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Sample records for general hospital inpatients

  1. A qualitative study on nurses' reactions to inpatient suicide in a general hospital

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    Shujie Wang

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Nurses who experienced inpatient suicide became stressed. Effective interventions must be implemented to improve the coping mechanisms of nurses against the negative consequences of inpatient suicide. The findings of this study will allow administrators to gain insight into the impacts of inpatient suicides on nurses in general hospitals. Such information can be used to develop effective strategies and provide individual support and ongoing education. Consequently, nurses will acquire suicide prevention skills and help patients achieve swift recovery.

  2. Nurses' experiences of inpatients suicide in a general hospital*

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    Mirriam Matandela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When suicide occurs, it is regarded as an adverse event. Often, little attention is given to the nurses who cared for the patients prior to the adverse event. Instead the affected nurses are expected to write statements and incident reports about the adverse event. The aim was to explore the experiences of nurses who cared for patients who successfully committed suicide whilst admitted at a specific general hospital in Gauteng Province, South Africa. A qualitative exploratory research was conducted. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of six nurses and content analysis was done. Nurses experienced feelings of shock; blame and condemnation; inadequacy and feared reprisal. This study suggests a basis for development of support strategies to assist the nurses to deal with their emotions following experience of adverse events.

  3. Changing patterns of psychiatric inpatient care for children and adolescents in general hospitals, 1988-1995.

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    Pottick, K J; McAlpine, D D; Andelman, R B

    2000-08-01

    The authors examine patterns in utilization of psychiatric inpatient services by children and adolescents in general hospitals during 1988-1995. National Hospital Discharge Survey data were used to describe utilization patterns for children and adolescents with primary psychiatric diagnoses in general hospitals from 1988 to 1995. During the study period, there was a 36% increase in hospital discharges and a 44% decline in mean length of stay, resulting in a 23% decline in the number of bed-days, from more than 3 million to about 2.5 million. The number of nonpsychotic major depressive disorders increased significantly. Discharges from public hospitals have declined, and those from proprietary hospitals have risen. Concurrently, the role of private insurance declined and the role of Medicaid increased. During the period of study, the mean and median length of stay declined most for children and adolescents who were hospitalized in private facilities and those covered by private insurance. Across the United States, the mean length of stay declined significantly; this decline was almost 60% in the West. Discharges also declined in the West, in contrast to the Midwest and the South, where they significantly increased. Increased numbers of discharges and decreased length of stay may reflect evolving market forces and characteristics of hospitals. Further penetration by managed care into the public insurance system or modifications in existing Medicaid policy could have a profound impact on the availability of inpatient resources.

  4. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Unit in General Hospital “Tzaneio”

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    E. Tseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Inpatient Service offers comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents (typical age ranges from 3-16 years old with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, severe disruptive behavior, and suicide attempts. Treatment Team. The inpatient treatment team includes psychiatrists, psychologists, registered nurses, special education teacher, social worker, speech and occupational therapists. In addition, pediatricians from a full range of medical subspecialties are available for consultations. The multi-disciplinary staff emphasizes a family-oriented approach and parents and care-givers are encouraged to be active participants in the treatment team throughout a child’s stay. Treatment Program. The program offers developmentally appropriate therapeutic activities in a closely supervised environment. Extensive opportunities for observation, assessment, and intervention are possible in this intensive setting. Specialized assessments including neuropsychological testing, speech and language testing, and occupational therapy assessments are all available. Treatment plans typically include a combination of individual psychotherapy, behavior management, family counseling and medications. Staff members develop an individualized treatment plan emphasizing safety for each patient during the hospital stay. The plan is closely coordinated with families, outpatient providers, and resource programs to coordinate aftercare plans and facilitate a smooth transition to home.

  5. Motivation to change risky drinking and motivation to seek help for alcohol risk drinking among general hospital inpatients with problem drinking and alcohol-related diseases.

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    Lau, Katharina; Freyer-Adam, Jennis; Gaertner, Beate; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; John, Ulrich; Hapke, Ulfert

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze motivation to change drinking behavior and motivation to seek help in general hospital inpatients with problem drinking and alcohol-related diseases. The sample consisted of 294 general hospital inpatients aged 18-64 years. Inpatients with alcohol-attributable disease were classified according to its alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF; AAF=1, AAFmotivation between the AAF groups were analyzed. Furthermore, differences in motivation to change, in motivation to seek help and in the amount of alcohol consumed from baseline to follow-up between the AAF groups were evaluated. During hospital stay, motivation to change was higher among inpatients with alcohol-attributable diseases than among inpatients who had no alcohol-attributable diseases [F(2)=18.40, PMotivation to seek help was higher among inpatients with AAF=1 than among inpatients with AAFmotivation to change drinking behavior remained stable within 12 months of hospitalization, motivation to seek help decreased. The amount of alcohol consumed decreased in all three AAF groups. Data suggest that hospital stay seems to be a "teachable moment." Screening for problem drinking and motivation differentiated by AAFs might be a tool for early intervention. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The frequency of smoking and problem drinking among general hospital inpatients in Brazil - using the AUDIT and Fagerström questionnaires

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    Neliana Buzi Figlie

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Although the CAGE questionnaire is one of the most widely used alcohol screening instruments, it has been criticized for not identifying people who are drinking heavily or who have alcohol related problems but do not as yet show symptoms of alcohol dependence. The AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test questionnaire was developed by WHO as a screening instrument specifically designed to identify problem drinkers, as well as those who were already dependent on alcohol. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to use the AUDIT and Fagerström questionnaires in a general hospital inpatient population to measure the frequency of problem drinking and nicotine dependence, and to see if levels varied between medical speciality. DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study. SETTING: Federally funded public teaching hospital. SAMPLE: 275 inpatients from both genders. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Socio-demographic data, AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. RESULTS: We interviewed 275 inpatients, 49% of whom were men and 51% women. Thirty-four patients were identified as "cases" by the Audit questionnaire; 22% of the male patients and 3% of the females. Just over 21% of inpatients were current smokers. The gastroenterology (26% and general medicine (16% inpatient units had the largest number of individual cases. CONCLUSIONS: Only by knowing the prevalence of alcohol abuse/dependence and nicotine dependence in a general hospital can we evaluate the need for a specialized liaison service to identify and treat these patients.

  7. Inpatient iron deficiency detection and management: how do general physicians and gastroenterologists perform in a tertiary care hospital?

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    Fazal, Muhammad W; Andrews, Jane M; Thomas, Josephine; Saffouri, Eliana

    2017-08-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is often an indicator of underlying pathology. Early detection and treatment avoids long-term morbidity and allows for prompt iron repletion, avoiding ID anaemia (IDA) and the need for blood transfusion. To evaluate the management of ID in two internal medicine units (general medical (GM) and gastroenterology (GE)) in a large metropolitan hospital and compare it to international guidelines. All consecutive inpatient admissions in the GM and GE units were retrospectively reviewed until 40 patients in each service were identified with anaemia and/or microcytic hypochromic blood counts. Patient records and electronic discharge summaries were then reviewed to assess the recognition, investigation and management of these abnormalities. Overall, only 60% (48/80) of the cases of microcytic hypochromic picture and/or anaemia were recognised. Cases were more likely to be detected under the GE unit, 77.5% (31/40) versus 42% (17/40) in GM (P < 0.002). Of the 31 recognised GE cases, 28 (90%) were investigated further with iron studies and/or endoscopic procedures. ID was confirmed in nearly half (5/11) of those tested; however, only 2 of 5 received iron replacement. Among GM patients, only 11 of the 17 recognised cases (64%) were investigated further. Iron studies were performed in all 11, confirming IDA in 4 (36%), all of whom received intravenous iron. A faecal human haemoglobin test was performed in two GM patients and one GE patient. There remains significant room for improvement in the recognition, investigation and management of ID in hospital practice in Australia. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

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    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  9. Characterizing hospital inpatients: the importance of demographics and attitudes.

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    Danko, W D; Janakiramanan, B; Stanley, T J

    1988-01-01

    To compete effectively, hospital administrators must understand inpatients who are involved in hospital-choice decisions more clearly. To this end, a methodology is presented to measure and assess the importance of inpatients' personal attributes in predicting hospital selection. Empirical results show that demographic characteristics are poor--but attitudes are useful--segmentation variables that delineate differences between two particular hospitals' inpatients. More generally, the survey method and statistical procedures outlined are applicable (with slight modification) to markets with a greater number of competitors.

  10. Factors related to positive and negative outcomes in psychiatric inpatients in a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit: a proposal for an outcomes index

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    HUGO KARLING MORESCHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background General Hospital Psychiatric Units have a fundamental importance in the mental health care systems. However, there is a lack of studies regarding the level of improvement of patients in this type of facility. Objective To assess factors related to good and poor outcomes in psychiatric inpatients using an index composed by clinical parameters easily measured. Methods Length of stay (LOS, Global Assessment of Functioning (variation and at discharge and Clinical Global Impression (severity and improvement were used to build a ten-point improvement index (I-Index. Records of psychiatric inpatients of a general hospital during an 18-month period were analyzed. Three groups (poor, intermediate and good outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate models according to clinical and sociodemographic variables. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were included, with a percentage in the groups with poor, regular and good outcomes of 16.4%, 59,6% and 24.0% respectively. Poor outcome at the discharge was associated mainly with lower education, transient disability, antipsychotics use, chief complaint “behavioral change/aggressiveness” and psychotic features. Multivariate analysis found a higher OR for diagnoses of “psychotic disorders” and “personality disorders” and others variables in relation to protective categories in the poor outcome group compared to the good outcome group. Discussion Our I-Index proved to be an indicator of that allows an easy and more comprehensive evaluation to assess outcomes of inpatients than just LOS. Different interventions addressed to conditions such as psychotic disorders and disruptive chief complaints are necessary.

  11. Suicide risk among inpatients at a university general hospital Risco de suicídio em pacientes internados em um hospital geral universitário

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    Marianne Herrera Falceti Ferreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the proportion of inpatients at a university general hospital who are at risk of committing suicide. METHOD: A random sample of 253 patients (57% males aged 18 years old or older, admitted to surgical and clinical wards, was assessed using the the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, which has a section that evaluates the risk for suicide. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: There were 58 (23% patients with a risk for suicide, 13 (5% of total of whom presented a high risk. The prevalence of suicide risk was greater in young adult patients, those with no matrimonial relationship and those diagnosed with major depression (univariate analysis, Chi-squared test; p = 0.01, 0.03 and 0.0001, respectively. The multivariate analysis revealed that the risk for suicide in individuals younger than 30 years old was two fold higher than in those individuals between the ages of 30 and 59 years (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.22-0.93; p = 0.03 and four fold greater than in those who were 60 years old or older (OR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.1-0.64; p = 0.004. CONCLUSION: When young adults are admitted to general hospitals they should receive special attention due to their suicidal potential.OBJETIVO: Estimar a proporção de pacientes internados em um hospital geral universitário que têm risco de suicídio. MÉTODO: Uma amostra aleatória de 253 pacientes (57% do sexo masculino com 18 anos ou mais, internados em enfermarias clínicas e cirúrgicas, foi avaliada por meio do Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, o qual possui uma seção que avalia risco de suicídio. Foram realizadas analises uni e multivariadas. RESULTADOS: Cinqüenta e oito (23% pacientes tinham risco de suicídio, 13 dos quais (5% do total risco elevado. A prevalência de risco de suicídio foi maior em adultos jovens, nos que não tinham vínculo matrimonial e nos que tiveram um diagnóstico de depressão maior (análise univariada, teste do Qui

  12. Performance of a Modern Glucose Meter in ICU and General Hospital Inpatients: 3 Years of Real-World Paired Meter and Central Laboratory Results.

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    Zhang, Ray; Isakow, Warren; Kollef, Marin H; Scott, Mitchell G

    2017-09-01

    Due to accuracy concerns, the Food and Drug Administration issued guidances to manufacturers that resulted in Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services stating that the use of meters in critically ill patients is "off-label" and constitutes "high complexity" testing. This is causing significant workflow problems in ICUs nationally. We wished to determine whether real-world accuracy of modern glucose meters is worse in ICU patients compared with non-ICU inpatients. We reviewed glucose results over the preceding 3 years, comparing results from paired glucose meter and central laboratory tests performed within 60 minutes of each other in ICU versus non-ICU settings. Seven ICU and 30 non-ICU wards at a 1,300-bed academic hospital in the United States. A total of 14,763 general medicine/surgery inpatients and 20,970 ICU inpatients. None. Compared meter results with near simultaneously performed laboratory results from the same patient by applying the 2016 U.S. Food and Drug Administration accuracy criteria, determining mean absolute relative difference and examining where paired results fell within the Parkes consensus error grid zones. A higher percentage of glucose meter results from ICUs than from non-ICUs passed 2016 Food and Drug Administration accuracy criteria (p meter results with laboratory results. At 1 minute, no meter result from ICUs posed dangerous or significant risk by error grid analysis, whereas at 10 minutes, less than 0.1% of ICU meter results did, which was not statistically different from non-ICU results. Real-world accuracy of modern glucose meters is at least as accurate in the ICU setting as in the non-ICU setting at our institution.

  13. Patient characteristics, resource use and outcomes associated with general internal medicine hospital care: the General Medicine Inpatient Initiative (GEMINI) retrospective cohort study.

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    Verma, Amol A; Guo, Yishan; Kwan, Janice L; Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Rawal, Shail; Tang, Terence; Weinerman, Adina; Cram, Peter; Dhalla, Irfan A; Hwang, Stephen W; Laupacis, Andreas; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Shadowitz, Steven; Upshur, Ross; Reid, Robert J; Razak, Fahad

    2017-12-11

    The precise scope of hospital care delivered under general internal medicine services remains poorly quantified. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic characteristics, medical conditions, health outcomes and resource use of patients admitted to general internal medicine at 7 hospital sites in the Greater Toronto Area. This was a retrospective cohort study involving all patients who were admitted to or discharged from general internal medicine at the study sites between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2015. Clinical data from hospital electronic information systems were linked to administrative data from each hospital. We examined trends in resource use and patient characteristics over the study period. There were 136 208 admissions to general internal medicine involving 88 121 unique patients over the study period. General internal medicine admissions accounted for 38.8% of all admissions from the emergency department and 23.7% of all hospital bed-days. Over the study period, the number of admissions to general internal medicine increased by 32.4%; there was no meaningful change in the median length of stay or cost per hospital stay. The median patient age was 73 (interquartile range [IQR] 57-84) years, and the median number of coexisting conditions was 6 (IQR 3-9). The median acute length of stay was 4.6 (IQR 2.5-8.6) days, and the median total cost per hospital stay was $5850 (IQR $3915-$10 061). Patients received at least 1 computed tomography scan in 52.2% of admissions. The most common primary discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (5.0% of admissions), heart failure (4.7%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4.1%), urinary tract infection (4.0%) and stroke (3.6%). Patients admitted to general internal medicine services represent a large, heterogeneous, resource-intensive and growing population. Understanding and improving general internal medicine care is essential to promote a high-quality, sustainable health care system. Copyright 2017

  14. The intended and unintended consequences of communication systems on general internal medicine inpatient care delivery: a prospective observational case study of five teaching hospitals.

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    Wu, Robert C; Lo, Vivian; Morra, Dante; Wong, Brian M; Sargeant, Robert; Locke, Ken; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo; Quan, Sherman D; Rossos, Peter; Tran, Kim; Cheung, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Effective clinical communication is critical to providing high-quality patient care. Hospitals have used different types of interventions to improve communication between care teams, but there have been few studies of their effectiveness. To describe the effects of different communication interventions and their problems. Prospective observational case study using a mixed methods approach of quantitative and qualitative methods. General internal medicine (GIM) inpatient wards at five tertiary care academic teaching hospitals. Clinicians consisting of residents, attending physicians, nurses, and allied health (AH) staff working on the GIM wards. Ethnographic methods and interviews with clinical staff (doctors, nurses, medical students, and AH professionals) were conducted over a 16-month period from 2009 to 2010. We identified four categories that described the intended and unintended consequences of communication interventions: impacts on senders, receivers, interprofessional collaboration, and the use of informal communication processes. The use of alphanumeric pagers, smartphones, and web-based communication systems had positive effects for senders and receivers, but unintended consequences were seen with all interventions in all four categories. Interventions that aimed to improve clinical communications solved some but not all problems, and unintended effects were seen with all systems.

  15. [Screening of the risk of functional decline performed by an inpatient geriatric consultation team in a general hospital].

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    Benoît, F; Bertiaux, M; Schouterden, R; Huard, E; Segers, K; Decorte, L; Robberecht, J; Simonetti, C; Surquin, M

    2013-01-01

    The Mobile Geriatric Team (MGT) is part of the Geriatric Care Program and aims to provide interdisciplinary geriatric expertise to other professionals for old patients hospitalized outside geriatric department. Our hospital has a MGT since 2008. Our objective is to retrospectively describe the population of patients of 75 years and older hospitalized outside the geriatric ward and screened for the risk of functional decline by the MGT between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2011. We recorded the risk of functional decline, as indicated by the Identification of Senior At Risk score (ISAR) performed within 48 h after admission, place of living, discharge destination, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) scores. In two years, 1.568 patients > or = 75 Y were screened with the ISAR score (mean age 82.5 Y, 60.7% of women). We identified 833 patients with a high-risk of functional decline (ISAR > or = 3). The majority of high-risk subjects (78%) were living at home before hospitalization and 58.7% returned home after discharge. Depression and cognitive impairment were identified among respectively 41% and 59% of high-risk subjects. Only 128 patients were admitted for fall. Most of the faller patients were living at home prior hospitalization and had an ISAR score > or = 3. The MGT allowed identifying many patients > or = 75 Y living at home and presenting with high-risk of functional decline and geriatric syndromes, confirming that good screening procedures are necessary to optimize management of hospitalized olders. Most of faller patients have an ISAR score > or = 3 and should benefit a comprehensive geriatric assessment.

  16. The effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care.

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    Mutter, Ryan L; Wong, Herbert S; Goldfarb, Marsha G

    2008-01-01

    Existing empirical studies have produced inconclusive, and sometimes contradictory, findings on the effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care. These inconsistencies may be due to the use of different methodologies, hospital competition measures, and hospital quality measures. This paper applies the Quality Indicator software from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to the 1997 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases to create three versions (i.e., observed, risk-adjusted, and "smoothed") of 38 distinct measures of inpatient quality. The relationship between 12 different hospital competition measures and these quality measures are assessed, using ordinary least squares, two-step efficient generalized method of moments, and negative binomial regression techniques. We find that across estimation strategies, hospital competition has an impact on a number of hospital quality measures. However, the effect is not unidirectional: some indicators show improvements in hospital quality with greater levels of competition, some show decreases in hospital quality, and others are unaffected. We provide hypotheses based on emerging areas of research that could explain these findings, but inconsistencies remain.

  17. EFFECT OF WARM WATER COMPRESS THERAPY ON THE INCIDENCE OF HYPEREMIA IN PHLEBITIS PATIENTS AT THE INPATIENT WARD OF BRIGJEND H. HASAN BASRI GENERAL HOSPITAL KANDANGAN

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    Nurul Hidayah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aims to determine the effect of warm water compress therapy on the incidence of hyperemia in 40 patients with phlebitis at the Inpatient Installation of H. Hasan Basry General Hospital Kandangan. Research method used quasi-experimental with two group; control and intervention. The control group was untreated phlebitis, while the intervention group was a phlebitis patient treated with warm water compresses. Data collection was collected by measuring the redness diameter before and after warm compress therapy. The result showed that the mean of intervention group diameter before treatment 49.3 mm and after treatment 40.2 mm. The mean diameter of control group before treatment 48.1 mm and after treatment 46.4 mm. The mean diameter of intervention group was decreased 9.1 mm and 1.7 mm in the control group. Statistically result test show that there was a significant difference of mean hyperemia diameter between intervention and control group (p<0.05. Statistically result test also shows that there was a significant difference of mean hyperemia between pre- and post-treatment with warm water (p<0.05. It was concluded that the warm compress therapy could decreased the incidence of hyperemia in phlebitis patients.

  18. Qualities of Inpatient Hospital Rooms: Patients' Perspectives.

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    Devlin, Ann Sloan; Andrade, Cláudia Campos; Carvalho, Diana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate what design features of hospital rooms are valued by inpatients. Little research has explored how patients evaluate the physical environment of their hospital rooms. Most responses are captured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, which includes only two questions about the physical environment. Two hundred thirty-six orthopedic patients (78 in the United States and 158 in Portugal) listed three features of their hospital room that influenced their level of satisfaction with their hospital stay, indicating whether the feature was positive or negative. The comments were more positive (71.4%) than negative (28.6%). Using the framework of supportive design from Ulrich, over half the comments (64.31%) could be categorized in one of the three dimensions: 33.2% (positive distraction), 22.4% (perceived control), and 6.0% (social support). This total includes Internet (2.7%), which could be categorized as either social support or positive distraction. Comments called "other aspects" focused on overall environmental appraisals, cleanliness, and functionality and maintenance. The majority of comments could be accommodated by Ulrich's theory, but it is noteworthy that other aspects emerge from patients' comments and affect their experience. Cross-cultural differences pointed to the greater role of light and sun for Portuguese patients and health status whiteboard for U.S. Qualitative research can add significantly to our understanding of the healthcare experience and may inform design decisions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011 Rates; Provider... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  20. Hazards of Hospitalization: Hospitalists and Geriatricians Educating Medical Students about Delirium and Falls in Geriatric Inpatients

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    Lang, Valerie J.; Clark, Nancy S.; Medina-Walpole, Annette; McCann, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for complications from delirium or falls during hospitalization. Medical education, however, generally places little emphasis on the hazards of hospitalization for older inpatients. Geriatricians conducted a faculty development workshop for hospitalists about the hazards of hospitalization for geriatric…

  1. The Relationship between Inpatient Expectations of Staff Responsiveness and Empathy with Inpatient Satisfaction at Wangaya District Hospital Denpasar

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    Dwidyaniti Wira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The evaluation of quality of service within inpatient and outpatient services is very critical to be done. This research aimed to explore the relationship between inpatient expectations of the quality of nursing service and inpatient satisfaction, in the third-class ward Wangaya District General Hospital, Denpasar.Methods: This research was a quantitative study using cross-sectional design. A sample of 111 was selected by simple random sampling. The data was analysed by using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis with logistic regression.Results: The analysis indicated that the level of actual satisfaction compared to inpatient expectations was as low as 45%. Perception of responsiveness with OR=2.404 (95%CI: 1.076–5.373 and perception of empathy with OR=2.594 (95%CI: 1.165-5.779 had a significant relationship with inpatient satisfaction.Conclusion: The study concluded that the patient satisfaction rate is moderate and found to have significant correlation with perceptions of responsiveness and empathy.Keywords: inpatient expectations, nursing service provision, inpatient satisfaction

  2. Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

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    Kelly, Michelle M; Coller, Ryan J; Hoonakker, Peter Lt

    2018-06-01

    Patient portals, web-based personal health records linked to electronic health records (EHRs), provide patients access to their healthcare information and facilitate communication with providers. Growing evidence supports portal use in ambulatory settings; however, only recently have portals been used with hospitalized patients. Our objective was to review the literature evaluating the design, use, and impact of inpatient portals, which are patient portals designed to give hospitalized patients and caregivers inpatient EHR clinical information for the purpose of engaging them in hospital care. Literature was reviewed from 2006 to 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science, CINALPlus, Cochrane, and Scopus to identify English language studies evaluating patient portals, engagement, and inpatient care. Data were analyzed considering the following 3 themes: inpatient portal design, use and usability, and impact. Of 731 studies, 17 were included, 9 of which were published after 2015. Most studies were qualitative with small samples focusing on inpatient portal design; 1 nonrandomized trial was identified. Studies described hospitalized patients' and caregivers' information needs and design recommendations. Most patient and caregiver participants in included studies were interested in using an inpatient portal, used it when offered, and found it easy to use and/or useful. Evidence supporting the role of inpatient portals in improving patient and caregiver engagement, knowledge, communication, and care quality and safety is limited. Included studies indicated providers had concerns about using inpatient portals; however, the extent to which these concerns have been realized remains unclear. Inpatient portal research is emerging. Further investigation is needed to optimally design inpatient portals to maximize potential benefits for hospitalized patients and caregivers while minimizing unintended consequences for healthcare teams. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  3. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... [CMS-1588-F2] RIN 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates..., 2012 Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

  4. Marijuana use and inpatient outcomes among hospitalized patients: analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database

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    Vin?Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi; Meng, Qingrui; Sakhuja, Swati; Hayward, Reid

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between marijuana use and health outcomes among hospitalized patients, including those hospitalized with a diagnosis of cancer. A total of 387,608 current marijuana users were identified based on ICD?9 codes for marijuana use among hospitalized patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between marijuana use and heart failur...

  5. Risk factors related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection among inpatients at Prof. dr. R. D. Kandou general hospital Manado

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    Utomo, H. T.; Nugroho, A.; Harijanto, P. N.

    2018-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) presents nosocomial infection problemsin hospitals. Identification of risk factors related to MRSA infection is a concern among healthcare provider. A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify MRSA infection proportion among isolates, also to identify risk factors amonginpatients at Prof. dr.R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado. Data were from themedical record, from patient’s culture isolateswith positive Staphylococcus aureus infection from January-December 2015. Case subject isolated cultures of MRSA and control subject isolated cultures of non-MRSA. Bivariate analysis were performed in 10 independent variables (age, length of stay, prior use of antibiotics before cultures, history of HIV infection, prior use of corticosteroid, history of malignancy, history of chronic disease, prior use of medical tools (catheter, ventilator, etc), history of invasive medical procedure, history of hospitalization before). All variables with a p-value<0.05 were into multivariate analysis with forwarding stepwise logistic regression. Mean subjects age were 48.13 ± 2.05 years old and length of stay were 8.65 ± 0.25 days, and only prior antibiotic use-variable were considered statistically significant (p = 0.017; OR 1.889; 95%CI 1.595 – 2.238).

  6. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals...

  7. Hospital billing for blood processing and transfusion for inpatient stays.

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    McCue, Michael J; Nayar, Preethy

    2009-07-01

    Medicare, an important payer for hospitals, reimburses hospitals for inpatient stays using Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Many private insurers also use the DRG methodology to reimburse hospitals for their services. Therefore, those blood service organizations that bill Medicare directly require an understanding of the DRG system of payment to enable them to bill Medicare correctly, and in order to be certain they are adequately reimbursed. Blood centers that do not bill Medicare directly need to understand how hospitals are reimbursed for blood and blood components as this affects a hospital's ability to pay service fees related to these products. This review presents a detailed explanation of how hospitals are reimbursed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for Medicare inpatient services, including blood services.

  8. The management of constipation in hospital inpatients.

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    Greenfield, Simon M

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the causes of constipation in hospital and how it can be prevented with simple measures. A review of laxatives available on hospital words is provided for the reader and recommendations are made.

  9. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services us...

  10. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal... the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates...

  11. 77 FR 65495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates...

  12. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... other than psychiatric hospitals. (a) Content of certification and recertification. Medicare Part A pays for inpatient hospital services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals only if a physician...

  13. Financial protection mechanisms for inpatients at selected Philippine hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballes, Alvin B; Söllner, Walter; Nañagas, Juan

    2012-11-01

    The study was undertaken to determine, from the patient's perspective, the comparative effectiveness of locally established financial protection mechanisms particularly for indigent and severely-ill hospitalized patients. Data was obtained from a survey conducted in 2010 in Philippine provinces which were part of the Health Systems Development Project and involved 449 patients from selected private and public hospitals. Direct medical expenses incurred during the confinement period, whether already paid for prior to or only billed upon discharge, were initially considered. Expenses were found to be generally larger for the more severely ill and lower for the poor. Hospital-provided discounts and social health insurance (PhilHealth) reimbursements were the financial protection mechanisms evaluated in this study. In average terms, only up to 46% of inpatient expenses were potentially covered by the combined financial support. Depending on the hospital type, 28-42% of submitted PhilHealth claims were invalidated. Multiple linear regression analysis was utilized to determine the relationship of the same set of patients' demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, severity of illness, and hospital assignments with selected expense categories and financial protection measures. Pre-discharge expenditures were significantly higher in public hospitals. The very ill also faced significantly larger expenses, including those for final hospital charges. Hospital-derived discounts provided significantly more support for indigent as well as very sick patients. The amounts for verified PhilHealth claims were significantly greater for the moderately-ill and, incongruously, the financially better-off patients. Sponsored Program members, supposed indigents enjoying fully-subsidized PhilHealth enrollment, qualified for higher mean reimbursements. However, there was a weak correlation between such patients and those identified as poor by the hospital social service staff. Thus

  14. Mortality among inpatients of a psychiatric hospital: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Shireesh Shatwaji; Nagarajaiah; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Viswanath, Biju; Kumar, Naveen C; Gangadhar, B N; Math, Suresh Bada

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess mortality and its correlates among psychiatric inpatients of a tertiary care neuropsychiatric hospital. Given the background that such a study has never been undertaken in India, the findings would have a large bearing on policy making from a mental health-care perspective. The medical records of those psychiatric inpatients (n = 333) who died during their stay at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in past 26 years (January 1983 to December 2008) constituted the study population. During the 26 years, there were a total of 103,252 psychiatric in-patient admissions, out of which 333 people died during their inpatient stay. Majority (n = 135, 44.6%) of the mortality was seen in the age group of 21-40 years. Most of the subjects were males (n = 202, 67%), married (n = 172, 56.8%) and from urban areas (n = 191, 63%). About, 54% of the subjects had short inpatient stay (history of physical illness. Leading cause of death were cardiovascular system disorders (n = 132, 43.6%), followed by respiratory system disorders (n = 45, 14.9%), nervous system disorders (n = 30, 9.9%) and infections (n = 31, 10.1%). In 21 (7%), cause of death was suicide. Identifying the factors associated with the death of inpatients is of utmost importance in assessing the care in a neuropsychiatric hospital and in formulating better treatment plan and policy in mental health. The discussion focuses on the analysis of different factors associated with inpatient mortality.

  15. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long- Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Rate Year 2010 Rates... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long-Term Care...

  16. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... identify outlier cases for both inpatient operating and inpatient capital related payments, which is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412... Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality...

  17. ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE-EVENT SIMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE -EVENT SIMULATION...in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-16-M-166 ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE -EVENT SIMULATION...UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENV-MS-16-M-166 ANALYSIS OF INPATIENT HOSPITAL STAFF MENTAL WORKLOAD BY MEANS OF DISCRETE -EVENT SIMULATION Erich W

  18. Pediatric inpatient hospital resource use for congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Regina M; Oster, Matthew E; Cassell, Cynthia H; Armour, Brian S; Gray, Darryl T; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-12-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in approximately 8 per 1000 live births. Improvements in detection and treatment have increased survival. Few national estimates of the healthcare costs for infants, children and adolescents with CHDs are available. We estimated hospital costs for hospitalizations using pediatric (0-20 years) hospital discharge data from the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) for hospitalizations with CHD diagnoses. Estimates were up-weighted to be nationally representative. Mean costs were compared by demographic factors and presence of critical CHDs (CCHDs). Up-weighting of the KID generated an estimated 4,461,615 pediatric hospitalizations nationwide, excluding normal newborn births. The 163,980 (3.7%) pediatric hospitalizations with CHDs accounted for approximately $5.6 billion in hospital costs, representing 15.1% of costs for all pediatric hospitalizations in 2009. Approximately 17% of CHD hospitalizations had a CCHD, but it varied by age: approximately 14% of hospitalizations of infants, 30% of hospitalizations of patients aged 1 to 10 years, and 25% of hospitalizations of patients aged 11 to 20 years. Mean costs of CHD hospitalizations were higher in infancy ($36,601) than at older ages and were higher for hospitalizations with a CCHD diagnosis ($52,899). Hospitalizations with CCHDs accounted for 26.7% of all costs for CHD hospitalizations, with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot having the highest total costs. Hospitalizations for children with CHDs have disproportionately high hospital costs compared with other pediatric hospitalizations, and the 17% of hospitalizations with CCHD diagnoses accounted for 27% of CHD hospital costs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. GENERAL PRACTITIONERS AND HOSPITALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years in South Africa the position of the general practi- tioner in hospitals has ... ments, and it is in these hospitals that difficulties have arisen. On the other hand, ... great extent deprived of contact with his colleagues. He comes to ... eventually lose interest in the results of treatment and advances in medicine. In fact ...

  20. 78 FR 64953 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... adjustment based on changes in the economy-wide productivity (the multifactor productivity (MFP) adjustment... notice and comment is unnecessary because the formulae used to calculate the inpatient hospital...

  1. 76 FR 67567 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... adjustment based on changes in the economy-wide productivity (the multifactor productivity (MFP) adjustment... notice and comment is unnecessary because the formulae used to calculate the inpatient hospital...

  2. Hospitalized women's willingness to pay for an inpatient screening mammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Waseem; Harris, Ché Matthew; Landis, Regina; Bridges, John F P; Wright, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    Lower rates for breast cancer screening persist among low income and uninsured women. Although Medicare and many other insurance plans would pay for screening mammograms done during hospital stays, breast cancer screening has not been part of usual hospital care. This study explores the mean amount of money that hospitalized women were willing to contribute towards the cost of a screening mammogram. Of the 193 enrolled patients, 72% were willing to pay a mean of $83.41 (95% CI, $71.51-$95.31) in advance towards inpatient screening mammogram costs. The study's findings suggest that hospitalized women value the prospect of screening mammography during the hospitalization. It may be wise policy to offer mammograms to nonadherent hospitalized women, especially those who are at high risk for developing breast cancer. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Readmission 5. MDC 8 (Diseases and Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue) a. Reverse... hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are..., (410) 786-2261, PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Allison Lee, (410) 786-8691 and...

  4. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Connective Tissue) a. Reverse Shoulder Procedures b. Total Ankle Replacement Procedures 6. MDC 15 (Newborns... specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric... Issues. James Poyer, (410) 786-2261, PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Allison Lee...

  5. Inpatient migration patterns in persons with spinal cord injury: A registry study with hospital discharge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ronca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared patient migration patterns of persons with spinal cord injury, the general population and persons with morbid obesity, rheumatic conditions and bowel disease, for secondary health conditions, across administrative boundaries in Switzerland. The effects of patient characteristics and health conditions on visiting hospitals outside the residential canton were examined using complete, nationwide, inpatient health records for the years 2010 and 2011. Patients with spinal cord injury were more likely to obtain treatment outside their residential canton as compared to all other conditions. Facilitators of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury and the general hospital population were private or accidental health insurances covering costs. Barriers of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury were old age, severe multimorbidity, financial coverage by basic health insurance, and minority language region. Keywords: Spinal cord injury, Patient migration, Health services accessibility, Health care utilization, Inpatient hospital care

  6. Hospital Related Stress Among Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric In-patient Unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric patient’s attitudes towards hospitalization have found an association between patient perceptions of the ward atmosphere and dissatisfaction. The aim of the study was to determine the aspects of stress related to hospitalization in inpatients admitted to a psychiatric facility. Fifty in-patients of both sexes admitted consecutively to a psychiatric unit in a General Hospital were asked to rate the importance of, and their satisfaction with, 38 different aspects of in-patient care and treatment. Results showed that the major sources of stress were related to having a violent patient near to his/her bed; being away from family; having to stay in closed wards; having to eat cold and tasteless food; losing income or job due to illness, being hospitalized away from home; not able to understand the jargons used by the clinical staff and not getting medication for sleep. A well-differentiated assessment of stress and satisfaction has implications for the evaluation of the quality of psychiatric care and for the improvement of in-patient psychiatric care.

  7. 5 CFR 890.905 - Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges. 890.905 Section 890.905 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.905 Limits on inpatient...

  8. Evaluating Hospital Readmission Rates After Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Laura Coots; Ingber, Melvin J; Carichner, Jessica; Barch, Daniel; Deutsch, Anne; Smith, Laura M; Levitt, Alan; Andress, Joel

    2017-08-09

    To examine facility-level rates of all-cause, unplanned hospital readmissions for 30 days after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs). Observational design. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries (N=567,850 patient-stays). Not applicable. The outcome is all-cause, unplanned hospital readmission rates for IRFs. We adapted previous risk-adjustment and statistical approaches used for acute care hospitals to develop a hierarchical logistic regression model that estimates a risk-standardized readmission rate for each IRF. The IRF risk-adjustment model takes into account patient demographic characteristics, hospital diagnoses and procedure codes, function at IRF admission, comorbidities, and prior hospital utilization. We presented national distributions of observed and risk-standardized readmission rates and estimated confidence intervals to make statistical comparisons relative to the national mean. We also analyzed the number of days from IRF discharge until hospital readmission. The national observed hospital readmission rate by 30 days postdischarge from IRFs was 13.1%. The mean unadjusted readmission rate for IRFs was 12.4%±3.5%, and the mean risk-standardized readmission rate was 13.1%±0.8%. The C-statistic for our risk-adjustment model was .70. Nearly three-quarters of IRFs (73.4%) had readmission rates that were significantly different from the mean. The mean number of days to readmission was 13.0±8.6 days and varied by rehabilitation diagnosis. Our results demonstrate the ability to assess 30-day, all-cause hospital readmission rates postdischarge from IRFs and the ability to discriminate between IRFs with higher- and lower-than-average hospital readmission rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Techniques and Behaviors Associated with Exemplary Inpatient General Medicine Teaching: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchens, Nathan; Harrod, Molly; Moody, Stephanie; Fowler, Karen; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    Clinician educators face numerous obstacles to their joint mission of facilitating high-quality learning while also delivering patient-centered care. Such challenges necessitate increased attention to the work of exemplary clinician educators, their respective teaching approaches, and the experiences of their learners. To describe techniques and behaviors utilized by clinician educators to facilitate excellent teaching during inpatient general medicine rounds. An exploratory qualitative study of inpatient teaching conducted from 2014 to 2015. Inpatient general medicine wards in 11 US hospitals, including university-affiliated hospitals and Veterans Affairs medical centers. Participants included 12 exemplary clinician educators, 57 of their current learners, and 26 of their former learners. In-depth, semi-structured interviews of exemplary clinician educators, focus group discussions with their current and former learners, and direct observations of clinical teaching during inpatient rounds. Interview data, focus group data, and observational field notes were coded and categorized into broad, overlapping themes. Each theme elucidated a series of actions, behaviors, and approaches that exemplary clinician educators consistently demonstrated during inpatient rounds: (1) they fostered positive relationships with all team members by building rapport, which in turn created a safe learning environment; (2) they facilitated patient-centered teaching points, modeled excellent clinical exam and communication techniques, and treated patients as partners in their care; and (3) they engaged in coaching and collaboration through facilitation of discussion, effective questioning strategies, and differentiation of learning among team members with varied experience levels. This study identified consistent techniques and behaviors of excellent teaching during inpatient general medicine rounds. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  10. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Paruk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this report was to establish a profile of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD admitted to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over the course of 1 year. Methods: A retrospective record review was conducted to investigate the prevalence, demographics, reasons for admission, treatment, length of stay and follow-up of a group of inpatients during 2010 with a diagnosis of BPD, based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria, allocated on discharge. Results: Considering evidence retrospectively, the quality of the BPD diagnosis allocated appeared adequate. Statistical analysis revealed findings mainly in keeping with other reports, for example, that patients with BPD are above-average users of resources who make significantly more use of emergency services and that they generally do not adhere well to their scheduled outpatient follow-up arrangements. The longer average length of inpatient stay of this group with BPD, however, exceeded the typically brief period generally recommended for acute inpatient containment and emergency intervention. Conclusion: Implementation of targeted prevention and early intervention strategies, based on systematised programmes such as dialectical behavioural therapy and mentalisation based therapy, may be useful in addressing these problems experienced with integrating the in- and outpatient management of BPD. Keywords: Borderline personality; inpatient; acute

  11. A general rehabilitation inpatient with exercise-induced vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Dan; Rydberg, Leslie

    2013-10-01

    While on our general inpatient rehabilitation floor, a 58-year-old man with no hematologic or dermatologic history developed an erythematous patch on his medial ankle that turned more purpuric, with a slight orange tint, and was associated with mild pruritus. The diagnosis of exercise-induced vasculitis was made after initially being mistaken for cellulitis. This common exanthem is often misdiagnosed. Due to its association with exercise, the physiatrist should be aware of its presence in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How can the impact of PACS on inpatient length of hospital stay be established?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Stirling; Muris, Nicole; Keen, Justin; Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Buxton, Martin J.

    1994-05-01

    Many have argued that the introduction of a large-scale PACS system into a hospital will bring about reductions in the length of inpatient hospital stays. There is currently no convicting empirical evidence to support such claims. As part of the independent evaluation exercise being undertaken alongside the Hammersmith Hospital PACS implementation, an assessment is being made of the impact of PACS on length of stay for selected patient groups. This paper reports the general research methods being employed to undertake this assessment and provides some baseline results from the analysis of total hip replacement patients and total knee replacement patients treated prior to the introduction of PACS.

  13. Reliability of hospital cost profiles in inpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenda, Tyler R; Krell, Robert W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-02-01

    With increased policy emphasis on shifting risk from payers to providers through mechanisms such as bundled payments and accountable care organizations, hospitals are increasingly in need of metrics to understand their costs relative to peers. However, it is unclear whether Medicare payments for surgery can reliably compare hospital costs. We used national Medicare data to assess patients undergoing colectomy, pancreatectomy, and open incisional hernia repair from 2009 to 2010 (n = 339,882 patients). We first calculated risk-adjusted hospital total episode payments for each procedure. We then used hierarchical modeling techniques to estimate the reliability of total episode payments for each procedure and explored the impact of hospital caseload on payment reliability. Finally, we quantified the number of hospitals meeting published reliability benchmarks. Mean risk-adjusted total episode payments ranged from $13,262 (standard deviation [SD] $14,523) for incisional hernia repair to $25,055 (SD $22,549) for pancreatectomy. The reliability of hospital episode payments varied widely across procedures and depended on sample size. For example, mean episode payment reliability for colectomy (mean caseload, 157) was 0.80 (SD 0.18), whereas for pancreatectomy (mean caseload, 13) the mean reliability was 0.45 (SD 0.27). Many hospitals met published reliability benchmarks for each procedure. For example, 90% of hospitals met reliability benchmarks for colectomy, 40% for pancreatectomy, and 66% for incisional hernia repair. Episode payments for inpatient surgery are a reliable measure of hospital costs for commonly performed procedures, but are less reliable for lower volume operations. These findings suggest that hospital cost profiles based on Medicare claims data may be used to benchmark efficiency, especially for more common procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Geriatric Inpatient Units in the Care of Hospitalized Frail Adults with a History of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahyar Michael Gharacholou

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Inpatient GEM was associated with better maintenance of physical function and basic ADLs at hospital discharge; however, no differences in HRQOL or survival were observed between GEM and UC at 1 year post randomization. Restructuring inpatient care models to incorporate inpatient GEM principles may be one method to optimize health-care delivery.

  15. The association of cannabis use on inpatient psychiatric hospital outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Melanie; Winston, Helena R; Medlin, Haley; Hull, Madelyne; Nussbaum, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    The associations between cannabis use and psychosis are well documented in numerous studies. There is a need to evaluate the impact of cannabis use on inpatient psychiatric utilization and outcomes. To evaluate the impact of cannabis use on psychiatric hospital outcomes. This study was conducted between April 20, 2015 and October 20, 2015. All patients (n = 120) admitted to Denver Health with psychotic symptoms were administered a urine toxicology screening testing for the presence of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH, the active metabolite of cannabis). Patients with positive tests were compared to those with negative tests on several measures, including length of stay, presence or lack of 30-day readmission, Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) score, and use of antipsychotics and/or sedatives/anxiolytics. There were 120 patients. Twenty nine were women and 91 were men. Patients testing positive for THC-COOH had a shorter length of stay compared to patients testing negative for THC-COOH, after adjusting for age, prior psychiatric admissions, history of a psychotic-spectrum disorder, and comorbid additional substance use (p = 0.02). There were no differences in 30-day readmissions, 30-day post-discharge presentation to the Denver Health psychiatric emergency department, BPRS scores, and medication administration. Patients presenting with psychotic symptoms and cannabis use require shorter inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations. This study is the first to quantify this observation and highlights the need for future clinical decision-making tools that would ideally correlate cannabis use with the degree of potential need for expensive and scarce mental health resources, such as psychiatric hospitalization.

  16. Data mining application in customer relationship management for hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM.

  17. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Results Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. Conclusions To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM. PMID:23115740

  18. Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Marion R; Hall, Matthew; Fieldston, Evan S; Hain, Paul D; Simon, Harold K; Brogan, Thomas V; Fagbuyi, Daniel B; Mundorff, Michael B; Shah, Samir S

    2011-09-01

    Quantifying how close hospitals came to exhausting capacity during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 can help the health care system plan for more virulent pandemics. This ecologic analysis used emergency department (ED) and inpatient data from 34 US children's hospitals. For the 11-week pandemic (H1N1) 2009 period during fall 2009, inpatient occupancy reached 95%, which was lower than the 101% occupancy during the 2008-09 seasonal influenza period. Fewer than 1 additional admission per 10 inpatient beds would have caused hospitals to reach 100% occupancy. Using parameters based on historical precedent, we built 5 models projecting inpatient occupancy, varying the ED visit numbers and admission rate for influenza-related ED visits. The 5 scenarios projected median occupancy as high as 132% of capacity. The pandemic did not exhaust inpatient bed capacity, but a more virulent pandemic has the potential to push children's hospitals past their maximum inpatient capacity.

  19. Estimating inpatient hospital prices from state administrative data and hospital financial reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, Katharine R; Friedman, Bernard; Wong, Herbert S

    2013-10-01

    To develop a tool for estimating hospital-specific inpatient prices for major payers. AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases and complete hospital financial reporting of revenues mandated in 10 states for 2006. Hospital discharge records and hospital financial information were merged to estimate revenue per stay by payer. Estimated prices were validated against other data sources. Hospital prices can be reasonably estimated for 10 geographically diverse states. All-payer price-to-charge ratios, an intermediate step in estimating prices, compare favorably to cost-to-charge ratios. Estimated prices also compare well with Medicare, MarketScan private insurance, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey prices for major payers, given limitations of each dataset. Public reporting of prices is a consumer resource in making decisions about health care treatment; for self-pay patients, they can provide leverage in negotiating discounts off of charges. Researchers can also use prices to increase understanding of the level and causes of price differentials among geographic areas. Prices by payer expand investigational tools available to study the interaction of inpatient hospital price setting among public and private payers--an important asset as the payer mix changes with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. © Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. 76 FR 41178 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment...; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates'' which appeared in the...

  1. Alcohol, cognitive impairment and the hard to discharge acute hospital inpatients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Popoola, A

    2012-02-03

    AIM: To examine the role of alcohol and alcohol-related cognitive impairment in the clinical presentation of adults in-patients less than 65 years who are \\'hard to discharge\\' in a general hospital. METHOD: Retrospective medical file review of inpatients in CUH referred to the discharge coordinator between March and September 2006. RESULTS: Of 46 patients identified, the case notes of 44 (25 male; age was 52.2 +\\/- 7.7 years) were reviewed. The average length of stay in the hospital was 84.0 +\\/- 72.3 days and mean lost bed days was 15.9 +\\/- 36.6 days. The number of patients documented to have an overt alcohol problem was 15 (34.1%). Patients with alcohol problems were more likely to have cognitive impairment than those without an alcohol problem [12 (80%) and 9 (31%) P = 0.004]. Patients with alcohol problems had a shorter length of stay (81.5 vs. 85.3 days; t = 0.161, df = 42, P = 0.87), fewer lost bed days (8.2 vs. 19.2 days; Mann-Whitney U = 179, P = 0.34) and no mortality (0 vs. 6) compared with hard to discharge patients without alcohol problem. CONCLUSION: Alcohol problems and alcohol-related cognitive impairment are hugely over-represented in acute hospital in-patients who are hard to discharge. Despite these problems, this group appears to have reduced morbidity, less lost bed days and a better outcome than other categories of hard to discharge patients. There is a need to resource acute hospitals to address alcohol-related morbidity in general and Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in particular.

  2. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    current admission.It was confirmed that, there are potentially avoidable nights in patients receiving OAT. The majority of this group were those being commenced on OAT for the first time (p = 0.00002), in the specialities of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic surgery and Care of the Elderly. The potential number of bed nights to be saved is 13 per week for the hospital or 1.1 bed nights per 10,000 general hospital admissions. These were predominantly weekday nights. The estimated cost of avoidable inpatient OAT dose optimization was approximately euro8300 per week. CONCLUSION: With rising costs and the increasing demands for acute hospital beds, alterations to inpatient management for this group of patients should be considered. Alternatives include increasing the size of current anticoagulation clinics, introduction of POCT (point of care testing) devices and increased GP management. POCT can be justified based upon the publication by Gardiner et al, who showed that 87% of patients find self testing straightforward, 87% were confident in the result they obtained using the devices and 77% preferred self testing.

  3. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. FINDINGS: The interplay between physical environment...... of staff identify the care of mentally disordered offenders in general psychiatric units as either "a parking space" or a very difficult or frightening course, where staff members tend to behave like pleasers in order to avoid risks of conflict or physical violence. Either way, it seems hard to provide...... sufficient mental health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease...

  4. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... must meet the conditions of this section to receive payment under the prospective payment system...

  5. Feeling safe during an inpatient hospitalization: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollon, Deene

    2014-08-01

    This paper aims to explore the critical attributes of the concept feeling safe. The safe delivery of care is a high priority; however; it is not really known what it means to the patient to 'feel safe' during an inpatient hospitalization. This analysis explores the topic of safety from the patient's perspective. Concept analysis. The data bases of CINAHL, Medline, PsychInfo and Google Scholar for the years 1995-2012 were searched using the terms safe and feeling safe. The eight-step concept analysis method of Walker and Avant was used to analyse the concept of feeling safe. Uses and defining attributes, as well as identified antecedents, consequences and empirical referents, are presented. Case examples are provided to assist in the understanding of defining attributes. Feeling safe is defined as an emotional state where perceptions of care contribute to a sense of security and freedom from harm. Four attributes were identified: trust, cared for, presence and knowledge. Relationship, environment and suffering are the antecedents of feeling safe, while control, hope and relaxed or calm are the consequences. Empirical referents and early development of a theory of feeling safe are explored. This analysis begins the work of synthesizing qualitative research already completed around the concept of feeling safe by defining the key attributes of the concept. Support for the importance of developing patient-centred models of care and creating positive environments where patients receive high-quality care and feel safe is provided. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Constructing Episodes of Inpatient Care: How to Define Hospital Transfer in Hospital Administrative Health Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingkai; Li, Bing; Southern, Danielle A; Eastwood, Cathy A; Quan, Hude

    2017-01-01

    Hospital administrative health data create separate records for each hospital stay of patients. Treating a hospital transfer as a readmission could lead to biased results in health service research. This is a cross-sectional study. We used the hospital discharge abstract database in 2013 from Alberta, Canada. Transfer cases were defined by transfer institution code and were used as the reference standard. Four time gaps between 2 hospitalizations (6, 9, 12, and 24 h) and 2 day gaps between hospitalizations [same day (up to 24 h), ≤1 d (up to 48 h)] were used to identify transfer cases. We compared the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of 6 definitions across different categories of sex, age, and location of residence. Readmission rates within 30 days were compared after episodes of care were defined at the different time gaps. Among the 6 definitions, sensitivity ranged from 93.3% to 98.7% and PPV ranged from 86.4% to 96%. The time gap of 9 hours had the optimal balance of sensitivity and PPV. The time gaps of same day (up to 24 h) and 9 hours had comparable 30-day readmission rates as the transfer indicator after defining episode of care. We recommend the use of a time gap of 9 hours between 2 hospitalizations to define hospital transfer in inpatient databases. When admission or discharge time is not available in the database, a time gap of same day (up to 24 h) can be used to define hospital transfer.

  7. Inpatient Obstetric Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital: A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Organization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bergeron, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    This study attempts to compare, analyze, and recommend the most efficient model with which to deliver inpatient obstetrics and gynecological services to the served population of Irwin Army Community Hospital...

  8. Department of Defense TRICARE Inpatient Satisfaction Survey (TRISS) Data– military hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains U.S. military hospital data from the TRICARE Inpatient Satisfaction Survey (TRISS) administered by the Department of Defense (DoD). TRISS data do...

  9. Satisfaction Level Of Inpatient in an University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Ejder Apay

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Quality concept is becoming increasingly more important in all sectors. Patient satisfaction is one of the basic steps in the quality of the health care system. The aim of this study was to determine the satisfaction of the patients receiving inpatient treatment. METHODS: This is a descriptive study, and it was conducted on 473 patients between the dates 03 March and 30 June 2008. A questionnarie form was applied to by means of face-to-face survey technique. A Visual Analog Patient Satisfaction Scale (VAPSS was used to evaluate the satisfaction state. RESULTS: It was found out that VAPSS score average of the patients was 7.2±2.2 in women; it was 7.4±2.2 in 50 and 65 age group; it was 7.1±2.2 in those who one graduate of primary school, it was 7.1±2.4 in those who dont have social security, and it was 7.1±2.3 in people who live in the towns. When we compare VAPSS points according to the clinics they stayed at, the average score of surgery clinic was 7.5±2.1 (p<0.001, score average of people who stayed in the hospital for 11–20 days was 7.3±2.1 (p<0.05, and the difference between the two was found statistically significant (p< 0.001, p< 0.05 . CONCLUSION: This study indicated that level of satisfaction of the patients different depending on the clinic they stayed at. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(3.000: 239-244

  10. Adverse events in surgical inpatients: A comparative analysis of public hospitals in Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Katharina Hauck; Xueyan Zhao; Terri Jackson

    2010-01-01

    We compare adverse event rates for surgical inpatients across 36 public hospitals in the state of Victoria, Australia, conditioning on differences in patient complexity across hospitals. We estimate separate models for elective and emergency patients which stay at least one night in hospitals, using fixed effects complementary log-log models to estimate AEs as a function of patient and episode characteristics, and hospital effects. We use 4 years of patient level administrative hospital data ...

