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Sample records for general adult psychiatry

  1. The virtual institution: cross-sectional length of stay in general adult and forensic psychiatry beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Dunn, Warren; O'Toole, Clare; Kennedy, Harry G

    2015-01-01

    Length of stay in psychiatric hospitals interests health service planners, economists and clinicians. At a systems level it is preferable to study general adult and forensic psychiatric beds together since these are likely to be inter-dependent. We examined whether patients were placed according to specialist need or according to their cross-sectional length of stay. A one night census of all registered mental nursing home (RMNH) beds was carried out for a defined catchment area of 1.2 m population in north London in November 1999. This included all public sector psychiatric hospital beds, independent sector and forensic beds in and outside the catchment area. Cross-sectional length of stay was defined as time since the date of admission from the community. Log rank (Mantel-Cox) Chi squared was used to test for differences between groups and hierarchical logistic regression for statistical modelling. There were 1,085 occupied psychiatric beds. Cross-sectional LOS was greater than 365 days in 43.5%. Forensic beds had longer cross-sectional LOS than general beds. LOS increased with the level of therapeutic security from open through low, medium and high secure. Cross-sectional LOS was shorter for open hospital beds than community RMNH beds, shorter for informal patients than those detained under civil mental health law, and longest for forensic detentions. Longest cross-sectional LOS were for patients placed in RMNHs in the community, 10.7% of whom were 'forensic' as were 25.4% of low secure patients. Designated length of stay (acute, rehab/medium term and long term) was also associated with increasing cross-sectional LOS. In regression analysis only three variables contributed to a model of cross-sectional LOS, commissioning status (general or forensic), designated length of stay and designated level of therapeutic security. Studying cross-sectional LOS for whole systems (all psychiatric beds) is essential for operational health service management. At the time of

  2. Cultural psychiatry: a general perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2013-01-01

    The current scene in the field of cultural psychiatry shows a vigorous growth, multifaceted conceptual and research developments and more relevant clinical presence. After a pertinent definition of the discipline, this chapter examines the contribution of cultural psychiatry to the etiopathogenesis of mental disorders, to the variations of clinical presentations in numerous entities, to psychiatric diagnosis and treatment and to the relatively unexplored rubric of preventive psychiatry. Advanced concepts of neurosciences and technology-based research can find a place in the realm of biocultural correlates. The role of culture in the definition of mental illness, the renewed notions of the old 'culture-bound syndromes', hope, cognition and culture in psychiatric treatments (including the so-called 'cultural therapies'), and resiliency are areas duly examined and discussed. Cultural psychiatry has re-emerged as a reliable body of knowledge aimed at a comprehensive assessment of human beings as patients.

  3. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    of staff identify the care of mentally disordered offenders in general psychiatric units as either "a parking space" or a very difficult or frightening course, where staff members tend to behave like pleasers in order to avoid risks of conflict or physical violence. Either way, it seems hard to provide......PURPOSE: To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. FINDINGS: The interplay between physical environment...... sufficient mental health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease...

  4. Centenary of Karl Jaspers's general psychopathology: implications for molecular psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Modern molecular psychiatry benefits immensely from the scientific and technological advances of general neuroscience (including genetics, epigenetics, and proteomics). This "progress" of molecular psychiatry, however, will be to a degree "unbalanced" and "epiphytic" should the development of the corresponding theoretical frameworks and conceptualization tools that allow contextualization of the individual neuroscientific findings within the specific perspective of mental health care issues be neglected. The General Psychopathology, published by Karl Jaspers in 1913, is considered a groundbreaking work in psychiatric literature, having established psychopathology as a space of critical methodological self-reflection, and delineating a scientific methodology specific to psychiatry. With the advance of neurobiology and molecular neuroscience and its adoption in psychiatric research, however, a growing alienation between current research-oriented neuropsychiatry and the classical psychopathological literature is evident. Further, consensus-based international classification criteria, although useful for providing an internationally accepted system of reliable psychiatric diagnostic categories, further contribute to a neglect of genuinely autonomous thought on psychopathology. Nevertheless, many of the unsolved theoretical problems of psychiatry, including those in the areas of nosology, anthropology, ethics, epistemology and methodology, might be fruitfully addressed by a re-examination of classic texts, such as Jaspers's General Psychopathology, and their further development and adaptation for 21st century psychiatry.

  5. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. The interplay between physical environment, bottlenecks, poor information exchange, lack of knowledge and competences, complex psychopathology, and a vague and therefore uncomfortable task of nursing leads to a focus on criminal offenses rather than mental disorders and an increased risk of brutalization and stigmatization in nursing practices. Members of staff identify the care of mentally disordered offenders in general psychiatric units as either "a parking space" or a very difficult or frightening course, where staff members tend to behave like pleasers in order to avoid risks of conflict or physical violence. Either way, it seems hard to provide sufficient mental health care. Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease bottlenecks throughout the clinical pathways. Furthermore, we need additional knowledge of the impact on general patient populations' resources for treatment and their safety. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Call to Restructure Psychiatry General and Subspecialty Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, Paul; Conroy, Michelle; Lyketsos, Constantine; Greenwald, Blaine; Forester, Brent; deVries, Christine; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike; Wiechers, Ilse; Zdanys, Kristina; Steffens, David; Reynolds, Charles F

    2016-02-01

    Dire shortages of psychiatrists with special expertise in geriatrics, substance abuse, forensics, and psychosomatics create barriers to care for populations with complex mental disorders and pose a significant public health concern. To address these disparities in access to care, we propose streamlining graduate medical education to increase efficiency and enhance cost-effectiveness while simultaneously increasing the number of psychiatric subspecialists in these key areas. We propose that trainees interested in subspecialties complete their general training in 3 years, while meeting ACGME required milestones, and then utilize their 4th year to complete subspecialty fellowship training. Eligible trainees would then qualify for psychiatry subspecialty certification and general psychiatry ABPN certification at the end of 4 years.

  7. [General systems theory, a mental frame for geriatric psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lit, A C

    1984-12-01

    Though psychogeriatrics is becoming a word of common usage, it is not a word of common meaning. This is a consequence of the lack of a generally accepted theoretical model regarding the complex and multiple pathology of the psychiatric disturbances of older people. On epistemological grounds the author stresses the necessity of a common theoretical concept and as such introduces the General System Theory. The systems approach then shows that the word 'psychogeriatrics' is rooted in a reductionistic concept of man. In order to avoid this the author prefers 'psychiatry of old age' to cover the broad field of the psychiatric disturbances of the elderly.

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... general psychiatry training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry ... More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists ...

  9. Innovative Training in Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, and Child Psychiatry: Background, Outcomes, and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Mary Margaret; Fritz, Gregory K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors describe the history, rationale, and outcomes of combined training programs in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry ("triple board"), including narrative feedback from graduates and reflections upon the important components of the program. Methods: This article reviews the background and experiences of triple board…

  10. An audit in general adult psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Udumaga, E

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the standards of lithium monitoring using the local prescribing guidelines in patients attending the lithium clinic of Galway University Hospitals (GUH). The laboratory records of 116 out of 142 patients who met the inclusion criteria were examined to identify the frequency of testing for serum lithium level, thyroid function tests and renal function tests. Only about one third of the patients met all the recommended standards in these three areas revealing poor standard of lithium monitoring. Lithium monitoring standards could be improved through the involvement of multidisciplinary team and a more detailed patient education system.

  11. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  12. Big data are coming to psychiatry: a general introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Geddes, John; Bauer, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Big data are coming to the study of bipolar disorder and all of psychiatry. Data are coming from providers and payers (including EMR, imaging, insurance claims and pharmacy data), from omics (genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data), and from patients and non-providers (data from smart phone and Internet activities, sensors and monitoring tools). Analysis of the big data will provide unprecedented opportunities for exploration, descriptive observation, hypothesis generation, and prediction, and the results of big data studies will be incorporated into clinical practice. Technical challenges remain in the quality, analysis and management of big data. This paper discusses some of the fundamental opportunities and challenges of big data for psychiatry.

  13. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview improves cultural competence in general psychiatry residents: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Xiao, Anna Q; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether a 1-hour didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves the cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. The main hypothesis was that teaching adult psychiatry residents a 1-hour session on the CFI would improve cultural competence. The exploratory hypothesis was that trainees with more experience in cultural diversity would have a greater increase in cultural competency scores. Psychiatry residents at a metropolitan, county hospital completed demographics and preintervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-hour session on the CFI, and were given a postintervention questionnaire. The questionnaire was an adapted version of the validated Cultural Competence Assessment Tool . Paired samples t tests compared pre- to posttest change. Hierarchical linear regression assessed whether pretraining characteristics predicted posttest scores. The mean change of total pre- and posttest scores was significant ( p = .002), as was the mean change in subscales Nonverbal Communications ( p < .001) and Cultural Knowledge ( p = .002). Demographic characteristics did not predict higher posttest scores (when covarying for pretest scores). Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved irrespective of previous experience in cultural diversity. More research is needed to further explore the implications of the improved scores in clinical practice.

  14. The concept of spirituality in relation to addiction recovery and general psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanter, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is directed at defining the nature of spirituality and its relationship to empirical research and clinical practice. A preliminary understanding of the spiritual experience can be achieved on the basis of diverse theoretical and empirically grounded sources, which will be delineated: namely, physiology, psychology, and cross-cultural sources. Furthermore, the impact of spirituality on mental health and addiction in different cultural and clinical settings is explicated regarding both beneficial and compromising outcomes. Illustrations of its application in addiction and general psychiatry are given: in meditative practices, Alcoholics Anonymous, and treatment programs for addiction singly and comorbid with major mental illness. Given its prominence in Alcoholics Anonymous and related Twelve-Step groups, spirituality plays an important role in the rehabilitation of many substance-dependent people. The issue of spirituality, however, is prominent within contemporary culture as well in the form of theistic orientation, as evidenced in a probability sampling of American adults, among whom 95% of respondents reply positively when asked if they believe in "God or a universal spirit." Responses to a follow-up on this question suggest that this belief affects the daily lives of the majority (51%) of those sampled, as they indicated that they had talked to someone about God or some aspect of their faith or spirituality within the previous 24 h (Gallup, 2002).

  15. Infant psychiatry: its relevance for the general psychiatrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minde, K; Benoit, D

    1991-08-01

    The study of infancy can provide us with new models for the genesis and treatment of psychiatric disorders. It allows us to observe development and can elucidate the contribution the internal and external world make to mental health and disorder. It can also help to define and describe developmental pathways which may be instrumental in creating a resilient or vulnerable adult.

  16. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Public General Hospital Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis R.; Gil, Rosa M.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the interaction between psychiatric services in public general hospitals and in other institutional settings. A one-day census of patients in a New York general hospital showed the hospital was providing care to a large number of patients in need of other, less intensive institutional settings. (BH)

  17. One hundred years of limited impact of Jaspers' General Psychopathology on US psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Jose

    2014-02-01

    Jaspers, a German psychiatrist, published General Psychopathology in 1913. Jaspers, Schneider, and Mayer-Gross were members of the Heidelberg school. General Psychopathology, indirectly through Schneider's and Mayer-Gross' textbooks and directly by its English translation in 1963, led to a narrow set of schizophrenia criteria in the United Kingdom. General Psychopathology had very limited direct impact on US psychiatry, which adopted a broader schizophrenia definition. The difference between UK and US schizophrenia was a key element in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, and the neo-Kraepelinian revolution. General Psychopathology contains two essential interrelated ideas: a) psychiatry is a hybrid scientific discipline that must combine natural and social science methods that provide an explanation of illness that follows the medical model and an understanding of psychiatric abnormalities that are variations of human living, respectively, and b) psychiatric disorders are heterogeneous. Berrios' ideas on the hybridity of psychiatry in the United Kingdom and McHugh's ideas on psychiatric diagnoses in the United States can be considered neo-Jasperian approaches because they further elaborate these two Jasperian concepts in the late 20th century.

  18. Varied Understanding and Application of Counter Transference in Active Music Therapy in Adult Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2006-01-01

    The article presents varied ways of understanding and applying the clinical concept of counter transference. The sources are drawn from the author's own clinical praxis, from psychoanalytic and music therapy literature and from a qualitative interview examination among experienced music therapist...... applying the concept in music therapy improvisational work in adult psychiatry.......The article presents varied ways of understanding and applying the clinical concept of counter transference. The sources are drawn from the author's own clinical praxis, from psychoanalytic and music therapy literature and from a qualitative interview examination among experienced music therapists...

  19. Utilization of a consultation liaison psychiatry service in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobar, A H; Collins, J L; Mathura, C B

    1987-05-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in response to a need to evaluate the overall utilization rates of the psychiatric consultation liaison service by nonpsychiatric units within Howard University Hospital, which deals almost exclusively with a black, inner-city population. The study covers a three-year period (July 1982 to July 1985). During this time only 815 patients (2 percent) were referred for psychiatric evaluation out of the total number of hospital admissions (40,000 patients).Patient characteristics and general attitudes appear to have had a major role in this low ratio of referrals, particularly a lack of awareness and bias against psychiatry. This latter finding is in disparity with other published reports. Diagnostically, depression, organic mental disorders (acute), and substance abuse (mainly PCP) constituted the greater bulk of the patients seen by the consultation liaison psychiatry service. The review of a random sample of psychiatric inpatients (n = 100) revealed that in 50 percent of the cases there was a coexisting physical illness or abnormality.The role of mental health education and the liaison function needs to be emphasized. It is suggested that efforts should be directed toward a wider acceptance and utilization of consultation liaison psychiatry by primary care physicians in general hospitals. The factors listed by physicians and patients that may account for the observed underutilization of consultation liaison services are discussed. The results of 20 interviews and the reasons given by referring physicians as to whether or not they will seek consultation from the consultation liaison services are also reviewed.

