, and lack of training funds. Participants gave recommendations how to resolve the above problems. Conclusions In order to improve the outcomes of general practice on-the-job training, it is necessary for government officials to resolve the contradiction between work and training, train preceptors continuously, and increase financial support in the training program. PMID:24728399

  16. General practice on-the-job training in Chinese urban community: a qualitative study on needs and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yali; Chen, Rui; Wang, Bo; Wu, Tao; Huang, Yafang; Guo, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    On-the-job training is an important strategy for general practitioners to deliver appropriately community health services in China. The development of basic professional competence for general practitioners is the main goal of on-the-job training program. The aim of this study was to explore the needs of and the challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners, and to provide advices for policy-makers to carry out this program more effectively. We conducted 3 nominal group techniques, 17 in-depth interviews and 3 focus groups to identify the status of, needs of and challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners in Liaoning, Ningxia, and Fujian provinces from September 2011 until December 2011. Audiotapes and transcripts were analyzed to identify major themes. Content analysis of the data was completed from January 2012 to March 2012. Basic theoretical knowledge and clinical skills were the main needs for general practitioners during on-the-job training. The challenges during training included the time contradiction between work and training, deficiencies of qualified preceptors, and lack of training funds. Participants gave recommendations how to resolve the above problems. In order to improve the outcomes of general practice on-the-job training, it is necessary for government officials to resolve the contradiction between work and training, train preceptors continuously, and increase financial support in the training program.

  17. Managing the consultation with patients with medically unexplained symptoms: a grounded theory study of supervisors and registrars in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Louise

    2014-12-05

    Patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) commonly present in general practice. They often experience significant disability and have difficulty accessing appropriate care. Many feel frustrated and helpless. Doctors also describe feeling frustrated and helpless when managing these patients. These shared negative feelings can have a detrimental effect on the therapeutic relationship and on clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore how novice and experienced GPs manage patients with MUS and how these skills are taught and learned in GP training. A constructivist grounded theory study with 24 general practice registrars and supervisors in GP training practices across Australia. Registrars lacked a framework for managing patients with MUS. Some described negative feelings towards patients that were uncomfortable and confronting. Registrars also were uncertain about their clinical role: where their professional responsibilities began and ended. Supervisors utilised a range of strategies to address the practical, interpersonal and therapeutic challenges associated with the care of these patients. Negative feelings and a lack of diagnostic language and frameworks may prevent registrars from managing these patients effectively. Some of these negative feelings, such as frustration, shame and helplessness, are shared between doctors and patients. Registrars need assistance to identify and manage these difficult feelings so that consultations are more effective. The care of these patients also raises issues of professional identity, roles and responsibilities. Supervisors can assist their registrars by proactively sharing models of the consultation, strategies for managing their own feelings and frustrations, and ways of understanding and managing the therapeutic relationship in this difficult area of practice.

  18. A qualitative study of patient experiences of Type 2 Diabetes care delivered comparatively by General Practice Nurses and Medical Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Eileen; Saunders, Rosemary; Drury, Vicki

    2016-07-01

    To explore patient experiences of type 2 diabetes mellitus care delivered by general practice nurses in collaboration with the general practitioner. Australian general practice nurses are expanding their role in multidisciplinary type 2 diabetes care with limited research on patient perceptions of care provision within this collaborative model. Qualitative interpretive. Purposeful sampling was used to invite the patients (n = 10). Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Braun and Clarke's () inductive coding thematic analysis process was used to interpret the data. All participants experienced their General Practice Nurse consultation as a clinical assessment for their General Practitioner. While they appreciated the extra time with the General Practice Nurse, they were unsure of the purpose of the consultation beyond clinical assessment. They described the ongoing challenge of living with T2DM and identified a need for additional information and advice. The results suggest that the model of general practice nurse type 2 diabetes care has an important role to play in the delivery of effective ongoing care of patients. However, this role requires further development to ensure that it is understood by the patients as a role that not only conducts clinical assessments but also provides relevant education and self-management support as part of a collaborative approach to care delivery with General Practitioners. The findings are relevant to primary health care clinicians providing diabetes care to inform more relevant supportive care by general practice nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The contribution of demographic and morbidity factors to self-reported visit frequency of patients: a cross-sectional study of general practice patients in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Helena

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the factors that affect patients' utilisation of health services is important for health service provision and effective patient management. This study aimed to investigate the specific morbidity and demographic factors related to the frequency with which general practice patients visit a general practitioner/family physician (GP in Australia. Methods A sub-study was undertaken as part of an ongoing national study of general practice activity in Australia. A cluster sample of 10,755 general practice patients were surveyed through a random sample of 379 general practitioners. The patient reported the number of times he/she had visited a general practitioner in the previous twelve months. The GP recorded all the patient's major health problems, including those managed at the current consultation. Results Patients reported an average of 8.8 visits to a general practitioner per year. After adjusting for other patient demographics and number of health problems, concession health care card holders made on average 2.6 more visits per year to a general practitioner than did non-card holders (p Conclusions Anxiety, back pain and depression are associated with greater patient demand for general practice services than other health problems. The effect of sociodemographic factors on patient utilisation of general practice services is complex. Equity of access to general practice services remains an issue for patients from remote areas, while concession health care card holders are attending general practice more frequently than other patients relative to their number of health problems.

  20. The diagnostic role of gut feelings in general practice A focus group study of the concept and its determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weijden Trudy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners sometimes base clinical decisions on gut feelings alone, even though there is little evidence of their diagnostic and prognostic value in daily practice. Research into these aspects and the use of the concept in medical education require a practical and valid description of gut feelings. The goal of our study was therefore to describe the concept of gut feelings in general practice and to identify their main determinants Methods Qualitative research including 4 focus group discussions. A heterogeneous sample of 28 GPs. Text analysis of the focus group discussions, using a grounded theory approach. Results Gut feelings are familiar to most GPs in the Netherlands and play a substantial role in their everyday routine. The participants distinguished two types of gut feelings, a sense of reassurance and a sense of alarm. In the former case, a GP is sure about prognosis and therapy, although they may not always have a clear diagnosis in mind. A sense of alarm means that a GP has the feeling that something is wrong even though objective arguments are lacking. GPs in the focus groups experienced gut feelings as a compass in situations of uncertainty and the majority of GPs trusted this guide. We identified the main determinants of gut feelings: fitting, alerting and interfering factors, sensation, contextual knowledge, medical education, experience and personality. Conclusion The role of gut feelings in general practice has become much clearer, but we need more research into the contributions of individual determinants and into the test properties of gut feelings to make the concept suitable for medical education.

  1. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to investigate to what extent the Clinical Interview for Depression (CID) used in the general practice setting covers clinically valid subscales (depression, anxiety, and apathy) which can measure outcome of antidepressant therapy as well as identifying subsyndromes...... within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale...... (approximately 20%) had an atypical depression. LIMITATIONS: The samples were derived from a single study and were all rated by a single rater. CONCLUSION: The CID contains subscales of depression, anxiety, and apathy with an acceptable scalability for use in general practice. A subsyndrome of atypical...

  2. Prognostic factors for neckpain in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Windt, D. van der; Koes, B.W.; Bouter, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  3. Healthcare utilization in general practice before and after psychological treatment: a follow-up data linkage study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Smit, Dineke; Verheij, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Literature suggests that serious mental health problems increase the use of health services and psychological interventions can reduce this effect. This study investigates whether this effect is also found in primary care patients with less serious mental health problems. Routine electronic health records (EHR) from a representative sample of 128 general practices were linked to patient files from 150 primary care psychologists participating in the NIVEL Primary Care Database, using a trusted third party. Data were linked using the date of birth, gender, and postcode. This yielded 503 unique data pairs that were listed in one of the participating GP practices in 2008-2010, for people who had psychological treatment from a psychologist that ended in 2009. The number of contacts, health problems presented, and prescribed medication in general practice were analysed before and after the psychological treatment. Nearly all 503 patients consulted their GP during the six months preceding the psychological treatment (90.9%) and also in the six months after this treatment had ended (83.7%). The frequency of contacts was significantly higher before than after the psychological treatment (6.1 vs. 4.8). Fewer patients contacted their GPs specifically for psychological or social problems (46.3% vs. 38.8%) and fewer patients had anxiolytic drug prescriptions (15.5% vs. 7.6%) after psychological treatment. After psychological treatment, patients contact their GPs less often and present fewer psychological or social problems. Although contact rates seem to decrease, clients of psychologists are still frequent GP attenders.

  4. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice: a study by the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D; Horowitz, Allan J; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G

    2012-05-01

    The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for teeth with irreversible pulpitis, necrotic pulp or periapical

  5. Practical study on the integrated course of general pathology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian ZHAO; Guo-hui FU; Ying HUANG; Wei LIU

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at summarizing the experience of offering the integrated course of general pathology and pathophysiology for eight-year clinical medicine program, providing references for further improving the teaching quality,and laying a foundation for expanding the course to five-year clinical medicine program. Teaching contents of the integrated course of general pathology and pathophysiology focus on the crossing and integration of relevant discipline knowledge and properly integrating the traditional pathological knowledge,which emphasizes morphological changes of human body,with the pathophysiological knowledge,which emphasizes functional and metabolic changes of human body. It is helpful for breaking the boundaries of disciplines and enabling students to understand the laws of occurrence and development of diseases as a whole.The teaching model has been improved by introducing new teaching methods such as PBL,so as to avoid the shortcomings of traditional teaching method. The innovation consciousness,spirit of active learning,and critical thinking of students are trained via discussions of clinical cases,so as to lay a solid foundation for the learning of subsequent clinical courses and academic research in the future. In summary,integrated course benefits the overall optimization of the structure of medical courses,promotes the improvement of teaching quality,and can be expanded to five-year clinical medicine program in the future.

  6. Nigerian Journal of General Practice: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of General Practice: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Nigerian Journal of General Practice: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Suspected cow's milk allergy in everyday general practice: a retrospective cohort study on health care burden and guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoogen, Sharayke C T A; van de Pol, Alma C; Meijer, Yolanda; Toet, Jaap; van Klei, Céline; de Wit, Niek J

    2014-08-09

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is the most common food allergy among infants. No data are available on the health care burden of suspected CMA in general practice. This study was conducted to evaluate the burden of suspected CMA in general practice (GP): (a) prevalence, (b) presenting symptoms, (c) diagnostic process, (d) guideline adherence, and (e) dietary measures. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in four Julius Healthcare Centers (JHCs). These JHCs form the core primary care academic network of the department of general practice of the University Medical Center of Utrecht. Electronic records of the first year of infants born May 2009 - April 2010 registered in the JHCs were screened for possible CMA suspicion. Preventive child healthcare (PCH) records were reviewed for additional information. Clinical presentation, diagnostic strategies and dietary measures were extracted. Of 804 infants evaluated, 55 presented with symptoms fitting the suspicion of CMA (prevalence of 7%). Presenting complaints involved the skin (71%); the gastrointestinal tract (60%); the respiratory tract (13%) or other symptoms (36%) and 23 infants presented with symptoms of two or more organ systems. In 31 children (56%) a food challenge was performed (n = 28 open and n = 3 double-blind). Open challenge test results were difficult to interpret due to inadequate implementation or reporting. None had confirmed CMA after an adequate challenge test. Long term milk substitute formulas were prescribed in 39 (71%) infants. On a yearly basis seven percent of children visit their GP for suspected CMA. A positive CMA diagnosis was rarely established after adequate implementation and reporting of diagnostics, yet long term dietary measures were prescribed in >70% of patients. There is definitely need for improvement of diagnosing CMA in primary care.

  8. The predictive validity of selection for entry into postgraduate training in general practice: evidence from three longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Lievens, Filip; Kerrin, Máire; Munro, Neil; Irish, Bill

    2013-11-01

    The selection methodology for UK general practice is designed to accommodate several thousand applicants per year and targets six core attributes identified in a multi-method job-analysis study To evaluate the predictive validity of selection methods for entry into postgraduate training, comprising a clinical problem-solving test, a situational judgement test, and a selection centre. A three-part longitudinal predictive validity study of selection into training for UK general practice. In sample 1, participants were junior doctors applying for training in general practice (n = 6824). In sample 2, participants were GP registrars 1 year into training (n = 196). In sample 3, participants were GP registrars sitting the licensing examination after 3 years, at the end of training (n = 2292). The outcome measures include: assessor ratings of performance in a selection centre comprising job simulation exercises (sample 1); supervisor ratings of trainee job performance 1 year into training (sample 2); and licensing examination results, including an applied knowledge examination and a 12-station clinical skills objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; sample 3). Performance ratings at selection predicted subsequent supervisor ratings of job performance 1 year later. Selection results also significantly predicted performance on both the clinical skills OSCE and applied knowledge examination for licensing at the end of training. In combination, these longitudinal findings provide good evidence of the predictive validity of the selection methods, and are the first reported for entry into postgraduate training. Results show that the best predictor of work performance and training outcomes is a combination of a clinical problem-solving test, a situational judgement test, and a selection centre. Implications for selection methods for all postgraduate specialties are considered.

  9. “Management of Overweight during Childhood: A Focus Group Study on Health Professionals’ Experiences in General Practice,”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lone Marie; Ledderer, Loni; Jarbol, Dorte E

    2015-01-01

    Background. Because of the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood in the Western world, focus on the management in general practice has also increased. Objective. To explore the experiences of general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses participating in a randomised...... controlled trial (RCT) comparing two management programmes in general practice for children who are overweight or obese. Methods. Three focus groups with GPs and nurses participating in the RCT. Transcribed data were analysed using systematic text condensation followed by thematic analysis. Results. Health...... to addressing overweight in children. However, increasing awareness of obesity in childhood and its consequences in society was considered helpful to reach an understanding of the articulations concerning how best to address the issue. Conclusions. Health professionals in general practice recognised...

  10. Course organizers in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    In August/September 1984 a survey of the 267 course organizers in post in England and Wales was carried out. Eighty-two per cent replied to a questionnaire asking for details about their work and personal status. All 16 regions in England and Wales completed a questionnaire about levels of staffing and remuneration of those involved in general practice postgraduate education. The results show that there are considerable variations between regions in the role and responsibilities of course organizers, in their training, and in the facilities that are provided for them. The majority of course organizers reported a workload greater than the number of sessions for which they were remunerated. The effects of these factors on recruitment, tenure of post, and job satisfaction are discussed. Recommendations are made for improving the situation, including the removal of course organizer pay from the scale of trainers' pay, so that there can be flexibility in the number of sessions which can be held, improvement in training and certain facilities, and the implementation of national and local job descriptions. PMID:2577940

  11. Effects of electronic communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Moorman, PW; Koppejan-Mulder, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight into the effects of electronic communication on GPs by studying those publications in literature describing the effects of structured electronic clinical communication in general practice. Methods: We retrieved all publications in the English language indexed in MEDLINE

  12. Ciguatera fish poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers: a retrospective study in a seaport general practice in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon-King, C M; Chen, A; Poon-King, T

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to outline the epidemiology of Ciguatera fish poisoning as seen in a general practice serving two industrial seaports in Trinidad and Tobago, in order to highlight the potential public health implications. A retrospective study was undertaken of all the cases of Ciguatera fish poisoning identified between November 1, 1992 and October 31, 1998 in a seaport general practice to identify signs, symptoms and treatment. An investigation of one outbreak was undertaken. Four outbreaks affecting 42 male ship crewmembers were identified. The suspect fish were caught in northern Caribbean waters en route to Trinidad and Tobago. The most common early symptoms were diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, pruritus and tiredness. In the third outbreak, dysaesthesia was common. Progression to muscular weakness, ataxic gait, unsteadiness and other neurotoxic signs were seen in moderate to severe disease. Hypotension was an important prognostic sign in the initial case. Treatment was symptomatic and supportive and included vitamins B12 and BCO, folic acid, prostigmine, steroids and antihistamines as indicated. In the investigation of the second outbreak, the relative risk of 'eating fish meat' was 5 (95% CI 1.45, 17.27, p ciguatera fish poisoning.' All cases were industrial ship crewmembers. It is suggested that increased clinician awareness with early and appropriate treatment, and focussed public health intervention may help limit the potential public health impact of ciguatera poisoning in industrial ship crewmembers and other fish-consuming communities in the future.

  13. Sharing Responsibilities within the General Practice Team - A Cross-Sectional Study of Task Delegation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthal, Karola; Beyer, Martin; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Guethlin, Corina

    2016-01-01

    Expected growth in the demand for health services has generated interest in the more effective deployment of health care assistants. Programs encouraging German general practitioners (GPs) to share responsibility for care with specially qualified health care assistants in the family practice (VERAHs) have existed for several years. But no studies have been conducted on the tasks German GPs are willing to rely on specially qualified personnel to perform, what they are prepared to delegate to all non-physician practice staff and what they prefer to do themselves. As part of an evaluation study on the deployment of VERAHs in GP-centered health care, we used a questionnaire to ask about task delegation within the practice team. From a list of tasks that VERAHs are specifically trained to carry out, GPs were asked to indicate which they actually delegate. We also asked GPs why they had employed a VERAH in their practice and for their opinions on the benefits and limitations of assigning tasks to VERAHs. The aim of the study was to find out which tasks GPs delegate to their specially qualified personnel, which they permit all HCAs to carry out, and which tasks they do not delegate at all. The survey was filled in and returned by 245 GPs (83%). Some tasks were exclusively delegated to VERAHs (e.g. home visits), while others were delegated to all HCAs (e.g. vaccinations). About half the GPs rated the assessment of mental health, as part of the comprehensive assessment of a patient's condition, as the sole responsibility of a GP. The possibility to delegate more complex tasks was the main reason given for employing a VERAH. Doctors said the delegation of home visits provided them with the greatest relief. In Germany, where GPs are solely accountable for the health care provided in their practices, experience with the transfer of responsibility to other non-physician health care personnel is still very limited. When HCAs have undergone special training, GPs seem to be

  14. Sharing Responsibilities within the General Practice Team – A Cross-Sectional Study of Task Delegation in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthal, Karola; Beyer, Martin; Gerlach, Ferdinand M.; Guethlin, Corina

    2016-01-01

    Background Expected growth in the demand for health services has generated interest in the more effective deployment of health care assistants. Programs encouraging German general practitioners (GPs) to share responsibility for care with specially qualified health care assistants in the family practice (VERAHs) have existed for several years. But no studies have been conducted on the tasks German GPs are willing to rely on specially qualified personnel to perform, what they are prepared to delegate to all non-physician practice staff and what they prefer to do themselves. Methods As part of an evaluation study on the deployment of VERAHs in GP-centered health care, we used a questionnaire to ask about task delegation within the practice team. From a list of tasks that VERAHs are specifically trained to carry out, GPs were asked to indicate which they actually delegate. We also asked GPs why they had employed a VERAH in their practice and for their opinions on the benefits and limitations of assigning tasks to VERAHs. The aim of the study was to find out which tasks GPs delegate to their specially qualified personnel, which they permit all HCAs to carry out, and which tasks they do not delegate at all. Results The survey was filled in and returned by 245 GPs (83%). Some tasks were exclusively delegated to VERAHs (e.g. home visits), while others were delegated to all HCAs (e.g. vaccinations). About half the GPs rated the assessment of mental health, as part of the comprehensive assessment of a patient’s condition, as the sole responsibility of a GP. The possibility to delegate more complex tasks was the main reason given for employing a VERAH. Doctors said the delegation of home visits provided them with the greatest relief. Conclusions In Germany, where GPs are solely accountable for the health care provided in their practices, experience with the transfer of responsibility to other non-physician health care personnel is still very limited. When HCAs have

  15. Outcomes associated with nurse practitioners in collaborative practice with general practitioners in rural settings in Canada: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, Alison; MacDonald, Marjorie

    2014-12-11

    The formalized nurse practitioner (NP) role in British Columbia is relatively new with most roles implemented in primary care. The majority of primary care is delivered by physicians using the fee-for-service model. There is a shortage of general practitioners associated with the difficulties of recruitment and retention, particularly in rural and remote locations. The uptake of the primary care NP role has been slow due to challenges in understanding the extent of its contributions. This study aims to identify the outcomes associated with the NP role in collaborative primary care practice. Three case studies where NPs were embedded into rural fee-for-service practices were undertaken to determine the outcomes at the practitioner, practice, community, and health services levels. Interviews, documents, and before and after data, were analyzed to identify changes in practise, access, and acute care service utilization. The results showed that NPs affected how care was delivered, particularly through the additional time afforded each patient visit, development of a team approach with interprofessional collaboration, and a change in style of practise from solo to group practise, which resulted in improved physician job satisfaction. Patient access to the practice improved with increased availability of appointments and practice staff experienced improved workplace relationships and satisfaction. At the community level, access to primary care improved for harder-to-serve populations and new linkages developed between the practice and their community. Acute care services experienced a statistically significant decrease in emergency use and admissions to hospital (P = 0.000). The presence of the NP improved their physician colleagues' desire to remain in their current work environment. This study identified the diversity of needs that can be addressed by the NP role. Namely, the importance of time to enhance patient care and its associated benefits, especially in the fee

  16. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice: a retrospective registry based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-05-19

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456,532 antibiotic prescriptions issued between July 2012 and June 2013. Pneumonia was the most common indication with 178,354 prescriptions (39%), followed by acute tonsillitis (21%) and acute otitis media (19%). In total, penicillin V accounted for 58% of all prescriptions, followed by macrolides (18%) and amoxicillin (15%). The use of second-line agents increased with age for all indications, and comprised more than 40% of the prescriptions in patients aged >75 years. Women were more often prescribed antibiotics regardless of clinical indication. This is the first Danish study to characterise antibiotic prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted. TRACKING THE OVERUSE OF ANTIBIOTICS: Better adherence to guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for different respiratory tract infections are warranted in Danish general practice. The over-use of antibiotics, particularly so

  17. Characteristics of general practice care: what do senior citizens value? A qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelmans, P.G.J.; Berendsen, A.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Meer, K. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of senior citizens in our society who are likely to consult their GP with age-related health problems, it is important to identify and understand the preferences of this group in relation to the non-medical attributes of GP care. The aim of this study is

  18. [Gout not induced by diuretics in a case-control study in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, H.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Janssen, M.; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relation between diuretics and the development of gout, taking into account the possible confounding by hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. DESIGN: Case-control study. METHOD: With the aid of the data on morbidity and medication from the electronic medical files ofa

  19. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark: the KVASIMODO study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    adherence to COPD guidelines. METHODS: We performed two audit surveys of GPs' patients' notes, one year apart, before and after an educational programme for participating GPs and their staff. A total of 154 GPs participated in the study. 2549 patient records were included in the first survey and 2394...

  20. Characteristics of general practice care : What do senior citizens value? A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelmans, P. (Ine) G. J.; Berendsen, Annette J.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of senior citizens in our society who are likely to consult their GP with age-related health problems, it is important to identify and understand the preferences of this group in relation to the non-medical attributes of GP care. The aim of this study is

  1. Patient anxiety in the medical encounter: a study of verbal and nonverbal communication in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verheul, W.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients feel anxious when entering the consultation room, but seldom verbalize their emotions explicitly in the medical encounter. The authors designed a study to analyse the visibility of patient pre-consultation (state) anxiety in their communication during the consultation. In an

  2. Identification and diagnostic evaluation of possible dementia in general practice. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Rishøj, Susanne; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2005-01-01

    , and 4 (3%) were treated for depression or referred for another condition. A total of 6 patients were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 102 undiagnosed patients the main reasons for not performing a diagnostic evaluation of dementia were patient/relative hesitation (34%), the GP thought that it would......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of diagnostic evaluation of dementia for patients in whom a suspicion of dementia was raised, and to investigate reasons why a diagnostic evaluation was not always being performed. DESIGN: A prospective study among elderly patients aged 65+, and a follow-up study...... of dementia, laboratory-screening tests prescribed by the GPs and referral status after 6 months, and follow-up questionnaire. RESULTS: Of 793 patients a total of 138 patients were identified with possible dementia. Among the identified patients 26 (20%) were referred for further evaluation within 6 months...

  3. Incidence of fractures among epilepsy patients: a population-based retrospective cohort study in the General Practice Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverein, Patrick C; Webb, David J; Petri, Hans; Weil, John; Van Staa, Tjeerd P; Egberts, Toine

    2005-02-01

    To compare the incidence of various fractures in a cohort of patients with epilepsy with a reference cohort of patients not having epilepsy. Patients were included in the epilepsy cohort if they had at least one diagnosis of epilepsy in their medical history and had sufficient evidence of "active" epilepsy (use of antiepileptic drugs, diagnoses) after the practice was included in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Two reference patients were sampled for each patient with epilepsy from the same practice. Primary outcome was the occurrence of any fracture during follow-up. Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate incidence density ratios (IDRs). The study population comprised 40,485 and 80,970 patients in the epilepsy and reference cohorts, respectively. The median duration of follow-up was approximately 3 years. The overall incidence rate in the epilepsy cohort was 241.9 per 10,000 person-years. This rate was about twice as high as that in reference cohort: age- and sex-adjusted IDR, 1.89 (95% CI, 1.81-1.98). When comparing IDRs among the different groups of fractures, the highest relative-risk estimate was found for hip and femur fractures (adjusted IDR, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.41-3.24). IDRs were consistently elevated across age and sex groups and across fracture subtypes. The overall risk of fractures was nearly twice as high among patients with epilepsy compared with the general population. The relative fracture risk was highest for hip and femur. Further study is necessary to elucidate whether this elevated risk is due to the disease, the use of antiepileptic drugs, or both.

  4. Decreased management of genital warts in young women in Australian general practice post introduction of national HPV vaccination program: results from a nationally representative cross-sectional general practice study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Harrison

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Since the introduction of Australia's human papillomavirus vaccination program, the management rate of genital warts in sexual health clinics and private hospitals has decreased in women of vaccine-eligible age. However, most genital warts in Australia are managed in general practice. This study examines whether a similar decrease occurred in Australian general practice after the introduction of the program. METHODS: Analysis of a nationally representative cross-sectional database of Australian general practice activity (1,175,879 patient encounters with 11,780 general practitioners. Genital warts management rates were estimated for the periods before and after introduction of the program (Pre-program, July 2002-June 2006; Post-program, July 2008-June 2012. Control conditions included genital herpes and gardnerella/bacterial vaginosis in female patients and genital herpes and urethritis in male patients. Trends in management rates by year, pre-vaccine (July 2000-June 2007 and post-vaccine (July 2007-June 2012 were also calculated. RESULTS: Management rate of genital warts among women potentially covered by program (aged 15-27 years decreased by 61% from 4.33 per 1,000 encounters in the Pre-program period to 1.67 in the Post-program period. Trend analysis of the post-vaccine period showed, among women of vaccine eligible age, a significant year-on-year reduction in the rate of genital warts management (p<0.0001 and a significant increase in the management rate of control conditions per year (p<0.0001. For all other age-sex groups there was no significant change in the management rate of genital warts between the Pre- and Post-program periods. CONCLUSION: The large decrease in general practice management of genital warts in women of vaccine-eligible age highlights the success of the program in the wider community.

  5. Early predictors of need for remediation in the Australian general practice training program: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker; Stewart, Rebecca; Turnock, Allison; Tapley, Amanda; Holliday, Elizabeth; Cooling, Nick

    2017-10-01

    Underperforming trainees requiring remediation may threaten patient safety and are challenging for vocational training programs. Decisions to institute remediation are high-stakes-remediation being resource-intensive and emotionally demanding on trainees. Detection of underperformance requiring remediation is particularly problematic in general (family) practice. We sought to establish early-training assessment instruments predictive of general practice (GP) trainees' subsequently requiring formal remediation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of trainees from a large Australian regionally-based GP training organization. The outcome factor was requirement for formal remediation. Independent variables were demographic factors and a range of formative assessments conducted immediately prior to or during early-stage training. Analyses employed univariate and multivariate logistic regression of each predictor assessment modality with the outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 248 trainees, 26 (10.5 %) required formal remediation. Performance on the Colleague Feedback Evaluation Tool (entailing feedback from a trainee's clinical colleagues on clinical performance, communication and probity) and External Clinical Teaching Visits (half-day sessions of the trainee's clinical consultations observed directly by an experienced GP), along with non-Australian primary medical qualification, were significantly associated with requiring remediation. There was a non-significant trend for association with performance on the Doctors Interpersonal Skills Questionnaire (patient feedback on interpersonal elements of the consultation). There were no significant associations with entry-selection scores or formative exam or assessment scores. Our finding that 'in vivo' assessments of complex behaviour, but not 'in vitro' knowledge-based assessments, predict need for remediation is consistent with theoretical understanding of the nature of remediation decision-making and

  6. [The role of spirometry in encouraging smoking cessation in general practice. A pilot study using "lung age"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, A; Noël, F; Lorenzo, M; Van Den Broucke, J

    2017-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether spirometry, performed in general practitioners' offices would change non-motivated smokers' attitudes toward smoking cessation. We performed an interventional, prospective, before-after single-center study, approved by a research ethics committee. We included 74 smokers older than 18years old, who reported no intention to quit smoking, whatever they were visiting general practitioners for. We performed spirometry and gave them their results, FEV 1 /FVC and lung age together with a comment on it. Nine months later, we called them for another assessment. Fifty-six percent were women with an average-age of 46.5, who smoked 26.3 pack-years. Eighty-two percent of them had normal FEV 1 /FVC but lung age was pathological among 38% of them. Nine months later, 61.1% reported an increased motivation to quit smoking. They smoked 10.9 cigarettes per day versus 13,3 at baseline (P=0.0254). Increase in motivation was not statistically related to age, gender, previous smoking cessations, daily smoking, nicotine dependence or an abnormal FEV 1 /VC ratio (P>0.75) but was significantly related to the presence of an abnormal lung age status (Pspirometry in general practice, combined with the determination of the lung age, may increase motivation towards smoking cessation in smokers who lack motivation. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergård, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP-patient encounter. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology with semi......-structured focus group interviews was employed. SETTING: General practice setting in Denmark. SUBJECTS: Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. RESULTS: Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being...... POINTS: Although integration of the existential dimension is recommended for patient care in general practice, little is known about GPs’ understanding and integration of this dimension in the GP-patient encounter. The existential dimension is understood to involve broad and universal life conditions...

  8. The existential dimension in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Søndergaard, Jens; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to identify points of agreement and disagreements among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark concerning how the existential dimension is understood, and when and how it is integrated in the GP–patient encounter. Design: A qualitative methodology with semi......-structured focus group interviews was employed. Setting: General practice setting in Denmark. Subjects: Thirty-one GPs from two Danish regions between 38 and 68 years of age participated in seven focus group interviews. Results: Although understood to involve broad life conditions such as present and future being...... points Although integration of the existential dimension is recommended for patient care in general practice, little is known about GPs’ understanding and integration of this dimension in the GP–patient encounter. The existential dimension is understood to involve broad and universal life conditions...

  9. What attributions do Australian high-performing general practices make for their success? Applying the clinical microsystems framework: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Annette H; Dunbar, James A; Johnson, Julie K; Fuller, Jeff; Morgan, Mark; Ford, Dale

    2018-04-10

    To identify the success attributions of high-performing Australian general practices and the enablers and barriers they envisage for practices wishing to emulate them. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and content analysis of the data. Responses were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded according to success characteristics of high-performing clinical microsystems. Primary healthcare with the participating general practices representing all Australian states and territories, and representing metropolitan and rural locations. Twenty-two general practices identified as high performing via a number of success criteria. The 52 participants were 19 general practitioners, 18 practice managers and 15 practice nurses. Participants most frequently attributed success to the interdependence of the team members, patient-focused care and leadership of the practice. They most often signalled practice leadership, team interdependence and staff focus as enablers that other organisations would need to emulate their success. They most frequently identified barriers that might be encountered in the form of potential deficits or limitations in practice leadership, staff focus and mesosystem support. Practice leaders need to empower their teams to take action through providing inclusive leadership that facilitates team interdependence. Mesosystem support for quality improvement in general practice should focus on enabling this leadership and team building, thereby ensuring improvement efforts are converted into effective healthcare provision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  11. Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice services in a tertiary and primary healthcare settings. ... Nigerian Health Journal ... This research compared the level of patients' satisfaction with general practice care delivered at physicians-manned General Outpatient clinics at tertiary and primary health ...