  11. Overcrowding as a possible risk factor for inpatient suicide in a South African psychiatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffel Grobler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available About 4% of all suicides are estimated to occur while being an inpatient in a psychiatric facility. Staff generally assume that an inpatient suicide reflects a failure on their part to recognise the patient’s suicidal intent and whether it could have been prevented in any way. Inpatients who commit suicide do not seem to be a homogenous group, but some risk factors have been identified, including being young, single, male, unemployed, abusing substances, schizophrenia and personality- and affective disorders. Number of admissions in the previous month also appears to be a risk factor. When the numbers of inpatients are high, more violent incidents occu. Although literature presently do not suggest an association, overcrowding in psychiatric inpatient wards should be considered a risk factor for inpatient suicide.

  12. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in § 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective payment...

  13. Supporting management of medical equipment for inpatient service in public hospitals: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Vallejos, Guido E

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of medical equipment availability in the short and long term. The work is divided in two parts. The first part is an analysis of the medical equipment inventory for the institution of study. We consider the replacement, maintenance, and reinforcement of the available medical equipment by considering local guidelines and surveying clinical personnel appreciation. The resulting recommendation is to upgrade the current equipment inventory if necessary. The second part considered a demand analysis in the short and medium term. We predicted the future demand with a 5-year horizon using Holt-Winters models. Inventory analysis showed that 27% of the medical equipment in stock was not functional. Due to this poor performance result we suggested that the hospital gradually addresses this situation by replacing 29 non-functional equipment items, reinforcing stock with 40 new items, and adding 11 items not available in the inventory but suggested by the national guidelines. The results suggest that general medicine inpatient demand has a tendency to increase within the time e.g. for general medicine inpatient service the highest increment is obtained by respiratory (12%, RMSE=8%) and genitourinary diseases (20%, RMSE=9%). This increment did not involve any further upgrading of the proposed inventory.

  14. Inpatient violence in a Dutch forensic psychiatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienke Verstegen; Vivienne de Vogel; Michiel de Vries Robbé; Martijn Helmerhorst

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient violence can have a major impact in terms of traumatic experiences for victims and witnesses, an unsafe treatment climate, and high-financial costs. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to gain more insight into patterns of violent behavior, so that adequate preventive measures can be

  15. 76 FR 39006 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing Program; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... and 480 [CMS-3239-CN] RIN 0938-AQ55 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing... Value-Based Purchasing Program.'' DATES: Effective Date: These corrections are effective on July 1, 2011... for the hospital value-based purchasing program. Therefore, in section III. 6. and 7. of this notice...

  16. Factors affecting time of access of in-patient care at Webuye District hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell M. Lodenyo

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Ten-year increment in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness(predisposing factors, having an illness that is considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital (need factors affect time of access of in-patient healthcare services in the community served by Webuye District hospital and should inform interventions geared towards improving access.

  17. Hospital and Health Insurance Markets Concentration and Inpatient Hospital Transaction Prices in the U.S. Health Care Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauda, Seidu

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effects of hospital and insurer markets concentration on transaction prices for inpatient hospital services. Measures of hospital and insurer markets concentration derived from American Hospital Association and HealthLeaders-InterStudy data are linked to 2005-2008 inpatient administrative data from Truven Health MarketScan Databases. Uses a reduced-form price equation, controlling for cost and demand shifters and accounting for possible endogeneity of market concentration using instrumental variables (IV) technique. The findings suggest that greater hospital concentration raises prices, whereas greater insurer concentration depresses prices. A hypothetical merger between two of five equally sized hospitals is estimated to increase hospital prices by about 9 percent (p costs. © Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Sleep Quality and Factors Influencing Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Quality in the General Internal Medicine Inpatient Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Dobing

    Full Text Available Sleep quality in hospitalized Canadian General Internal Medicine patients is not well characterized. Our goals were to characterize hospital sleep quality in this population and identify potentially modifiable barriers to good sleep.GIM inpatients at a quaternary centre in Edmonton, Canada completed a survey, including the Verran-Snyder Halpern (VSH questionnaire, to characterize the previous night's sleep within 48 hours prior to discharge. A chart review was also completed to assess comorbidities, discharge diagnoses, and pharmaceutical sleep aid use.Patients reported significantly worse nighttime sleep duration in hospital compared with home (mean 5.5 versus 7.0 hours per night, p < 0.0001. Sleep quality was poor, as measured by the VSH disturbance (mean 371, effectiveness (190, and supplementation (115 subscales. Variables independently associated with poorer sleep duration in multivariable regression include prior diagnosis of sleep disorder and multi-patient occupancy rooms. Age, sex, admitting diagnosis, length of stay, frequency of vital checks, and use of sleep pharmaceuticals during the index hospitalization were not associated with sleep duration. The most frequently reported reasons for poor sleep included noise (59%, nursing interruptions (30%, uncomfortable beds (18%, bright lights (16%, unfamiliar surroundings (14%, and pain (9%.Sleep quality for GIM inpatients is significantly worse in hospital than at home. There is a need to test non-pharmacologic interventions to address the most frequently identified factors causing poor sleep hygiene for GIM inpatients.

  19. Inpatient Hospitalization Costs: A Comparative Study of Micronesians, Native Hawaiians, Japanese, and Whites in Hawai‘i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Hagiwara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable interest exists in health care costs for the growing Micronesian population in the United States (US due to their significant health care needs, poor average socioeconomic status, and unique immigration status, which impacts their access to public health care coverage. Using Hawai‘i statewide impatient data from 2010 to 2012 for Micronesians, whites, Japanese, and Native Hawaiians (N = 162,152 hospitalizations, we compared inpatient hospital costs across racial/ethnic groups using multivariable models including age, gender, payer, residence location, and severity of illness (SOI. We also examined total inpatient hospital costs of Micronesians generally and for Medicaid specifically. Costs were estimated using standard cost-to-charge metrics overall and within nine major disease categories determined by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups. Micronesians had higher unadjusted hospitalization costs overall and specifically within several disease categories (including infectious and heart diseases. Higher SOI in Micronesians explained some, but not all, of these higher costs. The total cost of the 3486 Micronesian hospitalizations in the three-year study period was $58.1 million and 75% was covered by Medicaid; 23% of Native Hawaiian, 3% of Japanese, and 15% of white hospitalizations costs were covered by Medicaid. These findings may be of particular interests to hospitals, Medicaid programs, and policy makers.

  20. Inpatient Addiction Consultation for Hospitalized Patients Increases Post-Discharge Abstinence and Reduces Addiction Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Sarah E; Metlay, Joshua P; Chang, Yuchiao; Herman, Grace E; Rigotti, Nancy A

    2017-08-01

    Alcohol and drug use results in substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders are overrepresented in general medical settings. Hospital-based interventions offer an opportunity to engage with a vulnerable population that may not otherwise seek treatment. To determine whether inpatient addiction consultation improves substance use outcomes 1 month after discharge. Prospective quasi-experimental evaluation comparing 30-day post-discharge outcomes between participants who were and were not seen by an addiction consult team during hospitalization at an urban academic hospital. Three hundred ninety-nine hospitalized adults who screened as high risk for having an alcohol or drug use disorder or who were clinically identified by the primary nurse as having a substance use disorder. Addiction consultation from a multidisciplinary specialty team offering pharmacotherapy initiation, motivational counseling, treatment planning, and direct linkage to ongoing addiction treatment. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) composite score for alcohol and drug use and self-reported abstinence at 30 days post-discharge. Secondary outcomes included 90-day substance use measures and self-reported hospital and ED utilization. Among 265 participants with 30-day follow-up, a greater reduction in the ASI composite score for drug or alcohol use was seen in the intervention group than in the control group (mean ASI-alcohol decreased by 0.24 vs. 0.08, p drug decreased by 0.05 vs. 0.02, p = 0.003.) There was also a greater increase in the number of days of abstinence in the intervention group versus the control group (+12.7 days vs. +5.6, p drug, and days abstinent all remained statistically significant after controlling for age, gender, employment status, smoking status, and baseline addiction severity (p = 0.018, 0.018, and 0.02, respectively). In a sensitivity analysis, assuming that patients who were lost to follow-up had no change from baseline

  1. Perfil clínico, epidemiológico e etiológico de pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade internados em um hospital geral da microrregião de Sumaré, SP Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological profile of inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia at a general hospital in the Sumaré microregion of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Donalisio

    2011-04-01

    against influenza was significantly lower among the inpatients than in the general population of the Sumaré microregion (52.6% vs. > 70%. Fever was less common among the elderly patients (p < 0.05. The clinical evolution was associated with the PSI scores but not with age. The etiology was confirmed in 31 cases (50.8% and was attributed to S. pneumoniae, principally detected by the urinary antigen test, in 21 (34.4%, followed by C. pneumoniae, in 5 (8.2%. The mortality rate was 4.9%, and 80.3% of the patients were classified as cured at discharge. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge of the etiologic profile of CAP at the regional level favors the appropriate choice of empirical treatment, which is particularly relevant in elderly patients and in those with comorbidities. The lack of influenza vaccination in elderly patients is a risk factor for hospitalization due to CAP.

  2. Day hospital as an alternative to inpatient care for cancer patients: a random assignment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, V; Stalker, M Z; Gralla, R; Scher, H I; Cimma, C; Park, D; Flaherty, A M; Kiss, M; Nelson, P; Laliberte, L

    1988-01-01

    A stratified, random-assignment trial of 442 cancer patients was conducted to evaluate medical, psychosocial, and financial outcomes of day hospital treatment as an alternative to inpatient care for certain cancer patients. Eligible patients required: a 4- to 8-hour treatment plan, including chemotherapy and other long-term intravenous (i.v.) treatment; a stable cardiovascular status; mental competence; no skilled overnight nursing; and a helper to assist with home care. Patients were ineligible if standard outpatient treatment was possible. No statistically significant (p less than 0.05) differences were found between the Adult Day Hospital (ADH) and Inpatient care in medical or psychosocial outcomes over the 60-day study period. The major difference was in medical costs--approximately one-third lower for ADH patients (p less than 0.001) than for the Inpatient group. The study demonstrates that day hospital care of medical oncology patients is clinically equivalent to Inpatient care, causes no negative psychosocial effects, and costs less than Inpatient care. Findings support the trend toward dehospitalization of medical treatment.

  3. INPATIENTS NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS INDICATOR AT ARMY HOSPITAL DR. SOEPRAOEN MALANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumboyono Kumboyono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient acceptance to diet in fl uences patient intake during the hospitalization. Patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital can be seen from the left over. Whilst factors which in fl uences patient motivation to finish their meals including addtional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital, the aim of this research was to identify factors that related to patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital in class three ward dr. Soepraoen Hospital, Malang. Method: Descriptive analitic was used as research design with cross-sectional approach. As many as 51 samples were chosen with purposive sampling. Data was analyzed with chi square with 95%signi fi cance. Results: The results showed a signi fi cant relation between additional food and the leftover (p-Value = 0,018. There is signi fi cant relation on the taste and the leftover (p-Value = 0.032 and adaptation level and leftover (p-Value = 0.026. Discussion: It can be concluded that additional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital have signi fi cant relation with hospitalized patient acceptance on their diet. It is suggested that nurse pay more attention on these factors to fulfi ll patient nutrition needs during hospitalization.

  4. 42 CFR 412.75 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs based on a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.75 Determination of the... methodology set forth in §§ 412.73(c)(15) and 412.73(c)(16). (e) DRG adjustment. The applicable hospital...

  5. 42 CFR 412.79 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient... § 412.73(c)(14) through (c)(16). (e) DRG adjustment. The applicable hospital-specific cost per discharge...

  6. Utilization of inpatient care from private hospitals: trends emerging from Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilip, T R

    2010-09-01

    There is a gap in knowledge on the overall role and characteristics of private health care providers in India. This research is aimed at understanding changes in the consumption of inpatient care services from private hospitals between 1986 and 2004, with a particular focus on equitable outreach. Secondary analysis of National Sample Survey data on the utilization of inpatient care services in Kerala is performed for the periods 1986-87, 1995-96 and 2004. Household survey data are examined to understand the users of the private health system as there are limitations in obtaining reliable data from unregulated private health care providers. The annual hospitalization rate increased from 69 per 1000 population in 1986-87 to 126 per 1000 population by 2004. The proportion of persons seeking care from private rather than government hospitals increased from 55% in 1986-87 to 65% by 2004. Concentration indices revealed that the year 1995-96 witnessed the highest income inequality in hospitalization rates. A decline both in hospitalization rates and in the relative preference for private hospitals over government hospitals among the poorest two quintiles between 1986-87 and 1995-96 indicates that the poor avoided inpatient treatment. The rich-poor divide in care seeking from private hospitals was moderated by 2004. Improvements in the purchasing power of the population, and the strategy of private hospitals in this highly competitive market to generate revenue from the poorer quintiles by offering different pricing options, have reduced the observed rich-poor divide in the consumption of inpatient treatment from this sector. However, while this gap in utilization has closed, the burden of out-of-pocket expenditure is higher among the poor.

  7. Prevalence of vision loss among hospital in-patients; a risk factor for falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Susan J; Zecevic, Aleksandra A; Keeling, Alexis; Hileeto, Denise; Labreche, Tammy; Brymer, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Despite poor vision being a risk factor for falls, current hospital policies and practices often do not include a vision assessment at patient admission or in the hospital's incident reporting system when a fall occurs. Our purpose was to document the prevalence of vision loss in hospital general medicine units to increase awareness of poor vision as a potential risk factor for falls that occur within the hospital, and inform future preventative practice. This cross-sectional study took place in medicine units of an acute care hospital. Participants were adult in-patients. Visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity and stereoacuity were measured, and patients were screened for field loss, extinction and neglect. 115 participants took part (average age 67 ± 17, 48% female). Overall, 89% had a visual impairment defined as being outside the age-norms for one or more vision measure, 62% had low vision, and 36% had vision loss equivalent to legal blindness [VA equal to or poorer than 1.0 logMAR (6/60, 20/200) or ≥10x below age-norms]. There was a considerable discrepancy between the prevalence of low vision and the percentage of patients who reported an ocular diagnosis that would result in visual loss (30%). Ten patients fell during the study period, and of these 100% had visual impairment, 90% had low vision and 60% had vision loss equivalent to legal blindness, which compares to 58%, 22% and 9% for non-fallers. Similar high prevalences were found in those whose reason for admission to the hospital was a fall (92%, 63% and 33% respectively). Vision loss has a high prevalence among patients in hospital medicine units, and is higher still among those who fall. Since vision loss may be a contributing factor to falls that occur in hospitals, implementing an assessment of vision at hospital admission would be useful to alert staff to those patients who are at risk for falls due to poor vision, so that preventative measures can be applied. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic

  8. 76 FR 34633 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ..., 413, and 476 [CMS-1518-CN] RIN 0938-AQ24 Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient...-9644 of May 5, 2011 (76 FR 25788), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are...) endorsement number for the CMS quality measure, Percent of Residents With Pressure Ulcers That Are New or...

  9. Hospital heavies. Venture capital bulks up companies that outsource medicine's newest specialty: inpatient-only care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, C

    They're the designated drivers of inpatient care, cutting hospital stays by 19 percent on average. Yet as venture capital firms infuse hospitalist startup companies, some primary care doctors complain that their sickest patients are being taken away from them.

  10. Reasons for inpatients not to seek clarity at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langalibalele H. Mabuza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare practitioners should provide patients with information regarding their clinical conditions. Patients should also feel free to seek clarity on information provided. However, not all patients seek this clarity. Objectives: To explore the reasons inpatients gave for not seeking clarity on information that was received but not understood. Methods: This was a qualitative arm of a larger study, titled ‘Are inpatients aware of the admission reasons and management plans of their clinical conditions? A survey at a tertiary hospital in South Africa’, conducted in 2010. Of the 264 inpatients who participated in the larger study, we extracted the unstructured responses from those participants (n = 152 who had indicated in the questionnaire that there was information they had not understood during their encounter with healthcare practitioners, but that they had nonetheless not sought clarity.Data were analysed thematically. Results: Themes that emerged were that inpatients did not ask for clarity as they perceived healthcare practitioners to be ‘too busy’, aloof, non-communicators and sometimes uncertain about patients’ conditions. Some inpatients had unquestioning trust in healthcare practitioners,whilst others had experiences of bad treatment. Inpatients had poor self-esteem, incapacitating clinical conditions, fear of bad news and prior knowledge of their clinical conditions. Some inpatients stated that they had no reason for not seeking clarity. Conclusion: The reasons for not seeking clarity were based on patients’ experiences with the healthcare practitioners and their perceptions of the latter and of themselves. A programme should be developed in order to educate inpatients on effective communication with their healthcare practitioners.

  11. Lost in hospital: a qualitative interview study that explores the perceptions of NHS inpatients who spent time on clinically inappropriate hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Lucy; Adamson, Joy; Watt, Ian; Wright, John

    2015-10-01

    Prior research suggests that the placement of patients on clinically inappropriate hospital wards may increase the risk of experiencing patient safety issues. To explore patients' perspectives of the quality and safety of the care received during their inpatient stay on a clinically inappropriate hospital ward. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Nineteen patients who had spent time on at least one clinically inappropriate ward during their hospital stay at a large NHS teaching hospital in England. Patients would prefer to be treated on the correct specialty ward, but it is generally accepted that this may not be possible. When patients are placed on inappropriate wards, they may lack a sense of belonging. Participants commented on potential failings in communication, medical staff availability, nurses' knowledge and the resources available, each of which may contribute to unsafe care. Patients generally acknowledge the need for placement on inappropriate wards due to demand for inpatient beds, but may report dissatisfaction in terms of preference and belonging. Importantly, patients recount issues resulting from this placement that may compromise their safety. Hospital managers should be encouraged to appreciate this insight and potential threat to safe practice and where possible avoid inappropriate ward transfers and admissions. Where such admissions are unavoidable, staff should take action to address the gaps in safety of care that have been identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The ED-inpatient dashboard: Uniting emergency and inpatient clinicians to improve the efficiency and quality of care for patients requiring emergency admission to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Jones, Matt; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Patients who require emergency admission to hospital require complex care that can be fragmented, occurring in the ED, across the ED-inpatient interface (EDii) and subsequently, in their destination inpatient ward. Our hospital had poor process efficiency with slow transit times for patients requiring emergency care. ED clinicians alone were able to improve the processes and length of stay for the patients discharged directly from the ED. However, improving the efficiency of care for patients requiring emergency admission to true inpatient wards required collaboration with reluctant inpatient clinicians. The inpatient teams were uninterested in improving time-based measures of care in isolation, but they were motivated by improving patient outcomes. We developed a dashboard showing process measures such as 4 h rule compliance rate coupled with clinically important outcome measures such as inpatient mortality. The EDii dashboard helped unite both ED and inpatient teams in clinical redesign to improve both efficiencies of care and patient outcomes. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  13. Pulmonary Embolism Inpatients Treated With Rivaroxaban Had Shorter Hospital Stays and Lower Costs Compared With Warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jay M; Deitelzweig, Steven; Kline, Jeffrey; Tran, Oth; Smith, David M; Crivera, Concetta; Bookhart, Brahim; Schein, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Using real-world data, this study compares inpatient length of stay (LOS) and costs for patients with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) initiating treatment with oral anticoagulation with rivaroxaban versus warfarin. Hospitalizations from MarketScan's Hospital Drug Database were selected from November 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013, for adults with a primary diagnosis of PE initiating treatment with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Warfarin patients were matched 1:1 to rivaroxaban patients using exact and propensity score matching. Hospital LOS, treatment patterns, and hospitalization costs were evaluated. Matched cohorts included 751 rivaroxaban-treated patients and 751 warfarin-treated patients. Adjusted mean LOS was 3.77 days for rivaroxaban patients (95% CI, 3.66-3.87 days) and 5.48 days for warfarin patients (95% CI, 5.33-5.63 days; P < .001). Mean (SD) LOS was shorter for patients taking rivaroxaban whether admission was for provoked PE (rivaroxaban: 5.2 [5.1] days; warfarin: 7.0 [6.5] days; P < .001) or unprovoked PE (rivaroxaban: 3.4 [2.3] days; warfarin: 5.1 [2.7] days; P < .001). Mean (SD) days from first dose to discharge were 2.5 (1.7) (rivaroxaban) and 4.0 (2.9) (warfarin) when initiated with parenteral anticoagulants (P < .001) and 2.7 (1.7) (rivaroxaban) and 4.0 (2.2) (warfarin) without parenteral anticoagulants (P < .001). The rivaroxaban cohort incurred significantly lower unadjusted mean (SD) hospitalization costs (rivaroxaban: $8473 [$9105]; warfarin: $10,291 [$9185]; P < .001), confirmed by covariate adjustment with generalized linear modeling estimating predicted mean hospitalization costs of $8266 for rivaroxaban patients (95% CI, $7851-$8681) and $10,511 for warfarin patients (95% CI, $10,031-$10,992; P < .001). patients with PE treated with rivaroxaban incurred significantly lower hospitalization costs by $2245 per admission compared with patients treated with warfarin, which was attributable to cost offsets from 1.71 fewer days of

  14. Improving the smoking patterns in a general hospital psychiatric unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Iglesias García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the effects of a smoking ban in a general hospital psychiatric unit. Methods: We study the effects of smoking ban in 40 consecutive psychiatric inpatients. The staff registered socio-demographic and tobacco-related variables. We also registered any kind of behavioral effects of smoking ban.Results: The patients were willing to stop smoking during their hospital stay (with or without nicotine replacement with two mild behavioural incidences registered throughout the study. Conclusions: The benefits of non-smoking policy in a psychiatric unit can be significant. The introduction of smoking bans in psychiatric inpatients settings is possible and safe.

  15. 30-Day Hospital Readmission Following Otolaryngology Surgery: Analysis of a State Inpatient Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Saeed, Mohammed J.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives For patients undergoing inpatient otolaryngologic surgery, determine patient and hospital-level risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Study Design Retrospective cohort study Methods We analyzed the State Inpatient Database (SID) from California for patients who underwent otolaryngologic surgery between 2008 and 2010. Readmission rates, readmission diagnoses, and patient- and hospital-level risk factors for 30-day readmission were determined. Hierarchical logistic regression modeling was performed to identify procedure-, patient-, and hospital-level risk factors for 30-day readmission. Results The 30-day readmission rate following an inpatient otolaryngology procedure was 8.1%. The most common readmission diagnoses were nutrition, metabolic or electrolyte problems (44% of readmissions) and surgical complications (10% of readmissions). New complications after discharge were the major drivers of readmission. Variables associated with 30-day readmission in hierarchical logistic regression modeling were: type of otolaryngologic procedure, Medicare or Medicaid health insurance, chronic anemia, chronic lung disease, chronic renal failure, index admission via the emergency department, in-hospital complication during the index admission, and discharge destination other than home. Conclusions Approximately one out of twelve patients undergoing otolaryngologic surgery had a 30-day readmission. Readmissions occur across a variety of types of procedures and hospitals. Most of the variability was driven by patient-specific factors, not structural hospital characteristics. PMID:27098654

  16. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  17. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  18. Impact of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty on 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates and Unplanned Episodes of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Bryan D; Odum, Susan M; Vegari, David N; Mokris, Jeffrey G; Beaver, Walter B

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study comparing 30-day readmission rates between patients undergoing outpatient versus inpatient total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. A retrospective review of 137 patients undergoing outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and 106 patients undergoing inpatient (minimum 2-day hospital stay) TJA was conducted. Unplanned hospital readmissions and unplanned episodes of care were recorded. All patients completed a telephone survey. Seven inpatients and 16 outpatients required hospital readmission or an unplanned episode of care following hospital discharge. Readmission rates were higher for TKA than THA. The authors found no statistical differences in 30-day readmission or unplanned care episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Casemix funding for acute hospital inpatient services in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, S J

    1998-10-19

    Casemix funding was introduced first in Victoria in 1993-94, and since then most States have moved towards either casemix funding or using casemix to inform the budget setting process. The five States implementing casemix have adopted some common funding elements: all use AN-DRG-3; all have introduced capping, msot commonly at the hospital level; and all ensure accuracy of diagnosis and procedure coding through coding audits. Two funding models have been developed. The fixed and variable model involves a fixed grant for hospital overhead costs and a payment for each patient treated, covering only variable costs. The integrated model provides an integrated payment to hospitals for each patient treated, covering both the fixed and variable costs. There are different weight setting processes and base prices between the States, which result in marked differences in the price paid for the same type of case treated in similar hospitals. Learning across State boundaries should be encouraged, with knowledge of what is effective and what is ineffective in casemix funding arrangements being used to develop Australian best practice in this area.

  20. Performance of freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals before and after the rehabilitation prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; McCue, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation hospitals provide important services to patients to restore physical and cognitive functioning. Historically, these hospitals have been reimbursed by Medicare under a cost-based system; but in 2002, Medicare implemented a rehabilitation prospective payment system (PPS). Despite the implementation of a PPS for rehabilitation, there is limited published research that addresses the operating and financial performance of these hospitals. We examined operating and financial performance in the pre- and post-PPS periods for for-profit and nonprofit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals to test for pre- and post-PPS differences within the ownership groups. We identified freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Cost Report Information System database for the first two fiscal years under PPS. We excluded facilities that had fiscal years less than 270 days, facilities with missing data, and government facilities. We computed average values for performance variables for the facilities in the two consecutive fiscal years post-PPS. For the pre-PPS period, we collected data on these same facilities and, once facilities with missing data and fiscal years less than 270 days were excluded, computed average values for the two consecutive fiscal years pre-PPS. Our final sample of 140 inpatient rehabilitation facilities was composed of 44 nonprofit hospitals and 96 for-profit hospitals both pre- and post-PPS. We utilized a pairwise comparison test (t-test comparison) to measure the significance of differences on each performance variable between pre- and post-PPS periods within each ownership group. Findings show that both nonprofit and for-profit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals reduced length of stay, increased discharges, and increased profitability. Within the for-profit ownership group, the percentage of Medicare discharges increased and operating expense per

  1. Inpatient antibiotic consumption in a regional secondary hospital in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, C J

    2014-02-01

    Reporting of antibiotic consumption in hospitals is a crucial component of antibiotic stewardship, but data from Australasian secondary hospitals are scarce. The hypothesis of this audit is that antibiotic consumption in secondary hospitals would be lower than in tertiary centres. The study aims to present the first published audit of antibiotic consumption from a secondary hospital in New Zealand compared with two tertiary centres. Hospital population-level data were retrospectively accessed to identify all systemic antibiotics dispensed to adult inpatients at Taranaki District Health Board during 2011. Consumption was calculated in defined daily doses per 100 inpatient-days and per 100 admissions, stratified by drug class. Comparison was against published data from two tertiary centres. Total consumption was lower, but that of high-risk antibiotic classes was higher than both tertiary centres. The relative consumption of lincosamides was 4.0 and 2.6 times higher than the two tertiary centres, with an associated 14% incidence of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea within 3 months. Our secondary hospital appears to consume the wrong types of antibiotic rather than too much. Data from all Australasian hospitals, stratified by clinical service area and hospital level, are required for clinically relevant benchmarking. © 2014 The Author; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases among male hospital inpatients with problem drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coder, Beate; Freyer-Adam, Jennis; Lau, Katharina; Riedel, Jeannette; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; Meyer, Christian; John, Ulrich; Hapke, Ulfert

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if problem drinkers have varying risks of having alcohol-related diseases according to their reported beverage consumed. In a cross-sectional study all consecutive inpatients aged 18- 64 years from four general hospitals of one catchment area were systematically screened for alcohol use. A total of 1011 men with problem drinking were used for this study. Routine treatment diagnoses for all participants were provided by hospital physicians and were classified into three categories according to their alcohol-attributable fractions (AAF; AAF = 0; AAF spirits drinkers, 26.0% mixed beer and spirits drinkers and 6.9% individuals drinking wine exclusively or in combination with one or two other beverages (mixed wine drinkers). Compared to spirits drinkers and controlling for possible confounders (i.e. alcohol-associated characteristics, demographic variables), multinomial regressions revealed that beer drinkers, mixed beer and spirits drinkers, and mixed wine drinkers had lower odds of having diseases with AAF = 1 than spirits drinkers (e.g. for AAF = 1: beer versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.42, CI: 0.25-0.72). Beer drinkers and mixed wine drinkers also had lower odds of having diseases with AAF spirits drinkers (e.g. mixed wine versus spirits drinkers: OR = 0.36, CI: 0.18-0.72). These data suggest an association between the reported beverage consumed and alcohol-related diseases. Among hospitalized problem drinkers, spirits drinkers had the greatest risk of having diseases with AAF < 1 and with AAF = 1.

  3. Hospital Readmission Following Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation for Older Adults With Debility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Amol M.; Graham, James E.; Tan, Alai; Raji, Mukaila; Granger, Carl V.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Debility accounts for 10% of inpatient rehabilitation cases among Medicare beneficiaries. Debility has the highest 30-day readmission rate among 6 impairment groups most commonly admitted to inpatient rehabilitation. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine rates, temporal distribution, and factors associated with hospital readmission for patients with debility up to 90 days following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Design A retrospective cohort study was conducted using records for 45,424 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with debility discharged to community from 1,199 facilities during 2006–2009. Methods Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for readmission. Schoenfeld residuals were examined to identify covariate-time interactions. Factor-time interactions were included in the full model for Functional Independence Measure (FIM) discharge motor functional status, comorbidity tier, and chronic pulmonary disease. Most prevalent reasons for readmission were summarized by Medicare severity diagnosis related groups. Results Hospital readmission rates for patients with debility were 19% for 30 days and 34% for 90 days. The highest readmission count occurred on day 3 after discharge, and 56% of readmissions occurred within 30 days. A higher FIM discharge motor rating was associated with lower hazard for readmissions prior to 60 days (30-day hazard ratio=0.987; 95% confidence interval=0.986, 0.989). Comorbidities with hazard ratios >1.0 included comorbidity tier and 11 Elixhauser conditions, 3 of which (heart failure, renal failure, and chronic pulmonary disease) were among the most prevalent reasons for readmission. Limitations Analysis of Medicare data permitted only use of variables reported for administrative purposes. Comorbidity data were analyzed only for inpatient diagnoses. Conclusions One-third of patients were readmitted to acute hospitals within 90 days following rehabilitation for

  4. Drug use by elderly inpatients of a philanthropic hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Moreira dos Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of chronic diseases in the elderly leads to increased intermittent drug therapies. The presence of concomitant diseases and prescriptions made out by various health professionals facilitate the practice of polypharmacy, the emergence of iatrogenic diseases, and therapeutic regimens that are inconvenient for patients. The present study was carried out among elderly patients hospitalized at the Hospital Care Foundation of Paraiba, Campina Grande, with the objectives of studying the consumption of drugs by these patients, noting the possible adverse drug reactions (ADR, drug interactions and the presence of high-risk drugs prescribed to this age group. The study had a descriptive and cross-sectional quantitative design and involved a sample of 65 patients accompanied by the Pharmacovigilance Centre of the hospital, from August 2009 to July 2010. Over 90% of the patients were on polypharmacy, and the possible ADR found were related to the gastrointestinal tract where the most frequent interactions were with cardiovascular drugs. Within the context of pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacists can contribute by improving the quality of life of patients and preventing unnecessary expense with erroneous and poorly evaluated treatments.A elevada incidência de doenças crônicas na terceira idade induz ao aumento de terapias medicamentosas intermitentes. A presença de patologias concomitantes e prescrições elaboradas por diversos profissionais de saúde facilitam a prática da polifarmácia, surgimento de doenças iatrogênicas e esquemas terapêuticos pouco cômodos para o paciente. O estudo foi realizado junto aos pacientes idosos internados no Hospital da Fundação Assistencial da Paraíba (FAP, Campina Grande, com objetivo de estudar o consumo de medicamentos por estes pacientes, observando as possíveis reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM, interações medicamentosas apresentadas e a presença de medicamentos de alto risco

  5. 某综合医院住院患者精神障碍患病率、识别率及危险因素调查分析%A cross-sectional study of mental disorders among inpatients in a general hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙渊博; 祝扬; 李丁; 王晓慧; 李秀珍; 宋瑞华; 王瑛

    2018-01-01

    目的 了解某综合医院住院患者精神障碍的患病情况和影响因素、识别率及心理干预效果.方法 采用一阶段调查法,调查某综合医院2014年6~8月内科、外科及妇产科等所有非精神病科室597名住院患者精神障碍的患病率、发病率及危险因素.所得数据采用SPSS 22.0进行统计分析.结果 ①精神障碍患病率为17.6%;不同精神障碍患病率依次为:抑郁障碍9.4%、广泛性焦虑障碍3.7%、心境恶劣1.7%、自杀1.2%、轻躁狂发作1.2%、惊恐障碍为0.3%、场所恐惧症为0.5%、社交恐惧症为0.2%、强迫症为1.0%、创伤后应激障碍为2.0%、酒滥用或酒依赖为2.0%、非酒精类精神活性物质使用障碍为0.5%、精神性疾患为0.7%、神经性厌食为0.7%、神经性贪食为0.2%、反社会人格障碍为0.0%.②患病率最高的4个科室依次为消化内科44.9%、康复科25.0%、老年病房24.1%、神经内科19.0%.③精神障碍患者的识别率为51.4%;识别率最高的4个科室依次为神经内科87.5%、神经外科71.4%、呼吸内科60.0%、老年病房53.8%.④多因素Logistic回归分析显示,科室、居住方式、心理疾病史和就诊意愿为影响因素.结论 ①某综合医院住院患者精神障碍患病率较低,识别率较高.②内科、独居、有过心理疾病史、对精神障碍有负性看法的住院患者为精神障碍的高发人群;对外伤术后的患者应排除是否存在创伤后应激障碍.%Objective To investigate the prevalence and relevant characteristics of mental disorders among the inpatients in a general hospital, and to describe the recognition of the doctors in non-psychiatric departments of a general hospital and the effect of psychological interventions. Methods This was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. A stage of investigation was used. Data collection was conducted among the 597 intpatients from non

  6. Inpatient child mortality by travel time to hospital in a rural area of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mtei, Frank; Mtove, George; Nadjm, Behzad; Muro, Florida; Alegana, Victor; Noor, Abdisalan M; Todd, Jim; Reyburn, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association, if any, between child mortality and distance to the nearest hospital. The study was based on data from a 1-year study of the cause of illness in febrile paediatric admissions to a district hospital in north-east Tanzania. All villages in the catchment population were geolocated, and travel times were estimated from availability of local transport. Using bands of travel time to hospital, we compared admission rates, inpatient case fatality rates and child mortality rates in the catchment population using inpatient deaths as the numerator. Three thousand hundred and eleven children under the age of 5 years were included of whom 4.6% died; 2307 were admitted from time between admission and death. Assuming uniform mortality in the catchment population, the predicted number of deaths not benefiting from hospital admission prior to death increased by 21.4% per hour of travel time to hospital. If the same admission and death rates that were found at <3 h from the hospital applied to the whole catchment population and if hospital care conferred a 30% survival benefit compared to home care, then 10.3% of childhood deaths due to febrile illness in the catchment population would have been averted. The mortality impact of poor access to hospital care in areas of high paediatric mortality is likely to be substantial although uncertainty over the mortality benefit of inpatient care is the largest constraint in making an accurate estimate. © 2014 The Authors Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Length of stay of general psychiatric inpatients in the United States: systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tulloch, Alex D

    2011-05-01

    Psychiatric length of stay (LOS) has reduced but is still longer than for physical disorders. Inpatient costs are 16% of total mental health spending. Regression analyses of the determinants of LOS for US adult psychiatric inpatients were systematically reviewed. Most studies predated recent LOS reductions. Psychosis, female gender and larger hospital size were associated with longer LOS, while discharge against medical advice, prospective payment, being married, being detained and either younger or middle age were associated with shorter LOS. Associations appeared consistent, especially where sample size was above 3,000. Updated studies should be adequately powered and include the variables above.

  8. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating... determined using the methodology set forth in §§ 412.73(c)(15) and 412.73(c)(16). (f) DRG adjustment. The...

  9. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Determination of Transition Period Payment Rates for the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating... update factor is determined using the methodology set forth in § 412.73(c)(12) through (c)(16). (f) DRG...

  10. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, B; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised.

  11. Analysis of Drugs Interaction among Pediatric Inpatients at Hospital in Palu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmed G. Sjahadat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed drug interaction analyses in the pediatric inpatient unit at one of hospitals in Palu. In this study, those analysesstudy are important to prevent childhood morbidity, mortality and to improve patient’s safety. By using a cross-sectional descriptive study, we collected retrospective data from January until December 2012. We included patients at age of 0- 18 years old who were hospitalized during 2012 and received two or more drugs from a prescription sheet. In particular, we excluded pediatric inpatients in emergency and intensive care units who received topical medications (e.g., ointment, creams, eye drops, ear drops, and nasal drops. Each drug was analyzed by using Drug.Com software. In total, we minor interactions (44.78%. We found several drug interactions in the combination of rifampicin-isoniazid, dexamethasone-ibuprofen, acetaminophen-isoniazid, gentamicin-cefotaxime-ceftriaxone and diazepam- dexamethasone.

  12. Reductions in inpatient mortality following interventions to improve emergency hospital care in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Following focus group discussions, five priority areas were identified to improve emergency care; staff training, hospital layout, staff allocation, medical equipment, and medical record keeping. A team of international volunteers worked with local staff for six months to design and implement improvements in these five priority areas. The improvements were evaluated collectively rather than individually. Before the intervention, the inpatient mortality rate was 12.4%. After the intervention this improved to 5.9%. The relative risk of dying was 47% (95% CI 0.369-0.607 lower after the intervention. The estimated number of lives saved in the first two months after the intervention was 103. The total cost of the intervention was USD 29 714, the estimated cost per death averted was USD 148. There are two main limitation of the study. Firstly, the brevity of the study and secondly, the assumed homogeneity of the clinical cases that presented to the hospital before and after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstarted a signficant reductuion in inpatient mortality rate after an intervention to improve emergency hospital care If the findings of this paper could be reproduced in a larger more rigorous study, improving the quality of care in hospitals would be a very cost effective strategy to save children's lives in low resource settings.

  13. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohammad Ashraf; Tabish, S A; Jan, Farooq A; Khan, Nazir A; Wafai, Z A; Pandita, K K

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health problem in all communities worldwide. Rising healthcare costs associated with treating advanced cancers present a significant economic challenge. It is a need of the hour that the health sector should devise cost-effective measures to be put in place for better affordability of treatments. To achieve this objective, information generation through indigenous hospital data on unit cost of in-patient cancer chemotherapy in medical oncology became imperative and thus hallmark of this study. The present prospective hospital based study was conducted in Medical Oncology Department of tertiary care teaching hospital. After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96). This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket). The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  14. Discharges with surgical procedures performed less often than once per month per hospital account for two-thirds of hospital costs of inpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Liam; Dexter, Franklin; Park, Sae-Hwan; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-09-01

    Most surgical discharges (54%) at the average hospital are for procedures performed no more often than once per month at that hospital. We hypothesized that such uncommon procedures would be associated with an even greater percentage of the total cost of performing all surgical procedures at that hospital. Observational study. State of Texas hospital discharge abstract data: 4th quarter of 2015 and 1st quarter of 2016. Inpatients discharged with a major therapeutic ("operative") procedure. For each of N=343 hospitals, counts of discharges, sums of lengths of stay (LOS), sums of diagnosis related group (DRG) case-mix weights, and sums of charges were obtained for each procedure or combination of procedures, classified by International Classification of Diseases version 10 Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS). Each discharge was classified into 2 categories, uncommon versus not, defined as a procedure performed at most once per month versus those performed more often than once per month. Major procedures performed at most once per month per hospital accounted for an average among hospitals of 68% of the total inpatient costs associated with all major therapeutic procedures. On average, the percentage of total costs associated with uncommon procedures was 26% greater than expected based on their share of total discharges (Pcosts among surgical patients can be attributed to procedures performed at most once per month per hospital. The finding that such uncommon procedures account for a large percentage of costs is important because methods of cost accounting by procedure are generally unsuitable for them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived coercion in inpatients with Anorexia nervosa: Associations with illness severity and hospital course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Colleen C; Coughlin, Janelle W; Makhzoumi, Saniha H; Redgrave, Graham W; Hansen, Jennifer L; Guarda, Angela S

    2016-04-01

    The use of coercion in the treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN) is controversial and the limited studies to date have focused on involuntary treatment. However, coercive pressure for treatment that does not include legal measures is common in voluntarily admitted patients with AN. Empirical data examining the effect of non-legal forms of coerced care on hospital outcomes are needed. Participants (N = 202) with AN, Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID), or subthreshold AN admitted to a hospital-based behavioral specialty program completed questionnaires assessing illness severity and perceived coercion around the admissions process. Hospital course variables included inpatient length of stay, successful transition to a step-down partial hospitalization program, and achievement of target weight prior to program discharge. Higher perceived coercion at admission was associated with increased drive for thinness and body dissatisfaction, but not with admission BMI. Perceived coercion was not related to inpatient length of stay, rate of weight gain, or achievement of target weight although it was predictive of premature drop-out prior to transition to an integrated partial hospitalization program. These results, from an adequately powered sample, demonstrate that perceived coercion at admission to a hospital-based behavioral treatment program was not associated with rate of inpatient weight gain or achieving weight restoration, suggesting that coercive pressure to enter treatment does not necessarily undermine formation of a therapeutic alliance or clinical progress. Future studies should examine perceived coercion and long-term outcomes, patient views on coercive pressures, and the effect of different forms of leveraged treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Heat-related inpatient hospitalizations and emergency room visits among California residents, May-September, 2000-2010.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of heat-related inpatient hospitalizations and ED visits among California residents for the years...

  17. Orodental status and medical problems of stroke inpatients undergoing rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Omichi, Shiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Many stroke patients may have oral problems and systemic diseases, but clinical information on treatment provided to stroke patients for dental problems during inpatient rehabilitation is rare. The objective of this study was to research stroke inpatients' requirements for dental treatment and the accompanying risks. We included 165 stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation at Morinomiya Hospital during the year 2010 and researched the causes of stroke and the patients' orodental status, underlying diseases, antithrombotic drugs prescribed and special considerations or difficulties in the treatment. Cerebral infarction was the most common causes of stroke. Many patients had hypertension, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and 54.5% had been prescribed antithrombotic drugs. Dentists diagnosed 57.0% patients with untreated dental cavities. Approximately 30% did not use dentures despite having a requirement. In total, 142 patients underwent dental treatment including periodontal treatment, prosthetic treatment and tooth extraction under management of circulation and haemostasis such as monitoring vital signs and surgical splints in cases of the difficult extraction. The current study revealed a high requirement for dental treatment among stroke patients and demonstrated the effectiveness of performing dental treatment during inpatient rehabilitation of these patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Role of Hospital Inpatients in Supporting Medication Safety: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Garfield

    Full Text Available Inpatient medication errors are a significant concern. An approach not yet widely studied is to facilitate greater involvement of inpatients with their medication. At the same time, electronic prescribing is becoming increasingly prevalent in the hospital setting. In this study we aimed to explore hospital inpatients' involvement with medication safety-related behaviours, facilitators and barriers to this involvement, and the impact of electronic prescribing.We conducted ethnographic observations and interviews in two UK hospital organisations, one with established electronic prescribing and one that changed from paper to electronic prescribing during our study. Researchers and lay volunteers observed nurses' medication administration rounds, pharmacists' ward rounds, doctor-led ward rounds and drug history taking. We also conducted interviews with healthcare professionals, patients and carers. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Observation notes and transcripts were coded thematically.Paper or electronic medication records were shown to patients in only 4 (2% of 247 cases. However, where they were available during patient-healthcare professional interactions, healthcare professionals often viewed them in order to inform patients about their medicines and answer any questions. Interprofessional discussions about medicines seemed more likely to happen in front of the patient where paper or electronic drug charts were available near the bedside. Patients and carers had more access to paper-based drug charts than electronic equivalents. However, interviews and observations suggest there are potentially more significant factors that affect patient involvement with their inpatient medication. These include patient and healthcare professional beliefs concerning patient involvement, the way in which healthcare professionals operate as a team, and the underlying culture.Patients appear to have more access to paper-based records than

  19. The epidemiology of assault-related hospital in-patient admissions and ED attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and impact of serious assault warranting in-patient care over six years and its impact on ED attendances in a large teaching hospital in Dublin over 2 years. There were 16,079 emergency assault-related inpatient hospital discharges reducing from 60.1 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 50.6 per 100,000 population in 2010. The median length of stay was 1 day (1-466) representing 49,870 bed days. The majority were young males (13,921, 86.6%; median age 26 years). Overall crime figures showed a similar reduction. However, knife crimes did not reduce over this period. Data on ED attendances confirmed the age and gender profile and also showed an increase at weekends. Alcohol misuse was recorded in 2,292\\/16079 (14%) of in-patient cases and 242\\/2484 (10%) in ED attendances. An inter-sectoral preventative approach specifically targeting knife crime is required to reduce this burden on health services.

  20. Impact of bleeding-related complications and/or blood product transfusions on hospital costs in inpatient surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds Matthew W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate surgical hemostasis may lead to transfusion and/or other bleeding-related complications. This study examines the incidence and costs of bleeding-related complications and/or blood product transfusions occurring as a consequence of surgery in various inpatient surgical cohorts. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using Premier's Perspective™ hospital database. Patients who had an inpatient procedure within a specialty of interest (cardiac, vascular, non-cardiac thoracic, solid organ, general, reproductive organ, knee/hip replacement, or spinal surgery during 2006-2007 were identified. For each specialty, the rate of bleeding-related complications (including bleeding event, intervention to control for bleeding, and blood product transfusions was examined, and hospital costs and length of stay (LOS were compared between surgeries with and without bleeding-related complications. Incremental costs and ratios of average total hospital costs for patients with bleeding-related complications vs. those without complications were estimated using ordinary least squares (OLS regression, adjusting for demographics, hospital characteristics, and other baseline characteristics. Models using generalized estimating equations (GEE were also used to measure the impact of bleeding-related complications on costs while accounting for the effects related to the clustering of patients receiving care from the same hospitals. Results A total of 103,829 cardiac, 216,199 vascular, 142,562 non-cardiac thoracic, 45,687 solid organ, 362,512 general, 384,132 reproductive organ, 246,815 knee/hip replacement, and 107,187 spinal surgeries were identified. Overall, the rate of bleeding-related complications was 29.9% and ranged from 7.5% to 47.4% for reproductive organ and cardiac, respectively. Overall, incremental LOS associated with bleeding-related complications or transfusions (unadjusted for covariates was 6.0 days and ranged from 1

  1. Pathway for inpatients with depressive episode in Flemish psychiatric hospitals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Steven R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the context of a biopsychosocial model of the treatment of depressive episodes, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Clinical pathways have been developed and implemented in hospitals to support multidisciplinary teamwork. The aim of this study is to explore current practice for the treatment of depressive episodes in Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Current practice in different hospitals is studied to get an idea of the similarities (outlined as a pathway and the differences in the treatment of depressive episodes. Methods A convenience sample of 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals participated in this qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with different types of health care professionals (n = 43. The websites of the hospitals were searched for information on their approach to treating depressive episodes. Results A flow chart was made including the identified stages of the pathway: pre-admission, admission (observation and treatment, discharge and follow-up care. The characteristics of each stage are described. Although the stages are identified in all hospitals, differences between hospitals on various levels of the pathway exist. Hospitals emphasized the individual approach of each patient. The results point to a biopsychosocial approach to treating depressive episodes. Conclusion This study outlined current practice as a pathway for Flemish inpatients with depressive episodes. Within the context of surveillance of quality and quantity of care, this study may encourage hospitals to consider developing clinical pathways.

  2. Exploring differences in inpatient drug purchasing cost between two pediatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydert, Per; Poole, Robert

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the hospital cost of purchasing drugs at two children's hospitals is explored with respect to high-cost drugs and drug classes and discussed with regard to differences in hospital setting, drug price, or number of treatments. The purchasing costs of drugs at the two hospitals were retrieved and analyzed. All information was connected to the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical code and compared in a Microsoft Access database. The 6-month drug purchasing costs at Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital (ALCH), Stockholm, Sweden, and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LPCH), Palo Alto, California, are similar and result in a cost per patient day of US $149 and US $136, respectively. The hospital setting and choice of drug products are factors that influence the drug cost in product-specific ways. Several problems are highlighted when only drug costs are compared between hospitals. For example, the comparison does not take into account the amount of waste, risk of adverse drug events, local dosing strategies, disease prevalence, and national drug-pricing models. The difference in cost per inpatient day at ALCH may indicate that cost could be redistributed in Sweden to support pediatric pharmacy services. Also, when introducing new therapies seen at the comparison hospital, it may be possible to extrapolate the estimated increase in cost.

  3. Perceptions of Yoga Therapy Embedded in Two Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals: Agency Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Van Puymbroeck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inpatient medical rehabilitation has maintained a typical medical-model focus and structure for many years. However, as integrative therapies, such as yoga therapy, emerge as treatments which can enhance the physical and mental health of its participants, it is important to determine if they can be easily implemented into the traditional rehabilitation structure and milieu. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of key agency personnel on the feasibility and utility of yoga therapy implemented in inpatient rehabilitation. This study reports the results of focus groups and an individual interview with key stakeholders (administrators and rehabilitation therapists from two rehabilitation hospitals following the implementation of yoga therapy. Results focused on several key themes: feasibility from the therapist and administrator perspectives, challenges to implementation, and utility and benefit. Overall, the implementation and integration of yoga therapy were positive; however, some programmatic and policy and organizational considerations remain. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  4. An analysis of the recording of tobacco use among inpatients in Irish hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2014-10-01

    Smoking is the largest avoidable cause of premature mortality in the world. Hospital admission is an opportunity to identify and help smokers quit. This study aimed to determine the level of recording of tobacco use (current and past) in Irish hospitals. Information on inpatient discharges with a tobacco use diagnosis was extracted from HIPE. In 2011, a quarter (n=84, 679) of discharges had a recording of tobacco use, which were more common among males (29% (n=50,161) male v. 20% (n=30,162) female), among medical patients (29% (n=54,375) medical v. 20% (n=30,162) other) and was highest among those aged 55-59 years (30.6%; n=7,885). SLAN 2007 reported that 48% of adults had smoked at some point in their lives. This study would suggest an under- reporting of tobacco use among hospital inpatients. Efforts should be made to record smoking status at hospital admission, and to improve the quality of the HIPE coding of tobacco use.

  5. Profile and pattern of crack consumption among inpatients in a Brazilian psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Silvia Mendes; Araujo, Renata Brasil; Bizarro, Lisiane

    2015-01-01

    Crack cocaine use is associated with polydrug abuse, and inpatients dependent on crack exhibit profiles of serious consumption patterns. Use of alcohol and tobacco and other drugs is a risk factor for experimentation of additional drugs, including crack cocaine. The present study describes the characteristics and crack consumption patterns among inpatients in treatment during 2011 and 2012 at the Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro (Porto Alegre, Brazil). An additional objective was to identify the sequence of alcohol and tobacco consumption prior to crack use. The participants were 53 male inpatients addicted to crack with a mean age of 27.5±7.3 years. A sociodemographic questionnaire; the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test and the Mini Mental State Examination were all administered to participants. Inclusion criteria were crack cocaine dependency (based on the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases [ICD-10]) and being abstinent for 7 days. Patients with cognitive difficulties who were unable to understand and/or respond to the questionnaires were excluded from the sample. The participants were young male adults with low educational level and low incomes and were polydrug users. The majority had made more than one attempt to quit. Use of legal drugs in early adolescence, prior to crack use, was identified. The profiles of the inpatients addicted to crack treated at this hospital indicate a serious usage pattern among those who seek specialized support. Crack use is frequent and is associated with use of other drugs and with difficulty sustaining abstinence. The pattern of progression from alcohol and tobacco use to crack cocaine dependency demands the attention of those responsible for prevention policies.

  6. Inpatient dermatology: Characteristics of patients and admissions in a tertiary level hospital in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27% were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33% and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%. Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2% improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73% patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64% required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13% were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses.

  7. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  8. Cost analysis of inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents: hospital and caregiver perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Matthew; Katzman, Debra K.; Akseer, Nadia; Steinegger, Cathleen; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Coyte, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Admission to hospital is the treatment of choice for anorexia nervosa in adolescent patients who are medically unstable; however, stays are often prolonged and frequently disrupt normal adolescent development, family functioning, school and work productivity. We sought to determine the costs of inpatient treatment in this population from a hospital and caregiver perspective, and to identify determinants of such costs. Methods We used micro-costing methods for this cohort study involving all adolescent patients (age 12–18 yr) admitted for treatment of anorexia nervosa at a tertiary care child and adolescent eating disorder program in Toronto, between Sept. 1, 2011, and Mar. 31, 2013. We used hospital administrative data and Canadian census data to calculate hospital and caregiver costs. Results We included 73 adolescents in our cohort for cost-analysis. We determined a mean total hospital cost in 2013 Canadian dollars of $51 349 (standard deviation [SD] $26 598) and a mean total societal cost of $54 932 (SD $27 864) per admission, based on a mean length of stay of 37.9 days (SD 19.7 d). We found patient body mass index (BMI) to be the only significant negative predictor of hospital cost (p adolescents with anorexia nervosa on hospitals and caregivers is substantial, especially among younger patients and those with lower BMI. Recognizing the symptoms of eating disorders early may preclude the need for admission to hospital altogether or result in admissions at higher BMIs, thereby potentially reducing these costs. PMID:26389097

  9. Nurses' experiences of inpatients suicide in a general hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mirriam Matandela

    includes support of any affected patient or staff (National. Department of ... guilt, anger, self-blame, sadness, fear, and feelings of failure .... based on the decision of the employer about the future o f the involved .... practice and policy making.

  10. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Proposed... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... regarding MS-DRG classifications and new technology add-on payments. Eva Fung (410) 786-7539, for...

  11. Prevalence of nasal carriage and diversity of Staphylococcus aureus among inpatients and hospital staff at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egyir, Beverly; Guardabassi, Luca; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2013-01-01

    %) was more common than for other agents (resistant S. aureus carriage was observed among IP compared with HS (P = 0.01). High genetic diversity was shown by spa typing, with 55 spa types found among 105 isolates; the predominant spa types were t355 (10%) and t084 (10......There is a paucity of data on Staphylococcus aureus epidemiology in Africa. Prevalence of nasal carriage and genetic diversity of S. aureus were determined among hospital staff (HS) and inpatients (IP) at the largest hospital in Ghana. In total, 632 nasal swabs were obtained from 452 IP and 180 HS...... in the Child Health Department (CHD) and Surgical Department (SD). S. aureus carriage prevalences were 13.9% in IP and 23.3% in HS. The chance of being a carrier was higher in HS (P = 0.005) and IP staying ≤7 days in hospital (P = 0.007). Resistance to penicillin (93%), tetracycline (28%) and fusidic acid (12...