  20. Clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry: conceptualizing theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Kelly; Proffitt, Tina-Marie; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Wood, Stephen J; Cumner, Marnie; Brewer, Warrick J

    2013-01-01

    Historically, clinical neuropsychology has made significant contributions to the understanding of brain-behavior relationships, particularly in neurological conditions. During the past several decades, neuropsychology has also become established as an important discipline in psychiatric settings. Cognition is increasingly recognized as being core to psychiatric illnesses and predictive of functional outcomes, augmenting theories regarding symptomatology and illness progression. Adult-type psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and other psychotic, mood, anxiety, eating, substance-related, and personality disorders) typically emerge during adolescence or young adulthood, a critical neurodevelopmental period. Clinical neuropsychological assessment in adolescent psychiatric patients is particularly valuable in informing clinical formulation and intervention and can be therapeutic across a number of levels. This article articulates the theoretical considerations and practical challenges and applications of clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry. The importance of considering the neurodevelopmental context and its relationship to current theoretical models underpinning clinical practice are discussed.

  1. Quality of psychiatric care in the general hospital: referrer perceptions of an inpatient liaison psychiatry service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Luke C; Thachil, Ajoy; Burgess, Caroline; Hopper, Adrian; Glen-Day, Vicky; Ranjith, Gopinath; Hodgkiss, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    To explore the experience of senior staff on acute medical wards using an established inpatient liaison psychiatry service and obtain their views on clinically relevant performance measures. Semistructured face-to-face interviews with consultants and senior nurses were taped, transcribed and analyzed manually using the framework method of analysis. Twenty-five referrers were interviewed. Four key themes were identified - benefits of the liaison service, potential areas of improvement, indices of service performance such as speed and quality of response and expanded substance misuse service. Respondents felt the liaison service benefited patients, staff and service delivery in the general hospital. Medical consultants wanted stepped management plans devised by consultant liaison psychiatrists. Senior nurses, who perceived themselves as frontline crisis managers, valued on-the-spot input on patient management. Consultants and senior nurses differed in their expectations of liaison psychiatry. Referrers valued speed of response and regarded time from referral to definitive management plan as a key performance indicator for benchmarking services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview Improves Cultural Competence in General Psychiatry Residents: A Multi-site Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Xiao, Anna Q; Bourque, Marie Claire; Rojas, Sandra M Peynado; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Simpson, Annabelle K; Maye, Aleea; Lo, Pachida; Clark, Aaron; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2016-10-01

    The authors assessed whether a 1-h didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. Psychiatry residents at six residency programs completed demographics and pre-intervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-h session on the CFI, and completed a post-intervention questionnaire. Repeated measures ANCOVA compared pre- to post-intervention change. Linear regression assessed whether previous cultural experience predicted post-intervention scores. Mean scores on the questionnaire significantly changed from pre- to post-intervention (p cultural experience did not predict post-intervention scores. Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved with a 1-h session on the CFI but with notable limitations.

  3. [Adult psychiatry does not recognize child neuropsychiatric disorders. A registry study shows discrepancy between expected and real number of cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharin, Mikael; Hellström, Per

    2004-10-14

    To identify the group of patients with presumed special needs in adult psychiatry, a list survey was made covering 11 months of diagnostic work in adult psychiatry with a catchment area of 213,000 inhabitants. The survey was made in the urban setting of Gothenburg. During the period of observation, 6,386 patients were diagnosed. Among them 156 (2.4%) were diagnosed with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, disorders associated with Tourette's syndrome or mental retardation. The adult psychiatric hospital care does not recognize child neuropsychiatric disorders in the patient population by the frequency the disorders presumably appear. This is especially clear in the group of patients with a combination of narcotic substance abuse and psychiatric symptoms.

  4. The future of community psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Carl I; Feiner, Joel S; Huffine, Charles; Moffic, H Steven; Thompson, Kenneth S

    2003-10-01

    Leaders of national groups that have focused on issues of community and social psychiatry present their ideas about the future of psychiatry. They identify five areas: theory development; the relevance of community psychiatry in the 21st century; education and training; the relationship between community psychiatry and health maintenance organizations; and role of community psychiatry in bridging medical science with humanism. The unifying theme for these topics is that community psychiatry can be a vehicle for modifying general psychiatry's propensity towards individualism and reductionism by offering a more holistic and integrative approach to illness and well-being.

  5. [The General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy from the perspective of clinical psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In view of the fact that the suicide rate in Japan has remained high since 1998, the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was implemented in 2006 with the objective of comprehensively promoting suicide prevention measures on a national scale. Based on this Basic Act, in 2007, the Japanese government formulated the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy as a guideline for recommended suicide prevention measures. These General Principles were revised in 2012 in accordance with the initial plan of holding a review after five years. The Basic Act places an emphasis on the various social factors that underlie suicides and takes the perspective that suicide prevention measures are also social measures. The slogan of the revised General Principles is "Toward Realization of a Society in which Nobody is Driven to Commit Suicide". The General Principles list various measures that are able to be used universally. These contents would be sufficient if the objective of the General Principles were "realization of a society that is easy to live in"; however, the absence of information on the effectiveness and order of priority for each measure may limit the specific effectiveness of the measures in relation to the actual prevention of suicide. In addition, considering that nearly 90% of suicide victims are in a state at the time of committing suicide in which a psychiatric disorder would be diagnosed, it would appear from a psychiatric standpoint that measures related to mental health, including expansion of psychiatric services, should be the top priority in suicide prevention measures. However, this is not the case in the General Principles, in either its original or revised form. Revisions to the General Principles related to clinical psychiatry provide more detailed descriptions of measures for individuals who unsuccessfully attempt suicide and identify newly targeted mental disorders other than depression; however, the overall proportion of contents relating to

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to ... acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Enlarge Anatomy of the bone. The bone is made up ...

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and ... Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical ... Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 American Psychiatric ...

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and ... Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 ...

  10. Pediatric referrals to psychiatry in a Tertiary Care General Hospital: A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bheemsain Tekkalaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with chronic physical illnesses frequently have psychiatric comorbidities, which often go un-noticed and may lead to more resource utilization and morbidity. Pediatric liaison services can be effectively used to bridge this gap. Literature on pediatric liaison services is sparse. Aims: To study the referral patterns, reasons for referrals, psychiatric diagnoses and interventions in children and adolescents referred to psychiatry department in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all children and adolescents below 19 years of age, referred to psychiatry department from 2010 to 2015, was done. Data was collected and statistical analysis was done. Results: Two hundred and nine subjects were included in the study. Mean age of sample was 12.15 (±4.20 years, with about 66.02% being males. About 54.06% of the participants were referred from pediatricians. Almost three fourth (72.25% of children had no diagnosable physical illness. Intellectual disability (19.62% was the most common psychiatric diagnosis, followed by depressive disorders (14.35%, and dissociative disorders (12.92%. Conclusions: In our study, majority of the referrals were the adolescent males from pediatric department. Intellectual disability, depressive disorder, and stress-related disorders were the common diagnoses. The fact that three-fourth of the referred children had no physical illness implies lack of awareness, stigma toward mental illness, and pathway of care.

  11. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Psychiatric medications can help correct imbalances in brain chemistry that are thought to be involved in some ... additional specialized training after their four years of general psychiatry training. They may become certified in: Child ...

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Releases Message from the President Reporting on Mental Health Conditions APA Blogs Annual Meeting Advocacy & APAPAC APA ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical ...

  13. A Descriptive Study of a Spirituality Curriculum for General Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Thomas F; McMahon, Terry; Nelson, Jessica; Bundoc-Baronia, Regina; Giles, Chuck; Schmidt, Vanessa

    2017-08-01

    The study collected data on the attitudes of residents toward religion and spirituality in their practice after taking part in a 3-year curriculum on spirituality during their residency. This is a descriptive, single-site study with psychiatry residents as subjects. A questionnaire was given to the residents at the end of their third year of residency (N = 12). The responses heavily endorsed the religiousness/spirituality curriculum to be helpful and meaningful. Residents consider addressing spiritual and religious needs of patients to be important (76.9%) and appropriate. For majority of the residents (69.2%), there is strong agreement in the management of addictions having spiritual dimensions. Residents also strongly agreed that treatment of suffering, depression, guilt, and complicated grief may require attention to spiritual concerns (92-100%). Regardless of cultural or religious background, the residents endorsed the curriculum as a worthwhile experience and increased their appreciation of the place of spirituality in the holistic care of patients with psychiatric conditions.

  14. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry ... World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association ...

  15. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry ... World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association ...

  16. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine ... American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine American Academy of ...

  17. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A M; Ullmann, J F P; Norton, W H J; Parker, M O; Brennan, C H; Gerlai, R; Kalueff, A V

    2015-02-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern molecular psychiatry research.

  18. Use and diversion of medical marijuana among adults admitted to inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Abraham M; Thurstone, Christian; McGarry, Laurel; Walker, Brendan; Sabel, Allison L

    2015-03-01

    Marijuana use is associated with anxiety, depressive, psychotic, neurocognitive, and substance use disorders. Many US states are legalizing marijuana for medical uses. To determine the prevalence of medical marijuana use and diversion among psychiatric inpatients in Colorado. Some 623 participants (54.6% male) responded to an anonymous 15-item discharge survey that assessed age, gender, marijuana use, possession of a medical marijuana card, diversion of medical marijuana, perceived substance use problems, and effects of marijuana use. Univariate statistics were used to characterize participants and their responses. Chi-square tests assessed factors associated with medical marijuana registration. Of the total number of respondents, 282 (47.6%) reported using marijuana in the last 12 months and 60 (15.1%) reported having a marijuana card. In comparison to survey respondents who denied having a medical marijuana card, those respondents with a medical marijuana card were more likely to have initiated use before the age of 25, to be male, to have used marijuana in the last 12 months, and to have used at least 20 days in the past month. 133 (24.1%) respondents reported that someone with a medical marijuana card had shared or sold medical marijuana to them; 24 (41.4%) of respondents with a medical marijuana card reported ever having shared or sold their medical marijuana. Medical marijuana use is much more prevalent among adults hospitalized with a psychiatric emergency than in the general population; diversion is common. Further studies which correlate amount, dose, duration, and strain of use with particular psychiatric disorders are needed.

  19. GPs' experiences with enhanced collaboration between psychiatry and general practice for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink-Franke, L.J.A.; Janssen, M.M.M.; Oehlen, G.; Deurzen, P.A.M. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Wensing, M.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most general practitioners (GPs) do not feel comfortable with diagnosing and treating children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This is problematic since ADHD is a prevalent disorder and an active role of GPs is desired. In the Netherlands a collaborative ADHD

  20. GPs' experiences with enhanced collaboration between psychiatry and general practice for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink-Franke, L.J.A.; Janssen, M.M.M.; Oehlen, G.; Deurzen, P.A.M. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Wensing, M.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most general practitioners (GPs) do not feel comfortable with diagnosing and treating children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This is problematic since ADHD is a prevalent disorder and an active role of GPs is desired. In the Netherlands a collaborative ADHD progra

  1. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Community Psychiatrists American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry American Association for Emergency Psychiatry ...

  2. [Histrionic personality disorder in a psychiatry department at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, A; Valle, J; Moreno, D; de Miguel, D; Molina, D

    1991-01-01

    The personality disturbances imply problem within the psychiatric assistance, both for its difficult delimitation and classification and for the limited results and bad use obtained from therapeutic resources. We studied 402 patients psychiatric service of a general hospital over a period approximately 2 years, 70 (17.5%) were diagnosed DSM-III with Personality disturbances: 44 females (62.9%) and 26 males (37.1%), of an age group between 18 and 67 years old. The most frequent diagnosis was of histrionic of the personality followed by unspecific and border-line. Within the histrionic disturbance of the personality there was a clear predominance of women, whereas in the others types, no significant differences were observed.

  3. Associations among depressive symptoms, childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events in the general adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kotaro Ono,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,1 Yukiei Nakai,2 Akiyoshi Shimura,1 Yasuyuki Ono,1 Akiko Murakoshi,1 Yasunori Matsumoto,1 Hajime Tanabe,3 Ichiro Kusumi,2 Takeshi Inoue1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido, 3Department of Clinical Human Sciences, Graduate school of Humanities and Social Sciences, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Recent studies have suggested that the interactions among several factors affect the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder. This study investigated how childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events interact with one another and affect depressive symptoms in the general adult population. Subjects and methods: A total of 413 participants from the nonclinical general adult population completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale, the neuroticism subscale of the shortened Eysenck Personality Questionnaire – Revised, and the Life Experiences Survey, which are self-report scales. Structural equation modeling (Mplus version 7.3 and single and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Results: Childhood abuse, neuroticism, and negative evaluation of life events increased the severity of the depressive symptoms directly. Childhood abuse also indirectly increased the negative appraisal of life events and the severity of the depressive symptoms through enhanced neuroticism in the structural equation modeling. Limitations: There was recall bias in this study. The causal relationship was not clear because this study was conducted using a cross-sectional design. Conclusion: This study suggested that neuroticism is the mediating factor for the two effects of childhood abuse on adulthood depressive symptoms and negative evaluation of life events. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depressive symptoms

  4. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Because they are physicians, psychiatrists can order or perform a full range of medical laboratory and psychological ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry ...

  5. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International ... an M.D. or D.O.) who specializes in mental health, including substance use disorders. Psychiatrists are ...