  12. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    . The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...... and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first...

  13. Collaborative care for depression in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish...... context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an “active ingredient” in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two...... detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression...

  14. Clinical examination of leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (Empress) in general practice: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Lantto, R; Granberg, A; Sundström, B O; Tillberg, A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate leucite reinforced-glass ceramic crowns (Empress) placed in patients who regularly visit general practices. One hundred ten Empress crowns, placed in 29 patients who visited a general practice on a regular basis, were evaluated according to the California Dental Association's (CDA) quality evaluation system. In addition, the occurrence of plaque and certain gingival conditions was evaluated. All crowns were luted with resin composite cement. The mean and median years in function for the crowns were 3.6 and 3.9 years, respectively. Based on the CDA criteria, 92% of the 110 crowns were rated "satisfactory." Eighty-six percent were given the CDA rating "excellent" for margin integrity. Fracture was registered in 6% of the 110 crowns. Of the remaining 103 crowns, the CDA rating excellent was given to 74% for anatomic form, 86% for color, and 90% for surface. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed regarding fracture rates between anterior and posterior crowns. With regard to the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the Empress crowns and the controls. Most of the fractured crowns had been placed on molars or premolars. Although the difference between anterior and posterior teeth was not statistically significant with respect to the fracture rates obtained, the number of fractured crowns placed on posterior teeth exceeded that of those placed on anterior teeth. The difference between the fracture rates may have clinical significance, and the risk of fracture has to be taken into consideration when placing crowns on teeth that are likely to be subjected to high stress levels.

  15. Sphygmomanometers--an audit in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nayankumar C; Sibbritt, David W; Heaney, Susan; Sharples, Jan

    2004-11-01

    The accuracy of sphygmomanometers used in Australian general practice is unknown but potentially important. We measured the accuracy of sphygmomanometers in general practice in the Hunter region of New South Wales using a gold standard. Practices were recruited by an advertisement in the division newsletter. Sixty practices (35%) volunteered. A total of 404 instruments were checked. Over 95% of sphygmomanometers were within 4 mmHg of gold standard sphygmomanometer across the clinical pressure range. Mercury sphygmomanometers were more accurate than aneroid (pmercury.

  16. Risk of stroke in people with type 2 diabetes in the UK: a study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulnier, H.E.; Seaman, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Colhoun, H.M.; Lawrenson, R.A.; Vries, de C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Risk estimates for stroke in patients with diabetes vary. We sought to obtain reliable risk estimates for stroke and the association with diabetes, comorbidity and lifestyle in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients in the UK. Materials and methods Using the General Practice

  17. Improving Patient-Centered Care for Young People in General Practice With a Codesigned Screening App: Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marianne Julie; Wadley, Greg; Sanci, Lena Amanda

    2017-08-11

    Despite experiencing a high prevalence and co-occurrence of mental health disorders and health-compromising behaviors, young people tend not to seek professional help for these concerns. However, they do regularly attend primary care, making primary care providers ideally situated to identify and discuss mental health and lifestyle issues as part of young people's routine health care. The aim was to investigate whether using a codesigned health and lifestyle-screening app, Check Up GP, in general practice influenced young people's assessment of the quality of their care (measures of patient-centered care and youth friendliness), and their disclosure of sensitive issues. In addition, this study aimed to explore young people's acceptance and experience of using a screening app during regular health care. This was a mixed methods implementation study of Check Up GP with young people aged 14 to 25 years attending a general practice clinic in urban Melbourne, Australia. A 1-month treatment-as-usual group was compared to a 2-month intervention group in which young people and their general practitioners (GPs) used Check Up GP. Young people in both groups completed an exit survey immediately after their consultation about disclosure, patient-centered and youth-friendly care, and judgment. In addition, participants in the intervention group were surveyed about app acceptability and usability and their willingness to use it again. Semistructured interviews with participants in the intervention group expanded on themes covered in the survey. The exit survey was completed by 30 young people in the treatment-as-usual group and 85 young people in the intervention group. Young people using Check Up GP reported greater disclosure of health issues (Ptime to ask questions. In all, 86% (73/85) of young people felt the app was a "good idea" and only 1% (1/85) thought it a "bad idea." Thematic analysis of qualitative interviews with 14 participants found that Check Up GP created scope

  18. E-dietician in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl J.; Arendal, Cecilia; Glintborg, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is according to WHO one of the greatest health challenges of our time. The aim of the pilot project was to investigate the weight loss efficacy and the cost of individual dietetic internet-based consultations in a Danish medical centre in combination with an internet community. A total...... of 46 obese patients in general practice were offered participation in a cohort study during May 15th to December 1st 2008. Patients from three different health centers were included. 32 patients gave informed consent to participate and were given access to weekly e-mail consultations with a dietician...... weight loss treatments in general practice. The utilization of e-mail consultations can furthermore result in a saving in expenses and premises if the e-mail correspondences are held outside of the health centre....

  19. Nutrition communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are frequently confronted with patients who suffer from obesity or other nutrition-related diseases, such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. There is increasing evidence that nutrition communication is effective in changing nutrition behaviour. Moreover, it is widely

  20. Eating disorders in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M B

    1986-01-01

    A total of 748 patients who attended four south London group practices were screened using the eating attitudes test; 1% of women had bulimia nervosa and a further 3% a partial syndrome eating disorder. Eating and weight control behaviour and psychiatric indicators for an eating disorder were analysed. Patients with bulimia nervosa and partial syndromes were remarkably similar. They were mainly women, from the middle to upper classes, in the normal weight range but having had considerable weight fluctuation in the past, more likely to have had a history of menstrual irregularity, often psychologically troubled, and tended to have more family psychopathology. PMID:3099893

  1. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Practitioners toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Beheshti, Akram; Javadi, Maryam; Yasi, Marzieh

    2015-08-01

    Orientation of public and physicians to the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is one of the most prominent symbols of structural changes in the health service system. The aim of his study was a determination of knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners in complementary and alternative medicine. This cross- sectional study was conducted in Qazvin, Iran in 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting data including four information parts: population information, physicians' attitude and knowledge, methods of getting information and their function. A total of 228 physicians in Qazvin comprised the population of study according to the deputy of treatment's report of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. A total of 150 physicians were selected randomly, and SPSS Statistical program was used to enter questionnaires' data. Results were analyzed as descriptive statistics and statistical analysis. Sixty percent of all responders were male. About sixty (59.4) percent of participating practitioners had worked less than 10 years.96.4 percent had a positive attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine. Knowledge of practitioners about traditional medicine in 11 percent was good, 36.3% and 52.7% had average and little information, respectively. 17.9% of practitioners offered their patients complementary and alternative medicine for treatment. Although there was little knowledge among practitioners about traditional medicine and complementary approaches, a significant percentage of them had attitude higher than the lower limit.

  2. Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Implementation of Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in General Practice: a Delphi Study Among Healthcare Professionals and Addiction Prevention Experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Abidi; A. Oenema (Anke); P. Nilsen; P.D. Anderson (Peter); H. van de Mheen (Dike)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDespite the evidence base, alcohol screening and brief intervention (ASBI) have rarely been integrated into routine clinical practice. The aim of this study is to identify strategies that could tackle barriers to ASBI implementation in general practice by involving primary healthcare

  3. Inequity in contraceptive care between refugees and other migrant women?: a retrospective study in Dutch general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Liselotte A D; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria E T C

    2018-01-17

    Female refugees are at high risk of reproductive health problems including unmet contraceptive needs. In the Netherlands, the general practitioner (GP) is the main entrance to the healthcare system and plays a vital role in the prescription of contraceptives. Little is known about contraceptive care in female refugees in primary care. To get insight into GP care related to contraception in refugees and other migrants compared with native Dutch women. A retrospective descriptive study of patient records of refugees, other migrants and native Dutch women was carried out in five general practices in the Netherlands. The prevalence of discussions about contraception and prescriptions of contraceptives over the past 6 years was compared in women of reproductive age (15-49 years). In total, 104 refugees, 58 other migrants and 162 native Dutch women were included. GPs in our study (2 male, 3 female) discussed contraceptives significantly less often with refugees (51%) and other migrants (66%) than with native Dutch women (84%; P Dutch women (79%; P Dutch women (4% respectively 4%). Contraceptives were significantly less often discussed with and prescribed to refugees and other migrant women compared with native Dutch women. More research is needed to elicit the reproductive health needs and preferences of migrant women regarding GP's care and experiences in discussing these issues. Such insights are vital in order to provide equitable reproductive healthcare to every woman regardless of her background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. de Koning (Johan); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Prins (Ad); G.J.J.M. Borsboom (Gerard); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. DESIGN: This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the

  5. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Johan S.; Klazinga, Niek; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Prins, A. D.; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. Design. This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the Rotterdam region.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001. Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP with upper GI symptoms and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints, matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psychopharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year. Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs ranging from 1.37 to 3.45. Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90, including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or

  7. Accreditation in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Pedersen, Line B; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accreditation is used increasingly in health systems worldwide. However, there is a lack of evidence on the effects of accreditation, particularly in general practice. In 2016 a mandatory accreditation scheme was initiated in Denmark, and during a 3-year period all practices, as default...... general practitioners in Denmark. Practices allocated to accreditation in 2016 serve as the intervention group, and practices allocated to accreditation in 2018 serve as controls. The selected outcomes should meet the following criteria: (1) a high degree of clinical relevance; (2) the possibility...... practice and mortality. All outcomes relate to quality indicators included in the Danish Healthcare Quality Program, which is based on general principles for accreditation. Discussion: The consequences of accreditation and standard-setting processes are generally under-researched, particularly in general...

  8. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice and the other half to research and group discus- sions with the students. In the 4th, 6th and 7th years, group discussions are held with students about capita selecta chosen in consultation with the students and about casuis- tics in the general practitioner~ practice. In Utrecht a university group-practice is Jeveloping,.

  9. Consultation etiquette in general practice: a qualitative study of what makes it different for lay cancer caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwa Moyez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonplace for lay caregivers to overlook their own health concerns when supporting someone with advanced cancer. During this time, caregivers' needs as patients are often marginalised by health professionals, including General Practitioners (GPs, who may miss the breadth of caregivers' needs by focusing on the practicalities of caregiving. GPs traditionally rely on patients to raise their concerns, and then respond to these concerns, but caregivers as patients may be disinclined to cue their GP. The norms of engagement when caregivers consult their GP are less defined, and how they interact with their GP regarding their own health is under-explored. This sub-study investigates the norms, assumptions and subtleties which govern caregiver-GP consultations, and explores factors affecting their interaction regarding caregivers' own health concerns. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with six lay caregivers and 19 health professionals in Brisbane, Australia, and analyzed the interview transcripts thematically. Results Traditional norms of engagement are subjected to assumptions and expectations which caregivers and GPs bring to the consultation. Practice pressures also influence both parties' capacity and willingness to discuss caregivers' health. Nonetheless, some GPs monitor caregivers' health opportunistically. Their interaction is enhanced by the quality of the caregiver-GP relationship and by the GP's skills. Conclusions Caregivers are caught in a paradox whereby their health needs may become subsumed by the care recipient's needs in a setting where patient needs are normally scrutinised and supported. Caregivers may not raise their health concerns with their GP, who instead may need to cue them that it is timely and safe to do so. The routine use of a prompt may help to address caregivers' needs systematically, but it needs to be complemented by GPs' desire and capacity to engage with patients in a

  10. Diagnosing asthma in general practice with portable exhaled nitric oxide measurement – results of a prospective diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Gunter

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO for the diagnosis of asthma in general practice. Methods Prospective diagnostic study with 160 patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious of obstructive airway disease (OAD. Patients were referred to a lung function laboratory for diagnostic investigation. The index test was FENO measured with a portable FENO analyser based on electrochemical sensor. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC as received by spirometric manoeuvre and/or results of bronchial provocation. Bronchial provocation with methacholine was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR in the event of inconclusive spirometric results. Results 88 (55% were female; their average age was 43.9 years. 75 (46.9% patients had asthma, 25 (15.6% had COPD, 8 (5.0% had an overlap of COPD and asthma, and 52 (32.5% had no OAD. At a cut-off level of 46 parts per billion (ppb (n = 30; 18.8%, sensitivity was 32% (95%CI 23–43%, specificity 93% (95%CI 85–97%, positive predictive value (PPV 80% (95%CI 63–91%, negative predictive value (NPV 61% (95%CI 52–69% when compared with a 20% fall in FEV1 from the baseline value (PC20 after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. At 76 ppb (n = 11; 6.9% specificity was 100% (95%CI 96–100% and PPV was 100% (95%CI 72–100. At a cut-off level of 12 ppb (n = 34; 21.3%, sensitivity was 90% (95%CI 79–95%, specificity 25% (95%CI 17–34%, PPV 40% (95%CI 32–50, NPV 81% (95%CI 64–91% when compared with a 20% fall of FEV1 after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 4 mg/ml. Three patients with unsuspicious spirometric results have to be tested with FENO to save one bronchial provocation test. Conclusion Asthma could be ruled in with FENO > 46 ppb. Mild and moderate to severe asthma could be ruled out with FENO ≤ 12 ppb. FENO measurement with

  11. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing of men in UK general practice: a 10-year longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Grace J; Harrison, Sean; Turner, Emma L; Walsh, Eleanor I; Oliver, Steven E; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Evans, Simon; Lane, J Athene; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Martin, Richard M; Metcalfe, Chris

    2017-10-30

    Cross-sectional studies suggest that around 6% of men undergo prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing each year in UK general practice (GP). This longitudinal study aims to determine the cumulative testing pattern of men over a 10-year period and whether this testing can be considered equivalent to screening for prostate cancer (PCa). Patient-level data on PSA tests, biopsies and PCa diagnoses were obtained from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) for the years 2002 to 2011. The cumulative risks of PSA testing and of being diagnosed with PCa were estimated for the 10-year study period. Associations of a man's age, region and index of multiple deprivation with the cumulative risk of PSA testing and PCa diagnosis were investigated. Rates of biopsy and diagnosis, following a high test result, were compared with those from the programme of PSA testing in the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) study. The 10-year risk of exposure to at least one PSA test in men aged 45 to 69 years in UK GP was 39.2% (95% CI 39.0 to 39.4%). The age-specific risks ranged from 25.2% for men aged 45-49 years to 53.0% for men aged 65-69 years (p for trend PSA level ≥3, a test in UK GP was less likely to result in a biopsy (6%) and/or diagnosis of PCa (15%) compared with ProtecT study participants (85% and 34%, respectively). A high proportion of men aged 45-69 years undergo PSA tests in UK GP: 39% over a 10-year period. A high proportion of these tests appear to be for the investigation of lower urinary tract symptoms and not screening for PCa. ISRCTN20141297,NCT02044172. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Drug users in contact with general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J R

    1985-01-05

    A group of heroin users who are in contact with a general practice in north west Edinburgh are described. The study group was younger and included more women than previous studies. These people used a large variety of drugs and mainly purchased them locally. Frequent and often prolonged abstinent periods occurred with no prescribed opiate treatment. The group had experienced a high rate of drug related medical disorders. All these points raise the possibility that opiate users who are known to general practitioners may be a distinctly different population from those who attend drug dependency clinics. The frequency of remission and the prevalence of polydrug use have profound implications for planning and evaluating an effective medical response.

  13. Bereavement care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Vedsted, Peter; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2013-01-01

    I dette studie testes effekten af en klinisk intervention over for håndtering af sorg i almen praksis. Interventionen handlede om, at tidlig identifikation af komplicerede sorgreaktioner via praktiserende læge kan være med til at sikre behandling til behandlingskrævende sorgreaktioner, der volder...

  14. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  15. Supporting patients treated for prostate cancer: a video vignette study with an email-based educational program in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwa, Moyez; Halkett, Georgia; Meng, Xingqiong; Pillai, Vinita; Berg, Melissa; Shaw, Tim

    2014-02-26

    Men who have been treated for prostate cancer in Australia can consult their general practitioner (GP) for advice about symptoms or side effects at any time following treatment. However, there is no evidence that such men are consistently advised by GPs and patients experience substantial unmet need for reassurance and advice. The intent of the study was to evaluate a brief, email-based educational program for GPs to manage standardized patients presenting with symptoms or side effects months or years after prostate cancer treatment. GPs viewed six pairs of video vignettes of actor-patients depicting men who had been treated for prostate cancer. The actor-patients presented problems that were attributable to the treatment of cancer. In Phase 1, GPs indicated their diagnosis and stated if they would prescribe, refer, or order tests based on that diagnosis. These responses were compared to the management decisions for those vignettes as recommended by a team of experts in prostate cancer. After Phase 1, all the GPs were invited to participate in an email-based education program (Spaced Education) focused on prostate cancer. Participants received feedback and could compare their progress and their performance with other participants in the study. In Phase 2, all GPs, regardless of whether they had completed the program, were invited to view another set of six video vignettes with men presenting similar problems to Phase 1. They again offered a diagnosis and stated if they would prescribe, refer, or order tests based on that diagnosis. In total, 64 general practitioners participated in the project, 57 GPs participated in Phase 1, and 45 in Phase 2. The Phase 1 education program was completed by 38 of the 57 (59%) participants. There were no significant differences in demographics between those who completed the program and those who did not. Factors determining whether management of cases was consistent with expert opinion were number of sessions worked per week (OR 0

  16. Mentoring medical students in your general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2016-05-01

    Mentoring medical students in general practices is becoming more common in Australia due to formalised scholarship programs and informal approaches by students. This paper defines mentoring in Australian general practice. Practical suggestions are made on how to structure a mentorship program in your practice. Mentoring differs from leadership and teaching. It is a long-term relationship between a student and an experienced general practitioner. Avoiding summative assessment in mentorship is important to its success. Mentoring is about forming a safe place to confidentially discuss personal and professional issues between a mentor and student. This is based on defining roles and mutual trust. At the same time, students crave formative feedback. Unfortunately, present feedback models are based on teaching principles that can blur the differences between assessor, teacher and mentor. Mentorship can provide students with orientation and learning experiences so that they are prepared for practice as an intern.

  17. Organization and change in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl

    Organization and change in general practice Abstract for a symposium at Nordic Congress for General Practice Thursday 14 May at 15.30-17.00 General practice is under increasing pressure to assume new tasks, adopt new technologies and engage in new organizational structures. However, in a field...... of multiple actors and concerns such visions are rarely straightforward to realize. This symposium explores the significance of various organizational, cultural and regulative features of general practice in relation to proposals for change in the sector. Presentations: Thorkil Thorsen, Marius Kousgaard...... primary care. One purpose is to give more freedom to the patients to choose care-givers. Another is to create a more competitive health care system. These reforms will be evaluated in a research project to be presented. Chairman: John Sahl Andersen MESH-terms: Delivery of Health Care, Health Care Reform...

  18. Implementation of immunochemical faecal occult blood test in general practice: a study protocol using a cluster-randomised stepped-wedge design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Bro, Flemming; Hornung, Nete; Andersen, Berit Sanne; Laurberg, Søren; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-07-11

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer-related death. Half of patients with colorectal cancer initially present with non-specific or vague symptoms. In the need for a safe low-cost test, the immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) may be part of the evaluation of such patients in primary care. Currently, Danish general practitioners have limited access to this test. The aim of this article is to describe a study that will assess the uptake and clinical use of iFOBT in general practice. Furthermore, it will investigate the diagnostic value and the clinical implications of using iFOBT in general practice on patients presenting with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. The study uses a cluster-randomised stepped-wedge design and is conducted in the Central Denmark Region among 836 GPs in 381 general practices. The municipalities of the Region and their appertaining general practitioners will be included sequentially in the study during the first 7 months of the 1-year study period. The following intervention has been developed for the study: a mandatory intervention providing all general practitioners with a starting package of 10 iFOBTs, a clinical instruction on iFOBT use in general practice and online information material from the date of inclusion, and an optional intervention consisting of a continuous medical education on colorectal cancer diagnostics and use of iFOBT. This study is among the first and largest trials to investigate the diagnostic use and the clinical value of iFOBT on patients presenting with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. The findings will be of national and international importance for the future planning of colorectal cancer diagnostics, particularly for 'low-risk-but-not-no-risk' patients with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. A Trial of the Implementation of iFOBT in General Practice NCT02308384 . Date of registration: 26 November 2014.

  19. Diagnosis and management of perinatal depression and anxiety in general practice: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Elizabeth; Lee, Suzanne; Shakespeare, Judy; Ayers, Susan

    2017-08-01

    Up to 20% of women experience anxiety and depression during the perinatal period. In the UK, management of perinatal mental health falls under the remit of GPs. This review aimed at synthesising the available information from qualitative studies on GPs' attitudes, recognition, and management of perinatal anxiety and depression. Meta-synthesis of the available published qualitative evidence on GPs' recognition and management of perinatal anxiety and depression. A systematic search was conducted on Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and grey literature was searched using Google, Google Scholar, and British Library EThOS. Papers and reports were eligible for inclusion if they reported qualitatively on GPs' diagnosis or treatment of perinatal anxiety or depression. The synthesis was constructed using meta-ethnography. Five themes were established from five eligible papers: labels: diagnosing depression; clinical judgement versus guidelines; care and management; use of medication; and isolation: the role of other professionals. GPs considered perinatal depression to be a psychosocial phenomenon, and were reluctant to label disorders and medicalise distress. GPs relied on their own clinical judgement more than guidelines. They reported helping patients make informed choices about treatment, and inviting them back regularly for GP visits. GPs sometimes felt isolated when dealing with perinatal mental health issues. GPs often do not have timely access to appropriate psychological therapies and use several strategies to mitigate this shortfall. Training must focus on these issues and must be evaluated to consider whether this makes a difference to outcomes for patients. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  20. Perceptions of the uses of routine general practice data beyond individual care in England: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, David; Cook, Jenny; McKevitt, Christopher

    2018-01-08

    To investigate how different lay and professional groups perceive and understand the use of routinely collected general practice patient data for research, public health, service evaluation and commissioning. We conducted a multimethod, qualitative study. This entailed participant observation of the design and delivery of a series of deliberative engagement events about a local patient database made of routine primary care data. We also completed semistructured interviews with key professionals involved in the database. Qualitative data were thematically analysed. The research took place in an inner city borough in England. Of the community groups who participated in the six engagement events (111 individual citizens), five were health focused. It was difficult to recruit other types of organisations. Participants supported the uses of the database, but it was unclear how well they understood its scope and purpose. They had concerns about transparency, security and the potential misuse of data. Overall, they were more focused on the need for immediate investment in primary care capacity than data infrastructures to improve future health. The 10 interviewed professionals identified the purpose of the database in different ways, according to their interests. They emphasised the promise of the database as a resource in health research in its own right and in linking it to other datasets. Findings demonstrate positivity to the uses of this local database, but a disconnect between the long-term purposes of the database and participants' short-term priorities for healthcare quality. Varying understandings of the database and the potential for it to be used in multiple different ways in the future cement a need for systematic and routine public engagement to develop and maintain public awareness. Problems recruiting community groups signal a need to consider how we engage wider audiences more effectively. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  1. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark: a population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-08-07

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease. A national register-based cohort study was performed. All patients over 18 years receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008 were identified and detailed patient-specific data on sociodemographic status and spirometry tests were extracted. Information on practice characteristics like number of doctors, number of patients per doctor, training practice status, as well as age and gender of the general practitioners was linked to each medication user. Partnership practices had a higher odds ratio (OR) of performing spirometry compared with single-handed practices (OR 1.24, CI 1.09-1.40). We found a significant association between increasing general practitioner age and decreasing spirometry testing. This tendency was most pronounced among partnership practices, where doctors over 65 years had the lowest odds of spirometry testing (OR 0.25, CI 0.10-0.61). Training practice status was significantly associated with spirometry testing among single-handed practices (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Some of the variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving

  2. The Teamwork Study: enhancing the role of non-GP staff in chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D A; Taggart, J; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Crookes, P; Beilby, J; Powell-Davis, G; Wilson, L A; Harris, M F

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence for a team-based approach in the management of chronic disease in primary health care. However, the standard of care is variable, probably reflecting the limited organisational capacity of health services to provide the necessary structured and organised care for this group of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a structured intervention involving non-GP staff in GP practices on the quality of care for patients with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A cluster randomised trial was undertaken across 60 GP practices. The intervention was implemented in 30 practices with staff and patients interviewed at baseline and at 12-15 months follow up. The change in team roles was evaluated using a questionnaire completed by practice staff. The quality of care was evaluated using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire. We found that although the team roles of staff improved in the intervention practices and there were significant differences between practices, there was no significant difference between those in the intervention and control groups in patient-assessed quality of care after adjusting for baseline-level score and covariates at the 12-month follow up. Practice team roles were not significantly associated with change in Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scores. Patients with multiple conditions were more likely to assess their quality of care to be better. Thus, although previous research has shown a cross-sectional association between team work and quality of care, we were unable to replicate these findings in the present study. These results may be indicative of insufficient time for organisational change to result in improved patient-assessed quality of care, or because non-GP staff roles were not sufficiently focussed on the aspects of care assessed. The findings provide important information for researchers when designing similar studies.

  3. The temporomandibular opening index, report of headache and TMD, and implications for screening in general practice: an initial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victor J; Karic, Vesna V; Ofec, Ronen; Nehete, Swati R; Smidt, Ami

    2014-01-01

    TMD and the control group. Age serves as a mild protective for reported headache. Younger patients tend to report more headaches. More frequent and severe headache occurred in the high-TOI group. This study serves as a reminder for clinicians in general practice to consider the effect of comorbidity when faced with TMD patients with headache.

  4. General practice: the DREEM attachment? Comparing the educational environment of hospital and general practice placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun

    2012-01-01

    The clinical learning environment is changing. General practice placements are now a fundamental part of undergraduate medical education. There is growing recognition that changes in hospital work practices are altering the breadth of exposure available to students. Surprisingly little work has been done comparing the quality of clinical placements between the hospital and community using validated tools. Such comparisons inform curriculum planning and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of the educational environment experienced by junior medical students during hospital and general practice placements using a widely used tool. Following the introduction of a new integrated curriculum, all Year 3 students (n=108) completed a standardised evaluation instrument, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) at the end of each of their clinical attachments (two different hospital sites and one in general practice), giving a total of 324 questionnaires. All forms were analysed and input into Graphpad INSTAT version 3. Total DREEM scores as well as subscale scores were calculated for each site. These were compared across sites using a Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test. By comparison with international standards, clinical attachments in our new integrated curriculum were rated highly. In particular, attachments in general practice scored highly with a mean score of 156.6 and perform significantly better (P students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Finally, significant differences also emerged in students' perceptions of teachers in general practice when compared to those in the hospital setting. These findings provide evidence of the high-quality educational environment afforded students in primary care. They challenge the traditional emphasis on hospital-based teaching and preempt the question - Is the community a better place for junior students to learn?

  5. 'Just a GP': a mixed method study of undermining of general practice as a career choice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Hugh; Banner, Kimberley; Collingwood, Helen; Merritt, Kymberlee

    2017-11-03

    Failure to recruit sufficient applicants to general practice (GP) training has been a problem both nationally and internationally for many years and undermining of GP is one possible contributing factor. The aim of our study was to ascertain what comments, both negative and positive, are being made in UK clinical settings to GP trainees about GP and to further explore these comments and their influence on career choice. We conducted a mixed methods study. We surveyed all foundation doctors and GP trainees within one region of Health Education England regarding any comments they experienced relating to a career in GP. We also conducted six focus groups with early GP trainees to discuss any comments that they experienced and whether these comments had any influence on their or others career choice. Positive comments reported by trainees centred around the concept that choosing GP is a positive, family-focused choice which facilities a good work-life balance. Workload was the most common negative comment, alongside the notion of being 'just a GP'; the belief that GP is boring, a waste of training and a second-class career choice. The reasons for and origin of the comments are multifactorial in nature. Thematic analysis of the focus groups identified key factors such as previous exposure to and experience of GP, family members who were GPs, GP role models, demographics of the clinician and referral behaviour. Trainees perceived that negative comments may be discouraging others from choosing GP as a career. Our study demonstrates that negative comments towards GP as a career do exist within clinical settings and are having a potential impact on poor recruitment rates to GP training. We have identified areas in which further negative comments could be prevented by changing perceptions of GP as a career. Additional time spent in GP as undergraduates and postgraduates, and positive GP role models, could particularly benefit recruitment. We recommend that undermining of GP

  6. General Practice On-the-Job Training in Chinese Urban Community: A Qualitative Study on Needs and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yali; Chen, Rui; Wang, Bo; Wu, Tao; Huang, Yafang; Guo, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On-the-job training is an important strategy for general practitioners to deliver appropriately community health services in China. The development of basic professional competence for general practitioners is the main goal of on-the-job training program. The aim of this study was to explore the needs of and the challenges to on-the-job training for general practitioners, and to provide advices for policy-makers to carry out this program more effectively. METHODS: We conducted 3 n...

  7. Small business, cash budgets and general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A R

    1991-01-01

    In practice management, general practice falls into the category of small business with all its attendant generic problems. Disciplined planning and good financial management are not often seen in small business. These are required if general practitioners are to continue (or return to) the provision of high quality medical services. An effective budget process, especially cash-flow budgeting, is the key to successful planning and financial management. Budgeting will bring Control, Co-ordination, and Credibility to your practice. It will enable you to set goals and to achieve them.

  8. Undertreatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning-van Beest, F.J.A.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Herings, R.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the urinary incontinence guidelines that are issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, treatment guidelines are related to the type of incontinence. It is unknown whether treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice complies with these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To

  9. Prevalence of fatigue in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, W; Kearney, Y; Bury, G

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is an important symptom in general practice due to its association with physical, psychological and social problems. To determine the prevalence of fatigue as an unsolicited symptom during general practice consultations. A random sample of GPs practising in Ireland was invited to provide data on consultations held over one day. Data were recorded on the presence of fatigue as a main or supporting symptom, social and demographic characteristics. Data were recorded by 89 GPs on 1,428 consultations. The prevalence of fatigue was 25%. It was the main reason for attending the doctor in 6.5% and a secondary reason in 19%. Sixty-two per cent of patients were female and 48% were eligible for free GP services. The mean age was 47.1 years. The presence of fatigue was associated with: attending a female GP, being female, attending a GP who had been qualified for fewer years and attending the GP frequently. The prevalence of fatigue reported in this study is over three times higher than that reported in earlier work. Doctor characteristics appear to be as important as patient characteristics in determining fatigue.

  10. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial of early intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by practice nurse-general practitioner teams: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunker Jeremy M

    2012-09-01

    quality of life measures, smoking and immunisation status, medications, inhaler technique, and lung function. Outcomes will be assessed by project officers blinded to patients’ randomization groups. Discussion This study will use proven case-finding methods to identify patients with undiagnosed COPD in general practice, where improved care has the potential for substantial benefit in health and healthcare utilization. The study provides the capacity to trial a new model of team-based assessment and management of newly diagnosed COPD in Australian primary care. Trial registration ACTRN12610000592044

  11. How common is multiple general practice attendance in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael; Hall, Jane; van Gool, Kees; Haas, Marion

    2018-05-01

    Australians can seek general practice care from multiple general practitioners (GPs) in multiple locations. This provides high levels of patient choice but may reduce continuity of care. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of attendance at multiple general practices in Australia, and identify patient characteristics associated with multiple practice attendances. A cross-sectional survey of 2477 Australian adults was conducted online in July 2013. Respondents reported whether they had attended more than one general practice in the past year, and whether they had a usual general practice and GP. Demographic information, health service use and practice characteristics were also obtained from the survey. Over one-quarter of the sample reported attending more than one practice in the previous year. Multiple practice attendance is less common with increasing age, and less likely for survey respondents from regional Australia, compared with respondents from metropolitan areas. Multiple practice attenders are just as likely as single practice attenders to have a usual GP. A significant proportion of general practice care is delivered away from usual practices. This may have implications for health policy, in terms of continuity and quality of primary care.