  12. Depression and Associated Factors among Adult Inpatients at Public Hospitals of Harari Regional State, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haile Tilahun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Globally, depression is one of the three leading causes of disease and it will be the second leading cause of world disability by 2030. The prevalence of depression in Sub-Saharan Africa ranges from 15 to 30%. In Ethiopia, depression was found to be the seventh leading cause of disease burden and its prevalence has been increased in hospital compared to community setting because hospital environment itself is stressful. Yet, no study was done in Eastern Ethiopia, where substance use like Khat is very rampant. Objective. To assess depression and associated factors among adult inpatients at public hospitals of Harari Regional State, Eastern Ethiopia, from February 01 to 28, 2017. Methodology. Hospital based cross-sectional study design was employed on 492 admitted adult patients in Harari region hospitals. Consecutive sampling method was used to include study population. The data were collected by interviewee and analyzed by SPSS version 20.0. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed. p value of 0.05 or less was considered to be statistically significant. Result. A total of 489 patients were interviewed with response rate of 99.4%. Having duration of 1-2 weeks in the hospital [AOR = 2.02, 95% CI: (1.28, 3.19], being diagnosed with chronic morbidity [AOR = 4.06, 95% CI: (2.23, 7.40], being users of psychoactive drugs [AOR = 2.24, 95% CI: (1.18, 4.24], and having been admitted to surgical ward [AOR = 0.50, 95% CI: (0.31, 0.81] were significantly associated with depression. Conclusion and Recommendation. Prevalence of depression among admitted inpatients was high. Therefore, increasing the awareness of benefits of early diagnosis of patients to prevent major form of depression and strengthening the clinical set-up and establishing good referral linkage with mental health institutions was considered to be cost-effective method to reduce its prevalence.

  13. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraf Wani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. Results: The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96. This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket. Conclusion: The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  14. Adolescent inpatient activity 1999-2010: analysis of English Hospital Episode Statistics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Dougal S; Viner, Russell M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate patterns and trends of adolescent (10-19 years) inpatient activity in England by sex, disease category, and admitting speciality. 9 632 844 Finished Consultant Episodes (FCEs) from English patients aged 1-19 between 1999/2000 and 2010/2011 (Hospital Episode Statistics data). Age trends by sex and major International Classification of Disease 10 (ICD10) chapter; differences in activity rates by age and sex; inpatient activity trends over the past decade, disaggregated by sex, admitting speciality and ICD10 chapter. Adolescent female patients account for more activity than girls aged 1-9 (139.4 vs 107.2 FCEs/1000). Female inpatient activity increases significantly between age 10 (70.9 FCEs/1000) and 19 (281.7 FCES/1000, of which non-obstetric care accounts for 155.9 FCEs/1000). Male activity increases much less during adolescence, with lower overall rates among adolescents than younger children (93.7 vs 142.9 FCEs/1000). Between 1999 and 2010, total adolescent inpatient activity increased faster among adolescents (10-19 years) (+14.2%) than younger children (1-9 years) (+11.0%). Adolescent FCEs/1000 increased by 12.8%, including higher rates admitted under Paediatrics (+47.5%) and Paediatric Surgery (+23.2%). Adolescents were admitted across a range of specialities. These data challenge the belief that adolescents are a healthy group who rarely use inpatient services. In England, use of inpatient services is higher among female patients aged 10-19 years than those aged 1-9 years, while adolescent activity has increased faster than for younger children over the past 11 years. Improving service quality for adolescents will require engagement of the many different teams that care for them. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Prevalence of probiotic use among inpatients: A descriptive study of 145 U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sarah H; Jernigan, John A; McDonald, L Clifford

    2016-05-01

    To inform clinical guidance, public health efforts, and research directions, probiotic use in U.S. health care needs to be better understood. This work aimed to assess the prevalence of inpatient probiotic use in a sample of U.S. hospitals. Probiotic use among patients discharged in 2012 was estimated using the MarketScan Hospital Drug Database. In addition, the annual trend in probiotic use (2006-2012) was assessed among a subset of hospitals. Among 145 hospitals with 1,976,167 discharges in 2012, probiotics were used in 51,723 (2.6%) of hospitalizations occurring in 139 (96%) hospitals. Patients receiving probiotics were 9 times more likely to receive antimicrobials (P probiotic formulations were Saccharomyces boulardii (32% of patients receiving probiotics), Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (30%), L acidophilus (28%), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (11%). Probiotic use increased from 1.0% of 1,090,373 discharges in 2006 to 2.9% of 1,006,051 discharges in 2012 (P probiotics as part of their care despite inadequate evidence to support their use in this population. Additional research is needed to guide probiotic use in the hospital setting. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Prevalence of depression in a general hospital in Izhevsk, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakriev, Sergei; Kovalev, Juri; Mozhaev, Mikhail

    2009-11-01

    There are a lot of studies on depressive disorders in a general hospital done across the world, but no data from Russia on this subject was found in international psychiatric journals or MEDLINE. to determine the prevalence of depressive disorders in medical inpatients in Izhevsk, the capital of the Udmurt Republic, a region in Russia, and to identify associated factors. A sample of 323 adult medical inpatients was composed. The Russian version of the MINI 5.0.0 was used. The prevalence of lifetime and current depressive disorders was 30% and 20.7%, respectively. Depression was more common in women, widowed or divorced, retired or disabled, with low income and bad family relationships, and among respondents with a chronic somatic illness. Depression had a high comorbidity with organic mental and anxiety disorders. Only 40.3% of the individuals with depression had referred for psychiatric consultations, most of them being treated with fluvoxamine. Prevalence of depression was substantial but consistent with other studies. Taking into consideration associated factors, physicians can improve recognition and treatment of depression in medical inpatients.

  17. The community impact of consolidating long-term inpatient care at a single state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, N

    2000-06-01

    A community impact model was used to estimate how consolidation of all long-term inpatient care at one state mental hospital affected the town in which the hospital was located. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to measure objective and subjective impacts of the hospital's expanded role. Objective impacts included employment, retail sales, and use of local services such as police, welfare, and education. Subjective impacts included residents' perceptions of safety. Data were obtained from hospital records, service providers, merchants, residents, and persons living on the streets or in shelters. Overall, the policy had a positive net impact on the community, estimated at roughly $4 million during the 18 months after implementation. Nearly $1 million was a direct payment from the state in lieu of taxes for the property occupied by the hospital. The hospital's payments to businesses in the town increased 10 percent. The number of hospital employees increased by 61 percent, to 1,336. The number of local residents working in the hospital grew from 200 to 320, and the proportion of the hospital's annual payroll paid to local residents increased from 14 to 24 percent. Local service use did not increase, and no change was noted in the crime rate. More patients were discharged to other towns than were admitted from the host town. Eighty percent of the residents surveyed said the town had either improved or had not changed. The benefits brought by the consolidation are likely to be sustained in the long run if the state continues the current rate of payments to the community and the hospital continues its policy of discharging patients to the town where they resided before hospitalization.

  18. Readmission to an Acute Care Hospital During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J; Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Barrett, Ryan S; Ryser, David K; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-08-01

    To assess the incidence of, causes for, and factors associated with readmission to an acute care hospital (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prospective observational cohort. Inpatient rehabilitation. Individuals with TBI admitted consecutively for inpatient rehabilitation (N=2130). Not applicable. RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. A total of 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total of 210 episodes. Of 183 participants, 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. The mean time from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22±22 days. The mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7±8 days. Eighty-four participants (46%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for surgical reasons, and 6 (3%) participants had RTAC episodes for unknown reasons. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurological (23%), and cardiac (12%). Any RTAC was predicted as more likely for patients with older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission FIM motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experienced RTAC episodes during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation for RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. Copyright

  19. A Comparison of Inpatient Cost Per Day in General Surgery Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Basal-Bolus versus Sliding Scale Insulin Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Victoria L; Byrd, Anwar L; Adeel, Saira; Peng, Limin; Smiley, Dawn D; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2017-01-01

    The identification of cost-effective glycaemic management strategies is critical to hospitals. Treatment with a basal-bolus insulin (BBI) regimen has been shown to result in better glycaemic control and fewer complications than sliding scale regular insulin (SSI) in general surgery patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but the effect on costs is unknown. We conducted a post hoc analysis of the RABBIT Surgery trial to examine whether total inpatient costs per day for general surgery patients with T2DM treated with BBI ( n  = 103) differed from those for patients with T2DM treated with SSI ( n  = 99) regimens. Data were collected from patient clinical and hospital billing records. Charges were adjusted to reflect hospital costs. General linearized models were used to estimate the risk-adjusted effects of BBI versus SSI treatment on average total inpatient costs per day. Risk-adjusted average total inpatient costs per day were $US5404. Treatment with BBI compared with SSI reduced average total inpatient costs per day by $US751 (14%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 20-4). Being treated in a university medical centre, being African American or having a bowel procedure or higher-volume pharmacy use significantly reduced costs per day. In general surgery patients with T2DM, a BBI regimen significantly reduced average total hospital costs per day compared with an SSI regimen. BBI has been shown to improve outcomes in a randomized controlled trial. Those results, combined with our findings regarding savings, suggest that hospitals should consider adopting BBI regimens in patients with T2DM undergoing surgery.

  20. Bacteriological Evaluation of Kwale General Hospital Environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Pharmacy (40.7%) and Theatre (18.5%). This study showed that Kwale General Hospital environment is heavily contaminated and therefore underlies the necessity for regular evaluation of the hospital environment. Keywords: Bacteriological evaluation, hospital, environment. Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences Vol.

  1. Creation of inpatient capacity during a major hospital relocation: lessons for disaster planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Howard C; Shew, Stephen B; Atkinson, James B; Rosenthal, J Thomas; Hiatt, Jonathan R

    2009-09-01

    To identify tools to aid the creation of disaster surge capacity using a model of planned inpatient census reduction prior to relocation of a university hospital. Prospective analysis of hospital operations for 1-week periods beginning 2 weeks (baseline) and 1 week (transition) prior to move day; analysis of regional hospital and emergency department capacity. Large metropolitan university teaching hospital. Hospital census figures and patient outcomes. Census was reduced by 36% from 537 at baseline to 345 on move day, a rate of 18 patients/d (P emergency operations was unchanged. Hospital admissions were decreased by 42%, and the adjusted discharges per occupied bed were increased by 8% (both P capacity to absorb new patients was limited. During a period in which southern California population grew by 8.5%, acute care beds fell by 3.3%, while Los Angeles County emergency departments experienced a 13% diversion rate due to overcrowding. Local or regional disasters of any size can overwhelm the system's ability to respond. Our strategy produced a surge capacity of 36% without interruption of emergency department and trauma services but required 3 to 4 days for implementation, making it applicable to disasters and mass casualty events with longer lead times. These principles may aid in disaster preparedness and planning.

  2. Overweight in adolescent, psychiatric inpatients: A problem of general or food-specific impulsivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deux, Natalie; Schlarb, Angelika A; Martin, Franziska; Holtmann, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent psychiatric patients are vulnerable to weight problems and show an overrepresentation of overweight compared to the healthy population. One potential factor that can contribute to the etiology of overweight is higher impulsivity. As of yet, it is unclear whether it is a general impulse control deficit or weight-related aspects such as lower impulse control in response to food that have an impact on body weight. As this may have therapeutic implications, the current study investigated differences between overweight and non-overweight adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 98; aged 12-20) in relation to trait impulsivity and behavioral inhibition performance. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and two go/no-go paradigms with neutral and food-related stimulus materials were applied. Results indicated no significant differences concerning trait impulsivity, but revealed that overweight inpatients had significantly more difficulties in inhibition performance (i.e. they reacted more impulsively) in response to both food and neutral stimuli compared to non-overweight inpatients. Furthermore, no specific inhibition deficit for high-caloric vs. low-caloric food cues emerged in overweight inpatients, whereas non-overweight participants showed significantly lower inhibition skills in response to high-caloric than low-caloric food stimuli. The results highlight a rather general, non-food-specific reduced inhibition performance in an overweight adolescent psychiatric population. Further research is necessary to enhance the understanding of the role of impulsivity in terms of body weight status in this high-risk group of adolescent inpatients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of structural and economic factors on hospitalization costs, inpatient mortality, and treatment type of traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Tarun; Moos, Rudolf M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bopp, Matthias; Senn, Oliver; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ciritsis, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of structural and potentially economic factors determining cost, treatment type, and inpatient mortality of traumatic hip fractures are important health policy issues. We showed that insurance status and treatment in university hospitals were significantly associated with treatment type (i.e., primary hip replacement), cost, and lower inpatient mortality respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the structural level of hospital care and patient insurance type on treatment, hospitalization cost, and inpatient mortality in cases with traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland. The Swiss national medical statistic 2011-2012 was screened for adults with hip fracture as primary diagnosis. Gender, age, insurance type, year of discharge, hospital infrastructure level, length-of-stay, case weight, reason for discharge, and all coded diagnoses and procedures were extracted. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression with treatment by primary hip replacement as well as inpatient mortality as dependent variables were performed. We obtained 24,678 inpatient case records from the medical statistic. Hospitalization costs were calculated from a second dataset, the Swiss national cost statistic (7528 cases with hip fractures, discharged in 2012). Average inpatient costs per case were the highest for discharges from university hospitals (US$21,471, SD US$17,015) and the lowest in basic coverage hospitals (US$18,291, SD US$12,635). Controlling for other variables, higher costs for hip fracture treatment at university hospitals were significant in multivariate regression (p < 0.001). University hospitals had a lower inpatient mortality rate than full and basic care providers (2.8% vs. both 4.0%); results confirmed in our multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio (OR) 1.434, 95% CI 1.127-1.824 and OR 1.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.139-1.870 for full and basic coverage hospitals vs. university hospitals

  4. Overweight, obesity and related conditions: a cross-sectional study of adult inpatients at a Norwegian Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Overweight, obesity and associated conditions are major public health concerns in Norway. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the general population in Norway is increasing, but there are limited data on how the situation is in hospitals. This study aimed to find the prevalence of overweight and obesity, and explore the associations of overweight, obesity and its related medical conditions in an adult in-patient sample at specified somatic and psychiatric departments at St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim. Results A total of 497 patients participated. The mean BMI for the total sample at screening was 25.4 kg/m2. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 45.1%. There was a higher association of overweight and obesity among patients aged 40–59 years (OR: 1.7) compared to those being younger. There was no significant difference between the somatic and the psychiatric samples. In the somatic sample overweight and obesity was associated with obesity-related conditions for both genders (OR: 2.0 and 2.1, respectively), when adjusted for age. Conclusion The substantial prevalence of overweight and obese patients may pose a threat to future hospital services. To further address the burden of overweight and obesity in hospitals, we need more knowledge about consequences of length of stay, use of resources and overall cost. PMID:24571809

  5. [Impact of nurse, nurses' aid staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunmi; Lee, Ji Yun; Kang, Hyuncheol

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore the impact of registered nurse/nurses' aid (RN/NA) staffing and turnover rate on inpatient health outcomes in long term care hospitals. A secondary analysis was done of national data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Services including evaluation of long term care hospitals in October-December 2010 and hospital general characteristics in July-September 2010. Final analysis of data from 610 hospitals included RN/NA staffing, turnover rate of nursing staff and 5 patient health outcome indicators. Finding showed that, when variables of organization and community level were controlled, patients per RN was a significant indicator of decline in ADL for patients with dementia, and new pressure ulcer development in the high risk group and worsening of pressure ulcers. Patients per NA was a significant indicator for new pressure ulcer development in the low risk group. Turnover rate was not significant for any variable. To maintain and improve patient health outcomes of ADL and pressure ulcers, policies should be developed to increase the staffing level of RN. Studies are also needed to examine causal relation of NA staffing level, RN staffing level and patient health outcomes with consideration of the details of nursing practice.

  6. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Linghan; Li, Ye; Ding, Ding; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736-1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215-0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust-the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction-is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction with hospital care is the lack of trust. The

  7. Perfectionism Group Treatment for Eating Disorders in an Inpatient, Partial Hospitalization, and Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Brosof, Leigh C; Vanzhula, Irina A; Bumberry, Laura; Zerwas, Stephanie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-11-01

    Perfectionism is elevated in individuals with eating disorders and is posited to be a risk factor, maintaining factor, and treatment barrier. However, there has been little literature testing the feasibility and effectiveness of perfectionism interventions in individuals specifically with eating disorders in an open group format. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of (a) a short cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism intervention delivered in an inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient for eating disorders setting (combined N = 28; inpatient n = 15; partial hospital n = 9; outpatient n = 4), as well as (b) a training for disseminating the treatment in these settings (N = 9). Overall, we found that it was feasible to implement a perfectionism group in each treatment setting, with both an open and closed group format. This research adds additional support for the implementation of perfectionism group treatment for eating disorders and provides information on the feasibility of implementing such interventions across multiple settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  8. Weekend versus weekday hospital deaths: analysis of in-patient data in a Nigerian tertiary healthcare center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, B O; Eke, N O; Obi-Nwosu, A; Osakwe, O J; Eke, C O; Obi, N P

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at comparing weekday deaths to weekend deaths of in-patients of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. This is a 10-year retrospective survey conducted at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital in which the death records of the hospital were accessed from the various wards and health records department to extract relevant data pertaining to the time of hospital death. Tests of statistical significance were done using Chi-square test at 95% confidence intervals. A total of 3934 deaths were recorded during the period of study. The ages ranged from a few hours to 94 years with a mean age of 38.5 years. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1. An average of 547 weekend deaths and 568 weekday deaths were recorded, giving a ratio of 0.96:1. A ratio of weekend to weekday death rate of 0.99:1 and 0.93:1 for the males and females, respectively was noted. The labor ward, followed by the intensive care unit (ICU) had the highest weekend to weekday death ratio of 1.72:1 ( P = 0.0461) and 1.41:1 ( P = 0.1440), respectively. Weekend deaths were less in the other wards, with the gynaecological ward having the least ratio of 0.63:1 ( P = 0.7360). The rate of hospital deaths was generally found not to vary significantly over the weekends and weekdays in the hospital except for the labor ward which had significantly higher weekend to weekday death rates of 1.72:1. There is therefore need for confidential enquiry into the causes of hospital deaths, especially in the labor ward, in order to identify and prevent avoidable deaths.

  9. The pain experience of inpatients in a teaching hospital: revisiting a strategic priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabusch, Kimberly M; Lewthwaite, Barbara J; Mandzuk, Lynda L; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N; Wheeler, Barbara J

    2015-02-01

    For hospital executives and clinicians to improve pain management, organizations must examine the current pain experience of in-patients beyond simply measuring patient satisfaction. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of pain among adult in-patients and the degree of interference pain had on daily activities. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken in a 530 bed tertiary care, teaching hospital in central Canada. A convenience sample (N = 88) of adult medical-surgical patients completed the Short Form-Brief Pain Inventory survey. Pain prevalence was 70.4%. The mean pain severity score was 3.76 (standard deviation, SD = 2.88) and mean pain interference score on daily activities was 4.56 (SD = 3.93). The most frequently identified site of pain was the lower extremities (n = 15, 28%). Women had higher mean scores on pain "right now" compared to men (p < 0.05). The sample majority (n = 81) indicated hospital staff asked about the presence of pain. Seventy-nine percent (n = 57) reported hospital staff "always" did everything they could to help manage pain. Eighty-four percent (n = 61) selected "always" or "usually" to describe their ability to be involved in deciding pain treatments. The mean pain relief score from treatments was 61% (SD = 34.79). Significant positive correlations were found between pain intensity ratings and pain interference on all daily activities (p < 0.001). Pain prevalence remains high with a significant relationship between pain and activities of daily living. The study provides baseline data to direct future initiatives at improving pain management. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Data linkage of inpatient hospitalization and workers' claims data sets to characterize occupational falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Terry L; Slavova, Svetla; Bathke, Arne

    2007-07-01

    The identification of industry, occupation, and associated injury costs for worker falls in Kentucky have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between industry and occupation and 1) hospitalization length of stay; 2) hospitalization charges; and 3) workers' claims costs in workers suffering falls, using linked inpatient hospitalization discharge and workers' claims data sets. Hospitalization cases were selected with ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes for falls and payer code of workers' claims for years 2000-2004. Selection criteria for workers'claims cases were International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions Electronic Data Interchange Nature (IAIABCEDIN) injuries coded as falls and/or slips. Common data variables between the two data sets such as date of birth, gender, date of injury, and hospital admission date were used to perform probabilistic data linkage using LinkSolv software. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Construction falls were the most prevalent for male workers and incurred the highest hospitalization and workers' compensation costs, whereas most female worker falls occurred in the services industry. The largest percentage of male worker falls was from one level to another, while the largest percentage of females experienced a fall, slip, or trip (not otherwise classified). When male construction worker falls were further analyzed, laborers and helpers had longer hospital stays as well as higher total charges when the worker fell from one level to another. Data linkage of hospitalization and workers' claims falls data provides additional information on industry, occupation, and costs that are not available when examining either data set alone.

  11. Weekend hospitalization and additional risk of death: an analysis of inpatient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemantle, N; Richardson, M; Wood, J; Ray, D; Khosla, S; Shahian, D; Roche, W R; Stephens, I; Keogh, B; Pagano, D

    2012-02-01

    To assess whether weekend admissions to hospital and/or already being an inpatient on weekend days were associated with any additional mortality risk. Retrospective observational survivorship study. We analysed all admissions to the English National Health Service (NHS) during the financial year 2009/10, following up all patients for 30 days after admission and accounting for risk of death associated with diagnosis, co-morbidities, admission history, age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, seasonality, day of admission and hospital trust, including day of death as a time dependent covariate. The principal analysis was based on time to in-hospital death. National Health Service Hospitals in England. 30 day mortality (in or out of hospital). There were 14,217,640 admissions included in the principal analysis, with 187,337 in-hospital deaths reported within 30 days of admission. Admission on weekend days was associated with a considerable increase in risk of subsequent death compared with admission on weekdays, hazard ratio for Sunday versus Wednesday 1.16 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.18; P < .0001), and for Saturday versus Wednesday 1.11 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.13; P < .0001). Hospital stays on weekend days were associated with a lower risk of death than midweek days, hazard ratio for being in hospital on Sunday versus Wednesday 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.94; P < .0001), and for Saturday versus Wednesday 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.96; P < .0001). Similar findings were observed on a smaller US data set. Admission at the weekend is associated with increased risk of subsequent death within 30 days of admission. The likelihood of death actually occurring is less on a weekend day than on a mid-week day.

  12. Hospital organization and importance of an interventional radiology inpatient admitting service: Italian single-center 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of 1,009,095.35 euros. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  13. Health literacy and English language comprehension among elderly inpatients at an urban safety-net hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Kristina M; Asch, Steven M; Franco, Idalid; Mangione, Carol M

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between health literacy and age in chronically-ill inpatients at a safety-net hospital. We recruited 399 English- and Spanish-speaking inpatients being evaluated or treated for Congestive Heart Failure or Coronary Artery Disease at a large, urban safety-net teaching hospital in Southern California. Participants were interviewed to ascertain education, English comprehension, and in-home language use. Health literacy was assessed using The Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). We compared by age (aged 65 or more, 51 to 64 years of age, and less than age 50) levels of health literacy, educational attainment, English comprehension, and language use. Prevalence of inadequate health literacy significantly increased with increasing age (87.2% in > or = 65, 48.9% for 51-64, and 26.3% in immigration status. Additionally, older patients were more likely to have never learned to read (34.9% in > or = 65, 6.5% for 51-64, and 1.5% in or = 65, 9.0% for 51-64, and 0.8% in or = 65, 43.5% for 51-64, and 35.8% in language at home (82.3% in > or = 65, 70.2% for 51-64, and 62.2% in < or = 50, p=0.015). To prepare to meet the chronic disease needs of a growing older patient population, and ameliorate the negative health effects of associated low literacy, safety-net hospital leaders and providers need to prioritize the development and implementation of low-literacy educational materials, programs, and services.

  14. Effect of lean process improvement techniques on a university hospital inpatient pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintzen, Barbara L; Knoer, Scott J; Van Dyke, Christie J; Milavitz, Brian S

    2009-11-15

    The effect of lean process improvement on an inpatient university hospital pharmacy was evaluated. The University of Minnesota Medical Center (UMMC), Fairview, implemented lean techniques in its inpatient pharmacy to improve workflow, reduce waste, and achieve substantial cost savings. The sterile products area (SPA) and the inventory area were prospectively identified as locations for improvement due to their potential to realize cost savings. Process-improvement goals for the SPA included the reduction of missing doses, errors, and patient-specific waste by 30%, 50%, and 30%, respectively, and the reallocation of two technician full-time equivalents (FTEs). Reductions in pharmaceutical inventory and returns due to outdating were also anticipated. Work-flow in the SPA was improved through the creation of accountability, standard work, and movement toward one-piece flow. Increasing the number of i.v. batches decreased pharmaceutical waste by 40%. Through SPA environment improvements and enhanced workload sharing, two FTE technicians from the SPA were redistributed within the department. SPA waste reduction yielded an annual saving of $275,500. Quality and safety were also improved, as measured by reductions in missing doses, expired products, and production errors. In the inventory area, visual control was improved through the use of a double-bin system, the number of outdated drugs decreased by 20%, and medication inventory was reduced by $50,000. Lean methodology was successfully implemented in the SPA and inventory area at the UMMC, Fairview, inpatient pharmacy. Benefits of this process included an estimated annual cost saving of $289,256 due to waste reduction, improvements in workflow, and decreased staffing requirements.

  15. New onset of insomnia in hospitalized patients in general medical wards: incidence, causes, and resolution rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, An; Raja, Bronson; Waldhorn, Richard; Baez, Valentina; Mohammed, Idiris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Insomnia is common in hospitalized patients. However, no study has examined new onset of insomnia in patients without a prior history of insomnia. Objectives: Incidence of new onset of insomnia in inpatients, associated factors and resolution rate after 2 weeks. Method: This is a prospective observational study conducted at a community hospital. We used the Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire to screen for insomnia in all patients located in the general medical floors f...

  16. Renewed growth in hospital inpatient cost since 1998: variation across metropolitan areas and leading clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bernard S; Wong, Herbert S; Steiner, Claudia A

    2006-03-01

    To use disaggregated data about metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and clinical conditions to better describe the variation in cost increases and explore some of the hypothesized influences. The study uses the state inpatient databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, containing all discharges from hospitals in 172 MSAs in 1998 and 2001. The discharge summary information was combined with standardized hospital accounting files, surveys of managed care plans, MSA demographics, and state data pertaining to caps on medical malpractice awards. The analysis used descriptive comparisons and multivariate regressions of admission rate and cost per case in 9 leading disease categories across the MSAs. The increase in hospital input prices and changes in severity of illness were controlled. Metropolitan statistical areas with higher HMO market penetration continued to show lower admission rates, no less so in 2001 than in 1998. A cap on malpractice awards appeared to restrain admissions, but the net effect on hospital cost per adult eroded for those states with the most experience with award caps. Higher admission rates and increase in cost were found in several disease categories.

  17. Use of in-patient hospital beds by people living in residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, P; Wundke, R; Whitehead, C; Williamson, L; Baggoley, C

    2000-01-01

    There is concern that people living in residential care in Australia make significant and often inappropriate use of acute in-patient hospital services. To date, no factual information has been collected in Australia and its absence may allow myths and negative stereotypes to proliferate. To determine how and why people living in residential care in Australia use in-patient hospital beds. To determine the outcome of hospitalisation and functional status at 3 months following discharge. Prospective study of 184 consecutive admissions to hospital following Emergency Department (ED) attendance involving people aged over 65 years and living in residential care in southern Adelaide, South Australia. Information was obtained from the facilities' transfer letters, and where these were inadequate or absent, telephone interviews were held with residential care staff. 153 people accounted for the 184 admissions. They had a mean age of 84 years and 69% were female. 61% came from hostels and 35% from nursing homes. They had a wide range of clinical problems and twice as many were admitted to medical than to surgical units. Their mean length of hospital stay was 7.9 days, 2.3 days higher than for non-same-day patients and was higher for hostel than for nursing home residents. All but two admissions were considered unavoidable though the provision of specialised care within residential care could have prevented a further 19 (10%) admissions. 96% of admissions resulted in survival to leave hospital and in 74%, people returned directly to their place of origin. At 3 months follow-up, a further 20% of the group had died while 5% were in hospital. In all, 14% of the original group were in a different long-term care facility while 56% were living at their former residence. People living in residential care are often hospitalised because of acute illness. In the vast majority of cases hospitalisation is both appropriate and unavoidable. Most did not require prolonged hospitalisation

  18. General Practice Teaching--Within the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, M.

    1976-01-01

    A program of integrated teaching by consultants and general practitioners is described. The teaching took place in the hospitals used for the purpose by the Medical Faculty of the University of Birmingham. (Author)

  19. An Integrative Literature Review of Patient Turnover in Inpatient Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Hye; Weaver, Lindsay; Mejia-Johnson, Lydia; Vukas, Rachel; Zimmerman, Julie

    2016-05-01

    High patient turnover can result in fragmentation of nursing care. It can also increase nursing workload and thus impede the ability of nurses to provide safe and high-quality care. We reviewed 20 studies that examined patient turnover in relation to nursing workload, staffing, and patient outcomes as well as interventions in inpatient hospital settings. The studies consistently addressed the importance of accounting for patient turnover when estimating nurse staffing needs. They also showed that patient turnover varied by time, day, and unit type. Researchers found that higher patient turnover was associated with adverse events; however, further research on this topic is needed because evidence on the effect of patient turnover on patient outcomes is not yet strong and conclusive. We suggest that researchers and administrators need to pay more attention to patterns and levels of patient turnover and implement managerial strategies to reduce nursing workload and improve patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to compare the patterns of psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals in Bombay viz. the King Edward Memorial Hospital (64 cases and the Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre (62 cases. It was observed that depressive symptoms were the most common presenting symptoms in these patients attending either of the hospitals. Similarly, the commonest diagnoses were depression and organic mental disorder. Attempted suicide with organophosphorous compounds was the commonest reason for hospitalization at K.E.M. Hospital (p less than 0.001. A significant number of these patients were females (p less than 0.05. The psychiatric referrals at Jaslok had been hospitalized mainly for suspected medical or neurological illness (p less than 0.001. These patients belonged to higher economic strata and hence had a better paying capacity compared to patients at KEM hospital, a significant number of whom were unemployed (p less than 0.001. The duration of pre-referred illness of patients and their stay at Jaslok hospital were longer as compared to those at KEM Hospital (p less than 0.01. The number of non-relevant special investigations carried out on patients in Jaslok was more (p less than 0.01. Further analysis of diagnoses revealed that a significant number of patients at KEM Hospital were admitted as primary psychiatric illness (p less than 0.05.

  1. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  2. Incidence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions among medical inpatients of Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, S; Choon, S E

    2017-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) are common. There are only few studies on the incidence of cADRs in Malaysia. To determine the incidence, clinical features and risk factors of cADRs among hospitalized patients. A prospective study was conducted among medical inpatients from July to December 2014. A total of 43 cADRs were seen among 11 017 inpatients, yielding an incidence rate of 0.4%. cADR accounted for hospitalization in 26 patients. Previous history of cADR was present in 14 patients, with 50% exposed to the same drug taken previously. Potentially lifethreatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR), namely drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS: 14 cases) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN: 6 cases) comprise almost 50% of cADRs. The commonest culprit drug group was antibiotics (37.2%), followed by anticonvulsants (18.6%). Cotrimoxazole, phenytoin and rifampicin were the main causative drugs for DRESS. Anticonvulsants were most frequently implicated in SJS/TEN (66.7%). Most cases had "probable" causality relationship with suspected drug (69.8%). The majority of cases were of moderate severity (65.1%), while 18.6% had severe reaction with 1 death recorded. Most cases were not preventable (76.7%). Older age (> 60 years) and mucosal involvement were significantly associated with a more severe reaction. The incidence of cADRs was 0.4%, with most cases classified as moderate severity and not preventable. The commonest reaction pattern was DRESS, while the main culprit drug group was antibiotics. Older age and mucosal membrane involvement predicts a severe drug reaction.

  3. The effect of additional physiotherapy to hospital inpatients outside of regular business hours: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Natasha K; Paratz, Jennifer

    2006-12-01

    Provision of out of regular business hours (OBH) physiotherapy to hospital inpatients is widespread in the hospital setting. This systematic review evaluated the effect of additional OBH physiotherapy services on patient length of stay (LOS), pulmonary complications, discharge destination, discharge mobility status, quality of life, cost saving, adverse events, and mortality compared with physiotherapy only within regular business hours. A literature search was completed on databases with citation tracking using key words. Two reviewers completed data extraction and quality assessment independently by using modified scales for historical cohorts and case control studies as well as the PEDro scale for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials. This search identified nine articles of low to medium quality. Four reported a significant reduction in LOS associated with additional OBH physiotherapy, with two articles reporting overall significance and two reporting only for specific subgroups. Two studies reported significant reduction in pulmonary complications for two different patient groups in an intensive care unit (ICU) with additional OBH physiotherapy. Three studies accounted for discharge destination and/or discharge mobility status with no significant difference reported. Quality of life, adverse events, and mortality were not reported in any studies. Cost savings were considered in three studies, with two reporting a cost saving. This systematic review was unable to conclude that the provision of additional OBH physiotherapy made significant improvement to patient outcomes for all subgroups of inpatients. One study in critical care reported that overnight physiotherapy decreased LOS and reduced pulmonary complications of patients in the ICU. However, the studies in the area of orthopaedics, neurology, postcardiac surgery, and rheumatology, which all considered additional daytime weekend physiotherapy intervention, did not provide

  4. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Considered HAC Candidate: Iatrogenic Pneumothorax With Venous Catheterization 3. Present on Admission (POA.... History of Measures Adopted for the Hospital IQR Program b. Maintenance of Technical Specifications for...-Associated Infection (HAI) Measures (A) Proposed Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections ((CLABSI...

  5. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Estimated Net Savings for Current HACs g. Previously Considered Candidate HACs--RTI Analysis of Frequency of... Program 1. Background 2. Budget Neutrality Offset Amount for FY 2013 L. Hospital Routine Services... Program a. Administrative Requirements (1) Requirements Regarding QualityNet Account and Administrator for...

  6. Intriguing model significantly reduces boarding of psychiatric patients, need for inpatient hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As new approaches to the care of psychiatric emergencies emerge, one solution is gaining particular traction. Under the Alameda model, which has been put into practice in Alameda County, CA, patients who are brought to regional EDs with emergency psychiatric issues are quickly transferred to a designated emergency psychiatric facility as soon as they are medically stabilized. This alleviates boarding problems in area EDs while also quickly connecting patients with specialized care. With data in hand on the model's effectiveness, developers believe the approach could alleviate boarding problems in other communities as well. The model is funded by through a billing code established by California's Medicaid program for crisis stabilization services. Currently, only 22% of the patients brought to the emergency psychiatric facility ultimately need to be hospitalized; the other 78% are able to go home or to an alternative situation. In a 30-day study of the model, involving five community hospitals in Alameda County, CA, researchers found that ED boarding times were as much as 80% lower than comparable ED averages, and that patients were stabilized at least 75% of the time, significantly reducing the need for inpatient hospitalization.

  7. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  8. Appropriateness of pediatric hospitalization in a general hospital in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Magdy H; Seoudi, Tarek M M; Raway, Tarek S; Al Harbash, Nowair Z; Ahmad, Meshal M A; Al Mutairi, Hanan F

    2012-01-01

    To determine the rate of inappropriate pediatric admissions using the Pediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP) and to examine variables associated with inappropriateness of admissions. A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Farwania General Hospital, Kuwait, to examine successive admissions for appropriateness of admission as well as several sociodemographic characteristics over a 5-month period (August 2010 to December 2010). A total of 1,022 admissions were included. Of the 1,022 admissions, 416 (40.7%) were considered inappropriate. Factors associated with a higher rate of inappropriate admission included older age of patients and self-referral. The rate of inappropriate hospitalization of children was high in Farwania Hospital, Kuwait, probably due to the relatively free health care services, parental preference for hospital care, easy access to hospital services, and insufficient education about the child's condition. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Admission rates in a general practitioner-based versus a hospital specialist based, hospital-at-home model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Ankersen, Ejnar Skytte; Lindberg, Mats J

    2018-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: The GP based HaH model was more effective than the hospital specialist model in avoiding hospital admissions within 7 days among elderly patients with an acute medical condition with no differences in mental or physical recovery rates or deaths between the two models. REGISTRATION: No. NCT......BACKGROUND: Hospital at home (HaH) is an alternative to acute admission for elderly patients. It is unclear if should be cared for a primarily by a hospital intern specialist or by the patient's own general practitioner (GP). The study assessed whether a GP based model was more effective than...... Denmark, including + 65 years old patients with an acute medical condition that required acute hospital in-patient care. The patients were randomly assigned to hospital specialist based model or GP model of HaH care. Five physical and cognitive performance tests were performed at inclusion and after 7...

  10. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or formally...

  11. Preventing dehydration-related hospitalizations: a mixed-methods study of parents, inpatient attendings, and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Leticia; Mittal, Vineeta; Flores, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the proportion of dehydration-related ambulatory care-sensitive condition hospitalizations, the reasons why these hospitalizations were preventable, and factors associated with preventability. A cross-sectional survey of primary care providers (PCPs), inpatient attending physicians, and parents was conducted in a consecutive series of children with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions admitted to an urban hospital over 14 months. Eighty-five children were diagnosed with dehydration. Their mean age was 1.6 years; most had public (74%) or no (17%) insurance, and were nonwhite (91%). The proportion of hospitalizations assessed as preventable varied from 12% for agreement among all 3 sources to 45% for any source. Parents identified inadequate prevention (50%), poor self-education (34%), and poor quality of care (38%) as key factors. PCPs identified parents providing insufficient home rehydration (33%), not visiting the clinic (25%), and not calling earlier (16%) as reasons. Inpatient attending physicians cited home rehydration (40%), delays in seeking care (40%), and lacking a PCP (20%) as contributors. Physicians (PCPs and inpatient attending physicians) were more likely than parents to describe the admission as inappropriate (75% vs 67% vs 0%; P dehydration-related hospitalizations may be preventable. Inadequate parental education by physicians, insufficient home rehydration, deferring clinic visits, insurance and cost barriers, inappropriate admissions, poor quality of care, and parental dissatisfaction with PCPs are the reasons that these hospitalizations might have been prevented.

  12. Limited Documentation and Treatment Quality of Glycemic Inpatient Care in Relation to Structural Deficits of Heterogeneous Insulin Charts at a Large University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanz, Julia; Lichtenegger, Katharina M; Sendlhofer, Gerald; Semlitsch, Barbara; Cuder, Gerald; Pak, Andreas; Pieber, Thomas R; Tax, Christa; Brunner, Gernot; Plank, Johannes

    2018-02-09

    Insulin charts represent a key component in the inpatient glycemic management process. The aim was to evaluate the quality of structure, documentation, and treatment of diabetic inpatient care to design a new standardized insulin chart for a large university hospital setting. Historically grown blank insulin charts in use at 39 general wards were collected and evaluated for quality structure features. Documentation and treatment quality were evaluated in a consecutive snapshot audit of filled-in charts. The primary end point was the percentage of charts with any medication error. Overall, 20 different blank insulin charts with variable designs and significant structural deficits were identified. A medication error occurred in 55% of the 102 audited filled-in insulin charts, consisting of prescription and management errors in 48% and 16%, respectively. Charts of insulin-treated patients had more medication errors relative to patients treated with oral medication (P international standards, a new insulin chart was developed to overcome these quality hurdles.

  13. Prescribing errors during hospital inpatient care: factors influencing identification by pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Mary P; Buchan, Iain E

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence of prescribing errors identified by pharmacists in hospital inpatients and the factors influencing error identification rates by pharmacists throughout hospital admission. 880-bed university teaching hospital in North-west England. Data about prescribing errors identified by pharmacists (median: 9 (range 4-17) collecting data per day) when conducting routine work were prospectively recorded on 38 randomly selected days over 18 months. Proportion of new medication orders in which an error was identified; predictors of error identification rate, adjusted for workload and seniority of pharmacist, day of week, type of ward or stage of patient admission. 33,012 new medication orders were reviewed for 5,199 patients; 3,455 errors (in 10.5% of orders) were identified for 2,040 patients (39.2%; median 1, range 1-12). Most were problem orders (1,456, 42.1%) or potentially significant errors (1,748, 50.6%); 197 (5.7%) were potentially serious; 1.6% (n = 54) were potentially severe or fatal. Errors were 41% (CI: 28-56%) more likely to be identified at patient's admission than at other times, independent of confounders. Workload was the strongest predictor of error identification rates, with 40% (33-46%) less errors identified on the busiest days than at other times. Errors identified fell by 1.9% (1.5-2.3%) for every additional chart checked, independent of confounders. Pharmacists routinely identify errors but increasing workload may reduce identification rates. Where resources are limited, they may be better spent on identifying and addressing errors immediately after admission to hospital.

  14. CORRELATION OF INPATIENT AND OUTPATIENT MEASURES OF STROKE CARE QUALITY WITHIN VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION HOSPITALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph S.; Arling, Greg; Ofner, Susan; Roumie, Christianne L.; Keyhani, Salomeh; Williams, Linda S.; Ordin, Diana L.; Bravata, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Quality of care delivered in the inpatient and ambulatory settings may be correlated within an integrated health system such as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We examined the correlation between stroke care quality at hospital discharge and within 6 months post-discharge. Methods Cross-sectional hospital-level correlation analyses of chart-abstracted data for 3467 veterans discharged alive after an acute ischemic stroke from 108 VHA medical centers and 2380 veterans with post-discharge follow-up within 6 months, in fiscal year 2007. Four risk-standardized processes of care represented discharge care quality: prescription of anti-thrombotic and anti-lipidemic therapy, anti-coagulation for atrial fibrillation, and tobacco cessation counseling, along with a composite measure of defect-free care. Five risk-standardized intermediate outcomes represented post-discharge care quality: achievement of blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), international normalized ratio (INR), and glycosylated hemoglobin target levels, and delivery of appropriate treatment for post-stroke depression, along with a composite measure of achieved outcomes. Results Median risk-standardized composite rate of defect-free care at discharge was 79%. Median risk-standardized post-discharge rates of achieving goal were 56% for blood pressure, 36% for LDL, 41% for INR, 40% for glycosylated hemoglobin, and 39% for depression management and the median risk-standardized composite six-month outcome rate was 44%. The hospital composite rate of defect-free care at discharge was correlated with meeting the LDL goal (r=0.31; p=0.007) and depression management (r=0.27; p=0.03) goal, but was not correlated with blood pressure, INR, or glycosylated hemoglobin goals, nor with the composite measure of achieved post-discharge outcomes (p-values >0.15). Conclusions Hospital discharge care quality was not consistently correlated with ambulatory care quality. PMID:21719771

  15. Prevalence and cost of hospital medical errors in the general and elderly United States populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, Peter J; Pandya, Bhavik; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Kaplan, Harold S

    2013-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the differences in the prevalence rate and costs of hospital medical errors between the general population and an elderly population aged ≥65 years. Methods from an actuarial study of medical errors were modified to identify medical errors in the Premier Hospital Database using data from 2009. Visits with more than four medical errors were removed from the population to avoid over-estimation of cost. Prevalence rates were calculated based on the total number of inpatient visits. There were 3,466,596 total inpatient visits in 2009. Of these, 1,230,836 (36%) occurred in people aged ≥ 65. The prevalence rate was 49 medical errors per 1000 inpatient visits in the general cohort and 79 medical errors per 1000 inpatient visits for the elderly cohort. The top 10 medical errors accounted for more than 80% of the total in the general cohort and the 65+ cohort. The most costly medical error for the general population was postoperative infection ($569,287,000). Pressure ulcers were most costly ($347,166,257) in the elderly population. This study was conducted with a hospital administrative database, and assumptions were necessary to identify medical errors in the database. Further, there was no method to identify errors of omission or misdiagnoses within the database. This study indicates that prevalence of hospital medical errors for the elderly is greater than the general population and the associated cost of medical errors in the elderly population is quite substantial. Hospitals which further focus their attention on medical errors in the elderly population may see a significant reduction in costs due to medical errors as a disproportionate percentage of medical errors occur in this age group.

  16. Effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on inpatient mortality and hospital length of stay: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, Veronique; Fulcher, Robert A; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Potter, John F; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-11-01

    To examine the effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on stroke outcome. Retrospective database study. Norfolk, United Kingdom. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three men and women with stroke admitted to the hospital between 1997 and 2001. Inpatient mortality and likelihood of longer length of hospital stay, defined as longer than median length of stay (LOS). Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language. An experienced team assessed dysphagia and dysphasia using explicit criteria. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients (1,330 (44.6%) male), median age 78 (range 17-105), were included, of whom 77.7% had ischemic, 10.5% had hemorrhagic, and 11.8% had undetermined stroke types. Dysphasia was present in 41.2% (1,230) and dysphagia in 50.5% (1,506), and 27.7% (827) had both conditions. Having either or both conditions was associated with greater mortality and longer LOS (P<.001 for all). Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, premorbid Rankin score, previous disabling stroke, and stroke type, corresponding odds ratios for death and longer LOS were 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-2.7) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.2-1.6) for dysphasia; 12.5 (95% CI=8.9-17.3) and 3.9 (95% CI=3.3-4.6) for dysphagia, 5.5 (95% CI=3.7-8.2), 1.9 (95% CI=1.6-2.3) for either, and 13.8 (95% CI=9.4-20.4) and 3.7 (95% CI=3.1-4.6) if they had both, versus having no dysphasia, no dysphagia, or none of these conditions, respectively. Patients with dysphagia have worse outcome in terms of inpatient mortality and length of hospital stay than those with dysphasia. When both conditions are present, the presence of dysphagia appears to determine the likelihood of poor outcome. Whether this effect is related just to stroke severity

  17. Winter excess in hospital admissions, in-patient mortality and length of acute hospital stay in stroke: a hospital database study over six seasonal years in Norfolk, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Woodhouse, Peter R; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have examined the incidence and mortality of stroke in relation to season. However, the evidence is conflicting partly due to variation in the populations (community vs. hospital-based), and in climatic conditions between studies. Moreover, they may not have been able to take into account the age, sex and stroke type of the study population. We hypothesized that the age, sex and type of stroke are major determinants of the presence or absence of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. We analyzed a hospital-based stroke register from Norfolk, UK to examine our prior hypothesis. Using Curwen's method, we performed stratified sex-specific analyses by (1) seasonal year and (2) quartiles of patients' age and stroke subtype and calculated the winter excess for the number of admissions, in-patient deaths and length of acute hospital stay. There were 5,481 patients (men=45%). Their ages ranged from 17 to 105 years (median=78 years). There appeared to be winter excess in hospital admissions, deaths and length of acute hospital stay overall accounting for 3/100,000 extra admissions (winter excess index of 3.4% in men and 7.6% in women) and 1/100,000 deaths (winter excess index of 4.7 and 8.6% in women) due to stroke in winter compared to non-winter periods. Older patients with non-haemorrhagic stroke mainly contribute to this excess. If our findings are replicated throughout England and Wales, it is estimated that there are 1,700 excess admissions, 600 excess in-patient deaths and 24,500 extra acute hospital bed days each winter, related to stroke within the current population of approximately 60 million. Further research should be focused on the determinants of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. This may subsequently reduce the morbidity and mortality by providing effective preventive strategies in future. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Time-Series Approaches for Forecasting the Number of Hospital Daily Discharged Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting Zhu; Li Luo; Xinli Zhang; Yingkang Shi; Wenwu Shen

    2017-03-01

    For hospitals where decisions regarding acceptable rates of elective admissions are made in advance based on expected available bed capacity and emergency requests, accurate predictions of inpatient bed capacity are especially useful for capacity reservation purposes. As given, the remaining unoccupied beds at the end of each day, bed capacity of the next day can be obtained by examining the forecasts of the number of discharged patients during the next day. The features of fluctuations in daily discharges like trend, seasonal cycles, special-day effects, and autocorrelation complicate decision optimizing, while time-series models can capture these features well. This research compares three models: a model combining seasonal regression and ARIMA, a multiplicative seasonal ARIMA (MSARIMA) model, and a combinatorial model based on MSARIMA and weighted Markov Chain models in generating forecasts of daily discharges. The models are applied to three years of discharge data of an entire hospital. Several performance measures like the direction of the symmetry value, normalized mean squared error, and mean absolute percentage error are utilized to capture the under- and overprediction in model selection. The findings indicate that daily discharges can be forecast by using the proposed models. A number of important practical implications are discussed, such as the use of accurate forecasts in discharge planning, admission scheduling, and capacity reservation.

  19. Religious attitudes and spiritual health among elderly inpatient adults in Shahrekord hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Sadat hosseiny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human is a multidimensional creature and spiritual domain is the central dimension which has an undeniable effect on gaining health. The most important part of nursing care with family based approach is to help people in achieving optimal level of health. On the other hand, religious attitudes and spiritual health is an important domain of life in ageing period. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the religious attitudes and spiritual health among elderly inpatients in Shahrekord hospitals. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted in 1392 in Shahrekord hospitals. A total of 308 geriatric patients who were admitted to a surgical ward, were recruited through random sampling. Two sets of questionnaires regarding religious and spiritual health were used as the instruments. After collecting the data, descriptive (frequency, mean, variance, standard deviation and analytical (independent t test, Pearson correlation statistics were used by SPSS statistical software. Results: The results showed that 68.8% of patients possessed large religious attitude with an average of 140.68 ±30.14. Spiritual health in 51.3 percent of samples was described to be low while the obtained average score was 86.18 ± 16.61. However, Pearson test showed that there is a positive significant correlation between religious attitudes and spiritual health (r =0.83, P =0.05. Conclusions: The present study revealed that there is a significant relationship between religious attitudes and spiritual health and people with high religious attitudes have high spiritual health.

  20. Factors Influencing the Total Inpatient Pharmacy Cost at a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Jadoo, Saad Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    The steady growth of pharmaceutical expenditures is a major concern for health policy makers and health care managers in Malaysia. Our study examined the factors affecting the total inpatient pharmacy cost (TINPC) at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). In this retrospective study, we used 2011 administration electronic prescriptions records and casemix databases at UKMMC to examine the impact of sociodemographic, diagnostic, and drug variables on the TINPC. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of the factors associated with TINPC were conducted. The mean inpatient pharmacy cost per patient was USD 102.07 (SD = 24.76). In the multivariate analysis, length of stay (LOS; B = 0.349, P < .0005) and severity level III (B = 0.253, P < .0005) were the primary factors affecting the TINPC. For each day increase in the LOS and each increase of a case of severity level III, there was an increase of approximately USD 11.97 and USD 171.53 in the TINPC per year, respectively. Moreover, the number of prescribed items of drugs and supplies was positively associated with the TINPC (B = 0.081, P < .0005). Gender appears to have affected the TINPC; male patients seem to be associated with a higher TINPC than females (mean = 139.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 112.97-166.13, P < .001). Surgical procedures were associated with higher cost than medical cases (mean = 87.93, 95% CI: 61.00-114.85, P < .001). Malay (MYR 242.02, SD = 65.37) and Chinese (MYR 214.66, SD = 27.99) ethnicities contributed to a lower TINPC compared with Indian (MYR 613.93, SD = 98.41) and other ethnicities (MYR 578.47, SD = 144.51). A longer hospitalization period accompanied by major complications and comorbidities had the greatest influence on the TINPC. PMID:29436248

  1. 75 FR 68799 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... classification that do not reflect real change in case-mix would be 0.0 percent for FY 2010. Therefore, since we... for general information. Gregory J. Savord, (410) 786-1521 for case-mix analysis. SUPPLEMENTARY... case-mix. The adjustment to reflect real case-mix is determined on the basis of the most recent case...

  2. The Rural Inpatient Mortality Study: Does Urban-Rural County Classification Predict Hospital Mortality in California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnen, Daniel T; Kornak, John; Stephens, Caroline

    2018-03-28

    Evidence suggests an association between rurality and decreased life expectancy. To determine whether rural hospitals have higher hospital mortality, given that very sick patients may be transferred to regional hospitals. In this ecologic study, we combined Medicare hospital mortality ratings (N = 1267) with US census data, critical access hospital classification, and National Center for Health Statistics urban-rural county classifications. Ratings included mortality for coronary artery bypass grafting, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia across 277 California hospitals between July 2011 and June 2014. We used generalized estimating equations to evaluate the association of urban-rural county classifications on mortality ratings. Unfavorable Medicare hospital mortality rating "worse than the national rate" compared with "better" or "same." Compared with large central "metro" (metropolitan) counties, hospitals in medium-sized metro counties had 6.4 times the odds of rating "worse than the national rate" for hospital mortality (95% confidence interval = 2.8-14.8, p centers may contribute to these results, a potential factor that future research should examine.

  3. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30% of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13% drop-out prematurely.

  4. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (Phospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform.

  5. Alcohol misuse in the general hospital: some hard facts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bradshaw, P

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: To examine (1) the prevalence of alcohol use disorders in adult general hospital inpatients; (2) the accuracy of documentation in relation to alcohol use. METHODS: A total of 210 random patients were interviewed out of 1,448 consecutive new admissions to CUH over 7 days. Case notes were reviewed for 206 (98%). Alcohol consumption was assessed using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) and weekly drinking diary. FAST-positive (and a random sample of FAST-negative) patients then had a standardized interview. RESULTS: A total of 82% admitted for drinking alcohol. Among them 22% were drinking in excess of guidelines, 9% had DSM-IV Alcohol Abuse and 7% dependence. The sensitivity and specificity of the FAST for detecting those drinking above guidelines were 89 and 94% and for detecting a DSM-IV diagnosis was 100 and 73%. The majority of case notes contained inadequate information about alcohol intake. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use disorders are common and often undetected in the general hospital setting.