  6. Neuropsychiatry and neuroscience education of psychiatry trainees: attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Sheldon; Travis, Michael J; Cooper, Joseph J; Dickey, Chandlee C; Reardon, Claudia L

    2014-04-01

    The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) Task Force on Neuropsychiatry and Neuroscience Education of Psychiatry Residents was established in 2011 with the charge to seek information about what the field of psychiatry considers the core topics in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience to which psychiatry residents should be exposed; whether there are any "competencies" in this area on which the field agrees; whether psychiatry departments have the internal capacity to teach these topics if they are desirable; and what the reception would be for "portable curricula" in neuroscience. The task force reviewed the literature and developed a survey instrument to be administered nationwide to all psychiatry residency program directors. The AADPRT Executive Committee assisted with the survey review, and their feedback was incorporated into the final instrument. In 2011-2012, 226 adult and child and adolescent psychiatry residency program directors responded to the survey, representing over half of all US adult and child psychiatry training directors. About three quarters indicated that faculty resources were available in their departments but 39% felt the lack of neuropsychiatry faculty and 36% felt the absence of neuroscience faculty to be significant barriers. Respectively, 64 and 60% felt that neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience knowledge were very important or critically important to the provision of excellent care. Ninety-two percent were interested in access to portable neuroscience curricula. There is widespread agreement among training directors on the importance of neuropsychiatry and neuroscience knowledge to general psychiatrists but barriers to training exist, including some programs that lack faculty resources and a dearth of portable curricula in these areas.

  7. Holistic-medical foundations of American psychiatry: a bicentennial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowski, Z J

    1981-07-01

    American psychiatry has reached its bicentennial. Holistic-medical foundations have been its hallmark, inspiration, and source of preeminence. Incorporated by psychobiology, the American school, they enabled the growth of psychiatry as a medical specialty and scientific discipline and stimulated unparalleled growth of general hospital psychiatry, psychiatric research and teaching, and psychosomatic medicine and liaison psychiatry. Holistic conceptions, a product of a democratic system and the liberal mind, continue to provide the best framework for psychiatry and an antidote to dogma and fanaticism.

  8. Effect of individualized social activities on quality of life among older adults with mild to moderate cognitive impairment in a geriatric psychiatry facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; Scogin, Forrest; Bryant, Ami N; Sebastian, Sabin; Mundy, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the effect of an individualized social activities intervention (ISAI) on quality of life among older adults with mild to moderate cognitive impairment in a geriatric psychiatry facility. This randomized control trial consisted of 52 older adults (M = 70.63, SD = 5.62) with mild to moderate cognitive impairment in a geriatric inpatient psychiatry facility. A 2 (group condition) × 2 (time of measurement) design was used to compare the control (treatment-as-usual) and intervention (treatment-as-usual plus ISAI) conditions at pre- and post-treatment. ISAI consisted of 30- to 60-minute sessions for up to 15 consecutive days. The Dementia Quality of Life instrument and Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised were used to examine quality of life and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia at pre- and post-treatment. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated a significant time × group condition interaction on quality of life, with this effect remaining when only completer data were included. There was no evidence of a significant treatment effect on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Findings suggest that individualized social activities are a promising treatment for cognitively impaired geriatric inpatients.

  9. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  10. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Connections What Is Psychiatry? Back to Patients & Families All Topics What Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch ... of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 American Psychiatric Association. All Rights Reserved. 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1825, Arlington, ...

  11. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections What Is Psychiatry? Back to Patients & Families All Topics What Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused ...

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... What Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ... written examination for a state license to practice medicine, and then complete four years of psychiatry residency. ...

  13. The Impact of Health Information Technology on the Doctor-Patient Relationship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    As health information technology continues to expand and permeate medicine, there is increasing concern for the effect on the therapeutic relationship between patient and psychiatrist. This article explores this impact, seeking wisdom from adult psychiatry and more broadly from general medical disciplines to draw conclusions regarding how the child psychiatry encounter may be affected. Several proposed strategies to mitigate potential negative impacts of health information technology on the therapeutic relationship across practice settings are offered.

  14. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  15. A hundred-year of Karl Jaspers' General Psychopathology (Allgemeine Psychopathologie - 1913-2013: a pivotal book in the history of Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Egidio Nardi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available After a hundred-years of its publication, the Karl Jaspers' book, General Psychopathology, is still an indispensable book to psychiatrists and for all those who study psychopathology. It's a clear delineation of the phenomenological method for describing the symptoms of mental disorders that remains unmatched until nowadays. The book focuses on the relevance of phenomenological and hermeneutical methods in psychopathology. Although this work is grounded in the clinical thought and practices of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Jaspers' delineation of psychiatric methods in this work is still evaluated as unmatched to this day, a work that is indispensable to contemporary psychiatry. Jaspers also contributed with important articles and book reviews to psychiatric periodicals during the first two decades of the twentieth century.

  16. A hundred-year of Karl Jaspers' General Psychopathology (Allgemeine Psychopathologie)--1913-2013: a pivotal book in the history of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Freire, Rafael Christophe; Machado, Sergio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Crippa, José Alexandre

    2013-07-01

    After a hundred-years of its publication, the Karl Jaspers' book, General Psychopathology, is still an indispensable book to psychiatrists and for all those who study psychopathology. It's a clear delineation of the phenomenological method for describing the symptoms of mental disorders that remains unmatched until nowadays. The book focuses on the relevance of phenomenological and hermeneutical methods in psychopathology. Although this work is grounded in the clinical thought and practices of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Jaspers' delineation of psychiatric methods in this work is still evaluated as unmatched to this day, a work that is indispensable to contemporary psychiatry. Jaspers also contributed with important articles and book reviews to psychiatric periodicals during the first two decades of the twentieth century.

  17. The uncertain future of clinical psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesse, S

    1986-01-01

    Clinical psychiatry is in a crisis state and might not survive in its present form. Health-care costs, in general, have escalated tenfold over a period of twenty years. The various factors that are threatening the existence of clinical psychiatry in its current form are reviewed and suggestions for change are offered.

  18. Factors Affecting Recruitment into Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jon A.; Lewis, John E.; Katyal, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with…

  19. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  20. Psychiatry beyond the asylum: the origins of German military psychiatry before World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengwiler, Martin

    2003-03-01

    This study examines the co-operation between psychiatry and the army in Germany between 1870 and 1914, leading to the establishment of military psychiatry as an independent discipline. Arguing that military psychiatry played a key role in the history of modern clinical psychiatry, the paper points out how the first generation of military psychiatrists developed innovative diagnostic technologies, such as the intelligence test, and established crucial institutional alliances between psychiatric clinics, military authorities, and local and national administrations. The early history of military psychiatry marks the transition of psychiatry from a medical sub-discipline to a more generally applicable "social technology" assessing the borderline between normality and abnormality in multiple social contexts.

  1. TOWARDS AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, A.W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The situation of present day psychiatry is described as being dominated by an empiricist perspective. The limitations of this perspective are analyzed and a rough sketch of the hermeneutical approach in psychiatry is offered. It is argued that a fully developed hermeneutical psychiatry implies a ref

  2. Evidence for a General Factor Model of ADHD in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbins, Christopher; Toplak, Maggie E.; Flora, David B.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Tannock, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine factor structures of "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.) symptoms of ADHD in adults. Method: Two sets of models were tested: (a) models with inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity as separate but correlated latent constructs and (b) hierarchical general factor models with a general factor for…

  3. MRI correlates of general intelligence in neurotypical adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpas, Charles B; Genc, Sila; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia M; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest in the neurobiological substrate of general intelligence. Psychometric estimates of general intelligence are reduced in a range of neurological disorders, leading to practical application as sensitive, but non-specific, markers of cerebral disorder. This study examined estimates of general intelligence in neurotypical adults using diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity analysis. General intelligence was related to white matter organisation across multiple brain regions, confirming previous work in older healthy adults. We also found that variation in general intelligence was related to a large functional sub-network involving all cortical lobes of the brain. These findings confirm that individual variance in general intelligence is related to diffusely represented brain networks.

  4. [Feasibility of consultation - liaison psychiatry in a large general hospital: quantitative description of services and personnel expenditure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, Elmar; Thaler, Katharina; Selberis-Vahl, Wilia Vasiliki; Friedl-Wörgetter, Petra; Windhager, Isabella; Zauner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The integration of psychiatric departments in general hospitals lead to an increasing demand of psychiatric consultation, which often overstrains personnel resources of short staffed psychiatric services. To provide consulting service, as it is demanded by guidelines, a multidisciplinary consulting team could be a possible solution. A retrospective descriptive analysis of all consultations made by the psychosocial consultation and liaison service at the general hospital Wels-Grieskirchen in the years 2012 and 2013. There was an increase in referrals overall of 22 % from 2012 to 2013. The largest increase was observed in the group of psychiatrists, who carried out 33.1 % of all consultations. Most consultations, 39.5 %, were done by the group of clinical psychologists, partly substituting medical attendance. Taking together both occupational groups, the expected number of consultations of at least 3 % of all admissions could be achieved. A multidisciplinary consulting team consisting of psychiatrists, psychologists, psychosomatic physicians and social workers staffed with 5.11-6.79 full-time personnel is able to provide psychosocial consultation service at a quantitative level required by international guidelines.

  5. Conceptualising molecular psychiatry and translational psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Johannes

    2011-09-01

    The terms "molecular psychiatry" and "translational psychiatry" are frequently used key words of today's scientific community. However, the exact meaning of these terms remains surprisingly unclear. They also seem to be interpreted in different ways by different authors. Here, we first analyse how the terms have emerged historically and then try to indicate how meaningful and widely acceptable definitions could be achieved. Clearly, with the further development of these emerging psychiatric research areas, it will be necessary to regularly adjust these definitions accordingly.

  6. Preventive psychiatry: Current status in contemporary psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Chadda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventive psychiatry is one of the most ignored subdiscipline of psychiatry, which has got important role to play in the contemporary psychiatry. Mental disorders are very common with lifetime prevalence of about 25%, and tend to be chronic. Due to the stigma associated with mental disorders, lack of awareness, and also lack of adequate mental health resources, nearly 60%–80% of the persons suffering from mental disorders do not access mental health care services. Mental and substance use disorders have been identified as one of the major contributors to the disease-related burden and disability-adjusted life years. In this background, preventive psychiatry has an important role to play in public health sector. Since etiology of most of the mental disorders is not known, it is not possible to follow here the standard model of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of public health. A concept of universal, selective, and indicated prevention has been proposed in primary prevention. Preventive approaches in psychiatry focus on evidence-based risk and protective factors, promoting quality of life, reducing stressors, and improving resilience. Such interventions, when planned targeting at specific mental disorders, have a potential to prevent mental disorders. Thus, preventive psychiatry has a crucial role to play in mental health, considering the high prevalence of mental disorders, the associated disability and burden, and a great drain on human resources.

  7. The Lorazepam and Diazepam Protocol for Catatonia Due to General Medical Condition and Substance in Liaison Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Chuen; Hung, Yi-Yung; Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Objective The lorazepam-diazepam protocol had been proved to rapidly and effectively relieve catatonia in patients with schizophrenia or mood disorder. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of lorazepam-diazepam protocol in catatonia due to general medical conditions (GMC) and substance. Method Patients with catatonia that required psychiatric intervention in various settings of a medical center were included. The lorazepam-diazepam protocol had been used to treat the catatonia due to GMC or substance according to DSM-IV criteria. The treatment response had been assessed by two psychiatrists. Results Eighteen (85.7%) of 21 catatonic patients due to GMC or substance became free of catatonia after the lorazepam-diazepam protocol. Five (23.8%) of the 21 patients had passed away with various causes of death and wide range of time periods after catatonia. Conclusion Our results showed that the lorazepam-diazepam protocol could rapidly and effectively relieve catatonia due to GMC and substance. PMID:28114315

  8. Child and adolescent psychiatry: which knowledge and skills do primary care physicians need to have? A survey in general practitioners and paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Thomas; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) play a key role in the initial assessment and management of children and adolescents with mental health problems. However, it is unclear whether current medical education curricula sufficiently equip PCPs for this task. The aim of this study was to investigate, which child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP)-related skills and knowledge PCPs say they require in their daily practice. A questionnaire was generated, employing a modified two-step Delphi approach. Besides socio-demographic items, the questionnaire contained 17 CAP-related knowledge items and 13 CAP-related skills items, which had to be rated by importance in daily practice. The questionnaire was distributed to 348 office-based paediatricians and 500 general practitioners (GPs) in Germany. The overall return rate was 51.3% (435/848). Regarding CAP-related knowledge, both paediatricians and GPs rated somatoform disorders and obesity as highly important for daily practice. Moreover, paediatricians also deemed regulatory disorders during infancy (e.g. crying, sleep disorders) as important, while GPs assessed knowledge on paediatric depression as relevant. For paediatricians and GPs, the most relevant CAP-related skills were communicating with children and adolescents and their parents. Additionally, paediatricians rated differentiating between non-pathologic and clinically relevant behaviour problems very relevant, while GPs considered basic psychotherapeutic skills essential. The CAP-related knowledge and skills perceived relevant for doctors in primary care differ from the majority of current medical school CAP curricula, which cover mainly typical, epitomic CAP disorders and are predominantly knowledge-oriented. Therefore, medical education in CAP should be amended to reflect the needs of PCPs to improve healthcare for children and adolescents with mental health problems.

  9. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  10. Generalization of Adult's Stimulus Control of Children's Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, William H.

    1970-01-01

    Generalization of stimulus control in different situations and with novel adults occurred with those children who were trained by contingent reinforcement, but not with those trained by both contingent and noncontingent reinforcement. This research was submitted as part of the author's dissertation. (MH)

  11. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American ...

  13. [(Community) psychiatry, a parenthesis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucheron, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    Beyond an a priori antagonism between these two notions, alienism and mental health cultivate analogies as to the place to which they assign mental health. Is community psychiatry not therefore simply a parenthesis in the history of psychiatry? The question is raised therefore regarding the place given to subjectivity and complexity. What must be done to ensure that this parenthesis of community psychiatry does not close? It is perhaps a case of making use of the tools which institutional psychotherapy has developed to keep the community psychiatry spirit alive.