  12. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Shoulder disorders in general practice : Prognostic indicators of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Koes, Bart W.; Boeke, A. Joan P; Devillé, Walter; De Jong, Bareld A.; Bouter, Lex M.

    Background. Shoulder pain is common in primary health care. Nevertheless, information on the outcome of shoulder disorders is scarce, especially for patients encountered in general practice. Aim. To study the course of shoulder disorders in general practice and to determine prognostic indicators of

  14. Fracture diagnostics, unnecessary travel and treatment: a comparative study before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a remote general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jac J W M; Jacobs, Jan P A M; van Sonderen, Eric; van der Molen, Thys; Sanderman, Robbert

    2015-05-06

    Teleradiology entails attainment of x-rays in one location, transfer over some distance and assessment at another location for diagnosis or consultation. This study documents fracture diagnostics, unnecessary trips to the hospital, treatment and number of x-rays for the years 2006 and 2009, before and after the introduction of teleradiology in a general practice on the island of Ameland in the north of the Netherlands. In a retrospective, descriptive, observational before and after study of the introduction of x-ray facilities in an island-based general practice, we compared the number of accurately diagnosed fractures, unnecessary trips, treatments and number of x-rays taken in 2006 when only a hospital x-ray facility was available 5 hours away with those in 2009 after an x-ray facility became available at a local general practice. All patients visiting a general practice on the island of Ameland in 2006 and 2009 with trauma and clinical suspicion of a fracture, dislocation or sprain were included in the study. The initial clinical diagnoses, including those based on the outcomes of x-rays, were compared for the two years and also whether the patients were treated at home or in hospital. A total of 316 and 490 patients with trauma visited a general practice in 2006 and 2009, respectively. Of these patients, 66 and 116 were found to have fractures or dislocations in the two years, respectively. In 2006, 83 x-rays were ordered; in 2009, this was 284. In 2006, 9 fractures were missed; in 2009, this was only 2. In 2006, 15 patients with fractures or dislocations were treated at the general practice; in 2009, this had increased to 77. Since the introduction of teleradiology the number of missed fractures in patients visiting the general practice with trauma and the number of the unnecessary trips to a hospital are reduced. In addition more patients with fractures and dislocations can be treated in the general practice as opposed to the hospital.

  15. Effectiveness of a minimal intervention for stress-related mental disorders with sick leave (MISS): study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial in general practice [ISRCTN43779641

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, I.M.; Terluin, B.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Cundy, C.M.; Smit, J.H.; van Mechelen, W.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The main aims of this paper are to describe the setting and design of a Minimal Intervention in general practice for Stress-related mental disorders in patients on Sick leave (MISS), as well as to ascertain the study complies with the requirements for a cluster randomised controlled

  16. Patients' views about the use of their personal information from general practice medical records in health research: a qualitative study in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, P; Buckley, B S; Murphy, A W; MacFarlane, A E

    2013-02-01

    National policies are being developed, which may limit access to patients' records for health research. This could reduce the ability of health research to benefit society as a whole. It is important to develop an in-depth understanding of people's views across demographic groups to inform such policy development. Aims. To explore patients' views about the use of their general practice records in health research with attention to gender and age. Design of study. Qualitative study using focus groups. Six General Practices in the west of Ireland. Focus Group interviews with 35 people who were patients at the practices. Overall, participants were positively inclined towards the idea of information from their records (anonymous and identifiable) being used in research for the 'greater good' although there were some concerns about personal information being 'leaked'. Males emphasized risks in relation to employment and finances, whereas females emphasized risks in relation to social discomfort and embarrassment. Participants were supportive of consent models that enable patients to give prior ongoing consent for specific agreed 'levels' of data use, affording patients self-determination without the need for consent request on study-by-study basis. Overall male and female patients of different ages are supportive of the use of their general practice records in health research and of general practitioners as data protectors.

  17. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    Introduction: In Denmark about 600,000 persons are treated for hypertension and more than 300,000 people are receiving cholesterol lowering drugs. The prevalence of hypertension in people aged 80 years is 70%. For antidepressants the defined daily doses/1000 aged >80 years/day exceed 200. By far...... the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...

  18. Development and early experience from an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practices and allied health providers: the Team-link study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F; Chan, Bibiana C; Daniel, Christopher; Wan, Qing; Zwar, Nick; Davies, Gawaine Powell

    2010-04-27

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practice and outside allied and community health services and providers. A review of organizational theory and a qualitative study of 9 practices was used to design an intervention which was applied in four Divisions of General Practice and 26 urban practices. Clinical record review and qualitative interviews with participants were used to determine the key lessons from its implementation. Facilitating teamwork across organizational boundaries was very challenging. The quality of the relationship between professionals was of key importance. This was enabled by joint education and direct communication between providers. Practice nurses were key links between general practices and allied and community health services. Current arrangements for Team Care planning provide increased opportunities for access to allied health. However the current paper based system is insufficient to build relationships or effectively share roles as part of a patient care team. Facilitation is feasible but constrained by barriers to communication and trust.

  19. Neuroimaging studies of practice-related change: fMRI and meta-analytic evidence of a domain-general control network for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Jason M; Schneider, Walter

    2005-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging and a meta-analysis of prior neuroimaging studies were used to characterize cortical changes resulting from extensive practice and to evaluate a dual-processing account of the neural mechanisms underlying human learning. Three core predictions of the dual processing theory are evaluated: 1) that practice elicits generalized reductions in regional activity by reducing the load on the cognitive control mechanisms that scaffold early learning; 2) that these control mechanisms are domain-general; and 3) that no separate processing pathway emerges as skill develops. To evaluate these predictions, a meta-analysis of prior neuroimaging studies and a within-subjects fMRI experiment contrasting unpracticed to practiced performance in a paired-associate task were conducted. The principal effect of practice was found to be a reduction in the extent and magnitude of activity in a cortical network spanning bilateral dorsal prefrontal, left ventral prefrontal, medial frontal (anterior cingulate), left insular, bilateral parietal, and occipito-temporal (fusiform) areas. These activity reductions are shown to occur in common regions across prior neuroimaging studies and for both verbal and nonverbal paired-associate learning in the present fMRI experiment. The implicated network of brain regions is interpreted as a domain-general system engaged specifically to support novice, but not practiced, performance.

  20. CHAracteristics of research studies that iNfluence practice: a GEneral survey of Canadian orthopaedic Surgeons (CHANGES): a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, Darren; Thornley, Patrick; Evaniew, Nathan; Madden, Kim; Bhandari, Mohit; Ghert, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is increasingly being applied to inform clinical decision-making in orthopaedic surgery. Despite the promotion of EBM in Orthopaedic Surgery, the adoption of results from high quality clinical research seems highly unpredictable and does not appear to be driven strictly by randomized trial data. The objective of this study was to pilot a survey to determine if we could identify surgeon opinions on the characteristics of research studies that are perceived as being most likely to influence clinical decision-making among orthopaedic surgeons in Canada. A 28-question electronic survey was distributed to active members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) over a period of 11 weeks. The questionnaire sought to analyze the influence of both extrinsic and intrinsic characteristics of research studies and their potential to influence practice patterns. Extrinsic factors included the perceived journal quality and investigator profiles, economic impact, peer/patient/industry influence and individual surgeon residency/fellowship training experiences. Intrinsic factors included study design, sample size, and outcomes reported. Descriptive statistics are provided. Of the 109 members of the COA who opened the survey, 95 (87%) completed the survey in its entirety. The overall response rate was 11% (95/841). Surgeons achieved consensus on the influence of three key designs on their practices: 1) randomized controlled trials 94 (99%), 2) meta-analysis 83 (87%), and 3) systematic reviews 81 (85%). Sixty-seven percent of surgeons agreed that studies with sample sizes of 101-500 or more were more likely to influence clinical practice than smaller studies (n = design influencing adoption included 1) reputation of the investigators (99%) and 2) perceived quality of the journal (75%). Although study design and sample size (i.e. minimum of 100 patients) have some influence on clinical decision making, surgeon respondents are equally influenced

  1. The sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK to identify intimate partner violence: a diagnostic accuracy study in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Gene

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV including physical, sexual and emotional violence, causes short and long term ill-health. Brief questions that reliably identify women experiencing IPV who present in clinical settings are a pre-requisite for an appropriate response from health services to this substantial public health problem. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK developed from the Abuse Assessment screen, compared to a 30-item abuse questionnaire, the Composite Abuse Scale (CAS. Methods We administered the four HARK questions and the CAS to women approached by two researchers in general practice waiting rooms in Newham, east London. Inclusions: women aged more than 17 years waiting to see a doctor or nurse, who had been in an intimate relationship in the last year. Exclusions: women who were accompanied by children over four years of age or another adult, too unwell to complete the questionnaires, unable to understand English or unable to give informed consent. Results Two hundred and thirty two women were recruited. The response rate was 54%. The prevalence of current intimate partner violence, within the last 12 months, using the CAS cut off score of ≥3, was 23% (95% C.I. 17% to 28% with pre-test odds of 0.3 (95% C.I. 0.2 to 0.4. The receiver operator characteristic curve demonstrated that a HARK cut off score of ≥1 maximises the true positives whilst minimising the false positives. The sensitivity of the optimal HARK cut-off score of ≥1 was 81% (95% C.I. 69% to 90%, specificity 95% (95% C.I. 91% to 98%, positive predictive value 83% (95% C.I. 70% to 91%, negative predictive value 94% (95% C.I. 90% to 97%, likelihood ratio 16 (95% C.I. 8 to 31 and post-test odds 5. Conclusion The four HARK questions accurately identify women experiencing IPV in the past year and may help women disclose abuse in general practice. The HARK questions could be incorporated into the electronic medical record

  2. The role of informal dimensions of safety in high-volume organisational routines: an ethnographic study of test results handling in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne; Checkland, Katherine; Bowie, Paul; Guthrie, Bruce

    2017-04-27

    The handling of laboratory, imaging and other test results in UK general practice is a high-volume organisational routine that is both complex and high risk. Previous research in this area has focused on errors and harm, but a complementary approach is to better understand how safety is achieved in everyday practice. This paper ethnographically examines the role of informal dimensions of test results handling routines in the achievement of safety in UK general practice and how these findings can best be developed for wider application by policymakers and practitioners. Non-participant observation was conducted of high-volume organisational routines across eight UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics. Sixty-two semi-structured interviews were also conducted with the key practice staff alongside the analysis of relevant documents. While formal results handling routines were described similarly across the eight study practices, the everyday structure of how the routine should be enacted in practice was informally understood. Results handling safety took a range of local forms depending on how different aspects of safety were prioritised, with practices varying in terms of how they balanced thoroughness (i.e. ensuring the high-quality management of results by the most appropriate clinician) and efficiency (i.e. timely management of results) depending on a range of factors (e.g. practice history, team composition). Each approach adopted created its own potential risks, with demands for thoroughness reducing productivity and demands for efficiency reducing handling quality. Irrespective of the practice-level approach adopted, staff also regularly varied what they did for individual patients depending on the specific context (e.g. type of result, patient circumstances). General practices variably prioritised a legitimate range of results handling safety processes and outcomes, each with differing strengths and trade-offs. Future safety

  3. Shared learning in general practice--facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Mortel, Thea; Silberberg, Peter; Ahern, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Capacity for teaching in general practice clinics is limited. Shared learning sessions are one form of vertically integrated teaching that may ameliorate capacity constraints. This study sought to understand the perceptions of general practitioner supervisors, learners and practice staff of the facilitators of shared learning in general practice clinics. Using a grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted and analysed to generate a theory about the topic. Thirty-five stakeholders from nine general practices participated. Facilitators of shared learning included enabling factors such as small group facilitation skills, space, administrative support and technological resources; reinforcing factors such as targeted funding, and predisposing factors such as participant attributes. Views from multiple stakeholders suggest that the implementation of shared learning in general practice clinics would be supported by an ecological approach that addresses all these factors.

  4. Guidelines for computer security in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2007-06-01

    Conclusions This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making these guidelines relevant to local contexts should help maximise their uptake.

  5. Protocol for the Quick Clinical study: a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of an online evidence retrieval system on decision-making in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online information retrieval systems have the potential to improve patient care but there are few comparative studies of the impact of online evidence on clinicians' decision-making behaviour in routine clinical work. Methods/design A randomized controlled parallel design is employed to assess the effectiveness of an online evidence retrieval system, Quick Clinical (QC in improving clinical decision-making processes in general practice. Eligible clinicians are randomised either to receive access or not to receive access to QC in their consulting rooms for 12 months. Participants complete pre- and post trial surveys. Two-hundred general practitioners are recruited. Participants must be registered to practice in Australia, have a computer with Internet access in their consulting room and use electronic prescribing. Clinicians planning to retire or move to another practice within 12 months or participating in any other clinical trial involving electronic extraction of prescriptions data are excluded from the study. The primary end-points for the study is clinician acceptance and use of QC and the resulting change in decision-making behaviour. The study will examine prescribing patterns related to frequently prescribed medications where there has been a recent significant shift in recommendations regarding their use based upon new evidence. Secondary outcome measures include self-reported changes in diagnosis, patient education, prescriptions written, investigations and referrals. Discussion A trial under experimental conditions is an effective way of examining the impact of using QC in routine general practice consultations.

  6. Comparison of hypnosis with conventional relaxation for antenatal and intrapartum use: a feasibility study in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, Les R.; Guzvica, Sally A.

    1987-01-01

    A hypnosis programme for antenatal and intrapartum use has been developed and successfully introduced into a practice as an alternative to conventional relaxation training. Of 96 women from the practice who delivered during the 10-month period of the study 51 opted for the psychoprophylaxis and 45 for the hypnosis. Details of the pregnancy, labour and postnatal period were collected for both groups, together with a subjective assessment of their satisfaction with labour. Disparity between the ages and parity of the two groups made comparisons difficult. The duration of the first stage of labour was markedly reduced in the hypnosis group by 98 minutes for primiparas and 40 minutes for multiparas. A small (five minutes) increase in the length of the second stage may have been a result of the hypnotic relaxation. The verbalization has been amended accordingly. The hypnosis group were more satisfied with labour than the psychoprophylaxis group (mean satisfaction score 7.4 versus 5.6) and they reported other benefits of hypnosis, for example, reduction in anxiety and help with getting to sleep.Further studies are planned. PMID:3333169

  7. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

    ) for two weeks. If symptoms were unchanged after to weeks => referral to endoscopy. Later recurrence of symptoms => endoscopy (> 45 year) or management strategy according to helicobacter pylori status and/or clinical reflux (measures...... of dyspepsia, dyspeptic episodes, main symptom, previous contact to general practice, previous gastroscopia, use of antacids or NSAID's, Helicobacter Pylori status and mental/physical well being (SF-36 measurement scale) (Table 1). After two weeks the GPs assessed 46 % of the patients to be free of symptoms...... Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...

  8. Office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure control by treatment in general practice: the 'Monitoraggio della pressione ARteriosa nella medicina TErritoriale' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninelli, Augusto; Parati, Gianfranco; Cricelli, Claudio; Bignamini, Angelo A; Modesti, Pietro A; Pamparana, Franco; Bilo, Grzegorz; Mancia, Giuseppe; Gensini, Gian F

    2010-05-01

    Guidelines recommend that blood pressure (BP) should be lowered in hypertensive patients to prevent cardiovascular accidents. Management of antihypertensive treatment by general practitioners is usually based on office measurements, which may not allow an assessment of BP control over 24 h, which requires ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) to be implemented. This is rarely done in general practice, and limited information is available on the consistency between the evaluations of the response to treatment provided by office measurement and by ABPM in this setting. To assess concordance between office BP measurements and ABPM-based estimates of hypertension control in a general practice setting. Prospective, comparative between techniques. General practice. Seventy-eight general practices, representative of all Italian regions, participated in this study by recruiting sequential hypertensive adults on stabilized treatment, who were subdivided into even groups with office BP, respectively, controlled or noncontrolled by treatment. In each individual, ABPM was applied by the general practitioner after appropriate training, and 24-h ABP values were defined as controlled or not according to current guidelines. Concordance between office and ABPM evaluation of BP control was assessed with kappa statistics. Positive and negative predictive values of office measurement versus ABPM were estimated. Between July 2005 and November 2006, 190 general practitioners recruited 2059 hypertensive patients based on office BP measurements; in 1728 patients, a 24-h ABPM was performed, yielding 1524 recordings considered as valid for further analysis. The agreement between the assessment of BP control by office measurement and by ABPM was poor (kappa = 0.120), with office measurements showing a satisfactory positive predictive value (0.842) and a poor negative predictive value (0.278); the situation was worse in patients with three or more among the following features: male sex, age of at

  9. Cheques and challenges: business performance in New Zealand general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbanks, Richard; Doolan-Noble, Fiona; McKenna, Alex

    2017-09-01

    INTRODUCTION New Zealand general practice mainly functions as small businesses, usually owned by a single or small group of doctors. Consequently, owners often have to balance the provision of patient care with varying funding priorities, changing patient needs and the pressures of running a sustainable business. Such balancing inevitably leads to tensions developing between these factors. AIM To explore and understand these tensions and responses to them, by examining the business performance measurements used by general practice. METHODS For this study, the unit of analysis and focus were individual practices, but qualitative semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and practice managers were used to gather the data. RESULTS All participating practices had some form of governance or board review, where high-level aggregated business performance data were presented. More sophisticated business performance measures were evident in the larger, more developed practices and in practices functioning as community trusts. Examples of such measures included doctor utilisation and efficiency, appraisal of risk, patient satisfaction with services and responses to changes in patient demand. DISCUSSION As the number of general practices based on the traditional model decrease, a corresponding increase is likely in the establishment and development of 'super practices' based on a corporatized, multi-service, single-location model. Consequently, service delivery will become increasingly complex and will drive a need for increased sophistication in how general practice measures its business performance, thus ensuring a balance between high-quality, safe patient care and the maintenance of a sustainable business.

  10. Differences in diagnostic activity in general practice and findings for individuals invited to the danish screening programme for colorectal cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Andersen, Berit; Laurberg, Søren; Carlsen, Anders Helles; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2018-06-22

    To investigate the diagnostic activity in general practice and the cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in individuals invited to the Danish national screening programme for CRC. A historical population-based cohort study. The Danish CRC screening programme and general practice. The 376,198 individuals invited to the Danish CRC screening programme from 1 March to 31 December 2014. The diagnostic activity (consultations and haemoglobin measures) in general practice in the year preceding the screening invitation and the cumulated incidence of CRC in the year following the screening invitation. Screening participants had significantly higher diagnostic activity than non-participants. Individuals with a positive faecal immunochemical test (FIT) had higher diagnostic activity compared to individuals with a negative FIT, and a small increase in the months leading up to the invitation. Individuals with a screen-detected CRC had lower diagnostic activity than individuals with no CRC. In total, 308 (25.3%) of CRCs diagnosed in the invited population were diagnosed outside the screening programme. Non-participants with CRC more often had low socio-economic status, high comorbidity and stage IV CRC than participants with CRC. There was a tendency that participants and those with a positive FIT had a higher diagnostic activity the year before the screening. This was not seen for those with CRC detected through screening. CRC must still be diagnosed in general practice in the invited population and non-participants are of special interest as they have higher risk of late stage CRC. Key Points Current awareness:Individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) in screening may be symptomatic and CRC may still occur outside screening in the invited population. Most important points:The majority of individuals with CRC in screening cannot be expected to be diagnosed on symptomatic presentation in general practice GPs have to be aware that CRC still occurs outside screening in

  11. Vulnerability and the 'slippery slope' at the end-of-life: a qualitative study of euthanasia, general practice and home death in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Frances; Kimsma, Gerrit; Battin, Margaret P

    2009-12-01

    One enduring criticism of the Dutch euthanasia policy is the 'slippery slope' argument that suggests that allowing physicians to conduct legal euthanasia or assisted suicide would eventually lead to patients being killed against their will. What we currently know about euthanasia and its practices in The Netherlands is predominantly based on retrospective quantitative or interview-based studies, but these studies fail to detail the mechanisms of day-to-day practice. To examine the practices that surround euthanasia, particularly among vulnerable patients, using qualitative observation-based data. A 15-month qualitative, observation-based study of home death and general practice in the greater Amsterdam region of The Netherlands. Study included observation and interviews with a sample of 15 (GPs and 650 of their patients, 192 of whom were living with terminal or life-threatening illness (with and without requests for euthanasia). Euthanasia practice typically involves extensive deliberations, the majority of which do not end in a euthanasia death. Euthanasia discussions or 'euthanasia talk' share at least two consequences: (i) the talk puts the onus on patients to continue discussions towards a euthanasia death and (ii) there is a socio-therapeutic component, which tends to affirm social bonds and social life. While this qualitative evidence cannot disprove existence of abuse, it suggests that euthanasia practices have evolved in such a way that patients are more likely to talk about euthanasia than to die a euthanasia death.

  12. A qualitative study of the impact of the implementation of advanced access in primary healthcare on the working lives of general practice staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offredy Maxine

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The North American model of 'advanced access' has been emulated by the National Primary Care Collaborative in the UK as a way of improving patients' access in primary care. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the implementation of advanced access on the working lives of general practice staff. Methods A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interviews, was conducted with 18 general practice staff: 6 GPs, 6 practice managers and 6 receptionists. Two neighbouring boroughs in southeast England were used as the study sites. NUD*IST computer software assisted in data management to identify concepts, categories and themes of the data. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Results Whilst practice managers and receptionists saw advanced access as having a positive effect on their working lives, the responses of general practitioners (GPs were more ambivalent. Receptionists reported improvements in their working lives with a change in their role from gatekeepers for appointments to providing access to appointments, fewer confrontations with patients, and greater job satisfaction. Practice managers perceived reductions in work stress from fewer patient complaints, better use of time, and greater flexibility for contingency planning. GPs recognised benefits in terms of improved consultations, but had concerns about the impact on workload and continuity of care. Conclusion AA has improved working conditions for receptionists, converting their perceived role from gatekeeper to access facilitator, and for practice managers as patients were more satisfied. GP responses were more ambivalent, as they experienced both positive and negative effects.

  13. [Epidemiology of fatigue in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, R

    1994-11-01

    The epidemiology of fatigue is not well known in France, and this study reports on factors associated with fatigue in a sample of 3,784 general practice patients. Prevalence rates according to several definitions of fatigue are presented and factors are examined that have been reported to be associated with fatigue. Although 41.2% of the sample report having experienced symptoms of fatigue for at least three days, only 7.6% declare fatigue as a reason for consulting a doctor. Women report more symptoms of fatigue, but they do not consult more often than men for this reason. Age is strongly correlated with fatigue, but this is found only for men. Socioprofessional category bears no relationship to fatigue as a reason for consultation, however, the diagnosis of fatigue is more often attributed to professionals and upper management than it is to office staff or skilled and unskilled workers. We do find a strong relationship between depressive symptomatology as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies (CES-D) and fatigue; nonetheless, fatigue is neither sensitive nor specific to the diagnosis of depression.

  14. A theory-based implementation program for alcohol screening and brief intervention (ASBI) in general practices: Planned development and study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, L; Oenema, A; Candel, M J J M; van de Mheen, D

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that alcohol screening and brief intervention (ASBI) in general practices can lead to significant reductions in alcohol consumption among patients, yet ASBI is rarely implemented into routine clinical practice. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of an ASBI implementation program aimed at increasing ASBI delivery rates of general practitioners (GPs) and decreasing patients' alcohol consumption. This study protocol describes the step-wise development and evaluation of an ASBI implementation program. A four-step method is used to identify relevant determinants of change and intervention components based on the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Theoretical Domains Framework. The program will be evaluated in general practices in The Netherlands in a two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial which investigates the effect of the program on GPs' ASBI delivery behaviour as well as on patients' alcohol consumption. Effective theory- and practice-based strategies to implement ASBI in general practices are highly needed. Using a stepwise method we described the development of a program consisting of an e-learning module, a tailored feedback module and environmental support and materials. We hypothesize that this program will result in an increase of GPs' ASBI delivery behaviour. Secondly, we expect an overall decrease in percentage of patients with excessive or problematic alcohol use and a higher proportion of patients from GPs receiving the ASBI implementation program decreasing their alcohol consumption, compared to patients from GPs in the control group. NTR5539. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...... will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria...

  16. PROBLEMS OF GENERAL PRACTICE IN RURAL CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Hollis L.; Andrews, Carroll B.

    1949-01-01

    Medical care for rural populations is an important problem facing the medical profession nationally and locally. The mechanism for solution lies in the existing American Medical Association and California Medical Association committees on rural medical service and further development of “local health councils.” Additional emphasis on training of physicians for general practice is essential through medical school graduate and postgraduate periods. The problem of providing additional adequately equipped and staffed hospitals must receive much consideration. Recognizing that passiveness invites aggressive non-medical agencies to foster bureaucratic dictation inimical to the practice of medicine, the rural physician must act through medical and community organizations to correct weaknesses in the structure of medical practice. PMID:18116230

  17. Going for gold: the health promoting general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion has been influential in guiding the development of 'settings' based health promotion. Over the past decade, settings such as schools have flourished and there has been a considerable amount of academic literature produced, including theoretical papers, descriptive studies and evaluations. However, despite its central importance, the health-promoting general practice has received little attention. This paper discusses: the significance of this setting for health promotion; how a health promoting general practice can be created; effective health promotion approaches; the nursing contribution; and some challenges that need to be resolved. In order to become a health promoting general practice, the staff must undertake a commitment to fulfil the following conditions: create a healthy working environment; integrate health promotion into practice activities; and establish alliances with other relevant institutions and groups within the community. The health promoting general practice is the gold standard for health promotion. Settings that have developed have had the support of local, national and European networks. Similar assistance and advocacy will be needed in general practice. This paper recommends that a series of rigorously evaluated, high-quality pilot sites need to be established to identify and address potential difficulties, and to ensure that this innovative approach yields tangible health benefits for local communities. It also suggests that government support is critical to the future development of health promoting general practices. This will be needed both directly and in relation to the capacity and resourcing of public health in general.

  18. General practice registrars' views on maternity care in general practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Hanna; Jaye, Chrystal; Miller, Dawn L

    2015-12-01

    The number of general practitioners (GPs) providing maternity care in New Zealand has declined dramatically since legislative changes of the 1990s. The Ministry of Health wants GPs to provide maternity care again. To investigate New Zealand general practice registrars' perspectives on GPs' role in maternity care; specifically, whether maternity services should be provided by GPs, registrars' preparedness to provide such services, and training opportunities available or required to achieve this. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed to all registrars enrolled in The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners' (RNZCGP's) General Practice Education Programme (GPEP) in 2012, via their online learning platform OWL. 165 of the 643 general practice registrars responded (25.7% response rate). Most (95%) believe that GPs interested and trained in maternity care should consider providing antenatal, postnatal or shared care with midwives, and 95% believe women should be able to access maternity care from their general practice. When practising as a GP, 90% would consider providing antenatal and postnatal care, 47.3% shared care, and 4.3% full pregnancy care. Professional factors including training and adequate funding were most important when considering providing maternity care as a GP. Ninety-five percent of general practice registrars who responded to our survey believe that GPs should provide some maternity services, and about 90% would consider providing maternity care in their future practice. Addressing professional issues of training, support and funding are essential if more GPs are to participate in maternity care in New Zealand.

  19. [Dealing with diagnostic uncertainty in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübken, Magdalena; Oswald, Jana; Schneider, Antonius

    2013-01-01

    In general, the prevalence of diseases is low in primary care. Therefore, the positive predictive value of diagnostic tests is lower than in hospitals where patients are highly selected. In addition, the patients present with milder forms of disease; and many diseases might hide behind the initial symptom(s). These facts lead to diagnostic uncertainty which is somewhat inherent to general practice. This narrative review discusses different sources of and reasons for uncertainty and strategies to deal with it in the context of the current literature. Fear of uncertainty correlates with higher diagnostic activities. The attitude towards uncertainty correlates with the choice of medical speciality by vocational trainees or medical students. An intolerance of uncertainty, which still increases as medicine is making steady progress, might partly explain the growing shortage of general practitioners. The bio-psycho-social context appears to be important to diagnostic decision-making. The effect of intuition and heuristics are investigated by cognitive psychologists. It is still unclear whether these aspects are prone to bias or useful, which might depend on the context of medical decisions. Good communication is of great importance to share uncertainty with the patients in a transparent way and to alleviate shared decision-making. Dealing with uncertainty should be seen as an important core component of general practice and needs to be investigated in more detail to improve the respective medical decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. The general practitioner workforce crisis in England: a qualitative study of how appraisal and revalidation are contributing to intentions to leave practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Potter, Rachel; Owen, Katherine; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-07-20

    The general practice (GP) workforce in England is in crisis, with declining morale and job satisfaction, increasing early retirement and declining interest in training to become a GP. We recently reported on factors that are influencing this, with appraisal and revalidation emerging as an unexpected finding; 28.6 % of GPs stating an intention to leave general practice within the next 5 years included this as 'very important' or 'important' to their decision. In this study we undertook a secondary analysis to identify how the experience of appraisal and revalidation might be influencing intentions to leave general practice. Qualitative analysis of free text comments made by GPs in a survey of career intentions. All comments that included mention of appraisal or revalidation were extracted. Emergent themes were identified and a coding framework devised. Forty-two participants made comments that related to appraisal and revalidation. Compared to all 1192 participants who completed the main survey, they were older (76.2 % compared to 46.2 % aged 50 years and older), with more years' general practice experience (80.0 % compared to 48.0 % with >20 years' experience) and more likely to state an intention to retire within 5 years (72.2 % compared to 41.9 %). Key themes were appraisal and revalidation as: a bureaucratic, inflexible exercise that added to an already pressured workload; an activity that has little educational value, relevance to professional development or quality of care; and an issue that contributes to low morale, work-related distress and intentions to leave general practice. Revalidation was depicted as a cumbersome tick-box exercise that had little to do with quality of care or protecting patients. There were no comments that countered these negative views. While the representativeness of these comments to the experience of GPs as a whole cannot be judged, it is likely that that they reflect the concerns of GPs whose experience of appraisal

  1. Loyalty conflicts in medical practice. A comparative study of general practitioners', paediatricians' and gynaecologists' assessments of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynöe, N; Mattsson, B

    1998-09-01

    To shed light on attitudes towards loyalty conflicts among general practitioners (GPs) compared with related specialists such as gynaecologists and paediatricians. A postal questionnaire containing three case histories with arguments for and against different ways of acting in loyalty conflicts. The medical problems of the clinical cases varied, but the ethical ones were in principle similar. A random sample of all Swedish GPs, gynaecologists, and paediatricians. GPs (n = 313), paediatricians (n = 197), and gynaecologists (n = 236). On average 71% of the doctors replied. The gynaecologists differed from the other groups by being markedly loyal to the individual patient especially in one case. The paediatricians tended to reply most consistently and they seemed to favour the family perspective, compared with the other doctors. The GPs' response pattern fell in between the other two groups. The study indicates that ethical reasoning depends on the doctors' different medical background with regard to specialty. This study should be followed by others in order to give further explanation of the findings.