  6. [Inpatient acute pain management in German hospitals: results from the national survey "Akutschmerzzensus 2012"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Stamer, U; Koschwitz, R; Koppert, W; Quintel, M; Meißner, W; Petzke, F

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the German national guidelines on "Treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" were published. The aim of this study was to describe current structure and process data for acute pain management in German hospitals and to compare how the guidelines and other initiatives such as benchmarking or certification changed the healthcare landscape in the last decade. All directors of German departments of anesthesiology according to the DGAI ("Deutschen Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin", German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care) were mailed a standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management in their hospitals. A total of 403 completed questionnaires (46 %) could be evaluated. Of hospitals, 81 % had an acute pain service (ASD), whereby only 45 % met defined quality criteria. Written standards for acute pain management were available in 97 % of the hospitals on surgical wards and 51 % on nonsurgical wards. In 96 %, perioperative pain was regularly recorded (generally pain at rest and/or movement, pain-related functional impairment in 16 % only). Beside these routine measurements, only 38 % of hospitals monitored pain for effectiveness after acute medications. Often interdisciplinary working groups and/or pain managers are established for hospital-wide control. As specific therapy, the patient-controlled analgesia and epidural analgesia are largely prevalent (> 90 % of all hospitals). In the last decade, intravenous and oral opioid administration of opioids (including slow release preparations) has become established in acute pain management. The survey was representative by evaluating 20 % of all German hospitals. The organizational requirements for appropriate pain management recommended by the German guidelines for acute pain recommended have been established in the hospital sector in recent years. However, the organizational enforcement for acute pain management in

  7. Use of identification wristbands among patients receiving inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louíse Viecili Hoffmeister

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the use of identification wristbands among patients hospitalized in inpatient units.METHOD: quantitative, descriptive and transversal research, with a sample of 385 patients. Data collection occurred through the observational method through the filling out of a structured questionnaire which aimed to check the presence of the identification wristband and the identifiers used. Descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies was used for analysis.RESULTS: it was obtained that 83.9% of the patients were found to have the correctly identified wristband, 11.9% had a wristband with errors, and 4.2% of the patients were without a wristband. The main nonconformities found on the identification wristbands were incomplete name, different registration numbers, illegibility of the data and problems with the physical integrity of the wristbands.CONCLUSION: the study demonstrated the professionals' engagement in the process of patient identification, evidencing a high rate of conformity of the wristbands. Furthermore, it contributed to identify elements in the use of wristbands which may be improved for a safe identification process.

  8. Use of identification wristbands among patients receiving inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Louíse Viecili; de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the use of identification wristbands among patients hospitalized in inpatient units. quantitative, descriptive and transversal research, with a sample of 385 patients. Data collection occurred through the observational method through the filling out of a structured questionnaire which aimed to check the presence of the identification wristband and the identifiers used. Descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies was used for analysis. it was obtained that 83.9% of the patients were found to have the correctly identified wristband, 11.9% had a wristband with errors, and 4.2% of the patients were without a wristband. The main nonconformities found on the identification wristbands were incomplete name, different registration numbers, illegibility of the data and problems with the physical integrity of the wristbands. the study demonstrated the professionals' engagement in the process of patient identification, evidencing a high rate of conformity of the wristbands. Furthermore, it contributed to identify elements in the use of wristbands which may be improved for a safe identification process.

  9. Inpatient and Day Hospital Treatment of Patients with Depression and Job-related Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lisa Kristin; Lange, Sabine; Behringer, Johanna; Söllner, Wolfgang

    Burnout is a process of physical and emotional exhaustion that often results in clinical depression. Detailed descriptions and evaluations of specialized psychosomatic treatment are rare. This pilot study investigates the feasibility of inpatient and day hospital treatment of patients with burnout syndrome. Additionally, we present results of an initial, noncontrolled, pre-post-evaluation of changes in symptoms and individual work-related risk factors for burnout. Sixty-four consecutive patients with burnout syndrome were assessed before and after specialized multimodal treatment using a clinical symptom checklist (ICD-10 Symptom Rating) and burnout-specific instruments (Maslach Burnout Inventory, Occupational Stress & Coping Inventory). Patients' average age was 45 (range 23 to 61), 70% were currently employed, 24% in managerial positions or self-employed, and 89% diagnosed with an affective disorder. The average length of time off work due to illness in the past year was 13 weeks. Treatment lasted five weeks on average. After treatment, depression (p work (p = 0.001; d = 0.36) decreased, while emotional distancing (p balance and mental stability (p life satisfaction (p work-related risk factors. Controlled studies are necessary to establish treatment efficacy.

  10. Time to inpatient rehabilitation hospital admission and functional outcomes of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Camicia, Michelle; Terdiman, Joe; Hung, Yun-Yi; Sandel, M Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    To study the association of time to inpatient rehabilitation hospital (IRH) admission and functional outcomes of patients who have had a stroke. A retrospective cohort study. A regional IRH. Moderately (n = 614) and severely (n = 1294) impaired patients who had a stroke who were admitted to the facility between 2002 and 2006. Not applicable. Change in total, motor, and cognitive Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between IRH admission and discharge. After controlling for patient demographics and initial medical conditions and functional status, shorter periods from stroke onset to IRH admission were significantly associated with greater functional gains for these patients during IRH hospitalization. Moderately impaired patients achieved a greater total FIM gain when admitted to an IRH within 21 days of stroke. Severely impaired patients showed a gradient relationship between time to IRH admission and total FIM gain, with significantly different functional gain if admitted to an IRH within 30 and 60 days after stroke diagnosis. Results of multiple regression analysis also showed that age, race/ethnicity, side of stroke, history of a previous stroke, functional measures at IRH admission, IRH length of stay, and selected medications were associated with total, motor, and cognitive FIM score changes. In addition, certain factors such as older age, diagnosis of a hemorrhagic stroke or a previous history of stroke, and initial functional status were associated with longer periods between diagnosis and admission to an IRH after the stroke occurred. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that earlier transfer to an IRH may lead to better functional improvement after stroke. However, certain factors such as age, race/ethnicity, initial medical conditions and functional status, and length of stay at an IRH contributed to functional gain. Factors affecting the time to IRH admission also were addressed. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine

  11. A survey of inpatient practitioner knowledge of penicillin allergy at 2 community teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Mary L; Soni, Dipekka; Conn, Kelly M; Ramsey, Allison

    2017-07-01

    The negative effect of the penicillin allergy label on antibiotic use and patient outcomes has brought to light the need for thorough penicillin allergy assessments and heightened practitioner education. To evaluate practitioner knowledge of penicillin allergy and the clinical approach to the patients with penicillin allergy. An electronic survey was distributed to attending physicians, residents, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants practicing adult inpatient medicine at 2 community-based teaching hospitals from February to April 2016. A total of 276 (39%) of 716 practitioners completed surveys were analyzed. Most respondents were attending physicians (45%) with more than 10 years of experience (53%). Approximately half of the respondents indicated that they were unfamiliar with the rate of cross-reactivity between penicillin and cephalosporin (46%), carbapenem (42%), and monobactam (48%) antibiotics. When evaluating the role of penicillin skin testing and temporary induction of drug tolerance in the case vignettes, only 41% and 19% of respondents appropriately considered these options as the leading antibiotic management plan, respectively. Despite acknowledging the need for allergy/immunology consultation in clinical scenarios, 86% of respondents indicated that they never consult an allergist or immunologist or do so only once per year. Overall, pharmacists had a better understanding of the natural history of penicillin allergy and antibiotic cross-reactivity (P penicillin allergy in the hospital setting, where collaborative efforts between allergy and nonallergy health care practitioners are sparse. The expansion of a multidisciplinary approach may optimize antimicrobial prescribing in this subset of patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  13. An educational conference in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Western Sussex Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust comprises the District General Hospitals of Worthing and Chichester. Both hospitals have successful postgraduate medical education centres, providing training for junior doctors and continuing professional development for senior doctors. Until now, there have been limited multi-professional teaching and learning activities available. The two hospitals have recently merged. The education executive felt that workplace learning had become undervalued since the implementation of Modernising Medical Careers in the UK. The executive wanted to provide a multi-professional conference on Workplace Learning, both to support the merger and to promote the value of workplace and multi-professional learning. The conference topic covering the 'how' of workplace learning was innovative. Many educational conferences concentrate on the organisation and evaluation of classroom learning, rather than on how learning can be facilitated in the workplace during ordinary working practice. It was also innovative to ensure that the presenters were representative of the multi-professional workforce. The presentations were limited to 8 minutes each to promote high-impact short presentations. The talks were recorded for publishing on the trust's intranet and the internet. A committed team in a district general hospital can provide a high-quality educational conference with wide appeal. Local health care professionals can produce short high-impact presentations. The use of modern information technology and audio-visual systems can make the presentations available to both local and worldwide audiences. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  14. [Crisis unit at the general hospital: Determinants of further hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norotte, C; Omnès, C; Crozier, C; Verlyck, C; Romanos, M

    2017-10-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admission (less than 72hours) of crisis patients presenting to the emergency room is a model that has gained a growing interest because it allows time for developing alternatives to psychiatric hospitalization and favors a maintained functioning in the community. Still, the determinants influencing the disposition decision at discharge after crisis intervention remain largely unexplored. The primary objective of this study was to determine the factors predicting aftercare dispositions at crisis unit discharge: transfer for further hospitalization or return to the community. Secondary objectives included the description of clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of patients admitted to the crisis unit upon presentation to the emergency room. All patients (n=255) admitted to the short-stay unit of the emergency department of Rambouillet General Hospital during a one-year period were included in the study. Patient characteristics were collected in a retrospective manner from medical records: patterns of referral, acute stressors, presenting symptoms, initial patient demand, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5) disorders, psychiatric history, and socio-demographic characteristics were inferred. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with hospitalization decision upon crisis intervention at discharge. Following crisis intervention at the short-stay unit, 100 patients (39.2%) required further hospitalization and were transferred. Statistically significant factors associated with a higher probability of hospitalization (P<0.05) included the patient's initial wish to be hospitalized (OR=4.28), the presence of a comorbid disorder (OR=3.43), a referral by family or friends (OR=2.89), a history of psychiatric hospitalization (OR=2.71) and suicidal ideation on arrival in the emergency room (OR=2.26). Conversely, significant factors associated with a lower probability of

  15. Clostridium difficile infection in patients hospitalized with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its impact on morbidity, mortality, and the costs of inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Titilope O; Salemi, Jason L; Mejia de Grubb, Maria C; Gonzalez, Sandra J; Zoorob, Roger J

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often complicated by infections leading to hospitalization, increased morbidity, and mortality. Not much is known about the impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on health outcomes in hospitalized patients with T2DM. We estimated the prevalence and temporal trends of CDI; evaluated the associations between CDI and in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and the costs of inpatient care; and compared the impact of CDI with that of other infections commonly seen in patients with T2DM. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample among patients ⩾18years with T2DM and generalized linear regression was used to analyze associations and jointpoint regression for trends. The prevalence of CDI was 6.8 per 1000 hospital discharges. Patients with T2DM and CDI had increased odds of in-hospital mortality (OR, 3.63; 95% CI 3.16, 4.17). The adjusted mean LOS was higher in patients with CDI than without CDI (11.9 vs. 4.7days). That translated to average hospital costs of $23,000 and $9100 for patients with and without CDI, respectively. The adjusted risk of mortality in patients who had CDI alone (OR 3.75; 95% CI 3.18, 4.41) was similar to patients who had CDI in addition to other common infections (OR 3.25; 95% CI 2.58, 4.10). CDI is independently associated with poorer health outcomes in patients with T2DM. We recommend close surveillance for CDI in hospitalized patients and further studies to determine the cost effectiveness of screening for CDI among patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital Web site 'tops' in Louisiana. Hospital PR, marketing group cites East Jefferson General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    East Jefferson General Hospital in Metairie, La., launched a new Web site in October 2001. Its user-friendly home page offers links to hospital services, medical staff, and employer information. Its jobline is a powerful tool for recruitment. The site was awarded the 2002 Pelican Award for Best Consumer Web site by the Louisiana Society for Hospital Public Relations & Marketing.

  17. Care of "new" long-stay patients in a district general hospital psychiatric unit. The first two years of a hospital-hostel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J S

    1986-05-01

    The paper describes the need for long-term inpatient care in an English health district whose psychiatric services were based on a unit in a District General Hospital. Patients who became long-stay were placed in a new hospital-hostel in a city centre. Three quarters of those eligible could be managed in the hostel, with those rejected posing more control problems. Patients in the hostel became less withdrawn and increased their activity and use of community facilities.

  18. Inpatient satisfaction at different public sector hospitals of a metropolitan city in Pakistan: a comparative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mehwish; Rehman, Rehana; Ikramuddin, Zia; Asad, Nava; Farooq, Ayesha

    2018-04-01

    To observe inpatient satisfaction at different public sector hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan. A cross sectional study was carried out during 2010-2012 in four major public sector hospitals of Karachi. A total of 710 patients completed the study. Responses were gathered in a self-structured questionnaire that comprised of four dimensions of satisfaction with doctor, staff, administration and treatment. Average Score of each dimension was taken and compared using one way analysis of variance. Satisfaction with doctors, staff and administration of provincial and federal hospitals were comparatively similar (P > 0.05). However, satisfaction with treatment significantly differed in all four hospitals (P public sector hospitals showed satisfaction with healthcare personnel and related administration. However, treatment dimension needs to be improved to get more satisfaction.

  19. Effects of Peer Mentoring on Self-Efficacy and Hospital Readmission After Inpatient Rehabilitation of Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, Julie; Jones, Michael L; Sweatman, W Mark; Hong, Minna; Anziano, Peter; DeVault, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of intensive peer mentoring on patient-reported outcomes of self-efficacy and unplanned hospital readmissions for persons with spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) within the first 6 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Nonprofit inpatient rehabilitation hospital specializing in care of persons with SCI/D and brain injury. Patients (N=158) admitted to the SCI/D rehabilitation program whose discharge location was a community setting. Participants (51% with paraplegia and 49% with tetraplegia) were 73% white and 77% men, with a mean age of 38 years. Participants in the experimental group received initial consult/introduction with a peer support program liaison and were assigned a peer mentor, who met with the participant weekly throughout the inpatient stay and made weekly contact by phone, e-mail, or in person for 90 days postdischarge. Participants also were encouraged to participate in regularly scheduled peer support activities. Nonexperimental group participants were introduced to peer support and provided services only on request. General Self-efficacy Scale (adapted to SCI/D), project-developed community integration self-efficacy scale, and patient-reported unplanned rehospitalizations. Growth rate for self-efficacy in the first 6 months postdischarge was significantly higher for experimental group participants than nonexperimental group participants. Experimental group participants also had significantly fewer unplanned hospital days. This study provides evidence that individuals receiving intensive peer mentoring during and after rehabilitation for SCI/D demonstrate greater gains in self-efficacy over time and have fewer days of unplanned rehospitalization in the first 180 days postdischarge. More research is needed to examine the long-term effects of this intervention on health care utilization and the relation between improved health and patient-reported quality of life outcomes

  20. Carotid Surgery in a District General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairgrieve, John

    1981-01-01

    The carotid surgical experience of Cheltenham General Hospital over a 13 year period (1968-81) is presented. This includes 42 operations for stenosis, and 12 further operations for carotid body tumour, carotid aneurysm, subclavian steal syndrome and trauma to the internal carotid artery. The operative techniques and complications are briefly discussed and reasons advanced for a more agressive approach to the problems of extra-cerebral carotid disease in this country. PMID:7185417

  1. ANALYSIS OF INA-CBG’S FARE AND GOVERNOR REGULATION FAREON SURGERY AT INPATIENT ROOM OF UNDATA REGIONAL PUBLIC HOSPITAL IN PALU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Ryman Napirah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In order to determine the fares of surgery, there are two types of fares used by hospitals namely Indonesian Case Based Groups fare (INA-CBG s and Governor Regulation fare. This study aimed to identify and analyze both types of fares in orthopedic surgery, general, eyes, midwifery, mouth, ENT, urology at inpatient room of Undata Regional Public Hospital in Palu during year 2014. Method: This was a quantitative study with descriptive approach with 46 cases as the number of surgery. Data were collected through observation and analysis of secondary data were gotten from medical record, pharmaceutical installation of IBS/IDR, inpatient therapy room (Matahari, Aster, and Teratai pavilions and cashier of inpatient room in form of cost details and patient data from January to December 2014. Data Presentation was formed on tables, where the existing fares are grouped based on the component of each cost then summed and calculated the deviation between the two types of fares. Results: This study indicated that orthopedic surgery with deviation of Rp 11.311.365, general surgery with deviation of Rp 6.438.409, eyes surgery with deviation of Rp 45.173.741, midwifery surgery with deviation of Rp 6.645.765, oral surgery with deviation of Rp 6.105.659, and urological surgery with deviation of Rp. 3.809.959. Conclusion: It can be concluded that INA-CBG's fares are higher than Governor Regulation fares except orthopedic surgery, where the Governor Regulation faresare higher than INA-CBG’s fares.

  2. Malnutrition is independently associated with skin tears in hospital inpatient setting-Findings of a 6-year point prevalence audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Emma L; Hickling, Donna F; Williams, Damian M; Bell, Jack J

    2018-05-24

    Skin tears cause pain, increased length of stay, increased costs, and reduced quality of life. Minimal research reports the association between skin tears, and malnutrition using robust measures of nutritional status. This study aimed to articulate the association between malnutrition and skin tears in hospital inpatients using a yearly point prevalence of inpatients included in the Queensland Patient Safety Bedside Audit, malnutrition audits and skin tear audits conducted at a metropolitan tertiary hospital between 2010 and 2015. Patients were excluded if admitted to mental health wards or were <18 years. A total of 2197 inpatients were included, with a median age of 71 years. The overall prevalence of skin tears was 8.1%. Malnutrition prevalence was 33.5%. Univariate analysis demonstrated associations between age (P ˂ .001), body mass index (BMI) (P < .001) and malnutrition (P ˂ .001) but not gender (P = .319). Binomial logistic regression analysis modelling demonstrated that malnutrition diagnosed using the Subjective Global Assessment was independently associated with skin tear incidence (odds ratio, OR: 1.63; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.13-2.36) and multiple skin tears (OR 2.48 [95% CI 1.37-4.50]). BMI was not independently associated with skin tears or multiple skin tears. This study demonstrated independent associations between malnutrition and skin tear prevalence and multiple skin tears. It also demonstrated the limitations of BMI as a nutritional assessment measure. © 2018 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals and...

  4. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831-308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93-6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66-4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257-US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033-US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%-24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55-8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94-7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044-US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353-US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%-12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%-11.77%). Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population.

  5. Analysis of hospitalization expenditures and influencing factors for inpatients with coronary heart disease in a tier-3 hospital in Xi'an, China: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing-Mei; Zhang, Xian-Zhi; Hu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Huo-Liang; Yu, Min

    2017-12-01

    The medical costs for inpatients with coronary heart disease (CHD) have risen to unprecedented levels, putting tremendous financial pressure on their families and the entire society. The objective of this study was to examine the actual direct medical costs of inpatients with CHD and to analyze the influencing factors of those costs, to provide advice on the prevention and control of high medical costs of patients with CHD. A retrospective descriptive analysis of hospitalization expenditures data examined 10,301 inpatients with coronary heart disease of a tier-3 hospital in Xi'an from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. The data included demographic information, the average length of stay, and different types of expenses incurred during the hospitalization period. The difference between different groups was analyzed using a univariate analysis, and the influencing factors of hospitalization expenditures were explored by the multiple linear stepwise regression analysis. The average age of these patients was 60.0 years old, the average length of stay was 4.0 days, and the majority were males (7172, 69.6%). The average hospitalization expenses were $6791.38 (3294.16-9, 732.59), and the top 3 expenses were medical consumables, operation fees, and drugs. The influencing factors of hospitalization expenditures included the length of stay, the number of times of admission, the type of medical insurance schemes, whether have a surgery or not, the gender, the age, and the marriage status. The inpatients with CHD in this tier-3 hospital were mostly over 45 years old. The average medical cost of males was much higher than that of females. Our findings suggest that the solution for tremendous hospitalization expenditures should be that more attention is paid to controlling the high expense of medical consumables and that the traditional method of reducing medical expenses by shortening the length of stay is still important in nowadays. Furthermore, the type of medical

  6. 78 FR 16632 - Medicare Program; Part B Inpatient Billing in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... other devices used for reduction of fractures and dislocations. Prosthetic devices (other than dental... rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), CAHs, children's hospitals, cancer hospitals, and Maryland waiver hospitals. We...

  7. Geographic Region and Profit Status Drive Variation in Hospital Readmission Outcomes Among Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Laura Coots; Ingber, Melvin J; Deutsch, Anne; Hefele, Jennifer Gaudet; Perloff, Jennifer

    2017-12-22

    To examine whether there are differences in inpatient rehabilitation facilities' (IRFs') all-cause 30-day postdischarge hospital readmission rates vary by organizational characteristics and geographic regions. Observational study. IRFs. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged from all IRFs nationally in 2013 and 2014 (N = 1166 IRFs). Not applicable. We applied specifications for an existing quality measure adopted by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for public reporting that assesses all-cause unplanned hospital readmission measure for 30 days postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation. We estimated facility-level observed and risk-standardized readmission rates and then examined variation by several organizational characteristics (facility type, profit status, teaching status, proportion of low-income patients, size) and geographic factors (rural/urban, census division, state). IRFs' mean risk-standardized hospital readmission rate was 13.00%±0.77%. After controlling for organizational characteristics and practice patterns, we found substantial variation in IRFs' readmission rates: for-profit IRFs had significantly higher readmission rates than did not-for-profit IRFs (Preadmission rates than did IRFs in New England that had the lowest rates. Our findings point to variation in quality of care as measured by risk-standardized hospital readmission rates after IRF discharge. Thus, monitoring of readmission outcomes is important to encourage quality improvement in discharge care planning, care transitions, and follow-up. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Advancing the recovery orientation of hospital care through staff engagement with former clients of inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame; Collins, April; Clark, Carrie; Costa, Lucy; Mihalakakos, George; Paterson, Jane

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of consumer narratives on the recovery orientation and job satisfaction of service providers on inpatient wards that focus on the treatment of schizophrenia. It was developed to address the paucity of literature and service development tools that address advancing the recovery model of care in inpatient contexts. A mixed-methods design was used. Six inpatient units in a large urban psychiatric facility were paired on the basis of characteristic length of stay, and one unit from each pair was assigned to the intervention. The intervention was a series of talks (N=58) to inpatient staff by 12 former patients; the talks were provided approximately biweekly between May 2011 and May 2012. Self-report measures completed by staff before and after the intervention assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the recovery model, the delivery of recovery-oriented care at a unit level, and job satisfaction. In addition, focus groups for unit staff and individual interviews with the speakers were conducted after the speaker series had ended. The hypothesis that the speaker series would have an impact on the attitudes and knowledge of staff with respect to the recovery model was supported. This finding was evident from both quantitative and qualitative data. No impact was observed for recovery orientation of care at the unit level or for job satisfaction. Although this engagement strategy demonstrated an impact, more substantial change in inpatient practices likely requires a broader set of strategies that address skill levels and accountability.

  9. Zolpidem prescribing and adverse drug reactions in hospitalized general medicine patients at a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Webb, Melissa J; Gray, Shelly L

    2004-03-01

    Zolpidem is prescribed for sleep disruption in hospitalized patients, but data on the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are based largely on outpatient studies. Thus, the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized patients may be much higher. The goal of this study was to describe prescribing patterns of zolpidem for hospitalized medical patients aged 50 years, the incidence of ADRs possibly and probably associated with its use, and the factors associated with central nervous system (CNS) ADRs. This case series was conducted in 4 general medicine wards at a Veterans Affairs hospital and was a consecutive sample of patients aged 50 years who were hospitalized between 1993 and 1997 and received zolpidem as a hypnotic during hospitalization, but had not received it in the previous 3 months. Chart review was conducted by 2 evaluators. Data extracted from the medical records included admission demographic characteristics, medications, comorbidities, and levels of function in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The main outcome measure was ADRs possibly or probably related to zolpidem use. The association between zolpidem and the occurrence of CNS ADRs (eg, confusion, dizziness, daytime somnolence) was analyzed separately. The review included 119 medical patients aged > or =50 years who had newly received zolpidem for sleep disruption during hospitalization. The median age of the population was 70 years; 86 (72.3%) patients were aged 65 years. The initial zolpidem dose was 5 mg in 42 patients (35.3%) and 10 mg in 77 patients (64.7%). Twenty-three patients had a respective 16 and 10 ADRs possibly and probably related to zolpidem use (19.3% incidence). Of a total of 26 ADRs, 21 (80.8%) were CNS ADRs, occurring with both zolpidem 5 mg (10.8% of users) and 10 mg (18.3% of users). On univariate analyses, the only factor significantly associated with a CNS ADR was functional impairment at baseline (P = 0.003). Zolpidem was discontinued in 38.8% of

  10. Inpatient Management of Diabetes Mellitus among Noncritically Ill Patients at University Hospital of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee; González-Rosario, Rafael A; González, Loida; Sánchez, Viviana; Vega, Mónica A; Alvarado, Milliette; Ramón, Raul O

    2014-05-01

    To describe the state of glycemic control in noncritically ill diabetic patients admitted to the Puerto Rico University Hospital and adherence to current standard of care guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. This was a retrospective study of patients admitted to a general medicine ward with diabetes mellitus as a secondary diagnosis. Clinical data for the first 5 days and the last 24 hours of hospitalization were analyzed. A total of 147 noncritically ill diabetic patients were evaluated. The rates of hyperglycemia (blood glucose ≥180 mg/dL) and hypoglycemia (blood glucose diabetic patients is suboptimal, probably due to clinical inertia, manifested by absence of appropriate modification of insulin regimen and intensification of dose in uncontrolled diabetic patients. A comprehensive educational diabetes management program, along with standardized insulin orders, should be implemented to improve the care of these patients.

  11. Prescribing patterns for inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Slovenia: Results of 16-month prospective, non-interventional clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Cvetka Bačar; Pišlar, Mitja; Mrhar, Aleš; Tavčar, Rok

    2017-06-01

    In Slovenia, there has been no evidence about the prescribing patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorders. The research aims to analyze drug utilization patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorder that are coded as F20-F29 according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 th revision (schizophrenia spectrum disorders). Prospective research was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija. The medical records of the inpatients admitted over a 12-month period were collected from the beginning to the end of their hospitalization. A total of 311 inpatients with 446 hospitalizations were included, producing a total of 3954 medication prescriptions. Medications prescribed pro re nata (the use of as needed) were also taken into account. Antipsychotics (N=1149, 43% of prescriptions) were the most often prescribed medications, followed by anxiolytics, antiparkinsonians, antidepressants, mood stabilizers and cardiovascular drugs. A total of 256 (82%) inpatients received at least one pro re nata medication. It was observed that the studied population was treated with one antipsychotic on 27 percent of prescriptions. Inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were exposed to a large number of different drugs. They were not received only psychotropic drugs but also other medications. With the knowledge about medications the implementation of clinical pharmacy services to the psychiatrists would significantly improve medication of inpatients with psychotic disorders and polypharmacotherapy.

  12. Control costs, enhance quality, and increase revenue in three top general public hospitals in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue-Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. METHODS: We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS, cost per day (CPD, inpatient mortality rate (IMR, and length of stay (LOS, using a generalized additive model. FINDINGS: There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001, from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. INTERPRETATIONS: These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role

  13. IVC filter placements in children: nationwide comparison of practice patterns at adult and children's hospitals using the Kids' Inpatient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Trivedi, Premal S; Ali, Sumera; Ryu, Robert K; Pezeshkmehr, Amir

    2018-02-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement in children has been described in literature, but there is variability with regard to their indications. No nationally representative study has been done to compare practice patterns of filter placements at adult and children's hospitals. To perform a nationally representative comparison of IVC filter placement practices in children at adult and children's hospitals. The 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database was searched for IVC filter placements in children filter insertion (38.7), IVC filter placements were identified. A small number of children with congenital cardiovascular anomalies codes were excluded to improve specificity of the code used to identify filter placement. Filter placements were further classified by patient demographics, hospital type (children's and adult), United States geographic region, urban/rural location, and teaching status. Statistical significance of differences between children's or adult hospitals was determined using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. A total of 618 IVC filter placements were identified in children filters were placed in the setting of venous thromboembolism in children's hospitals (40/44, 90%) compared to adult hospitals (246/573, 43%) (Pfilters comprised 327/573 (57%) at adult hospitals, with trauma being the most common indication (301/327, 92%). The mean length of stay for patients receiving filters was 24.5 days in children's hospitals and 18.4 days in adult hospitals. The majority of IVC filters in children are placed in adult hospital settings. Children's hospitals are more likely to place therapeutic filters for venous thromboembolism, compared to adult hospitals where the prophylactic setting of trauma predominates.

  14. Obesity and Mortality, Length of Stay and Hospital Cost among Patients with Sepsis: A Nationwide Inpatient Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tuan Nguyen

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and all-cause mortality, length of stay and hospital cost among patients with sepsis 20 years of age or older.It was a retrospective cohort study. The dataset was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Hospitalizations of sepsis patients 20 years of age or older were included. All 25 primary and secondary diagnosis fields were screened to identify patients with sepsis using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Obesity was the exposure of interest. It was one of the 29 standardized Elixhauser comorbidity measures and readily available in the dataset as a dichotomized variable. The outcome measures were all-cause in-hospital death, length of stay and hospital cost.After weighting, our sample projected to a population size of 1,763,000, providing an approximation for the number of hospital discharges of all sepsis patients 20 years of age or older in the US in 2011. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 14.8%, the median hospital length of stay was 7 days and the median hospital cost was $15,917. After adjustment, the all-cause mortality was lower (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.88; the average hospital length of stay was longer (adjusted difference = 0.65 day; 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.86 and the hospital cost per stay was higher (adjusted difference = $2,927; 95% CI = $1,606 to $4,247 for obese sepsis patients as compared to non-obese ones.With this large and nationally representative sample of over 1,000 hospitals in the US, we found that obesity was significantly associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of dying among hospitalized sepsis patients; however it was also associated with greater duration and cost of hospitalization.

  15. Quality care for children: inpatient medication use in a mid-Atlantic hospital system 2000-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Tamar; Lawless, Stephen T; Greenspan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on a preliminary analysis of an electronic database that includes more than 32 000 pediatric hospitalizations during 2000-2003. They analyzed pediatric inpatient medication use in a defined geographic area, the catchment area for the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, serving Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The study population included 18 108 female and 14 375 male children. The authors calculated the percentages of children receiving at least 1 administration of each drug. More than 700 drugs were received by children in the study population; 9 were received by at least 10% of all patients. The probability of receiving specific medications varied with patient age, sex, and race, but much further work is needed to quantify the variations. The database has the potential to inform pediatric health services research and pediatric comparative effectiveness research, and it may be the first analysis of hospitalizations for a pediatric population comprising all ages from 0 to 18.

  16. Screening for Older Emergency Department Inpatients at Risk of Prolonged Hospital Stay: The Brief Geriatric Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Cyrille P.; de Decker, Laure; Kabeshova, Anastasiia; Annweiler, Cédric; Beauchet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were 1) to confirm that combinations of brief geriatric assessment (BGA) items were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS among geriatric patients hospitalized in acute care medical units after their admission to the emergency department (ED); and 2) to determine whether these combinations of BGA items could be used as a prognostic tool of prolonged LHS. Methods Based on a prospective observational cohort design, 1254 inpatients (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.9±5.9 years; 59.3% female) recruited upon their admission to ED and discharged in acute care medical units of Angers University Hospital, France, were selected in this study. At baseline assessment, a BGA was performed and included the following 6 items: age ≥85years, male gender, polypharmacy (i.e., ≥5 drugs per day), use of home-help services, history of falls in previous 6 months and temporal disorientation (i.e., inability to give the month and/or year). The LHS in acute care medical units was prospectively calculated in number of days using the hospital registry. Results Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of prolonged LHS of different combinations of BGA items ranged from 0.50 to 0.57. Cox regression models revealed that combinations defining a high risk of prolonged LHS, identified from ROC curves, were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS (hazard ratio >1.16 with P>0.010). Kaplan-Meier distributions of discharge showed that inpatients classified in high-risk group of prolonged LHS were discharged later than those in low-risk group (Prisk factors for prolonged LHS but their prognostic value was poor in the studied sample of older inpatients. PMID:25333271

  17. Screening for older emergency department inpatients at risk of prolonged hospital stay: the brief geriatric assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Cyrille P; de Decker, Laure; Kabeshova, Anastasiia; Annweiler, Cédric; Beauchet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to confirm that combinations of brief geriatric assessment (BGA) items were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS among geriatric patients hospitalized in acute care medical units after their admission to the emergency department (ED); and 2) to determine whether these combinations of BGA items could be used as a prognostic tool of prolonged LHS. Based on a prospective observational cohort design, 1254 inpatients (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.9±5.9 years; 59.3% female) recruited upon their admission to ED and discharged in acute care medical units of Angers University Hospital, France, were selected in this study. At baseline assessment, a BGA was performed and included the following 6 items: age ≥85years, male gender, polypharmacy (i.e., ≥5 drugs per day), use of home-help services, history of falls in previous 6 months and temporal disorientation (i.e., inability to give the month and/or year). The LHS in acute care medical units was prospectively calculated in number of days using the hospital registry. Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of prolonged LHS of different combinations of BGA items ranged from 0.50 to 0.57. Cox regression models revealed that combinations defining a high risk of prolonged LHS, identified from ROC curves, were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS (hazard ratio >1.16 with P>0.010). Kaplan-Meier distributions of discharge showed that inpatients classified in high-risk group of prolonged LHS were discharged later than those in low-risk group (PLHS of all combinations was poor with sensitivity under 77%, a high variation of specificity (from 26.6 to 97.4) and a low likelihood ratio of positive test under 5.6. Combinations of 6-item BGA tool were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS but their prognostic value was poor in the studied sample of older inpatients.

  18. Characteristics of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases-Producing Escherichia coli in Fecal Samples of Inpatients of Beijing Tongren Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maoye; Fan, Yanyan; Wang, Mei; Lu, Xinxin

    2017-05-24

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in Beijing Tongren hospital and to identify a possible relation between colonization and infection. The clinical data on 650 inpatients between March 2012 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli among the inpatients was 25.7% (167/650), with the highest level (50.0%) in the rheumatology ward and the lowest (10.0%) in intensive care units. Hospital stay more than 2 years prior to infection, the use of antibiotics within 3 months of infection, and the use of glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive drugs were found to be significantly associated with carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli (P coli was not high. The risk factors of carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli are hospitalization and use of antibiotics, glucocorticoids, or immunosuppressive drugs. ST38, ST10, ST131, and ST167 are the prominent genotypes, but almost 50.0% of STs were scarcely distributed.

  19. Overall Hospital Cost Estimates in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: Analysis of the 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraoni, David; Nasr, Viviane G; DiNardo, James A

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine overall hospital cost in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to compare cost associated with cardiac surgical procedures, cardiac catheterizations, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical admissions. The 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kid's Inpatient Database was used to evaluate hospital cost in neonates and children with CHD undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac catheterization, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical treatments. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to determine independent predictors for increased hospital cost. In 2012, total hospital cost was 28,900 M$, while hospital cost in children with CHD represented 23% of this total and accounted for only 4.4% of hospital discharges. The median cost was $51,302 ($32,088-$100,058) in children who underwent cardiac surgery, $21,920 ($13,068-$51,609) in children who underwent cardiac catheterization, $4134 ($1771-$10,253) in children who underwent non-cardiac surgery, and $23,062 ($5529-$71,887) in children admitted for medical treatments. Independent predictors for increased cost were hospital bed size cost in children with CHD represented 23% of global cost while accounting for only 4.4% of discharges. This study identified factors associated with increased cost of cardiac surgical procedures, cardiac catheterizations, non-cardiac surgical procedures, and medical management in children with CHD.

  20. Hernia Surgery in Nyeri Provincial General Hospital, Kenya: Our 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The average length of hospital stay was 3 days. Of the inguinal ... on hernia disease with reference to prevalence, pattern and management at a provincial general hospital in Kenya. Methods. After obtaining permission from the hospital administration, we .... financial constraint on hospitals, length of hospital stay and enable ...

  1. Hospital Guidelines for Diabetes Management and the Joint Commission-American Diabetes Association Inpatient Diabetes Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Pamela; Scheurer, Danielle; Dake, Andrew W; Hedgpeth, Angela; Hutto, Amy; Colquitt, Caroline; Hermayer, Kathie L

    2016-04-01

    The Joint Commission Advanced Inpatient Diabetes Certification Program is founded on the American Diabetes Association's Clinical Practice Recommendations and is linked to the Joint Commission Standards. Diabetes currently affects 29.1 million people in the USA and another 86 million Americans are estimated to have pre-diabetes. On a daily basis at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Medical Center, there are approximately 130-150 inpatients with a diagnosis of diabetes. The program encompasses all service lines at MUSC. Some important features of the program include: a program champion or champion team, written blood glucose monitoring protocols, staff education in diabetes management, medical record identification of diabetes, a plan coordinating insulin and meal delivery, plans for treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, data collection for incidence of hypoglycemia, and patient education on self-management of diabetes. The major clinical components to develop, implement, and evaluate an inpatient diabetes care program are: I. Program management, II. Delivering or facilitating clinical care, III. Supporting self-management, IV. Clinical information management and V. performance measurement. The standards receive guidance from a Disease-Specific Care Certification Advisory Committee, and the Standards and Survey Procedures Committee of the Joint Commission Board of Commissioners. The Joint Commission-ADA Advanced Inpatient Diabetes Certification represents a clinical program of excellence, improved processes of care, means to enhance contract negotiations with providers, ability to create an environment of teamwork, and heightened communication within the organization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Book Review: Review Manual for Massachusetts General Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Review Manual for Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of. General Hospital Psychiatry. 5th ed. Book Author: Theodore A. Stern. Pp 121. Philadelphia: Elsevier Mosby. 2004. ISBN 0-323-02768-7.

  3. A survey of the prevalence of smoking and smoking cessation advice received by inpatients in a large teaching hospital in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bartels, C

    2012-01-06

    BACKGROUND: The adverse effects of smoking are well documented and it is crucial that this modifiable risk factor is addressed routinely. Professional advice can be effective at reducing smoking amongst patients, yet it is not clear if all hospital in-patient smokers receive advice to quit. AIMS: To explore smoking prevalence amongst hospital in-patients and smoking cessation advice given by health professionals in a large university teaching hospital. METHODS: Interviews were carried out over 2 weeks in February 2011 with all eligible in-patients in Beaumont Hospital. RESULTS: Of the 205 patients who completed the survey, 61% stated they had been asked about smoking by a healthcare professional in the past year. Only 44% of current\\/recent smokers stated they had received smoking cessation advice from a health professional within the same timeframe. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to increase rates of healthcare professional-provided smoking cessation advice are urgently needed.

  4. Ambulatory surgery center and general hospital competition: entry decisions and strategic choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Housman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    General hospitals are consistently under pressure to control cost and improve quality. In addition to mounting payers' demands, hospitals operate under evolving market conditions that might threaten their survival. While hospitals traditionally were concerned mainly with competition from other hospitals, today's reimbursement schemes and entrepreneurial activities encouraged the proliferation of outpatient facilities such as ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) that can jeopardize hospitals' survival. The purpose of this article was to examine the relationship between ASCs and general hospitals. More specifically, we apply the niche overlap theory to study the impact that competition between ASCs and general hospitals has on the survival chances of both of these organizational populations. Our analysis examined interpopulation competition in models of organizational mortality and market demand. We utilized Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the impact of competition from each on ASC and hospital exit while controlling for market factors. We relied on two data sets collected and developed by Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration: outpatient facility licensure data and inpatient and outpatient surgical procedure data. Although ASCs do tend to exit markets in which there are high levels of ASC competition, we found no evidence to suggest that ASC exit rates are affected by hospital density. On the other hand, hospitals not only tend to exit markets with high levels of hospital competition but also experience high exit rates in markets with high ASC density. The implications from our study differ for ASCs and hospitals. When making decisions about market entry, ASCs should choose their markets according to the following: demand for outpatient surgery, number of physicians who would practice in the surgery center, and the number of surgery centers that already exist in the market. Hospitals, on the other hand, should account for competition from ASCs

  5. Inpatient Behavioral Health Recapture A Busiess Case Analysis at Evans Army Community Hospital Fort Carson, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-20

    and Obstetrics /Gynecology. Inpatient care includes Obstetrics , Intensive Care, and Post Anesthesia Care/Same Day Surgery. EACH Mission: Delivering...charged with murder in Iraq shooting deaths, 2009). EACH Inpt Psych 13 Fort Carson has not been immune to the increase in suicides and violence among...to identify Soldiers with PTSD symptoms. In 2008, however, attention returned to Fort Carson as a number of local homicides and other violence tied

  6. Using a mentoring approach to implement an inpatient glycemic control program in United States hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushakoff, Robert J; Sullivan, Mary M; Seley, Jane Jeffrie; Sadhu, Archana; O'Malley, Cheryl W; Manchester, Carol; Peterson, Eric; Rogers, Kendall M

    2014-09-01

    establishing an inpatient glycemic control program is challenging, requires years of work, significant education and coordination of medical, nursing, dietary, and pharmacy staff, and support from administration and Performance Improvement departments. We undertook a 2 year quality improvement project assisting 10 medical centers (academic and community) across the US to implement inpatient glycemic control programs. the project was comprised of 3 interventions. (1) One day site visit with a faculty team (MD and CDE) to meet with key personnel, identify deficiencies and barriers to change, set site specific goals and develop strategies and timelines for performance improvement. (2) Three webinar follow-up sessions. (3) Web site for educational resources. Updates, challenges, and accomplishments for each site were reviewed at the time of each webinar and progress measured at the completion of the project with an evaluation questionnaire. as a result of our intervention, institutions revised and simplified formularies and insulin order sets (with CHO counting options); implemented glucometrics and CDE monitoring of inpatient glucoses (assisting providers with orders); added new protocols for DKA and perinatal treatment; and implemented nursing, physician and patient education initiatives. Changes were institution specific, fitting the local needs and cultures. As to the extent to which Institution׳s goals were satisfied: 2 reported "completely", 4 "mostly," 3 "partially," and 1 "marginally". Institutions continue to move toward fulfilling their goals. an individualized, structured, performance improvement approach with expert faculty mentors can help facilitate change in an institution dedicated to implementing an inpatient glycemic control program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Seasonality of hospital admissions and birth dates among inpatients with eating disorders: a nationwide population-based retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2018-04-01

    Seasonal variation exists in the psychopathology of eating disorders. However, it is still unknown whether there is seasonal variation in eating disorder symptom severity. This study investigated seasonal trends in hospital admissions and birth dates among patients with eating disorders in Taiwan (25°N). Subgroup analyses by gender and comorbid affective disorders were also of interest. Data on all hospital admissions between 2000 and 2013 were collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, and 1954 patients with eating disorders were identified. Hospital admissions and birth dates were recorded by day. The four seasons and cross-seasons were defined by solstices and equinoxes. The expected distribution of births was determined using data from all patients hospitalized from 2000 to 2013 (n = 13,139,306). Hospital admissions among patients with eating disorders exceeded the rate of expected hospital admissions in the summer season (p distributions of birth dates among these patients did not differ from the expected distributions. Interestingly, hospital admissions among patients with comorbid affective disorders exceeded the rates of hospital admissions among non-affective patients during the spring (p = 0.004). Moreover, the number of non-affective patients born during autumn exceeded the birth rates of affective patients during this season (p = 0.001). Gender and comorbid affective disorders were not associated with cross-seasonal differences in either hospitalizations or dates of birth. Affective psychopathology in inpatients with eating disorders may substantially contribute to symptom severity that waxes and wanes with the seasons. Moreover, the seasonal distribution of birth dates was significantly different in patients without comorbid affective disorders.

  8. Paediatric in-patient care in a conflict-torn region of Somalia: are hospital outcomes of acceptable quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Khogali, M.; Manzi, M.; van Griensven, J.; Ayada, L.; Jemmy, J. P.; Maalim, A.; Amin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A district hospital in conflict-torn Somalia. Objective: To report on in-patient paediatric morbidity, case fatality and exit outcomes as indicators of quality of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Results: Of 6211 children, lower respiratory tract infections (48%) and severe acute malnutrition (16%) were the leading reasons for admission. The highest case-fatality rate was for meningitis (20%). Adverse outcomes occurred in 378 (6%) children, including 205 (3.3%) deaths; 173 (2.8%) absconded. Conclusion: Hospital exit outcomes are good even in conflict-torn Somalia, and should boost efforts to ensure that such populations are not left out in the quest to achieve universal health coverage. PMID:26393014

  9. Length of psychiatric hospitalization is correlated with CYP2D6 functional status in inpatients with major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Szarek, Bonnie L; Villagra, David; Gorowski, Krystyna; Kocherla, Mohan; Seip, Richard L; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to determine the effect of the CYP2D6 genotype on the length of hospitalization stay for patients treated for major depressive disorder. Methods A total of 149 inpatients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder at the Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital (CT, USA), were genotyped to detect altered alleles in the CYP2D6 gene. Prospectively defined drug metabolism indices (metabolic reserve, metabolic alteration and allele alteration) were determined quantitatively and assessed for their relationship to length of hospitalization stay. Results Hospital stay was significantly longer in deficient CYP2D6 metabolizers (metabolic reserve <2) compared with functional or suprafunctional metabolizers (metabolic reserve ≥2; 7.8 vs 5.7 days, respectively; p = 0.002). Conclusion CYP2D6 enzymatic functional status significantly affected length of hospital stay, perhaps due to reduced efficacy or increased side effects of the medications metabolized by the CYP2D6 isoenzyme. Functional scoring of CYP2D6 alleles may have a substantial impact on the quality of care, patient satisfaction and the economics of psychiatric treatment. PMID:23734807

  10. Unexplained Variation for Hospitals' Use of Inpatient Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Facilities After an Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Thomas, Laine; Liang, Li; Federspiel, Jerome J; Webb, Laura E; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Duncan, Pamela W; Schwamm, Lee H; Stein, Joel; Fonarow, Gregg C; Hoenig, Helen; Montalvo, Cris; George, Mary G; Lutz, Barbara J; Peterson, Eric D; Bettger, Janet Prvu

    2017-10-01

    Rehabilitation is recommended after a stroke to enhance recovery and improve outcomes, but hospital's use of inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) or skilled nursing facility (SNF) and the factors associated with referral are unknown. We analyzed clinical registry and claims data for 31 775 Medicare beneficiaries presenting with acute ischemic stroke from 918 Get With The Guidelines-Stroke hospitals who were discharged to either IRF or SNF between 2006 and 2008. Using a multilevel logistic regression model, we evaluated patient and hospital characteristics, as well as geographic availability, in relation to discharge to either IRF or SNF. After accounting for observed factors, the median odds ratio was reported to quantify hospital-level variation in the use of IRF versus SNF. Of 31 775 patients, 17 662 (55.6%) were discharged to IRF and 14 113 (44.4%) were discharged to SNF. Compared with SNF patients, IRF patients were younger, more were men, had less health-service use 6 months prestroke, and had fewer comorbid conditions and in-hospital complications. Use of IRF or SNF varied significantly across hospitals (median IRF use, 55.8%; interquartile range, 34.8%-75.0%; unadjusted median odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 2.44-2.77). Hospital-level variation in discharge rates to IRF or SNF persisted after adjustment for patient, clinical, and geographic variables (adjusted median odds ratio, 2.87; 95% confidence interval, 2.68-3.11). There is marked unexplained variation among hospitals in their use of IRF versus SNF poststroke even after accounting for clinical characteristics and geographic availability. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02284165. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Impact of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea on acute care length of stay, hospital costs, and readmission: A multicenter retrospective study of inpatients, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Glenn; Strauss, Marcie E; Thomas, Sheila M; Brown, Harold; Baumer, Dorothy; Broderick, Kelly C

    2015-11-01

    The recent epidemiologic changes of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) have resulted in substantial economic burden to U.S. acute care hospitals. Past studies evaluating CDAD-attributable costs have been geographically and demographically limited. Here, we describe CDAD-attributable burden in inpatients, overall, and in vulnerable subpopulations from the Premier hospital database, a large, diverse cohort with a wide range of high-risk subgroups. Discharges from the Premier database were retrospectively analyzed to assess length of stay (LOS), total inpatient costs, readmission, and inpatient mortality. Patients with CDAD had significantly worse outcomes than matched controls in terms of total LOS, rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and inpatient mortality. After adjustment for risk factors, patients with CDAD had increased odds of inpatient mortality, total and ICU LOS, costs, and odds of 30-, 60- and 90-day all-cause readmission versus non-CDAD patients. CDAD-attributable costs were higher in all studied vulnerable subpopulations, which also had increased odds of 30-, 60- and 90-day all-cause readmission than those without CDAD. Given the significant economic impact CDAD has on hospitals, prevention of initial episodes and targeted therapy to prevent recurrences in vulnerable patients are essential to decrease the overall burden to hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Institutional blood glucose monitoring system for hospitalized patients: an integral component of the inpatient glucose control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Mona; Landau, Zohar; Matas, Zipora; Wainstein, Julio

    2009-09-01

    The ability to measure patient blood glucose levels at bedside in hospitalized patients and to transmit those values to a central database enables and facilitates glucose control and follow-up and is an integral component in the care of the hospitalized diabetic patient. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of an institutional glucometer employed in the framework of the Program for the Treatment of the Hospitalized Diabetic Patient (PTHDP) at E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel. As part of the program to facilitate glucose control in hospitalized diabetic patients, an institutional glucometer was employed that permits uploading of data from stands located in each inpatient department and downloading of that data to a central hospital-wide database. Blood glucose values from hospitalized diabetic patients were collected from August 2007 to October 2008. The inpatient glucose control program was introduced gradually beginning January 2008. During the follow-up period, more than 150,000 blood glucose measures were taken. Mean glucose was 195.7 +/- 99.12 mg/dl during the follow-up period. Blood glucose values declined from 206 +/- 105 prior to PTHDP (August 2007-December 2007) to 186 +/- 92 after its inception (January 2008-October 2008). The decline was associated significantly with time (r = 0.11, p < 0.0001). The prevalence of blood glucose values lower than 60 mg/dl was 1.48% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36%] prior to vs 1.55% (95% CI 0.37%) following implementation of the PTHDP. Concomitantly, a significant increase in the proportion of blood glucose values between 80 and 200 mg/dl was observed, from 55.5% prior to program initiation vs 61.6% after program initiation (p < 0.0001). The present study was designed to observe changes in institution-wide glucose values following implementation of the PTHDP. Information was extracted from the glucometer system itself. Because the aforementioned study was not a clinical trial, we cannot rule out

  13. Inpatient Management Of Diabetes Mellitus Among Noncritically Ill Patients At The University Hospital Of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee; González-Rosario, Rafael A.; González, Loida; Sánchez, Viviana; Vega, Mónica A.; Alvarado, Milliette; Ramón, Raul O.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the state of glycemic control in non-critically ill diabetic patients admitted to the PR University Hospital, and the adherence to current standard of care guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. METHODS This was a retrospective study of patients admitted to a General Medicine ward with Diabetes Mellitus as a secondary diagnosis. Clinical data was analyzed for the first 5 days and the last 24 hours of admission. RESULTS One hundred and forty-seven (147) non-critically ill diabetic patients were evaluated. The rate of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia was 56.7% and 2.8%, respectively. Nearly 60% of patients were hyperglycemic during the first 24 hrs of admission and 54.2% during the last 24 hrs. Mean last glucose value before discharge was 189.6 ± 73 mg/dL. Most patients were treated with subcutaneous insulin with basal insulin alone used as the most common regimen. The proportion of patients classified as uncontrolled receiving basal-bolus therapy increased from 54.3% on day 1 to 60.0% on day 5, with still 40.0% receiving only basal insulin. Most of the uncontrolled patients had their insulin dose increased (70.1%), however, a substantial portion had no change (23.7%) or even had a decrease (6.2%) in their insulin dose. CONCLUSIONS Even though there are areas of improvement in the management of hospitalized diabetic patients, it is still suboptimal, probably due to clinical inertia. A comprehensive educational diabetes management program, along with standardized insulin orders should be implemented to improve the care of these patients. PMID:24325996

  14. Predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration in an adult psychiatric inpatient hospital in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study objective was to epidemiologically analyse patients presenting at an adult and mixed-gender psychiatric inpatient unit in Essex, Kingswood Centre, UK, to report the predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration. Method and material: Meta-analysis and descriptive statistics analysed the year 2016 discharge data on Excel® for 162 patients. ICD-10 codes classified their mental illnesses. Results: Meta-analysis evidenced statistically significant heterogeneity in numbers admissions (I2=95%; p≤0.001, length (I2=78%; p≤0.001, and gender (I2=76%; p≤0.001. The prevailing diagnosis was borderline personality disorder (BPD (rate, 95% CI=0.46 [0.38-0.54]. The longest admission was for schizoaffective disorder (mean duration, 95% CI=53 [22.65-83.34], p=0.001. Gender presented a prevalence of male over female admissions for schizophrenia (OR, 95% CI=0.14 [0.05-0.35], p≤0.001 and BPD with prevalence of female over male admissions (OR, 95% CI=2.79 [1.35-5.76], p=0.05. Conclusion: Female patients with BPD were the most represented category in non-forensic psychiatric inpatient wards in the population studied. Male patients with schizophrenia represented the other gender highly represented. The longest admission was recorded for schizoaffective disorder due to the complexity to treat both mood and psychotic symptoms. It is likely that women with BPD will be the future recipients of psychiatric inpatient and outpatient healthcare services.