  14. The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanai Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Kanai,1,2 Yoshikazu Takaesu,1 Yukiei Nakai,3 Masahiko Ichiki,1 Mitsuhiko Sato,1 Yasunori Matsumoto,1 Jun Ishikawa,1 Yasuyuki Ono,1 Akiko Murakoshi,1 Hajime Tanabe,4 Ichiro Kusumi,3 Takeshi Inoue1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 4Department of Clinical Human Sciences, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect and ill-being (negative affect. We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Methods: A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI; Life Experiences Survey (LES; Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A; and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS. The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus. Results: Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects. Limitations: The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not

  15. Screening for Psychopathology Symptoms in Mexican Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Francisco Javier Mesa; Munoz, Maria Del Carmen Lara

    2011-01-01

    Background: Various rates of alcoholism, drug abuse, mental illness, and suicide among physician have been reported, generally higher than those in the general population. Psychiatry residents, as other specializing physicians, seem to be prone to suffering them. The prevalence of psychological symptoms among psychiatry residents has not been…

  16. Foundations of Child Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emanuel, Ed.; And Others

    Twenty-eight papers examine basic theories and clinical methods in child psychiatry. Theories and methods discussed concern child psychiatry and the World Health Organization, pediatrics, child disturbances, observation, the psychodiagnostic approach, longitudinal research in child development, the comparative approach to early child development,…

  17. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 American Psychiatric ...

  18. Lobotomy in Norwegian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranøy, Joar; Blomberg, Wenche

    2005-03-01

    Lobotomy is still a hidden chapter in the history of Norwegian psychiatry. The main reasons, which are discussed here, may have been the role of Ørnulv Ødegård at Gaustad Hospital in Oslo and the links between health authorities and the power élite in Norwegian psychiatry.

  19. Adult Education and Lifelong Learning. The case of GSAE (General Secretary for Adult Education in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Kalogiannakis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The participation rates in adult education in Greece are low in comparison with other European countries. Within the framework of the present research an effort has been undertaken in order to evaluate the program of training instructors of adults through distance learning education hosted by the GSAE (General Secretary for Adult Education and the ICAE (Institute for the Continuing Adult Education in Greece. Among the most important outcomes of this research was considered to be the positive attitude of the participants concerning the program in general as well as the electronic educational material distributed. Furthermore, the hybrid educational process selected for use by the program was thought to be particularly flexible. As for the program’s negative aspects, the main problems noted were the distance certain trainees had to cover in order to participate physically during the scheduled meetings, as well as the technical issues arose within the e-learning environment.

  20. History of psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review examines recent contributions to the evolving field of historical writing in psychiatry. Recent findings Interest in the history of psychiatry continues to grow, with an increasing emphasis on topics of current interest such as the history of psychopharmacology, electroconvulsive therapy, and the interplay between psychiatry and society. The scope of historical writing in psychiatry as of 2007 is as broad and varied as the discipline itself. Summary More than in other medical specialties such as cardiology or nephrology, treatment and diagnosis in psychiatry are affected by trends in the surrounding culture and society. Studying the history of the discipline provides insights into possible alternatives to the current crop of patent-protected remedies and trend-driven diagnoses. PMID:18852567

  1. Old age psychiatry in the modern age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James P

    2015-11-01

    Old age psychiatry services globally are under threat. The discipline enjoyed its heyday in the two decades bridging the millennium. More recently there has been a move to integrate old age services with those of working age adults, to create 'ageless' services. Evidence is beginning to accumulate that this is a bad idea.

  2. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge.

  3. Cardiovascular and general health status of adults with Trisomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Samuel A; Kutty, Shelby; Thomas, Joshua; Johnson, Joyce T; Yetman, Anji T

    2017-08-15

    Patients with Trisomy 21 are now living well into adulthood. Little data exists to assist the cardiologist in the care of these patients. We sought to examine the cardiac and general health status of adults with Trisomy 21 undergoing cardiac evaluation. A retrospective review of all affected adults >21years followed at 2 tertiary care institutions was performed. Of 193 patients identified, median age was 31 (range 21.1-60.5) years. Cardiac surgery was performed in childhood in 127 with 30 patients who did not undergo surgery developing Eisenmenger syndrome. The remaining 36 patients did not warrant early surgical intervention. Six patients were lost to follow-up. Significant cardiac residua were present in 117 (62%). Arrhythmias were present in 53 (28%) with 15 having atrial fibrillation (8%). Non-cardiac comorbidities were common and included sleep apnea, pulmonary hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, thromboses and recurrent infections. Hospitalization in adulthood occurred in 58 patients (51%); pneumonia and cardiac related surgeries being the most common reasons for hospitalization. Average age of death (n=23) was 39.8±8.5years. Transition of care to an adult provider was uncommon occurring in 54 (27%) patients. On multivariate analysis, presence of younger age and absence of pulmonary hypertension were the sole predictors of survival for the group as a whole, as well as those patients without Eisenmenger syndrome. Adults with Trisomy 21 have frequent cardiac and non-cardiac co-morbidities. Cardiologists caring for these patients should be familiar with the adult acquired medical problems these patients encounter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Informed Consent in Adult Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bait Amer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some of the groundwork of informed consent in people with mental illness whose decision-making capacity has obviously been compromised. This article examines four crucial aspects in particular, namely: i the main elements of informed consent; ii difficulties pertaining to psychiatric illnesses; iii the effect of psychiatric disorders on the patient’s capability; iv how to assess situations in which consents may not be required.

  5. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... become a psychiatrist, a person must complete medical school and take a written examination for a state ... A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (completed medical school and residency) with special training in psychiatry. A ...

  6. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association ...

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Patients & Families Patients & ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections What Is Psychiatry? ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association ...

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and insomnia. Hypnotics – used to induce and maintain sleep. Mood stabilizers – used to treat bipolar disorder. Stimulants – ... psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some psychiatrists choose additional training in psychoanalysis ...

  10. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and insomnia. Hypnotics – used to induce and maintain sleep. Mood stabilizers – used to treat bipolar disorder. Stimulants – ... psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some psychiatrists choose additional training in psychoanalysis ...

  11. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. A psychiatrist ... Coping After Disaster, Trauma Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs of Mental Illness What is Psychiatry? ...

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Patients & Families Patients & Families ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections What Is Psychiatry? Back ...

  13. Genetics in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Shreekantiah; Nizamie, Shamshul Haque

    2014-04-01

    Today, psychiatrists are focusing on genetics aspects of various psychiatric disorders not only for a future classification of psychiatric disorders but also a notion that genetics would aid in the development of new medications to treat these disabling illnesses. This review therefore emphasizes on the basics of genetics in psychiatry as well as focuses on the emerging picture of genetics in psychiatry and their future implications.

  14. Psychiatry and music

    OpenAIRE

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry...

  15. The adolescent or adult with generalized tonic-clonic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roop Gursahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCs together constitute up to 50% of adolescent and adult patients with epilepsy as diagnosed by history and EEG. Syncope and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are major differential diagnoses and must be carefully excluded in therapy-resistant cases. Individual episodes can have up to seven phases in secondarily generalized GTCs. The distinction between primary and secondary GTCs depends mainly on history and EEG, and yield can be improved with sleep deprivation or overnight recording. Epilepsies with primary or unclassified GTCs can respond to any one of the five broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: valproate, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, topiramate and zonisamide. Unless a focal onset is clearly confirmed, a sodium-channel blocking AED should not be used in the initial treatment of these conditions.

  16. [Deafness in adults. Study of practices in general medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, P; Kossowski, M; Pons, Y

    2012-01-01

    Deafness is a sensory disability responsible for communication disorder, sometimes impairing social life. In children, the hearing is an important concern for all stakeholders in early childhood (systematic neonatal screening, etc.). On the other hand, in the adult, it is rarely tested, and patients do consult when their audiometric status is already badly impaired. But their care is all the better if the deafness diagnosis is made early, as for the audio-prosthetic rehabilitation for example. Today, the general practitioner is the first link of the diagnostic and therapeutic management chain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic practices of practitioners in front of deafness in adults. This prospective study included 74 practitioners based in "Ile de France" interviewed using a multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ) on otoscopic and audiometric diagnostics and a Script Concordance test (SC) on clinical adult deafness situations validated by a 5 experts panel. The obtained average score was 66.35% of correct answers to the MCQ and 47.76% to the SC. In our study, the surveyed practitioners showed a good level of otoscopic and audiometric diagnosis in the MCQ. However, their answers were not concordant with those of the expert panel in the SC. They have been particularly poorly performing on issues related to functional signs and their use in a given clinical situation, often driving to establish an otoscopic misdiagnosis while their diagnostic recognition of a pathological eardrum in the MCQ was rather good. These results reflect a lack of confidence in their otoscopic diagnosis related to the lack of knowledge of the causes of deafness in adults and their symptoms.

  17. Gender differences in career paths in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krener, P

    1994-03-01

    Although psychiatry has one of the highest proportions of women entering its residency programs, women have not assumed a proportionate amount of academic or research leadership positions in the field. This literature review identifies three general groups of models that explain disparities between men's and women's careers, but these do not fully account for observed differences in psychiatric practice and academic progression of women in psychiatry. Gender differences in career paths in psychiatry are not only affected by individual traits and choices, but also by economic factors. Theories based on organizational discrimination, and systems and market factors are also reviewed. No single explanatory model accounts for disparities between the careers of men and those of women. Because psychiatric practice patterns may be broadly distributed across labor sectors, more diverse career patterns are possible in psychiatry than in more constrained and traditional fields. Research on gender differences in psychiatry careers must consider not only the individual work style and choice, but also the position of individuals within the organization and the position of those organizations across the labor market.

  18. How Health Reform is Recasting Public Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Roderick; Thompson, Kenneth S; Braslow, Joel; Ragins, Mark; Parks, Joseph John; Vaccaro, Jerome V

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the fiscal, programmatic, clinical, and cultural forces of health care reform that are transforming the work of public psychiatrists. Areas of rapid change and issues of concern are discussed. A proposed health care reform agenda for public psychiatric leadership emphasizes (1) access to quality mental health care, (2) promotion of recovery practices in primary care, (3) promotion of public psychiatry values within general psychiatry, (4) engagement in national policy formulation and implementation, and (5) further development of psychiatric leadership focused on public and community mental health.

  19. Educating psychiatry residents in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Sheldon

    2013-06-01

    Neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience should be part of the general psychiatry curriculum so that graduate psychiatrists will be able to allow their patients the benefit of neuroscientifically informed diagnosis and treatment. Current neurology and neuroscience educational requirements for US psychiatry training are reviewed. The draft milestone requirements for clinical neuroscience training as part of the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System are also provided. Suggestions for the neuropsychiatric and neuroscience content of psychiatry residency training are made, along with a description of pedagogic methods and resources. Survey data are reviewed indicating agreement by programme directors with the importance of neuroscience training and an increase in the amount of time devoted to this area. Faculty staff development in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience literacy will be needed to provide high quality training in these areas.

  20. Limitations of the biopsychosocial model in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benning TB

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tony B Benning Maple Ridge Mental Health Centre, Maple Ridge, BC, Canada Abstract: A commitment to an integrative, non-reductionist clinical and theoretical perspective in medicine that honors the importance of all relevant domains of knowledge, not just “the biological,” is clearly evident in Engel’s original writings on the biopsychosocial model. And though this model’s influence on modern psychiatry (in clinical as well as educational settings has been significant, a growing body of recent literature is critical of it - charging it with lacking philosophical coherence, insensitivity to patients’ subjective experience, being unfaithful to the general systems theory that Engel claimed it be rooted in, and engendering an undisciplined eclecticism that provides no safeguards against either the dominance or the under-representation of any one of the three domains of bio, psycho, or social. Keywords: critique of biopsychosocial psychiatry, integrative psychiatry, George Engel

  1. SPECT in psychiatry. SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocka, A. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Feistel, H. (Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Ebert, D. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Lungershausen, E. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D[sub 2] and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.)

  2. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brittlebank, A.; Hermans, M.; Bhugra, D.; Costa, M.; Rojnic-Kuzman, M.; Fiorillo, A.; Kurimay, T.; Hanon, C.; Wasserman, D.; Gaag, R.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Europeenne des Medecins Specialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an

  3. Factor structure of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire in the Japanese general adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yuriko; Minowa, Masumi

    2003-08-01

    The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) has been extensively used in a variety of settings across countries. The main aim of the present study was to assess the factor structure of the GHQ-12 for the Japanese general adult population. Data came from a sample of 1808 Japanese aged 20 years or older who were randomly selected based on the 1995 census (897 men and 911 women). Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.83 for men and 0.85 for women. Overall, the corrected item-total correlation coefficients were >0.20 for both genders. The GHQ-12 yielded a two-factor solution of psychological distress (items 2, 5, 6, 9, 10 and 11) and social dysfunction (items 1, 3, 4, 7 and 8), which jointly accounted for 49.1% of the total variance, for women. Item 12 on happiness was not discernable. For men, item 12 was separated from a social dysfunction factor and yielded the third factor with item 3 on social role, and the three factors jointly accounted for 57.6%. The results of the present study suggest that the GHQ-12 can be used as an internally reliable and homogeneous scale that produces mainly the factors of psychological distress and social dysfunction. Item 12 may be structurally different in the case of Japanese adults.