  2. Specialization and the Current Practices of General Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Marquita R; Dodgion, Christopher M; Kwok, Alvin C; Hu, Yue-Yung; Havlena, Jeff A; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Kent, K Craig; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of specialization on the practice of general surgery has not been characterized. Our goal was to assess general surgeons’ operative practices to inform surgical education and workforce planning. Study Design We examined the practices of general surgeons identified in the 2008 State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) for three US states. Operations were identified using ICD-9 and CPT codes linked to encrypted physician identifiers. For each surgeon, total operative volume and the percentage of practice comprised of their most common operation were calculated. Correlation was measured between general surgeons’ case volume and the number of other specialists in a health service area. Results There were 1,075 general surgeons who performed 240,510 operations in 2008. The mean operative volume for each surgeon was 224 annual procedures. General surgeons performed an average of 23 different types of operations. For the majority of general surgeons, their most common procedure comprised no more than 30% of total practice. The most common operations, ranked by the frequency that they appeared as general surgeons’ top procedure, included: cholecystectomy, colonoscopy, endoscopy, and skin excision. The proportion of general surgery practice comprised of endoscopic procedures inversely correlated with the number of gastroenterologists in the health service area (Rho = - 0.50, p = 0.005). Conclusions Despite trends toward specialization, the current practices of general surgeons remain heterogeneous. This indicates a continued demand for broad-based surgical education to allow future surgeons to tailor their practices to their environment. PMID:24210145

  3. Abnormal vaginal bleeding in women of reproductive age: a descriptive study of initial management in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Corlien J. H.; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet; Vervoort, Cléo-Lotte A. G.; Ankum, Willem M.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal vaginal bleeding (AVB) in women of reproductive age is a common reason for consulting a general practitioner. Nevertheless, how general practitioners (GPs) choose to initially manage AVB is largely unknown, as is the prevalence of underlying pathology of AVB in primary care.

  4. Cluster randomized trial in the general practice research database: 2. Secondary prevention after first stroke (eCRT study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dregan Alex

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this research is to develop and evaluate methods for conducting pragmatic cluster randomized trials in a primary care electronic database. The proposal describes one application, in a less frequent chronic condition of public health importance, secondary prevention of stroke. A related protocol in antibiotic prescribing was reported previously. Methods/Design The study aims to implement a cluster randomized trial (CRT using the electronic patient records of the General Practice Research Database (GPRD as a sampling frame and data source. The specific objective of the trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention at enhancing the delivery of stroke secondary prevention in primary care. GPRD family practices will be allocated to the intervention or usual care. The intervention promotes the use of electronic prompts to support adherence with the recommendations of the UK Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party and NICE guidelines for the secondary prevention of stroke in primary care. Primary outcome measure will be the difference in systolic blood pressure between intervention and control trial arms at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be differences in serum cholesterol, prescribing of antihypertensive drugs, statins, and antiplatelet therapy. The intervention will continue for 12 months. Information on the utilization of the decision-support tools will also be analyzed. Discussion The CRT will investigate the effectiveness of using a computer-delivered intervention to reduce the risk of stroke recurrence following a first stroke event. The study will provide methodological guidance on the implementation of CRTs in electronic databases in primary care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN35701810

  5. General practice ethnicity data: evaluation of a tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwelt P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is evidence that the collection of ethnicity data in New Zealand primary care is variable and that data recording in practices does not always align with the procedures outlined in the Ethnicity Data Protocols for the Health and Disability Sector. In 2010, The Ministry of Health funded the development of a tool to audit the collection of ethnicity data in primary care. The aim of this study was to pilot the Ethnicity Data Audit Tool (EAT in general practice. The goal was to evaluate the tool and identify recommendations for its improvement. METHODS: Eight general practices in the Waitemata District Health Board region participated in the EAT pilot. Feedback about the pilot process was gathered by questionnaires and interviews, to gain an understanding of practices’ experiences in using the tool. Questionnaire and interview data were analysed using a simple analytical framework and a general inductive method. FINDINGS: General practice receptionists, practice managers and general practitioners participated in the pilot. Participants found the pilot process challenging but enlightening. The majority felt that the EAT was a useful quality improvement tool for handling patient ethnicity data. Larger practices were the most positive about the tool. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that, with minor improvements to the toolkit, the EAT has the potential to lead to significant improvements in the quality of ethnicity data collection and recording in New Zealand general practices. Other system-level factors also need to be addressed.

  6. Readiness for organisational change among general practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, B; Harris, M F; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Taggart, J; Tan, J

    2010-10-01

    Increasing demands on general practice to manage chronic disease may warrant organisational change at the practice level. Staff's readiness for organisational change can act as a facilitator or barrier to implementing interventions aimed at organisational change. To explore general practice staff readiness for organisational change and its association with staff and practices characteristics. This is a cross-sectional study of practices in three Australian states involved in a randomised control trial on the effectiveness of an intervention to enhance the role of non-general practitioner staff in chronic disease management. Readiness for organisational change, job satisfaction and practice characteristics were assessed using questionnaires. 502 staff from 58 practices completed questionnaires. Practice characteristics were not associated with staff readiness for change. A multilevel regression analysis showed statistically significant associations between staff readiness for organisational change (range 1 to 5) and having a non-clinical staff role (vs general practitioner; B=-0.315; 95% CI -0.47 to -0.16; pchange which addresses the mix of practice staff. Moderately low job satisfaction may be an opportunity for organisational change.

  7. The patient, the doctor, and the patient’s loyalty: a qualitative study in French general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Laura; François, Mathilde; de Chefdebien, Marine; Saint-Lary, Oliver; Jami, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background The term loyalty can be defined as the attachment that characterises someone who consistent in their feelings, affections, or habits. By introducing the Declaration of General Practitioner (or preferred doctor declaration) in 2004, France adopted a formal incentive for patients to be faithful to their doctor since it entailed optimal coverage of medical care by their national health insurance There has been no research evaluating the impact of this measure and to determine the components of doctor–patient loyalty. Aim To explore what builds and maintains patients’ loyalty to their GP. Design and setting Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews close to Paris (the département of Yvelines’), France. Method Twenty-eight patients were interviewed in five surgeries of self-employed GPs with different demographics. Interviews were transcribed and a thematic analysis conducted to categorise the data. Phenomenological analysis was used to analyse the transcripts. Results Patient loyalty is based mainly on trust. Trust can be reinforced by certain comforting factors such as the ability to listen, a sense of carefulness, and the quality of care. Loyalty is both a dynamic construct and a relational exchange subject to various influences. Patients find advantages in being loyal. The model of the ‘family doctor’ has always been the archetype of loyalty for several generations within one family. A GP’s inability to meet all of the patient’s requirements is not necessarily a determining factor in breaking the patient’s loyalty. Conclusion Loyalty is more complex than commonly assumed and involves dimensions of trust, listening, quality of care, availability, and familiarity. The observations drawn out from this study warrant a larger scale investigation. PMID:27789510

  8. Practices and opinions regarding HPV vaccination among French general practitioners: evaluation through two cross-sectional studies in 2007 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasset, Christine; Kalecinski, Julie; Régnier, Véronique; Barone, Giovanna; Leocmach, Yann; Vanhems, Philippe; Chauvin, Franck; Lutringer-Magnin, Delphine

    2014-06-01

    To use both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the evolution of practices and opinions regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among French general practitioners. A cross-sectional study (self-questionnaires) was performed in 2007 and repeated in 2010 among 271 general practitioners. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on 27 voluntary participants by a sociologist and analyzed according to content analysis. Acceptability of HPV vaccination had increased from 2007 to 2010 (79.9 vs. 87.1%, respectively), just as the practice of HPV vaccination among 14-year-old girls (19.0 vs. 49.1%, respectively). Though about 60% reported complications associated with HPV vaccination, irrespective of year, the types of difficulties have varied: difficulties related to "questions asked by patients" had decreased, though concerns about side effects had remained stable. During interviews, difficulties related to "the reason for medical consultation" and "the target age" were often associated with addressing the issue of sexuality, especially when the parents were present. Although the high level of acceptability of HPV vaccination among general practitioners, which increased from 2007 to 2010, there remain difficulties in addressing this practice.

  9. Outcomes of implants and restorations placed in general dental practices: a retrospective study by the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, John D; Kazimiroff, Julie; Papas, Athena; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Vena, Donald A; Wu, Hongyu; Collie, Damon; Craig, Ronald G

    2014-07-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine the types, outcomes, risk factors and esthetic assessment of implants and their restorations placed in the general practices of a practice-based research network. All patients who visited network practices three to five years previously and underwent placement of an implant and restoration within the practice were invited to enroll. Practitioner-investigators (P-Is) recorded the status of the implant and restoration, characteristics of the implant site and restoration, presence of peri-implant pathology and an esthetic assessment by the P-I and patient. The P-Is classified implants as failures if the original implant was missing or had been replaced, the implant was mobile or elicited pain on percussion, there was overt clinical or radiographic evidence of pathology or excessive bone loss (> 0.2 millimeter per year after an initial bone loss of 2 mm). They classified restorations as failures if they had been replaced or if there was abutment or restoration fracture. The authors enrolled 922 implants and patients from 87 practices, with a mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 4.2 (0.6) years. Of the 920 implants for which complete data records were available, 64 (7.0 percent) were classified as failures when excessive bone loss was excluded from the analysis. When excessive bone loss was included, 172 implants (18.7 percent) were classified as failures. According to the results of univariate analysis, a history of severe periodontitis, sites with preexisting inflammation or type IV bone, cases of immediate implant placement and placement in the incisor or canine region were associated with implant failure. According to the results of multivariate analysis, sites with preexisting inflammation (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.41-3.34]) or type IV bone (OR = 1.99; 95 percent CI, 1.12-3.55) were associated with a greater risk of implant failure. Of the 908 surviving implants, 20 (2.2 percent) had

  10. Experiences of General Practitioners and Practice Support Staff Using a Health and Lifestyle Screening App in Primary Health Care: Implementation Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marianne Julie; Wadley, Greg; Sanci, Lena Amanda

    2018-04-24

    Technology-based screening of young people for mental health disorders and health compromising behaviors in general practice increases the disclosure of sensitive health issues and improves patient-centered care. However, few studies investigate how general practitioners (GPs) and practice support staff (receptionists and practice managers) integrate screening technology into their routine work, including the problems that arise and how the staff surmount them. The aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of a health and lifestyle screening app, Check Up GP, for young people aged 14 to 25 years attending an Australian general practice. We conducted an in-depth implementation case study of Check Up GP in one general practice clinic, with methodology informed by action research. Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted with GPs and support staff at the end of the implementation period. Data were thematically analyzed and mapped to normalization process theory constructs. We also analyzed the number of times we supported staff, the location where young people completed Check Up GP, and whether they felt they had sufficient privacy and received a text messaging (short message service, SMS) link at the time of taking their appointment. A total of 4 GPs and 10 support staff at the clinic participated in the study, with all except 3 receptionists participating in the final interviews and focus groups. During the 2-month implementation period, the technology and administration of Check Up GP was iterated through 4 major quality improvement cycles in response to the needs of the staff. This resulted in a reduction in the average time taken to complete Check Up GP from 14 min to 10 min, improved SMS text messaging for young people, and a more consistent description of the app by receptionists to young people. In the first weeks of implementation, researchers needed to regularly support staff with the app's administration; however, this support

  11. Knowledge, attitude and practice related to diabetes mellitus among the general public in Galle district in Southern Sri Lanka: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. M Herath

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM has become a global epidemic with significant disability and premature death. Identification of the level of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP related to diabetes among the general public is important in strategies for prevention of diabetes mellitus. Methods This study was conducted as a community based cross sectional study in three Medical Officers of Health (MOH areas in Galle district. Previously healthy literate individuals who have not attended any diabetes education program in the last two years were selected for this study. Results A total of 277 participants were included in the study. The majority (77% had either moderate (39% or above moderate knowledge (38% on diabetes mellitus. Even though, level of education was significantly and positively associated with knowledge (p = 0.001, the association of gender and age with knowledge was not significant. Unlike knowledge, the attitude towards diabetes was poor in majority (90% and level of education had no significant effect on attitude. With regards to practices, more than half of study subjects never had their blood sugar checked and, about 65% used to take refined sugar liberally and a large majority (80% had no regular exercise activity. Conclusions Even though the majority (77% had moderate or above moderate knowledge on diabetes, their attitudes towards diabetes was poor (88%. It appears that the higher knowledge on diabetes did not translate into good practices as over 50% of study subjects did not involve with any preventive measures. Therefore, more emphasis should be given to address the issue of poor attitude and practices towards diabetes mellitus among general public in Sri Lanka.

  12. An analytic observational study on complaints management in the general practice out of hours care setting: who complains, why, and what can we do about it?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barragry, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    General Practice Co-Operatives provide most out of hours care in communities in Ireland. Limited data exists on patient complaints. This study reports on complaints at Kildare and West Wicklow Doctors on Call (\\'K Doc\\'), a GP Co-Operative in Ireland, examining the impact of a formal risk reduction strategy implemented (2010-2013). The aim of the study was to determine if it was possible to reduce the rate of written complaints per 1000 consultations through a formal approach encompassing evaluation of complaints, improved communication in relation to complaints, and more direct use of insights gained from complaints analysis in continuing professional development at the Co-Operative.

  13. Facilitators and barriers in the diagnostic process of vulvovaginal complaints (vulvodynia) in general practice: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusink, Peter; Teunissen, Doreth; Lucassen, Peter L.; Laan, Ellen T.; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The gap between the relatively high prevalence of provoked vulvodynia (PVD) in the general population and the low incidence in primary care can partly be explained by physicians' lack of knowledge about the assessment and management of PVD. Objectives: To recognize barriers and

  14. No abatement of steroid injections for tennis elbow in Australian General Practice: A 15-year observational study with random general practitioner sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzino, Bill; Britt, Helena; Pollack, Allan J; Hall, Michelle; Bennell, Kim L; Hunter, David J

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate general practitioner (GP) management of tennis elbow (TE) in Australia. Data about the management of TE by GPs from 2000 to 2015 were extracted from the Bettering the Evaluation of Care of Health program database. Patient and GP characteristics and encounter management data were classified by the International Classification of Primary Care, version 2, and reported using descriptive statistics with point estimates and 95% confidence intervals. TE was managed by GPs 242,000 times per year on average. Patients were mainly female (52.3%), aged between 35 and 64 years (mean: 49.3 yrs), had higher relative risks of concomitant disorders (e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome and other tendonitis) and their TE was 10 times more likely to be work related than problems managed for patients who did not have TE. Use of diagnostic tests was low, implying a clinical examination based diagnosis of TE. Management was by procedural treatments (36 per 100 TE problems), advice, education or counselling (25 per 100), and referral to other health care providers (14 per 100, mainly to physiotherapy). The rate of local injection did not change over the 15 years and was performed at similar rates as physiotherapy referral. The high risk of comorbidities and work relatedness and no abatement in the reasonably high rate of local injections (which is contrary to the evidence from clinical trials) provides support for the development and dissemination of TE clinical guidelines for GPs.

  15. Interacting institutional logics in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca; Holt, Robin

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the organisational field of general dental practice and how agents change or maintain the institution of values associated with the everyday work of health care provision. Our dataset comprise archival literature and policy documents, interview data from field level actors, as well as service delivery level interview data and secondary data gathered (2011-12) from 16 English dental practices. Our analysis provides a typology of institutional logics (prevailing systems of value) experienced in the field of dental practice. Confirming current literature, we find two logics dominate how care is assessed: business-like health care and medical professionalism. We advance the literature by finding the business-like health care logic further distinguished by values of commercialism on the one hand and those of accountability and procedural diligence on the other. The logic of professionalism we also find is further distinguished into a commitment to clinical expertise and independence in delivering patient care on the one hand, and concerns for the autonomy and sustainability of a business enterprise on the other. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. Method During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral. Results The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred. Conclusion This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral.

  17. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Wing-Yee; de Kwaadsteniet, Marjolein CE; Harmsen, Mirjam; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette WA; Schellevis, François G; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. Method During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral. Results The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred. Conclusion This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral. PMID:16584577

  18. The problem of diagnostic variability in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, D L; Cross, K W; Fleming, D M

    1992-08-01

    The aim was to examine the scale, source, and relevance of variation between general practices in respect of the rates with which patients consulted with illnesses falling in each of several diagnostic groups. This study involved a general practice morbidity survey conducted over two years, 1970-72. All patients who consulted their general practitioners were identified and the number of these who consulted with diagnoses attributable to each of the 18 main chapters of the International classification of diseases were counted. Patients who consulted for more than one diagnosis within a chapter were counted once only; those who consulted for one or more diagnoses in each of several chapters were counted once for each chapter. This was a national survey involving general practitioners in England and Wales. The study involved 214,524 patients from 53 selected general practices (115 doctors) who were registered with their general practitioners for the whole of the year 1970-71 and for whom their morbidity data had been linked with their social data from the 1971 census. Using the numbers of patients on the practice lists as denominators, practice patient consulting rates (PPCR) were calculated for each practice and for each ICD chapter. Variability in chapter PPCR was examined by calculating coefficients of variation and, after allowance for random variation, coefficients of residual variation. There were large interpractice (doctor) variations in all chapter rates. These variations were only marginally attributable to: chance; different age, sex and social class mixes of practice populations; geographical locations; and practice organisation. The rates were, however, consistent from one year to the next for any one practice. Approximately half of the interpractice (doctor) diagnostic variability was associated with overall patient consulting behaviour. When the effects of this behaviour were discounted, any major residual diagnostic variability was confined largely to

  19. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... included in the first audit and 2394 in the second audit. We observed a significantly increased utilisation of spirometry from the first (52.7%) to the second audit (71.4%) (p quality of management. We conclude that participation in an educational...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  20. General practice in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Rose Olsen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: General practice systems in the Nordic countries share certain common features. The sector is based on the Nordic model of a tax-financed supply of services with a political objective of equal access for all. The countries also share the challenges of increased political expectations to deliver primary prevention and increased workload as patients from hospital care are discharged earlier. However, within this common framework, primary care is organized differently. This is particularly in relation to the private-public mix, remuneration systems and the use of financial and non-financial incentives. Objective: The objective of this paper is to compare the differences and similarities in primary care among the Nordic countries, to create a mapping of the future plans and reforms linked to remuneration and incentives schemes, and to discuss the pros and cons for these plans with reference to the literature. An additional objective is to identify gaps in the literature and future research opportunities. Results/Conclusions: Despite the many similarities within the Nordic health care systems, the primary care sectors function under highly different arrangements. Most important are the differences in the gate-keeping function, private versus salaried practices, possibilities for corporate ownership, skill-mix and the organisational structure. Current reforms and political agendas appear to focus on the side effects of the individual countries’ specific systems. For example, countries with salaried systems with geographical responsibility are introducing incentives for private practice and more choices for patients. Countries with systems largely based on private practice are introducing more monitoring and public regulation to control budgets. We also see that new governments tends to bring different views on the future organisation of primary care, which provide considerable political tension but few actual changes. Interestingly

  1. The SPHERE Study. Secondary prevention of heart disease in general practice: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of tailored practice and patient care plans with parallel qualitative, economic and policy analyses. [ISRCTN24081411].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Andrew W

    2005-07-29

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the SPHERE study is to design, implement and evaluate tailored practice and personal care plans to improve the process of care and objective clinical outcomes for patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) in general practice across two different health systems on the island of Ireland. CHD is a common cause of death and a significant cause of morbidity in Ireland. Secondary prevention has been recommended as a key strategy for reducing levels of CHD mortality and general practice has been highlighted as an ideal setting for secondary prevention initiatives. Current indications suggest that there is considerable room for improvement in the provision of secondary prevention for patients with established heart disease on the island of Ireland. The review literature recommends structured programmes with continued support and follow-up of patients; the provision of training, tailored to practice needs of access to evidence of effectiveness of secondary prevention; structured recall programmes that also take account of individual practice needs; and patient-centred consultations accompanied by attention to disease management guidelines. METHODS: SPHERE is a cluster randomised controlled trial, with practice-level randomisation to intervention and control groups, recruiting 960 patients from 48 practices in three study centres (Belfast, Dublin and Galway). Primary outcomes are blood pressure, total cholesterol, physical and mental health status (SF-12) and hospital re-admissions. The intervention takes place over two years and data is collected at baseline, one-year and two-year follow-up. Data is obtained from medical charts, consultations with practitioners, and patient postal questionnaires. The SPHERE intervention involves the implementation of a structured systematic programme of care for patients with CHD attending general practice. It is a multi-faceted intervention that has been developed to respond to barriers and solutions to

  2. A reverse J-shaped association of all-cause mortality with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in general practice, the CopD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durup, D; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Christensen, J.

    2012-01-01

    with higher mortality (P study from the general practice sector, a reverse J-shaped relation between the serum level of 25(OH)D and all-cause mortality was observed, indicating not only a lower limit but also an upper limit. The lowest mortality risk was at 50-60 nmol/liter......Context:Optimal levels of vitamin D have been a topic of heavy debate, and the correlation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and mortality still remains to be established.Objective:The aim of the study was to determine the association between all-cause mortality and serum levels of 25(OH......)D, calcium, and PTH.Design and Setting:We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study, the CopD Study, in a single laboratory center in Copenhagen, Denmark.Participants:Serum 25(OH)D was analyzed from 247,574 subjects from the Copenhagen general practice sector. In addition, serum levels of calcium...

  3. Motives of former interns in general practice for speciality-choice − Results of a cross-sectional study among graduates 2007 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendroth, Jens; Schnell, Ute; Lichte, Thomas; Oemler, Matthias; Klement, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: The influence of a final-year elective internship in general practice (IGP) on motives affecting graduates’ choice of specialty is the object of great public interest, yet still insufficiently evaluated. Longitudinal studies show the influence of numerous motives (e.g. work-life balance), but not following the IGP experience itself. Thus, we performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study of all graduates who completed the IGP in Saxony-Anhalt during 2007-2012 regarding their motives for choosing a speciality. Method: A standardized questionnaire was sent to 109 former interns in general practice. The questionnaire contained 29 items addressing three topics (personal attitudes, concept of personal and professional life, motives for speciality choice) and used single-choice and multiple-choice answers, as well as Likert scales. Correlation analysis was carried out by means of Kendall's tau. Results: The questionnaire reached 97 former interns, of which 45 (46%) responded. In the overall ranking of motives for speciality choice, family (71%), leisure time (66%) and job opportunities (48%) rated as more important than income (36%), mentoring (20%), status or scientific work (20%). Only 29% of the respondents stated that their speciality choice was changed by the IGP. If the speciality choice was already established before the IGP, the influence of the IGP on speciality choice was significantly low (r=-.5; pteacher during the IGP. Conclusion: The final-year IGP is an opportunity to change the perception of general practice in students who are still undecided. This can lead to different speciality choices in a subgroup. Personal attitudes and concepts of personal life and career were also important factors affecting speciality choice. The aspects of the positive influence exerted by medical teachers on those students who are still undecided during the IGP should be carefully evaluated. PMID:24575153

  4. Effectiveness of a Minimal Intervention for Stress-related mental disorders with Sick leave (MISS; study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial in general practice [ISRCTN43779641

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Marwijk Harm WJ

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main aims of this paper are to describe the setting and design of a Minimal Intervention in general practice for Stress-related mental disorders in patients on Sick leave (MISS, as well as to ascertain the study complies with the requirements for a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT. The potential adverse consequences of sick leave due to Stress-related Mental Disorders (SMDs are extensive, but often not recognised. Since most people having SMDs with sick leave consult their general practitioner (GP at an early stage, a tailored intervention given by GPs is justified. We provide a detailed description of the MISS; that is more accurate assessment, education, advice and monitoring to treat SMDs in patients on sick leave. Our hypothesis is that the MISS will be more effective compared to the usual care, in reducing days of sick leave of these patients. Methods The design is a pragmatic RCT. Randomisation is at the level of GPs. They received the MISS-training versus no training, in order to compare the MISS vs. usual care at patient level. Enrolment of patients took place after screening in the source population, that comprised 20–60 year old primary care attendees. Inclusion criteria were: moderately elevated distress levels, having a paid job and sick leave for no longer than three months. There is a one year follow up. The primary outcome measure is lasting full return to work. Reduction of SMD- symptoms is one of the secondary outcome measures. Forty-six GPs and 433 patients agreed to participate. Discussion In our study design, attention is given to the practical application of the requirements for a pragmatic trial. The results of this cluster RCT will add to the evidence about treatment options in general practice for SMDs in patients on sick leave, and might contribute to a new and appropriate guideline. These results will be available at the end of 2006.

  5. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolter, R.; Freund, T.; Ledig, T.; Boll, B.; Szecsenyi, J.; Roos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the

  6. Clinical indications for antibiotic use in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2017-01-01

    of routine electronic antibiotic prescriptions from Danish general practice. Subjects: All 975,626 patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription at outpatient pharmacies during the 1-year study period (July 2012 to June 2013). Main outcome measures: Number of prescriptions per clinical indication. Number......Objective: To assess the availability and applicability of clinical indications from electronic prescriptions on antibiotic use in Danish general practice. Design: Retrospective cohort register-based study including the Danish National Prescription Register. Setting: Population-based study...... from electronic prescriptions are accessible and available to provide an overview of drug use, in casu antibiotic prescriptions, in Danish general practice. These clinical indications may be further explored in detail to assess rational drug use and congruence with guidelines, but validation...

  7. Management in general practice: the challenge of the new General Medical Services contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath

    2004-10-01

    Managers in general practice perform a variety of roles, from purely administrative to higher-level strategic planning. There has been little research investigating in detail how they perform these roles and the problems that they encounter. The new General Medical Services (GMS) contract contains new management challenges and it is not clear how practices will meet these. To improve understanding of the roles performed by managers in general practice and to consider the implications of this for the implementation of the new GMS contract. In-depth qualitative case studies covering the period before and immediately after the vote in favour of the new GMS contract. Three general practices in England, chosen using purposeful sampling. Semi-structured interviews with all clinical and managerial personnel in each practice, participant and non-participant observation, and examination of documents. Understanding about what constitutes the legitimate role of managers in general practice varies both within and between practices. Those practices in the study that employed a manager to work at a strategic level with input into the direction of the organisation demonstrated significant problems with this in practice. These included lack of clarity about what the legitimate role of the manager involved, problems relating to the authority of managers in the context of a partnership, and lack of time available to them to do higher-level work. In addition, general practitioners (GPs) were not confident about their ability to manage their managers' performance. The new GMS contract will place significant demands on practice management. These results suggest that it cannot be assumed that simply employing a manager with high-level skills will enable these demands to be met; there must first be clarity about what the manager should be doing, and attention must be directed at questions about the legitimacy enjoyed by such a manager, the limits of his or her authority, and the

  8. An approach to vertigo in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaraju, Sindhu; Perera, Eshini

    2016-04-01

    Dizziness is a common and very distressing presentation in general practice. In more than half of these cases, the dizziness is due to vertigo, which is the illusion of movement of the body or its surroundings. It can have central or peripheral causes, and determining the cause can be difficult. The aim of this article is to provide a clear framework for approaching patients who present with vertigo. A suggested approach to the assessment of vertigo is outlined. The causes of vertigo may be central (involving the brainstem or cerebellum) or peripheral (involving the inner ear). A careful history and physical examination can distinguish between these causes. The most common causes of vertigo seen in primary care are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), vestibular neuronitis (VN) and Ménière's disease. These peripheral causes of vertigo are benign, and treatment involves reassurance and management of symptoms.

  9. Improvisational Practices in Elementary General Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenhagen, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Despite historic and ongoing support for the inclusion of improvisation in the elementary general music curriculum, music educators consistently report challenges with implementation of improvisational activities in their classes. This study was designed to examine (a) the extent to which improvisational activities were occurring in the…

  10. Food avoidance and restriction in adults: a cross-sectional pilot study comparing patients from an immunology clinic to a general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; Frankum, Brad

    2017-01-01

    With the introduction of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - fifth edition, there is an increased need to understand the prevalence and pattern of food avoidance and restriction in adults. High rates of food allergy and intolerance in immunology clinic populations, and subsequent high rates of elimination diets, place these individuals at a greater risk of developing pathological eating behaviours. This descriptive cross sectional pilot study aims to provide preliminary data on the prevalence and nature of food avoidance and restriction in an adult population, and to explore the reasons for this behaviour. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed to adults presenting to an immunology clinic and a general practice over the course of 6 months to describe the prevalence and nature of avoidant and restrictive eating behaviours in this population. Pearson's chi square test was used to examine the strength of a potential link to a formal diagnosis of avoidant restrictive food intake disorder in these patients. A total of 102 completed questionnaires were used for data analysis. Food avoidance or restriction was detected in 81 respondents (79%), with rates not significantly higher in the immunology clinic group compared to the general practice group ( p  = .242). Food allergy and intolerance were the most common reasons for disturbed eating patterns. Life impact secondary to food avoidance and restriction was reported by 26% of respondents, with significantly higher rates observed in the immunology clinic cohort compared to the general practice ( p  = .011). Eating disturbances similar to those characteristic of ARFID are very common in adults. Food avoidance and restriction due to perceived food allergy and intolerance are significant reasons for such disordered eating patterns, particularly in an immunology clinic population. Further investigation is needed to determine if such eating

  11. Eating Disorders in the General Practice : A Case-Control Study on the Utilization of Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Son, Gabrielle E.; Hoek, Hans W.; Van Hoeken, Daphne; Schellevis, Francois G.; Van Furth, Eric F.

    Objective To investigate primary care utilization between patients with an eating disorder (ED) and other patient groups, and between the ED subgroups anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Method The present study was an observational casecontrol study. In total, 167 patients with ED were

  12. Sex differences in the medication choice for hypertension in general practice. A study with written case simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klungel, O.H.; Paes, A.H.P.; de Boer, A; Kuyvenhoven, M.; Seidell, J C; Bakker, A

    The objective of this study was to explore explanations for the preference of physicians to prescribe beta-blockers to hypertensive men and diuretics to hypertensive women. A qualitative study among 12 family physicians was conducted with a combination of written case simulations, semi-structured

  13. Eating disorders in the general practice: a case–control study on the utilization of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Son, G.E. van; Hoek, H.W.; Hoeken, D. van; Schellevis, F.G.; Furth, E.F. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate primary care utilization between patients with an eating disorder (ED) and other patient groups, and between the ED subgroups anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Method: The present study was an observational case–control study. In total, 167 patients with ED

  14. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without....... In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach...... Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME-) activities, and clusters...

  15. Studying Engineering Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study of engineering practices has been the focus of Engineering Studies over the last three decades. Theses studies have used ethnographic and grounded methods in order to investigate engineering practices as they unfold in natural settings - in workplaces and engineering education. However......, engineering studies have not given much attention to conceptually clarifying what should be understood by 'engineering practices' and more precisely account for the composition and organization of the entities and phenomena that make up the practices. This chapter investigates and discusses how a 'practice...... will draw out some methodological consequences and discuss the ramifications of a practice theoretical approach for Engineering Studies....

  16. Prognostic factors for neck pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan L.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Koes, Bart W.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic studies on neck pain are scarce and are typically restricted to short-term follow-up only. In this prospective cohort study, indicators of short- and long-term outcomes of neck pain were identified that can easily be measured in general practice. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age,

  17. Use of general practice before and after mild traumatic brain injury: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galili, Stine Fjendbo; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup

    2017-01-01

    Milde hovedtraumer ses hyppigt i de danske akutafdelinger, og følgevirkningerne af milde hovedtraumer er stærkt omdiskuterede. Formålet med dette nationale studie var at beskrive brugen af almen praksis før og efter et mildt hovedtraume og bruge antallet af kontakter som en proxy variabel...

  18. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns? A comparative study in Western-European general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Dulmen, S. van; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; Bensing, J.