  15. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  16. Evaluation of an inpatient psychiatric hospital physician education program and adherence to American Diabetes Association practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Robin L; Mican, Lisa M; Lopez, Debra A; Barner, Jamie C

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations for diabetes monitoring following an educational intervention for physicians in an inpatient psychiatric hospital. This retrospective chart review was conducted in an inpatient psychiatric institution from July 1, 2010-January 15, 2011. A total of 120 subjects (60 subjects each in the pre- and post-intervention groups) meeting the inclusion criteria served as the study sample. Included subjects were admitted and discharged from an inpatient psychiatric institution within 90 days prior to (pre-intervention) and following (post-intervention) the physician education program. The medical staff was presented an educational program intervention, consisting of a 30 minute overview of the ADA 2010 Standards of Care recommendations and distribution of laminated treatment reminders. Electronic grouped order sets for patients with diabetes were also created and implemented. The primary outcome was change (pre-intervention to post-intervention) in frequency of hemoglobin A1c documentation on admission following the intervention. Secondary outcomes included the change in frequency of documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, urine creatinine/microalbumin ratio (UMA), fasting lipid profile (FLP), and change in days on sliding scale insulin. Regarding change in frequency of documentation of A1c values on admission, chi-square analysis revealed a significant increase from pre-intervention to post-intervention period of 30% (n = 18) to 61.7% (n = 37), respectively (p = 0.0005). Documentation of FLP also significantly increased [73.3% vs. 91.7% (p = 0.0082)]. There were no significant differences in the documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, and UMA or days treated with sliding scale insulin. The physician education program was successful in increasing the assessment of A1c values and lipid profiles for patients with diabetes mellitus in a psychiatric

  17. Parental responses to involvement in rounds on a pediatric inpatient unit at a teaching hospital: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Linda C; Dick, Ronald; Parry, Carol; Tamura, Glen S

    2008-03-01

    In pediatric teaching hospitals, medical decisions are traditionally made by the attending and resident physicians during rounds that do not include parents. This structure limits the ability of the medical team to provide "family-centered care" and the attending physician to model communication skills. The authors thus set out to identify how parents responded to participation in interdisciplinary teaching rounds conducted in a large tertiary care children's teaching hospital. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using data from semistructured interviews of parents who had participated in rounds on the inpatient medical unit of a large academic children's hospital. From December 2004 to April 2005, 18 parents were interviewed after their participation in rounds. Questions assessed their experiences, expectations, preferred communication styles, and suggestions for improvement. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Being able to communicate, understand the plan, and participate with the team in decision making about their child's care were the most frequently cited outcomes of importance to parents. All 18 participants described the overall experience as positive, and 17 of 18 described themselves as "comfortable" with inclusion in rounds. Use of lay terminology and inclusion of nurses in rounds were preferred. Including parents on ward rounds at a teaching hospital was viewed positively by parents. Specific themes of particular importance to parents were identified. Further study is needed to assess the impact of inclusion of parents on rounds on patient outcomes and the resident experience.

  18. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Short Inpatient Hospital Stays; Transition for Certain Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospitals Under the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System; Provider Administrative Appeals and Judicial Review. Final rule with comment period; final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2016 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, this document includes certain finalized policies relating to the hospital inpatient prospective payment system: Changes to the 2-midnight rule under the short inpatient hospital stay policy; and a payment transition for hospitals that lost their status as a Medicare-dependent, small rural hospital (MDH) because they are no longer in a rural area due to the implementation of the new Office of Management and Budget delineations in FY 2015 and have not reclassified from urban to rural before January 1, 2016. In addition, this document contains a final rule that finalizes certain 2015 proposals, and addresses public comments received, relating to the changes in the Medicare regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review relating to appropriate claims in provider cost reports.

  19. Screening for older emergency department inpatients at risk of prolonged hospital stay: the brief geriatric assessment tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille P Launay

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were 1 to confirm that combinations of brief geriatric assessment (BGA items were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS among geriatric patients hospitalized in acute care medical units after their admission to the emergency department (ED; and 2 to determine whether these combinations of BGA items could be used as a prognostic tool of prolonged LHS.Based on a prospective observational cohort design, 1254 inpatients (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.9±5.9 years; 59.3% female recruited upon their admission to ED and discharged in acute care medical units of Angers University Hospital, France, were selected in this study. At baseline assessment, a BGA was performed and included the following 6 items: age ≥85years, male gender, polypharmacy (i.e., ≥5 drugs per day, use of home-help services, history of falls in previous 6 months and temporal disorientation (i.e., inability to give the month and/or year. The LHS in acute care medical units was prospectively calculated in number of days using the hospital registry.Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of prolonged LHS of different combinations of BGA items ranged from 0.50 to 0.57. Cox regression models revealed that combinations defining a high risk of prolonged LHS, identified from ROC curves, were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS (hazard ratio >1.16 with P>0.010. Kaplan-Meier distributions of discharge showed that inpatients classified in high-risk group of prolonged LHS were discharged later than those in low-risk group (P<0.003. Prognostic value for prolonged LHS of all combinations was poor with sensitivity under 77%, a high variation of specificity (from 26.6 to 97.4 and a low likelihood ratio of positive test under 5.6.Combinations of 6-item BGA tool were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS but their prognostic value was poor in the studied sample of older inpatients.

  20. Assessment of hospitalization and mortality of scleroderma in-patients: a thirteen-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shenavandeh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an uncommon non-hereditary sporadic disease that increases the risk of premature death, especially in diffuse type. We determined the prevalence of SSc in the last 13 years in our rheumatologic hospitals as a referral center for southern Iranian patients, the causes of hospitalization, the average length of stay (LOS, the mortality rate, and the reason for their mortality. Material and methods : A cross-sectional study was performed in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied population included all patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. We calculated the hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality rates, and mean LOS. Results: There were 446 admissions by 181 patients with SSc. The female to male ratio was about 10.7 : 1. The overall mean LOS was 5.95 days. Digital ulcer and interstitial lung disease (ILD were the most common causes of hospitalizations among the SSc-related events. For those with a non-SSc-related condition, infection was the most prevalent event. Most of the deaths were due to ILD and pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH, and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%. Conclusions : Women with SSc had higher rates of hospitalization but lower in-hospital mortality than men.There were some differences between our study and other similar studies in the causes of hospitalization and in-hospital death among SSc patients, especially the lower age of death. The patients with digital ulcers and those with intestinal lung disease or pulmonary hipertension were most commonly admitted to the hospital in our study group. Probably, increasing the skin care of these patients and asking other specialty groups to cooperate will decrease the high rate of hospitalizations in our population.

  1. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users ( n = 42) and care providers ( n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  2. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time.

  3. The use of Skype in a community hospital inpatient palliative medicine consultation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, David B

    2013-01-01

    Skype™, an Internet-based communication tool, has enhanced communication under numerous circumstances. As telemedicine continues to be an increasing part of medical practice, there will be more opportunities to use Skype and similar tools. Numerous scenarios in the lay literature have helped to highlight the potential uses. Although most commonly used to enhance physician-to-patient communication, there has been limited reported use of Skype for patient-to-family communication, especially in end of life and palliative care. Our inpatient Palliative Medicine Consultation Service has offered and used this technology to enhance our patients' quality of life. The objective was to provide another tool for our patients to use to communicate with family and/or friends, especially under circumstances in which clinical symptoms, functional status, financial concerns, or geographic limitations preclude in-person face-to face communication.

  4. Underestimated prevalence of heart failure in hospital inpatients: a comparison of ICD codes and discharge letter information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Mathias; Fette, Georg; Güder, Gülmisal; Seidlmayer, Lea; Ertl, Maximilian; Dietrich, Georg; Greger, Helmut; Puppe, Frank; Störk, Stefan

    2018-04-17

    Heart failure is the predominant cause of hospitalization and amongst the leading causes of death in Germany. However, accurate estimates of prevalence and incidence are lacking. Reported figures originating from different information sources are compromised by factors like economic reasons or documentation quality. We implemented a clinical data warehouse that integrates various information sources (structured parameters, plain text, data extracted by natural language processing) and enables reliable approximations to the real number of heart failure patients. Performance of ICD-based diagnosis in detecting heart failure was compared across the years 2000-2015 with (a) advanced definitions based on algorithms that integrate various sources of the hospital information system, and (b) a physician-based reference standard. Applying these methods for detecting heart failure in inpatients revealed that relying on ICD codes resulted in a marked underestimation of the true prevalence of heart failure, ranging from 44% in the validation dataset to 55% (single year) and 31% (all years) in the overall analysis. Percentages changed over the years, indicating secular changes in coding practice and efficiency. Performance was markedly improved using search and permutation algorithms from the initial expert-specified query (F1 score of 81%) to the computer-optimized query (F1 score of 86%) or, alternatively, optimizing precision or sensitivity depending on the search objective. Estimating prevalence of heart failure using ICD codes as the sole data source yielded unreliable results. Diagnostic accuracy was markedly improved using dedicated search algorithms. Our approach may be transferred to other hospital information systems.

  5. Vaccine-preventable, hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children using the 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Amanda J; Puumala, Susan E; Kharbanda, Anupam B

    2018-02-08

    Our aim was to assess the odds of hospitalization for a vaccine-preventable, infectious disease (VP-ID) in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children compared to other racial and ethnic groups using the 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database (KID) The KID is a nationally representative sample, which allows for evaluation of VP-ID in a non-federal, non-Indian Health Service setting. In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the association of race/ethnicity and a composite outcome of hospitalization due to vaccine-preventable infection using multivariate logistic regression. AI/AN children were more likely (OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.34, 2.45) to be admitted to the hospital in 2012 for a VP-ID compared to Non-Hispanic white children after adjusting for age, sex, chronic disease status, metropolitan location, and median household income. This disparity highlights the necessity for a more comprehensive understanding of immunization and infectious disease exposure among American Indian children, especially those not covered or evaluated by Indian Health Service. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific job anxiety in comparison to general psychosomatic symptoms at admission, discharge and six months after psychosomatic inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Job anxiety is a severe problem in many patients with chronic mental disorders, as it usually results in specific participation problems in the workplace and long-term sick leave. The aim of this study was to explore the development of sick leave in dependence on general psychosomatic complaints and job anxiety from admission to a psychosomatic inpatient treatment until 6 months after discharge. A convenience sample of 91 patients, suffering from multiple mental disorders, filled in self-rating questionnaires on job anxiety (Job Anxiety Scale) and on general psychosomatic symptom load (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised) at the beginning, the end, and 6 months after discharge from an inpatient psychosomatic treatment. Additionally, sick leave status and employment status were assessed before and 6 months after the treatment. 15.4% of 91 patients were on sick leave before inpatient treatment and at follow-up (SS group), 20.9% were fit for work at intake and follow-up (FF group), 6.6% were fit for work initially and on sick leave later (FS group), and 57.1% on sick leave first and working at follow-up (SF group). In regard to general psychosomatic complaints, there were initially high scores on the SCL, a marked reduction during inpatient treatment, and a bouncing back to initial levels at follow-up for all 4 patient groups. SS and FS patients showed the highest scores at intake and follow-up. Concerning job anxiety, SS patients had the highest scores at all three assessments, while FF patients had significantly lower scores, with only low variation between assessments. SF patients started with comparatively high scores of job anxiety, which even increased before reentering work, but decreased in the follow-up period when they were confronted with work again. FS patients started low (like the FF patients) at intake, reduced their job anxiety further till discharge, but increased to higher scores at follow-up. General psychosomatic symptom load and job anxiety show a

  7. EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA IN IZOLA GENERAL HOSPITAL

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    Sabina Verem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study presents the experience with epidural analgesia (EPA for pain relief in Izola General Hospital from 2003 to 2006, the differences of labour between epidural analgesia and without it and the parturients’ satisfaction. Methods. A retrospective observational study was performed. Data were compared between 214 parturients with EPA matched by 214 parturients without. The control parturient was the equiipara with a term birth and the cephalic presentation of fetus that delivered just before the parturient of the EPA group. Maternal age, labor length, rate of oxitocin use, instrumental deliveries and cesarean sections, Apgar scores and birthweights were compared. The questionnaire was used to estimate the pain in 62 parturients. Results. In GH Izola in 214 parturients (10 % EPA was applied for labour pain relief in the period from July 2003 till December 2006. In the EPA group there was a statistically significance compared with the control group: higher parturients’ mean age (30.5 vs 28.7 y.o.; p < 0.0005, longer labour length (278 vs 222 min; p < 0.0005, higher oxitocin use rate (93.4 % vs 72.9 %; p < 0.0001 and higher instrumental delivery rate (vacuum extraction 14 % vs 1.9 %; p < 0.0001. The cesarean section rates were equal in both groups. Despite the higher instrumental delivery rate and the longer labour length in the EPA group there were no worse perinatal outcomes, neither was statisticaly significant difference in Apgar scores compared with the control group. The mean intensity of pain was highest before the EPA application (VAS 7, lowest during the transition stage (VAS 1.5 and some higher during the second phase (VAS 2.7. Most of parturients in the EPA group were satisfied; 92 % of them evaluated the EPA as good or very good. Conclusions. EPA is a very effective method for pain control during labor. The parturients’ satisfaction with this pain control method is appropriate. Despite the higher instrumental

  8. Deterioro funcional en ancianos ingresados en un hospital sin unidades geriátricas Functional impairment in elderly inpatients in a hospital without geriatric units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Jesús Cruz Lendínez

    2010-03-01

    ás influyen en la variación de la capacidad funcional durante la hospitalización. La hospitalización de ancianos en un hospital sin unidad geriátrica supone peores resultados en la capacidad funcional de los pacientes frente a los hospitales que cuentan con unidad de hospitalización geriátrica.Introduction: Increased population of elderly people is becoming more frequent admission to hospitals of people older than 65 years. Hospital stay in conventional units can lead to functional worsening in the elderly. Aim: To identify the profile of elderly patients treated in the Internal Medicine Hospital of Jaén. To analyze variation in functional ability of elderly people following admission to inpatient units of a public hospital. To identify variables that influence the changes in the functional ability of elderly inpatients in hospitals without geriatric units. Methods: Prospective observational study in 3 units of internal medicine units in a hospital belonging to the Andalusian Health Service. A sample of 190 hospitalized elderly patients has been included. Variables related to demographic, hospitalization and functional ability using Barthel Index, were reported. Results: Hospitalization in internal medicine units did not help to improve functional ability in older people; rather, they had a negative effect, promoting functional worsening in an important group of these patients. Depending on the age, among patients studied (65-85 and over, younger patients got better results on functional recovery at discharge, while those above 85 years got worst results. 16% under 85 years and 67.5% of those over 85 lose functional capacity. Conclusions: Most important factors affecting functional ability change during hospitalization were age, functional ability at admission, functional ability at discharge, the presence of companions during hospitalization and discharge destination. Hospitalization of elderly in a nongeriatric inpatient unit at hospital assumes no worse results in

  9. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore; Matheny, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention.

  10. The effect of major adverse renal cardiovascular event (MARCE) incidence, procedure volume, and unit cost on the hospital savings resulting from contrast media use in inpatient angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuffel, Eric; McCullough, Peter A; Todoran, Thomas M; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Palli, Swetha R; Ryan, Michael P; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2018-04-01

    To determine the net economic impact of switching from low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) to iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; iodixanol) in patients undergoing inpatient coronary or peripheral angioplasty in the United States (US). A budget impact model (BIM) was developed from a hospital perspective. Nationally representative procedural and contrast media prevalence rates, along with MARCE (major adverse renal cardiovascular event) incidence and episode-related cost data were derived from Premier Hospital Data (October 2014 to September 2015). A previously estimated relative risk reduction in MARCE associated with IOCM usage (9.3%) was applied. The higher cost of IOCM was included when calculating the net impact estimates at the aggregate, hospital type, and per hospital levels. One-way (±25%) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses identified the model's most important inputs. Based on weighted analysis, 513,882 US inpatient angioplasties and 35,610 MARCE cases were estimated annually. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" strategy increases contrast media cost, but prevents 2,900 MARCE events. The annual budget impact was an estimated saving of $30.71 million, aggregated across all US hospitals, $6,316 per hospital, or $60 per procedure. Net savings were maintained across all univariate sensitivity analyses. While MARCE/event-free cost differential was the most important factor driving total net savings for hospitals in the Northeast and West, procedural volume was important in the Midwest and rural locations. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" approach yields substantial net global savings to hospitals, both at the national level and within hospital sub-groups. Hospital administrators should maintain awareness of the factors that are likely to be more influential for their hospital and recognize that purchasing on the basis of lower contrast media cost may result in higher overall costs for patients undergoing inpatient

  11. Current understanding of treatment and management protocol for adult diabetic in-patients at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waki, N.; Memon, A.; Khan, M.O.; Masood, S.; Rouf, M.; Mirza, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the current understanding of treatment and management protocols for adult diabetic in-patients at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted at the Civil Hospital Karachi from July to September 2009, involved 450 participants, who were interviewed through a well-structured questionnaire regarding the patient's demography, clinical features, past medical history, type of diabetes mellitus, duration, associated complications, and also involved patient notes for laboratory tests and management. SPSSv15.0 was used for descriptive analysis. Results: The study population of 450 diabetics had 144 (32%) males and 306 (68%) females. Of the total, 435 (96.7%) patients had type 2 diabetes. There were 231 (51%) patients using insulin, 168 (37.3%) oral hypoglycaemic drugs, and 51 (11.3%) using both. Among patients using insulin, regular insulin usage stood at 30% followed by a combination of regular insulin and NPH (26.7%) and NPH alone at 6%. The most popular drug used was metformin (27.3%) and the least used drug was glitazones (4%). In the study population, 73.3% patients controlled their diabetes with diet, and 24.7% with regular exercise. Conclusion: Majority of the study population had type 2 diabetes with a female preponderance. Insulin was prescribed for half the patients. Metformin was the most frequently used oral hypoglycaemic drug. (author)

  12. Adherence to blood pressure and glucose recommendations in chronic kidney disease hospital inpatients: Clinical inertia and patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Fergus William; Nwose, Ezekiel Uba; Bwititi, Phillip Taderera; Crockett, Judith; Wang, Lexin

    2018-05-01

    To determine the extent to which targets for blood pressure (BP) (inertia affects BP and glucose control in CKD and diabetes mellitus (DM). Data was collected from the 1st January 2015 until 31st December 2015 on key patient pathology, admission reason, final discharge diagnosis, and information concerning clinical guideline adherence. Eighty-seven (n = 87) CKD patients were included. The average hospital BP for all CKD patients was 134.3/73.4 mmHg, adhering to recommendations of 7.0% >53 mmol/mol). There were 21 cases of clinical inertia, affecting 18 out of 87 patients (20.7%), with significant adverse hospital discharge differences (p = inertia and non- clinical inertia patient systolic BP (144.2 vs. 132.8 mmHg), deranged BGL (66.7% vs. 35.3%), and reduction in kidney function (83.3% vs. 30.9%). Adherence appears to be related to inpatient clinical inertia and outpatient patient health literacy and empowerment. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: reducing misdiagnosis via collaboration between an inpatient anticoagulation pharmacy service and hospital reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Allison E; Bowles, Harmony; Borrego, Matthew E; Montoya, Tiffany N; Garcia, David A; Mahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Misdiagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is common and exposes patients to high-risk therapies and potentially serious adverse events. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaboration between an inpatient pharmacy-driven anticoagulation management service (AMS) and hospital reference laboratory to reduce inappropriate HIT antibody testing via pharmacist intervention and use of the 4T pre-test probability score. Secondary objectives included clinical outcomes and cost-savings realized through reduced laboratory testing and decreased unnecessary treatment of HIT. This was a single center, pre-post, observational study. The hospital reference laboratory contacted the AMS when they received a blood sample for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent HIT antibody (HIT Ab). Trained pharmacists prospectively scored each HIT Ab ordered by using the 4T score with subsequent communication to physicians recommending for or against processing and reporting of lab results. Utilizing retrospective chart review and a database for all patients with a HIT Ab ordered during the study period, we compared the incidence of HIT Ab testing before and after implementation of the pharmacy-driven 4T score intervention. Our intervention significantly reduced the number of inappropriate HIT Ab tests processed (176 vs. 63, p reference laboratories can result in reduction of misdiagnosis of HIT and significant cost savings with similar safety.

  14. Predictors of extended length of stay, discharge to inpatient rehab, and hospital readmission following elective lumbar spine surgery: introduction of the Carolina-Semmes Grading Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Chotai, Silky; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Sorenson, Jeffrey M; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Extended hospital length of stay (LOS), unplanned hospital readmission, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after elective spine surgery contribute significantly to the variation in surgical health care costs. As novel payment models shift the risk of cost overruns from payers to providers, understanding patient-level risk of LOS, readmission, and inpatient rehabilitation is critical. The authors set out to develop a grading scale that effectively stratifies risk of these costly events after elective surgery for degenerative lumbar pathologies. METHODS The Quality and Outcomes Database (QOD) registry prospectively enrolls patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine disease. This registry was queried for patients who had undergone elective 1- to 3-level lumbar surgery for degenerative spine pathology. The association between preoperative patient variables and extended postoperative hospital LOS (LOS ≥ 7 days), discharge status (inpatient facility vs home), and 90-day hospital readmission was assessed using stepwise multivariate logistic regression. The Carolina-Semmes grading scale was constructed using the independent predictors for LOS (0-12 points), discharge to inpatient facility (0-18 points), and 90-day readmission (0-6 points), and its performance was assessed using the QOD data set. The performance of the grading scale was then confirmed separately after using it in 2 separate neurosurgery practice sites (Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates [CNSA] and Semmes Murphey Clinic). RESULTS A total of 6921 patients were analyzed. Overall, 290 (4.2%) patients required extended LOS, 654 (9.4%) required inpatient facility care/rehabilitation on hospital discharge, and 474 (6.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 90 days postdischarge. Variables that remained as independently associated with these unplanned events in multivariate analysis included age ≥ 70 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System

  15. Reduction in hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus with daily chlorhexidine gluconate bathing for medical inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Christopher F; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Sidhu, Baljinder; Ritchie, Gordon; Sharma, Azra; Jang, Willson; Wong, Anna; Bilawka, Jennifer; Richards, Danielle; Kind, Thomas; Puddicombe, David; Champagne, Sylvie; Leung, Victor; Romney, Marc G

    2017-03-01

    Daily bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) is increasingly used in intensive care units to prevent hospital-associated infections, but limited evidence exists for noncritical care settings. A prospective crossover study was conducted on 4 medical inpatient units in an urban, academic Canadian hospital from May 1, 2014-August 10, 2015. Intervention units used CHG over a 7-month period, including a 1-month wash-in phase, while control units used nonmedicated soap and water bathing. Rates of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization or infection were the primary end point. Hospital-associated S. aureus were investigated for CHG resistance with a qacA/B and smr polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar dilution. Compliance with daily CHG bathing was 58%. Hospital-associated MRSA and VRE was decreased by 55% (5.1 vs 11.4 cases per 10,000 inpatient days, P = .04) and 36% (23.2 vs 36.0 cases per 10,000 inpatient days, P = .03), respectively, compared with control cohorts. There was no significant difference in rates of hospital-associated Clostridium difficile. Chlorhexidine resistance testing identified 1 isolate with an elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (8 µg/mL), but it was PCR negative. This prospective pragmatic study to assess daily bathing for CHG on inpatient medical units was effective in reducing hospital-associated MRSA and VRE. A critical component of CHG bathing on medical units is sustained and appropriate application, which can be a challenge to accurately assess and needs to be considered before systematic implementation. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 42 CFR 413.40 - Ceiling on the rate of increase in hospital inpatient costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... October 1, 2002, is the percentage increase projected by the hospital market basket index. (4) Target... target amount for the previous cost reporting period, updated by the market basket percentage increase... each cost reporting period, the ceiling is determined by multiplying the updated target amount, as...

  17. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Diagnoses for Current HACs g. Preliminary RTI Analysis of Estimated Net Savings for Current HACs h... MIEA-TRHCA a. Reclassification Average Hourly Wage Comparison Criteria b. Budget Neutrality Adjustment....--Proposed Rural Floor Budget Neutrality Factors for Acute Care Hospitals--FY 2011 Table 4D-2.--Urban Areas...

  18. Validating hospital antibiotic purchasing data as a metric of inpatient antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlie; Ritchie, Michael; Alldred, Jason; Daneman, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic purchasing data are a widely used, but unsubstantiated, measure of antibiotic consumption. To validate this source, we compared purchasing data from hospitals and external medical databases with patient-level dispensing data. Antibiotic purchasing and dispensing data from internal hospital records and purchasing data from IMS Health were obtained for two hospitals between May 2013 and April 2015. Internal purchasing data were validated against dispensing data, and IMS data were compared with both internal metrics. Scatterplots of individual antimicrobial data points were generated; Pearson's correlation and linear regression coefficients were computed. A secondary analysis re-examined these correlations over shorter calendar periods. Internal purchasing data were strongly correlated with dispensing data, with correlation coefficients of 0.90 (95% CI = 0.83-0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.95-0.99) at hospitals A and B, respectively. Although dispensing data were consistently lower than purchasing data, this was attributed to a single antibiotic at both hospitals. IMS data were favourably correlated with, but underestimated, internal purchasing and dispensing data. This difference was accounted for by eight antibiotics for which direct sales from some manufacturers were not included in the IMS database. The correlation between purchasing and dispensing data was consistent across periods as short as 3 months, but not at monthly intervals. Both internal and external antibiotic purchasing data are strongly correlated with dispensing data. If outliers are accounted for appropriately, internal purchasing data could be used for cost-effective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, and external data sets could be used for surveillance and research across geographical regions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  19. Inpatient satisfaction and usage patterns of personalized smart bedside station system for patient-centered service at a tertiary university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Borim; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2016-11-01

    Bedside stations, also known as bedside terminals, are in place to enhance the quality and experience of a hospital's healthcare service delivery. The purpose of this study was to identify information needs and overall satisfaction with the personalized patient bedside system, called Smart Bedside Station (SBS) system, embedded in a tertiary general university hospital. End-user responses on the satisfaction survey and system usage logs of the SBS system were collected and analyzed. For the user opinion survey, 156 nurses and 1914 patients, their family members, or caregivers participated during the evaluation period of 2013 to 2014 in this study. All working nurses in the SBS-installed ward were answered the paper-based evaluation, for complete enumeration survey. Inpatients were voluntary participated to deliver the online questionnaire on the SBS menu. We also explored system log data including page calls and usage time from December 2013 to 2015. Regarding the relationship of overall satisfaction of the SBS with patient's characteristics, patient's education status and degree of familiarity with the smart device were statistically significant. From the analysis of system logs, Personalized My Menu(28.0%) was the most frequently used menu item (except for TV and Internet entertainment service use of 62.7%),it provides individual health information, such as laboratory test results, hospital fee check, message logs, daily medication information, and meal information. Next frequently used menus were information support(4.9%) which deliver hospital guide and health information and convenience service ordering(4.4%) such as meal order, bed sheet change. Satisfaction survey results and log data results show that the personalized service enhances the user satisfaction during hospital admission. Our post-implementation experience and subsequent assessment of SBS system is capable of providing insights into improving the hospital information system and service contents

  20. Inpatient Profile of Patients with Major Depression in Portuguese National Health System Hospitals, in 2008 and 2013: Variation in a Time of Economic Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniel Francisco Santos; Nunes, Carla

    2018-02-01

    The economic crisis has placed Portugal in a situation of budgetary constraints with repercussions on mental health, since 2009. This study analyses the association between economic crisis and the inpatient profile of major depression in the working-age population in Portuguese National Health System hospitals. This was an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. An individual analysis of hospitalisation and an ecological analysis at district level, were performed before 2008 and during the crisis (2013). Data on the hospitalisation episodes, working-age population and psychiatric inpatient beds were analysed. An increase in hospitalisation rates for major depression were observed, and across country, high spatial variations were perceived: districts with lower rates of urbanisation and population density had higher hospitalisation rates for major depression. Hospitalisation rates were positively influenced by the available inpatient beds. The results for 2013 were more critical (higher hospitalisation rates, less beds). Further research is needed to understand all patterns, considering other individual and contextual information.

  1. How Multidimensional Health Locus of Control predicts utilization of emergency and inpatient hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Dawn; Peterson, Bridget; Cunningham, Amy; Ku, Bon; Scott, Kevin; LaNoue, Marianna

    2017-03-01

    Health locus of control may be an important predictor of health care utilization. We analyzed associations between health locus of control and frequency of emergency department visits and hospital admissions, and investigated self-rated health as a potential mediator. Overall, 863 patients in an urban emergency department completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control instrument, and self-reported emergency department use and hospital admissions in the last year. We found small but significant associations between Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and utilization, all of which were mediated by self-rated health. We conclude that interventions to shift health locus of control may change patients' perceptions of their own health, thereby impacting utilization.

  2. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Wearable Device for Monitoring Heart Rates in Hospital Inpatients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Ryan R; Boyd, J Gordon; Maslove, David M

    2016-09-20

    As the sensing capabilities of wearable devices improve, there is increasing interest in their application in medical settings. Capabilities such as heart rate monitoring may be useful in hospitalized patients as a means of enhancing routine monitoring or as part of an early warning system to detect clinical deterioration. To evaluate the accuracy of heart rate monitoring by a personal fitness tracker (PFT) among hospital inpatients. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 stable patients in the intensive care unit who each completed 24 hours of heart rate monitoring using a wrist-worn PFT. Accuracy of heart rate recordings was compared with gold standard measurements derived from continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring. The accuracy of heart rates measured by pulse oximetry (Spo2.R) was also measured as a positive control. On a per-patient basis, PFT-derived heart rate values were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring (average bias of -1.14 beats per minute [bpm], with limits of agreement of 24 bpm). By comparison, Spo2.R recordings produced more accurate values (average bias of +0.15 bpm, limits of agreement of 13 bpm, P<.001 as compared with PFT). Personal fitness tracker device performance was significantly better in patients in sinus rhythm than in those who were not (average bias -0.99 bpm vs -5.02 bpm, P=.02). Personal fitness tracker-derived heart rates were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring in real-world testing and not as accurate as Spo2.R-derived heart rates. Performance was worse among patients who were not in sinus rhythm. Further clinical evaluation is indicated to see if PFTs can augment early warning systems in hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02527408; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02527408 (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6kOFez3on).

  3. The Epidemiological And Susceptibility Study Of Inpatient Blood Cultures In Amir Alam Hospital 1998 - 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Shahidi M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the most critical medical emergency situations. Treatment with anti microbial drugs should be initiated as soon as samples of blood and other relevant sites have been cultured. Available information about patterns of anti microbial Susceptibility among bacterial isolates from the community, the hospital, and the patient should be taken in to account. It is important, pending culture results, to initiate empirical anti microbial therapy."nMaterials and methods: In a descriptive study during 3 years (1377-1379, microbial and anti microbial susceptibility patterns evaluated in Amir alam clinical laboratory on 2000 specimen of blood culture received from 765 hospitalized patients at Amir Alam hospital wards."nResults: 113 specimens from 77 patient (10 percent were positive for microbial growth. Enterobacter, S. aureus, S.epidermidis, Pneumococci, Ecoli, and Pseudomonas were the most common isolated etiologic agents(80 percent . The most common organism was Entenobacter in 1377, S.aureus in 1378 and pseudomonas in 1379 There were significant change in patlern of organisms, increase resistance to some important available antibiotics and change in antibiotic susceptibility pattern during three years (disc diffusion method."nConclusions: According to Results of this study due to change in pattern of organism and their antibiotic susceptibility, dynamic microbiological study provide important data for Ordering empirical and culture oriented treatment of patients with bacteremia, Sepsis, anti microbial Chemotherapy, anti microbial susceptibility empirical anti microbial therapy, microbial pattern.

  4. Outcomes of an inpatient refeeding protocol in youth with Anorexia Nervosa and atypical Anorexia Nervosa at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn; Lesser, Julie; Brandenburg, Beth; Lesser, Andrew; Cici, Jessica; Juenneman, Robert; Beadle, Amy; Eckhardt, Sarah; Lantz, Elin; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Historically, inpatient protocols have adopted relatively conservative approaches to refeeding in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in order to reduce the risk of refeeding syndrome, a potentially fatal constellation of symptoms. However, increasing evidence suggests that patients with AN can tolerate higher caloric prescriptions during treatment, which may result in prevention of initial weight loss, shorter hospital stays, and less exposure to the effects of severe malnutrition. Therefore the present study sought to examine the effectiveness of a more accelerated refeeding protocol in an inpatient AN and atypical AN sample. Participants were youth (ages 10-22) with AN ( n  = 113) and atypical AN ( n  = 16) who were hospitalized for medical stabilization. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess changes in calories, weight status (percentage of median BMI, %mBMI), and indicators of refeeding syndrome, specifically hypophosphatemia, during hospitalization. Weight was assessed again approximately 4 weeks after discharge. No cases of refeeding syndrome were observed, though 47.3 % of participants evidenced hypophosphatemia during treatment. Phosphorous levels were monitored in all participants, and 77.5 % were prescribed supplemental phosphorous at the time of discharge. Higher rates of caloric changes were predictive of greater changes in %mBMI during hospitalization. Rates of caloric and weight change were not related to an increased likelihood of re-admission. Results suggest that a more accelerated approach to inpatient refeeding in youth with AN and atypical AN can be safely implemented and is not associated with refeeding syndrome, provided there is close monitoring and correction of electrolytes. These findings suggest that this approach has the potential to decrease length of stay and burden associated with inpatient hospitalization, while supporting continued progress after hospitalization.

  5. Prevalence, Nature, Severity and Risk Factors for Prescribing Errors in Hospital Inpatients: Prospective Study in 20 UK Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Darren M; Lewis, Penny J; Tully, Mary P; Farragher, Tracey M; Taylor, David; Wass, Valerie; Williams, Steven D; Dornan, Tim

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that doctors in their first year of post-graduate training make a disproportionate number of prescribing errors. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of prescribing errors made by first-year post-graduate doctors with that of errors by senior doctors and non-medical prescribers and to investigate the predictors of potentially serious prescribing errors. Pharmacists in 20 hospitals over 7 prospectively selected days collected data on the number of medication orders checked, the grade of prescriber and details of any prescribing errors. Logistic regression models (adjusted for clustering by hospital) identified factors predicting the likelihood of prescribing erroneously and the severity of prescribing errors. Pharmacists reviewed 26,019 patients and 124,260 medication orders; 11,235 prescribing errors were detected in 10,986 orders. The mean error rate was 8.8 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.6-9.1) errors per 100 medication orders. Rates of errors for all doctors in training were significantly higher than rates for medical consultants. Doctors who were 1 year (odds ratio [OR] 2.13; 95 % CI 1.80-2.52) or 2 years in training (OR 2.23; 95 % CI 1.89-2.65) were more than twice as likely to prescribe erroneously. Prescribing errors were 70 % (OR 1.70; 95 % CI 1.61-1.80) more likely to occur at the time of hospital admission than when medication orders were issued during the hospital stay. No significant differences in severity of error were observed between grades of prescriber. Potentially serious errors were more likely to be associated with prescriptions for parenteral administration, especially for cardiovascular or endocrine disorders. The problem of prescribing errors in hospitals is substantial and not solely a problem of the most junior medical prescribers, particularly for those errors most likely to cause significant patient harm. Interventions are needed to target these high-risk errors by all grades of staff and hence

  6. Trabeculectomy outcomes in a Malaysian general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, S T; Hooi, S H

    2003-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru to determine the outcome of trabeculectomy surgeries over a period of 4 years. One hundred and two eyes were followed up to a maximum of 63 months (mean 34.2 months). The 2-year survival rates for plain trabeculectomies, 5-Fluorouracil augmented trabeculectomies and Mitomycin-C augmented trabeculectomies were 52.9%, 27.3% and 60.5% respectively. The commonest complications noted were cataract formation (25%) and hyphaema (11%). Mitomycin-C induced complications were rarely seen. At last follow-up, 54% of eyes had intraocular pressures below 21 mmHg without medication, while 34% of eyes had intraocular pressures below 21 mmHg with medication. Vitreous at the trabeculectomy site was a statistically significant predictor of operative failure.

  7. Children's experiences as hospital in-patients: voice, competence and work. Messages for nursing from a critical ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, Joan; Long, Tony

    2013-10-01

    There is growing evidence that children's subjective interpretations of events may differ significantly from those of adults; yet children's and young people's voices and children's knowledge regarding hospital care remain relatively unexplored. To develop insight into children's subjective interpretations and knowledge of being hospital in-patients. Critical ethnography. A nephro-urology ward in a tertiary referral children's hospital in the north of England. A purposive sample was employed of 15 children over 2 phases: six (9-15 years) at home in a reconnaissance first phase, and nine (5-14 years) in hospital in phase 2. A raft of child-friendly, age-appropriate strategies was used to engage children in phase 1. Phase 2 involved over 100 h of field-work with hospitalised children over 6 months, with observation, interview, play and craft activities as prominent methods. Data were analysed using constant comparative methods. The study ward was a place in which children struggled to find a space for their competence to be recognised and their voice heard. Children's voice became manifest in what they said but also through the non-verbal mechanisms of resisting, turning away and being silent. While all the children shared the experience of being in trouble, recognition of their competence was fluid and contingent on their relationships with the nurses alongside other structural and material factors. The children worked hard to maintain their position as knowledgeable individuals. When they could not do so they relied on supportive adults, and in the absence of supportive adults they became marooned and received bare minimum care. The hospital ward was a place for children in which there was little space for children's voices. When their voices were heard, they were often seen as a challenge. Quiet, sick and shy children who were alone were the most likely to have their needs overlooked and become subject to standardised nursing care. A more inclusive and

  8. Development and localisation of casemix applications for inpatient hospital activity in EU member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, M M

    1999-01-01

    The successful infiltration of casemix techniques across geographical, systemic and cultural boundaries provides an interesting and timely example of the translation of research evidence into health policy development. This paper explores the specifics of this policy development by reviewing the application of casemix techniques within the acute hospital systems of European Union member states. The fact that experimentation with or application of casemix measures can be reported for the majority of European Union member states would suggest that the deployment of these measures can be expected to continue to expand within these health systems into the new millennium.

  9. 76 FR 25787 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... comments. Comments received timely will also be available for public inspection, generally beginning... Array Deep Brain Stimulation System 3. MDC 3 (Diseases and Disorders of the Ear, Nose, Mouth, and Throat...

  10. Role of emerging private hospitals in a post-Soviet mixed health system: a mixed methods comparative study of private and public hospital inpatient care in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevelvaanchig, Uranchimeg; Gouda, Hebe; Baker, Peter; Hill, Peter S

    2017-05-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990 severely impacted the health sector in Mongolia. Limited public funding for the post-Soviet model public system and a rapid growth of poorly regulated private providers have been pressing issues for a government seeking to re-establish universal health coverage. However, the evidence available on the role of private providers that would inform sector management is very limited. This study analyses the current contribution of private hospitals in Mongolia for the improvement of accessibility of health care and efficiency. We used mixed research methods. A descriptive analysis of nationally representative hospital admission records from 2013 was followed by semi-structured interviews that were carried out with purposively selected key informants (N = 45), representing the main actors in Mongolia's mixed health system. Private-for-profit hospitals are concentrated in urban areas, where their financial model is most viable. The result is the duplication of private and public inpatient services, both in terms of their geographical location and the range of services delivered. The combination of persistent inpatient-oriented care and perverse financial incentives that privilege admission over outpatient management, have created unnecessary health costs. The engagement of the private sector to improve population health outcomes is constrained by a series of issues of governance, regulation and financing and the failure of the state to manage the private sector as an integral part of its health system planning. For a mixed system like in Mongolia, a comprehensive policy and plan which defines the complementary role of private providers to optimize private public service mix is critical in the early stages of the private sector development. It further supports the importance of a system perspective that combines regulation and incentives in consistent policy, rather than an isolated approach to provide regulation. © The Author

  11. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescriptions in hospital inpatients: are we assessing the risks?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kitchen, J

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To determine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prescribing practices in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODS: A single time-point audit of drug kardexes and clinical notes of n = 388 patients on 2 July 2008 was carried out assessing demographics, gastrointestinal and coronary heart disease risk factors, renal function and co-prescribed medications. RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 388 (14.7%) hospital patients were on NSAIDs. Forty-nine were prescribed NSAID after admission. Nineteen (32.2%) were on regular NSAID (11\\/19 on PPI) and 38 patients were on PRN NSAID (12\\/38 on PPI). Seventeen of 49 patients were on other medications associated with gastrointestinal bleeding (10\\/17 were on PPI). Nineteen patients (33.3%) were >60 years. Eight patients had three or four risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding; six were on PPI. Thirteen patients had two risks; 7 were on PPI. Six of 19 patients with one risk factor were on PPI. 40.3% had stage 2\\/3 chronic kidney disease. 35.1% had ischaemic heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: NSAIDs and PPIs are often prescribed inappropriately.

  12. Moderate dose melatonin for the abatement and treatment of delirium in elderly general medical inpatients: study protocol of a placebo controlled, randomised, double blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton-Chubb, Daniel I; Lange, Peter W

    2016-02-29

    Delirium is a frequent, costly and morbid problem. No agent has been shown to modify the natural history of the condition, and current treatments have significant side effects. Prophylactic melatonin in low doses has been shown to prevent delirium developing. This trial then aims to determine the feasibility of a trial to assess if melatonin at a moderate dose effectively treats the symptoms of delirium and modifies the natural history, including abating symptoms after treatment cessation. Elderly (≥70 years of age) patients admitted to the Royal Melbourne Hospital with delirium, and not requiring surgery, will be identified from the current practice of the investigators and through referral by other general medical unit staff. To facilitate this, other staff will be briefed on the project by investigators. Patients will be recruited with suitable informed and documented consent (person responsible) by the study investigators. They will receive orally either 5 mg melatonin (18 patients) or placebo (18 patients) nightly for 5 nights (or until discharged). During treatment, participants will be assessed by study staff using a validated scale of delirium severity (the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale), and a validated measure of delirium state (Confusion Assessment Method) to determine if melatonin decreases the severity or the duration of delirium. Assessment will continue for a further two days after treatment has ceased, to determine if the treatment causes persisting abatement of symptoms, and to assess for adverse events. The on-going study described herein will contribute to our knowledge of available treatment options for elderly inpatients with delirium, where current pharmacological interventions show weak or no effect on hastening the resolution of delirium. As melatonin is safe, cheap, and potentially effective, it would be easily implementable in routine practice and could lead to significant outcome benefits for delirious inpatients. The trial is

  13. Sepsis National Hospital Inpatient Quality Measure (SEP-1): Multistakeholder Work Group Recommendations for Appropriate Antibiotics for the Treatment of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septimus, Edward J; Coopersmith, Craig M; Whittle, Jessica; Hale, Caleb P; Fishman, Neil O; Kim, Thomas J

    2017-10-16

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services adopted the Early Management Bundle, Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock (SEP-1) performance measure to the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting Program in July 2015 to help address the high mortality and high cost associated with sepsis. The SEP-1 performance measure requires, among other critical interventions, timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis or septic shock. The multistakeholder workgroup recognizes the need for SEP-1 but strongly believes that multiple antibiotics listed in the antibiotic tables for SEP-1 are not appropriate and the use of these antibiotics, as called for in the SEP-1 measure, is not in alignment with prudent antimicrobial stewardship. To promote the appropriate use of antimicrobials and combat antimicrobial resistance, the workgroup provides recommendations for appropriate antibiotics for the treatment of sepsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The Best of Intentions. Interior Architecture: Massachusetts General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Sharon Lee

    1974-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Hospital/Surgical and Special Services study, an information processing system for redesigning an outmoded existing hospital, structured information into small-scale elements that could be analyzed, reassembled into different solutions, and the solution selected that best accommodates all of the complex requirements. (MF)

  15. Hip osteoarthritis in Douala General Hospital: Clinical, radiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiological, clinical and radiological profile of hip OA, and also treatment options offered to patients presenting with this condition at the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon. Methods: After prior ethical clearance, a hospital-based cross sectional descriptive study was carried out, including ...

  16. Improving the quality of the order-writing process for inpatient orders in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Peter A; Rylander, Jeanette; Dizon, Dominic T; Peterson, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    Physicians' illegible handwriting is a notorious contributing factor to medical errors. Furthermore, an illegible signature or failure to print prescribers' name interferes with the ability of staff to clarify orders. We surveyed support medical staff at a teaching hospital before and 2 months after providing all internal medicine department residents a self-inking stamp with their name and pager number. Responses were received from 51% at the first and 36% at the second survey of 401 eligible staff. Responses to questions regarding illegible or absent signature, illegible or absent pager number, and failure to print prescribers' name showed a significant improvement (P writing process. This kind of signature allows clarification of orders in a timely fashion.

  17. Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Adults With Previous Hospital-Based Psychiatric Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Waagstein, Kristine; Winkel, Bo Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals with and......Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals...

  18. "Cough officer screening" improves detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in hospital in-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jen-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current tuberculosis (TB reporting protocols are insufficient to achieve the goals established by the Stop TB partnership. Some countries have recommended implementation of active case finding program. We assessed the effect of Cough Officer Screening (an active screening system on the rate of TB detection and health care system delays over the course of four years. Methods Patients who were hospitalized at the Changhua Christian Hospital (Changhua, Taiwan were enrolled from September 2004 to July 2006 (Stage I and August 2006 to August 2008 (Stage II. Stage II was implemented after a Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA cycle analysis indicated that we should exclude ICU and paediatric patients. Results In Stage I, our COS system alerted physicians to 19,836 patients, and 7,998 were examined. 184 of these 7,998 patients (2.3% had TB. Among these 184 patients, 142 (77.2% were examined for TB before COS alarming and 42 were diagnosed after COS alarming. In Stage II, a total of 11,323 patients were alerted by the COS system. Among them, 6,221 patients were examined by physicians, and 125 of these patients (2.0% had TB. Among these 125 patients, 113 (90.4% were examined for TB before COS alarming and 12 were diagnosed after COS alarming. The median time from COS alarm to clinical action was significantly less (p = 0.041 for Stage I (1 day; range: 0-16 days than for Stage II (2 days; range: 0-10 days. Conclusion Our COS system improves detection of TB by reducing the delay from infection to diagnosis. Modifications of scope may be needed to improve cost-effectiveness.

  19. Acceptance of hospital diets and nutritional status among inpatients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daiane; Guimarães, Tessa Gomes; Marcadenti, Aline

    2013-01-01

    To verify acceptance of hospital diets as to the nutritional status among patients admitted to the Oncology/Hematology Unit of a tertiary care hospital. A cross-sectional study conducted among 100 patients, aged ≥ 18 years, of both genders. Body mass index and subjective global nutritional evaluation by patients were used to detect the nutritional status. The rest-ingestion index was used to evaluate diet acceptance, and the reasons for non-acceptance were identified by means of a questionnaire. Data were expressed in means and standard deviation, or medians and percentages. Comparisons were made using the Student's t test, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test, and Pearson's χ² test. A total of 59% of patients were males, and mean age was 51.6±13.5 years. According to the global subjective nutritional evaluation done by the patients themselves, 33% of the participants were considered malnourished and the body mass index detected 6.3% of malnutrition. The main symptoms reported were lack of appetite, xerostomia (dry mouth), constipation, dysgeusia, odor-related nausea, and early satiety. The rest-ingestion index was approximately 37% and significantly greater among the malnourished relative to the well-nourished (58.8 versus 46.4%; p=0.04). The primary reasons reported for non-acceptance of the diet offered were lack of flavor, monotonous preparations, large quantities offered, lack of appetite, and inappropriate temperature of the meal. A high the rest-ingestion index was seen among the patients with cancer, especially those who were malnourished according to the global nutritional evaluation produced by the patient.

  20. Psychiatric units in Brazilian general hospitals: a growing philanthropic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botega, Neury José

    2002-06-01

    Some countries, mainly in North America and Europe, have adopted psychiatric wards in the general hospital as an alternative to the classic psychiatric hospital. In Brazil there are 6,169 general hospitals, 1.3% of which with a psychiatric unit. This service strategy is scarcely developed in the country and comprises only 4% of all psychiatric admissions. There was no information on the facilities and functioning of the psychiatric units in general hospitals. To determine the main characteristics of psychiatric units in Brazilian general hospitals and to assess the current trends in the services provided. A mailing survey assessed all 94 Brazilian general hospitals which made psychiatric admissions. A two-page questionnaire was designed to determine the main characteristics of each institution and of the psychiatric unit. Seventy-nine (84%) questionnaires were returned. In contrast to the 1970s and 1980s, in the last decade the installation of psychiatric units has spread to smaller philanthropic institutions that are not linked to medical schools. A fifth of hospitals admit psychiatric patients to medical wards because there is no specialist psychiatric ward. They try to meet all the local emergency demands, usually alcohol-dependent patients who need short term admission. This could signal the beginning of a program through which mental health professionals may become an integral part of general health services. The inauguration of psychiatric wards in philanthropic hospitals, as well as the admission of psychiatric patients in their medical wards, is a phenomenon peculiar to this decade. The installation of psychiatric services in these and other general hospitals would overcome two of major difficulties encountered: prejudice and a lack of financial resources.

  1. Quality of inpatient pediatric case management for four leading causes of child mortality at six government-run Ugandan hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sears

    Full Text Available A better understanding of case management practices is required to improve inpatient pediatric care in resource-limited settings. Here we utilize data from a unique health facility-based surveillance system at six Ugandan hospitals to evaluate the quality of pediatric case management and the factors associated with appropriate care.All children up to the age of 14 years admitted to six district or regional hospitals over 15 months were included in the study. Four case management categories were defined for analysis: suspected malaria, selected illnesses requiring antibiotics, suspected anemia, and diarrhea. The quality of case management for each category was determined by comparing recorded treatments with evidence-based best practices as defined in national guidelines. Associations between variables of interest and the receipt of appropriate case management were estimated using multivariable logistic regression.A total of 30,351 admissions were screened for inclusion in the analysis. Ninety-two percent of children met criteria for suspected malaria and 81% received appropriate case management. Thirty-two percent of children had selected illnesses requiring antibiotics and 89% received appropriate antibiotics. Thirty percent of children met criteria for suspected anemia and 38% received appropriate case management. Twelve percent of children had diarrhea and 18% received appropriate case management. Multivariable logistic regression revealed large differences in the quality of care between health facilities. There was also a strong association between a positive malaria diagnostic test result and the odds of receiving appropriate case management for comorbid non-malarial illnesses - children with a positive malaria test were more likely to receive appropriate care for anemia and less likely for illnesses requiring antibiotics and diarrhea.Appropriate management of suspected anemia and diarrhea occurred infrequently. Pediatric quality

  2. Hospital costs associated with surgical site infections in general and vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Julian, Kathleen G; Ortenzi, Gail; Dillon, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Although much has been written about excess cost and duration of stay (DOS) associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after cardiothoracic surgery, less has been reported after vascular and general surgery. We used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to estimate the total cost and DOS associated with SSIs in patients undergoing general and vascular surgery. Using standard NSQIP practices, data were collected on patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at a single academic center between 2007 and 2009 and were merged with fully loaded operating costs obtained from the hospital accounting database. Logistic regression was used to determine which patient and preoperative variables influenced the occurrence of SSIs. After adjusting for patient characteristics, costs and DOS were fit to linear regression models to determine the effect of SSIs. Of the 2,250 general and vascular surgery patients sampled, SSIs were observed in 186 inpatients. Predisposing factors of SSIs were male sex, insulin-dependent diabetes, steroid use, wound classification, and operative time (P surgery. Although the excess costs and DOS associated with SSIs after general and vascular surgery are somewhat less, they still represent substantial financial and opportunity costs to hospitals and suggest, along with the implications for patient care, a continuing need for cost-effective quality improvement and programs of infection prevention. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. nutritional status in pregnant women attending kiru general hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... of pregnant women in General Hospital Kiru, Kiru. Local Government .... AACC, American Association for Clinical Chemistry,. 2012. ... Animal. Reproductive Science. 72: pp. 235. Das, S. C. and Isechei, U. P. (1996). Serum ...

  4. LIGASURE (PRECISION HAEMORROIDECTOMY AT GOVT. GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Haemorrhoids is a common problem throughout the world. Many procedures are available for management of grade II and grade III hemorrhoids. The main postoperative complications associated with any of these procedures are pain and bleeding per rectum and pro longed healing time. Liga Surel TM haemorroidectomy was evaluated in this study for post - operative complications and symptomatic relief. METHODS: We analyzed 50 patients of hemorrhoids of grade II, III and IV who underwent Ligasure Precise haemorroidectomy by a classical Milligan - Morgan technique. The outcome factors analyzed were total operative time, blood loss, post - operative pain on visual analogue scale, any other complication and days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Of all the 50 patients, the operative ti me was less than 10 minutes in 27 patients (54% and the blood loss, as was measured by number of soaked gauze pieces only one gauze piece was soaked in 31 patients (62%. The Average Post - operative pain score measured on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at 12, 24 & 48 hours were 6.54, 4.52 and 3.12 respectively. In all patients postoperative period and follow up was uneventful except for one patient who developed transient flatus incontinence. With physiotherapy and dietary management this problem resolved ther eafter. CONCLUSIONS: Liga Sure Hemarrhoidectomy is a safe, Technically easy and fast modality of treatment for 2 nd , 3 rd & 4 th degree of hemorrhoids whether single or multiple, requiring very less operating ti me, with no major post - operative complications an d early return to day to day activities

  5. The 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test as a bedside screening for dementia in general hospital patients: results of the General Hospital Study (GHoSt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Johannes Baltasar; Schäufele, Martina; Hendlmeier, Ingrid; Nora Junge, Magdalena; Leonhardt, Sarah; Weber, Joshua; Bickel, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric quality of the 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test (6CIT) as a bedside screening for the detection of dementia in general hospital patients. Participants (N = 1,440) were inpatients aged ≥65 of 33 randomly selected general hospitals in Southern Germany. The 6CIT was conducted at bedside, and dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-IV. Nursing staff was asked to rate the patients' cognitive status, and previous diagnoses of dementia were extracted from medical records. Completion rates and validity statistics were calculated. Two-hundred seventy patients had dementia. Cases with delirium but no dementia were excluded. Feasibility was 97.9% and 83.3% for patients without and with dementia, respectively, and decreased from moderate (93.8%) to severe dementia (53%). The area under the curve of the 6CIT was 0.98. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the cutoffs 7/8 (0.96, 0.82, 0.85, 0.52, 0.99) and 10/11 (0.88, 0.95, 0.94, 0.76, 0.98). The nurse ratings and medical records information had lower validity statistics. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the 6CIT statistically significantly provided information above nurse ratings and medical records. Twenty-five and 37 additional patients were correctly classified by the 7/8 and 10/11 cutoffs, respectively. The 6CIT is a feasible and valid screening tool for the detection of dementia in older general hospital patients. The 6CIT outperformed the nurse ratings of cognitive status and dementia diagnoses from medical records, suggesting that standardized screening may have benefits with regard to case finding. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Comparison of Corporate Image a nd Patient Loyalty Perceptions of Outpatients and Inpatients: Example of a Training and Research Hospital in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Rıfkı Önder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of corporate image and patient loyalty of outpatients and inpatients who get services from a hospital and to evaluate the relationship between corporate images’ factors and patient loyalty. Totally 600 patients from a training and research hospitals in Ankara, formed the study sample. As a result, outpatients’ loyalty and image perceptions found medium level; while inpatients’ level found high. In addition, the effect of corporate image factors on patient loyalty was determined that there is a statistically significant , strong and positive correlation and 83% of patient loyalty is explained by corporate image factors. Based on the research findings, making improvements especially in quality and also physical, communication, social responsibility factors can obtain loyal patients. It is suggested to adopt different strategies to outpatients and inpatients while implementing these improvements.