  4. EPA guidance on improving the image of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Möller, H-J; Maier, W; Gaebel, W; Falkai, P

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores causes, explanations and consequences of the negative image of psychiatry and develops recommendations for improvement. It is primarily based on a WPA guidance paper on how to combat the stigmatization of psychiatry and psychiatrists and a Medline search on related publications since 2010. Furthermore, focussing on potential causes and explanations, the authors performed a selective literature search regarding additional image-related issues such as mental health literacy and diagnostic and treatment issues. Underestimation of psychiatry results from both unjustified prejudices of the general public, mass media and healthcare professionals and psychiatry's own unfavourable coping with external and internal concerns. Issues related to unjustified devaluation of psychiatry include overestimation of coercion, associative stigma, lack of public knowledge, need to simplify complex mental issues, problem of the continuum between normality and psychopathology, competition with medical and non-medical disciplines and psychopharmacological treatment. Issues related to psychiatry's own contribution to being underestimated include lack of a clear professional identity, lack of biomarkers supporting clinical diagnoses, limited consensus about best treatment options, lack of collaboration with other medical disciplines and low recruitment rates among medical students. Recommendations are proposed for creating and representing a positive self-concept with different components. The negative image of psychiatry is not only due to unfavourable communication with the media, but is basically a problem of self-conceptualization. Much can be improved. However, psychiatry will remain a profession with an exceptional position among the medical disciplines, which should be seen as its specific strength.

  5. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be a... knowledge and skills necessary to manage care requirements in the home. Adult day health care is principally... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for...

  6. American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Task Force on Medical Clearance of Adults Part I: Introduction, Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric L.; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Wilson, Michael P.; Peltzer-Jones, Jennifer M.; Zun, Leslie; Ng, Anthony; Allen, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, the number of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) for a mental health concern is significant and expected to grow. The breadth of the medical evaluation of these patients is controversial. Attempts have been made to establish a standard evaluation for these patients, but to date no nationally accepted standards exist. A task force of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry, consisting of physicians from emergency medicine and psychiatry, and a psychologist was convened to form consensus recommendations on the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to EDs. Methods The task force reviewed existing literature on the topic of medical evaluation of psychiatric patients in the ED (Part I) and then combined this with expert consensus (Part II). Results In Part I, we discuss terminological issues and existing evidence on medical exams and laboratory studies of psychiatric patients in the ED. Conclusion Emergency physicians should work cooperatively with psychiatric receiving facilities to decrease unnecessary testing while increasing the quality of medical screening exams for psychiatric patients who present to EDs. PMID:28210358

  7. Epistemology of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Ivana S; Berrios, German E

    2012-01-01

    In historical and epistemological terms, psychiatry is a new discipline born during the 19th century. Rooted in both the natural and social sciences, psychiatric objects of inquiry, namely mental symptoms and mental disorders, are hybrid, constituted by the blending of components arising from disparate sources of knowledge ranging from the biological to the semantic in its widest sense. This poses problems for psychiatric research and therapy. Whilst conventional pluralism may be a convenient approach to manage aspects of psychiatric practice, it lacks the capacity to analyse psychiatric objects in their entirety. For the latter, psychiatry demands a new, tailored regional epistemology. This paper outlines the main features of an epistemology specific to the needs of psychiatry. It highlights the relational approach that needs to be taken and illustrates the usefulness of this approach by analysing the structure of psychiatric objects, exploring the manner in which they may be inscribed in the brain, and identifying the need to periodically recalibrate the language of psychiatry.

  8. Racism and Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alexander; Sillen, Samuel

    White racism has influenced theory and practice in psychiatry and allied fields. Psychiatrists have largely ignored the interactionist approach, as expounded by Sullivan and Rush, in analyzing Negroes within their respective societies. Rather, in the vein of Freudian preoccupation with unconscious motivation, abnormal behavior and what is…

  9. Artificial intelligence and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servan-Schreiber, D

    1986-04-01

    This paper provides a brief historical introduction to the new field of artificial intelligence and describes some applications to psychiatry. It focuses on two successful programs: a model of paranoid processes and an expert system for the pharmacological management of depressive disorders. Finally, it reviews evidence in favor of computerized psychotherapy and offers speculations on the future development of research in this area.

  10. [Sophrology and psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehr, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relatively new discipline in the field of human sciences, sophrology seeks, through a physical as well as mental approach, to awaken awareness while energising the patient's resources and capacities. In psychiatry, it favours the development of body awareness and the positive activation of the mental structures, for the greater wellbeing of the patient.

  11. Psychiatrie en reclassering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, Walter

    1967-01-01

    Het doel van dit onderzoek is geweest de bestudering van de bijdrage die de hedendaagse psychiatrie aan de reclassering van met de justitie in aanraking gekomen delinquenten kan leveren. In de inleiding wordt erop gewezen hoe de reclassering zich in ons land heeft ontwikkeld van een persoonlijk init

  12. The latent structure of generalized anxiety disorder in midlife adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, David K; Sawaqdeh, Abere; Kwon, Paul

    2014-02-28

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is identified as a discrete disorder in the DSM-5, but evidence suggests that GAD and the related construct of pathological worry possesses a dimensional latent structure. The objective of this study was to ascertain the latent structure of GAD using taxometric methods. A subsample of adults (N=2061) from the Midlife in the United States Study, a national sample of Americans, provided the data. Additional data from individuals who were re-interviewed 10 year later (n=1228) were also analyzed. Items corresponding to the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for GAD were used to generate indicators for the taxometric analyses. Multiple taxometric procedures provided no evidence that GAD has a categorical or taxonic latent structure. Instead, the results were more consistent with the proposition that GAD exists on a continuum. Evidence that GAD is dimensional suggests that dichotomizing individuals into GAD versus non-GAD groups will typically result in decreased statistical power. They also suggest that any diagnostic thresholds for identifying GAD are likely to be arbitrary. The findings are consistent with models that locate GAD within the framework of extant dimensional models of personality and with research that emphasizes a multifactorial etiology for GAD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nightmares: risk factors among the Finnish general adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2015-04-01

    To identify risk factors for experiencing nightmares among the Finnish general adult population. The study aimed to both test whether previously reported correlates of frequent nightmares could be reproduced in a large population sample and to explore previously unreported associations. Two independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study. Age- and sex-stratified random samples of the Finnish population in 2007 and 2012. A total of 13,922 participants (6,515 men and 7,407 women) aged 25-74 y. N/A. Nightmare frequency as well as several items related to socioeconomic status, sleep, mental well-being, life satisfaction, alcohol use, medication, and physical well-being were recorded with a questionnaire. In multinomial logistic regression analysis, a depression-related negative attitude toward the self (odds ratio [OR] 1.32 per 1-point increase), insomnia (OR 6.90), and exhaustion and fatigue (OR 6.86) were the strongest risk factors for experiencing frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Sex, age, a self-reported impaired ability to work, low life satisfaction, the use of antidepressants or hypnotics, and frequent heavy use of alcohol were also strongly associated with frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Symptoms of depression and insomnia were the strongest predictors of frequent nightmares in this dataset. Additionally, a wide variety of factors related to psychological and physical well-being were associated with nightmare frequency with modest effect sizes. Hence, nightmare frequency appears to have a strong connection with sleep and mood problems, but is also associated with a variety of measures of psychological and physical well-being. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Sleep hygiene use in a psychiatry outpatient setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, J

    2012-02-01

    Non-pharmacological measures are recommended prior to use of hypnotics in the latest NICE guidance. This study investigated if non-pharmacological measures are utilised prior to hypnotic prescribing in a general adult psychiatry outpatient setting, and further reviewed patient\\'s sleep quality following implementation of sleep hygiene education. Interviews were conducted with 85 patients, and poor adherence with NICE guidance was found among the 74 (87%) patients previously prescribed a hypnotic. Just five (6.8%) patients recalled use of non-pharmacological measures prior to hypnotic prescription, 47 (63.5%) indicated non-pharmacological measures had not been discussed, while a further 22 (29.7%) could not remember. Improvement in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores following implementation of sleep hygiene education was also noted (P = 0.03). These findings suggest that increased awareness of sleep hygiene education for clinicians may be beneficial.

  15. A 4-Year Curriculum on Substance Use Disorders for Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Rocco; Sanders, Kathy; Greenfield, Shelly F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe an addiction psychiatry curriculum integrated in a general psychiatry training program to demonstrate comprehensive and practical approaches to educating general psychiatric residents on the recognition and treatment of substance use disorders. Methods: The Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital adult…

  16. Psychiatry in former socialist countries: implications for north korean psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Su; Park, Sang Min; Jun, Jin Yong; Kim, Seog Ju

    2014-10-01

    Very little information is available regarding psychiatry in North Korea, which is based on the legacy of Soviet psychiatry. This paper reviews the characteristics of psychiatry in former socialist countries and discusses its implications for North Korean psychiatry. Under socialism, psychiatric disorders were attributed primarily to neurophysiologic or neurobiological origins. Psychosocial or psychodynamic etiology was denied or distorted in line with the political ideology of the Communist Party. Psychiatry was primarily concerned with psychotic disorders, and this diagnostic category was sometimes applied based on political considerations. Neurotic disorders were ignored by psychiatry or were regarded as the remnants of capitalism. Several neurotic disorders characterized by high levels of somatization were considered to be neurological or physical in nature. The majority of "mental patients" were institutionalized for a long periods in large-scale psychiatric hospitals. Treatment of psychiatric disorders depended largely on a few outdated biological therapies. In former socialist countries, psychodynamic psychotherapy was not common, and psychiatric patients were likely to experience social stigma. According to North Korean doctors living in South Korea, North Korean psychiatry is heavily influenced by the aforementioned traditions of psychiatry. During the post-socialist transition, the suicide rate in many of these countries dramatically increased. Given such mental health crises in post-socialist transitional societies, the field of psychiatry may face major challenges in a future unified Korea.

  17. Psychiatry in Former Socialist Countries: Implications for North Korean Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Su; Park, Sang Min; Jun, Jin Yong

    2014-01-01

    Very little information is available regarding psychiatry in North Korea, which is based on the legacy of Soviet psychiatry. This paper reviews the characteristics of psychiatry in former socialist countries and discusses its implications for North Korean psychiatry. Under socialism, psychiatric disorders were attributed primarily to neurophysiologic or neurobiological origins. Psychosocial or psychodynamic etiology was denied or distorted in line with the political ideology of the Communist Party. Psychiatry was primarily concerned with psychotic disorders, and this diagnostic category was sometimes applied based on political considerations. Neurotic disorders were ignored by psychiatry or were regarded as the remnants of capitalism. Several neurotic disorders characterized by high levels of somatization were considered to be neurological or physical in nature. The majority of "mental patients" were institutionalized for a long periods in large-scale psychiatric hospitals. Treatment of psychiatric disorders depended largely on a few outdated biological therapies. In former socialist countries, psychodynamic psychotherapy was not common, and psychiatric patients were likely to experience social stigma. According to North Korean doctors living in South Korea, North Korean psychiatry is heavily influenced by the aforementioned traditions of psychiatry. During the post-socialist transition, the suicide rate in many of these countries dramatically increased. Given such mental health crises in post-socialist transitional societies, the field of psychiatry may face major challenges in a future unified Korea. PMID:25395966

  18. Mumbai Psychiatry: Current Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay V Bagadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mumbai, like any other Metro city, has its own share of contentious issues influencing psychiatric management. These could be old ongoing issues like myths about medications, electroconvulsive therapy and counselling, or newer ones like our stand on homosexuality and crime related to psychosocial factors. A range of these issues is considered in this paper along with some possible solutions. Getting due credit and status for psychiatry as a medical branch is also a challenge we need to address.

  19. [Psychiatry and neuroethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Richards, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientific knowledge have enter to psychiatry in a new era, however, new technology for viewing images, brain function, psychopharmacology, non-invasive methodology requires an ethical approach, framed in the bioethical environment. The field of neuroethics has evolved to address many of the specific concerns and what neuroenhancement and neuroimaging provide us, is necessary to extend the scope of ethical things to consider the clinical implications for the psychiatric work.

  20. Confidentiality principles in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasevici, B

    2015-01-01

    Confidentiality stands out in psychiatry through its multiple connotations as an intrinsic necessity in the ethics of professional relationships. Thus it represents an important characteristic of this profession and at the same time a stringent request which, through its specificity, implies a direct contact with persons in need for help. Despite being inserted in professional codes and legislative systems, confidentiality in psychiatry is far from being considered a clarified matter and does not stand aside from ethical controversy. Keeping the professional secret is often a hard task due to the pressure of the law or of other professional groups who can bring multiple justifications, including that of action for the benefit of society. The therapist is often sub- mitted to a tension caused on the one hand by the promise of keeping the professional secret and on the other hand by multiple requests of breaking the confidentiality. So the problem of confidentiality in Psychiatry deserves special attention because in this profession, more than in other branches of medicine, the gain of the patient's trust is essential in the psychotherapeutic relationship.

  1. What psychiatry means to us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Trivedi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry has come up as one of the most dynamic branches of medicine in recent years. There are a lot of controversies regarding concepts, nosology, definitions and treatments in psychiatry, all of which are presently under a strict scanner. Differences are so many that even the meaning of psychiatry varies amongst individual psychiatrists. For us, it is an art to practice psychiatry and give the patient what he needs. Still, it should be practiced with great caution and utmost sincerity towards the patient, based on scientific knowledge and not to be guided by individual conceptions alone. Ethics in psychiatry forms an integral part of its basic concept and meaning, and a tight balance should be maintained between professional advancement and patient benefit. In recent years, the scope of psychiatry has enlarged considerably, with wide ranging influences from Sociology, Anthropology and Philosophy on the one hand, and Neurology and Medicine on the other.