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor–patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor–patient communication as well. This study examined (1)whether or not communication

  19. Overweight in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease needs more attention: a cross-sectional study in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, L.D.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; Dijk, C.E. van; Bakker, D.H. de; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) primarily focus on the prevention of weight loss, while overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in patients with milder stages of COPD. This cross-sectional study examines the association of overweight and obesity with the

  20. Laboratory-supported influenza surveillance in Victorian sentinel general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, H; Murphy, A; Leong, W; Leydon, J; Tresise, P; Gerrard, M; Chibo, D; Birch, C; Andrews, R; Catton, M

    2000-12-01

    Laboratory-supported influenza surveillance is important as part of pandemic preparedness, for identifying and isolating candidate vaccine strains, for supporting trials of anti-influenza drugs and for refining the influenza surveillance case definition in practice. This study describes the implementation of laboratory-supported influenza surveillance in Victorian sentinel general practices and provides an estimate of the proportion of patients with an influenza-like illness proven to have influenza. During 1998 and 1999, 25 sentinel general practices contributed clinical surveillance data and 16 metropolitan practices participated in laboratory surveillance. Serological, virus-antigen detection, virus culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures were used to establish the diagnosis of influenza. Two laboratories at major teaching hospitals in Melbourne provided additional data on influenza virus identification. General practice sentinel surveillance and laboratory identification of influenza provided similar data on the pattern of influenza in the community between May and September. The clinical suspicion of influenza was confirmed in 49 to 54 per cent of cases seen in general practice.

  1. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, W.Y.; Kwaadsteniet, M.C. de; Harmsen, M.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W. van; Schellevis, F.G.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. METHOD: During one calendar year, 195 general

  2. Factors associated with non-attendance in a general practice super clinic population in regional Australia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancarrow, Susan; Bradbury, Joanne; Avila, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Non-attendance at medical appointments is associated with increased patient morbidity and is a significant drain on health service resources. Australian studies have focused on secondary healthcare settings, screening, and interventions to reduce non-attendance. To explore factors associated with non-attendance in a regional primary care setting. A retrospective cohort of all patients with a scheduled appointment between October 2011 and October 2013 at a regional, primary care clinic providing medical and allied health services in a region of New South Wales (NSW) serving a large Aboriginal population (10.7 per cent). Using multivariate logistic regression, non-attendance was regressed on a range of covariates, including number of appointments per person, gender and ethnicity, and day of the week. The overall proportion of missed appointments was 7.6 per cent. Risk factors for non-attendance were day of the week [Mondays (8.1 per cent), Fridays (8.0 per cent), and Thursdays (7.9 per cent), (χ2(4)= 20.208, pattend (FTA) (95% CI: 11-28%)]; Aboriginality (OR=4.022, 95% CI: 3.263, 4.956), and female gender (OR=1.077; 95% CI 1.024, 1.132). There was a trend toward an interaction between gender and Aboriginality, with Aboriginal females being the group most likely to miss appointments (OR=1.272, 95% CI: 0.949, 1.705). This is the largest study of non-attendance in an Australian primary healthcare setting. While not a typical setting, the study had the advantage of a large, mixed population. The suggested high rates of non-attendance by Aboriginal females have potentially important policy implications.

  3. Implementation of an Arranged Preventive Consultation in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram; Kirkegaard, Pia; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    Background: In 2006 an arranged preventive consultation (0106-service) was implemented in Danish general practice. The purpose of the consultation is an attempt to improve the systematic prevention of the main chronic lifestyle diseases. Aim: This study examines the GP's experiences...... with the arranged preventive consultation with focus on facilitators and barriers in the implementation of the consultation. Material & Method: Semi-structured interviews with 10 GPs and nurses in general practice. Results & Conclusions: Economically lucrative services are not an isolated motivation for the GPs....../nurses, but must be accompanied with a basic belief in the effect of preventive consultations in general practice. The better payment of the 0106-service is used to spend more time per consultation and it makes the GPs/nurses feel rewarded for the preventive work they perform. The consultation frames a social...

  4. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    inequalities in health or whether social factors in themselves determine the use of general practice. AIM: To examine if social factors are associated with frequent attendance in general practice after adjusting for physical and psychological health variables. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based cross......BACKGROUND: A lack of social support is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased effect of prevention. Frequent attenders to primary care are characterised by poorer social conditions than other patients in general practice, but we do not know whether this is due to social...... during the period November 1997-October 1998. A questionnaire about physical, psychological and social factors was sent to the patients. The associations between social factors and frequent attendance were adjusted for physical and psychological health and tendency towards somatisation. RESULTS: A total...

  5. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic consumption in the primary care sector is often perceived as synonymous with consumption in general practice despite the fact that few countries stratify the primary care sector by providers' medical specialty. We aimed to characterize and quantify antibiotic use in Danish...... general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. Methods: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants....../day (DIDs and TIDs, respectively) and assessed according to antibiotic spectrum (narrow versus broad) and their anatomical therapeutic classification codes in total as well as in six age groups. Results: The contribution of general practice to the entire antibiotic use in the primary care sector declined...

  6. Childhood fever: a qualitative study on parents' expectations and experiences during general practice out-of-hours care consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Eefje G P M; Loonen, Nicole; Hendrix, Dagmar A S; Lepot, Julie M M; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2015-10-07

    Fever in children is common and mostly caused by benign self-limiting infections. Yet consultation rates in primary care are high, especially during GP out-of-hours care. Therefore, we aimed to explore experiences of parents when having visited GP out-of-hours services with their febrile child. We performed a qualitative study using 20 semi-structured interviews among parents from different backgrounds presenting to GP out-of-hours care with a febrile child rationality and emotion, (3) expecting reassurance from a professional and (4) a need for consistent, reliable information. Not one symptom, but a combination of fever with other symptoms, made parents anxious and drove care seeking. Although parents carefully considered when to seek care, they experienced increased anxiety with increases in their child's temperature. Because parents work during the day and fever typically rises during the early evening, the decision to seek care was often made during out-of-hours care. When parents consulted a GP they did not have any set expectations other than seeking reassurance, however a proper physical examination diminished their anxiety. Parents did not demand antibiotics, but trusted on the expertise of the GP to assess necessity. Parents requested consistent, reliable information on fever and self-management strategies. Parents were inexperienced in self-management strategies and had a subsequent desire for reassurance; this played a pivotal role in out-of-hours help seeking for childhood fever. These factors provide clues to optimise information exchange between GPs and parents, by providing written, tailored, consistent information on self-management strategies for current and future fever episodes. GPs' had incorrect assumptions that parents expected antibiotic treatment.

  7. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  8. Primary non-adherence to prescribed medication in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristján; Halldórsson, Matthías; Thengilsdóttir, Gudrún

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-adherence refers to the patient not redeeming a prescribed medication at some point during drug therapy. Research has mainly focused on secondary non-adherence. Prior to this study, the overall rate of primary non-adherence in general practice in Iceland was not known....

  9. Characteristics of effective clinical guidelines for general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, J.S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Zaat, J.O.M.; Spies, T.H.; Bij, A.K. van der; Mokkink, H.G.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of clinical guidelines in general practice is often limited. Research on barriers to guideline adherence usually focuses on attitudinal factors. Factors linked to the guideline itself are much less studied. AIM: To identify characteristics of effective clinical guidelines for

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitions in the Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of general practitioners ... identified include the fact that they are time consuming, disrupt schedules, parents are difficult and ... oral administration of methylphenidate. ... Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences.

  11. Utility of learning plans in general practice vocational training: a mixed-methods national study of registrar, supervisor, and educator perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Belinda; Kirby, Catherine; Silberberg, Peter; Brown, James

    2016-08-19

    Learning plans are a compulsory component of the training and assessment requirements of general practice (GP) registrars in Australia. There is a small but growing number of studies reporting that learning plans are not well accepted or utilised in general practice training. There is a lack of research examining this apparent contradiction. The aim of this study was to examine use and perceived utility of formal learning plans in GP vocational training. This mixed-method Australian national research project utilised online learning plan usage data from 208 GP registrars and semi-structured focus groups and telephone interviews with 35 GP registrars, 12 recently fellowed GPs, 16 supervisors and 17 medical educators across three Regional Training Providers (RTPs). Qualitative data were analysed thematically using template analysis. Learning plans were used mostly as a log of activities rather than as a planning tool. Most learning needs were entered and ticked off as complete on the same day. Learning plans were perceived as having little value for registrars in their journey to becoming a competent GP, and as a bureaucratic hurdle serving as a distraction rather than an aid to learning. The process of learning planning was valued more so than the documentation of learning planning. This study provides creditable evidence that mandated learning plans are broadly considered by users to be a bureaucratic impediment with little value as a learning tool. It is more important to support registrars in planning their learning than to enforce documentation of this process in a learning plan. If learning planning is to be an assessed competence, methods of assessment other than the submission of a formal learning plan should be explored.

  12. Miscommunication between patients and general practitioners: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Effective communication is integral to the general practice consultation, yet it is acknowledged that problems commonly occur. Previous research has shown that misunderstandings with potentially significant consequences occur frequently, but does not provide a clear picture of how and why miscommunication occurs, or how such problems can be prevented or resolved. This study explored the occurrence and management of specific examples of miscommunication in two routine general practice consultations. METHODS: A multi-method case study approach was used. The primary data collected for each case included a video-recorded consultation and post-consultation interviews with each general practitioner (GP and patient. Instances of communication mismatch were examined using in-depth interaction analysis techniques. FINDINGS: GPs and patients may not be aware when misunderstandings have occurred. In-depth analysis of the case studies revealed the complexity of miscommunication: it was not a straightforward matter to locate when or why instances of communication mismatch had occurred, and each of the mismatches was quite distinctive: (1 they were identified in different ways; (2 they occurred at different points in the communication process; (3 they arose because of problems occurring at different levels of the communication, and (4 they had different consequences. CONCLUSION: Given the frequency and complexity of miscommunication in general practice consultations, GPs need to consider adopting various strategies, at both the practice/systems level and the level of the consultation interaction to minimise the risk of communication problems.

  13. Mortality rates and causes of death in children with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs: a retrospective cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Ruth; Besag, Frank M C; Hughes, Elaine; Squier, Waney; Murray, Macey L; Wong, Ian C K

    2011-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased risk of mortality compared with the general population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were the most frequent class of drugs reported in a study looking at fatal suspected adverse drug reactions in children in the UK. The objective of the study was to identify cases and causes of death in a paediatric patient cohort prescribed AEDs with an associated epilepsy diagnosis. This was a retrospective cohort study supplemented with general practitioner-completed questionnaires, post-mortem reports and death certificates. The setting was UK primary care practices contributing to the General Practice Research Database. Participants were children and adolescents aged 0-18 years prescribed AEDs between 1993 and 2005. Causality assessment was undertaken by a consensus panel comprising paediatric specialists in neuropathology, neurology, neuropsychiatry, paediatric epilepsy, pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacy to determine crude mortality rate (CMR) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and the likelihood of an association between AED(s) and the event of death. There were 6190 subjects in the cohort (contributing 26,890 person-years of data), of whom 151 died. Median age at death was 8.0 years. CMR was 56.2 per 10,000 person-years and the SMR was 22.4 (95% CI 18.9, 26.2). The majority of deceased subjects had severe underlying disorders. Death was attributable to epilepsy in 18 subjects; in 9 the cause of death was sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) [3.3 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 1.5, 6.4)]. AEDs were probably (n = 2) or possibly (n = 3) associated causally with death in five subjects. Two status epilepticus deaths were associated causally with AED withdrawal. Children prescribed AEDs have an increased risk of mortality relative to the general population. Most of the deaths were in children with serious underlying disorders. A small number of SUDEP cases were identified. AEDs are not a major

  14. Exploring the perspectives of clinical professionals and support staff on implementing supported self-management for asthma in UK general practice: an IMP2ART qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan; Daines, Luke; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Steed, Liz; McKee, Lorna; Caress, Ann-Louise; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-07-18

    Despite an overwhelming evidence base, supported self-management of asthma is poorly implemented into routine practice. Strategies for implementation must address organisational routines, as well as provide resources for patients and training to improve professionals' skills. We aimed to explore the priority that primary care practices attach to asthma self-management, to describe their existing asthma management routines, and to generate innovative implementation strategies. We recruited 33 participants (23 general practitioners; seven nurses; three administrative staff) from 14 general practices. The 12 interviews and three focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Supported self-management was largely a nurse-led task within clinic-based annual reviews. Barriers included poor attendance at asthma clinics, lack of time, demarcation of roles, limited access to a range of tailored resources, and competing agendas in consultation, often due to multimorbidity. Suggestions for initiatives to improve the provision of supported self-management included emphasising the evidence for benefit (to influence prioritisation), improving teamwork (including team-based education), organisational strategies (including remote consulting) which need to fit within existing practice routines. Technology offers some potential solutions (e.g., improved templates, 'app'-based plans), but must be integrated with the practice information technology systems. Building on these insights, we will now develop a theoretically-based implementation strategy that will address patient, professional, and organisational buy-in, provide team-based education and offer a range of practical options and tools, which can be adapted and integrated within existing routines of individual practices.OVERCOMING THE ORGANISATIONAL BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ASTHMA SELF-MANAGEMENT: Understanding the routines of primary care practices can suggest strategies to implement supported self

  15. Chlamydia and HIV testing, contraception advice, and free condoms offered in general practice: a qualitative interview study of young adults' perceptions of this initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leah Ffion; Ricketts, Ellie; Town, Katy; Rugman, Claire; Lecky, Donna; Folkard, Kate; Nardone, Anthony; Hartney, Thomas Nathan; McNulty, Cliodna

    2017-07-01

    Opportunistic chlamydia screening is actively encouraged in English general practices. Based on recent policy changes, Public Health England piloted 3Cs and HIV in 2013-2014, integrating the offer of chlamydia testing with providing condoms, contraceptive information, and HIV testing (referred to as 3Cs and HIV) according to national guidelines. To determine young adults' opinions of receiving a broader sexual health offer of 3Cs and HIV at their GP practice. Qualitative interviews were conducted in a general practice setting in England between March and June 2013. Thirty interviews were conducted with nine male and 21 female patients aged 16-24 years, immediately before or after a routine practice attendance. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic framework. Participants indicated that the method of testing, timing, and the way the staff member approached the topic were important aspects to patients being offered 3Cs and HIV. Participants displayed a clear preference for 3Cs and HIV to be offered at the GP practice over other sexual health service providers. Participants highlighted convenience of the practice, assurance of confidentiality, and that the sexual health discussion was appropriate and routine. Barriers identified for patients were embarrassment, unease, lack of time, religion, and patients believing that certain patients could take offence. Suggested facilitators include raising awareness, reassuring confidentiality, and ensuring the offer is made in a professional and non-judgemental way at the end of the consultation. General practice staff should facilitate patients' preferences by ensuring that 3Cs and HIV testing services are made available at their surgery and offered to appropriate patients in a non-judgemental way. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  16. Social Case-work in General Practice: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratoff, L.; Pearson, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    During a two-year period a senior case-worker was seconded by a voluntary family case-work agency, the Liverpool Personal Service Society, to work with three general practitioners. The commonest reasons for referral of the 157 new patients to the social worker over this study period were extreme poverty; housing, matrimonial, and psychiatric problems; and problems of fatherless families. The successful and valuable co-operation between the general practitioners, case-worker, and various specialist professional and financial services of the Society have proved that a professional social worker has an important role in the general-practice team. PMID:5420213

  17. Motives of former interns in general practice for speciality-choice--results of a cross-sectional study among graduates 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendroth, Jens; Schnell, Ute; Lichte, Thomas; Oemler, Matthias; Klement, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a final-year elective internship in general practice (IGP) on motives affecting graduates' choice of specialty is the object of great public interest, yet still insufficiently evaluated. Longitudinal studies show the influence of numerous motives (e.g., work-life balance), but not following the IGP experience itself. Thus, we performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study of all graduates who completed the IGP in Saxony-Anhalt during 2007-2012 regarding their motives for choosing a speciality. A standardized questionnaire was sent to 109 former interns in general practice. The questionnaire contained 29 items addressing three topics (personal attitudes, concept of personal and professional life, motives for speciality choice) and used single-choice and multiple-choice answers, as well as Likert scales. Correlation analysis was carried out by means of Kendall's tau. The questionnaire reached 97 former interns, of which 45 (46%) responded. In the overall ranking of motives for speciality choice, family (71%), leisure time (66%) and job opportunities (48%) rated as more important than income (36%), mentoring (20%), status or scientific work (20%). Only 29% of the respondents stated that their speciality choice was changed by the IGP. If the speciality choice was already established before the IGP, the influence of the IGP on speciality choice was significantly low (r = -.5; p life and career were also important factors affecting speciality choice. The aspects of the positive influence exerted by medical teachers on those students who are still undecided during the IGP should be carefully evaluated.

  18. [Trends among medical students towards general practice or specialization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breinbauer K, Hayo; Fromm R, Germán; Fleck L, Daniela; Araya C, Luis

    2009-07-01

    A 60/40 ratio has been estimated as a country's ideal proportion between general practitioners and specialists. In Chile this proportion was 36/ 64 in 2004, exactly the opposite of the ideal. Trends towards specialization or general practice among medical students have not been thoughtfully studied. To assess trends among medical students towards becoming general practitioners or specialists, exploring associated factors. Descriptive survey of 822 first to seventh year medical students at the University of Chile, School of Medicine. Desired activity to pursue (general practice or specialization) after graduation and general orientations within clinical practice were explored. Fifty three percent of students desired to enter a specialization program. Only 20% would work as a general practitioner (27% were still indecisive). Furthermore, a trend in early years of medical training towards an integral medicine is gradually reversed within later years. Seventh year students give significantly more importance to specialization than to integral medicine (p specialized medicine in the teaching environment. Most students prefer to enter a specialization program immediately after finishing medical school. Moreover, there is a social trend, at least within the teacher-attending environment, promoting not only the desire to specialize, but a pro-specialist culture.

  19. Information in general medical practices: the information processing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sarah; Tully, Mary P; Cantrill, Judith A

    2010-04-01

    The need for effective communication and handling of secondary care information in general practices is paramount. To explore practice processes on receiving secondary care correspondence in a way that integrates the information needs and perceptions of practice staff both clinical and administrative. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with a wide range of practice staff (n = 36) in nine practices in the Northwest of England. Analysis was based on the framework approach using N-Vivo software and involved transcription, familiarization, coding, charting, mapping and interpretation. The 'information processing model' was developed to describe the six stages involved in practice processing of secondary care information. These included the amendment or updating of practice records whilst simultaneously or separately actioning secondary care recommendations, using either a 'one-step' or 'two-step' approach, respectively. Many factors were found to influence each stage and impact on the continuum of patient care. The primary purpose of processing secondary care information is to support patient care; this study raises the profile of information flow and usage within practices as an issue requiring further consideration.

  20. Multi-institutional study of self-reported attitudes and behaviors of general surgery residents about ethical academic practices in test taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignol, Valerie P; Grannan, Kevin; Sabra, John; Cromer, Robert M; Jarman, Benjamin; Dent, Daniel; Sticca, Robert P; Nelson, Timothy M; Kukora, John S; Daley, Brian J; Treat, Robert W; Termuhlen, Paula M

    2013-01-01

    Correlation exists between people who engage in academic dishonesty as students and unethical behavior once in practice. Previously, we assessed the attitudes of general surgery residents and ethical practices in test taking at a single institution. Most residents had not participated in activities they felt were unethical, yet what constituted unethical behavior was unclear. We sought to verify these results in a multi-institutional study. A scenario-based survey describing potentially unethical activities related to the American Board of Surgery In-training Examination (ABSITE) was administered. Participants were asked about their knowledge of or participation in the activities and whether the activity was unethical. Program directors were surveyed about the use of ABSITE results for resident evaluation and promotion. Ten programs participated in the study. The resident response rate was 67% (186/277). Of the respondents, 43% felt that memorizing questions to study for future examinations was unethical and 50% felt that using questions another resident memorized was unethical. Most felt that buying (86%) or selling (79%) questions was unethical. Significantly more senior than junior residents have memorized (30% vs 16%; p = 0.04) or used questions others memorized (33% vs 12%; p = 0.002) to study for future ABSITE examinations and know of other residents who have done so (42% vs 20%; p = 0.004). Most programs used results of the ABSITE in promotion (80%) and set minimum score expectations and consequences (70%). Similar to our single-institution study, residents had not participated in activities they felt to be unethical; however the definition of what constitutes cheating remains unclear. Differences were identified between senior and junior residents with regard to memorizing questions for study. Cheating and unethical behavior is not always clear to the learner and represents an area for further education. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  1. Can we bridge the gap? Knowledge and practices related to Diabetes Mellitus among general practitioners in a developing country: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katulanda, Prasad; Constantine, Godwin R; Weerakkody, Muditha I; Perera, Yashasvi S; Jayawardena, Mahesh G; Wijegoonawardena, Preethi; Matthews, David R; Sheriff, Mohamed Hr

    2011-11-24

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming a serious public health problem in Sri Lanka and many other developing countries in the region. It is well known that effective management of diabetes reduces the incidence and progression of many diabetes related complications, thus it is important that General Practitioners (GPs) have sound knowledge and positive attitudes towards all aspects of its management. This study aims to assess knowledge, awareness and practices relating to management of Diabetes Mellitus among Sri Lankan GPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 246 GPs registered with the Ceylon College of General Practitioners using a pre-validated self-administered questionnaire. 205 responded to the questionnaire(response rate 83.3%). Their mean duration of practice was 28.7 ± 11.2 years. On average, each GP had 27 ± 25 diabetic-patient consultations per-week. 96% managed diabetic patients and 24% invariably sought specialist opinion. 99.2% used blood glucose to diagnose diabetes but correct diagnostic cut-off values were known by only 48.8%. Appropriate use of HbA1c and urine microalbumin was known by 15.2% and 39.2% respectively. 84% used HbA1c to monitor glyceamic control, while 90.4% relied on fasting blood glucose to monitor glyceamic control. Knowledge on target control levels was poor.Nearly 90% correctly selected the oral hypoglyceamic treatment for obese as well as thin type 2 diabetic patients. Knowledge on the management of diabetes in pregnancy was poor. Only 23.2% knew the correct threshold for starting lipid-lowering therapy. The concept of strict glycaemic control in preference to symptom control was appreciated only by 68%. The skills for comprehensive care in subjects with multiple risk factors were unsatisfactory. The study was done among experienced members of the only professional college dedicated to the specialty. However, we found that there is room for improvement in their knowledge and practices related to diabetes. We recommend

  2. Can we bridge the gap? Knowledge and practices related to Diabetes Mellitus among general practitioners in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katulanda Prasad

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is becoming a serious public health problem in Sri Lanka and many other developing countries in the region. It is well known that effective management of diabetes reduces the incidence and progression of many diabetes related complications, thus it is important that General Practitioners (GPs have sound knowledge and positive attitudes towards all aspects of its management. This study aims to assess knowledge, awareness and practices relating to management of Diabetes Mellitus among Sri Lankan GPs. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 246 GPs registered with the Ceylon College of General Practitioners using a pre-validated self-administered questionnaire. Results 205 responded to the questionnaire(response rate 83.3%. Their mean duration of practice was 28.7 ± 11.2 years. On average, each GP had 27 ± 25 diabetic-patient consultations per-week. 96% managed diabetic patients and 24% invariably sought specialist opinion. 99.2% used blood glucose to diagnose diabetes but correct diagnostic cut-off values were known by only 48.8%. Appropriate use of HbA1c and urine microalbumin was known by 15.2% and 39.2% respectively. 84% used HbA1c to monitor glyceamic control, while 90.4% relied on fasting blood glucose to monitor glyceamic control. Knowledge on target control levels was poor. Nearly 90% correctly selected the oral hypoglyceamic treatment for obese as well as thin type 2 diabetic patients. Knowledge on the management of diabetes in pregnancy was poor. Only 23.2% knew the correct threshold for starting lipid-lowering therapy. The concept of strict glycaemic control in preference to symptom control was appreciated only by 68%. The skills for comprehensive care in subjects with multiple risk factors were unsatisfactory. Conclusions The study was done among experienced members of the only professional college dedicated to the specialty. However, we found that there is room for improvement in

  3. A pilot study of the use of near-patient C-Reactive Protein testing in the treatment of adult respiratory tract infections in one Irish general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Kim E

    2011-08-31

    Abstract Background New approaches are being sought to safely reduce community antibiotic prescribing. A recent study demonstrated that CRP testing resulted in decreased antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection in primary care. There is little other published primary care data available evaluating CRP in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in routine clinical practice. This pilot study aims to describe the performance of near-patient CRP testing, in a mixed payments health system. Specific areas to be reviewed included the integrity of the study protocol, testing of data collection forma and acceptability of the intervention. Patients Patients over the age of 18 years, with acute cough and\\/or sore throat with a duration of one month or less, in routine clinical practice. Method Design: A pilot with a cross-sectional design. The first 60 recruited patients were treated with routine clinical management, and GP\\'s had no access to a CRP test. For the subsequent 60 patients, access to CRP testing was available. Participants: 3 GP\\'s in one Irish primary care practice recruited 120 patients, fulfilling the above criteria over five months, from January 1 to May 31, 2010. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was antibiotic prescription at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were the numbers of delayed prescriptions issued, patient satisfaction immediately after consultation and re-consultations and antibiotic prescriptions during 28 days follow-up. Results The protocol and data collection forms worked well and the intervention of CRP testing appeared acceptable. Thirty-five (58%) patients in the no-test group received antibiotic prescriptions compared to 27 (45%) in the test group. Both groups demonstrated similarly high level of patient satisfaction (85%). Fourteen (23%) patients in the CRP test group re-attended within 28 days compared to 9 (15%) in the no-CRP test group. Conclusion This pilot study confirms the

  4. Open-access ultrasound referrals from general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct access referral for radiological investigations from General Practice (GP) provides an indispensable diagnostic tool and avoids the inherently long waiting time that referral through a hospital based specialty would entail. Improving access to hospital based radiology services is one of Health Information and Quality Authority\\'s key recommendations in its report on patient referrals from general practice. This study aimed to review all GP referrals for ultrasound investigations to a tertiary referral teaching hospital over a seven month period with respect to their demographics, waiting times and diagnostic outcomes. 1,090 ultrasounds originating in general practice were carried out during the study period. Positive findings were recorded in 332 (30.46%) examinations. The median waiting time from receipt of referral to the diagnostic investigation was 56 days (range 16 - 91 years). 71 (6.5%) patients had follow-up imaging investigations while recommendation for hospital based specialty referral was made in 35 cases (3.2%). Significant findings included abdominal aortic aneurysms, metastatic disease and lymphoma. Direct access to ultrasound for general practitioners allows the referring physician to make an informed decision with regard to the need for specialist referral. We believe these findings help support the case for national direct access to diagnostic ultrasound for general practitioners.

  5. Predictors of weight stigma experienced by middle-older aged, general-practice patients with obesity in disadvantaged areas of Australia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Catherine; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Faruqi, Nighat; Stocks, Nigel; Harris, Mark F

    2018-05-21

    Rates of obesity have increased globally and weight stigma is commonly experienced by people with obesity. Feeling stigmatised because of one's weight can be a barrier to healthy eating, physical activity and to seeking help for weight management. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of perceived weight among middle-older aged patients with obesity attending general practices in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban areas of Australia. As part of a randomised clinical trial in Australia, telephone interviews were conducted with 120 patients from 17 general practices in socioeconomically disadvantaged of Sydney and Adelaide. Patients were aged 40-70 years with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 . The interviews included questions relating to socio-demographic variables (e.g. gender, language spoken at home), experiences of weight-related discrimination, and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Multi-level logistic regression data analysis was undertaken to examine predictors of recent experiences of weight-related discrimination ("weight stigma"). The multi-level model showed that weight stigma was positively associated with obesity category 2 (BMI = 35 to stigma and gender, age, education or the other HLQ domains examined. Weight stigma disproportionately affected the patients with obesity most in need of support to manage their weight: those with more severe obesity, from non-English speaking backgrounds and who were not in employment. Additionally, those who had experienced weight stigma were less able to actively engage with healthcare providers further compounding their disadvantage. This suggests the need for a more proactive approach to identify weight stigma by healthcare providers. Addressing weight stigma at the individual, system and population levels is recommended. The trial was registered with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN126400102162 .

  6. Under the radar: a cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Christine; Yoong, Sze Lin; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Carey, Mariko; Russell, Grant; Makeham, Meredith

    2014-04-28

    Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs' detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is 'at-risk', computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care.

  7. Quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice according to patients' ethnic background: a cross-sectional study from Oslo, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkeland Kåre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades immigration to Norway from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe has increased rapidly. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients from these ethnic minority groups compared with the care received by Norwegians. Methods In 2006, electronic medical record data were screened at 11 practices (49 GPs; 58857 patients. 1653 T2DM patients cared for in general practice were identified. Ethnicity was defined as self-reported country of birth. Chi-squared tests, one-way ANOVAs, multiple regression, linear mixed effect models and generalized linear mixed models were used. Results Diabetes was diagnosed at a younger age in patients from the ethnic minority groups (South Asians (SA: mean age 44.9 years, Middle East/North Africa (MENA: 47.2 years, East Asians (EA: 52.0 years, others: 49.0 years compared with Norwegians (59.7 years, p 85% of patients in all groups with minor differences between minority groups and Norwegians. A greater proportion of the minority groups were prescribed hypoglycaemic medications compared with Norwegians (≥79% vs. 72%, p 9% was higher in minority groups (SA: 19.6%, MENA: 18.9% vs. Norwegians: 5.6%, p Conclusions Mean age at the time of diagnosis of T2DM was 8-15 years younger in minority groups compared with Norwegians. Recording of important processes of care measures is high in all groups. Only one in four of most patient groups achieved all four treatment targets and prescribing habits may be sub-optimal. Patients from minority groups have worse glycaemic control than Norwegians which implies that it might be necessary to improve the guidelines to meet the needs of specific ethnic groups.

  8. Open Access to General Practice Was Associated with Burnout among General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Walk-in open access in general practice may influence the general practitioner's (GP's) work, but very little research has been done on the consequences. In this study from Danish general practice, we compare the prevalence of burnout between GPs with a walk-in open access and those without. In a questionnaire study (2004), we approached all 458 active GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, and 376 (82.8%) GPs returned the questionnaire. Walk-in open access was defined as at least 30 minutes every weekday where patients could attend practice without an appointment. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Analyses using logistic regression were adjusted for gender, age, marital status, job satisfaction, minutes per consultation, practice organisation, working hours, number of listed patients per GP, number of contacts per GP, continuing medical education- (CME-) activities, and clusters of GPs. In all, 8% of GPs had open access and the prevalence of burnout was 24%. GPs with walk-in open access were more likely to suffer from burnout. Having open access was associated with a 3-fold increased likelihood of burnout (OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.1-8.8, P = 0.035)). Although the design cannot establish causality, it is recommended to closely monitor possible negative consequences of open access in general practice.

  9. Gonorrhoea and Syphilis Epidemiology in Flemish General Practice 2009–2013: Results from a Registry-based Retrospective Cohort Study Compared with Mandatory Notification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schweikardt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of newly diagnosed gonorrhoea and syphilis cases has increased in Flanders in recent years. Our aim was to investigate, to which extent these diagnoses were registered by general practitioners (GPs, and to examine opportunities and limits of the Intego database in this regard. Methods: Data from a retrospective cohort study based on the Flemish Intego general practice database was analyzed for the years 2009–2013. Case definitions were applied. Due to small case numbers obtained, cases were pooled and averaged over the observation period. Frequencies were compared with those calculated from figures of mandatory notification. Results: A total of 91 gonorrhoea and 23 syphilis cases were registered. The average Intego annual frequency of gonorrhoea cases obtained was 11.9 (95% Poisson confidence interval (CI 9.6; 14.7 per 100,000 population, and for syphilis 3.0 (CI 1.9; 4.5, respectively, while mandatory notification was calculated at 14.0 (CI: 13.6, 14.4 and 7.0 (CI: 6.7, 7.3, respectively. Conclusion: In spite of limitations such as small numbers and different case definitions, comparison with mandatory notification suggests that the GP was involved in the large majority of gonorrhoea cases, while the majority of new syphilis cases did not come to the knowledge of the GP.