  7. Prospective study of symptom control in 133 cases of palliative care inpatients in Shatin Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, R S; Ding, A; Chung, T K; Woo, J

    1999-07-01

    We report a prospective study assessing the prevalence and severity of physical and nonphysical symptoms, and the benefits from treatment and intervention, in advanced cancer patients presenting to a local palliative care unit in Hong Kong. Patients were assessed by a modified version of the support team assessment schedule (STAS). The study highlighted some symptoms which needed better control, and also reinforced the team morale by demonstrating aspects where there was definite improvement. In general, the STAS was found to be practicable and acceptable by our patients and staff. The most important benefit gained from the study was the successful dissemination of the concept of audit and quality assurance throughout the unit, which is essential for continuous improvement in the future.

  8. Asthma and myocardial infarction inpatient hospitalization and emergency room visit counts and rates by county, year and month of admission, age group, race/ethnicity and gender of California residents, 2000-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of asthma (ICD9-CM 493.0-493.9) and myocardial infarction (ICD9-CM 410) inpatient hospitalizations...

  9. Non-fatal suicidal behaviour at the Johannesburg General Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-fatal suicidal behaviour at the Johannesburg General Hospital. ... African Journal of Psychiatry ... Patients who threaten deliberate self-harm and who have a history of previous NFSB, past psychiatric illness and physical or sexual abuse, are at a higher risk of this behaviour as compared to the general population.

  10. High Levels Of Bed Occupancy Associated With Increased Inpatient And Thirty-Day Hospital Mortality In Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Ladelund, Steen; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-01-01

    to low bed occupancy rates. Being admitted to a hospital outside of normal working hours or on a weekend or holiday was also significantly associated with increased mortality. The health risks of bed shortages, including mortality, could be better documented as a priority health issue. Resources should......High bed occupancy rates have been considered a matter of reduced patient comfort and privacy and an indicator of high productivity for hospitals. Hospitals with bed occupancy rates of above 85 percent are generally considered to have bed shortages. Little attention has been paid to the impact...... be allocated to researching the causes and effects of bed shortages, with the aim of creating greater interest in exploring new methods to avoid or reduce bed shortages....

  11. Primary prevention in psychiatry in general hospitals in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Kallivayalil, Roy Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The focus of primary prevention is on reducing the disease incidence. Primary prevention in mental health has been given minimal priority in low-resource settings with no significant investments. General hospitals are one of the main providers of mental health services in South Asia. This paper focuses on primary prevention activities, which can be undertaken in a general hospital in South Asia with abysmally low-mental health resources. For implementing primary prevention in psychiatry, a general hospital may be conceptualized as a population unit, located in a well-populated area with easy accessibility where different kinds of communities, for example, students and resident doctors, consultants, patients and their caregivers, and paramedical, nursing, administrative and other supportive staff, coexist and have varied functions. All the functional components of the general hospital psychiatric units (GHPUs) offer scope for introducing primary preventive psychiatry services. Psychiatrists in GHPUs can lead efforts for primary prevention in mental health in the hospital by employing strategies in the framework of universal, selective, and indicated prevention. The preventive strategies could be targeted at the patients visiting the hospital for various health services and their caregivers, employees, and the trainees. Similar principles can be employed in teaching and training. PMID:29497199

  12. Physician perspectives on collaborative working relationships with team-based hospital pharmacists in the inpatient medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Mark J; Madill, Helen M; Schindel, Theresa J; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2013-04-01

    Collaborative care between physicians and pharmacists has the potential to improve the process of care and patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine whether team-based pharmacist care was associated with higher physician-rated collaborative working relationship scores than usual ward-based pharmacist care at the end of the COLLABORATE study, a 1 year, multicentre, controlled clinical trial, which associated pharmacist intervention with improved medication use and reduced hospital readmission rates. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all team-based and usual care physicians (attending physicians and medical residents) who worked on the participating clinical teaching unit or primary healthcare teams during the study period. They were invited to complete an online version of the validated Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index (PPCI) survey at the end of the study. The main endpoint of interest was the mean total PPCI score. Only three (response rate 2%) of the usual care physicians responded and this prevented us from conducting pre-specified comparisons. A total of 23 team-based physicians completed the survey (36%) and reported a mean total PPCI score of 81.6 ± 8.6 out of a total of 92. Mean domain scores were highest for relationship initiation (14.0 ± 1.4 out of 15), and trustworthiness (38.9 ± 3.7 out of 42), followed by role specification (28.7 ± 4.3 out of 35). Pharmacists who are pursuing collaborative practice in inpatient settings may find the PPCI to be a meaningful tool to gauge the extent of collaborative working relationships with physician team members. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  14. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  15. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  16. Return-on-Investment (ROI) Analyses of an Inpatient Lay Health Worker Model on 30-Day Readmission Rates in a Rural Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Bausch, Gregory; Murdock, Joan; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2017-07-07

    The purpose of the study was to assess the return-on-investment (ROI) of an inpatient lay health worker (LHW) model in a rural Appalachian community hospital impacting 30-day readmission rates. The Bridges to Home (BTH) study completed an evaluation in 2015 of an inpatient LHW model in a rural Kentucky hospital that demonstrated a reduction in 30-day readmission rates by 47.7% compared to a baseline period. Using the hospital's utilization and financial data, a validated ROI calculator specific to care transition programs was used to assess the ROI of the BTH model comparing 3 types of payment models including Diagnosis Related Group (DRG)-only payments, pay-for-performance (P4P) contracts, and accountable care organizations (ACOs). The BTH program had a -$0.67 ROI if the hospital had only a DRG-based payment model. If the hospital had P4P contracts with payers and 0.1% of its annual operating revenue was at risk, the ROI increased to $7.03 for every $1 spent on the BTH program. However, if the hospital was an ACO as was the case for this study's community hospital, the ROI significantly increased to $38.48 for every $1 spent on the BTH program. The BTH model showed a viable ROI to be considered by community hospitals that are part of an ACO or P4P program. A LHW care transition model may be a cost-effective alternative for impacting excess 30-day readmissions and avoiding associated penalties for hospital systems with a value-based payment model. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Boarding admitted children in the emergency department impacts inpatient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezian, Arpi; Chung, Paul J

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between boarding of admitted children in the emergency department (ED) and cost, inpatient length of stay (LOS), mortality, and readmission. This was a retrospective study of 1,792 pediatric inpatients admitted through the ED and discharged from the hospital between February 20, 2007 and June 30, 2008 at a major teaching hospital with an annual ED volume of 40,000 adult and pediatric patients.The main predictor variable was boarding time (time from admission decision to departure for an inpatient bed, in hours). Covariates were patient age, payer group, times of ED and inpatient bed arrival, ED triage acuity, type of inpatient service, intensive care unit admission, surgery, and severity of inpatient illness. The main outcome measures, cost (dollars) and inpatient LOS (hours), were log-transformed and analyzed using linear regressions. Secondary outcomes, mortality and readmission to the hospital within 72 hours of discharge, were analyzed using logistic regression. Mean ED LOS for admitted patients was 9.0 hours. Mean boarding time was 5.1 hours. Mean cost and inpatient LOS were $9893 and 147 hours, respectively. In general, boarding time was associated with cost (P boarding times were associated with greater inpatient LOS especially among patients triaged as low acuity (P = 0.008). In addition, longer boarding times were associated with greater probability of being readmitted among patients on surgical services (P = 0.01). Among low-acuity and surgical patients, longer boarding times were associated with longer inpatient LOS and more readmissions, respectively.

  18. ROLE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN THE STRUCTURE OF BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN THE CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED TO INPATIENT HOSPITALS IN MOSCOW IN 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in the RF are extremely limited. 3 pneumococcal conjugated vaccines are approved inRussia; however, neither has yet been employed in the framework of the national population immunization program. At the same time, it is the dataon the serotype range of pneumococcal infections that may be considered the prognostic efficacy criterion for the national vaccination programs.The objective of this research is identification of the circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes and spread of pneumococcal etiology infections in the structure of bacterial infections in the infants hospitalized to 5 inpatient hospital of Moscow in 2011–2012. The trial involved 864 patients in tote. Vast majority of patients (86% had acute purulent otitis media and sinusitis. Community-acquired pneumonia was diagnosed in 9% of patients, sepsis and bacteremia — in 3.6%; purulent meningitis — 1.2% of patients. It has been revealed that S. pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in the structure of nasopharyngeal carriage in the children under 5 years of age hospitalized with acute bacterial infections, and the primary bacterial causative agent of acute otitis media at this age. Nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage analysis revealed the prevalent serotypes — 19F, 14, 23F, 3, 6A and B; they were present in 3/4 of all cases; 19F was the most frequent (> 20%. Diversity of the S. pneumoniae serotypes detected in middle ear liquid was less significant — 17 serotypes (in comparison with 24 serotypes in nasopharynx. The 5 prevalent serotypes were 19F, 3, 14, 23F, 6B and 19A (> 75% in tote. Detection rate of serotypes 3 and 19A in middle ear liquid significantly exceeded the detection rate of these serotypes in case of nasopharyngeal carriage. The study of invasive infections revealed serotypes 14, 23F, 3 and 15C. These data may be used as a benchmark for future monitoring and evaluation of effect of PCV vaccines on epidemiology of

  19. [Philanthropic general hospitals: a new setting for psychiatric admissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrobla, Cristina; Botega, Neury José

    2006-12-01

    To understand the process that led Brazilian philanthropic general hospitals to implement psychiatric units and to describe the main characteristics and therapeutic approaches of these services. Ten institutions in three Brazilian states (Minas Gerais, São Paulo e Santa Catarina) were assessed in 2002. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with health professionals who worked at the hospitals to collect data on service implementation process, therapeutic approaches and current situation. The interviews were audio-recorded and their content was analyzed. There was no mental hospital in the cities where the institutions were located. In five hospitals, psychiatric patients were admitted to general medical wards because there was no psychiatric unit. The therapeutic approach in six hospitals was based on psychopharmacological treatment. Due to lack of resources and more appropriate therapeutic planning, the admission of patients presenting psychomotor agitation increases resistance against psychiatric patients in general hospitals. Financial constraints regarding laboratory testing is still a challenge. There is no exchange between local authorities and hospital administrators of these institutions that are compelled to exceed the allowed number of admissions to meet the demand of neighboring cities. The need for mental health care to local populations combined with individual requests of local authorities and psychiatrists made possible the implementation of psychiatric units in these localities. In spite of the efforts and flexibility of health professional working in these institutions, there are some obstacles to be overcome: resistance of hospital community against psychiatric admissions, financial constraints, limited professional training in mental health and the lack of a therapeutic approach that goes beyond psychopharmacological treatment alone.

  20. Emergency department boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes among patients admitted to a general medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Kito; Parwani, Vivek; Ulrich, Andrew; Finn, Emily B; Rothenberg, Craig; Emerson, Beth; Rosenberg, Alana; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2018-03-20

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has been associated with patient harm, yet little is known about the association between ED boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes. We sought to examine the association between ED boarding and three common adverse hospitalization outcomes: rapid response team activation (RRT), escalation in care, and mortality. We conducted an observational analysis of consecutive patient encounters admitted from the ED to the general medical service between February 2013 and June 2015. This study was conducted in an urban, academic hospital with an annual adult ED census over 90,000. We defined boarding as patients with greater than 4h from ED bed order to ED departure to hospital ward. The primary outcome was a composite of adverse outcomes in the first 24h of admission, including RRT activation, care escalation to intensive care, or in-hospital mortality. A total of 31,426 patient encounters were included of which 3978 (12.7%) boarded in the ED for 4h or more. Adverse outcomes occurred in 1.92% of all encounters. Comparing boarded vs. non-boarded patients, 41 (1.03%) vs. 244 (0.90%) patients experienced a RRT activation, 53 (1.33%) vs. 387 (1.42%) experienced a care escalation, and 1 (0.03%) vs.12 (0.04%) experienced unanticipated in-hospital death, within 24h of ED admission. In unadjusted analysis, there was no difference in the composite outcome between boarding and non-boarding patients (1.91% vs. 1.91%, p=0.994). Regression analysis adjusted for patient demographics, acuity, and comorbidities also showed no association between boarding and the primary outcome. A sensitivity analysis showed an association between ED boarding and the composite outcome inclusive of the entire inpatient hospital stay (5.8% vs. 4.7%, p=0.003). Within the first 24h of hospital admission to a general medicine service, adverse hospitalization outcomes are rare and not associated with ED boarding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. [Dementia friendly care services in general hospitals : Representative results of the general hospital study (GHoSt)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendlmeier, Ingrid; Bickel, Horst; Hessler, Johannes Baltasar; Weber, Joshua; Junge, Magdalena Nora; Leonhardt, Sarah; Schäufele, Martina

    2017-11-06

    Mostly model projects report on special care services and procedures for general hospital patients with cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of special care services and procedures in general hospitals on the basis of a representative cross-sectional study. From a list of all general hospitals in southern Germany we randomly selected a specified number of hospitals und somatic wards. The hospitals were visited and all older patients on the selected wards on that day were included in the study. Information about care services and their utilization was collected with standardized instruments. A total of 33 general hospitals and 172 wards participated in the study. The patient sample included 1469 persons over 65 (mean age 78.6 years) and 40% of the patients showed cognitive impairments. The staff reported that the most frequent measures for patients with cognitive impairments concerned patients with wandering behavior (63.1%), efforts to involve the patients' relatives to help with their daily care (60.1%), conducting nonintrusive interviews to identify cognitive impairments (59.9%), allocation to other rooms (58%) and visual aids for place orientation of patients (50.6%). In accordance with earlier studies our results show that other dementia friendly services implemented in pilot projects were rare. The existing special services for patients with cognitive impairment were rarely used by the patients or their relatives. The results demonstrate the urgent need to improve special care services and routines for identification of elderly patients with cognitive impairment and risk of delirium in general hospitals.

  2. Eventos adversos a antibióticos em pacientes internados em um hospital universitário Adverse events to antibiotics in inpatients of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Louro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Antibióticos são os medicamentos que mais causam eventos adversos, gerando problemas aos pacientes e custos adicionais ao sistema de saúde. Assim, objetivou-se analisar a ocorrência de eventos adversos a antibióticos em pacientes internados em um hospital. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se monitoramento intensivo do uso de antibióticos em pacientes adultos internados no município de Maringá, Paraná, de setembro de 2002 a fevereiro de 2003. Foram pesquisadas variáveis relativas aos medicamentos em uso, em particular aos antibióticos e aos eventos adversos. Com base em critérios para a avaliação do uso correto dos antibióticos, os eventos observados foram classificados como reações adversas, erros de medicação e "quase erros". Para relação de causalidade entre a administração do fármaco e o surgimento dos eventos utilizou-se o algoritmo de Naranjo. RESULTADOS: Foram acompanhados 87 pacientes e identificados 91 eventos adversos, sendo três deles (3,3% reações adversas a medicamentos, sete (7,7% erros de medicação, e 81 (89,0% "quase erros". As reações a medicamentos ocorreram devido ao uso de quinolonas e foram consideradas "prováveis" utilizando-se o algoritmo de Naranjo. Os sete erros de medicação ocorreram devido a quatro prescrições incorretas de dose e três interações medicamentosas. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados sugerem que a falta de conhecimento do medicamento ou a falta de informação sobre o paciente no momento da prescrição tenham sido os principais fatores envolvidos na ocorrência das reações a medicamentos.OBJECTIVE: Antibiotics are the most common drugs causing adverse events and they lead to problems to patients and additional costs of the health system. The aim of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of adverse events to antibiotics in inpatients of a hospital. METHODS: An extensive drug monitoring was conducted in adult inpatients taking antibiotics in the city of Maringá, Southern

  3. Texas hospitals with higher health information technology expenditures have higher revenue: A longitudinal data analysis using a generalized estimating equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhyung; Choi, Jae-Young

    2016-04-05

    The benefits of health information technology (IT) adoption have been reported in the literature, but whether health IT investment increases revenue generation remains an important research question. Texas hospital data obtained from the American Hospital Association (AHA) for 2007-2010 were used to investigate the association of health IT expenses and hospital revenue. The generalized estimation equation (GEE) with an independent error component was used to model the data controlling for cluster error within hospitals. We found that health IT expenses were significantly and positively associated with hospital revenue. Our model predicted that a 100% increase in health IT expenditure would result in an 8% increase in total revenue. The effect of health IT was more associated with gross outpatient revenue than gross inpatient revenue. Increased health IT expenses were associated with greater hospital revenue. Future research needs to confirm our findings with a national sample of hospitals.

  4. Bed blocking by elderly patients in general-hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S G; Davies, G H

    1975-08-01

    A point prevalence survey, using a questionnaire, was performed in three general hospitals to investigate the problem of elderly patients blocking acute-hospital beds. A total of 1010 occupied general beds were surveyed and all patients, over the age of 60 years, who had been in hospital more than four weeks, and who, in the opinion of medical and nursing staff, were no longer in need of the facilities of a general hospital, were investigated. Forty-eight patients (4.8 per cent of the total) were found to be genuinely in bed inappropriate to their needs. Rehabilitation, together with assessment of these patients, appeared disorganized and lacked consistency, and decisions regarding suitable 'disposal' appeared to be made without sufficient consultation and conformed to no detectable pattern. The main reason for the continuing bed occupancy of the patients was the length of the waiting lists for alternative residential accommodation and the main single medical factor preventing discharge home or to a hostel was the problem of mobility. By interviewing staff and patients and scrutinizing the questionnaires, it was found that 23 patients (48 per cent) were only suitable for transfer to a long-stay hospital. Of these, however, 15 (31 per cent) could be placed in specialized accommodation if some degree of nursing care, at present not available, was provided.

  5. History of Cardiovascular Surgery at Toronto General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myunghyun M; Alvarez, Juglans; Rao, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The Division of Cardiovascular Surgery at Toronto General Hospital has enjoyed an enviable history of academic achievement and clinical success. The foundations of this success are innovation, creativity and excellence in patient care, which continue to influence the current members of the division. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Physical medicine in hospital. Minimum standards in a physical medical department in acute inpatient areas in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reißhauer, A; Liebl, M E

    2012-07-01

    Standards for what should be available in terms of equipment and services in a department of physical medicine caring for acute inpatients do not exist in Germany. The profile of a department determines the therapeutic services it focuses on and hence the technical facilities required. The German catalogue of operations and procedures defines minimum thresholds for treatment. In the opinion of the authors a department caring for inpatients with acute rheumatic diseases must, as a minimum, have the facilities and equipment necessary for offering thermotherapeutic treatment. Staff trained in physical therapeutic procedures and occupational therapy is also crucial. Moreover, it is desirable that the staff should be trained in manual therapy.

  7. Maribor General Hospital from its foundation until World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivec, Gregor

    2006-01-01

    The author describes the history of Maribor General Hospital from its foundation in 1799 until the beginning of World War II. In 1799 the magistrate of the town of Maribor issued a memorandum regarding the establishment of a town hospital in the renovated building of the town hospice, providing space for 24 patients. The work of the hospital was carried out in the former hospice building until 1855. In the period between its establishment and eventual relocation 26 beds were added. The last two decades of the hospital's operation at the original location were marked by the assiduous work of the town's physicist, Dr. Anton Kuker. In the first half of the 19th century, the population of Maribor grew rapidly as a consequence of the construction of the Southern Railway. The town authorities therefore purchased the Prosenjak family villa in the Magdalena suburbs and relocated the hospital to it in 1855, providing 28 rooms for 110 patients. For a whole century, the care of patients was taken over by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul. The hospital was soon admitting over 1000 patients a year, the most common complaints being pulmonary catarrh, gastritis and fever. In 1872, when the Master of Surgery Feliks Ferk joined the hospital, the internal "medical" and the "external" surgical departments were formed. Although medical studies were not easily accessible, there were a number of Slovene physicians working in the hospital and the town in that period. In the last decades of the 19th century, the hospital was often renovated and enlarged. The infrastructure (telephone, water supply system, heating, lighting) had also been modernized before World War I. In 1914, the first X-ray apparatus was purchased. Between the wars, the hospital's development was boosted by recruitment of the Slovene physicians Ivan Matko, Mirko Cernic, Janko Dernovsek and Hugon Robic. The initial external and medical departments split into several departments: internal medicine, surgery

  8. Hospital and patient influencing factors of treatment schemes given to type 2 diabetes mellitus inpatients in Inner Mongolia, China [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In clinical practice, the physician’s treatment decision making is influenced by many factors besides the patient’s clinical conditions and is the fundamental cause of healthcare inequity and discrimination in healthcare settings. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a chronic disease with high prevalence, long average length of stay and high hospitalization rate. Although the treatment of T2DM is well guideline driven, there is a large body of evidence showing the existence of treatment disparities. More empirical studies from the provider side are needed to determine if non-clinical factors influence physician’s treatment choices.   Objective: To determine the hospital and patient influencing factors of treatment schemes given to T2DM inpatients in Inner Mongolia, China.   Methods: A cross-sectional, hospital-based survey using a cluster sampling technique was conducted in three tertiary hospitals and three county hospitals in Inner Mongolia, China. Treatment schemes were categorized as lifestyle management, oral therapy or insulin therapy according to the national guideline. Socio-demographic characteristics and variables related to severity of disease at the individual level and hospital level were collected. Weighted multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine influencing factors of treatment schemes.   Results: Regardless of patients’ clinical conditions and health insurance types, both hospital and patient level variables were associated with treatment schemes. Males were more likely to be given oral therapy (RRR=1.72, 95% CI=1.06-2.81 and insulin therapy (RRR=1.94, 95% CI=1.29-2.91 compared to females who were given lifestyle management more frequently. Compared to the western region, hospitals in the central regions of Inner Mongolia were less likely to prescribe T2DM patients oral therapy (RRR = 0.18, 95% CI=0.05-0.61 and insulin therapy (RRR = 0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.67 than lifestyle management

  9. 42 CFR 412.90 - General rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.90 General rules. (a) Sole community hospitals... after October 1, 1984 are ESRD beneficiary discharges. In determining ESRD discharges, discharges in DRG...

  10. Neer Award 2016: Outpatient total shoulder arthroplasty in an ambulatory surgery center is a safe alternative to inpatient total shoulder arthroplasty in a hospital: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Tyler J; Mulligan, Ryan P; Azar, Frederick M; Throckmorton, Thomas W

    2017-02-01

    Recent emphasis on safe and efficient delivery of high-quality health care has increased interest in outpatient total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of outpatient total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) by comparing episode-of-care complications in matched cohorts of patients with anatomic TSA as an outpatient or inpatient procedure. Thirty patients with outpatient TSA at a freestanding ambulatory surgery center (ASC) were compared with an age- and comorbidities-matched cohort of 30 patients with traditional inpatient TSA to evaluate 90-day episode-of-care complications, including hospital admissions or readmissions and reoperations. Two-tailed t-tests were used to evaluate differences, and differences of P surgery and disrupted his subscapularis repair. Three minor complications in the hospital cohort were mild asymptomatic anterior subluxation, blood transfusion, and superficial venous thrombosis. The complication rates (13% vs. 10%) were not significantly different. Outpatient TSA is a safe alternative to hospital admission in appropriately selected patients. Further investigation is warranted to evaluate the longer term outcomes and cost-effectiveness of outpatient TSA. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of the inpatient admission unit condition in the educational hospitals of Lorestan univercity of medical sciences in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahnaz Samadbeik

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: The condition of the investigated admission departments was evaluated as average. To improve admission process, some solutions should be taken into consideration including: preparing and supplying special strategies of inpatient admission department, employing professional and interested staff, holding postgraduation courses, ideal allotting of resources and space, regular evaluation of the admission department function and implementing process improvement procedures.

  12. A MiniReview of the Use of Hospital-based Databases in Observational Inpatient Studies of Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Cars, Thomas; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    inpatient databases in Asia, the United States and Europe were found. Most databases were automatically collected from claims data or generated from electronic medical records. The contents of the databases varied as well as the potential for linkage with other data sources such as laboratory and outpatient...

  13. [Audit of general hospitals and private surgical clinics in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Ruth; Dor, Michael; Lotan, Yoram; Haver, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Supervision and inspection of medical facilities are among the responsibilities of the Ministry of Health (MOH) anchored in the "Public Health Act 1940". In order to implement the law, the General Medical Division of the MOH began the process of auditing hospitals and private surgical clinics prior to considering the reissue of their license. The audit aimed to implement the law, activate supervision on general hospitals and private surgical clinics, provide feed-back to the audited institution and upgrade quality assurance, regulate medical activities according to the activities elaborated in the license and recommend the license renewal. Prior to the audits, 20 areas of activity were chosen for inspection. For each activity a check list was developed as a tool for inspection. Each area was inspected during a 4-5 hour visit by a MOH expert, accompanied by the local service manager in the institution under inspection. A comprehensive report, summarizing the findings was sent to the medical institute, requesting correction in those areas where improvements were needed. Recommendation for license renewal was sent to the Director of Licensing Division Ministry of Health. Between June 2003 and July 2006, 91 structured audits took place. A total of 47 general hospitals and 24 private surgical clinics were visited at least once. Most general hospitals were found abiding, functioning according to the required standards and eligible for license renewal. Licenses of institutions that complied with the standards determined by the audit teams, were renewed. Two private hospitals in central Israel, that were given an overall poor evaluation, were issued with a temporary license and subsequently re-audited 4 times over the next two years. Generally, the standards in private surgical clinics were lower than those found in general public hospitals. In one clinic the license was not renewed, and in another an order was issued to cease surgical procedures requiring general

  14. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  15. GENERAL HOSPITAL MARIBOR FROM ITS FOUNDATION TILL WORLD WAR II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Pivec

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Author describes the history of General Hospital Maribor from its foundation (1799 to the beginning of World War II. In 1799 the magistrate of the town Maribor issued a memorandum regarding establishment of a town hospital in the renovated building of the town hospice, providing space for 24 patients. The work of the hospital was carried out in the former hospice building until 1855. 26 beds were added in the period between its establishment and eventual relocation. The last two decades of the hospital’s operation at the original location were marked by the assiduous work of the town’s physicist, Dr. Anton Kuker. In the first half of the 19th century, the population of Maribor rapidly grew as a consequence of the construction of the Southern Railway. The city authorities therefore purchased the Prosenjak family villa in the Magdalena suburbs and relocated the hospital to it in 1855, providing 28 rooms for 110 patients. For a whole century, the care of patients was taken over by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul. The hospital was soon admitting over 1000 patients a year; the most common complaints being pulmonary catarrh, gastritis and fever. In 1872, when the Master of Surgery, Feliks Ferk, joined the hospital, the internal, medical, and the »external« surgical departments were formed. Although medical studies were not easily accessible, there was a number of Slovene physicians working in the hospital and the town in that period. In the last decades of the 19th century, the hospital was often renovated and enlarged. The infrastructure (telephone, water supply system, heating, lighting had also been modernized by World War I. In 1914, the first X-ray apparatus was purchased. Between the wars, the hospital’s development was stepped up by the recruitment of the Slovene physicians Ivan Matko, Mirko Černič, Janko Dernovšek and Hugon Robič. The initial external and medical departments split into several departments

  16. First 101 Robotic General Surgery Cases in a Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jarrod C.; Alrajhi, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The general surgeon's robotic learning curve may improve if the experience is classified into categories based on the complexity of the procedures in a small community hospital. The intraoperative time should decrease and the incidence of complications should be comparable to conventional laparoscopy. The learning curve of a single robotic general surgeon in a small community hospital using the da Vinci S platform was analyzed. Methods: Measured parameters were operative time, console time, conversion rates, complications, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), length of stay, and patient demographics. Results: Between March 2014 and August 2015, 101 robotic general surgery cases were performed by a single surgeon in a 266-bed community hospital, including laparoscopic cholecystectomies, inguinal hernia repairs; ventral, incisional, and umbilical hernia repairs; and colorectal, foregut, bariatric, and miscellaneous procedures. Ninety-nine of the cases were completed robotically. Seven patients were readmitted within 30 days. There were 8 complications (7.92%). There were no mortalities and all complications were resolved with good outcomes. The mean operative time was 233.0 minutes. The mean console operative time was 117.6 minutes. Conclusion: A robotic general surgery program can be safely implemented in a small community hospital with extensive training of the surgical team through basic robotic skills courses as well as supplemental educational experiences. Although the use of the robotic platform in general surgery could be limited to complex procedures such as foregut and colorectal surgery, it can also be safely used in a large variety of operations with results similar to those of conventional laparoscopy. PMID:27667913

  17. Uncommon combinations of ICD10-PCS or ICD-9-CM operative procedure codes account for most inpatient surgery at half of Texas hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Liam; Dexter, Franklin; Park, Sae-Hwan; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-09-01

    Recently, there has been interest in activity-based cost accounting for inpatient surgical procedures to facilitate "value based" analyses. Research 10-20years ago, performed using data from 3 large teaching hospitals, found that activity-based cost accounting was practical and useful for modeling surgeons and subspecialties, but inaccurate for individual procedures. We hypothesized that these older results would apply to hundreds of hospitals, currently evaluable using administrative databases. Observational study. State of Texas hospital discharge abstract data for 1st quarter of 2016, 4th quarter of 2015, 1st quarter of 2015, and 4th quarter of 2014. Discharged from an acute care hospital in Texas with at least 1 major therapeutic ("operative") procedure. Counts of discharges for each procedure or combination of procedures, classified by ICD-10-PCS or ICD-9-CM. At the average hospital, most surgical discharges were for procedures performed at most once a month at the hospital (54%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 51% to 55%). At the average hospital, approximately 90% of procedures were performed at most once a month at the hospital (93%, CI 93% to 94%). The percentages were insensitive to the quarter of the year. The percentages were 3% to 6% greater with ICD-10-PCS than for the superseded ICD 9 CM. There are many different procedure codes, and many different combinations of codes, relative to the number of different hospital discharges. Since most procedures at most hospitals are performed no more than once a month, activity-based cost accounting with a sample size sufficient to be useful is impractical for the vast majority of procedures, in contrast to analysis by surgeon and/or subspecialty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial consumption and resistance in adult hospital inpatients in 53 countries: results of an internet-based global point prevalence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Versporten, MPH

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The Global Point Prevalence Survey (Global-PPS established an international network of hospitals to measure antimicrobial prescribing and resistance worldwide. We aimed to assess antimicrobial prescribing and resistance in hospital inpatients. Methods: We used a standardised surveillance method to collect detailed data about antimicrobial prescribing and resistance from hospitals worldwide, which were grouped by UN region. The internet-based survey included all inpatients (adults, children, and neonates receiving an antimicrobial who were on the ward at 0800 h on one specific day between January and September, 2015. Hospitals were classified as primary, secondary, tertiary (including infectious diseases hospitals, and paediatric hospitals. Five main ward types were defined: medical wards, surgical wards, intensive-care units, haematology oncology wards, and medical transplantation (bone marrow or solid transplants wards. Data recorded included patient characteristics, antimicrobials received, diagnosis, therapeutic indication according to predefined lists, and markers of prescribing quality (eg, whether a stop or review date were recorded, and whether local prescribing guidelines existed and were adhered to. We report findings for adult inpatients. Findings: The Global-PPS for 2015 included adult data from 303 hospitals in 53 countries, including eight lower-middle-income and 17 upper-middle-income countries. 86 776 inpatients were admitted to 3315 adult wards, of whom 29 891 (34·4% received at least one antimicrobial. 41 213 antimicrobial prescriptions were issued, of which 36 792 (89·3% were antibacterial agents for systemic use. The top three antibiotics prescribed worldwide were penicillins with β-lactamase inhibitors, third-generation cephalosporins, and fluoroquinolones. Carbapenems were most frequently prescribed in Latin America and west and central Asia. Of patients who received at least one antimicrobial

  19. Evaluation of a radioisotope service in a general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateil, P.-Y.

    1978-12-01

    The value of radioisotopes in medicine has become increasingly apparent over the last few years. Nuclear medicine however recent, has nevertheless reached adult hood and doctors appreciate its substantial contribution in the field of diagnosis especially. So far nuclear medicine has been confined to University Hospital Centres, mainly for legal reasons. However the considerable help offered by this discipline is now taken for granted in the medical world and the wholly experimental stage is long past. While this aspect of nuclar medicine still exists, and is still dealt with by the services of University Hospital Centres, radioisotopes are now used to a large extend and on a day-to-day basis in pathology. Owing to pressure of work it is difficult for UH Centres to meet all request for examinations, so would the presence of nuclear medicine Service be justified in general Hospitals. The existence of one such service at the Bayonne HC might help to answer this question. For this reason the activity of the Bayonne HC Nuclear Medicine Service during its first year of practice is examined here. For a better understanding of the position this report first presents the Bayonne Hospital and the place occupied by a nuclear Medicine service in such an establishment. The activity of this service during its first year is then studied and the situation weighed up generally [fr

  20. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Foote

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose: Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods: A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results: The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01 and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01. The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8. The Alaska (38.9 and Southwest regions (27.3 had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions: Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children.

  1. Where schizophrenic patients commit suicide: a review of suicide among inpatients and former inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Mancinelli, Iginia; Ruberto, Amedeo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Girardi, Paolo; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    To review the literature on suicide of inpatients with schizophrenia, to identify suicide risk factors as well as typical patterns of behavior and to suggest a rationale and strategies for future interventions. A computerized MedLine, Excerpta Medica and PsycLit search supplemented by an examination of cross-references and reviews. Up to half the suicides among patients with schizophrenia occur during inpatient admission. Inpatient suicides were found among those of a young age group who were predominantly single, childless and socially isolated. The vast majority experienced an illness characterized by long duration and prolonged psychiatric hospitalizations or multiple admissions and discharges. Up to 50% of the suicides occurred in the first few weeks and months following discharge from the hospital. The paranoid subtype of schizophrenia, where positive symptoms prevail and negative symptoms are few, is associated with a suicide risk that is three times greater than that associated with nonparanoid subtypes and eight times greater than the risk associated with the deficit subtype. Treatment of suicide is a major problem among inpatients with schizophrenia. Evidence suggests that suicide is generally carried-out by patients who have been recently discharged or by those who manage to get away from the hospital. Strategies aimed at preventing this phenomenon have been introduced to the medical personnel, but suicide in these patients does not seem to have been reduced. We emphasize the need to establish guidelines for the prevention of suicide in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia.

  2. Group of family companions of hospitalized patients: an occupational therapy intervention strategy in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ferreira Dahdah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a consensus in the literature that the company of a family member during the hospitalization period increases patient recovery. However, this can have some negative effects on the caregiver’s health. With the purpose of reducing these negatives effects, it is useful to let family members express themselves. The State Hospital of Ribeirão Preto created a Group of Family Companions coordinated by the Occupational Therapy and Social Service. This study focuses on the assistance offered in a general hospital to families that undergo the whole illness and hospitalization process of their family member, suffering the impacts of this process in their daily lives, and on the intervention of Occupational Therapy in these cases.

  3. Terapia ocupacional en un hospital general de pacientes agudos = Occupational therapy in a general hospital for acute pacients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocello, M. G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Desde su creación, el Hospital Provincial “Dr. José María Cullen” posee la característica de ser un hospital de emergencias, sostenido por la Sociedad de Beneficencia y la Hermanas de la Caridad.Su funcionamiento responde a un Modelo Clínico-Asistencial, lo cual influye en la inserción de Terapia Ocupacional debiendo adaptar sus funciones a las características de la Institución.Los marcos de referencia teóricos y programas que se implementandeber ser acordes con las necesidades surgidas de un Hospital General de Agudos y de emergencias.En el Sector de Terapia Ocupacional se desarrolla la actividad docente cumpliendo con los requisitos reglamentados por el Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Santa Fe.ABSTRACT Ever since its start the Provincial Hospital “Dr. José María Cullen” is characterised for being an emergency hospital under the guidance of the Benfit Society of Hermanas de la Caridad.Its function responds to a Clinical Assistential Model, which influences the insertion of Occupational Therapy, adapting its functiones to the characteristics of the Institution as and when called for.The theoretical points of reference and programmes that are used must be in accordance with tehe necessities that appear in an Acute and Emergency General Hospital.In the Occupational Therapy Sector the teaching activity is developed as required by rules and regulations of the Ministry of Health for the Province of Santa Fe.

  4. The costs of inequality: whole-population modelling study of lifetime inpatient hospital costs in the English National Health Service by level of neighbourhood deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Tim; Cookson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background There are substantial socioeconomic inequalities in both life expectancy and healthcare use in England. In this study, we describe how these two sets of inequalities interact by estimating the social gradient in hospital costs across the life course. Methods Hospital episode statistics, population and index of multiple deprivation data were combined at lower-layer super output area level to estimate inpatient hospital costs for 2011/2012 by age, sex and deprivation quintile. Survival curves were estimated for each of the deprivation groups and used to estimate expected annual costs and cumulative lifetime costs. Results A steep social gradient was observed in overall inpatient hospital admissions, with rates ranging from 31 298/100 000 population in the most affluent fifth of areas to 43 385 in the most deprived fifth. This gradient was steeper for emergency than for elective admissions. The total cost associated with this inequality in 2011/2012 was £4.8 billion. A social gradient was also observed in the modelled lifetime costs where the lower life expectancy was not sufficient to outweigh the higher average costs in the more deprived populations. Lifetime costs for women were 14% greater than for men, due to higher costs in the reproductive years and greater life expectancy. Conclusions Socioeconomic inequalities result in increased morbidity and decreased life expectancy. Interventions to reduce inequality and improve health in more deprived neighbourhoods have the potential to save money for health systems not only within years but across peoples’ entire lifetimes, despite increased costs due to longer life expectancies. PMID:27189975

  5. Components of Hospital Perioperative Infrastructure Can Overcome the Weekend Effect in Urgent General Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N; Zapf, Matthew A C; Blackwell, Robert H; Markossian, Talar; Chang, Victor; Mi, Zhiyong; Gupta, Gopal N; Kuo, Paul C

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that perioperative hospital resources could overcome the "weekend effect" (WE) in patients undergoing emergent/urgent surgeries. The WE is the observation that surgeon-independent patient outcomes are worse on the weekend compared with weekdays. The WE is often explained by differences in staffing and resources resulting in variation in care between the week and weekend. Emergent/urgent surgeries were identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Database (Florida) from 2007 to 2011 and linked to the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey Database to determine hospital level characteristics. Extended median length of stay (LOS) on the weekend compared with the weekdays (after controlling for hospital, year, and procedure type) was selected as a surrogate for WE. Included were 126,666 patients at 166 hospitals. A total of 17 hospitals overcame the WE during the study period. Logistic regression, controlling for patient characteristics, identified full adoption of electronic medical records (OR 4.74), home health program (OR 2.37), pain management program [odds ratio (OR) 1.48)], increased registered nurse-to-bed ratio (OR 1.44), and inpatient physical rehabilitation (OR 1.03) as resources that were predictors for overcoming the WE. The prevalence of these factors in hospitals exhibiting the WE for all 5 years of the study period were compared with those hospitals that overcame the WE (P surgery procedures. Improved hospital perioperative infrastructure represents an important target for overcoming disparities in surgical care.

  6. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  7. Stroke admissions in Kubwa General Hospital: A 30-month review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaze Ojo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available >Background: Stroke is a common neurological disorder that contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of medical admissions.Objectives: To review the types, risk factors, hemispheric involvement, and outcomes of admitted stroke patients in Kubwa General Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria.Subjects and Methods: We carried out a retrospective study of patients who had a clinical diagnosis of stroke in Kubwa General Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria, between January 2013 and June 2015.Results: A total of 60 patients who had stroke were admitted during this period, accounting for 4.25% of medical admissions. Men and women accounted for 68.3% and 31.7%, respectively, with a male-to-female ratio of 2:1. Their mean age was 54.9 ± 13.5 years while the median age was 52.5 years. The mean hospital stay for these patients was 8.4 ± 5.5 days. Ischemic stroke occurred more frequently (65% compared with hemorrhagic stroke (35%. Hypertension (65%, alcohol (25%, previous stroke (18.3%, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia (18.3% were the common identifiable risk factors for stroke. Ten patients (16.7% had two risk factors for stroke, whereas 8 patients (13.3% had three risk factors for stroke. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures on admission were 171.5 ± 41.6 mmHg and 103.3 ± 24.0 mmHg, respectively. The left hemisphere (53.3% was more often affected than the right hemisphere in these patients. Majority of the patients (48.3% were discharged following improvement while the case fatality was 11.7%.Conclusion: Stroke is not uncommon as a cause of medical admission in Kubwa General Hospital. Ischemic stroke occurred more commonly and the left hemisphere was more often involved compared with the right hemisphere. Hypertension was the most common risk factor for stroke in these patients.

  8. A strategy for enhancing financial performance: a study of general acute care hospitals in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of hospital profitability were evaluated using a sample of 142 hospitals that had undergone hospital standardization inspections by the South Korea Hospital Association over the 4-year period from 1998 to 2001. The measures of profitability used as dependent variables in this study were pretax return on assets, after-tax return on assets, basic earning power, pretax operating margin, and after-tax operating margin. Among those determinants, it was found that ownership type, teaching status, inventory turnover, and the average charge per adjusted inpatient day positively and statistically significantly affected all 5 of these profitability measures. However, the labor expenses per adjusted inpatient day and administrative expenses per adjusted inpatient day negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures. The debt ratio negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures, with the exception of basic earning power. None of the market factors assessed were shown to significantly affect profitability. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the profitability of hospitals can be improved despite deteriorating external environmental conditions by facilitating the formation of sound financial structures with optimal capital supplies, optimizing the management of total assets with special emphasis placed on inventory management, and introducing efficient control of fixed costs including labor and administrative expenses.

  9. General practice: the DREEM attachment? Comparing the educational environment of hospital and general practice placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun

    2012-01-01

    The clinical learning environment is changing. General practice placements are now a fundamental part of undergraduate medical education. There is growing recognition that changes in hospital work practices are altering the breadth of exposure available to students. Surprisingly little work has been done comparing the quality of clinical placements between the hospital and community using validated tools. Such comparisons inform curriculum planning and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of the educational environment experienced by junior medical students during hospital and general practice placements using a widely used tool. Following the introduction of a new integrated curriculum, all Year 3 students (n=108) completed a standardised evaluation instrument, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) at the end of each of their clinical attachments (two different hospital sites and one in general practice), giving a total of 324 questionnaires. All forms were analysed and input into Graphpad INSTAT version 3. Total DREEM scores as well as subscale scores were calculated for each site. These were compared across sites using a Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test. By comparison with international standards, clinical attachments in our new integrated curriculum were rated highly. In particular, attachments in general practice scored highly with a mean score of 156.6 and perform significantly better (P students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Finally, significant differences also emerged in students' perceptions of teachers in general practice when compared to those in the hospital setting. These findings provide evidence of the high-quality educational environment afforded students in primary care. They challenge the traditional emphasis on hospital-based teaching and preempt the question - Is the community a better place for junior students to learn?

  10. Low Yield of Chest Radiography in General Inpatients and Outpatients with "Positive PPD" Results in a Country with Low Prevalence of TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ronald L; Heidinger, Benedikt H

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and spectrum of abnormalities on routine screening chest radiographs among inpatients and outpatients with "positive purified protein derivative (PPD)" in a large tertiary care academic medical center in a country with low prevalence of tuberculosis (TB). The reports of all chest radiographs of general inpatients and outpatients referred for positive PPD (2010-2014) were evaluated for the frequency of evidence of active or latent TB and the spectrum of imaging findings. The results of additional chest radiographs and computed tomography scans were recorded, as were additional relevant clinical histories and symptoms. Of the 2518 patients who underwent chest radiography for positive PPD, the radiographs were normal in 91.3%. The vast majority of the abnormal radiographs demonstrated findings consistent with old tuberculous disease. There were three cases (0.1%) of active TB, all of which were either recent immigrants from an endemic area or had other relevant histories or clinical symptoms suggestive of the disease. Universal chest radiography in general inpatient and outpatient populations referred for positive PPD is of low yield for detecting active disease in a country with low prevalence of TB. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medication Administration Errors Involving Paediatric In-Patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    In-Patients in a Hospital in Ethiopia. Yemisirach Feleke ... Purpose: To assess the type and frequency of medication administration errors (MAEs) in the paediatric ward of .... prescribers, does not go beyond obeying ... specialists, 43 general practitioners, 2 health officers ..... Medication Errors, International Council of Nurses.

  12. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor Regulations... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including...

  13. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg. ... South African Journal of Psychiatry ... to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over ...

  14. The effects of inpatient exercise therapy on the length of hospital stay in stages I-III colon cancer patients: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki-Yong; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Min, Jihee; Jeong, Duck Hyoun; Chu, Sang Hui; Lee, Ji Won; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Jeon, Justin Y; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a postsurgical, inpatient exercise program on postoperative recovery in operable colon cancer patients We conducted the randomized controlled trial with two arms: postoperative exercise vs. usual care. Patients with stages I-III colon cancer who underwent colectomy between January and December 2011 from the Colorectal Cancer Clinic, were recruited for the study. Subjects in the intervention group participated in the postoperative inpatient exercise program consisted of twice daily exercise, including stretching, core, balance, and low-intensity resistance exercises. The usual care group was not prescribed a structured exercise program. The primary endpoint was the length of hospital stay. Secondary endpoints were time to flatus, time to first liquid diet, anthropometric measurements, and physical function measurements. A total of 31 (86.1 %) patients completed the trial, with adherence to exercise interventions at 84.5 %. The mean length of hospital stay was 7.82 ± 1.07 days in the exercise group compared with 9.86 ± 2.66 days in usual care (mean difference, 2.03 days; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.47 to -0.60 days; p = 0.005) in per-protocol analysis. The mean time to flatus was 52.18 ± 21.55 h in the exercise group compared with 71.86 ± 29.2 h in the usual care group (mean difference, 19.69 h; 95 % CI, -38.33 to -1.04 h; p = 0.036). Low-to-moderate-intensity postsurgical exercise reduces length of hospital stay and improves bowel motility after colectomy procedure in patients with stages I-III colon cancer.

  15. Risk factors of falls in inpatients and their practical use in identifying high-risk persons at admission: Fukushima Medical University Hospital cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Hashimoto, Shigeatsu; Kanda, Hideyuki; Hirano, Noriko; Kurihara, Yumi; Kawashima, Takako; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the risk factors for falls in hospital settings and to propose the use of such factors to identify high-risk persons at admission. Prospective cohort study. Fukushima Medical University Hospital, Japan, from August 2008 and September 2009. 9957 adult consecutive inpatients admitted to our hospital. Information was collected at admission from clinical records obtained from a structured questionnaire conducted in face-to-face interviews with subjects by nurses and doctors and fall events were collected from clinical records. The proportion of patients who fell during follow-up was 2.5% and the incidence of falls was 3.28 per 100 person-days. There were significant differences in age, history of falling, cognitive dysfunction, planned surgery, wheelchair use, need for help to move, use of a remote caring system, rehabilitation, use of laxative, hypnotic or psychotropic medications and need for help with activities of daily living (ADL) between patients who did and did not fall. Multivariable adjusted ORs for falls showed that age, history of falls and need for help with ADL were common risk factors in both men and women. Using psychotropic medication also increased the risk of falling in men while cognitive dysfunction and use of hypnotic medication increased the risk of falling in women. Planned surgery was associated with a low risk of falls in women. To prevent falls in inpatients it is important to identify high-risk persons. Age, history of falling and the need for help with ADL are the most important pieces of information to be obtained at admission. Care plans for patients including fall prevention should be clear and considered.

  16. Acute general hospital admissions in people with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilleke, Nishamali; Hayes, Richard D; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Stewart, Robert

    2018-02-28

    Serious mental illness (SMI, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder) is associated with worse general health. However, admissions to general hospitals have received little investigation. We sought to delineate frequencies of and causes for non-psychiatric hospital admissions in SMI and compare with the general population in the same area. Records of 18 380 individuals with SMI aged ⩾20 years in southeast London were linked to hospitalisation data. Age- and gender-standardised admission ratios (SARs) were calculated by primary discharge diagnoses in the 10th edition of the World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes, referencing geographic catchment data. Commonest discharge diagnosis categories in the SMI cohort were urinary conditions, digestive conditions, unclassified symptoms, neoplasms, and respiratory conditions. SARs were raised for most major categories, except neoplasms for a significantly lower risk. Hospitalisation risks were specifically higher for poisoning and external causes, injury, endocrine/metabolic conditions, haematological, neurological, dermatological, infectious and non-specific ('Z-code') causes. The five commonest specific ICD-10 diagnoses at discharge were 'chronic renal failure' (N18), a non-specific code (Z04), 'dental caries' (K02), 'other disorders of the urinary system' (N39), and 'pain in throat and chest' (R07), all of which were higher than expected (SARs ranging 1.57-6.66). A range of reasons for non-psychiatric hospitalisation in SMI is apparent, with self-harm, self-neglect and/or reduced healthcare access, and medically unexplained symptoms as potential underlying explanations.

  17. [General conditions concerning the implementation of an outpatient education programme--characteristics and distinctions from an inpatient training programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, I; Wunderlich, B; Niehues, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the EVA study was to develop an outpatient education programme for women with endometriosis with a view to permanent transfer into routine care. Implementation of the programme generated several problems and obstacles that are not, or not to this extent, present in the inpatient setting of a rehabilitation clinic. The patient education programme was developed in line with an existing inpatient programme, taking into account the criteria for evaluating such training programmes. Several adjustments to process, structure and content level had to be made to achieve the conditions of the outpatient setting. Since May 2008, 17 training courses took place in various outpatient and acute inpatient settings, and a total of 156 women with diagnosed endometriosis participated. The problems and obstacles that emerged affected similarly the process, structure and content of the training programme. On the structural level, especially problems with availability of rooms, technical equipment and trainers occurred, leading to significant time pressures. The main problem on the procedural level was the recruitment of participants, since--in contrast to the inpatient setting and to disease management programmes--no assignment by physicians or insurers takes place. Furthermore, gainful activity of the participants and the resulting shift of the training beyond the usual working and opening hours are important barriers for implementation. The unavailability of trainers in these settings requires creative solutions. Regarding the contents of the training it has to be taken into consideration that--unlike the inpatient setting--no aftercare intervention and no individual psychological consultation are possible. The training programme has to be designed in such a way that all problems that have occurred could be dealt with appropriately. In summary, the permanent implementation of an outpatient training programme is possible but is more time-consuming than inpatient trainings

  18. Herniated Nucleus Pulposus in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Ikhsanawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP is one of the most common diseases of the spine. For an optimal management and prevention, there’s a need for data on factors related to the onset of complaints because this disease lowers the quality of life and increases morbidity. This study is aimed to see the scale and pattern of the HNP in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung. Methods: This is a descriptive study with the design of case series, data was obtained from medical records of patients with the diagnosis of HNP in the inpatient care of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in the period of 2007–2011. Results: According to the study on 79 patients, with 43 men and 36 women, the highest incidence was at the age group of 51–60 years old (31.6% and most common occupation was civil servant (11.4%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9%. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level of L5–S1 (58.2%. Trauma was found to be the highest relatable history in the patients (39.2%. Therapy of choice was primarily conservative (58.2% and most patients went home after the progression (84.8%. The year 2007 showed the highest prevalence of HNP at 25.3%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9% Conclusions: The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica and low back pain. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level L5–S1.

  19. How complete is the information on preadmission psychotropic medications in inpatients with dementia? A comparison of hospital medical records with dispensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, Federica Edith; Palese, Francesca; Romanese, Federico; Barbone, Fabio; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Riedel, Oliver

    2018-06-05

    Reliable information on preadmission medications is essential for inpatients with dementia, but its quality has hardly been evaluated. We assessed the completeness of information and factors associated with incomplete recording. We compared preadmission medications recorded in hospital electronic medical records (EMRs) with community-pharmacy dispensations in hospitalizations with discharge code for dementia at the University Hospital of Udine, Italy, 2012-2014. We calculated: (a) prevalence of omissions (dispensed medication not recorded in EMRs), additions (medication recorded in EMRs not dispensed), and discrepancies (any omission or addition); (b) multivariable logistic regression odds ratio, with 95% confidence interval (95% CI), of ≥1 omission. Among 2,777 hospitalizations, 86.1% had ≥1 discrepancy for any medication (Kappa 0.10) and 33.4% for psychotropics. When psychotropics were recorded in EMR, antipsychotics were added in 71.9% (antidepressants: 29.2%, antidementia agents: 48.2%); when dispensed, antipsychotics were omitted in 54.4% (antidepressants: 52.7%, antidementia agents: 41.5%). Omissions were 92% and twice more likely in patients taking 5 to 9 and ≥10 medications (vs. 0 to 4), 17% in patients with psychiatric disturbances (vs. none), and 41% with emergency admission (vs. planned). Psychotropics, commonly used in dementia, were often incompletely recorded. To enhance information completeness, both EMRs and dispensations should be used. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Dermatology consultations significantly contribute quality to care of hospitalized patients: a prospective study of dermatology inpatient consults at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Fabrizio; Guren, Lauren; Fernandez, Anthony P; Sood, Apra

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous abnormalities are common in hospitalized patients but are frequently missed or misdiagnosed by admitting teams. Inpatient dermatology consultations provide important information to help diagnose and manage these patients. However, few studies have analyzed dermatology inpatient consultations and their effect. We prospectively collected information for 691 consecutive dermatology consultations from November 2013 to November 2014. Patients ranged in age from newborns to 97 years old. The internal medicine service requested the most consultations (45%). Only 6.5% of consultations were requested within 24 hours of appearance of cutaneous findings. Before consultation, 70.3% of patients did not receive treatment for or based on their cutaneous findings. Dermatology consultation resulted in treatment change in 81.9% of patients. The most common diagnoses were drug rash and contact dermatitis. Biopsies confirmed 71.7% of the initial bedside diagnoses by the dermatology consultation team. Common skin diseases were responsible for the majority of dermatology consultations. Most patients were not treated for their cutaneous conditions before the dermatology consultation. Dermatology consultations resulted in treatment changes in the majority of cases. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, A C; Phillips, A W; Bawa, S M; Gallagher, P V

    2011-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular for elective surgery but it has gained slow transference to emergency surgery. The management of perforated peptic ulcers (PPU) laparoscopically is an accepted strategy yet it still remains infrequently used. The purpose of this study was to analyse the utility and outcomes of laparoscopy versus open repair for PPU in a district general hospital. In addition, we evaluated whether the subspecialty of the on-call consultant affected the method of repair performed and the training opportunities for trainee surgeons. Between 2003 and 2009, 53 patients underwent laparoscopic repair, 89 patients underwent open repair and a further 20 patients had laparoscopic repair that was converted to open repair for PPU. The results from a prospectively compiled database were analysed with primary outcome measures including operative time, length of hospital stay and mortality. The median operating time in the laparoscopic group was 60.0 minutes compared with 50.5 minutes in the open group. Hospital stay in surviving patients was significantly shorter in patients treated completely laparoscopically (5 days) when compared with the open group (6 days) ( p management of PPU. Our findings support the view that this procedure can be successfully used as a training operation.