  2. Bright Light Treatment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bright light treatment is a treatment modality that leads elevation of mood due to attenuation in depressive symptoms, regulation in circadian rhythm activity, increase the effect of antidepressants and amelioration in sleep quality. Bright light treatment is considered among the first-line treatments for seasonal affective disorder because of high response rates. Additionally, bright light treatment being extended to other conditions, including non-seasonal mood disorders, Alzheimer's disease, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other behavioral syndromes is likely to have a far reached use. Side effects are often temporary and can generally be overcome by reducing exposure time. The central focus on this paper is to review the action mechanisms, efficacy, usage areas, the ways of administration and side effects of the light treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(2.000: 177-188

  3. Psychiatry beyond the current paradigm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Pat

    2012-12-01

    A series of editorials in this Journal have argued that psychiatry is in the midst of a crisis. The various solutions proposed would all involve a strengthening of psychiatry\\'s identity as essentially \\'applied neuroscience\\'. Although not discounting the importance of the brain sciences and psychopharmacology, we argue that psychiatry needs to move beyond the dominance of the current, technological paradigm. This would be more in keeping with the evidence about how positive outcomes are achieved and could also serve to foster more meaningful collaboration with the growing service user movement.

  4. Measuring the stigma of psychiatry and psychiatrists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zäske, Harald; Cleveland, Helen-Rose

    2011-01-01

    to improve the image of psychiatry and to reduce potential stigmatizing attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatrists. To evaluate such interventions, a questionnaire has been developed that assesses opinions and attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatry in different samples of medical specialists...

  5. General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity and mortality from disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the benefits and harms of general health checks in adults with an emphasis on patient-relevant outcomes such as morbidity and mortality rather than on surrogate outcomes.......To quantify the benefits and harms of general health checks in adults with an emphasis on patient-relevant outcomes such as morbidity and mortality rather than on surrogate outcomes....

  6. Management of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in UK primary care: a survey of general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Suzanne; Wilton, Lynda; Murray, Macey; Hodgkins, Paul; Asherson, Philip; Wong, Ian CK

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to existing literature on childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little published adult data are available, particularly outside of the United States. Using General Practitioner (GP) questionnaires from the United Kingdom, this study aimed to examine a number of issues related to ADHD in adults, across three cohorts of patients, adults who received ADHD drug treatment in childhood/adolescence but stopped prior to adulthood; adults who received ADHD dru...

  7. Impact of a psychiatry clerkship on stigma, attitudes towards psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career choice

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Zaza; Janca, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental illnesses are a major public health problem around the world and the prevalence and burden of common mental disorders is growing. Psychiatry is an unpopular career choice for many medical students and this impacts negatively on the supply of psychiatrists to the workforce. The psychiatry clerkship can play an important role in influencing students’ attitudes towards psychiatry, either positively or negatively. However, stigma towards mental illness detracts students from con...

  8. Treatment resistance and psychodynamic psychiatry: concepts psychiatry needs from psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 30 years psychiatry and psychoanalysis have moved in substantially divergent directions. Psychiatry has become rich in methodology but conceptually limited, with a drift toward biological reductionism. Psychoanalysis has remained relatively limited in methodology, but conceptually rich. The rich methodology of psychiatry has led to major contributions in discovering gene by environment interactions, the importance of early adversity, and to recognition of the serious problem posed by treatment resistance. However, psychiatry's biologically reductionistic conceptual focus interferes with the development of a nuanced clinical perspective based on emerging knowledge that might help more treatment resistant patients become treatment responders. This article argues that recognition of the problem of treatment resistance in psychiatry creates a need for it to reconnect with the conceptual richness of psychoanalysis in order to improve patient care. Psychodynamic psychiatry is defined as the relevant intersection of psychiatry and psychoanalysis where this reconnection can occur. I will suggest selected aspects of psychoanalysis that are especially relevant to psychiatry in improving outcomes in work with treatment resistant patients.

  9. [Clinical ethics in psychiatry: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter-Theil, Stella; Schürmann, Jan; Schmeck, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Overview on Clinical Ethics Consultation in Psychiatry. Systematic literature search in data bases (PubMed, Web of Knowledge, SpringerLink, PubPsych, PsychSpider und PsycINFO) against the background of practical experiences with pilot model of implementation of Ethics Consultation in one psychiatric university hospital. Reports on Ethics Consultation in Psychiatry were published only sporadically. This is contrasted by recent experiences showing considerable needs for ethics support in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Adult as well as Forensic Psychiatry. This somewhat "late" development of Ethics Consultation in Psychiatry (compared with somatic medicine) might have structural reasons (lacking resources), be related to strong compensatory competencies of psychiatric staff, esp. regarding communication or legal knowledge, but could also relate to an under-estimation ("under-diagnostic") of ethical problems in psychiatric patient care - both, in the eyes of psychiatric insiders, as well as seen from the outside. Needs for model projects and accompanying research on Ethics Consultation in Psychiatry. Proved in practice: patient- as well as team-oriented ethics support. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. [Forensic psychiatry. Its relations to clinical psychiatry and criminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröber, H-L

    2005-11-01

    A basic task of psychiatry is to identify and treat mentally disordered persons at risk of committing crimes. Psychiatry has an important function in preserving social peace, law, and order. How the psychiatric world handles this duty has changed with time. There have been very important changes from asylums to mental hospitals and from voluntary or involuntary inpatient treatment to outpatient care; but clinical psychiatry cannot give up forensic psychiatry. As a result of developments, inpatient care in mental hospitals often concentrates on crisis management, risk assessment, and risk management. On the other hand, forensic psychiatry has made great efforts in recent decades with special therapies for mentally disturbed criminals and collaborated closely with criminologists in developing instruments for risk assessment and prognosis of repeat offenses.

  11. BIOETHICS AND FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Călin SCRIPCARU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent laws on mental health define psychiatric illness as a loss of consciousness and understanding of consequences of self-behavioral acts, evaluated by loss of discernment. As discernment represents the main criteria of responsibility towards personal actions, this study attempts at presenting the ethical issues related to discernment evaluation from the perspective of forensic medicine. We propose a "mint" representation of the content and consequences of one’s own actions as a new criteria of evaluation, taking into account the modern principles of psychology and psychiatry.

  12. Personalized medicine in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient’s unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention.  Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors......, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention.  Discussion and conclusion: Personalized medicine in psychiatry....... The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine....

  13. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  14. Associations among depressive symptoms, childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events in the general adult population

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Kotaro; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Nakai,Yukiei; Shimura, Akiyoshi; Ono, Yasuyuki; Murakoshi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Tanabe, Hajime; Kusumi, Ichiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Kotaro Ono,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,1 Yukiei Nakai,2 Akiyoshi Shimura,1 Yasuyuki Ono,1 Akiko Murakoshi,1 Yasunori Matsumoto,1 Hajime Tanabe,3 Ichiro Kusumi,2 Takeshi Inoue1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido, 3Department of Clinical Human Sciences, Graduate school of Humanities and Social Sciences, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Recent studies have suggested that the in...

  15. Developmental aspects of fear: Comparing the acquisition and generalization of conditioned fear in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Miriam A; Reinhard, Julia; Reif, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina; Romanos, Marcel; Deckert, Jürgen; Pauli, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Most research on human fear conditioning and its generalization has focused on adults whereas only little is known about these processes in children. Direct comparisons between child and adult populations are needed to determine developmental risk markers of fear and anxiety. We compared 267 children and 285 adults in a differential fear conditioning paradigm and generalization test. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and ratings of valence and arousal were obtained to indicate fear learning. Both groups displayed robust and similar differential conditioning on subjective and physiological levels. However, children showed heightened fear generalization compared to adults as indexed by higher arousal ratings and SCR to the generalization stimuli. Results indicate overgeneralization of conditioned fear as a developmental correlate of fear learning. The developmental change from a shallow to a steeper generalization gradient is likely related to the maturation of brain structures that modulate efficient discrimination between danger and (ambiguous) safety cues.

  16. Ethics Training in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Guloksuz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although ethics training is one of the core components of psychiatric education, it is not sufficiently addressed in the curricula of many educational institutions. It is shown that many of the psychiatry residents received no ethics training in both residency and medical school. Predictably, over half of the psychiatry residents had faced an ethical dilemma that they felt unprepared to meet, and nearly all of them indicated ethics education would have helped them to solve this dilemma. In addition to learning about the fundamental topics of ethics like confidentiality, boundary violations, justice, benefience and nonmaleficence, psychiatrists must also learn to deal with other hidden ethical dilemmas which are mostly due to the changing world order. It is obvious that residency training should include a well developed ethics curriculum. However, some still believe that ethical principles cannot be taught and are formed in one’s early moral development. Accepting the fact that teaching ethics is difficult, we believe that it is getting easier with the new methods for teaching in medicine. These methods are clinical supervisions, rol-models, case studies, role playing, small group discussions, team based learning and “let’s talking medicine” groups which is a useful methods for discussing ethics dilemmas on daily practice and C.A.R.E (Core Beliefs, Actions, Reasons, Experience which is a special training method for teaching ethics. In this review, the need of ethics training in residency curriculum will be discussed and new methods for teaching ethics will be proposed.

  17. Confirmation of the factorial structure of the Japanese short version of the TEMPS-A in psychiatric patients and general adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakato Y

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yasuya Nakato,1 Takeshi Inoue,1,2 Shin Nakagawa,1 Yuji Kitaichi,1 Rie Kameyama,1 Yumi Wakatsuki,1 Kan Kitagawa,1 Yuki Omiya,1 Ichiro Kusumi1 1Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 2Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Background: The Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A is a 110-item questionnaire that assesses five affective temperaments. However, a valid shortened version is desired for large-scale investigations to enhance the compliance of respondents. Methods: A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted among 320 psychiatric patients and 61 general adults. The participants completed the Japanese 39-item short version of the TEMPS-A, and a portion of the participants completed the 110-item version. An exploratory factor analysis with the principal factor method and varimax rotation was conducted to identify a more suitable model of the short version of the TEMPS-A. Results: The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 39-item version exhibited a poor model fit. However, we found that the 18-item version exhibited a firm five-factor structure based on the exploratory factor analysis, and this model exhibited an acceptable model fit. It had good or acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s αs: 0.672–0.819. Limitations: The majority of the subjects in the present study were patients, and the temperament data may have been affected by psychiatric symptoms. Conclusion: A firm five-factor structure was not found in the 39-item short version of the Japanese TEMPS-A. Therefore, an 18-item version was proposed. This new 18-item version of the TEMPS-A might be useful for clinical applications and large-scale investigations. Keywords: TEMPS-A, affective temperament, depression, validation, confirmatory factor analysis

  18. Teaching Medical Gerontology: Utilization of a Psychiatry Consultation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Georgia G.; Starkman, Monica N.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot project to explore the feasibility of using the clinical Adult Service Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Program at the University of Michigan as the locus for teaching medical gerontology to psychiatric and medical/surgical residents and medical students is described. The goals, techniques, content, and implementation procedures are…

  19. Is psychiatry an art or a science? The views of psychiatrists and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Parker, Damon

    2005-12-01

    It is generally considered by many practitioners that psychiatry is an art, that is, one of the humanities, as well as being a science. We systematically collected the views of practitioners and trainee psychiatrists regarding the question 'Is psychiatry an art or a science?' Eleven supervisors and nine trainees were interviewed and their responses analysed, using a qualitative method, the modified framework approach. Several themes emerged from the data: that 'art' and 'science' are different; psychiatry as a discipline is difficult to define; psychiatry demands a broader range of skills than other medical specialties; the relationship of psychology to psychiatry; supervisor cynicism to the 'science' of psychiatry; and the 'art' and 'science' of the assessment process. The tension that exists within the profession's identity as a discipline has important implications for teaching, learning, and clinical and research practices.

  20. Asthma in adult patients presenting with symptoms of acute bronchitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, HA; Postma, DS; de Bock, GH; Huysman, DAN; van Houwelingen, HC; Springer, MP

    Objectives - To investigate the association between asthma and acute bronchitis in adults and to ascertain criteria to help general practitioners (GPs) differentiate between acute bronchitis and asthma. Design - Descriptive study. Setting - Primary health care centre in The Netherlands. Patients -

  1. Dental Caries and General Health in Children and Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Caries is a biofilm-mediated noncommunicable disease fueled by dietary sugar, neglected oral hygiene, and reduced saliva flow. General diseases may influence the oral environment through its pathogenesis, medication, and/or the caring of the condition. Associations between caries and chronic...

  2. Why a career in psychiatry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varun

    2014-06-01

    To reflect upon the factors that might motivate one to undertake a career in psychiatry from the personal perspective of a current registrar in training. The reasons for choosing a career path in psychiatry are complex, and relate to an individual doctor's life experience, training experiences and own value system. Dissatisfaction with the traditional "medical model" of illness may be a contributing factor, with a perception that psychiatry may embrace the biopsychosocial model of illness more fully. Beyond this, a particular interest in the poetry inherent to an individual's story and appreciation of the artistic underpinnings of medicine may also contribute. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  3. YouTube and 'psychiatry'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Miller, John; Collins, Noel

    2015-12-01

    YouTube is a video-sharing website that is increasingly used to share and disseminate health-related information, particularly among younger people. There are reports that social media sites, such as YouTube, are being used to communicate an anti-psychiatry message but this has never been confirmed in any published analysis of YouTube clip content. This descriptive study revealed that the representation of 'psychiatry' during summer 2012 was predominantly negative. A subsequent smaller re-analysis suggests that the negative portrayal of 'psychiatry' on YouTube is a stable phenomenon. The significance of this and how it could be addressed are discussed.

  4. Personalized medicine in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel; McIntyre, Roger S

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient's unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention. Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention. Personalized medicine in psychiatry is challenged by the current taxonomy, where the diagnostic categories are broad and great biological heterogeneity exists within each category. There is, thus, a gap between the current advanced research prospects and clinical practice, and the current taxonomy is, thus, a poor basis for biological research. The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine.