  10. Talking about psychosocial problems: an observational study on changes in doctor–patient communication in general practice between 1977 and 2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butalid, L.; Bensing, J.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether GPs’ communication styles have changed since the introduction and implementation of clinical guidelines for psychosocial problems in Dutch general practice in the 1990s. Methods: From a database of 5184 consultations videotaped between 1977 and 2008, 512 consultations

  11. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.Y. Kwok (Wing-Yee); M.C. Kwaadsteniet (Marjolein); M. Harmsen (Mirjam); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); F.G. Schellevis (François); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. METHOD: During one calendar year, 195

  12. A cross-sectional study of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners regarding dog bite management in nothern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There are many myths and false beliefs associated with wound management. These include application of oils, herbs, and red chilies on wound inflicted by rabid animals, and not washing the wound properly. General practitioners (GPs constitute a key source of medical care in study area and are approached for anti-rabies treatment by victims of animal bites. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge and practices among the general practitioners (GPs regarding dog bite management. Settings and Design : Community-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out in the private and public clinics of Ambala city from January 2012 to April 2012 using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. The study population composed of 100 GPs comprising 45 MBBS or above degree holders (Group 1 and 55 other GPs like BAMS, RMPs, etc (Group 2. Statistical Analysis Used: Interpretation of data was done using percentages and proportions. χ2 -Test was used to test the statistical difference in the knowledge between the two groups. Results: Out of the total, 68% and 29% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, correctly told that wound must be washed with soap and water for minimum period of 15 min. A total 71% and 11% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, could correctly answer about the target groups for pre-exposure prophylaxis. A total 62% GPs did not know the high-risk groups to whom pre-exposure prophylaxis has to be given. Conclusions: There was an apparent lack of awareness among the GPs regarding appropriate animal wound management and vaccine administration. Reorientation programs and continued medical education for GPs are required to highlight the WHO guidelines regarding treatment of animal bite.

  13. SEX-DIFFERENCES AMONG RECIPIENTS OF BENZODIAZEPINES IN DUTCH GENERAL-PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waals, F. W.; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective-To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting-Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  14. General Practitioners' Familiarity, Attitudes and Practices with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Practices with Regard to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adults. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... With regard to children the most important barriers were uninformed parents (70%), limited ...

  15. Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Suzanne L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Middle school general music may be a student's last encounter with school music. A practical book with accessible pedagogical resources on middle school general music is needed for methods courses and music practitioners' use. The book "Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music" presents numerous ways to engage…

  16. Relationship between initial therapy and blood pressure control for high-risk hypertension patients in the UK: a retrospective cohort study from the THIN general practice database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Sharada; Juhasz, Attila; Puelles, Jorge; Tierney, Travis S

    2017-07-28

    To examine the UK practice patterns in treating newly diagnosed hypertension and to determine whether subgroups of high-risk patients are more or less likely to follow particular therapeutic protocols and to reach blood pressure goals. Retrospective cohort study. This study examined adults in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) UK general practice medical records database who were initiated on medication for hypertension. 48 131 patients with essential hypertension diagnosed between 2008 and 2010 who were registered with a participating practice for a minimum of 13 months prior to, and 6 months following, initiation of therapy. We excluded patients with gestational hypertension or secondary hypertension. Patients were classified into risk groups based on blood pressure readings and comorbid conditions. Odds of receiving single versus fixed or free-drug combination therapy and odds of achieving blood pressure control were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. The vast majority of patients (95.8%) were initiated on single drug therapy. Patients with high cardiovascular risk (patients with grade 2-3 hypertension or those with high normal/grade 1 hypertension plus at least one cardiovascular condition pretreatment) had a statistically significant benefit of starting immediately on combination therapy when blood pressure control was the desired goal (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.42) but, surprisingly, were less likely than patients with no risk factors to receive combination therapy (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.47 to 0.59). Our results suggest that combination therapy may be indicated for patients with high cardiovascular risk, who accounted for 60.6% of our study population. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guideline CG34 of 2006 (in effect during the study period) recommended starting with single drug class therapy for most patients, and this advice does seem to have been followed even in cases where a more aggressive approach might

  17. Whither British general practice after the 2004 GMS contract? Stories and realities of change in four UK general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby, Guro; Guthrie, Bruce; Grant, Suzanne; Watkins, Francis; Checkland, Kath; McDonald, Ruth; Davies, Huw

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide answers to two questions: what has been the impact of nGMS on practice organisation and teamwork; and how do general practice staff perceive the impact? The article is based on comparative in-depth case studies of four UK practices. There was a discrepancy between changes observed and the way practice staff described the impact of the contract. Similar patterns of organisational change were apparent in all practices. Decision-making became concentrated in fewer hands. Formally or informally constituted "elite" multidisciplinary groups monitored and controlled colleagues' behaviour for maximum performance and remuneration. This convergence of organisational form was not reflected in the dominant "story" each practice constructed about its unique ethos and style. The "stories" also failed to detect negative consequences to the practice flowing from its adaptation to the contract. The paper highlights how collective "sensemaking" in practices may fail to detect and address key organisational consequences from the nGMS.

  18. A case-control study of autism and mumps-measles-rubella vaccination using the general practice research database: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiangning

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An association between mumps-measles-rubella (MMR vaccination and the onset of symptoms typical of autism has recently been suggested. This has led to considerable concern about the safety of the vaccine. Methods A matched case-control study using data derived form the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database. Children with a possible diagnosis of autism will be identified from their electronic health records. All diagnoses will be validated by a detailed review of hospital letters and by using information derived from a parental questionnaire. Ten controls per case will be selected from the database. Conditional logistic regression will be used to assess the association between MMR vaccination and autism. In addition case series analyses will be undertaken to estimate the relative incidence of onset of autism in defined time intervals after vaccination. The study is funded by the United Kingdom Medical Research Council. Discussion Electronic health databases offer tremendous opportunities for evaluating the adverse effects of vaccines. However there is much scope for bias and confounding. The rigorous validation of all diagnoses and the collection of additional information by parental questionnaire in this study are essential to minimise the possibility of misleading results.

  19. HPV vaccination among French girls and women aged 14-23 years and the relationship with their mothers' uptake of Pap smear screening: a study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutringer-Magnin, D; Cropet, C; Barone, G; Canat, G; Kalecinski, J; Leocmach, Y; Vanhems, P; Chauvin, F; Lasset, C

    2013-10-25

    HPV vaccination is recommended in France for girls aged 14 and for those aged 15-23 before sexual debut or who have become sexually active within the previous year. The first aim was to describe vaccination practice among 14-23-year-old girls visiting a general practitioner. A second objective was to investigate factors associated with starting vaccination among girls aged 14-18, in particular the regular practice of Pap-smear screening (PSS) by their mothers. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to August 2009. A total of 87 general practitioners from the large Rhône-Alpes region contributed data on 502 girls/women who came for consultation. 231 (46.0%) of these girls/women had begun the process of HPV vaccination (68.2%, 56.9% and 18.7% of the 14-16, 17-20 and 21-23-year-olds respectively) of whom 139 (60.2%) had received all three doses. 92 girls/women (39.8%) had received only one or two doses at the time of study. However, in 71 (77.2%) cases, the gap between the last dose received and the time of study was within the between-dose interval recommended in the vaccination schedule. GPs reported that 16 (11.5%) had mentioned side effects following injections. Having a mother who practised regular PSS (Odds Ratio 6.2 [1.5-25.8]), having never lived with a partner (4.6 [1.6-13.5]) and vaccination against hepatitis B (3.2 [1.6-6.1]) were found to be independently correlated with the initiation of HPV vaccination among girls/women aged 14-18 years. Two years after the start of the programme, only half of girls/women aged 14-23 years had begun the process of HPV vaccination. HPV vaccination status was correlated with PSS in the mother, family status and hepatitis B vaccination. Such information may help to better target girls who are less likely to be vaccinated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Audit and feedback by medical students to improve the preventive care practices of general practice supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkes, Lucy A; Liira, Helena; Emery, Jon

    Medical students benefit from their contact with clinicians and patients in the clinical setting. However, little is known about whether patients and clinicians also benefit from medical students. We developed an audit and feedback intervention activity to be delivered by medical students to their general practice supervisors. We tested whether the repeated cycle of audit had an effect on the preventive care practices of general practitioners (GPs). The students performed an audit on topics of preventive medicine and gave feedback to their supervisors. Each supervisor in the study had more than one student performing the audit over the academic year. After repetitive cycles of audit and feedback, the recording of social history items by GPs improved. For example, recording alcohol history increased from 24% to 36%. This study shows that medical students can be effective auditors, and their repeated audits may improve their general practice supervisors' recording of some aspects of social history.

  1. Practice patterns and career satisfaction of Canadian female general surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbard, Pamela C; Wirtzfeld, Debrah A

    2009-06-01

    We wanted to study how female general surgeons in Canada manage lifestyle and career demands. All female Canadian general surgeons registered with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada were asked to complete a survey evaluating their practice patterns, personal lives, and levels of satisfaction related to these factors. Eighty-five surveys (66%) were returned. Most respondents work in full-time clinical practices. While it was rare to find women in part-time or shared practices, 35% of women reported interest in these alternative models. Respondents described the necessary factors for a transition into alternative models. Job satisfaction was high (3.8 out of 5), with personal and parenting satisfaction being less highly rated (3.3 and 3.2, respectively). Canadian female general surgeons have active and satisfying careers, although many would like to work in alternative practice models that better conform to their lifestyle demands. This pressure will have a significant impact on the future surgical workforce.

  2. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  3. [Feasibility, in general practice, to give to the patients clear, loyal and appropriate information about the undesirable side effects of the medicines prescribed. EICLAT study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Pascale; Raineri, François; Hebbrecht, Gilles; Duhot, Didier

    2011-12-01

    Drug prescription in general practice is present in 78 to 83% of consultations; practitioners must give to their patient clear loyal and appropriate information about the undesirable side effects of the medicines prescribed. The object of the EICLAT study was to give some light on the feasibility to respect this obligation. To that effect the study evaluates, for a normal prescription activity, the average number of potential undesirable side effects (USE) in relation with the number of lines of different medicines prescribed in each doctor's prescription. A total of 8,382 doctor's prescriptions, generating 34,427 lines of prescriptions given by 175 general practitioners, were analysed. Amongst these prescriptions, 11% included only one line, 55% from 2 to 4 lines and 34% 5 lines or more. The average doctor's prescription was of 4 lines of medicines generating 407 potential USE, of which 194 were different (the same undesirable effect may be present twice or more in the same doctor's prescription), and 293 frequent or serious potential USE, of which 166 were different. The patent medicines with a major or important added medical value (AMV), present in 7,840 doctor's prescriptions for a total of 24,127 lines exposed the patient, in the average, to 151 frequent or serious USE different. The patent medicines with an insufficient AMV, present in 2,292 prescriptions for a total of 3,887 lines, exposed the patient to 37 frequent and/or serious potential USE. Supposing that the information provided by the legal authority is sufficiently adequate, precise and exhaustive, the volume of information that must be given to the patient is not compatible with the present conditions of exercise of the profession.

  4. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms "Community of Practice" (CoP) AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic) AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR "Allied Health"). Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders rather than single company VCoPs. Specific goals are important

  5. Collaborative care for panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia in general practice: study protocol for three cluster-randomised, superiority trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curth, Nadja Kehler; Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Csillag, Claudio; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-08-16

    People with anxiety disorders represent a significant part of a general practitioner's patient population. However, there are organisational obstacles for optimal treatment, such as a lack of coordination of illness management and limited access to evidence-based treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy. A limited number of studies suggest that collaborative care has a positive effect on symptoms for people with anxiety disorders. However, most studies are carried out in the USA and none have reported results for social phobia or generalised anxiety disorder separately. Thus, there is a need for studies carried out in different settings for specific anxiety populations. A Danish model for collaborative care (the Collabri model) has been developed for people diagnosed with depression or anxiety disorders. The model is evaluated through four trials, of which three will be outlined in this protocol and focus on panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia. The aim is to investigate whether treatment according to the Collabri model has a better effect than usual treatment on symptoms when provided to people with anxiety disorders. Three cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trials are set up to investigate treatment according to the Collabri model for collaborative care compared to treatment-as-usual for 364 patients diagnosed with panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia, respectively (total n = 1092). Patients are recruited from general practices located in the Capital Region of Denmark. For all trials, the primary outcome is anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)) 6 months after baseline. Secondary outcomes include BAI after 15 months, depression symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) after 6 months, level of psychosocial functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning) and general psychological symptoms (Symptom Checklist-90-R) after 6 and 15 months. Results will add to the limited pool of information about

  6. [Respiratory syncytial virus infections in children in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa Monica; Halgrener, Jørgen; Hansen, Bjarne V Lühr

    2003-06-30

    The aim of the study was to describe the course of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in children under two years of age seen in general practice. Children under two years of age presenting acute respiratory infection during the registration period on 59 GPs' lists participated in the study. The GPs recorded data on a registration chart and a questionnaire was sent to the parents of the children in question one month after the date of inclusion. The children were tested in general practice for the presence of RSV. The GPs' objective findings and choice of treatment as well as the parents' account of the course of disease were compared in children with and without the presence of RSV. A total of 221 children participated in the study. Fifty-seven children were found RSV positive (25.8%). Among the RSV positive children there were significantly more with wheezing audibly detected with examination by stethoscope than among the RSV negative. The remaining parameters (the GP's objective examination, treatment and course of the disease) were distributed independently of the result of the RSV analysis. The results showed that RSV infections in children under two years in general practice are frequent and that the clinical picture most often is uncomplicated.

  7. Process evaluation of a practice nurse-led smoking cessation trial in Australian general practice: views of general practitioners and practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Furler, John S; Hermiz, Oshana S; Blackberry, Irene D; Smith, Julie P; Richmond, Robyn L; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2015-08-01

    Support in primary care can assist smokers to quit successfully, but there are barriers to general practitioners (GPs) providing this support routinely. Practice nurses (PNs) may be able to effectively take on this role. The aim of this study was to perform a process evaluation of a PN-led smoking cessation intervention being tested in a randomized controlled trial in Australian general practice. Process evaluation was conducted by means of semi-structured telephone interviews with GPs and PNs allocated in the intervention arm (Quit with PN) of the Quit in General Practice trial. Interviews focussed on nurse training, content and implementation of the intervention. Twenty-two PNs and 15 GPs participated in the interviews. The Quit with PN intervention was viewed positively. Most PNs were satisfied with the training and the materials provided. Some challenges in managing patient data and follow-up were identified. The Quit with PN intervention was acceptable to participating PNs and GPs. Issues to be addressed in the planning and wider implementation of future trials of nurse-led intervention in general practice include providing ongoing mentoring support, integration into practice management systems and strategies to promote greater collaboration in GPs and PN teams in general practice. The ongoing feasibility of the intervention was impacted by the funding model supporting PN employment and the competing demands on the PNs time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Use of general practice by intravenous heroin users on a methadone programme.

    OpenAIRE

    Leaver, E J; Elford, J; Morris, J K; Cohen, J

    1992-01-01

    Users of intravenous heroin represent a major challenge for general practice. A study was undertaken in a general practice in central London in 1990 to investigate the use of general practice made by intravenous heroin users who were on a methadone programme. Using information recorded in the patients' notes, 29 intravenous heroin users on a methadone programme were identified; 58 non-drug users (two controls per case) were matched for age, sex and general practitioner. A study of the number ...

  9. Team climate for innovation: what difference does it make in general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Judith; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Holton, Chris; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya; Amoroso, Cheryl; Beilby, Justin; Harris, Mark F

    2007-06-01

    Teamwork in primary healthcare is associated with patient care processes and staff outcomes. The ability of teams to be innovative is a hypothesized mechanism. We examined the characteristics of general practices with good team climate for innovation, and assessed the impact of climate on chronically ill patients' assessment of their care and on the job satisfaction of the staff. Large cross-sectional study. Australian general practices. A total of 654 general practitioners and staff and 7505 chronically ill patients from 93 general practices in 6 Australian states and territories. The Team Climate Inventory and the Overall Job Satisfaction Scale, customized for use with general practices, were administered to general practitioners and practice staff, and the General Practice Assessment Survey was administered to patients. Practice characteristics were collected by survey from the principal doctor or practice manager. Mean scores of team climate in Australian general practices were similar to those reported in the UK, except that in our study there was no association between the number of doctors in a practice and their team climate. Better team climate was found in practices with fewer non-clinical staff. Team climate predicted the job satisfaction of the general practitioners and staff, irrespective of the number of practice staff. Better team climate was associated with greater satisfaction by patients with their care. Team climate is important for patient and staff satisfaction. In large general practices, separate sub-cultures may exist between administrative and clinical staff, which has implications for designing effective team interventions.

  10. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  11. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  12. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    interactions during 1 year. Patient factors associated with increased risk of potential drug interactions were high age, a high number of concurrently used drugs, and a high number of prescribers. Practice factors associated with potential drug interactions were a high percentage of elderly patients and a low......Objective: To identify patient- and practice-related factors associated with potential drug interactions. Methods: A register analysis study in general practices in the county of Funen, Denmark. Prescription data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database (Odense University......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  13. Feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of an online alternative to face-to-face consultation in general practice: a mixed-methods study of webGP in six Devon practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mary; Fletcher, Emily; Sansom, Anna; Warren, Fiona C; Campbell, John L

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of webGP as piloted by six general practices. Mixed-methods evaluation, including data extraction from practice databases, general practitioner (GP) completion of case reports, patient questionnaires and staff interviews. General practices in NHS Northern, Eastern and Western Devon Clinical Commissioning Group's area approximately 6 months after implementing webGP (February-July 2016). Six practices provided consultations data; 20 GPs completed case reports (regarding 61 e-consults); 81 patients completed questionnaires; 5 GPs and 5 administrators were interviewed. Attitudes and experiences of practice staff and patients regarding webGP. WebGP uptake during the evaluation was small, showing no discernible impact on practice workload. The completeness of cross-sectional data on consultation workload varied between practices.GPs judged 41/61 (72%) of webGP requests to require a face-to-face or telephone consultation. Introducing webGP appeared to be associated with shifts in responsibility and workload between practice staff and between practices and patients.81/231 patients completed a postal survey (35.1% response rate). E-Consulters were somewhat younger and more likely to be employed than face-to-face respondents. WebGP appeared broadly acceptable to patients regarding timeliness and quality/experience of care provided. Similar problems were presented by all respondents. Both groups appeared equally familiar with other practice online services; e-consulters were somewhat more likely to have used them.From semistructured staff interviews, it appeared that, while largely acceptable within practice, introducing e-consults had potential for adverse interactions with pre-existing practice systems. There is potential to assess the impact of new systems on consultation patterns by extracting routine data from practice databases. Staff and patients noticed subtle changes to responsibilities associated with

  14. Prevalence of alcohol problems in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Todisco, N; Gluud, C

    1996-01-01

    The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) and the response to a question about heavy alcohol consumption were used to assess the prevalence of alcohol problems in consecutive patients (77 males and 46 females) consulting a general practitioner in an urban area in the South of Italy (Castellam...... as a screening question in order to detect alcohol problems and give advice regarding reduction of alcohol consumption....

  15. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  16. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Empathy as a characteristic of patient-physician communication in both general practice and clinical care is considered to be the backbone of the patient-physician relationship. Although the value of empathy is seldom debated, its effectiveness is little discussed in general practice.

  17. Effectiveness of empathy in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, F.; Bensing, J.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Empathy as a characteristic of patient-physician communication in both general practice and clinical care is considered to be the backbone of the patient-physician relationship. Although the value of empathy is seldom debated, its effectiveness is little discussed in general practice.

  18. Computerisation of general practice in the Republic of Croatia: experience gained in general practice use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biserka Bergman-Markovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Well-organised medical records are the prerequisite for achieving a high level of performance in primary healthcare settings. Recording balanced structured and coded data as well as free text can improve both quality and organisation of work in the office. It provides a more substantiated support of financial transactions and accountancy, allows better communication with other facilities and institutions, and is a source of valuable scientific research material. This article is the result of an individual experience gained in general practice use of various programs/ systems employed within the family medicine frame, and the frame of evaluation of available and commonly- exploited program solutions. The use of various programs allows for systematic adjustments as to the increasingly complex requirements imposed on electronic medical records (EMRs. The experience of a general practitioner, presented in this paper, confirms the assumption that an adequate program to be employed with EMRs should be developed, provided that family medicine practitioners, that is, the final users, have been involved in each and every stage of its development, adjustment, implementation and evaluation.

  19. Opioid dependence - management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Addiction to opioids, or opioid dependence, encompasses the biopsychosocial dysfunction seen in illicit heroin injectors, as well as aberrant behaviours in patients prescribed opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. To outline the management of opioid dependence using opioid pharmacotherapy as part of a comprehensive chronic illness management strategy. The same principles and skills general practitioners employ in chronic illness management underpin the care of patients with opioid dependence. Opioid pharmacotherapy, with the substitution medications methadone and buprenorphine, is an effective management of opioid dependence. Training and regulatory requirements for prescribing opioid pharmacotherapies vary between jurisdictions, but this treatment should be within the scope of most Australian GPs.

  20. Quality in general practice consultations; a qualitative study of the views of patients living in an area of high socio-economic deprivation in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikker Annemieke P

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inequality in health and health care services is an important policy issue internationally as well as in the UK, and is closely linked to socio-economic deprivation, which in Scotland is concentrated in and around Glasgow. Patients views on primary care in deprived areas are not well documented. In the present study we explore the views of patients living in a high deprivation area on the quality of consultations in general practice. Methods Qualitative focus group study set in an area of high socio-economic deprivation in a large peripheral housing estate in Glasgow, Scotland. 11 focus groups were conducted; 8 with local community groups and 3 with other local residents. In total 72 patients took part. Grounded theory was used to analyse the data. Results Patients' perceptions of the quality of the consultation with GPs consisted of two broad, inter-relating themes; (1 the GPs' competence, and (2 the GPs empathy or ' caring'. Competence was often assumed but many factors coloured this assumption, in particular whether patients had experienced (directly or indirectly with a close family member 'successful' outcomes with that doctor previously or not. 'Caring' related to patients feeling (a listened to by the doctor and being able to talk; (b valued as an individual by the doctor (c that the doctor understood 'the bigger picture', and (d the doctors' explanations were clear and understandable. Relational continuity of care (being able to see the same GP and having a good relationship, and having sufficient time in the consultation were closely linked with perceptions of consultation quality. Conclusion Patients from deprived areas want holistic GPs who understand the realities of life in such areas and whom they can trust as both competent and genuinely caring. Without this, they may judge doctors as socially distant and emotionally detached. Relational continuity, empathy and sufficient time in consultations are key factors

  1. Blended care vs. usual care in the treatment of depressive symptoms and disorders in general practice [BLENDING]: study protocol of a non-inferiority randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudi, Btissame; Blanker, Marco H; van Valen, Evelien; Wouters, Hans; Bockting, Claudi L H; Burger, Huibert

    2017-06-13

    The majority of patients with depressive disorders are treated by general practitioners (GPs) and are prescribed antidepressant medication. Patients prefer psychological treatments but they are under-used, mainly due to time constraints and limited accessibility. A promising approach to deliver psychological treatment is blended care, i.e. guided online treatment. However, the cost-effectiveness of blended care formatted as an online psychological treatment supported by the patients' own GP or general practice mental health worker (MHW) in routine primary care is unknown. We aim to demonstrate non-inferiority of blended care compared with usual care in patients with depressive symptoms or a depressive disorder in general practice. Additionally, we will explore the real-time course over the day of emotions and affect, and events within individuals during treatment. This is a pragmatic non-inferiority trial including 300 patients with depressive symptoms, recruited by collaborating GPs and MHWs. After inclusion, participants are randomized to either blended care or usual care in routine general practice. Blended care consists of the 'Act and Feel' treatment: an eight-week web-based program based on behavioral activation with integrated monitoring of depressive symptomatology and automatized feedback. GPs or their MHWs coach the participants through regular face-to-face or telephonic consultations with at least three sessions. Depressive symptomatology, health status, functional impairment, treatment satisfaction, daily activities and resource use are assessed during a follow-up period of 12 months. During treatment, real-time fluctuations in emotions and affect, and daily events will be rated using ecological momentary assessment. The primary outcome is the reduction of depressive symptoms from baseline to three months follow-up. We will conduct intention-to-treat analyses and supplementary per-protocol analyses. This trial will show whether blended care might be an

  2. Management of needlestick injuries in general dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, A.J.; Cameron, S.O.; Bagg, J.; Kennedy, D.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to advise on the development of practical policies for needlestick injuries in general dental practice. Policies for dealing with occupational exposure to chronic blood borne viruses, namely, hepatitis B, C and HIV are evolving. This article was particularly prompted by recent changes in post exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection. A flow chart is also included which should be of possible use in general dental practice. Needlestick injuries are of increasing con...

  3. A spatial analysis of the expanding roles of nurses in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes to the workforce and organisation of general practice are occurring rapidly in response to the Australian health care reform agenda, and the changing nature of the medical profession. In particular, the last five years has seen the rapid introduction and expansion of a nursing workforce in Australian general practices. This potentially creates pressures on current infrastructure in general practice. Method This study used a mixed methods, ‘rapid appraisal’ approach involving observation, photographs, and interviews. Results Nurses utilise space differently to GPs, and this is part of the diversity they bring to the general practice environment. At the same time their roles are partly shaped by the ways space is constructed in general practices. Conclusion The fluidity of nursing roles in general practice suggests that nurses require a versatile space in which to maximize their role and contribution to the general practice team.

  4. Psychological stress and multimorbidity in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . Additionally, stress is a common reason for contacting the general practitioner (GP), and yet no guidelines for management and treatment exist. Aims The aim of this thesis was to investigate the consequences of psychological stress on the health while taking into account mental‐physical multimorbidity, i...... found to be associated with adverse health outcomes and potentially suboptimal healthcare. The link between stress and multimorbidity could substantiate the efforts to develop management guidelines for primary care, stress‐targeted interventions, and to accommodate the healthcare system to better...... and poor prognosis of physical diseases, including increased mortality. However, little is known on the physical consequences of sub‐threshold psychological stress, which is more common than psychiatric disorders in the background population and is highly prevalent in persons with multimorbidity...

  5. Adherence to guidelines for creatinine and potassium monitoring and discontinuation following renin-angiotensin system blockade: a UK general practice-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morten; Mansfield, Kathryn E; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Nitsch, Dorothea; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Smeeth, Liam; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2017-01-09

    To examine adherence to serum creatinine and potassium monitoring and discontinuation guidelines following initiation of treatment with ACE inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs); and whether high-risk patients are monitored. A general practice-based cohort study using electronic health records from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and Hospital Episode Statistics. UK primary care, 2004-2014. 223 814 new ACEI/ARB users. Proportion of patients with renal function monitoring before and after ACEI/ARB initiation; creatinine increase ≥30% or potassium levels >6 mmol/L at first follow-up monitoring; and treatment discontinuation after such changes. Using logistic regression models, we also examined patient characteristics associated with these biochemical changes, and with follow-up monitoring within the guideline recommendation of 2 weeks after treatment initiation. 10% of patients had neither baseline nor follow-up monitoring of creatinine within 12 months before and 2 months after initiation of an ACEI/ARB, 28% had monitoring only at baseline, 15% only at follow-up, and 47% both at baseline and follow-up. The median period between the most recent baseline monitoring and drug initiation was 40 days (IQR 12-125 days). 34% of patients had baseline creatinine monitoring within 1 month before initiating therapy, but creatinine increase ≥30% (n=567, 1.2%) or potassium level >6 mmol/L (n=191, 0.4%), 80% continued treatment. Although patients with prior myocardial infarction, hypertension or baseline potassium >5 mmol/L were at high risk of ≥30% increase in creatinine after ACEI/ARB initiation, there was no evidence that they were more frequently monitored. Only one-tenth of patients initiating ACEI/ARB therapy receive the guideline-recommended creatinine monitoring. Moreover, the vast majority of the patients fulfilling postinitiation discontinuation criteria for creatinine and potassium increases continue on treatment

  6. Adherence to guidelines for creatinine and potassium monitoring and discontinuation following renin–angiotensin system blockade: a UK general practice-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morten; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Nitsch, Dorothea; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Smeeth, Liam; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine adherence to serum creatinine and potassium monitoring and discontinuation guidelines following initiation of treatment with ACE inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs); and whether high-risk patients are monitored. Design A general practice-based cohort study using electronic health records from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and Hospital Episode Statistics. Setting UK primary care, 2004–2014. Subjects 223 814 new ACEI/ARB users. Main outcome measures Proportion of patients with renal function monitoring before and after ACEI/ARB initiation; creatinine increase ≥30% or potassium levels >6 mmol/L at first follow-up monitoring; and treatment discontinuation after such changes. Using logistic regression models, we also examined patient characteristics associated with these biochemical changes, and with follow-up monitoring within the guideline recommendation of 2 weeks after treatment initiation. Results 10% of patients had neither baseline nor follow-up monitoring of creatinine within 12 months before and 2 months after initiation of an ACEI/ARB, 28% had monitoring only at baseline, 15% only at follow-up, and 47% both at baseline and follow-up. The median period between the most recent baseline monitoring and drug initiation was 40 days (IQR 12–125 days). 34% of patients had baseline creatinine monitoring within 1 month before initiating therapy, but creatinine increase ≥30% (n=567, 1.2%) or potassium level >6 mmol/L (n=191, 0.4%), 80% continued treatment. Although patients with prior myocardial infarction, hypertension or baseline potassium >5 mmol/L were at high risk of ≥30% increase in creatinine after ACEI/ARB initiation, there was no evidence that they were more frequently monitored. Conclusions Only one-tenth of patients initiating ACEI/ARB therapy receive the guideline-recommended creatinine monitoring. Moreover, the vast majority of the patients fulfilling postinitiation

  7. Undergraduate teaching in UK general practice: a geographical snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Helen; Rees, Eliot; Gay, Simon P; McKinley, Robert K

    2014-06-01

    Learning in general practice is an essential component of undergraduate medical education; currently, on average, 13% of clinical placements in the UK are in general practice. However, whether general practice can sustainably deliver more undergraduate placements is uncertain. To identify the geographical distribution of undergraduate teaching practices and their distance from the host medical school. National survey of all medical schools in the UK. All 33 UK medical schools were invited to provide the postcodes of their undergraduate teaching practices. These were collated, de-duplicated, and mapped. The distance in kilometres and journey times by car and public transport between each medical school and its teaching practices was estimated using Transport Direct (www.transportdirect.info). The postcodes of every practice in the UK were obtained from the UK's health departments. All 33 UK medical schools responded; 4392 practices contributed to teaching, with a median (minimum-maximum) of 142 (17-385) practices per school. The median (minimum-maximum) distance between a school and a teaching practice was 28 km (0-1421 km), 41 (0:00-23:26) minutes' travel by car and 1 hour 12 (0:00-17:29) minutes' travel by public transport. All teaching practices were accessible by public transport in one school and 90-99% were in a further four schools; 24 schools had >20% of practices that were inaccessible by public transport. The 4392 undergraduate teaching general practices are widely distributed and potentially any practice, no matter how isolated, could contribute to undergraduate education. However, this is, at the price of a considerable travel burden. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  8. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner AC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England.Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD. Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations.Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin.