  2. Characterizing and predicting rates of delirium across general hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomas H; Hart, Kamber L; Perlis, Roy H

    2017-05-01

    To better understand variation in reported rates of delirium, this study characterized delirium occurrence rate by department of service and primary admitting diagnosis. Nine consecutive years (2005-2013) of general hospital admissions (N=831,348) were identified across two academic medical centers using electronic health records. The primary admitting diagnosis and the treating clinical department were used to calculate occurrence rates of a previously published delirium definition composed of billing codes and natural language processing of discharge summaries. Delirium rates varied significantly across both admitting diagnosis group (X 2 10 =12786, pdelirium (86/109764; 0.08%) and neurological admissions the greatest (2851/25450; 11.2%). Although the rate of delirium varied across the two hospitals the relative rates within departments (r=0.96, pdelirium varies significantly across admitting diagnosis and hospital department. Both admitting diagnosis and department of care are even stronger predictors of risk than age; as such, simple risk stratification may offer avenues for targeted prevention and treatment efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital discharge summary scorecard: a quality improvement tool used in a tertiary hospital general medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Harvey, R; Dyne, A; Said, A; Scott, I

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the impact of completion and feedback of discharge summary scorecards on the quality of discharge summaries written by interns in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital. The scorecards significantly improved summary quality in the first three rotations of the intern year and could be readily adopted by other units as a quality improvement intervention for optimizing clinical handover to primary care providers. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Marketing research activities in hospitals. Satisfaction surveys of inpatients and outpatients are the most widely used application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubeau, P R; Jantzen, R

    1998-01-01

    Virtually unheard of in health care 30 years ago, marketing research by hospitals is expanding at a notable rate, particularly among larger institutions located in highly competitive urban markets. Research applications are particularly pronounced at for-profit institutions, those heavily involved in managed care programs, and hospitals that are part of an integrated delivery system. However, the majority of hospital administrators surveyed indicated they do not invest in marketing research to track the effectiveness of their own institution's advertising.

  5. Factors associated with nursing home placement of all patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation in Singapore community hospitals from 1996 to 2005: a disease stratified analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To (1 identify social and rehabilitation predictors of nursing home placement, (2 investigate the association between effectiveness and efficiency in rehabilitation and nursing home placement of patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation from 1996 to 2005 by disease in Singapore. DESIGN: National data were retrospectively extracted from medical records of community hospital. DATA SOURCES: There were 12,506 first admissions for rehabilitation in four community hospitals. Of which, 8,594 (90.3% patients were discharged home and 924 (9.7% patients were discharged to a nursing home. Other discharge destinations such as sheltered home (n = 37, other community hospital (n = 31, death in community hospital (n = 12, acute hospital (n = 1,182 and discharge against doctor's advice (n = 24 were excluded. OUTCOME MEASURE: Nursing home placement. RESULTS: Those who were discharged to nursing home had 33% lower median rehabilitation effectiveness and 29% lower median rehabilitation efficiency compared to those who were discharged to nursing homes. Patients discharged to nursing homes were significantly older (mean age: 77 vs. 73 years, had lower mean Bathel Index scores (40 vs. 48, a longer median length of stay (40 vs. 33 days and a longer time to rehabilitation (19 vs. 15 days, had a higher proportion without a caregiver (28 vs. 7%, being single (21 vs. 7% and had dementia (23 vs. 10%. Patients admitted for lower limb amputation or falls had an increased odds of being discharged to a nursing home by 175% (p<0.001 and 65% (p = 0.043 respectively compared to stroke patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the odds of nursing home placement was found to be increased in Chinese, males, single or widowed or separated/divorced, patients in high subsidy wards for hospital care, patients with dementia, without caregivers, lower functional scores at admission, lower rehabilitation effectiveness or efficiency at discharge and primary diagnosis groups such

  6. Interoperability prototype between hospitals and general practitioners in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Bruno; Müller, Henning; Schumacher, Michael; Godel, David; Abu Khaled, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Interoperability in data exchange has the potential to improve the care processes and decrease costs of the health care system. Many countries have related eHealth initiatives in preparation or already implemented. In this area, Switzerland has yet to catch up. Its health system is fragmented, because of the federated nature of cantons. It is thus more difficult to coordinate efforts between the existing healthcare actors. In the Medicoordination project a pragmatic approach was selected: integrating several partners in healthcare on a regional scale in French speaking Switzerland. In parallel with the Swiss eHealth strategy, currently being elaborated by the Swiss confederation, particularly medium-sized hospitals and general practitioners were targeted in Medicoordination to implement concrete scenarios of information exchange between hospitals and general practitioners with a high added value. In this paper we focus our attention on a prototype implementation of one chosen scenario: the discharge summary. Although simple in concept, exchanging release letters shows small, hidden difficulties due to the multi-partner nature of the project. The added value of such a prototype is potentially high and it is now important to show that interoperability can work in practice.

  7. URGENCIAS PSIQUIÁTRICAS EN EL HOSPITAL GENERAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rodrigo Nieto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias psiquiátricas pueden presentarse en diversos escenarios clínicos, incluyendo la consulta ambulatoria, el servicio de urgencias, o el hospital general. Por este motivo, es importante que tanto psiquiatras como médicos de otras especialidades estén capacitados para su reconocimiento y manejo inicial. Especialmente en el contexto del hospital general, es importante considerar la relación entre enfermedades médicas y psiquiátricas, desde los síntomas físicos que pueden presentarse producto de un trastorno psiquiátrico, hasta los síntomas psiquiátricos que son el resultado de enfermedades orgánicas, medicamentos o abuso de sustancias. Adicionalmente, en este artículo se entregan elementos para el manejo de algunas urgencias psiquiátricas particularmente relevantes, tales como la ideación suicida, la agitación psicomotora o el delirium, donde las intervenciones iniciales pueden ser de gran importancia para la evolución y el pronóstico del paciente.

  8. Causes of recurrent pneumonia in children in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, M F Paulien; Brand, Paul L P

    2013-03-01

    Because the few previous studies on underlying causes of recurrent pneumonia in children have come from tertiary care referral centres where selection bias may be important, the aim of this study was to examine underlying causes of recurrent pneumonia in children in a general hospital. We performed a retrospective chart review in a general hospital of 62 children with recurrent pneumonia over a 7.5 years period. In 19 patients (30.6%), no cause was identified, commonly because favourable natural history obviated the need for a full and invasive diagnostic work-up. Other underlying causes included recurrent aspiration in 16 patients (25.7%), lung disease (airway stenosis, bronchiectasis, middle lobe syndrome or tracheooesophageal fistula) in 10 patients (16.1%) and immune deficiency in 10 patients (16.1%). In contrast to previous studies, asthma was never diagnosed as an underlying cause, but diagnostic confusion between asthma (or recurrent upper respiratory tract infections) and recurrent pneumonia was common. The cause of recurrent pneumonia in children remains elusive in almost a third of patients, partly because the favourable natural history consistent with immune system maturation eliminates the need for further diagnostic procedures. Asthma is more likely a differential diagnostic consideration than an underlying cause of recurrent pneumonia in children. A standardised diagnostic guideline is needed to improve knowledge on causes of recurrent pneumonia in children. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability.

  10. Percutaneous injuries among healthcare workers at a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibak Gönen, Mehmet Faruk Geyik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Percutaneous injuries (PCIs remain a common incident among healthcare workers (HCWs despite the introductionof safety programs. The aim of this study was to assess the PCIs, required precautions, and applications after the injuries among healthcare workers in a small general hospital.Materials and methods: We assessed the occurrence of PCIs at a General Hospital (EGH from January 2007 to November2010. During this period, all injury cases among HCWs were reported to the Infection Control Committee (ICC using percutaneous injury notification form. The injury notification forms were evaluated retrospectively.Results: Totally 275 health personnel were working in our hospital, 36 healthy workers have been exposed to PCIs during this period. The incidence of PCIs was 2,9/10000 in 2007, 3,1/10000 in 2008, 3,8/10000 in 2009 and 3,9/10000 patient-days in 2010. Injured staff were recorded as, 16 nurses (44%, 12 cleaning staffs (34%, and eight (22% doctors. The device leading to damage was most frequently the needle-channel. Ten sources (27% were detected positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV, four (11% for hepatitis C virus (HCV, and two (5% for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV. No case of seroconversion has been recognized for any of the above mentioned infections.Conclusions: Percutaneous injuries remain to occur among HCWs. Since some the sources were infected, the health personnel are endangered for infections due to PCIs. The health personnel should presume that all patients are infected,and thus should work following universal precautions to avoid complications about the PCIs. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1(1:26-30.

  11. CHERISH (collaboration for hospitalised elders reducing the impact of stays in hospital): protocol for a multi-site improvement program to reduce geriatric syndromes in older inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Alison M; Banks, Merrilyn D; Barnett, Adrian G; Blackberry, Irene; Graves, Nicholas; Green, Theresa; Harvey, Gillian; Hubbard, Ruth E; Inouye, Sharon K; Kurrle, Sue; Lim, Kwang; McRae, Prue; Peel, Nancye M; Suna, Jessica; Young, Adrienne M

    2017-01-09

    Older inpatients are at risk of hospital-associated geriatric syndromes including delirium, functional decline, incontinence, falls and pressure injuries. These contribute to longer hospital stays, loss of independence, and death. Effective interventions to reduce geriatric syndromes remain poorly implemented due to their complexity, and require an organised approach to change care practices and systems. Eat Walk Engage is a complex multi-component intervention with structured implementation, which has shown reduced geriatric syndromes and length of stay in pilot studies at one hospital. This study will test effectiveness of implementing Eat Walk Engage using a multi-site cluster randomised trial to inform transferability of this intervention. A hybrid study design will evaluate the effectiveness and implementation strategy of Eat Walk Engage in a real-world setting. A multisite cluster randomised study will be conducted in 8 medical and surgical wards in 4 hospitals, with one ward in each site randomised to implement Eat Walk Engage (intervention) and one to continue usual care (control). Intervention wards will be supported to develop and implement locally tailored strategies to enhance early mobility, nutrition, and meaningful activities. Resources will include a trained, mentored facilitator, audit support, a trained healthcare assistant, and support by an expert facilitator team using the i-PARIHS implementation framework. Patient outcomes and process measures before and after intervention will be compared between intervention and control wards. Primary outcomes are any hospital-associated geriatric syndrome (delirium, functional decline, falls, pressure injuries, new incontinence) and length of stay. Secondary outcomes include discharge destination; 30-day mortality, function and quality of life; 6 month readmissions; and cost-effectiveness. Process measures including patient interviews, activity mapping and mealtime audits will inform interventions in each

  12. Cost effectiveness of enoxaparin as prophylaxis against venous thromboembolic complications in acutely ill medical inpatients: modelling study from the hospital perspective in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädlich, Peter K; Kentsch, Michael; Weber, Manfred; Kämmerer, Wolfgang; Brecht, Josef Georg; Nadipelli, Vijay; Huppertz, Eduard

    2006-01-01

    To estimate, from the hospital perspective in Germany, the cost effectiveness of the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium 40 mg once daily (ENOX) relative to no pharmacological prophylaxis (NPP) and relative to subcutaneous unfractionated heparin (UFH) 5,000 IU three times daily (low-dose UFH [LDUFH]). Each is used in addition to elastic bandages/compression stockings and physiotherapy in the prevention of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in immobilised acutely ill medical inpatients without impaired renal function or extremes of body weight. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of the 'additional cost for ENOX per clinical VTE avoided versus NPP' and 'additional cost for ENOX per episode of major bleeding avoided versus LDUFH' were chosen as target variables. The target variables were quantified using a modelling approach based on the decision-tree technique. Resource use during thromboprophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of VTEs, episode of major bleeding and secondary pneumonia after pulmonary embolism (PE) was collected from a hospital survey. Costs were exclusively those to hospitals incurred by staff expenses, drugs, devices, disposables, laboratory tests and equipment for diagnostic procedures. These costs were determined by multiplying utilised resource items by the price or tariff of each item as of the first quarter of 2003. Safety and efficacy values of the comparators were taken from the MEDENOX (prophylaxis in MEDical patients with ENOXaparin) and the THE-PRINCE (THromboEmbolism-PRevention IN Cardiac or respiratory disease with Enoxaparin) trials and from a meta-analysis. The evaluation encompassed 8 (6-14) days of thromboprophylaxis plus time to treat VTE and episode of major bleeding in hospital. Point estimates of all model parameters were applied exclusively in the base-case analysis. There were incremental costs of euro 1,106 for ENOX per clinical VTE avoided versus NPP (1 euro approximately equals 1

  13. A multicomponent approach to identify predictors of hospital outcomes in older in-patients: a multicentre, observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie L De Buyser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of older patients at risk of poor hospital outcomes (e.g. longer hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, and institutionalisation is important to provide an effective healthcare service. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors related to older patients' clinical, nutritional, functional and socio-demographic profiles at admission to an acute care ward that can predict poor hospital outcomes. DESIGN AND SETTING: The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project was a multicentre, observational study performed in geriatric and internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. SUBJECTS: One thousand one hundred twenty-three consecutively admitted patients aged 65 years or older. METHODS: Hospital outcomes were length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and institutionalisation. RESULTS: Mean age of participants was 81 years, 56% were women. Median length of stay was 10 (7-14 days, 41 patients died during hospital stay and 37 were newly institutionalised. Number of drugs before admission, metastasized cancer, renal failure or dialysis, infection, falls at home during the last year, pain, and walking speed were independent predictors of LoS. Total dependency in activities of daily living and inability to perform grip strength test were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Malnutrition and total dependency in activities of daily living were independent predictors of institutionalisation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that not only diseases, but also multifaceted aspects of ageing such as physical function and malnutrition are strong predictors of hospital outcomes and suggest that these variables should be systematically recorded.

  14. [Mortality of psychiatric patients. A retrospective cohort study of in-patients at the Psychiatric Hospital of Reggio Emilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballone, E; Contini, G

    1992-03-01

    The authors report the results of historical cohort study in long-term patients of psychiatric hospitals in Reggio Emilia. The cohort was formed by 790 patients hospitalized before 1978, and has been followed-up until 31/12/'89. The results of the study are: 269 subjects deceased (34%); 117 discharges (14.8%) and 411 (52.1%) still in hospital on 1/1/'90. An excess mortality was observed in the cohort. Mortality appears to be particularly high among young patient and females.

  15. Evolution of the Whipple procedure at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; McGrath, Deborah; Wargo, Jennifer A; Ferrone, Cristina R; Thayer, Sarah P; Lillemoe, Keith D; Warshaw, Andrew L

    2012-09-01

    Since Allen O. Whipple published his seminal paper in 1935, the procedure that bears his name has been performed widely throughout the world and is now a common operation in major medical centers. The goal of this study was to investigate the evolution of pancreatoduodenectomy at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We sought to identify all pancreatoduodenectomies performed at the MGH since 1935. Cases were obtained from a computerized database, hospital medical records, and the MGH historical archive. Demographics, diagnosis, intraoperative variables and short-term surgical outcomes were recorded. The first pancreatoduodenectomy at the MGH was carried out in 1941; since then, 2,050 Whipple procedures have been performed. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was the most frequent indication (36%). Pylorus preservation has been the most important variation in technique, accounting for 45% of Whipple procedures in the 1980s; observation of frequent delayed gastric emptying after this procedure led to decline in its use. Pancreatic fistula was the most frequent complication (13%). Operative blood replacement and reoperation rates have decreased markedly over time; the most frequent indication for reoperation was intra-abdominal bleeding. Mortality has decreased from 45% to 0.8%, with sepsis and hypovolemic shock being the most frequent causes of death. Mean duration of hospital stay has decreased from >30 to 9.5 days, along with an increasing readmission rate (currently 19%). The Whipple procedure in the 21st century is a well-established operation. Improvements in operative technique and perioperative care have contributed in making it a safe operation that continues evolving. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interconsulta psicológica: demanda e assistência em hospital geral Interconsulta psicológica: demanda y asistencia en hospital general Consultation-liaison psychology: demand and assistance in general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nátali Castro Antunes Santos

    2011-06-01

    adaptación del paciente a la hospitalización (41%. El modelo adoptado referencia psicológica era apropiado en el contexto estudiado, con la participación del equipo multidisciplinario en la efectividad de la práctica.The consultation-liaison psychology in general hospitals represents a modality of clinical and a methodological tool used by psychologists in inpatient care, upon the request of other health professionals. The study aimed to characterize the psychological demands of the liaison in a general hospital, from the analysis of attendance records request. One hundred and seven patients were treated between January and June 2010, in which 53% of the participants were male and 57% of adults over 45 years. Most requests were performed by physicians (44% and nurses (38%, formally (59%, and previous contact between interconsultor and the applicant (85%. The main reasons given for the request liaison were: psychological symptoms related to illness (43% and identification of impairment in the patient's adaptation to hospitalization (41%. The psychological liaison model adopted was appropriate to the studied context, with engagement of the multidisciplinary team in the effectiveness of practice.

  17. Estimating the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD exacerbations: reduction of hospital inpatient days during the following year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katajisto M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Milla Katajisto,1,2 Tarja Laitinen3 1Clinical Research Unit for Pulmonary Diseases, Division of Pulmonology, Helsinki University Hospital Heart and Lung Center, 2Helsinki University, Helsinki, 3Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Clinical Allergology, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland Aims: To study the short- and long-term results of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR given in the Helsinki University Heart and Lung Center and to understand the hospital resources used to treat severe COPD exacerbations in the city of Helsinki.Materials and methods: Seventy-eight inactive patients with severe COPD were recruited for a PR course; three of them did not finish the course. The course took 6–8 weeks and included 11–16 supervised exercise sessions. Using electronic medical records, we studied all COPD patients with hospital admission in the city of Helsinki in 2014, including COPD diagnosis, criteria for exacerbation, and potential exclusion/inclusion criteria for PR.Results: Seventy-five of the patients finished the PR course and 92% of those patients showed clinically significant improvement. Their hospital days were reduced by 54% when compared to the year before. At 1 year after the course, 53% of the patients reported that they have continued with regular exercise training. In the city of Helsinki, 437 COPD patients were treated in a hospital due to exacerbation during 2014. On the basis of their electronic medical records, 57% of them would be suitable for PR. According to a rough estimate, 10%–20% hospital days could be saved annually if PR was available to all, assuming that the PR results would be as good as those shown here.Conclusions: The study showed that in a real-world setting, PR is efficient when measured by saved hospital days in severe COPD. Half of the patients could be motivated to continue exercising on their own. Keywords: COPD, severe exacerbation, pulmonary rehabilitation, physical inactivity, COPD

  18. Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; electronic reporting pilot; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Quality Reporting Program; revision to Quality Improvement Organization regulations. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2013 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program, and the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program. We are continuing the electronic reporting pilot for the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, and revising the various regulations governing Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), including the secure transmittal of electronic medical information, beneficiary complaint resolution and notification processes, and technical changes. The technical changes to the QIO regulations reflect CMS' commitment to the general principles of the President's Executive Order on Regulatory Reform, Executive Order 13563 (January 18, 2011).

  19. Variation in markup of general surgical procedures by hospital market concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Marcelo; Chen, Sophia Y; Dillhoff, Mary; Schmidt, Carl R; Canner, Joseph K; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2018-04-01

    Increasing hospital market concentration (with concomitantly decreasing hospital market competition) may be associated with rising hospital prices. Hospital markup - the relative increase in price over costs - has been associated with greater hospital market concentration. Patients undergoing a cardiothoracic or gastrointestinal procedure in the 2008-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were identified and linked to Hospital Market Structure Files. The association between market concentration, hospital markup and hospital for-profit status was assessed using mixed-effects log-linear models. A weighted total of 1,181,936 patients were identified. In highly concentrated markets, private for-profit status was associated with an 80.8% higher markup compared to public/private not-for-profit status (95%CI: +69.5% - +96.9%; p markup compared to public/private not-for-profit status in unconcentrated markets (95%CI: +45.4% - +81.1%; p markup. Government and private not-for-profit hospitals employed lower markups in more concentrated markets, whereas private for-profit hospitals employed higher markups in more concentrated markets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hospital financing: calculating inpatient capital costs in Germany with a comparative view on operating costs and the English costing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    The paper analyzes the German inpatient capital costing scheme by assessing its cost module calculation. The costing scheme represents the first separated national calculation of performance-oriented capital cost lump sums per DRG. The three steps in the costing scheme are reviewed and assessed: (1) accrual of capital costs; (2) cost-center and cost category accounting; (3) data processing for capital cost modules. The assessment of each step is based on its level of transparency and efficiency. A comparative view on operating costing and the English costing scheme is given. Advantages of the scheme are low participation hurdles, low calculation effort for G-DRG calculation participants, highly differentiated cost-center/cost category separation, and advanced patient-based resource allocation. The exclusion of relevant capital costs, nontransparent resource allocation, and unclear capital cost modules, limit the managerial relevance and transparency of the capital costing scheme. The scheme generates the technical premises for a change from dual financing by insurances (operating costs) and state (capital costs) to a single financing source. The new capital costing scheme will intensify the discussion on how to solve the current investment backlog in Germany and can assist regulators in other countries with the introduction of accurate capital costing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Inpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data provided here include hospital-specific charges for the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals that receive Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS)...

  2. The Barriers to High-Quality Inpatient Pain Management: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richard J; Reid, M Carrington; Liu, Lydia L; Chused, Amy E; Evans, Arthur T

    2015-09-01

    The current literature suggests deficiencies in the quality of acute pain management among general medical inpatients. The aim of this qualitative study is to identify potential barriers to high-quality acute pain management among general medical inpatients at an urban academic medical center during a 2-year period. Data are collected using retrospective chart reviews, survey questionnaires, and semistructured, open-ended interviews of 40 general medical inpatients who have experienced pain during their hospitalization. Our results confirm high prevalence and disabling impacts of pain and significant patient- and provider-related barriers to high-quality acute pain management. We also identify unique system-related barriers such as time delay and pain management culture. Efforts to improve the pain management experience of general medical inpatients will need to address all these barriers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Computational tool kit for evaluating air kerma with the purpose of radiation protection of hospital inpatients: proposal of a simple experimental evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira, E-mail: ghoff.gesic@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, (Brazil); Andrade, Jose Rodrigo Mendes; Bacelar, Alexandre [Service of Medical Physics and Radioprotection, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Objective: To present a data analysis toolkit that may be utilized with the purpose of radiation protection of hospital inpatients and workers in areas where mobile apparatuses are used. Materials and methods: an Excel Active Sheet was utilized to develop a computational toolkit with exposure measurements to generate a database of shape factors and to calculate the air kerma around hospital beds. The initial database included data collected with three mobile apparatuses. A non-anthropomorphic phantom was utilized and exposure measurements were performed on a (4.2 x 4.2) m{sup 2} mesh-grid at 0.3 m steps. Results: The toolkit calculates the air kerma (associated with patients' radiation exposure and with ambient equivalent dose) under secondary radiation. For distances lower than 60.0 cm, values above the maximum ambient equivalent dose threshold defined for radiation free areas (0.5 mSv/year) were verified. Data collected at 2.1 m have always presented values lower than 12% of that threshold. Conclusion: The toolkit can aid in the radiological protection of patients and workers, provided it is combined with appropriate data collection, since it allows the determination of radiation free areas around beds in rooms where mobile X-ray apparatuses are utilized. (author)

  4. Computational tool kit for evaluating air kerma with the purpose of radiation protection of hospital inpatients: proposal of a simple experimental evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira; Andrade, Jose Rodrigo Mendes; Bacelar, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present a data analysis toolkit that may be utilized with the purpose of radiation protection of hospital inpatients and workers in areas where mobile apparatuses are used. Materials and methods: an Excel Active Sheet was utilized to develop a computational toolkit with exposure measurements to generate a database of shape factors and to calculate the air kerma around hospital beds. The initial database included data collected with three mobile apparatuses. A non-anthropomorphic phantom was utilized and exposure measurements were performed on a (4.2 x 4.2) m 2 mesh-grid at 0.3 m steps. Results: The toolkit calculates the air kerma (associated with patients' radiation exposure and with ambient equivalent dose) under secondary radiation. For distances lower than 60.0 cm, values above the maximum ambient equivalent dose threshold defined for radiation free areas (0.5 mSv/year) were verified. Data collected at 2.1 m have always presented values lower than 12% of that threshold. Conclusion: The toolkit can aid in the radiological protection of patients and workers, provided it is combined with appropriate data collection, since it allows the determination of radiation free areas around beds in rooms where mobile X-ray apparatuses are utilized. (author)

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life, Anxiety, and Depression in Bariatric Surgery Candidates Compared to Patients from a Psychosomatic Inpatient Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhues, Alexandra; von Lengerke, Thomas; Mall, Julian W; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2017-09-01

    Past research indicated high psychiatric comorbidity and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients seeking surgical treatment for obesity. This study investigated if preoperative bariatric surgery patients perceive equally poor HRQOL and increased levels of anxiety and depression as mentally ill patients. The study included four groups: 192 bariatric surgery candidates (PRE, 71% women, BMI 48.35 ± 8.98 kg/m 2 ), 96 psychotherapy inpatients with mental disorders (PSY, 77% women, BMI 27.12 ± 9.17 kg/m 2 ), 103 postoperative bariatric surgery patients (POST, 78% women, BMI 30.38 ± 2.88 kg/m 2 ), and a convenience sample of 96 non-clinical volunteers with pre-obesity or obesity grade 1 (CG, 52% women, BMI 29.22 ± 2.64 kg/m 2 ). HRQOL was measured using the 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), and psychopathology was assessed with the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). The PRE group exhibited the lowest physical HRQOL, and the PSY group the lowest mental HRQOL. The highest mental/physical HRQOL was reported by the POST group and the CG, without significant differences between these two groups. While the PSY group scored higher on HADS-anxiety scale than the PRE group, neither group differed with regards to symptoms of depression. The lowest levels of HADS-depression were found in the POST group and the CG. The present findings suggest that bariatric surgery candidates may suffer from equally high levels of depression as psychotherapy inpatients, but they perceive better mental well-being. Routine mental health evaluation should incorporate assessments for both psychopathology and HRQOL. DRKS00009901.

  6. Causes and predictors of mortality in hospitalized lupus patient in Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, C L; Ling, G R

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a serious autoimmune disease that can be life threatening and fatal if left untreated. Causes and prognostic indicators of death in SLE have been well studied in developed countries but lacking in developing countries. We aimed to investigate the causes of mortality in hospitalized patients with SLE and determine the prognostic indicators of mortality during hospitalization in our center. All SLE patients who were admitted to Sarawak General Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, were followed up in a prospective study using a standard protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, disease activities and damage indices were collected. Logistic regression and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the prognostic indicators of mortality in our patients. There were a total of 251 patients in our study, with the female to male ratio 10 to 1. Our study patients were of multiethnic origins. They had a mean age of 30.5 ± 12.2 years and a mean duration of illness of 36.5 ± 51.6 months. The main involvements were hematologic (73.3%), renal (70.9%) and mucocutaneous (67.3%). There were 26 deaths (10.4%), with the main causes being: infection and flare (50%), infection alone (19%), flare alone (19%) and others (12%). Independent predictors of mortality in our cohort of SLE patients were the presence of both infection and flare of disease (hazard ratio (HR) 5.56) and high damage indices at the time of admission (HR 1.91). Infection and flare were the main causes of death in hospitalized Asian patients with SLE. The presence of infection with flare and high damage indices at the time of admission were independent prognostic indicators of mortality.

  7. Closing the patient experience chasm: A two-level validation of the Consumer Quality Index Inpatient Hospital Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, A.; Lombarts, K.; Arah, O.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of patients' health care experiences is central to measuring patient-centred care. However, different instruments tend to be used at the hospital or departmental level but rarely both, leading to a lack of standardization of patient experience measures. OBJECTIVE: To validate

  8. Closing the patient experience chasm: A two-level validation of the Consumer Quality Index Inpatient Hospital Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, Alina; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundEvaluation of patients' health care experiences is central to measuring patient-centred care. However, different instruments tend to be used at the hospital or departmental level but rarely both, leading to a lack of standardization of patient experience measures. ObjectiveTo validate the

  9. Medication errors in pediatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe medication errors (MEs) in hospitalized children reported to the national mandatory reporting and learning system, the Danish Patient Safety Database (DPSD). MEs were extracted from DPSD from the 5-year period of 2010–2014. We included reports from public hospitals on pati...... safety in pediatric inpatients.(Table presented.)...

  10. Effect of Inpatient Dobutamine versus Milrinone on Out-of-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jordan B; Shah, Rashmee U; Sainski-Nguyen, Amy; Biskupiak, Joseph; Munger, Mark A; Bress, Adam P

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effect of dobutamine versus milrinone on out-of-hospital mortality in the treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Propensity score weighted retrospective cohort study with mortality as the primary outcome. An academic health care system. Five hundred adult patients with a prior history of heart failure who survived a hospitalization for ADHF that included treatment with dobutamine or milrinone between January 1, 2006, and April 30, 2014. ADHF events were defined as a hospitalization with receipt of an intravenous loop diuretic or a brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) value greater than 400 pg/ml during the hospitalization. Patients were followed until death or 180 days from hospital discharge. Risk ratios (RRs) for mortality associated with dobutamine compared with milrinone were calculated at 15, 30, and 180 days postdischarge using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Mean age was 62.7 years, 65.4% were male, and 48.2% had a mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 40% or lower. Overall, 55 (18%) of dobutamine-treated versus 23 (12%) of milrinone-treated patients died during follow-up (RR 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-2.13, p=0.360). For death from cardiovascular causes, the RR for dobutamine was 1.49 (95% CI 0.79-2.82, p=0.214). For death from worsening heart failure, the RR for dobutamine was 2.55 (95% CI 1.07-6.10, p=0.035). A trend toward significance was observed at day 15 after discharge for all mortality analyses (all p values milrinone in patients with ADHF. These results replicate and extend prior associations with mortality and should be confirmed in a prospective study. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. Risk factor for preterm labor in Haji Adam Malik General Hospital, Pirngadi General hospital and satellite hospitals in Medan from January 2014 to December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukatendel, K.; Hasibuan, C. L.; Pasaribu, H. P.; Sihite, H.; Ardyansah, E.; Situmorang, M. F.

    2018-03-01

    In 2010, Indonesia was ranked fifth in the world for the number of premature birth. Prematurity is a multifactorial problem. Preterm Labor (PTL) can occur spontaneously without a clear cause. Preventing PTL, its associated risk factors must be recognized first. To analyze risk factors associated with the incidence of PTL. It is a cross sectional study using secondary data obtained from medical records in Haji Adam Malik general hospital, Pirngadi general hospital and satellite hospitals in Medan from January 2014 to December 2016. Data were analyzed using chi-square method and logistic regression test. 148 cases for each group of preterm labor and obtained term laborin this study. Using the logistic regression test, three factors with astrong association to the incidence of identifiedpreterm labor. Antenatal Care frequency (OR 2,326; CI 95%), leucorrhea (OR 6,291; 95%), and premature rupture of membrane (OR 9,755; CI 95%). In conclusion, antenatal care frequency, leucorrhea, and history of premature rupture of themembrane may increase the incidence of Preterm Labor (PTL).

  12. The impact of three discharge coding methods on the accuracy of diagnostic coding and hospital reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopra, Rosy; Peckham, Daniel; Beirne, Paul; Rodger, Kirsty; Callister, Matthew; White, Helen; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Ghosh, Dipansu; Whitaker, Paul; Clifton, Ian J; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2018-07-01

    Coding of diagnoses is important for patient care, hospital management and research. However coding accuracy is often poor and may reflect methods of coding. This study investigates the impact of three alternative coding methods on the inaccuracy of diagnosis codes and hospital reimbursement. Comparisons of coding inaccuracy were made between a list of coded diagnoses obtained by a coder using (i)the discharge summary alone, (ii)case notes and discharge summary, and (iii)discharge summary with the addition of medical input. For each method, inaccuracy was determined for the primary, secondary diagnoses, Healthcare Resource Group (HRG) and estimated hospital reimbursement. These data were then compared with a gold standard derived by a consultant and coder. 107 consecutive patient discharges were analysed. Inaccuracy of diagnosis codes was highest when a coder used the discharge summary alone, and decreased significantly when the coder used the case notes (70% vs 58% respectively, p coded from the discharge summary with medical support (70% vs 60% respectively, p coding with case notes, and 35% for coding with medical support. The three coding methods resulted in an annual estimated loss of hospital remuneration of between £1.8 M and £16.5 M. The accuracy of diagnosis codes and percentage of correct HRGs improved when coders used either case notes or medical support in addition to the discharge summary. Further emphasis needs to be placed on improving the standard of information recorded in discharge summaries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  14. The effectiveness of consultation-liaison psychiatry in the general hospital setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca; Wand, Anne P F

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review how the effectiveness of consultation liaison psychiatry (CLP) services has been measured and to evaluate the strength of the evidence for effectiveness. Systematic review of medical databases using broad search terms as well as expert opinion was sought. The literature search was restricted to studies of general, whole-of-hospital inpatient CLP services. Forty articles were found and grouped into five measurements of effectiveness: cost effectiveness including length of stay, concordance, staff and patient feedback, and follow-up outcome studies. All measurements contributed to the evaluation of CLP services, but no one measure in isolation could adequately cover the multifaceted roles of CLP. Concordance was the only measurement with an established, consistent approach for evaluation. Cost effectiveness and follow-up outcome studies were the only measures with levels of evidence above four, however the three follow-up outcome studies reported conflicting results. Subjective evidence derived from patient and staff feedback is important but presently lacking due to methodological problems. The effectiveness of CLP services was demonstrated by cost-effectiveness, earlier referrals to CLP predicting shorter length of stay, and concordance with some management recommendations. There is evidence that some CLP services are cost-effective and reduce length of stay when involved early and that referrers follow certain recommendations. However, many studies had disparate results and were methodologically flawed. Future research should focus on standardising patient and staff feedback, and short-term patient outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Etiology of Diarrhea in Children Younger Than 5 Years Attending the Bengo General Hospital in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparinho, Carolina; Mirante, Maria Clara; Centeno-Lima, Sónia; Istrate, Claudia; Mayer, António Carlos; Tavira, Luis; Nery, Susana Vaz; Brito, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Diarrheal disease is among the leading causes of death in children younger than 5 years, especially in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the most frequent etiological agents of diarrhea and its associated factors in children younger than 5 years attending the Bengo General Hospital in Angola. From September 2012 through December 2013, stool samples were collected from 344 children presenting with diarrhea to investigate the presence of viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. Relevant sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained from parents and caregivers. An enteric pathogen was detected in 66.6% of stool samples: Cryptosporidium spp. (30.0%), rotavirus (25.1%), Giardia lamblia (21.6%), diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (6.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.1%), adenovirus (3.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.5%), astrovirus (2.6%), Hymenolepis nana (1.7%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (0.9%), Taenia spp. (0.6%), Trichuris trichiura (0.3%) and Entamoeba histolytica (0.3%). Children younger than 12 months were more frequently infected with Cryptosporidium spp. compared with older children (age: 12-59 months), independently of sex, season, lethargy and wasting [odds ratio (OR): 3.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.0-6.2]. Age (OR: 5.0, 95% CI: 2.6-9.3), vomiting (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8) and type of admission (inpatients, OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) were significantly associated with rotavirus infection. This study demonstrates high rates of infection with an enteric pathogen, particularly in children younger than 12 months, emphasizing the need to address diarrheal disease in this age group.

  16. [Effects of self-adapting G-DRG system 2004 to 2006 on in-patient services payment in pediatric hematology and oncology patients of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaras, A; Schaper, J; Strelow, H; Laws, H-J; Göbel, U

    2006-01-01

    Reimbursement of inpatient treatment by daily constant charges is replaced by diagnosis- and procedure-related group system (G-DRG) in German acute care hospitals excerpt for psychiatry since 2004. Re-designs of G-DRG system were undertaken in 2005 and 2006. Parallel to implementation requirement- and resource-based self-adjustment of this new reimbursement system has been established by law. Adjustments performed in 2005 and 2006 are examined with respect to their effect on reimbursements in treatments of children with oncological, hematological, and immunological diseases. An unchanged population of 349 patients associated with 1,731 inpatient stays of a Clinic of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, and Immunology in 2004 was analyzed by methods and means of G-DRG systems 2004, 2005, and 2006. DRGs and additional payments for drugs and procedures eligible for all and/or individual hospitals were calculated. G-DRG system 2005 resulted in overall reimbursement loss of 3.77 % compared to G-DRG 2004. G-DRG 2006 leads to slightly improved overall reimbursements compared to G-DRG 2005 by increasing DRG-based revenues. G-DRG 2006 effects 2.40 % reduction in overall reimbursement compared to G-DRG 2004. This loss includes ameliorating effects of additional payments for drugs and blood products already. Despite introduction of additional payments especially designed for children and teenagers in 2006, additional payment volume is decreased by 21.71 % from 2005 to 2006. G-DRG 2006 yields over-all reimbursement losses of 1.45 % in comparison to G-DRG 2004. Overall reimbursements include introduced additional payments for drugs and blood products. (Reimbursements resulting out of DRG payment alone drop by 14.73 % from 2004 to 2005, and increase by 3.26 % from 2005 to 2006 (2004 vs. 2006 11.95 %). Introduction of additional payments for drugs and blood products on a Germany-wide basis introduced in 2005 dampens DRG-based reimbursement losses. Despite introduction of dosage

  17. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation.

  18. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Setondji Amoussouhoui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin.A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients' understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question-answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers.Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their treatment. This

  19. Profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa em um hospital geral Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Fuzinatto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prática de profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa (TEV em pacientes em um hospital geral. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte transversal conduzido no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, localizado na cidade de Porto Alegre (RS, com uma amostra constituída de pacientes internados selecionados randomicamente entre outubro de 2008 e fevereiro de 2009. Foram incluídos pacientes maiores de 18 anos e internados por mais de 48 h. Os critérios de exclusão foram pacientes em uso de anticoagulantes, história de doença tromboembólica, gestação e puerpério. A adequação da profilaxia foi avaliada seguindo as recomendações de um protocolo criado pela instituição e tendo como base principal a diretriz da American College of Chest Physician, oitava edição. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 262 pacientes com média de idade de 59,1 ± 16,6 anos. Os fatores de risco mais comuns foram imobilização (70,6%, infecção (44,3%, câncer (27,5%, obesidade (23,3% e cirurgia maior (14,1%. Na avaliação do nível de risco para TEV, 143 (54,6% e 117 pacientes (44,7%, respectivamente, foram classificados como de risco alto e moderado. No geral, 46,2% dos pacientes tiveram profilaxia adequada, assim como 25% dos pacientes com três ou mais fatores de risco e 18% dos pacientes com câncer, e houve diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre esses grupos quando comparados àqueles com menos de três fatores de risco e sem câncer (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in a general hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional cohort study at the Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, located in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, involving a random sample of patients admitted between October of 2008 and February of 2009. We included patients over 18 years of age and hospitalized for more than 48 h. The exclusion criteria were anticoagulant use, pregnancy, puerperium, and a history of thromboembolic disease. The

  20. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the German Armed Forces: a retrospective study in inpatients of a German army hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bandelow, Borwin; Koch, Manuel; Zimmermann, Peter; Biesold, Karl-Heinz; Wedekind, Dirk; Falkai, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, around 0.4 and 0.7% of all German soldiers involved in missions abroad were registered as suffering from PTSD. The frequency of PTSD in the German Armed Forces was assessed from army records. All soldiers admitted to the German Military Hospital in Hamburg, Germany, with PTSD (n = 117) in the years 2006 and 2007 were assessed by using questionnaires and structure interviews. Risk factors associated with PTSD were identified. Of the 117 soldiers with PTSD, 39.3% were in missi...

  1. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  2. HCUP State Inpatient Databases (SID) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Inpatient Databases (SID) contain the universe of hospital inpatient discharge abstracts in States participating in HCUP that release their data through...

  3. Economic impact of surgery cancellation in a general hospital, Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    cause of inefficient use of operating room (OR) time and a drain on finite .... of total hospitalizations. In this hospital (270 beds ... Preoperative instructions not followed or patient not instructed. Change in .... concrete possibilities of reducing the level of surgical cancellations by .... room case-mix problem under uncertainty and.

  4. [Pain therapy in in-patients with cancer. Effects of a manual-based approach as guideline for pain-consulting service at a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkers, M; Pfau, Gernot; Lux, A; Pfau, Giselher; Schneemilch, C; Meyer, F; Grond, S

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate medication is an important and substantial part in the therapy of tumor-induced pain. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of anaesthesiology-based consultant service characterizing the quality of this type of treatment in daily clinical practice of a university hospital, i. e., in the patient profile of a tertiary center (study design: systematic clinical, unicenter observational study reflecting clinical practice and study-based control of therapeutic care quality). In the course of consulting function with regard to pain care on the single wards a considerable portion of cancer patients are recieving drugs. For most patients such care comprises several consultations and subsequently initiated treatment modifications. The consulting function ends if the patients feel free of pain or report a substantial improvement. From 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2012 detailed information on the drug therapy applied prior to, during and after the consultation was prospectively documented.This data was retrospectively evaluated as "pre-vs.-post" comparison (Chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test and McNemar's test), in particular, focussing on the quality of pain medication using the WHO index as well as pain intensity obtained by means of the visual analogue scale (VAS). In total, 375 in-patients were treated. The modified pain medication by the anesthesiological consultant service led to a significant increase (p therapy for cancer-related pain. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Left ventricular assist device exchange: the Toronto General Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Hideki; Ribeiro, Roberto V P; Billia, Filio; Cusimano, Robert J; Yau, Terrence M; Badiwala, Mitesh V; Stansfield, William E; Rao, Vivek

    2017-08-01

    As support times for left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) become longer, several complications requiring device exchange may occur. To our knowledge, this is the first Canadian report regarding implantable LVAD exchange. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of consecutive, unique patients implanted with an LVAD between June 2006 and October 2015 at Toronto General Hospital. In total, 122 patients were impanted with an LVAD during the study period. Eight patients required LVAD exchange, and 1 patient had 2 replacements (9 of 122, 7.3%). There were 7 HeartMate II (HMII), 1 HVAD and 1 DuraHeart pumps exchanged. Two of these exchanges occurred early at the time of initial implant, whereas 7 occurred late (range 8-623 d). Six exchanges were made owing to pump thrombosis. Of the 3 exchanges made for other causes, 1 HMII exchange was owing to a driveline fracture, 1 DuraHeart patient had early inflow obstruction requiring exchange to HMII at the initial implant, and the third had a suspected inflow obstruction with no evidence of thrombosis at the time of the procedure. The mean support time before exchange was 225 days, and time from exchange to transplant, death or ongoing support was 245 days. Three patients were successfully bridged to transplant, and at the time of data collection 2 were supported awaiting transplant. Three patients died after a mean duration of 394.3 days (range 78-673 d) of support postreplacement. Four cases were successfully performed using a subcostal approach. Pump thrombosis is the most common cause for LVAD exchange, which can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. The subcostal approach may be the preferred procedure for an HMII exchange when indicated.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from inpatients with infected diabetic foot ulcers in an Algerian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djahmi, N; Messad, N; Nedjai, S; Moussaoui, A; Mazouz, D; Richard, J-L; Sotto, A; Lavigne, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen cultured from diabetic foot infection (DFI). The consequence of its spread to soft tissue and bony structures is a major causal factor for lower-limb amputation. The objective of the study was to explore ecological data and epidemiological characteristics of S. aureus strains isolated from DFI in an Algerian hospital setting. Patients were included if they were admitted for DFI in the Department of Diabetology at the Annaba University Hospital from April 2011 to March 2012. Ulcers were classified according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot classification system. All S. aureus isolates were analysed. Using oligonucleotide arrays, S. aureus resistance and virulence genes were determined and each isolate was affiliated to a clonal complex. Among the 128 patients, 277 strains were isolated from 183 samples (1.51 isolate per sample). Aerobic Gram-negative bacilli were the most common isolated organisms (54.9% of all isolates). The study of ecological data highlighted the extremely high rate of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) (58.5% of all isolates). The situation was especially striking for S. aureus [(85.9% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)], Klebsiella pneumonia (83.8%) and Escherichia coli (60%). Among the S. aureus isolates, 82.2% of MRSA belonged to ST239, one of the most worldwide disseminated clones. Ten strains (13.7%) belonged to the European clone PVL+ ST80. ermA, aacA-aphD, aphA, tetM, fosB, sek, seq, lukDE, fnbB, cap8 and agr group 1 genes were significantly associated with MRSA strains (p study shows for the first time the alarming prevalence of MDROs in DFI in Algeria. ©2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection ©2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  7. Effects of inpatient geriatric interventions in a German geriatric hospital: Impact on ADL, mobility and cognitive status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordne, S; Schulz, R-J; Zank, S

    2015-06-01

    Given the demographic changes, the need for effective geriatric intervention is obvious. Geriatric care aims to maintain the highest possible level of independence and quality of life and to reduce the risk of need for care. This study investigated the benefits of geriatric care on functional performance, mobility and cognition. This study involved a retrospective analysis of clinical data from 646 patients. At hospital admission and discharge functional status was assessed using the Barthel index. Mobility was evaluated by means of the Tinetti test and cognition by the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). A follow-up was conducted on 112 patients 2-5 months after hospital discharge. Statistical analysis included t-tests including Cohen's d for effect size and multivariate regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 81.1 ± 7.1 years including 439 women (68%) and 207 men (32%). There were significant average improvements for activities of daily living (ADL), mobility and cognition comparing discharge and admission scores. For functional and mobility status, effect sizes were medium to high. Regression analyses showed that ADL improvement was predicted by functional, mobile and cognitive status at admission. Follow-up analyses revealed a high percentage of former patients still living at home and an overall maintenance of ADL levels. Geriatric patients seem to experience long-term improvements during geriatric treatment, which appears to fulfill its aim of recovering independence. For a better understanding of relevant factors for the recreation of geriatric patients, further research is needed, e.g. with respect to the impact of the nutritional status.

  8. Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaQuia A. Vinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029. Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office.

  9. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is often...

  10. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  11. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  12. [Orientation of patients referred by their general practionner to the public or private hospital sector in France: A prospective epidemiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, P-G; Kernéis, S; Turbelin, C; Souty, C; Arena, C; Gavazzi, G; Sarazin, M; Blanchon, T; Hanslik, T

    2012-12-01

    In-patients characteristics generate cost differences between hospitals. In France, there are few data on the characteristics on the patients referred to hospitals by their general practitioners (GPs) and none on the predictors of referral to the public or for-profit hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze those characteristics and the predictors of referral to the public or for-profit hospitals. We collected, prospectively, the request for hospitalizations made by the GPs of the Sentinelles network in France, from 2007 to 2009. Patients' characteristics and also the reasons for that request were analyzed. A logistic regression was used to compare the population between local hospitals. Ten thousand seven hundred and eighteen statements were collected. The median age was 73 years. Patients were women in 51% of the cases, and only 14% of the hospitalizations had been planned. Hospitalization in the public sector was preferred for young children and the elderly (Pprivate sector, patients addressed to the public sector were more often seen for emergencies (OR: 2.3 [2.0-2.8]), by a doctor different from their referring GP (OR: 1.7 [1.4-2.1]) and out of the GP's office. The reasons for hospital admission were different depending on the sector of hospitalization (Ppublic sector hospitals presented with greater comorbidity or more complex diagnosis (for example: feeling ill, fainting or syncope and fever) or a greater disability (for example: stroke, neurological and psychiatric diseases). This study suggests that GPs send their patients to the public or for-profit hospitals according to criteria of severity, comorbidity and disability. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paiva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents.Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories.Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%. The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%, surgical site infection (26.3% and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%. The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year.Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation.

  14. Inpatient preanalytic process improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Elizabeth A; Phipps, Ron; Del Guidice, Robert; Middleton, Lavinia P; Bingham, John; Prejean, Cheryl; Johnson-Hamilton, Martha; Philip, Pheba; Le, Ngoc Han; Muses, Waheed

    2013-12-01

    Phlebotomy services are a common target for preanalytic improvements. Many new, quality engineering tools have recently been applied in clinical laboratories. However, data on relatively few projects have been published. This example describes a complete application of current, quality engineering tools to improve preanalytic phlebotomy services. To decrease the response time in the preanalytic inpatient laboratory by 25%, to reduce the number of incident reports related to preanalytic phlebotomy, and to make systematic process changes that satisfied the stakeholders. The Department of Laboratory Medicine, General Services Section, at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston) is responsible for inpatient phlebotomy in a 24-hour operation, which serves 689 inpatient beds. The study director was project director of the Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine's Quality Improvement Section and was assisted by 2 quality technologists and an industrial engineer from MD Anderson Office of Performance Improvement. After implementing each solution, using well-recognized, quality tools and metrics, the response time for blood collection decreased by 23%, which was close to meeting the original responsiveness goal of 25%. The response time between collection and arrival in the laboratory decreased by 8%. Applicable laboratory-related incident reports were reduced by 43%. Comprehensive application of quality tools, such as statistical control charts, Pareto diagrams, value-stream maps, process failure modes and effects analyses, fishbone diagrams, solution prioritization matrices, and customer satisfaction surveys can significantly improve preset goals for inpatient phlebotomy.

  15. [Prospective DRG coding : Improvement in cost-effectiveness and documentation quality of in-patient hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuss, S; Jungmeister, A; Baumgart, A; Seelos, R; Ockert, S

    2018-02-01

    In prospective reimbursement schemes a diagnosis-related group (DRG) is assigned to each case according to all coded diagnoses and procedures. This process can be conducted retrospectively after (DC) or prospectively during the hospitalization (PC). The use of PC offers advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness and documentation quality without impairing patient safety. A retrospective analysis including all DRG records and billing data from 2012 to 2015 of a surgical department was carried out. The use of PC was introduced into the vascular surgery unit (VS) in September 2013, while the remaining surgical units (RS) stayed with DC. Analysis focused on differences between VS and RS before and after introduction of PC. Characteristics of cost-effectiveness were earnings (EBIT-DA), length of stay (LOS), the case mix index (CMI) and the productivity in relation to the DRG benchmark (productivity index, PI). The number of recorded diagnoses/procedures (ND/NP) was an indicator for documentation quality. A total of 1703 cases with VS and 27,679 cases with RS were analyzed. After introduction of PC the EBIT-DA per case increased in VS but not in RS (+3342 Swiss francs vs. +84, respectively, p  0.05) and the LOS was more reduced in VS than in RS (-0.36 days vs. -0.03 days, p > 0.005). The PI increased in VS but decreased in RS (+0.131 vs. -0.032, p DRG benchmark, i. e. increasing the PI. The increasing ND indicates an improvement in documentation quality.

  16. Relative effects of heavy alcohol use and hepatitis C in decompensated chronic liver disease in a hospital inpatient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Abed, Jean; Aristy, Jose David; Munot, Khushboo; Suneja, Upma; Engelson, Ellen S; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-03-01

    Heavy alcohol use has been hypothesized to accelerate disease progression to end-stage liver disease in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this study, we estimated the relative influences of heavy alcohol use and HCV in decompensated chronic liver disease (CLD). Retrospectively, 904 patients with cirrhotic disease admitted to our hospitals during January 2010-December 2012 were identified based on ICD9 codes. A thorough chart review captured information on demographics, viral hepatitis status, alcohol use and progression of liver disease (i.e. decompensation). Decompensation was defined as the presence of ascites due to portal hypertension, bleeding esophageal varices, hepatic encephalopathy or hepatorenal syndrome. Heavy alcohol use was defined as a chart entry of greater than six daily units of alcohol or its equivalent. 347 patients were included based on our selection criteria of documented heavy alcohol use (n = 215; 62.0%), hepatitis titers (HCV: n = 182; 52.5%) and radiological evidence of CLD with or without decompensation (decompensation: n = 225; 64.8%). Independent of HCV infection, heavy alcohol use significantly increased the risk of decompensation (OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.11-2.75, p < 0.02) relative to no heavy alcohol use. No significance was seen with age, sex, race, HIV, viral hepatitis and moderate alcohol use for risk for decompensation. Additionally, dose-relationship regression analysis revealed that heavy, but not moderate alcohol use, resulted in a three-fold increase (p = 0.013) in the risk of decompensation relative to abstinence. While both heavy alcohol use and HCV infection are associated with risk of developing CLD, our data suggest that heavy, but not moderate, alcohol consumption is associated with a greater risk for hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis than does HCV infection.