  5. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  6. Forensic psychiatry in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tariq; Nizami, Asad Tamizuddin; Hirji, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews existing forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan highlighting the role played by the judicial and the medical fraternity in managing the legal and forensic issues of the population of patients with mental illnesses. Until 2001, all legal and forensic issues were dealt with the mental health legislation of 1912, the Lunacy Act of 1912. This was inherited from the British rulers in the Sub-Continent at the time. The Mental Health Ordinance of 2001 could not sustain following the 18th constitutional amendment in 2010, whereby psychiatric healthcare was devolved to the provinces from the previous federal authority. The article also highlights the difficulties and the barriers in implementation of the forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan at various levels within the healthcare system. This article also delves into the current framework of training in forensic psychiatry for postgraduates as well as the assessments and management schedules for the mentally ill offenders at tertiary care institutions in Pakistan.

  7. Psychiatry and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Gold, Joel; Henderson, Schuyler W; Merlino, Joseph P; Norwood, Ann; Post, Jerrold M; Shanfield, Stephen; Weine, Stevan; Katz, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Terrorism has dominated the domestic and international landscape since 9/11. Like other fields, psychiatry was not well prepared. With the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attack approaching, it is timely to consider what can be done to prepare before the next event. Much has been learned to provide knowledge and resources. The roles of psychiatrists are challenged by what is known of the causes of, consequences of, and responses to terrorism. Reflecting on knowledge from before and since 9/11 introduces concepts, how individuals become terrorists, how to evaluate the psychiatric and behavioral effects of terrorism, and how to expand treatments, behavioral health interventions, public policy initiatives, and other responses for its victims. New research, clinical approaches, and policy perspectives inform strategies to reduce fear and cope with the aftermath. This article identifies the psychiatric training, skills and services, and ethical considerations necessary to prevent or reduce terrorism and its tragic consequences and to enhance resilience.

  8. Computational neurology and psychiatry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta; Cochran, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest research in computational methods for modeling and simulating brain disorders. In particular, it shows how mathematical models can be used to study the relationship between a given disorder and the specific brain structure associated with that disorder. It also describes the emerging field of computational psychiatry, including the study of pathological behavior due to impaired functional connectivity, pathophysiological activity, and/or aberrant decision-making. Further, it discusses the data analysis techniques that will be required to analyze the increasing amount of data being generated about the brain. Lastly, the book offers some tips on the application of computational models in the field of quantitative systems pharmacology. Mainly written for computational scientists eager to discover new application fields for their model, this book also benefits neurologists and psychiatrists wanting to learn about new methods.

  9. Clinical characteristics of delirium Patients referred to consultation-liaison Psychiatry in general hosPi-tals%综合医院精神科会诊患者谵妄的临床特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑学宝; 王洪飞; 李金亮; 罗忠; 张开宇

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical characteristics of delirium patients referred to consultation-liaison psychiatry in general hospitals,as well as those in psychiatric hospitals. Method:The clinical data of 28 delirium patients referred to consultation-liaison psychiatry in general hospitals(consulation-liaison group) and 24 delirium patients in psychiatric hospitals(non-consulation-liaison group)admitted were included for a contrast analysis. They were all evaluated by the Chinese revision of confusion assessment method(CAM-CR). Results:Delirium patients in the consultation-liaison group were with elder age and complex etiology. Medi-cine diseases they suffering from were mainly in respiratory tract infections,brain stroke and cardiovascular dis-eases,while the surgical diseases were mainly in cerebral trauma,post-operation and fractures. Among them, multi-system diseases had the highest probability of causing delirium. The psychomotor retardation score in CAM-CR was significantly higher than the non-consultation-liaison group. However,delirium patients in non-consulation-liaison group were with younger age and simple etiology. Their diseases were mainly caused by with-drawing from psychoactive substances,senile dementia and improper application of antipsychotics. The total score,change in the level of consciousness,perceptual disturbance and psychomotor excitation scores in CAM-CR were all significantly higher than the consultation-liaison group. Conclusion:Elder age,complex etiology and symptoms,high misdiagnosis rate and poor prognosis are among the main features in delirium patients in general hospitals,the consultation liaison needs to be strengthened.%目的:探讨综合性医院精神科会诊中的谵妄与精神病专科医院中的谵妄的临床特点。方法:对综合性医院中精神科会诊中的28例谵妄患者(会诊组)与同期在精神病院的24例患者(非会诊组)的临床资料进行对照分析,并使用谵妄

  10. Fatigue, General Health, and Ischemic Heart Disease in Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, Anette; Petersen, Inge; Mänty, Minna Regina

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds.Fatigue has been shown to predict ischemic heart disease (IHD) and mortality in nonsmoking middle-aged men free of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of fatigue for IHD and general health in nondisabled individuals free...... of cardiovascular disease and older than 70 years. METHODS: The study population was drawn from The Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. In total, 1,696 participants were followed up for 2-10 years by questionnaires and 10-16 years through registries. Kaplan Meier, Cox Proportional Hazard and logistic......-related diagnoses, no use of heart medication, sustained good mobility, and participation at follow-up. IHD was defined as first hospitalization due to IHD (ICD10: I20-I25) or death due to IHD as primary cause. RESULTS: Participants without fatigue had higher chances of a sustained good general health at 2 (odds...

  11. Assessment of Psychopharmacology on the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Dorthea; Winstead, Daniel K.; Sheiber, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the assessment of psychopharmacology on the certification and recertification exams in general psychiatry and in the subspecialties administered by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). METHODS: The ABPN's core competencies for psychiatrists were reviewed. The number of items addressing psychopharmacology or…

  12. Fostering Psychiatry in Ghana: The Impact of a Short Review Course through an International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugharne, Jonathan; Appiah-Poku, John; Laugharne, Richard; Stanley, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate a short review course in psychiatry conducted at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology medical school and any change in student interest in a career in psychiatry. Method: Students were asked to complete a general psychiatric knowledge questionnaire before and immediately…

  13. Assessment of Psychopharmacology on the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Dorthea; Winstead, Daniel K.; Sheiber, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the assessment of psychopharmacology on the certification and recertification exams in general psychiatry and in the subspecialties administered by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). METHODS: The ABPN's core competencies for psychiatrists were reviewed. The number of items addressing psychopharmacology or…

  14. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your area. Read more » AAGP Journal Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Read more ... RESEARCHERS GMHF Scholars Since my program is so small and there is not much interest among my ...

  15. Choosing a Career in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... students follow a standard curriculum. In addition to anatomy, biochemistry, and physiology, students take courses in psychiatry, ... university medical centers, community agencies, courts and prisons, nursing homes, industry, government, military settings, schools and universities, ...

  16. [Psychiatry and the Great War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fras, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    During the World War I, the high rate of psychiatric casualties was differently tackled according to the nations: the Central Powers carried an authoritarian approach with prevailing physical treatment methods whereas the Allies' attitude reflected their democratic background. Particularly French psychiatry demonstrated a real willingness and ability to respond to the clinical realities. The conceptual problem of what DSM IV now classified as acute stress disorder was resolved so successfully that this disorder deserves the eponym "Viovenel's Syndrome". American Military Psychiatry followed the French methods of precise diagnosis and expeditious treatment close to the front and amplified them by creating effective treatment methods : brief psychotherapy methods and group psychotherapy within a therapeutic environment. Franco-American psychiatry thereby created the foundation for modern community psychiatry.

  17. State of psychiatry in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Jeanett Østerby; Okkels, Niels; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-01-01

    of common mental disorders, in particular depression and anxiety. Furthermore, 'new' diagnostic groups are represented in the treatment statistics with steeply increasing incidences, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and eating disorders, especially in the outpatient part...... to the somatic specialities, handicapping development in psychiatry. Action has been taken to increase research activity in psychiatry. This is facilitated by an increasing interest among medical students and young graduate physicians attracted by the neuropsychiatric paradigm, rapidly implemented in Danish...

  18. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  19. [Reform of psychiatry in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa Gil, F; Luderer, H J

    2000-11-01

    Since the 1980's psychiatric care in Spain changed considerably (Reforma psiquiátrica española). In the course of this reform, many positive results were achieved. An extensive community network of mental health centres was build up which resulted in the majority of psychiatric patients being integrated in the Spanish general health care system and making a better organized mental health care structure possible. New legislation also improved the care and civil rights of patients. An analysis of the experiences of the Spanish psychiatric reform shows that the tendency to retain the old mental hospitals, alongside the other institutions still exists. The process of deinstitutionalization and the original aims of the psychiatric reform cannot only be satisfied by the closure of large psychiatric hospitals as during the reform new aspects and problems as well the great complexity of the task have become apparent. This article together with the details of the Spanish sources gives the German public a good overview of the developments in Spanish psychiatry.

  20. [Karl Jaspers and the challenges of social psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Markus; Lang, Fabian U; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Karl Jaspers, in his book "General Psychopathology", argued for methodological pluralism rather than theoretical dogmatism. He formulated a methodological order of psychopathology with a distinction between "explanation" (objective psychopathology) and "understanding" (subjective psychopathology, psychopathology of meaning). The latter approach focused on patients' subjective experience and biographical issues. Karl Jaspers emphasised social factors in the genesis and course of mental disorders. Following a multiperspective concept, from Jaspers' viewpoint social psychiatry should consider itself of equal importance with biological and psychotherapeutic psychiatry. Therefore, uncritical generalization of one of these perspectives should be avoided. Personalized psychiatry, apart from searching biological markers to tailor treatment should identify psychosocial factors and subjective meaning. Concepts of recovery should not ignore biological foundations in mental disorders.

  1. Incorporating active learning in psychiatry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sonia; McLean, Loyola; Nash, Louise; Trigwell, Keith

    2017-06-01

    We aim to summarise the active learning literature in higher education and consider its relevance for postgraduate psychiatry trainees, to inform the development of a new Formal Education Course (FEC): the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry) at the University of Sydney. We undertook a literature search on 'active learning', 'flipped classroom', 'problem-based learning' and 'psychiatry education'. The effectiveness of active learning pedagogy in higher education is well supported by evidence; however, there have been few psychiatry-specific studies. A new 'flipped classroom' format was developed for the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry). Postgraduate psychiatry training is an active learning environment; the pedagogical approach to FECs requires further evaluation.

  2. Integrating Neuroscience Knowledge and Neuropsychiatric Skills Into Psychiatry: The Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildkrout, Barbara; Benjamin, Sheldon; Lauterbach, Margo D

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the integration of neuroscience knowledge and neuropsychiatric skills into general psychiatric practice would facilitate expanded approaches to diagnosis, formulation, and treatment while positioning practitioners to utilize findings from emerging brain research. There is growing consensus that the field of psychiatry would benefit from more familiarity with neuroscience and neuropsychiatry. Yet there remain numerous factors impeding the integration of these domains of knowledge into general psychiatry.The authors make recommendations to move the field forward, focusing on the need for advocacy by psychiatry and medical organizations and changes in psychiatry education at all levels. For individual psychiatrists, the recommendations target obstacles to attaining expanded neuroscience and neuropsychiatry education and barriers stemming from widely held, often unspoken beliefs. For the system of psychiatric care, recommendations address the conceptual and physical separation of psychiatry from medicine, overemphasis on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and on psychopharmacology, and different systems in medicine and psychiatry for handling reimbursement and patient records. For psychiatry residency training, recommendations focus on expanding neuroscience/neuropsychiatry faculty and integrating neuroscience education throughout the curriculum.Psychiatry traditionally concerns itself with helping individuals construct meaningful life narratives. Brain function is one of the fundamental determinants of individuality. It is now possible for psychiatrists to integrate knowledge of neuroscience into understanding the whole person by asking, What person has this brain? How does this brain make this person unique? How does this brain make this disorder unique? What treatment will help this disorder in this person with this brain?

  3. Kandinsky-Clerambault's Syndrome: concept of use for Western psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Kaptsan, Alexander; Witztum, Eliezer

    2003-01-01

    The aim of our paper is to describe Kandinsky-Clerambault's Syndrome, which has important cultural-historical value in the history of psychiatry, and to illustrate the syndrome by means of a case report. Although its component symptoms are known among Western psychiatrists, the syndrome's specific name is generally unknown. The authors suggest that detailed clinical descriptions of some specific conditions may contribute to a more detailed knowledge of psychopathology, a more colorful and memorable view of conditions, with an increased awareness of the historical and cultural origins of psychiatry.

  4. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members of AACAP. Be CAPtivated - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as a Career AACAP's Current Award Opportunities More... ... More... Copyright ©2016 - American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. All Rights Reserved. Contact Us | Disclaimer | Privacy Statement ...

  5. Forensic psychiatry in Africa: prospects and challenges

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental health care has always had an important interface with the law.1 Nevertheless, .... protection of the mentally ill user's human rights. According to the South .... Njenga F. Forensic psychiatry:The African experience. World. Psychiatry 2006 ...

  6. Cultural psychiatry in the French-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    For the last five centuries, France's international influence has been constant. This has been particularly evident in the areas of general culture, history and science. In psychiatry, the role of Pinel during the French Revolution, and the discovery of the first psychotropic agent, chlorpromazine, by Delay and Deniker are two outstanding historical facts. This chapter examines the contributions of French social scientists in the understanding of the sequelae of colonial exploitation, racism and political oppression. The establishment of a multi-ethnic society in France and Francophile regions of the world has led to the gradual creation of a cultural psychiatry rich in terminological influences, clinical understanding, training programs and research. Closer connections between French psychiatric thought and Anglophile psychiatry is likely to produce beneficial effects.