  9. Health care costs before and after diagnosis of depression in patients with unexplained pain: a retrospective cohort study using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Reed,1 Jihyung Hong,2 Diego Novick,1 Alan Lenox-Smith,3 Michael Happich41Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 3Eli Lilly UK, Basingstoke, UK; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Bad Homburg, GermanyPurpose: To assess the impact of pain severity and time to diagnosis of depression on health care costs for primary care patients with pre-existing unexplained pain symptoms who subsequently received a diagnosis of depression.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study analyzed 4000 adults with unexplained pain (defined as painful physical symptoms [PPS] without any probable organic cause and a subsequent diagnosis of depression, identified from the UK General Practice Research Database using diagnostic codes. Patients were categorized into four groups based on pain severity (milder or more severe; based on number of pain-relief medications and use of opioids and time to diagnosis of depression (≤1 year or >1 year from PPS index date. Annual health care costs were calculated (2009 values and included general practitioner (GP consultations, secondary care referrals, and prescriptions for pain-relief medications for the 12 months before depression diagnosis and in the subsequent 2 years. Multivariate models of cost included time period as a main independent variable, and adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities.Results: Total annual health care costs before and after depression diagnosis for the four patient groups were higher for the groups with more severe pain (£819–£988 versus £565–£628; P < 0.001 for all pairwise comparisons and highest for the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis in the subsequent 2 years (P < 0.05. Total GP costs were highest in the group with more severe pain and longer time to depression diagnosis both before and after depression diagnosis (P

  10. Study protocol of an economic evaluation of an enhanced implementation strategy for the treatment of low back pain in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Cathrine; Riis, Allan; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2014-01-01

    on the design of the health economic evaluation. Methods/design: The economic evaluation is carried out alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial consisting of 60 general practices in the North Denmark Region. An expected 1,200 patients between the age of 18 and 65 years with a low back pain diagnosis...... include all relevant additional costs of the extended implementation strategy compared to usual implementation. The economic evaluation will be performed from both a societal perspective and a health sector perspective with a 12-month time horizon. Discussion: It is expected that the extended...

  11. Diagnostic strategies for urinary tract infections in French general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouani, S; de Lary de Latour, H; Joseph, J-P; Letrilliart, L

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to describe the diagnostic management procedures for detection of urinary tract infections in general practice and their correlated factors. We analyzed data from the ECOGEN study on urinary tract infections, collected in France between November 2011 and April 2012. This national cross-sectional study was carried out in general practices. Data was coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. A total of 340 consultations or home visits were held for urinary tract infections. The five most frequent diagnostic procedures were (in descending order) clinical examination (67.6%), urine cytobacteriological examination (UCBE) (47.9%), urine dipstick test (15.6%), blood test (8.5%), and imaging (6.5%). No urine dipstick test or UCBE was performed in 43% of cases. Factors correlated with diagnostic procedures were age and gender of patients, annual number of consultations held by family physicians, and duration of consultation. Family physicians did not comply with guidelines on diagnostic management for detection of urinary tract infections. We hypothesized that this non-compliance could be due to the family physicians' environment and characteristics, and to clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Study protocol: Transition from localized low back pain to chronic widespread pain in general practice: Identification of risk factors, preventive factors and key elements for treatment – A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viniol Annika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic localized pain syndromes, especially chronic low back pain (CLBP, are common reasons for consultation in general practice. In some cases chronic localized pain syndromes can appear in combination with chronic widespread pain (CWP. Numerous studies have shown a strong association between CWP and several physical and psychological factors. These studies are population-based cross-sectional and do not allow for assessing chronology. There are very few prospective studies that explore the predictors for the onset of CWP, where the main focus is identifying risk factors for the CWP incidence. Until now there have been no studies focusing on preventive factors keeping patients from developing CWP. Our aim is to perform a cross sectional study on the epidemiology of CLBP and CWP in general practice and to look for distinctive features regarding resources like resilience, self-efficacy and coping strategies. A subsequent cohort study is designed to identify the risk and protective factors of pain generalization (development of CWP in primary care for CLBP patients. Methods/Design Fifty-nine general practitioners recruit consecutively, during a 5 month period, all patients who are consulting their family doctor because of chronic low back pain (where the pain is lasted for 3 months. Patients are asked to fill out a questionnaire on pain anamnesis, pain-perception, co-morbidities, therapy course, medication, socio demographic data and psychosomatic symptoms. We assess resilience, coping resources, stress management and self-efficacy as potential protective factors for pain generalization. Furthermore, we raise risk factors for pain generalization like anxiety, depression, trauma and critical life events. During a twelve months follow up period a cohort of CLBP patients without CWP will be screened on a regular basis (3 monthly for pain generalization (outcome: incident CWP. Discussion This cohort study will be the largest

  13. Quality of diabetes care in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, J.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a quality incentive is expected to ensue from improved collaboration between healthcare professionals. Whether this view is supported by sufficient evidence is, however, questionable. Therefore, the first study included in this thesis is a systematic review of studies on the

  14. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  15. Referrals and relationships: in-practice referrals meetings in a general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, G; Willis, S; Singleton, A

    2001-08-01

    GP referrals to secondary care are an important factor in the cost of running the NHS. The known variation in referral rates between doctors has the potential to cause tension within primary care which will be exacerbated by the latest reorganization of primary care and the trend towards capitation-based budgets. The importance of postgraduate learning for GPs has been recognized; continuing professional development is moving towards self-directed practice-based learning programmes. Educational interventions have been shown to alter doctors' prescribing behaviour. This, together with the pressure on accounting for referral activity, makes the prospect of improving, and possibly reducing, referral activity through educational interventions very attractive. This study complemented a randomized controlled trial (RCT) which investigated whether an intervention of the type which had reduced prescribing costs would have a similar effect on referral activity. The context of the study, description of the characteristics of the practice and the issues seen as important by the doctors and practice manager were identified through preliminary semi-structured interviews. The practice then held a series of educational in-practice meetings to discuss referrals and issues arising from referrals. The audio- and videotaped transcripts were interpreted using content and group dynamic analysis. Participants commented upon our preliminary findings. In addition, we used dimensional analysis to induce a preliminary theory describing the effect of the intervention on this general practice which enabled us to review the findings of the parallel RCT. The educational value of the meetings and the learning needs of the participants were also assessed. Our complementary study showed no alteration of practice referral rates following the educational intervention. The qualitative study, unencumbered by the assumptions inherent in the development of the hypothesis tested in the RCT, highlighted

  16. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... attitude towards task delegation was positive and led to increased job satisfaction, probably because task delegation comprised a high degree of work autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: The few studies included in our review suggest that task delegation within general practice may be seen by the staff as an overall...

  17. ‘Just a GP’: a mixed method study of undermining of general practice as a career choice in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Hugh; Collingwood, Helen; Merritt, Kymberlee

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Failure to recruit sufficient applicants to general practice (GP) training has been a problem both nationally and internationally for many years and undermining of GP is one possible contributing factor. The aim of our study was to ascertain what comments, both negative and positive, are being made in UK clinical settings to GP trainees about GP and to further explore these comments and their influence on career choice. Methodology We conducted a mixed methods study. We surveyed all foundation doctors and GP trainees within one region of Health Education England regarding any comments they experienced relating to a career in GP. We also conducted six focus groups with early GP trainees to discuss any comments that they experienced and whether these comments had any influence on their or others career choice. Results Positive comments reported by trainees centred around the concept that choosing GP is a positive, family-focused choice which facilities a good work–life balance. Workload was the most common negative comment, alongside the notion of being ‘just a GP’; the belief that GP is boring, a waste of training and a second-class career choice. The reasons for and origin of the comments are multifactorial in nature. Thematic analysis of the focus groups identified key factors such as previous exposure to and experience of GP, family members who were GPs, GP role models, demographics of the clinician and referral behaviour. Trainees perceived that negative comments may be discouraging others from choosing GP as a career. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that negative comments towards GP as a career do exist within clinical settings and are having a potential impact on poor recruitment rates to GP training. We have identified areas in which further negative comments could be prevented by changing perceptions of GP as a career. Additional time spent in GP as undergraduates and postgraduates, and positive GP role models, could particularly benefit

  18. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice: impact of an educational programme delivered on location in Danish general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse; Olsen, Kim Rose; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD guidelines. A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted of a 3-hr teaching lesson with a respiratory specialist and five visits by a representative from the sponsoring pharmaceutical company focusing on assessment and management of patients including written algorithms. A one-to-one propensity-matched control group of practices was selected. Register data were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed. Participating clinics had a significant increase in preventive consultations and influenza vaccinations (peducation of GPs and their staff delivered in the GPs' own practices may improve adherence to COPD guidelines, not least for clinics with a high potential for improvement.

  19. Policy implementation in practice: the case of national service frameworks in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath; Harrison, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    National Service Frameworks are an integral part of the government's drive to 'modernise' the NHS, intended to standardise both clinical care and the design of the services used to deliver that clinical care. This article uses evidence from qualitative case studies in three general practices to illustrate the difficulties associated with the implementation of such top-down guidelines and models of service. In these studies it was found that, while there had been little explicit activity directed at implementation overall, the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease had in general fared better than that for older people. Gunn's notion of 'perfect implementation' is used to make sense of the findings.

  20. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer....... In the future, we need to learn to differentiate between indolent and aggressive prostate cancers. This may, again, leave room for PSA testing as a screening tool. Our findings do indicate a small positive effect of more lower endoscopies, which could be investigated in an intervention study where some GPs...... are randomised to a more liberal access to lower endoscopies. Alongside this, we need to keep on exploring alternative approaches including the use of iFOBT in symptomatic patients. Overall, this thesis indicates that the role of GPs in the diagnosis of cancer should be strengthened through easy access...

  1. A general practice approach to Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nga T; Panizza, Benedict; Wallwork, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute onset of unilateral, lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve in the absence of an identifiable cause. Establishing the correct diagnosis is imperative and choosing the correct treatment options can optimise the likelihood of recovery. This article summarises our understanding of Bell's palsy and the evidence-based management options available for adult patients. The basic assessment should include a thorough history and physical examination as the diagnosis of Bell's palsy is based on exclusion. For confirmed cases of Bell's palsy, corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment and should be initiated within 72 hours of symptom onset. Antiviral therapy in combination with corticosteroid therapy may confer a small benefit and may be offered on the basis of shared decision making. Currently, no recommendations can be made for acupuncture, physical therapy, electrotherapy or surgical decompression because well-designed studies are lacking and available data are of low quality.

  2. Medical engagement and organizational characteristics in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; dePont Christensen, René; Halling, Anders; Kristensen, Troels; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Nexøe, Jørgen; Barwell, Fred; Spurgeon, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Medical engagement is a mutual concept of the active and positive contribution of doctors to maintaining and enhancing the performance of their health care organization, which itself recognizes this commitment in supporting and encouraging high quality care. A Medical Engagement Scale (MES) was developed by Applied Research Ltd (2008) on the basis of emerging evidence that medical engagement is critical for implementing radical improvements. To study the importance of medical engagement in general practice and to analyse patterns of association with individual and organizational characteristics. A cross-sectional study using a sampled survey questionnaire and the official register from the Danish General Practitioners' Organization comprising all registered Danish GPs. The Danish version of the MES Questionnaire was distributed and the survey results were analysed in conjunction with the GP register data. Statistically adjusted analyses revealed that the GPs' medical engagement varied substantially. GPs working in collaboration with colleagues were more engaged than GPs from single-handed practices, older GPs were less engaged than younger GPs and female GPs had higher medical engagement than their male colleagues. Furthermore, GPs participating in vocational training of junior doctors were more engaged than GPs not participating in vocational training. Medical engagement in general practice varies a great deal and this is determined by a complex interaction between both individual and organizational characteristics. Working in collaboration, having staff and being engaged in vocational training of junior doctors are all associated with enhanced levels of medical engagement among GPs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [The practice guideline 'Anemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Anaemia' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners will certainly be a support for the Dutch general practitioner. The inclusion of an algorithm to make a more precise diagnosis is an experiment that needs to be evaluated in the near future. However, many general

  4. Relational Coordination and Organisational Social Capital Association with Characteristics of General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Bøllingtoft Knudsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) aremeasures of novel aspects of an organisation’s performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives.The aim of this studywas to analyse the associations between RC and OSC......, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC...... and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type...

  5. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands | Ten Cate | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. With the aid of a film the training in general practice is discussed at 4 of the 7 universities in the Netherlands: Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. The differences in training methods are shown.

  6. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  7. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    The exact cause is unknown but a ... Scratching may result in secondary infec- tion and associated ... general practice. Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition ... There was either insufficient or no .... itch and indirectly improving sleep.

  8. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  9. Position Paper: Dental General Practice Residency Programs: Financing and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Paul W.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of changeable economic issues that can affect dental general practice residency program planning includes costs and resource allocation, maximizing efficiency and productivity, ambulatory and inpatient revenue sources, management functions, faculty as practitioners, faculty appointments, and marketing. (MSE)

  10. Development and validation of a risk model for prediction of hazardous alcohol consumption in general practice attendees: the predictAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael; Marston, Louise; Švab, Igor; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Xavier, Miguel; Benjamin, Vicente; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco; Bellon-Saameno, Juan Angel; Rotar, Danica; Aluoja, Anu; Saldivia, Sandra; Correa, Bernardo; Nazareth, Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the risk of progression to hazardous alcohol use in people currently drinking at safe limits. We aimed to develop a prediction model (predictAL) for the development of hazardous drinking in safe drinkers. A prospective cohort study of adult general practice attendees in six European countries and Chile followed up over 6 months. We recruited 10,045 attendees between April 2003 to February 2005. 6193 European and 2462 Chilean attendees recorded AUDIT scores below 8 in men and 5 in women at recruitment and were used in modelling risk. 38 risk factors were measured to construct a risk model for the development of hazardous drinking using stepwise logistic regression. The model was corrected for over fitting and tested in an external population. The main outcome was hazardous drinking defined by an AUDIT score ≥8 in men and ≥5 in women. 69.0% of attendees were recruited, of whom 89.5% participated again after six months. The risk factors in the final predictAL model were sex, age, country, baseline AUDIT score, panic syndrome and lifetime alcohol problem. The predictAL model's average c-index across all six European countries was 0.839 (95% CI 0.805, 0.873). The Hedge's g effect size for the difference in log odds of predicted probability between safe drinkers in Europe who subsequently developed hazardous alcohol use and those who did not was 1.38 (95% CI 1.25, 1.51). External validation of the algorithm in Chilean safe drinkers resulted in a c-index of 0.781 (95% CI 0.717, 0.846) and Hedge's g of 0.68 (95% CI 0.57, 0.78). The predictAL risk model for development of hazardous consumption in safe drinkers compares favourably with risk algorithms for disorders in other medical settings and can be a useful first step in prevention of alcohol misuse.

  11. Development and validation of a risk model for prediction of hazardous alcohol consumption in general practice attendees: the predictAL study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael King

    Full Text Available Little is known about the risk of progression to hazardous alcohol use in people currently drinking at safe limits. We aimed to develop a prediction model (predictAL for the development of hazardous drinking in safe drinkers.A prospective cohort study of adult general practice attendees in six European countries and Chile followed up over 6 months. We recruited 10,045 attendees between April 2003 to February 2005. 6193 European and 2462 Chilean attendees recorded AUDIT scores below 8 in men and 5 in women at recruitment and were used in modelling risk. 38 risk factors were measured to construct a risk model for the development of hazardous drinking using stepwise logistic regression. The model was corrected for over fitting and tested in an external population. The main outcome was hazardous drinking defined by an AUDIT score ≥8 in men and ≥5 in women.69.0% of attendees were recruited, of whom 89.5% participated again after six months. The risk factors in the final predictAL model were sex, age, country, baseline AUDIT score, panic syndrome and lifetime alcohol problem. The predictAL model's average c-index across all six European countries was 0.839 (95% CI 0.805, 0.873. The Hedge's g effect size for the difference in log odds of predicted probability between safe drinkers in Europe who subsequently developed hazardous alcohol use and those who did not was 1.38 (95% CI 1.25, 1.51. External validation of the algorithm in Chilean safe drinkers resulted in a c-index of 0.781 (95% CI 0.717, 0.846 and Hedge's g of 0.68 (95% CI 0.57, 0.78.The predictAL risk model for development of hazardous consumption in safe drinkers compares favourably with risk algorithms for disorders in other medical settings and can be a useful first step in prevention of alcohol misuse.

  12. Influences on final year medical students' attitudes to general practice as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Johanna E; Hudson, Ben; Wilkinson, Tim J

    2014-03-01

    General practice is under-represented in student career choices. This study aimed to identify and explore factors that influence the attitudes of final year medical students to general practice as a career. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews of focus groups of final year undergraduate medical students at the University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. Thematic analysis and grounded theory were used to interpret the data. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in influencing medical students' attitudes to general practice as a career. Students identified their general practice placement during medical school training and personal contact with their own GP as principal factors. The media portrayal of general practice and the attitudes of friends and family were also influential. Students were positively influenced when they were made to feel part of the team, involved with consultations, allowed to carry out practical procedures under supervision, and witnessed what they perceived as good medical practice during clinical placements. Positive experiences often occurred later in training, when students felt more confident of their clinical abilities. While students reported occasional negative comments about general practice by some hospital doctors, these had a lesser role in influencing their perceptions of general practice compared with their own experiences, both as students and patients. GPs have a strong influence, positively and negatively, on the attitudes of medical students to general practice as a career. Effective influences include being made to feel welcome, involved, valued, and given legitimate roles during clinical placements.

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for hypertension in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R S; Stockman, J; Kernick, D; Reinhold, D; Shore, A C; Tooke, J E

    1998-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being increasingly used in general practice. There is at present little published evidence regarding the clinical utility of ABPM in the care of patients with established hypertension in this setting. We examined this issue by undertaking ABPM in a group of patients with established hypertension. 40 patients (aged 33-60 years) currently being treated for hypertension were randomly selected from a general practice list and underwent a single 24-ho...

  14. Study protocol of an economic evaluation of an extended implementation strategy for the treatment of low back pain in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Riis, Allan; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller; Jensen, Martin Bach; Petersen, Karin Dam

    2014-10-08

    In Denmark, guidelines on low back pain management are currently being implemented; in association with this, a clinical trial is conducted. A health economic evaluation is carried out alongside the clinical trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of an extended implementation strategy to increase the general practitioners' adherence to the guidelines. In addition to usual dissemination, the extended implementation strategy is composed of visits from a guideline facilitator, stratification tools, and feedback on guideline adherence. The aim of this paper is to provide the considerations on the design of the health economic evaluation. The economic evaluation is carried out alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial consisting of 60 general practices in the North Denmark Region. An expected 1,200 patients between the age of 18 and 65 years with a low back pain diagnosis will be enrolled. The economic evaluation comprises both a cost-effectiveness analyses and a cost-utility analysis. Effectiveness measures include referral to secondary care, health-related quality of life measured by EQ-5D-5L, and disability measured by the Roland Morris disability questionnaire. Cost measures include all relevant additional costs of the extended implementation strategy compared to usual implementation. The economic evaluation will be performed from both a societal perspective and a health sector perspective with a 12-month time horizon. It is expected that the extended implementation strategy will reduce the number of patients referred to secondary care. It is hypothesised that the additional upfront cost of extended implementation will be counterbalanced by improvements in clinical practice and patient-related outcomes, thereby rendering the extended implementation strategy cost-effective. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01699256.

  15. Roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation for people with type 2 diabetes in the general practice setting: a qualitative study drawing on relational coordination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Furler, John; Blackberry, Irene; Young, Doris; O'Neal, David; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2014-01-31

    The majority of care for people with type 2 diabetes occurs in general practice, however when insulin initiation is required it often does not occur in this setting or in a timely manner and this may have implications for the development of complications. Increased insulin initiation in general practice is an important goal given the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and a relative shortage of specialists. Coordination between primary and secondary care, and between medical and nursing personnel, may be important in achieving this. Relational coordination theory identifies key concepts that underpin effective interprofessional work: communication which is problem solving, timely, accurate and frequent and relationships between professional roles which are characterized by shared goals, shared knowledge and mutual respect. This study explores roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation in order to gain an understanding of factors which may impact on this task being carried out in the general practice setting. 21 general practitioners, practice nurses, diabetes nurse educators and physicians were purposively sampled to participate in a semi-structured interview. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using framework analysis. There were four closely interlinked themes identified which impacted on how health professionals worked together to initiate people with type 2 diabetes on insulin: 1. Ambiguous roles; 2. Uncertain competency and capacity; 3. Varying relationships and communication; and 4. Developing trust and respect. This study has shown that insulin initiation is generally recognised as acceptable in general practice. The role of the DNE and practice nurse in this space and improved communication and relationships between health professionals across organisations and levels of care are factors which need to be addressed to support this clinical work. Relational coordination provides a useful framework for

  16. Knowledge and practices of general practitioners at district hospitals towards cervical cancer prevention in Burundi, 2015: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndizeye, Zacharie; Vanden Broeck, Davy; Vermandere, Heleen; Bogers, John Paul; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre

    2018-01-16

    Well-organized screening and treatment programmes are effective to prevent Invasive Cervical Cancer (ICC) in LMICs. To achieve this, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the involvement of existing health personnel in casu doctors, nurses, midwives in ICC prevention. A necessary precondition is that health personnel have appropriate knowledge about ICC. Therefore, to inform policy makers and training institutions in Burundi, we documented the knowledge and practices of general practitioners (GPs) at district hospital level towards ICC control. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to April, 2015 among all GPs working in government district hospitals. A structured questionnaire and a scoring system were used to assess knowledge and practices of GPs. The participation rate was 58.2%. Majority of GPs (76.3%) had appropriate knowledge (score > 70%) on cervical cancer disease; but some risk factors were less well known as smoking and the 2 most important oncogenic HPV. Only 8.4% of the participants had appropriate knowledge on ICC prevention: 55% of the participants were aware that HPV vaccination exists and 48.1% knew cryotherapy as a treatment method for CIN. Further, 15.3% was aware of VIA as a screening method. The majority of the participants (87%) never or rarely propose screening tests to their clients. Only 2 participants (1.5%) have already performed VIA/VILI. Wrong thoughts were also reported: 39.7% thought that CIN could be treated with radiotherapy; 3.1% thought that X-ray is a screening method. In this comprehensive assessment, we observed that Burundian GPs have a very low knowledge level about ICC prevention, screening and treatment. Suboptimal practices and wrong thoughts related to ICC screening and treatments have also been documented. We therefore recommend an adequate pre- and in-service training of GPs and most probably nurses on ICC control before setting up any public health intervention on ICC control.

  17. General practice registrars' intentions for future practice: implications for rural medical workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Catherine; Seal, Alexa; McGirr, Joe; Caton, Tim

    2016-11-01

    The models of practice that general practice registrars (GPRs) envisage undertaking will affect workforce supply. The aim of this research was to determine practice intentions of current GPRs in a regional general practice training program (Coast City Country General Practice Training). Questionnaires were circulated to 220 GPRs undertaking general practice placements to determine characteristics of ideal practice models and intentions for future practice. Responses were received for 99 participants (45%). Current GPRs intend to work an average of less than eight half-day sessions/week, with male participants intending to work more hours (t(91)=3.528, P=0.001). More than one-third of this regional cohort intends to practice in metropolitan centres. Proximity to family and friends was the most important factor influencing the choice of practice location. Men ranked remuneration for work as more important (t (88)=-4.280, Pmedical graduates intend to own their own practice compared with 52% of international medical graduates (χ 2 (1)=8.498, P=0.004). Future general practitioners (GPs) intend to work fewer hours than current GPs. Assumptions about lifestyle factors, practice models and possible professional roles should be carefully evaluated when developing strategies to recruit GPs and GPRs into rural practice.

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating diagnostic test accuracy: A practical review for clinical researchers-Part I. general guidance and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, June Young

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods

  19. Is immunising all patients with chronic lung disease in the community against influenza cost effective? : Evidence from a general practice based clinical prospective cohort study in Utrecht, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; van Essen, G A; Buskens, E; Stalman, W; de Melker, R A

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: There is little information on the potential benefit of immunising all patients with chronic lung disease in the community against influenza. The clinical effectiveness and economic benefit was established of the influenza vaccination programme in a general practice based cohort of

  20. Nigerian Journal of General Practice: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Policies. » Focus and Scope; » Section Policies; » Peer Review Process; » Publication Frequency; » Subscriptions; » The Association of General and Private Medical Practitioners of Nigeria [AGPMPN]; » Advertising in the Nigerian Journal of General Practice; » NJGP Editorial Board ...

  1. Positive experiences with a specialist as facilitator in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2012-01-01

    The use of facilitators for quality improvement in general practice has accelerated during the past decade. As general practitioners (GPs) or pharmacists have typically been used as facilitators, there is a lack of knowledge of how other professionals function as facilitators. This article explores...

  2. Clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical usefulness of teleradiology in general dental practice. Two hundred and seventy five cases were submitted for inquiry to the case presentation board of the website of The Korean Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology for a 5 year periods. The diagnosis results of those cases were analyzed according to the disease classification, the correlation with the patient's chief complaint, the necessity of additional examinations or treatments, the image modalities, and the number of dentists inquiring. Differential diagnoses of normal anatomic structures were the most frequently submitted cases, covering 15.6% of all cases. Among 275 cases, 164 cases required no additional treatments or examinations. Panoramic radiographs were the most frequently submitted images, accounting for 248 inquiries. The 275 cases were submitted by 96 dentists. Fifty-two dentists wrote one inquiry, and 44 inquired 2 or more times. The average inquiry number of the latter group was 5.0 cases. A teleradiology system in general dental practice could be helpful in the differential diagnosis of common lesions and reduce unnecessary costs.

  3. Validity of the Self- Mini Nutritional Assessment (Self- MNA) for the Evaluation of Nutritional Risk. A Cross- Sectional Study Conducted in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Marrocco, W; Marocco, C; Lenzi, A

    2018-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent condition in the elderly especially in hospitals and in nursing homes, and even among the free-living elders the prevalence is not negligible (5-10%). Awareness towards malnutrition is still limited. The lack of time for nutritional assessment by the overcommitted healthcare personnel, including the general practitioners (GPs), may represent one possible explanation for limited recognition of malnutrition. Therefore, a self-administered instrument could be useful in raising alert on the GPs and allow early detection of malnutrition and early care provision. The aim of the present study was to analyze the validity of the Self-MNA that takes cue from the Mini Nutritional Assessment- Short Form (MNA-SF) and has been adapted to be self-administered by free-living elderly subjects. Participants were recruited from patients referring to the GP offices in Italy. Nutritional evaluation was performed through the administration of Full-MNA, MNA-SF and Self-MNA. The comorbidity level was assessed through the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS). The level of difficulty in filling out the test was reported by the participants, and the time spent to complete the Self-MNA was also registered. A total of 226 subjects, 125 women and 101 men (75.1 ±8 and 75.3 ± 8 years old, respectively; p=0.89) were enrolled, and 214 (94.7%) of them completed the Self-MNA. According with the Full-MNA test score, 8.4% of women and 3.5% of men were classified as malnourished, whereas 32.7% of women and 31.4% of men were at risk of malnutrition. Agreement between Self-MNA and Full-MNA, and Self-MNA vs. MNA-SF was classified as "moderate" (k = 0.476 and 0.496 respectively; p < 0.001). Self-MNA showed a fair predictive value compared to the Full-MNA and MNA-SF tests (76.6 and 79.9%, respectively) with a barely adequate sensitivity (70.9 and 75.4%, respectively). The analysis of the characteristics of FN (false negative: subjects who were considered at risk of malnutrition

  4. Doctors' attitudes and confidence towards providing nutrition care in practice: Comparison of New Zealand medical students, general practice registrars and general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Jennifer; Ball, Lauren; Han, Dug Yeo; McGill, Anne-Thea; Arroll, Bruce; Leveritt, Michael; Wall, Clare

    2015-09-01

    Improvements in individuals' nutrition behaviour can improve risk factors and outcomes associated with lifestyle-related chronic diseases. This study describes and compares New Zealand medical students, general practice registrars and general practitioners' (GPs') attitudes towards incorporating nutrition care into practice, and self-perceived skills in providing nutrition care. A total of 183 New Zealand medical students, 51 general practice registrars and 57 GPs completed a 60-item questionnaire investigating attitudes towards incorporating nutrition care into practice and self-perceived skills in providing nutrition care. Items were scored using a 5-point Likert scale. Factor analysis was conducted to group questionnaire items and a generalised linear model compared differences between medical students, general practice registrars and GPs. All groups indicated that incorporating nutrition care into practice is important. GPs displayed more positive attitudes than students towards incorporating nutrition in routine care (ppractice registrars were more positive than students towards performing nutrition recommendations (p=0.004), specified practices (p=0.037), and eliciting behaviour change (p=0.024). All groups displayed moderate confidence towards providing nutrition care. GPs were more confident than students in areas relating to wellness and disease (pmedical students, general practice registrars and GPs have positive attitudes and moderate confidence towards incorporating nutrition care into practice. It is possible that GPs' experience providing nutrition care contributes to greater confidence. Strategies to facilitate medical students developing confidence in providing nutrition care are warranted.

  5. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'The menopause'; reaction of the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on the menopause will not be any major cause for discussion. The hot issue of giving oestrogens to peri- and postmenopausal women to prevent osteoporosis or cardiovascular disease was already covered in the practice guideline on

  6. Health profiles of overweight and obese youth attending general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Winifred D; Palmer, Millicent; Chondros, Patty; Kauer, Sylvia; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Sanci, Lena A

    2017-05-01

    Literature suggests that overweight and obese young people use healthcare services more often, but this awaits confirmation in primary care. To identify health profiles of underweight, overweight and obese young people attending general practice and compare them to normal-weight youth and also to explore the weight-related health risks of eating and exercise behaviour in the four different weight categories. This study used a cross-sectional design with baseline data from a trial including 683 young people (14-24 years of age) presenting to general practice. Through computer-assisted telephone interviews data were obtained on number and type of health complaints and consultations, emotional distress, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and eating and exercise behaviour. General practitioners (GPs) were consulted more often by overweight (incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.28, 95% CI (1.04 to 1.57)) and obese youth (IRR: 1.54, 95% CI (1.21 to 1.97), but not for different health problems compared with normal-weight youth. The reason for presentation was seldom a weight issue. Obese youth reported lower physical HRQoL. Obese and underweight youth were less likely to be satisfied with their eating behaviour than their normal-weight peers. Exercise levels were low in the entire cohort. Our study highlights the need for effective weight management given that overweight and obese youth consult their GP more often. Since young people do not present with weight issues, it becomes important for GPs to find ways to initiate the discussion about weight, healthy eating and exercise with youth. ISRCTN16059206. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Nurses who work in general medical practices: a Victorian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonawit, V; Watson, L

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire survey of 452 general medical practices in Victoria attracted responses from 277 practices, many of which did not employ nurses. The 93 respondents from 85 practices who were nurses reported that they enjoyed flexible working hours and stable employment. While their main reason for working in GPs' rooms was convenience, the most important aspect of their work was interaction with patients and fellow workers. Sixtyseven percent of nurses thought continuing education in specific skills was necessary for their work, 43% thought a post-registration qualification in community health nursing would be desirable and 47% thought a special interest group of nurses working in medical practices would be useful.

  8. COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) for selecting at-risk patients for spirometry: a cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Anthony J; Hasan, Iqbal; Crockett, Alan J; van Schayck, Onno C P; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2014-07-10

    Using the COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) as a selection tool for spirometry could potentially improve the efficiency and accuracy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis in at-risk patients. To identify an optimal single cut point for the CDQ that divides primary care patients into low or high likelihood of COPD, with the latter group undergoing spirometry. Former or current smokers aged 40-85 years with no prior COPD diagnosis were invited to a case-finding appointment with the practice nurse at various general practices in Sydney, Australia. The CDQ was collected and pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry was performed. Cases with complete CDQ data and spirometry meeting quality standards were analysed (1,054 out of 1,631 patients). CDQ cut points were selected from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the ROC curve was 0.713. A cut point of 19.5 had the optimal combination of sensitivity (63%) and specificity (70%) with two-thirds below this cut point. A cut point of 14.5 corresponded to a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 35% and negative predictive value of 96%, and 31% of patients below this cut point. The CDQ can be used to select patients at risk of COPD for spirometry using one cut point. We consider two possible cut points. The 19.5 cut point excludes a higher proportion of patients from undergoing spirometry with the trade-off of more false negatives. The 14.5 cut point has a high sensitivity and negative predictive value, includes more potential COPD cases but has a higher rate of false positives.