  17. Epidemia de influenza A(H1N1 en la Argentina: Experiencia del Hospital Nacional Profesor Alejandro Posadas Influenza A(H1N1 epidemic in Argentina: Experience in a National General Hospital (Hospital Nacional Profesor Alejandro Posadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la preparación y la atención médica durante la epidemia de influenza A(H1N1 (junio 2009 en un hospital general de agudos, público, de alta complejidad; con diagnóstico de laboratorio, internación general y cuidados intensivos (UCI. Se elaboró un plan para aumentar la capacidad asistencial, reasignar recursos y garantizar la bioseguridad. La consulta fue 7.1 ± 3.8 veces mayor que en 2006-2008. La detección de casos de A(H1N1 fue confirmada por PCR-RT en 186/486 (38.3% pacientes internados y en 56/176 (31.8% ambulatorios. Internados: mediana de edad 20 años; 75% menores de 45 y 32.3% menores de 15. Mortalidad global: 6.8%; 9.1% en los positivos. Adultos: recepción en un área de atención ambulatoria, internación (aislamiento y ventilación mecánica. Sala general: ingresaron 110 pacientes (5 veces más que 1999-2006 con saturación de oxígeno The preparation and medical care during the influenza A(H1N1 outbreak (June 2009 in a high complexity level, public, general hospital with laboratory diagnosis, general and intensive care (ICU hospitalization is described. A plan was designed to increase the hospital's surge capacity, reallocate resources and guarantee bio-safety. The number of consultations was 7.1 ± 3.8 times higher than during June 2006-2008. Detection of A(H1N1 cases were confirmed by PCR-RT in 186/486 (38.3% in-patients and 56/176 (31.8% out-patients. Median age among in-patients was 20 years; 75% < 45 and 32.3% < 15. Global mortality: 6.8%; 9.1% among confirmed cases. Adults were directed to a reception area of out-patient care, hospitalization (isolation and mechanical ventilation. General ward: 110 patients with oxygen saturation < 96% and/or risk factors (65.5% had asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity, pregnancy or other were admitted (5 times more than in 1999-2006. Chest X-ray showed lung infiltrates and/or lung consolidation in 97.3%. Severe hypoxemia: 43.5%. There were no significant

  18. Cuidado ecológico: o significado para profissionais de um hospital geral Cuidado ecológico: el significado para profesionales de un hospital general Ecological care: meaning for health care professionals from a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2009-01-01

    ón general, todavía incipiente, respecto a la problemática ambiental. La preocupación principal está relacionada a la separación, reciclaje y destino adecuado de la basura, aunque algunos profesionales hayan destacado la importancia de medidas preventivas como el lavado de las manos, utilización de productos biodegradables, entre otros.OBJECTIVE: To understand the meaning of ecological care in view of complex thinking and how ecological care had been associated with the clinical practice of health care professionals from a general hospital. METHODS: This was a qualitative descriptive study among 15 health care professionals working in the laundry, nutrition, or inpatient unit. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Bardin's recommendations guided the content analysis. RESULTS: The following categories emerged: Meaning of ecological care, significance of ecological care for clinical practice, and preventive measures associated with ecological care. CONCLUSIONS: Although incipient, the findings suggest that there is a general concern regarding environmental issues. Even though some health care professionals stated the significance of hand washing and use of biodegradable products as preventive measures, the main concern was related to the separation, recycling, and disposal of trash.

  19. Phenotypic and molecular detection of the bla KPC gene in clinical isolates from inpatients at hospitals in São Luis, MA, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Patricia Cristina Saldanha; Monteiro, Andrea Souza; Marques, Sirlei Garcia; Monteiro, Sílvio Gomes; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Coqueiro, Martina Márcia Melo; Marques, Ana Cláudia Garcia; de Jesus Gomes Turri, Rosimary; Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma

    2016-12-07

    Bacteria that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) are resistant to broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics. The objective of this study was to phenotypically and genotypically characterize the antibiotic susceptibility to carbapenems of 297 isolates recovered from clinical samples obtained from inpatients at 16 hospitals in São Luis (Maranhão, Brazil). The study was conducted using phenotypic tests and molecular methods, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. The nonparametric chi-square test of independence was used to evaluate the associations between the bacterial bla KPC gene and the modified Hodge test, and the chi-square adherence test was used to assess the frequency of carbapenemases and their association with the bla KPC gene. The most frequently isolated species were Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 128; 43.0%), K. pneumoniae (n = 75; 25.2%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 42; 14.1%). Susceptibility assays showed that polymixin B was active against 89.3% of the bacterial isolates. The Acinetobacter spp. and K. pneumoniae strains were susceptible to amikacin and tigecycline, and Pseudomonas spp. were sensitive to gentamicin and amikacin. Among the 297 isolates, 100 (33.7%) were positive for the bla KPC gene, including non-fermentative bacteria (A. baumannii) and Enterobacteriaceae species. Among the isolates positive for the bla KPC gene, K. pneumoniae isolates had the highest positivity rate of 60.0%. The bla KPC gene variants detected included KPC-2, which was found in all isolates belonging to species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. KPC-2 and KPC-3 were observed in A. baumannii isolates. Importantly, the bla KPC gene was also detected in three Raoultella isolates and one isolate of the Pantoea genus. ERIC-PCR patterns showed a high level of genetic diversity among the bacterial isolates; it was capable of distinguishing 34 clones among 100 strains

  20. A comparison of antibiotic point prevalence survey data from four Irish regional/general hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, C

    2011-06-01

    Point prevalence surveys (PPS) are increasingly used to examining and compare hospital antibiotic consumption. The aim of this study was to identify the (1) point prevalence of antibiotic use in one regional hospital and (2) compare PPS data from similar regional\\/general hospitals.

  1. CT scanning in stroke patients: meeting the challenge in the remote and rural district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, A W; Anderson, E M

    2009-05-01

    National audit data allow crude comparison between centres and indicate that most Scottish hospitals fail to meet current guidelines for CT scanning of the brain in stroke patients. This study identifies some of the reasons for delay in performing CT scans in a largely rural population. This audit study assesses the delays from onset of symptoms, time of admission and request received to CT scan in stroke patients for three different in-patient groups as well as those managed in the community. The reasons for delay in CT scanning varied between different patient groups but for one group of in-patients, changes in booking procedure and introduction of a second CT scanner increased the proportion scanned within 48 hours of request from 65% to 96%. Further developments including the introduction of Saturday and Sunday routine CT scanning, radiologist reporting from home and additional CT scanners placed in remote hospitals may be expected to improve these figures further. Target times of three hours from onset of symptoms to scan to allow thrombolysis may however be impossible to meet for all stroke patients in rural areas.

  2. Variations in inpatient pediatric anesthesia in California from 2000 to 2009: a caseload and geographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C; Honkanen, Anita; Chan, Jia; Schmitt, Susan; Saynina, Olga; Hackel, Alvin; Gregory, George; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Wise, Paul H

    2014-12-01

    Regional referral systems are considered important for children hospitalized for surgery, but there is little information on existing systems. To examine geographic variations in anesthetic caseloads in California for surgical inpatients ≤6 years and to evaluate the feasibility of regionalizing anesthetic care. We reviewed California's unmasked patient discharge database between 2000 and 2009 to determine surgical procedures, dates, and inpatient anesthetic caseloads. Hospitals were classified as urban or rural and were further stratified as low, intermediate, high, and very high volume. We reviewed 257,541 anesthetic cases from 402 hospitals. Seventeen California Children's Services (CCS) hospitals conducted about two-thirds of all inpatient anesthetics; 385 non-CCS hospitals accounted for the rest. Urban hospitals comprised 82% of low- and intermediate-volume centers (n = 297) and 100% of the high- and very high-volume centers (n = 41). Ninety percent (n = 361) of hospitals performed risk procedures such as appendectomies were the most frequent in urban low- and intermediate-volume hospitals, fairly complex neurosurgical and general surgeries were also performed. The median distance from urban lower-volume hospitals to the nearest high- or very high-volume center was 12 miles. Up to 98% (n = 40,316) of inpatient anesthetics at low- or intermediate-volume centers could have been transferred to higher-volume centers within 25 miles of smaller centers. Many urban California hospitals maintained low annual inpatient anesthetic caseloads for children ≤6 years while conducting potentially more complex procedures. Further efforts are necessary to define the scope of pediatric anesthetic care at urban low- and intermediate-volume hospitals in California. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial Isolates and Their Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Wound Infections among Inpatients and Outpatients Attending the University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynalem Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The widespread uses of antibiotics, together with the length of time over which they have been available, have led to the emergence of resistant bacterial pathogens contributing to morbidity and mortality. This study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their drug susceptibility patterns from inpatients and outpatients with pus and/or wound discharge. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital from March to May, 2014. Wound swab samples were collected from each study participant and inoculated into appropriate media. The bacterial pathogens were identified using standard microbiological methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using disk diffusion technique following Kirby-Bauer method. Results. A total of 137 study subjects were included in the study with bacterial isolation rate of 115 (83.9%. Of all, 81 (59.1% were males. Seventy-seven (57% of the isolates were Gram-negative and 59 (43% were Gram-positive. From the total isolates, Staphylococcus aureus was the most predominant isolate 39/115 (34% followed by Klebsiella species (13%, coagulase negative staphylococci spp. (12% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Gram-positive isolates were resistant to ampicillin (86.4%, amoxicillin (83%, penicillin (81.3%, oxacillin (74.6%, and tetracycline (59.4%, while Gram-negative isolates were resistant to amoxicillin (97.4%, ampicillin (94.8%, tetracycline (72.7%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (66%, and chloramphenicol (54.5%. Conclusion. High prevalence of bacterial isolates was found, Staphylococcus aureus being the most dominant. High rates of multiple drug resistance pathogens to the commonly used antimicrobial agents were isolated. Therefore, concerned bodies should properly monitor the choice of antibiotics to be used as prophylaxis and empiric treatment in the study area.

  5. Development and validation of a casemix classification to predict costs of specialist palliative care provision across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings in the UK: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Dzingina, Mendwas; Firth, Alice M; Davies, Joanna M; Douiri, Abdel; O'Brien, Suzanne M; Pinto, Cathryn; Pask, Sophie; Higginson, Irene J; Eagar, Kathy; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2018-03-17

    Provision of palliative care is inequitable with wide variations across conditions and settings in the UK. Lack of a standard way to classify by case complexity is one of the principle obstacles to addressing this. We aim to develop and validate a casemix classification to support the prediction of costs of specialist palliative care provision. Phase I: A cohort study to determine the variables and potential classes to be included in a casemix classification. Data are collected from clinicians in palliative care services across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings on: patient demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. Cost predictors are derived using multivariate regression and then incorporated into a classification using classification and regression trees. Internal validation will be conducted by bootstrapping to quantify any optimism in the predictive performance (calibration and discrimination) of the developed classification. Phase II: A mixed-methods cohort study across settings for external validation of the classification developed in phase I. Patient and family caregiver data will be collected longitudinally on demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. This will be triangulated with data collected from clinicians on potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use, and with qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers about care provision across difference settings. The classification will be refined on the basis of its performance in the validation data set. The study has been approved by the National Health Service Health Research Authority Research Ethics Committee. The results are expected to be disseminated in 2018 through papers for publication in major palliative care journals; policy briefs for clinicians, commissioning leads and policy makers; and lay summaries for patients and public. ISRCTN90752212. © Article author

  6. Microbiological etiology of bacterial prostatitis in general hospital and primary care clinic in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sun Choi

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: The total portion of chronic bacterial prostatitis was 59.3% (174/293. Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

  7. The first general practitioner hospital in The Netherlands: towards a new form of integrated care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll van Charante, E.; Hartman, E.; IJzermans, J.; Voogt, E.; Klazinga, N.; Bindels, P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the types of patients admitted to the first Dutch general practitioner (GP) hospital, their health-related quality of life and its substitute function. Design: A prospective observational study. Setting. The remaining 20-bed ward of a former district general hospital west of

  8. The first general practitioner hospital in The Netherlands: towards a new form of integrated care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll van Charante, Eric; Hartman, Esther; Yzermans, Joris; Voogt, Elsbeth; Klazinga, Niek; Bindels, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Objective - To describe the types of patients admitted to the first Dutch general practitioner (GP) hospital, their health-related quality of life and its substitute function. Design - A prospective observational study. Setting - The remaining 20-bed ward of a former district general hospital west

  9. Factors associated to inpatient mortality rates in type-2-diabetic patients: a cross-sectional analytical study in three Peruvian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamari-Anahui, Noé; Martinez-Ninanqui, Franklin W; Paucar-Tito, Liz; Morales-Concha, Luz; Miranda-Chirau, Alejandra; Gamarra-Contreras, Marco Antonio; Zea-Nuñez, Carlos Antonio; Mejia, Christian R

    2017-12-05

    Diabetes mortality has increased in recent years. In Peru, there are few studies on in-hospital mortality due to type 2 diabetes in the provinces. To determine factors associated to hospital mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in three hospitals from Cusco-Peru. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed. All patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 hospitalized in the city of Cusco during the 2016 were included. Socio-educational and clinical characteristics were evaluated, with "death" as the variable of interest. The crude (cPR) and adjusted (aPR) prevalence ratios were estimated using generalized linear models with Poisson family and log link function, with their respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The values p diabetes mellitus type 2 patients died during the study period. Mortality was increased as age rises, patients admitted through emergency rooms, patients who were readmitted to the hospital, and patients who had metabolic or renal complications. Patients admitted for a urinary tract infection had a lower mortality rate.

  10. Patients' Care Needs: Documentation Analysis in General Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paans, Wolter; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study is (a) to describe care needs derived from records of patients in Dutch hospitals, and (b) to evaluate whether nurses employed the NANDA-I classification to formulate patients' care needs. A stratified cross-sectional random-sampling nursing documentation audit was conducted employing the D-Catch instrument in 10 hospitals comprising 37 wards. The most prevalent nursing diagnoses were acute pain, nausea, fatigue, and risk for impaired skin integrity. Most care needs were determined in physiological health patterns and few in psychosocial patterns. To perform effective interventions leading to high-quality nursing-sensitive outcomes, nurses should also diagnose patients' care needs in the health management, value-belief, and coping stress patterns. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  11. Is the Current Management of Patients Presenting With Spinal Trauma to District General Hospitals Fit for Purpose? Our Experience of Delivering a Spinal Service Using an Electronic Referral Platform in a Large District General Teaching Hospital Without Onsite Spinal Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel S; Marynissen, Hans

    2018-04-12

    A retrospective cross-sectional analysis. To describe the provision of a spinal service using an electronic platform to direct management from an external spinal unit, and quantify time taken to obtain definitive management plans whilst under prescribed spinal immobilization. Most attending district general hospitals following spinal trauma will have stable injuries and normal neurology, with only a small proportion requiring urgent transfer to a specialist centre. A retrospective review of 104 patients admitted following vertebral during a 12-month period. The British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma consensus that "spinal immobilisation is not recommended for more than 48 hours" was the standard of care measured against. 100 patients occupied a total of 975 hospital inpatient bed days. 117 radiological investigations were requested after the point of external referral (47 CT-scans, 37 MRI-scans, and 33 weight bearing radiographs). The period between initial referral to the regional spinal service and then receiving a definitive final management had a median value of 72 hours and a range of 0 - 33 days. Patients will have been under some form of prescribed spinal immobilisation until the definitive management plan was communicated. 34 patients (34% of the overall cohort) had a definitive management plan in place within 48 hours. 80 patients had vertebral injuries (73 stable, 6 unstable), 3 patients had prolapsed intervertebral disks, 1 had metastatic disease, and 17 had not evidence of an acute injury following evaluation. Patients are being placed under prescribed immobilisation for longer than is recommended. Delays in obtaining radiological imaging were an important factor, together with the time taken to receive a definitive management plan. Limitations in social care provision and delays in arranging this were additional barriers to hospital discharge following the final management plan. 4.

  12. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX; Asesoria especializada en seguridad radiologica al hospital general Ciudad del Carmen, PEMEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeles C, A.; Hernandez C, J. E.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J

    2003-02-15

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  13. In a niche of time: do specialty hospitals outperform general services hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, LeJon; Davis, Jullet A; Gunby, Norris W

    2013-01-01

    Niche hospitals represent a growing segment in the health care industry. Niche facilities are primarily engaged in the treatment of cardiac or orthopedic conditions. The effectiveness of this strategy is of interest because niche hospitals focus on only the most profitable services. The purpose of this research was to assess the financial effectiveness of the niche strategy. We theorize that firm and market-level factors concomitantly with the strategy of the hospital-niche versus traditional-are associated with financial performance. This research used 2 data sources, the 2003 Medicare Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. The sample was limited to only for-profit, urban, nongovernmental hospitals (n = 995). The data were analyzed using hierarchical least squares regression. Financial performance was operationalized using the hospital's return on assets. The principal finding of this project is that niche hospitals had significantly higher performance than traditional facilities. From the organizational perspective, the niche strategy leads to better financial performance. From a societal perspective, the niche strategy provides increased focus and efficiencies through repetition. Despite the limited focus of this strategy, patients who can access these providers may experience better outcomes than patients in more traditional hospitals.

  14. Contracting between public agencies and private psychiatric inpatient facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W H; Dorwart, R A; Schlesinger, M; Davidson, H

    1991-08-01

    Purchasing human services through contracts with private providers has become an increasingly common practice over the past 20 years. Using data from a national survey of psychiatric inpatient facilities, this paper examines the extent to which psychiatric units in privately controlled general hospitals and private psychiatric specialty hospitals (N = 611) participate in contractual arrangements to provide services to governmental bodies. It also examines how the likelihood of such a practice is affected by hospital characteristics (general or specialty, for profit or nonprofit) and features of hospitals' environments, including the competitiveness of the market for psychiatric inpatient care and the population's need for services in the hospital's county. The findings indicate that nonprofit psychiatric specialty hospitals were more likely than other types of hospitals to enter into such contracts, and that forces such as local competition and need for services were not predictors of such involvement. Contracting was shown to have a significant impact on the level of referrals a hospital accepted, but these levels were also affected by competition and need. Among hospitals with public contracts, referral acceptance from public agencies was unaffected by these factors, but they did have a significant effect on referral acceptance by hospitals without public contracts. These data suggest that public agencies contracting for services with private hospitals may represent a means by which "public sector" patients may gain access to private providers. Further, this mechanism may impose sufficient structure and regulation on the acceptance of such patients that many concerns of hospital administrators regarding patients who are costly and difficult to treat and discharge can be allayed.

  15. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  16. Admission of foreign citizens to the general teaching hospital of Bologna, northeastern Italy: an epidemiological and clinical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Baldi, Elena; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy), all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG) features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%), including 2,542 males (34.8%) and 4,769 females (65.2%). Males had a mean age of 36.8+/-14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8+/-12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively) from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8%) were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%), and pregnancy complications (18.7%), followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%), malignancies (5.1%), gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%), and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%). Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%), followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%), heart-vascular diseases (8.9%), psycho-social disorders (8.4%), respiratory (7.1%), kidney (6.1%), liver (5.2%), and metabolic (4

  17. Admission of foreign citizens to the general teaching hospital of bologna, northeastern Italy: An epidemiological and clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sabbatani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. METHODS: Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy, all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. RESULTS: Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%, including 2,542 males (34.8% and 4,769 females (65.2%. Males had a mean age of 36.8±14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8±12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8% were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%, and pregnancy complications (18.7%, followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%, malignancies (5.1%, gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%, and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%. Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%, followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%, heart-vascular diseases (8.9%, psycho-social disorders (8.4%, respiratory (7.1%, kidney (6.1%, liver

  18. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  19. Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalle Grave

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E. The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and six and 12 months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96% completed the program. In these patients there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

  20. Using a New Measurement to Evaluate Pain Relief Among Cancer Inpatients with Clinically Significant Pain Based on a Nursing Information System: A Three-Year Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Developing a new measurement index is the first step in evaluating pain relief outcomes. Although the percentage difference in pain intensity (%PID) is the most popular indicator, this indicator does not take into account the goal of pain relief. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop a pain relief index (PRI) for outcome evaluation and to examine the index using demographic characteristics of cancer inpatients with clinically significant pain. Retrospective cohort study. A national hospital. All cancer inpatients. Pain intensity was assessed using a numerical rating scale, a faces pain scale or the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Behavioral Tool. Using a nursing information system, a pain score database containing data from 2011 through 2013 was analyzed. Cancer patients representing 93,812 hospitalizations were considered in this study. We focused on cancer patients for whom the worst pain intensity (WPI) was ≥ 4 points. PRI values of -62.02% to -72.55% were observed in the WPI ≥ 7 and 4 ≤ WPI ≤ 6 groups. Significant (P 65 years old, those who were admitted to the medicine or gynecology and those who had a hospital stay > 30 days. This hospital-based study demonstrated that the PRI is an effective and valid measure for evaluating outcome data using an electronic nursing information system. We will further define the meaningful range of percentage difference in PRI from various perspectives. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  2. Parasuicide among youth in a general hospital in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Mhlongo

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasuicide cases among youth (15-24 years referred to the clinical psychology section of a regional hospital from 1995 to 1998 were reviewed. In all 100 cases (37 males and 63 females were identified being about 10% of the caseload. As part of the clinical psychological assessment sociodemographic, clinical characteristics, trigger factors, employed methods and suicide intentions were analysed. Most patients were students (79% or unemployed (16%. The major method employed to attempt suicide was ingestion of harmful substances (like paraffin, pesticides or battery acid(73%. Acute social conflicts (38%, socio-economic deprivation (17%, AIDS phobia (17%, academic failure (14%, teenage pregnancy (10% and mental illness (5% triggered suicide attempts. Fifty-eight percent of the attempts were categorised as demonstrative and 27% as genuine. The psychodynamics of parasuicides are discussed in case studies and with reference to other studies.

  3. General principles of radiation protection in hospital media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1993-01-01

    Principles of radiation protection given by ICRP in term of justification, optimization, limitation are applicable in hospital media. The medical act has to be justified and, in France, it is not possible to use ionizing radiations without a prescription from a doctor. The acceleration of technologies development make non radiological techniques more employed than radiologic ones, in an aim of efficiency more than an aim radiation protection. The second principle of optimization means to give medical care with the minimum of ionizing radiations for the patients as well the operators. For the principle of limitation which applied only for operators, we have the new recommends of ICRP, but it would be reasonable to give the most part of decision to the works doctor to decide if somebody has the aptitude to work at an exposed place. The last points concern the quality of equipment, the safety of installations, the organization of works which are under laws and regulations. 3 tabs

  4. Risk factors and precautions of inpatient suicide from the perspective of nurses: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, De-ying; Huang, Di; Xiong, Yu; Lu, Cai-hong; Han, Yan-hong; Ding, Xiao-ping; Wang, Shu-jie; Liu, Yi-lan

    2015-04-01

    The risk factors and precautions of inpatient suicide were explored. Thirty suicide victims were drawn from the adverse event reports of suicidal act during hospitalization in a general hospital from 2008 to 2014. Data were gathered from the focus group interviews of twelve nurses who had experienced inpatient suicide. The data were analyzed by using analytical technique based on grounded theory, and software QSR NVIVO8 was used to aid the collation of data. Three main themes of risk factors about inpatient suicide emerged from the analysis: individual value, social factors and environmental factors. The individual value was categorized into different groups such as sense of guilt, hopelessness and low self-esteem. Social factors included two aspects of negative life events and social support. Three themes of precautions about inpatient suicide appeared in this study: evaluation, nursing and information exchange. Evaluation was elaborated from both physical and psychological assessments. This finding extends existing work of risk factors and precautions about inpatient suicide and brings new knowledge about the reasons why inpatients commit suicide.

  5. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonelli Fabio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01, and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration more frequently than "not at risk" population

  6. Nurses' work-related stress in China: a comparison between psychiatric and general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun-Ke; Xiang, Yu-Tao; An, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Jiao-Ying; Ungvari, Gabor S; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Ding, Yan-Ming; Yu, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Chiu, Helen F K

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the level of work-related stress in nurses in China.This study compared the level of work-related stress between female nurses working in psychiatric and general hospitals in China. A descriptive comparative cross-sectional design was used.A consecutive sample of nurses from two psychiatric hospitals (N = 297) and a medical unit (N = 408) of a general hospital completed a written survey including socio-demographic data and a measure of work-related stress (Nurse Stress Inventory). Compared to the nurses working in the general hospital, those working in the psychiatric setting had a higher level of stress in the domains of working environment and resources (p working experience, and working in psychiatric hospitals were associated with high work-related stress (b = .2, p work-related stress, specific stress management workshops and effective staff supportive initiatives for Chinese nurses are warranted.

  7. Planning Development for a Family Planning Centre in Nursing Unit of the General Hospital of Argolida

    OpenAIRE

    Koukoufilippou J; Koinis A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The family planning centres must be upgraded to a cornerstone of primary health care, and prevent, advise and protect the citizen's health while reducing hospitalization costs for hospitals. Aim: The purpose of this literature review is the family planning centre development in general hospital of Argolida that has a similar clinic. Material and Methods: Literature review was conducted of published English and Greek Articles from bibliographic databases Medline, Goog...

  8. Opt-out of Voluntary HIV Testing: A Singapore Hospital's Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Arlene C.; Leo, Yee Sin; Cavailler, Philippe; Chu, Christine; Ng, Aloysius; Ng, Oon Tek; Krishnan, Prabha

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since 2008, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH) has expanded HIV testing by increasing anonymous HIV test sites, as well as issuing a directive to hospitals to offer routine voluntary opt out inpatient HIV testing. We reviewed this program implemented at the end of 2008 at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), the second largest acute care general hospital in Singapore. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From January 2009 to December 2010, all inpatients aged greater or equal than 21 years were ...

  9. A methodology model for quality management in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Z; Naveh, E

    1997-01-01

    A reappraisal is made of the relevance of industrial modes of quality management to the issues of medical care. Analysis of the nature of medical care, which differentiates it from the supplier-client relationships of industry, presents the main intrinsic characteristics, which create problems in application of the industrial quality management approaches to medical care. Several examples are the complexity of the relationship between the medical action and the result obtained, the client's nonacceptance of economic profitability as a value in his medical care, and customer satisfaction biased by variable standards of knowledge. The real problems unique to hospitals are addressed, and a methodology model for their quality management is offered. Included is a sample of indicator vectors, measurements of quality care, cost of medical care, quality of service, and human resources. These are based on the trilogy of planning quality, quality control, and improving quality. The conclusions confirm the inadequacy of industrial quality management approaches for medical institutions and recommend investment in formulation of appropriate concepts.

  10. Culture-proven bacterial keratitis in a Malaysian general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, S H; Hooi, S T

    2005-12-01

    One hundred patients (101 eyes) with culture-proven bacterial keratitis were treated in the Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru, over a 4-year period. The majority of patients was male (63%), Malay (60%), from the Johor Bahru district (62%) and aged between 41 to 50 years (20%). The ocular predisposing factors were ocular trauma (41 eyes), ocular surface disease (28 eyes) and contact lens wear (26 eyes). The corneal ulcers were mainly large (50.5%), central (59.4%) and colonized by Gram-negative bacteria (78.1%). The most frequently isolated microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (67 eyes), Staphylococcus aureus (12 eyes), Acinetobacter baumanii (6 eyes), Klebsiella pneumoniae (5 eyes), Corynebacterium sp. (3 eyes:) and Streptococcus pneumonliae (3 eyes). Twelve eyes (11.8%) had polymicrobial infection. A good visual outcome occurred in 52.5% of eyes analysed. Prognostic factors for visual outcome include presenting Snellen visual acuity, time to presentation after onset of ocular symptoms, ocular predisposing factor, corneal ulcer location and corneal ulcer size.

  11. Outcomes of glycemic control in Hispanic geriatric diabetic patients admitted to a general ward community hospital in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Pérez-López, Shirley; Torres-Torres, Nancy; Torres-Semprit, Erick; Millán-Aponte, Ismenio

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent medical conditions among the Hispanic population. Although studies with patients in intensive care units have shown poor outcomes among those with uncontrolled glucose, more recent data have shown increased mortality associated with a tighter inpatient glucose control. In view of the lack of information regarding geriatric Hispanic patients with diabetes this study evaluated the effect of glucose control in the outcomes of this population in a community hospital in Puerto Rico. Through analysis of data from a previous study we evaluated 502 admissions of Hispanic geriatric patients with diabetes as comorbidity, for glucose control, management of diabetes and outcome. Data was stratified by age groups (65-74 years, 75-84 years and > or = 85 years) and outcomes were compared between the groups using chi-square and odds ratio. The most common admission diagnosis was pneumonia. Hypoglycemia was the most common complication and was associated with tighter glucose control in the age group of 75-84 years. An increased risk of having an acute coronary syndrome/acute myocardial infarction among uncontrolled patients was observed in the 75-84 year old group. Finally, although we found a high prevalence of uncontrolled blood glucose, only 54% of the patients received interventions for their glucose control. Poor glucose control seems to be associated with a tendency for decreased risk of hypoglycemia and higher risk of acute coronary syndrome/acute myocardial infarction as complications among geriatric patients with diabetes admitted to a general ward.

  12. Care complexity in the general hospital - Results from a European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, P; Huyse, FJ; Slaets, JPJ; Herzog, T; Lobo, A; Lyons, JS; Opmeer, BC; Stein, B; Arolt, [No Value; Balogh, N; Cardoso, G; Fink, P; Rigatelli, M; van Dijck, R; Mellenbergh, GJ

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to effectively treat patients with complex care needs from the moment of admission to the general hospital. In this study, the authors developed a measurement strategy for hospital-based care complexity. The authors' four-factor model describes the interrelations between

  13. Transferable and non-transferable drug resistance in enteric bacteria from hospital and from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Bülow, P

    1976-01-01

    Drug resistance to 8 different antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different hospitals and two groups of general practitioners was studied. Escherichia coli dominated among the 632 strains investigated. Drug resistance was found in 62% of the 512 hospital strains and in 38% of the 120...

  14. Management of chronic orofacial pain: a survey of general dentists in german university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Ellerkmann, Richard K.; Buecheler, Marcus; Putensen, Christian; Nadstawek, Joachim; Wartenberg, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This survey assessed procedures performed by general dentists in German university hospitals treating patients with chronic orofacial pain (COP). METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to dentists at all 42 German universities. Doctors were asked to describe demographics, diagnoses,

  15. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Edward N. Lo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWell-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.MethodsWe performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular, evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years.ResultsThe mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82, with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years. Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2% and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4% initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7% presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%. A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively.ConclusionOverall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups.

  16. Self medication amongst general outpatients in a nigerian community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omolase, C O; Adeleke, O E; Afolabi, A O; Afolabi, O T

    2007-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the proportion of general out patients who practice self medication, the drugs employed and the reasons for resorting to self medication. This study was conducted between June and December, 2007 at the General Outpatient Clinic of the Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred consenting respondents were selected by simple random sampling and interviewed with the aid of semi structured questionnaire by the authors with three assistants. Information regarding their bio-data, history of self medication, drugs used and the reasons for resorting to self medication were obtained. Majority of the respondents (85%) admitted to self medication while the remaining proportion (15%) did not practice it. Drugs utilized could be single, usually analgesics (26.5%) and anti-malaria (15.9%) or in combinations, usually antimalaria-analgesics (22.4%), antimalariaanalgesic- antibiotic (15.3%) and antibiotic-analgesic (10.0%). The reasons cited by respondents for self medication were their perception of their complaints been minor enough to be amenable to self medication (54.7%) and financial constraint (22.4%). Majority of the respondents practiced self medication using an array of drugs like analgesics, anti-malaria and antibiotics used either singly or in combination. The main reasons identified for self medication were that the ailments were minor and financial constraint.

  17. Satisfaction degree evaluation of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos; Georgakopoulou, Konstantina-Maria

    2013-01-01

    The ability of hospital medical libraries to meet users' needs is a complicated issue and has been examined by many surveys. The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction degree of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's medical library. A questionnaire was used to collect the necessary information Although, in general, the users seems to be satisfied, some adjustments, such as up-to-date books, journals and computers, have to be made.

  18. An assessment of the quality of sleep among health professionals of the general hospital of Karpenissi

    OpenAIRE

    Ifanti Ε.; Zagkotsi Μ.; Gketsios Ι.; Armagos P.; Ifantis Α.; Charalampopoulou Ν.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Employees in cyclic or night shifts often complain of sleep disturbances. The latter are extremely frequent among health care workers. Aim: To evaluate sleep quality in health care workers of a Greek provincial general hospital Material and Methods: Seventy seven health professionals of General Hospital of Karpenisi took part in the study( doctors, nurses and paramedicals). 49 were women and 28 were men. Athens Insomnia Scale was used to evaluate sleep quality. The scale include...

  19. Impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and rates of re-hospitalization in a general hospital setting in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is known to be related to a higher incidence of clinical and surgical complications and poorer outcomes. Adequate glycemic control and earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during hospitalization are cost-effective measures. Methods This prospective cohort study was designed to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality in a general hospital setting during a 3-month period by reviewing patients' records. The primary purposes of this trial were to verify that hyperglycemia was diagnosed properly and sufficiently early and that it was managed during the hospital stay; we also aimed to evaluate the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia control and outcomes such as complications during the hospital stay, extent of hospitalization, frequency of re-hospitalization, death rates and number of days in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit after admission. Statistical analyses utilized the Kruskall-Wallis complemented by the "a posteriori" d.m.s. test, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, with a level of significance of 5% (p Results We reviewed 779 patient records that fulfilled inclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 5 groups: group (1 diabetic with normal glycemic levels according to American Diabetes Association criteria for in-hospital patients (n = 123; group (2 diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 76; group (3 non-diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 225; group (4diabetics and non-diabetics with persistent hyperglycemia during 3 consecutive days (n = 57 and group (5 those with normal glucose control (n = 298. Compared to patients in groups 1 and 5, patients in groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher mortality rates (17.7% vs. 2.8% and Intensive Care Unit admissions with complications (23.3% vs. 4.5%. Patients in group 4 had the longest hospitalizations (mean 15.5 days, and group 5 had the lowest re-hospitalization rate (mean of 1.28 hospitalizations. Only

  20. [Mental Health in the General Hospital: Results of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in Four Hospital Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Camacho, Leonidas; Escobar, Juan Manuel; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Delgado-Barrera, Lucía; Aparicio-Turbay, Soraya; Molano, Juan Carlos; Noguera, Efraín

    2012-03-01

    Few individuals have access to mental health services due in part to underdetection. As it is more likely to consult for medical conditions, primary care may be a useful gateway for early detection of mental health problems. Detection of the frequency of mental health problems in four hospital services at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá: Outpatient unit, hospitalization, emergency department, and primary care through a brief detection questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Cross-sectional study of patients seen at the four services who answered a Demographic Data Questionnaire and the PHQ together with information gathered about current medical diagnosis, history of visits, and hospitalizations during the last year. 1094 patients seen at the four hospital services between September 2010 and May 2011 were selected at random. A mental health problem was detected in 36.7% of the total sample. Major depressive disorder (7.3%), alcohol abuse (14.4%), and any anxiety disorder (7.7%) showed the highest prevalence with the emergency department showing the highest frequency of detection. The usefulness of a brief detection questionnaire such as the PHQ in hospital settings is demonstrated and implications in the design of mental health programs in the general hospital are discussed. The need to replicate this study in other settings and to undertake further research is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the Rate and Causes of Deductions Imposed on Social Security and Health Insurance`s Bills Related to Inpatients in Two Hospitals Affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rezvanjou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Annually, a large amount of fees that are paid by hospitals, will not be reimbursed as deductions by health insurance which imposes irreparable financial losses on hospitals. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of deductions imposed on social security and health insurance`s bills and its causes related to inpatients in two hospitals affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Alavi and Madani hospitals affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by using 2015 data.  Researcher-designed checklist was used for data collecting. According to population size, census method and random sampling were used in Alavi and Madani hospitals, respectively. Gathered data were analyzed through descriptive statistics assisted by Excel v.13 software. Results: In the studied hospitals, most of the deductions in the Alavi and Madani hospitals were related to charge of surgeon and angioplasty, respectively. Also, in Alavi Hospital among deductions factors, the most repeated one was extra application in contrary to determined tariffs. In both hospitals, the role of the human factor in cases of error cannot be denied. Extra applications, inaccuracy in registration costs and lack of knowledge of the approved insurance tariffs are the main important factors influential on the deduction. Conclusion: Due to high rates of preventable deductions in both hospitals and being given the multiplicity and variety of services offered at the health centers, establishing income monitoring unit in hospitals and use of experienced staff is inevitable.

  2. General hospital costs in England of medical and psychiatric care for patients who self-harm: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; McDaid, David; Casey, Deborah; Brand, Fiona; Leal, Jose; Park, A-La; Geulayov, Galit; Hawton, Keith

    2017-10-01

    Self-harm is an extremely common reason for hospital presentation. However, few estimates have been made of the hospital costs of assessing and treating self-harm. Such information is essential for planning services and to help strengthen the case for investment in actions to reduce the frequency and effects of self-harm. In this study, we aimed to calculate the costs of hospital medical care associated with a self-harm episode and the costs of psychosocial assessment, together with identification of the key drivers of these costs. In a retrospective analysis, we estimated hospital resource use and care costs for all presentations for self-harm to the John Radcliffe Hospital (Oxford, UK), between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Episode-related data were provided by the Oxford Monitoring System for Self-harm and we linked these with financial hospital records to quantify costs. We assessed time and resources allocated to psychosocial assessments through discussion with clinical and managerial staff. We then used generalised linear models to investigate the associations between hospital costs and methods of self-harm. Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, 1647 self-harm presentations by 1153 patients were recorded. Of these, 1623 (99%) presentations by 1140 patients could be linked with hospital finance records. 179 (16%) patients were younger than 18 years. 1150 (70%) presentations were for self-poisoning alone, 367 (22%) for self-injury alone, and 130 (8%) for a combination of methods. Psychosocial assessments were made in 75% (1234) of all episodes. The overall mean hospital cost per episode of self-harm was £809. Costs differed significantly between different types of self-harm: self-injury alone £753 (SD 2061), self-poisoning alone £806 (SD 1568), self-poisoning and self-injury £987 (SD 1823; p<0·0001). Costs were mainly associated with the type of health-care service contact such as inpatient stay, intensive care, and psychosocial assessment. Mean

  3. Ten thousand steps: a pedometer study of junior dentists in a major British teaching hospital and a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, R M; Thomas, M; McKechnie, A

    2017-05-01

    Sedentary behaviour is widely associated with deleterious health outcomes that in modern medicine have similar connotations to smoking tobacco and alcohol misuse. The integration of e-portfolio, e-logbook, British National Formulary (BNF) and encrypted emails has made smartphones a necessity for trainees. Smartphones also have the ability to record the amount of exercise taken, which allows activity at work to be monitored. The aim of this study to compare the activity of the same group of dental core trainees when they worked within a large multisite teaching hospital and a smaller district general hospital, to find out if supplementary activity was needed outside work. Data were collected from smartphones. To ensure continuity, data were collected only from those who had calibrated iPhones (n=10). At the teaching hospital six of the trainees walked over 10 000 steps a day while working (mean (SD) 10 004 (639)). At the district hospital none of the trainees walked 10 000 steps. The mean (SD) number of steps completed by all trainees was 6265 (119). Walking at work provides the full quota of recommended daily exercise most of the time for those working in the teaching hospital, but additional exercise is occasionally required. While working at the district hospital they walk less, meaning that they should try to increase their activity outside work. Trainees working in the teaching hospital walk significantly more steps than in the district hospital. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial consumption at Auckland City Hospital: 2006-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticehurst, Rob; Thomast, Mark

    2011-04-15

    We aimed to determine the level of antimicrobial consumption by adult inpatients at Auckland City Hospital (Auckland, New Zealand) and to compare our findings with those in other developed nations. We used the computerised records of the central Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) pharmacy to measure the amount of antimicrobials dispensed to inpatients (excluding psychiatric units, day stay units and outpatient clinics) during 2006 to 2009. The total weight of each antimicrobial dispensed was used to determine the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) dispensed. The Information Management and Technical Services department of ADHB provided data on the number of admissions and inpatient days, and these data, together with information from the 2006 census, were used to calculate antimicrobial consumption for adult inpatients measured in DDDs/100 admissions, DDDs/100 inpatient days and DDDs/1000 population. Total antimicrobial consumption by adult inpatients increased from 74 DDDs/100 inpatient days in 2006 to 80.3 DDDs/100 inpatient days in 2009. The level of consumption did not vary greatly with the season. The total level of consumption was very similar to that seen in adult inpatients in hospitals in Australia and Scandinavian countries. The level of consumption of fluoroquinolones, third or fourth generation cephalosporins, carbapenems and vancomycin (antimicrobial classes that are not available for unrestricted use in Auckland City Hospital) was comparable to or less than that seen in adult inpatients in hospitals in Australia or Scandinavian countries. Beta-lactamase susceptible penicillins (such as benzyl penicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin) comprised a relatively small proportion of total penicillin use and beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (predominantly amoxicillin/clavulanate) a relatively large proportion of total penicillin use, when compared with Scandinavian hospitals. The antimicrobial stewardship programme at Auckland City Hospital has

  5. A review of governance of maternity services at South Tipperary general hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flory, David

    2015-09-01

    This review of the governance of maternity services at South Tipperary General Hospital has focussed on the systems and processes for assurance of service quality, risk management and patient safety primarily inside the hospital but also in the Hospital Group structure within which it operates. The effectiveness of the governance arrangements is largely determined by the quality of the leadership and management – both clinical and general – which designs, implements, and oversees those systems and processes and is ultimately responsible and accountable.\\r\

  6. The Inpatient Assessment and Management of Motor Functional Neurological Disorders: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Kathleen; Glass, Sean; Adams, Caitlin; Stephen, Christopher D; King, Franklin; Parlman, Kristin; Perez, David L; Kontos, Nicholas

    2018-01-08

    Motor functional neurologic disorders (FND)-previously termed "hysteria" and later "conversion disorder"-are exceedingly common and frequently encountered in the acute hospital setting. Despite their high prevalence, patients with motor FND can be challenging to diagnose accurately and manage effectively. To date, there is limited guidance on the inpatient approach to the neuropsychiatric evaluation of patients with functional (psychogenic) neurologic symptoms. The authors outline an inpatient multidisciplinary approach, involving neurology, psychiatry, and physical therapy, for the assessment and acute inpatient management of motor FND. A vignette of a patient with motor FND is presented followed by a discussion of general assessment principles. Thereafter, a detailed description of the neurologic and psychiatric assessments is outlined. Delivery of a "rule-in" diagnosis is emphasized and specific guidance for what can be accomplished postdiagnosis in the hospital is suggested. We encourage an interdisciplinary approach beginning at the early stages of the diagnostic assessment once an individual is suspected of having motor FND. Practical suggestions for the inpatient assessment of motor FND are presented. It is also important to individualize the diagnostic assessment. Future research should be conducted to test best practices for motor FND management in the acute inpatient hospital setting. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DRUG MANAGEMENT REVIEWS IN DISTRICT DRUG MANAGEMENT UNIT AND GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug is one of the essential elements in healthcare that should be effectively and efficiently managed. Following thedecentralization in 2001 in Indonesia, drug management has changed in district drug management units and also in District General Hospitals. Certainly this condition influences the sustainability of drug access in primary health care such as in Community Health Center and District General Hospital, especially in drug financing policy. A cross sectional descriptive study to obtain information on drug management in public healthcare in district had been carried out between July and December 2006 in 10 District Public Drug Management Units from 10 district health offices and 9 district general hospitals as samples. Data were collected by interviewing heads of Drug Section in District Health Offices and heads of Hospital Pharmacies using structured questionnaires and observing drug storage in District Drug Management Units, Community Health Centers, and Hospital Pharmacies. Results of the study show that drug planning in District Health Offices and General Hospitals did not meet the basic real need in some districts nor District Hospitals. The minimum health service standards had no been achieved yet. Furthermore, drug procurement, storage and recording as well as reporting was not good enough either, such as shown by the existence of expired drugs. Lead time for drug delivery to community health centers in some districts was longer than the average of lead time in the past 3 years.

  8. 42 CFR 412.604 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient rehabilitation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient rehabilitation facilities. 412.604 Section 412.604 Public Health CENTERS FOR... SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment for Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals and Rehabilitation Units § 412.604 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient...

  9. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  10. Behavioural and psychological symptoms in general hospital patients with dementia, distress for nursing staff and complications in care: results of the General Hospital Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, J B; Schäufele, M; Hendlmeier, I; Junge, M N; Leonhardt, S; Weber, J; Bickel, H

    2018-06-01

    Little is known about how behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) manifest in the general hospital. The aim was to examine the frequency of BPSD in general hospitals and their associations with nursing staff distress and complications in care. Cross-sectional representative study with 1469 patients aged ≥65, including 270 patients with dementia, of 33 randomly selected general hospitals in Germany. BPSD and complications were reported by nurses. Overall frequency of BPSD was higher in patients with dementia (76%) than without (38%). The most frequent symptoms in patients with dementia were nighttime disturbances (38%), depression (29%) and aberrant motor behaviour (28%) and the most distressing symptoms for nursing staff were delusions, aggression and nighttime disturbances. The overall frequency of BPSD increased from 67% in mild dementia, to 76% in moderate dementia and to 88% in severe dementia. The most frequent symptoms in patients without dementia were depression (19%), nighttime disturbances (13%) and irritability (13%). The most distressing symptoms were aggression and delusions, while the same symptoms were consistently rated as less distressing than in patients with dementia. Factor analysis revealed three independent groups of BPSD that explained 45% of the total variance. First, expansive symptoms (aggression, irritability, nighttime disturbances, aberrant motor behaviour and disinhibition) were frequent, distressing for nursing staff and associated with many complications. Second, psychotic symptoms (delusions and hallucinations) were infrequent, distressing and associated with some complications. Third, affective symptoms (apathy, anxiety and depression) were frequent, non-distressing and associated with few complications. The results did not change when cases with delirium were excluded from both groups. BPSD are common in older hospital patients with dementia and associated with considerable distress in nursing staff, as well as

  11. Communication at the interface between hospitals and primary care - a general practice audit of hospital discharge summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleli, Esther; Naccarella, Lucio; Pirotta, Marie

    2013-12-01

    Timeliness and quality of hospital discharge summaries are crucial for patient safety and efficient health service provision after discharge. We audited receipt rates, timeliness and the quality of discharge summaries for 49 admissions among 38 patients in an urban general practice. For missing discharge summaries, a hospital medical record search was performed. Discharge summaries were received for 92% of identified admissions; 73% were received within three days and 55% before the first post-discharge visit to the general practitioner (GP). Administrative information and clinical content, including diagnosis, treatment and follow-up plans, were well reported. However, information regarding tests, referrals and discharge medication was often missing; 57% of summaries were entirely typed and 13% had legibility issues. Completion rates were good but utility was compromised by delays, content omissions and formatting. Digital searching enables extraction of information from rich existing datasets contained in GP records for accurate measurement of discharge summary receipt rate and timing.

  12. Strategy, leadership and change: the North York General Hospital transformation journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bonnie; Kwolek, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Improvements in the emergency department and general internal medicine will serve as a case study to examine how North York General Hospital cultural transformation efforts led to improvements in these departments, and why we believe this approach will enable the organization to sustain these improvements over time.

  13. Integration between orthodox medicine, homeopathy and acupuncture for inpatients: Three years experience in the first hospital for Integrated Medicine in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Bernardini

    2015-10-01

    Up to now 532 inpatients suffering from acute illnesses, relapse of a chronic illness or neurological or orthopaedic rehabilitation following strokes, brain haemorrhage, neurological illness or limb prosthesis operations have been treated. This work has tried to illustrate the innovative and positive experience for the Italian public health authorities so that it may also be useful to anyone who would like to promote similar initiatives within its public health Institution.

  14. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  15. The study of self-evaluated health level in inpatients with depression in general hosptial%综合医院住院抑郁障碍患者自测健康状况的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓东; 苏敬华; 农秋葵

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the self-evaluated health level and it’s associated factors in inpatients with depression in general hospital. Method A total number of 600 inpatients were enrol ed from three general hosptial in Guangzhou city. Al of these patients were asked to complete a self-designed questionaire about demorgraphic features, and complete self-rating health measurement scale(SRHMS) to evaluate health level. Diagnostic and statistic manual about mental disorder, fourth edition(DSM-IV) was used to diagnose depression. We compared the differences between the depression group and control, and probed the associated factors of self-evaluated health level in depression group. Result The total score of SRHMS in patients with depression in general hosptial was 222.85±65.53, the scores of physical health, mental health and social health were 92.39±31.97, 75.06±24.97 and 55.09±23.10 respectively, which were al significantly lower than that in controls. The scores of physical health and mental health were higher in patients who were below 55 years old compare with those older. The educational level was associated with social health level. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the fol owing factors were associated with higher total score of SRHMS, married, higher family monthly income, first admission and inpatient time range from 8 to 14 days. Conclusion The self-evaluated health levels were low in patients with depression in general hospital. Age, marrital status, educational level, family monthly income, admission frequency and time may be the important factors associated with health level.%目的:探讨综合医院住院患者中抑郁障碍者自测健康状况及其影响因素。方法采用自编一般情况问卷、自测健康状况评定量表(SRHMS)、美国《精神障碍诊断与统计手册第四版》DSM-Ⅳ轴Ⅰ障碍定式临床检查病人版(SCID)对广州市3家综合医院≥16岁的600名住院患者进行调查。以SCID为精

  16. [Data supporting quality circle management of inpatient depression treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S; Härter, M; Sitta, P; van Calker, D; Menke, R; Heindl, A; Herold, K; Kudling, R; Luckhaus, C; Rupprecht, U; Sanner, Dirk; Schmitz, D; Schramm, E; Berger, M; Gaebel, W; Schneider, F

    2005-07-01

    Several quality assurance initiatives in health care have been undertaken during the past years. The next step consists of systematically combining single initiatives in order to built up a strategic quality management. In a German multicenter study, the quality of inpatient depression treatment was measured in ten psychiatric hospitals. Half of the hospitals received comparative feedback on their individual results in comparison to the other hospitals (bench marking). Those bench markings were used by each hospital as a statistic basis for in-house quality work, to improve the quality of depression treatment. According to hospital differences concerning procedure and outcome, different goals were chosen. There were also differences with respect to structural characteristics, strategies, and outcome. The feedback from participants about data-based quality circles in general and the availability of bench-marking data was positive. The necessity of carefully choosing quality circle members and professional moderation became obvious. Data-based quality circles including bench-marking have proven to be useful for quality management in inpatient depression care.

  17. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. VI. - December of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  18. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. IV. - October of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  19. STUDIES OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTION PROFILE OF ANTISNAKE VENOM AT DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Mulchand Shende *, Sneha Gawali , Kanchan Bhongade , Vivek Bhuskade , Abhijit Nandgaonkar

    2017-01-01

    Snake bite is a common predominant problem of the rural and periurban areas, neglected and frequently devastating environmental and occupational disease, especially in rural areas of tropical developing countries. This study aimed to investigate of the adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom (ASV) in a district general hospital. An observational study was conducted in hospital for six months. A total number of 142 indoor case papers of snake bite from October 2016 to April 2017 were...

  20. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Hernandez C, J. E.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J.

    2003-02-01

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  1. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES IN ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN CELJE GENERAL HOSPITAL IN 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Veninšek

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. DIGAMI study showed that intrahospital mortality and mortality at one year after myocardial infarction can be significantly reduced in diabetics treated in acute phase of myocardial infarction by GI infusion and afterwards for at least three months with intensive insulin treatment. Mortality can be reduced for more than 50% in a subgroup of patients younger than 70 years, without congestive heart failure, with first myocardial infarction, not treated with insulin or digitalis. In this perspective we reviewed treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in 1999 in Celje General Hospital.Methods. We reviewed documentation of treatment of all diabetics with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. We collected data on number of newly discovered diabetes, on previous treatment of diabetes, on treatment of diabetes during hospitalization and at discharge, on drugs used for treatment of diabetes and on mortality during hospitalization.Results. Diabetics presented 20% of all patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. None of patients received GI infusion, none had intensively managed blood sugar. 24% of patients were treated with sulfonylureas in acute phase of myocardial infarction. 33% of patients were discharged from hospital with insulin therapy. Intrahospital mortality was 9%, comparable with patients without diabetes.Conclusions. In 1999 was intrahospital treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in Celje General Hospital successful as their intrahospital mortality equaled non-diabetics. Treatment of diabetes itself, during hospitalization and after discharge, on the other hand, in 1999 had not been up to date according to results of recent studies. In our opinion, it is mandatory for diabetologist to make part of the team that treats diabetic with acute myocardial infarction

  2. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. I.- July of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.

    2001-09-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic. The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  3. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. II.- August of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J.

    2001-10-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  4. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. III.- September of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  5. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. V. - November of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  6. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.432 Section 412.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Services of Inpatient...

  7. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  8. Psychogeriatric inpatient unit design: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrohotoff, John T; Llewellyn-Jones, Robert H

    2011-03-01

    In many parts of the world the provision of psychogeriatric inpatient units (PGUs) remains limited. More units will be required over coming decades given rapid population aging. Medline (1950-2010), psycINFO (1806-2009), EMBASE (1980-2009) and CINAHL (1982-2009) were searched for papers about PGU design. Selected non-peer reviewed literature such as government reports and unpublished academic dissertations were also reviewed. Data were also obtained from the literature related to general adult psychiatry inpatient units where there was limited information from studies of units designed for older people. Over 200 papers were reviewed and 130 were included. There are few good quality studies to guide the design of acute PGUs and much of the existing literature is based on opinion and anecdote or, at best, based on observational studies. Randomized controlled studies comparing different designs and assessing outcomes are virtually non-existent. Several studies have identified violence and trauma resulting from hospitalization as significant problems with current acute PGU care. Despite its limitations the available literature provides useful guidance on how PGU design can optimize patient and staff safety and improve clinical outcomes. There are significant problems with current acute PGUs, and patient mix on existing units is an important issue. Future research should examine patient and staff perceptions of different PGU ward environments, the relationship between ward design and clinical outcomes, the effects of segregating patients with challenging behaviors in dementia and the benefits or otherwise of gender segregation.

  9. Caring for homeless persons with serious mental illness in general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Leah K; Baggett, Travis P; Stern, Theodore A; O'Connell, Jim J; Shtasel, Derri

    2013-01-01

    The care of homeless persons with serious mental illness remains a common and challenging problem in general hospital settings. This article aims to review data on homelessness and its psychiatric comorbidities, and to expand the skills of providers who encounter homeless individuals in general hospital settings. Literature review reveals patient, provider, and systems factors that contribute to suboptimal health outcomes in homeless individuals. Diagnostic rigor, integrated medical and psychiatric care, trauma-informed interventions, special considerations in capacity evaluations, and health care reform initiatives can improve the treatment of homeless persons with serious mental illness. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin; Choi, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y -1 ). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  11. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,