  9. Patient factors influencing the prescribing of lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in UK general practice: a national retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wu

    Full Text Available Guidelines indicate eligibility for lipid lowering drugs, but it is not known to what extent GPs' follow guidelines in routine clinical practice or whether additional clinical factors systematically influence their prescribing decisions.A retrospective cohort analysis was undertaken using electronic primary care records from 421 UK general practices. At baseline (May 2008 patients were aged 30 to 74 years, free from cardiovascular disease and not taking lipid lowering drugs. The outcome was prescription of a lipid lowering drug within the next two years. The proportions of eligible and ineligible patients prescribed lipid lowering drugs were reported and multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors and prescribing.Of 365,718 patients with complete data, 13.8% (50,558 were prescribed lipid lowering drugs: 28.5% (21,101/74,137 of those eligible and 10.1% (29,457/291,581 of those ineligible. Only 41.7% (21,101/50,558 of those prescribed lipid lowering drugs were eligible. In multivariable analysis prescribing was most strongly associated with increasing age (OR for age ≥ 65 years 4.21; 95% CI 4.05-4.39; diabetes (OR 4.49; 95% CI 4.35-4.64; total cholesterol level ≥ 7 mmol/L (OR 2.20; 95% CI 2.12-2.29; and ≥ 4 blood pressure measurements in the past year (OR 4.24; 95% CI 4.06-4.42. The predictors were similar in eligible and ineligible patients.Most lipid lowering drugs for primary prevention are prescribed to ineligible patients. There is underuse of lipid lowering drugs in eligible patients.

  10. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the determinants related to gender differences in the GP utilization in Danish population aged 50-65 years. DESIGN: Cohort-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish general practice. SUBJECTS: Totally, 54,849 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer...... information on lifestyle (smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol use, physical activity), medical conditions (somatic and mental), employment, education, gravidity, and hormone therapy (HT) use was collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Women had on average 4.1 and men 2.8 consultations per year. In a crude....... Strongest determinants for GP use among Danish adults aged 50-65 years were the presence of medical conditions (somatic and mental) and unemployment, while lifestyle factors (e.g., body mass index, alcohol consumption and smoking) had minor effect....

  11. Impact of robotic general surgery course on participants' surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Pugin, François; Volonté, Francesco; Hagen, Monika E; Morel, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Courses, including lectures, live surgery, and hands-on session, are part of the recommended curriculum for robotic surgery. However, for general surgery, this approach is poorly reported. The study purpose was to evaluate the impact of robotic general surgery course on the practice of participants. Between 2007 and 2011, 101 participants attended the Geneva International Robotic Surgery Course, held at the University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland. This 2-day course included theory lectures, dry lab, live surgery, and hands-on session on cadavers. After a mean of 30.1 months (range, 2-48), a retrospective review of the participants' surgical practice was performed using online research and surveys. Among the 101 participants, there was a majority of general (58.4 %) and colorectal surgeons (10.9 %). Other specialties included urologists (7.9 %), gynecologists (6.9 %), pediatric surgeons (2 %), surgical oncologists (1 %), engineers (6.9 %), and others (5.9 %). Data were fully recorded in 99 % of cases; 46 % of participants started to perform robotic procedures after the course, whereas only 6.9 % were already familiar with the system before the course. In addition, 53 % of the attendees worked at an institution where a robotic system was already available. All (100 %) of participants who started a robotic program after the course had an available robotic system at their institution. A course that includes lectures, live surgery, and hands-on session with cadavers is an effective educational method for spreading robotic skills. However, this is especially true for participants whose institution already has a robotic system available.

  12. Practices, patients and (imperfect data - feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical (drug trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01 to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI. Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH in mainly inexperienced general practices. Methods This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1 successful practice recruitment, 2 sufficient patient recruitment, 3 complete and accurate data collection and 4 appropriate protection of patient safety. Results The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs were observed during the trial. Conclusions To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and

  13. Spot-checks to measure general hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Ina L; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A variety of hygiene behaviors are fundamental to the prevention of diarrhea. We used spot-checks in a survey of 761 households in Burundi to examine whether something we could call general hygiene practice is responsible for more specific hygiene behaviors, ranging from handwashing to sweeping the floor. Using structural equation modeling, we showed that clusters of hygiene behavior, such as primary caregivers' cleanliness and household cleanliness, explained the spot-check findings well. Within our model, general hygiene practice as overall concept explained the more specific clusters of hygiene behavior well. Furthermore, the higher general hygiene practice, the more likely children were to be categorized healthy (r = 0.46). General hygiene practice was correlated with commitment to hygiene (r = 0.52), indicating a strong association to psychosocial determinants. The results show that different hygiene behaviors co-occur regularly. Using spot-checks, the general hygiene practice of a household can be rated quickly and easily.

  14. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  15. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, Lasse; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve; Straelberg, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  16. Epidemiology of unintentional injuries in childhood: a population-based survey in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otters, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Damen, J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.; Koes, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence of unintentional injuries presented in general practice, and to identify children at risk from experiencing an unintentional injury. We used the data of all 0–17-yearold children from a representative survey in 96 Dutch general practices in 2001. We computed

  17. Prescribing of pain medication in palliative care: a survey in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, S.D.; Deliens, L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Schellevis, F.; Willems, D.L.; Wal, G. van der; Eijk, J.T.M. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine what pain and adjuvant medication is prescribed in palliative care patients at home in The Netherlands. METHODS: In a nationwide, representative, prospective study in general practice in The Netherlands, prescribed medication was registered in 95 general practices with a listed

  18. Prescribing of pain medication in palliative care. A survey in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, Sander D.; Deliens, Luc; Zuurmond, Wouter W. A.; Schellevis, François G.; Willems, Dick L.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van Eijk, Jacques Th M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To examine what pain and adjuvant medication is prescribed in palliative care patients at home in The Netherlands. Methods In a nationwide, representative, prospective study in general practice in The Netherlands, prescribed medication was registered in 95 general practices with a listed

  19. [General practice research units in Denmark: multidisciplinary research in support of practical work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reventlow, Susanne; Broholm, Katalin Alexa Király; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark the general practice research units operating in connection with universities provide a home base, training and methodology support for researchers in the field from medical students to general practitioners carrying out practical work. Research issues frequently require a multidisciplinary approach and use of different kinds of materials. Problems arising from the practical work of general practitioners take priority in the wide selection of topics. The units have networked efficiently with organizations of general practitioners and medical education. The combination of research environments has created synergy benefiting everybody and increased the scientific productivity and visibility of the field.

  20. Abdominal symptoms in general practice: Frequency, cancer suspicions raised, and actions taken by GPs in six European countries. Cohort study with prospective registration of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtedahl, Knut; Vedsted, Peter; Borgquist, Lars; Donker, Gé A; Buntinx, Frank; Weller, David; Braaten, Tonje; Hjertholm, Peter; Månsson, Jörgen; Strandberg, Eva Lena; Campbell, Christine; Ellegaard, Lisbeth; Parajuli, Ranjan

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal symptoms are diagnostically challenging to general practitioners (GPs): although common, they may indicate cancer. In a prospective cohort of patients, we examined abdominal symptom frequency, initial diagnostic suspicion, and actions of GPs in response to abdominal symptoms. Over a 10-day period, 493 GPs in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Scotland, recorded consecutive consultations: sex, date of birth and any specified abdominal symptoms. For patients with abdominal symptoms, additional data on non-specific symptoms, GPs' diagnostic suspicion, and features of the consultation were noted. Data on all cancer diagnoses among all included patients were requested from the GPs eight months later. Consultations with 61802 patients were recorded. Abdominal symptoms were recorded in 6264 (10.1%) patients. A subsequent malignancy was reported in 511 patients (0.8%): 441 (86.3%) had a new cancer, 70 (13.7%) a recurrent cancer. Abdominal symptoms were noted in 129 (25.2%) of cancer patients ( P GPs noted a suspicion of cancer for 85 (65.9%) versus 1895 (30.9%) when there was no subsequent cancer ( P GPs' diagnostic thinking and referral practices.

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating diagnostic test accuracy: A practical review for clinical researchers-Part II. general guidance and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, June Young

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies differs from the usual meta-analysis of therapeutic/interventional studies in that, it is required to simultaneously analyze a pair of two outcome measures such as sensitivity and specificity, instead of a single outcome. Since sensitivity and specificity are generally inversely correlated and could be affected by a threshold effect, more sophisticated statistical methods are required for the meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy. Hierarchical models including the bivariate model and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic model are increasingly being accepted as standard methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. We provide a conceptual review of statistical methods currently used and recommended for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. This article could serve as a methodological reference for those who perform systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies

  2. Practice nurse and health visitor management of acute minor illness in a general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, A; Kendrick, D

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate practice nurse (PN) and health visitor (HV) management of patients with acute minor illnesses, monitor the effect on general practitioner (GP) workload, and describe the range of conditions seen by nurses. Patients requesting 'urgent' appointments (within 24 hours) were offered consultations with a PN or HV trained in the management of acute minor illness. Comparative data were collected before and after the establishment of the acute minor illness service. A general practice in Nottingham, England. Patient satisfaction, consultation rate, prescriptions, investigations, referrals and urgent re-consultations for the same condition within 2 weeks. About 2056 urgent consultations were recorded in the study period, of which 332 (16.1%) were seen by PNs and 46 (2.2%) by a HV. High levels of patient satisfaction were reported for all health professionals. Patients seeing the HV reported higher levels of satisfaction than those consulting GPs (P=0.033) and PNs (P=0.010). There was no difference by health professional for prescription rates (P=0.76), re-consultations (P=0.14), or referrals to secondary care (P=0.07). General practitioners were more likely to initiate further investigations than the PNs or HV (P manage patients with a range of conditions. General practitioner workload can be reduced while maintaining high patient satisfaction levels.

  3. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  4. Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Mental Illness in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Steve; Jenkins, Rachel; Burch, Tony; Calamos Nasir, Laura; Fisher, Brian; Giotaki, Gina; Gnani, Shamini; Hertel, Lise; Marks, Marina; Mathers, Nigel; Millington-Sanders, Catherine; Morris, David; Ruprah-Shah, Baljeet; Stange, Kurt; Thomas, Paul; White, Robert; Wright, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert 'Think Tank' convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategies (ETHICS Foundation) and the Royal College of General Practitioners. It makes 12 recommendations for General Practice: (1) Mental health promotion and prevention are too important to wait. (2) Work with your community to map risk factors, resources and assets. (3) Good health care, medicine and best practice are biopsychosocial rather than purely physical. (4) Integrate mental health promotion and prevention into your daily work. (5) Boost resilience in your community through approaches such as community development. (6) Identify people at increased risk of mental disorder for support and screening. (7) Support early intervention for people of all ages with signs of illness. (8) Maintain your biopsychosocial skills. (9) Ensure good communication, interdisciplinary team working and inter-sectoral working with other staff, teams and agencies. (10) Lead by example, taking action to promote the resilience of the general practice workforce. (11) Ensure mental health is appropriately included in the strategic agenda for your 'cluster' of General Practices, at the Clinical Commissioning Groups, and the Health and Wellbeing Board. (12) Be aware of national mental health strategies and localise them, including action to destigmatise mental illness within the context of community development.

  5. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...... scale and qualitative questions. We used a phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Almost all of the young Danish doctors responding felt that training in general practice is a necessary part of a postgraduate basic training programme. Early training in primary care not only gives doctors a broad...

  6. Flexible but boring: medical students' perceptions of a career in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Australia will continue to face a general practitioner (GP) shortage unless a significant number of medical students make general practice their chosen career. Perceptions regarding general practice may influence career choices. Thus this study investigated what Australian medical students perceived to be the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a career in general practice via an anonymous online survey. Fifty-one students indicated general practice to be their first ranked career preference, 200 indicated a career other than general practice, and 106 were undecided. Two-hundred and two students reported having been on a GP placement, whereas 88 students had not. Flexibility, continuity of patient care and work-life balance were the three most common stated advantages to pursuing a career in general practice whereas general practice being boring, poorly paid, and of low prestige were the three most common disadvantages stated. Some disadvantages stated by those with a non-GP preference were not stated by those with a GP preference (e.g. lack of procedural skills, lack of career advancement opportunities). Students with more than 80 h of GP placement experience were more likely to list the advantages of work-life balance and a diversity of problems/illnesses/patients than those with no placement experience but were also more likely to list the disadvantage of low prestige. Negative stereotypes regarding general practice continue to exist which may influence students' career choices.

  7. The role of culture in the general practice consultation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nasreen; Atkin, Karl; Neal, Richard

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, we will examine the importance of culture and ethnicity in the general practice consultation process. Good communication is associated with positive health outcomes. We will, by presenting qualitative material from an empirical study, examine the way in which communication within the context of a general practitioner (GP) consultation may be affected by ethnicity and cultural factors. The aim of the study was to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which white and South Asian patients communicate with white GPs and to explore any similarities and differences in communication. This paper reports on South Asian and white patients' explanations of recent videotaped consultations with their GP. We specifically focus on the ways in which issues of ethnic identity impacted upon the GP consultation process, by exploring how our sample of predominantly white GPs interacted with their South Asian patients and the extent to which the GP listened to the patients' needs, gave patients information, engaged in social conversation and showed friendliness. We then go on to examine patients' suggestions on improvements (if any) to the consultation. We conclude, by showing how a non-essentialist understanding of culture helps to comprehend the consultation process when the patients are from Great Britain's ethnicised communities. Our findings, however, raise generic issues of relevance to all multi-racial and multi-ethnic societies.

  8. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Teik T; Eccles, Martin P; Steen, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relatio...

  9. Towards a rationalization of counselling in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nancy; Irving, Jill

    1984-01-01

    While there is good evidence to show that counselling may be beneficial to those patients in general practice with non-organic problems, deployment of the available resources lacks standardization and rationalization. The Counselling in Medical Settings Working Party of the British Association for Counselling is pressing for standardized training and accreditation of counsellors so that general practitioners will feel more confident about taking on workers who will ultimately be incorporated into the NHS team. PMID:6512752

  10. Discourse analysis in general practice: a sociolinguistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, J; Malterud, K

    1990-06-01

    It is a simple but important fact that as general practitioners we talk to our patients. The quality of the conversation is of vital importance for the outcome of the consultation. The purpose of this article is to discuss a methodological tool borrowed from sociolinguistics--discourse analysis. To assess the suitability of this method for analysis of general practice consultations, the authors have performed a discourse analysis of one single consultation. Our experiences are presented here.

  11. Building chronic disease management capacity in General Practice: The South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire C; Szabo, Natalie; Bollen, Chris; Parker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on the implementation experience of the South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative in order to establish what is needed to support the development of the chronic disease management role of practice nurses. The Initiative was delivered between 2007 and 2010 to recruit, train and place 157 nurses across 147 General Practices in Adelaide. The purpose was to improve chronic disease management in General Practice, by equipping nurses to work as practice nurses who would coordinate care and establish chronic disease management systems. Secondary analysis of qualitative data contained in the Initiative evaluation report, specifically drawing on quarterly project records and four focus groups conducted with practice nurses, practice nurse coordinators and practice nurse mentors. As evidenced by the need to increase the amount of support provided during the implementation of the Initiative, nurses new to General Practice faced challenges in their new role. Nurses described a big learning curve as they dealt with role transition to a new work environment and learning a range of new skills while developing chronic disease management systems. Informants valued the skills development and support offered by the Initiative, however the ongoing difficulties in implementing the role suggested that change is also needed at the level of the Practice. While just over a half of the placement positions were retained, practice nurses expressed concern with having to negotiate the conditions of their employment. In order to advance the role of practice nurses as managers of chronic disease support is needed at two levels. At one level support is needed to assist practice nurses to build their own skills. At the level of the Practice, and in the wider health workforce system, support is also needed to ensure that Practices are organisationally ready to include the practice nurse within the practice team.

  12. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  13. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Jones, Joseph; Lucas, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  14. Assessment of general education teachers' Tier 1 classroom practices: contemporary science, practice, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory A; Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-12-01

    Progress monitoring is a type of formative assessment. Most work on progress monitoring in elementary school settings has been focused on students. However, teachers also can benefit from frequent evaluations. Research addressing teacher progress monitoring is critically important given the recent national focus on teacher evaluation and effectiveness. This special topic section of School Psychology Quarterly is the first to showcase the current research on measuring Tier 1 instructional and behavioral management practices used by prekindergarten and elementary school teachers in general education settings. The three studies included in the special section describe the development and validation efforts of several teacher observational and self-report measures of instruction and/or behavioral management. These studies provide evidence for the utility of such assessments for documenting the use of classroom practices, and these assessment results may be leveraged in innovative coaching models to promote best practice. These articles also offer insight and ideas for the next generation of teacher practice assessment for the field. Finally, the special topic is capped by a commentary synthesizing the current work and offers "big ideas" for future measurement development, policy, and professional development initiatives. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. The motivation to teach as a registrar in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampy, Harish; Agius, Steven; Allery, Lynne A

    2013-07-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) states that teaching should be an integral part of the doctor's role and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) have incorporated teaching outcomes into the GP training curriculum. However, there are suggestions that the teaching role of a GP trainee declines as they move from hospital posts to the registrar community year. Using doctors in training as near-peer tutors offers multiple advantages. Trainees themselves benefit as teaching others is a strong driver of the tutor's own learning. In addition there are also practical incentives to mobilising this under-utilised pool of primary care clinical teachers given the continuing shift of focusing medical education in the community. This study forms part of a larger body of work exploring the attitudes and perceived learning needs of GP registrars with regards to developing a teaching role. A primary area of investigation was trainees' motivation to teach. This paper describes our attempts to establish: a) how strongly motivated are GP registrars to take on teaching roles? b) in consequence how strongly motivated are they to learn more about teaching? c) what are the factors which affect motivation to teach? Three themes emerged from the data. First, teaching was felt to be of low priority in comparison to competing clinical learning needs. Secondly, the clinical dominance to both formative and summative assessment during training further compounded this situation. Thirdly, registrars identified a number of practical barriers and incentives that influenced their teaching engagement. This included potential negative views from trainers as to their trainee's ability and requirement to be involved with teaching activities.By understanding and addressing these issues, it is hoped that GP trainees' engagement with teaching activities can be better engendered with subsequent benefits for both the trainee and those they teach.

  16. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing.

  17. The quality and outcomes framework: QOF - transforming general practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillam, Stephen; Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan

    2011-01-01

    ... comprehensive scheme of its kind in the world. Champions claim the QOF advances the quality of primary care; detractors fear the end of general practice as we know it. The introduction of the QOF provides a unique opportunity for research, analysis and re ection. This book is the rst comprehensive analysis of the impact of the QOF, examining the claims and counter-claims ...

  18. Feasibility of automatic evaluation of clinical rules in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opondo, D.; Visscher, S.; Eslami, S.; Medlock, S.; Verheij, R.; Korevaar, J.C.; Abu-Hanna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent to which clinical rules (CRs) can be implemented for automatic evaluationof quality of care in general practice.Methods: We assessed 81 clinical rules (CRs) adapted from a subset of Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders(ACOVE) clinical rules, against Dutch College of

  19. Nutritional deficiency in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Weel, van C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency is an independent risk factor for mortality. Despite its clinical relevance, the prevalence in a primary care setting is poorly documented. We performed a systematic review of reported prevalence and clinical assessment of nutritional deficiency in general practice.

  20. Potentials and pitfalls for nutrition counselling in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Bakx, J.C.; Weel, C. van; Staveren, W.A. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper was based on collaborative research efforts from Wageningen University and the University Medical Centre St Radboud in The Netherlands and describes the rationale for web-based nutrition counselling applications in general practice as well as some of the frequently used models and

  1. Incidence and treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Marian J.; Saaltink, Anne Linde; Groenhof, Feikje; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in women of reproductive age. In 2008, the Dutch guideline for general practitioners (GPs) was revised to recommend the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) as a first-choice treatment for HMB. However, GP prescribing practices

  2. Disease prevalence estimations based on contact registrations in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Westert, Gert; Dijkgraaf, Marcel; Schellevis, François; de Bakker, Dinny

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes how to estimate the prevalence of chronic diseases in a population using data from contact registrations in general practice with a limited time length. Instead of using only total numbers of observed patients adjusted for the length of the observation period, we propose the use

  3. 19 CFR 177.1 - General ruling practice and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authority to represent is known, any person appearing before the Customs Service as an agent in connection... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General ruling practice and definitions. 177.1 Section 177.1 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  4. The Future of General Surgery: Evolving to Meet a Changing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Eric M; Ronson, Ashley R; Gorman, Lisa J; Taber, Sarah A; Harris, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Similar to other countries, the practice of General Surgery in Canada has undergone significant evolution over the past 30 years without major changes to the training model. There is growing concern that current General Surgery residency training does not provide the skills required to practice the breadth of General Surgery in all Canadian communities and practice settings. Led by a national Task Force on the Future of General Surgery, this project aimed to develop recommendations on the optimal configuration of General Surgery training in Canada. A series of 4 evidence-based sub-studies and a national survey were launched to inform these recommendations. Generalized findings from the multiple methods of the project speak to the complexity of the current practice of General Surgery: (1) General surgeons have very different practice patterns depending on the location of practice; (2) General Surgery training offers strong preparation for overall clinical competence; (3) Subspecialized training is a new reality for today's general surgeons; and (4) Generation of the report and recommendations for the future of General Surgery. A total of 4 key recommendations were developed to optimize General Surgery for the 21st century. This project demonstrated that a high variability of practice dependent on location contrasts with the principles of implementing the same objectives of training for all General Surgery graduates. The overall results of the project have prompted the Royal College to review the training requirements and consider a more "fit for purpose" training scheme, thus ensuring that General Surgery residency training programs would optimally prepare residents for a broad range of practice settings and locations across Canada. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of selective prevention for cardiometabolic diseases; are Dutch general practices adequately prepared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stol, Daphne M; Hollander, Monika; Nielen, Markus M J; Badenbroek, Ilse F; Schellevis, François G; de Wit, Niek J

    2018-03-01

    Current guidelines acknowledge the need for cardiometabolic disease (CMD) prevention and recommend five-yearly screening of a targeted population. In recent years programs for selective CMD-prevention have been developed, but implementation is challenging. The question arises if general practices are adequately prepared. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the organizational preparedness of Dutch general practices and the facilitators and barriers for performing CMD-prevention in practices currently implementing selective CMD-prevention. Observational study. Dutch primary care. General practices. Organizational characteristics. General practices implementing selective CMD-prevention are more often organized as a group practice (49% vs. 19%, p = .000) and are better organized regarding chronic disease management compared to reference practices. They are motivated for performing CMD-prevention and can be considered as 'frontrunners' of Dutch general practices with respect to their practice organization. The most important reported barriers are a limited availability of staff (59%) and inadequate funding (41%). The organizational infrastructure of Dutch general practices is considered adequate for performing most steps of selective CMD-prevention. Implementation of prevention programs including easily accessible lifestyle interventions needs attention. All stakeholders involved share the responsibility to realize structural funding for programmed CMD-prevention. Aforementioned conditions should be taken into account with respect to future implementation of selective CMD-prevention. Key Points   There is need for adequate CMD prevention. Little is known about the organization of selective CMD prevention in general practices.   • The organizational infrastructure of Dutch general practices is adequate for performing most steps of selective CMD prevention.   • Implementation of selective CMD prevention programs including easily accessible

  6. The reported availability of general practitioners and the influence of practice list size.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J L

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined practice list sizes have increased, but larger practice size may be associated with disadvantage to patients. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the availability of general practitioners as reported by their patients and the relationship between reported availability and practice list size. METHOD: A one-week questionnaire survey of 8315 patients attending participating practices in West Lothian, Scotland, was conducted. Patients were asked about the arrangement...

  7. Problem solving therapy - use and effectiveness in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David

    2012-09-01

    Problem solving therapy (PST) is one of the focused psychological strategies supported by Medicare for use by appropriately trained general practitioners. This article reviews the evidence base for PST and its use in the general practice setting. Problem solving therapy involves patients learning or reactivating problem solving skills. These skills can then be applied to specific life problems associated with psychological and somatic symptoms. Problem solving therapy is suitable for use in general practice for patients experiencing common mental health conditions and has been shown to be as effective in the treatment of depression as antidepressants. Problem solving therapy involves a series of sequential stages. The clinician assists the patient to develop new empowering skills, and then supports them to work through the stages of therapy to determine and implement the solution selected by the patient. Many experienced GPs will identify their own existing problem solving skills. Learning about PST may involve refining and focusing these skills.

  8. The place of knowledge and evidence in the context of Australian general practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Field, John; Cant, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the place of knowledge and evidence in the context of Australian general practice nursing. General practice nursing is a rapidly developing area of specialized nursing in Australia. The provision of primary care services in Australia rests largely with medical general practitioners who employ nurses in a small business model. A statistical research design was used that included a validated instrument: the developing evidence-based practice questionnaire (Gerrish et al. 2007). A total of 1,800 Victorian practice nurses were surveyed with a return of 590 completed questionnaires, equaling a response rate of 33%. Lack of time to access knowledge for practice was a barrier for participants in this study. In-service education and training opportunities were ranked as the number one source of knowledge for general practice nurses. Experiential learning and interactions with clients, peers, medical practitioners, and specialist nurses were also considered very important sources of knowledge. Research journals were ranked much lower than experiential learning and personal interactions. Participants assessed their own skills at sourcing and translating evidence into practice knowledge as low. Younger general practice nurses were more likely than older nurses to assess themselves as competent at using the library and Internet to locate evidence. The predominantly oral culture of nursing needs to be identified and incorporated into methods for disseminating evidence from research findings in order to increase the knowledge base of Australian general practice nurses. Findings from this study will be significant for policy makers and funders of Australian nursing in general practice. The establishment of a career structure for general practice nurses that includes salaried positions for clinical nurse specialists would assist in the translation of evidence into knowledge for utilization at the point of care.

  9. General discussion of feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals, objectives and parameters of feasibility studies in the field of nuclear power project planning are discussed in a general way. Technical and economic problems to be considered are pointed out. In special cases, IAEA offers its aid and support. (UA) [de

  10. Electrocardiogram interpretation in general practice: relevance to prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, W A; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess, in the context of their possible role in prehospital thrombolysis, the ability of general practitioners to recognise acute transmural myocardial ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram. DESIGN--150 doctors (every fifth name) were selected from the alphabetical list of 750 on Merseyside general practitioner register and without prior warning were asked to interpret a series of six 12 lead electrocardiograms. Three of these showed acute transmural ischaemia/infarction, one was normal, and two showed non-acute abnormalities. Details of doctors' ages, postgraduate training, and clinical practice were sought. SETTING--General practitioners' surgeries and postgraduate centres within the Merseyside area. PARTICIPANTS--106 general practitioners (mean age 45 years) agreed to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Accuracy of general practitioners' interpretations of the six electrocardiograms. RESULTS--82% of general practitioners correctly recognised a normal electrocardiogram. Recognition of acute abnormalities was less reliable. Between 33% and 61% correctly identified acute transmural ischaemia/infarction depending on the specific trace presented. Accurate localisation of the site of the infarct was achieved only by between 8% and 30% of participants, while between 22% and 25% correctly interpreted non-acute abnormalities. Neither routine use of electrocardiography nor postgraduate hospital experience in general medicine was associated with significantly greater expertise. CONCLUSION--The current level of proficiency of a sample of general practitioners in the Merseyside area in recognising acute transmural ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram suggests that refresher training is needed if general practitioners are to give prehospital thrombolysis. Images PMID:8398491

  11. The identification of the general practice registrar needing assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDoctors undertaking vocational training in general practicein Australia may require assistance, in addition to thenormal training offered as part of their training programme.Issues requiring assistance may go undetected for a periodof time. Delay in the identification of issues leads to delay inthe provision of the assistance. The aim of this study is todetermine the most common reasons registrars requireextra assistance, and how these issues are identified. Thefindings of this study will provide direction for 21 regionallybased training providers (RTPs to develop improved toolsto ensure earlier detection of registrars requiring assistance.MethodThis study is based on qualitative research methods, usingsemi-structured interviews with senior medical educationstaff of four regional general practice training providers inVictoria, Australia.ResultsIssues identified included language and cultural issues,applied knowledge and skills, attitude and professionalism,and health and family issues.The principal method that training providers identifiedissues was via the GP supervisor. This was predominantly byinformal communication, rather than formal evaluationsheets. Other methods included the external clinicalteaching visit and other training formative assessments.These more formalised procedures were more likely toidentify issues later than desired. They were also used as away of clarifying suspected problems. The selection processwas not felt to be helpful, and the examinations providedinformation too late.ConclusionAn increased awareness of the potential issues leading to aregistrar to require assistance enables identification andsubsequent action to occur in a more timely and moreuseful fashion. Informal communication between practicesand training programme staff should be encouraged toenable these issues to be dealt with early in training.

  12. What determines medical students' career preference for general practice residency training?: a multicenter survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Murata, Akiko; Tahara, Masao; Komiyama, Manabu; Ichikawa, Shuhei; Takemura, Yousuke C; Onishi, Hirotaka

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have systematically explored factors affecting medical students' general practice career choice. We conducted a nationwide multicenter survey (Japan MEdical Career of Students: JMECS) to examine factors associated with students' general practice career aspirations in Japan, where it has been decided that general practice will be officially acknowledged as a new discipline. From April to December 2015, we distributed a 21-item questionnaire to final year medical students in 17 medical schools. The survey asked students about their top three career preferences from 19 specialty fields, their demographics and their career priorities. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the effect of each item. A total of 1264 responses were included in the analyses. The top three specialty choice were internal medicine: 833 (65.9%), general practice: 408 (32.3%), and pediatrics: 372 (29.4%). Among demographic factors, "plan to inherit other's practice" positively associated with choosing general practice, whereas "having physician parent" had negative correlation. After controlling for potential confounders, students who ranked the following items as highly important were more likely to choose general practice: "clinical diagnostic reasoning (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.65, 95% CI 1.40-1.94)", "community-oriented practice (aOR: 1.33, 95% CI 1.13-1.57)", and" involvement in preventive medicine (aOR: 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38)". On the contrary, "acute care rather than chronic care", "mastering advanced procedures", and "depth rather than breadth of practice" were less likely to be associated with general practice aspiration. Our nationwide multicenter survey found several features associated with general practice career aspirations: clinical diagnostic reasoning; community-oriented practice; and preventive medicine. These results can be fundamental to future research and the development of recruitment strategies.

  13. Is primary prevention of childhood obesity by education at 13-month immunisations feasible and acceptable? Results from a general practice based pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doorley, E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity remains high in Ireland. In this study an intervention conducted within primary care was evaluated. This involved a structured discussion with parents at the 13 month immunisations with their general practitioner (GP), including measuring weight of the toddler and parental education regarding healthy nutrition and physical activity for their toddler. There was a telephone follow-up interview with parents three months later assessing change in toddler diet\\/lifestyle. Endpoints assessed included parents\\' reports of specific lifestyle parameters with regard to the toddler and parental assessment of the usefulness of the intervention. 39 toddlers were studied. Most lifestyle parameters had improved at follow up. Reported fruit and vegetable intake of more than 4 portions per day increased from 20.5% of toddlers at baseline 28.6% at follow up. The number of toddlers abstaining from unhealthy snacks increased from 15.4% to 21.4%. Television watching of more than 2 hours daily decreased from 12.8% to 0%. Supervised exercise of more than thirty minutes per day increased from 69.2% to 89.3%. The majority of parents reported at follow up that they found the intervention acceptable (100%, n = 28) and useful (79%, n = 22).

  14. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    General practice is the corner stone of Danish primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) are similar to family physicians in the United States. On average, all Danes have 6.9 contacts per year with their GP (in-person, telephone, or E-mail consultation). General practice is characterized...... education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...... by 5 key components: (1) a list system, with an average of close to 1600 persons on the list of a