  7. Communication skills in psychiatry training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Halpin, Sean; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Vamos, Marina; Outram, Sue; Bylund, Carma L; Levin, Tomer; Kissane, David; Cohen, Martin; Loughland, Carmel

    2015-08-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience problems communicating distressing diagnostic information to patients and their families, especially about severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. Evidence suggests that interpersonal communication skills can be effectively taught, as has been demonstrated in the specialty of oncology. However, very little literature exists with respect to interpersonal communication skills training for psychiatry. This paper provides an overview of the communication skills training literature. The report reveals significant gaps exist and highlights the need for advanced communication skills training for mental health clinicians, particularly about communicating a diagnosis and/or prognosis of schizophrenia. A new communication skills training framework for psychiatry is described, based on that used in oncology as a model. This model promotes applied skills and processes that are easily adapted for use in psychiatry, providing an effective platform for the development of similar training programs for psychiatric clinical practice. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  8. Internet resources for psychiatry and neuropsychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, J.; Sharpe, M

    2003-01-01

    Some of the most useful internet resources relevant to psychiatry and neuropsychiatry are summarised. Web sites recommended for professionals and patients are detailed, including where to find evidence based psychiatry, psychiatry news, and professional organisations. Some thoughts on "cyberchondria" and the opportunities that the internet offers for illness transmission are also considered.

  9. Internet resources for psychiatry and neuropsychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J; Sharpe, M

    2003-01-01

    Some of the most useful internet resources relevant to psychiatry and neuropsychiatry are summarised. Web sites recommended for professionals and patients are detailed, including where to find evidence based psychiatry, psychiatry news, and professional organisations. Some thoughts on "cyberchondria" and the opportunities that the internet offers for illness transmission are also considered. PMID:12486258

  10. DETECTING PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN YOUNG-ADULTS - THE YOUNG-ADULT SELF REPORT, THE GENERAL HEALTH QUESTIONNAIRE AND THE SYMPTOM CHECKLIST AS SCREENING INSTRUMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIZNITZER, M; VERHULST, FC; VANDENBRINK, W; KOETER, M; VANDERENDE, J; GIEL, R; KOOT, HM

    This study compares the screening capacity of an age-adjusted child-oriented questionnaire, the Young Adult Self Report (YASR) with two adult-oriented questionnaires, the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a sample of young adults (18-25 years). The YASR

  11. DETECTING PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN YOUNG-ADULTS - THE YOUNG-ADULT SELF REPORT, THE GENERAL HEALTH QUESTIONNAIRE AND THE SYMPTOM CHECKLIST AS SCREENING INSTRUMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIZNITZER, M; VERHULST, FC; VANDENBRINK, W; KOETER, M; VANDERENDE, J; GIEL, R; KOOT, HM

    1992-01-01

    This study compares the screening capacity of an age-adjusted child-oriented questionnaire, the Young Adult Self Report (YASR) with two adult-oriented questionnaires, the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a sample of young adults (18-25 years). The YASR pe

  12. Associations among depressive symptoms, childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events in the general adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kotaro; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Yukiei; Shimura, Akiyoshi; Ono, Yasuyuki; Murakoshi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Tanabe, Hajime; Kusumi, Ichiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that the interactions among several factors affect the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder. This study investigated how childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events interact with one another and affect depressive symptoms in the general adult population. Subjects and methods A total of 413 participants from the nonclinical general adult population completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale, the neuroticism subscale of the shortened Eysenck Personality Questionnaire – Revised, and the Life Experiences Survey, which are self-report scales. Structural equation modeling (Mplus version 7.3) and single and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Results Childhood abuse, neuroticism, and negative evaluation of life events increased the severity of the depressive symptoms directly. Childhood abuse also indirectly increased the negative appraisal of life events and the severity of the depressive symptoms through enhanced neuroticism in the structural equation modeling. Limitations There was recall bias in this study. The causal relationship was not clear because this study was conducted using a cross-sectional design. Conclusion This study suggested that neuroticism is the mediating factor for the two effects of childhood abuse on adulthood depressive symptoms and negative evaluation of life events. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depressive symptoms. PMID:28243100

  13. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & ... Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical Students International Become a Fellow APA Sites APA Publishing APA ...

  14. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & ... Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical Students International Become a Fellow APA Sites APA Publishing APA ...

  15. General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness may use general or specialist psychiatric services. This review aims to assess if there is evidence for a difference in outcome between them. A literature review was conducted using a variety of electronic databases and hand-search strategies to identify all studies evaluating the outcome…

  16. Increasing seroprevalence of Clostridium difficile in an adult Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Linneberg, A; Tvede, M

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated infections is increasing, but it remains to be defined whether any change in the seroprevalence of C. difficile has also occurred. In a population-based study of the general adult population, 734 subjects, aged 15-69 years, were examined on two...

  17. New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

  18. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  19. Mechanisms and Reduction in Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise Marie

    2016-01-01

    The view that psychiatry should be elucidating the mechanisms behind mental phenomena is gaining momentum. This view, coupled with an intuition that such mechanisms must, by nature, be biological, has inspired the field to look to cognitive neuroscience for classification of mental illnesses. One...... of causation and mechanism to bridge the gab between mechanistic explanations and multilevel models of mental disorders....

  20. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Hermans, Marc; Bhugra, Dinesh; Pinto da Costa, Mariana; Rojnic-Kuzman, Martina; Fiorillo, Andrea; Kurimay, Tamas; Hanon, Cecile; Wasserman, Danuta; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an additional European Framework for Competencies in Psychiatry in 2009. Yet these have not been implemented throughout Europe. In this paper, the diversity in training throughout Europe is approached from different angles: the cultural differences between countries with regards to how mental health care is considered and founded on, the cultural differences between people throughout Europe in all states. The position of psychotherapy is emphasised. What once was the cornerstone of psychiatry as medical specialty seems to have become a neglected area. Seeing the patient with mental health problems within his cultural context is important, but considering him within his family context. The purpose of any training is enabling the trainee to gain the knowledge and acquire the competencies necessary to become a well-equipped professional is the subject of the last paragraph in which trainees consider their position and early career psychiatrists look back to see whether what they were trained in matches with what they need in the working situation. Common standard for training and certification are a necessity within Europe, for the benefit of the profession of psychiatrist but also for patient safety. UEMS is advised to join forces with the Council of National Psychiatric Associations (NPAs) within the EPA and trainings and early career psychiatrist, to discuss with the users what standards should be implemented in all European countries and how a European board examination could ensure professional quality of psychiatrists throughout the continent.

  1. Characteristic of Older Adult with Balance Disorder in Rehabilitation Clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Shi Yun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Older adult population is increasing worldwide. Balance has an important role in conducting daily activities and mobility, with impaired balance it can lead to negative impacts for example fall. This study is conducted to obtain common factors and characteristics of older adults with balance disorder to provide better rehabilitation services. Method: A descriptive study was conducted in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung from August-October 2014 using total sampling method and a 5 times sit-to-stand (5STS test was conducted. The total sample obtained was 34. Result: The characteristics of older adult with balance disorder in this study were mostly from young old (n=17, male gender (n=19, and mean 5STS test is 18.48 seconds. Most of the patients had high blood pressure (n=29, normal body mass index (BMI (n=22, independent activity of daily living (ADL (n=21, and use of greater than 3 medication (n=21.The most common disease found is musculoskeletal disease and majority of patients had one medical disease. Conclusion: Older adults categorized as young old has the greatest frequency of having balance disorder. Increase in age, increases the duration of 5STS test conducted. The most common problem among older adult is high blood pressure, musculoskeletal disease and hypertension and majority of the patients consume greater than 3 medication. Lastly, most of the BMI and the ADL of the older adults were normal.

  2. The state of psychiatry in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Julio; Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria-Teresa; Parellada, Mara; Bascaran, Maria-Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bousoño, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2012-08-01

    The 1986 General Health Act and the so-called 'psychiatric reform' were key issues in the development of the mental healthcare system (MHCS) in Spain. The World Health Organization Declaration and Action Plan on Mental Health in 2005 gave it a revitalizing impetus and resulted in the first National Health System (NHS) Mental Health Strategy in 2006. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Spanish journals, reference lists, national databases, and European and Spanish official documents to describe the current state of the MHCS in Spain. The main results were: (1) existence of great variability among the autonomous communities with respect to mental health resources and provision of care; (2) lack of national epidemiological information on mental disorders with the exception of substance use disorders and suicide, which comprise powerful longitudinal national data, (3) training in psychiatry is well established, although there is no specialism of child and adolescent psychiatry, and (4) a dramatic increase in scientific productivity in the last decade among research groups, in part due to the creation of the Spanish Mental Health Network, the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en el Área de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM). Quantifiable and reliable indicators are needed to provide efficient monitoring and analysis of epidemiological events and subsequently to understand the status of the Spanish MHCS.

  3. Assessing competencies during education in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Holly J; Marcangelo, Michael; Rodriguez, Elizabeth R; Spitz, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    The utilization of competencies in medical education is relatively recent. In 1999 the United States Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) established six main competencies. Since then, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology have approved a specific list of competencies for their specialities in each of the ACGME's core competency areas. Assessment of competencies in both medical students and residents can be achieved through such methods as structured case discussion, direct observation, simulation, standardized patients, and 360-degree assessments, etc. Each assessment methodology has specific applications in the discipline of psychiatry. This paper reviews the different methods for assessing competencies with specific examples in psychiatric education. It is not intended as a comprehensive review of all assessment methods, but to provide examples and strategies to guide psychiatric educators in their practice. Students and residents were intentionally separated because there are differences in the teaching goals and objectives, and thus in the assessment purposes and design. Students are general, undifferentiated physicians-in-training who need to learn about psychiatric nosology, examinations, and treatment. Residents are mental health professionals who need more in-depth supervision in order to hone skills in all the specialized areas that arise in psychiatric practices, making supervision a vital part of residency programs.

  4. Professionalisation in General Adult Education in Germany--An Attempt to Cut a Path through a Jungle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dausien, Bettina; Schwendowius, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The article summarizes the findings of a study on adult learning professions in Europe (ALPINE) commissioned by DG Education and Culture. It explores the current professional and social situation of staff in non-vocational adult education in Germany. It describes the structures and organisations of general adult education in Germany and…

  5. Antidepressant medication augmented with cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J; White, Kamila S; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. METHOD Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 16 weeks of escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. RESULTS Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy.

  6. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... the President Reporting on Mental Health Conditions APA Blogs Advocacy & APAPAC APA Sites APA Publishing APA Learning ... News Releases Psychiatric News Message from President APA Blogs Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical ...

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... including private practices, clinics, general and psychiatric hospitals, university medical centers, community agencies, courts and prisons, nursing ... Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personality Disorders Postpartum ... (PTSD) Schizophrenia Sleep Disorders Somatic Symptom Disorder ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... year of residency training is typically in a hospital working with patients with a wide range of ... settings, including private practices, clinics, general and psychiatric hospitals, university medical centers, community agencies, courts and prisons, ...

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... practices, clinics, general and psychiatric hospitals, university medical centers, community agencies, courts and prisons, nursing homes, industry, government, military settings, rehabilitation programs, emergency rooms, hospice programs, and many other ...

  10. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural ... APAPAC Meetings Search Directories/Databases International Registry Residents & Medical Students Residents Medical Students Patients & Families Mental Health ...

  11. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Families Become an APA Member Learn More Explore APA Psychiatrists Residents & Medical Students Patients & Families About APA ... Psychiatric News Message from President APA Blogs Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical Students International ...

  12. 精神科专科医院与综合医院医师工作倦怠及相关因素分析%Analysis on occupational burnout of psychiatrists in psychiatry hospitals and doctors in general hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨程甲; 张胜军; 钟天平; 许明智

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of occupational burnout of psychiatrists in psychiatry hos-pitals and doctors in general hospitals, and to explore the association between work stress and somatization, as well as health-related behaviors.Methods A cross-sectional study was implemented.121 psychiatrists and 121 doctors filled out the Maslach Burnout lnventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) and Patient Health Questionnaire(PHQ-15) to explore the level of job burnout and somatic complains.Results There were 89.3%of psychiatrists and 99.2%of doctors suffer-ing from burnout.Doctors in general hospitals yielded higher scores of burnout, exhaustion and reduced personal accom-plishment ( P<0.001) .Psychiatrists more often engaged in physical exercise, smoke less, and kept a better dietary rou-tine than doctors in general hospitals (P<0.05 or P<0.001).The PHQ-15 total scores, stomach pain, back pain, pain in arms/legs/joints, chest pain, palpitation, shortness of breath, sexual problems, abnormal bowel movement, diges-tive discomfort, tiredness and sleep difficulties were notably higher in doctors in general hospital(P<0.05 or P<0.001). Engagement in physical exercise was negatively correlated with exhaustion, while overall PHQ score was positively correla-ted with exhaustion.Results from multiple linear regression showed that MBI-GS score (β=0.375, 95%CI:2.85 -3.09), exhaustion(β=0.273,95%CI:3.11-3.47) and gender (β=0.218,95%CI:1.38-1.51) were potential risk factors of somatic complains(R2 =0.102).Conclusion There are higher burnout level and more somatic complains in doctors in general hospitals.Exhaustion is a predictive factor of somatic symptoms, and a healthy lifestyle may have some effects on reducing burnout.%目的:调查精神科专科医院及综合医院医务人员工作压力状况,并探讨不同专科医师工作压力与功能性躯体不适及健康相关行为的关系。方法应用Maslach工作倦怠量表通用版( MBI-GS

  13. [The "Psychiatrie-Enquete" - the German Report on the State of Psychiatry in 1975].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzen, Asmus

    2015-10-01

    Forty years ago an expert-commission submitted a report on the deplorable state of German psychiatric care, called the "Psychiatrie-Enquete" to the Bundestag, the German parliament. The Report initiated a substantial change of Psychiatric services in the country. Inhuman treatment and living conditions were superseded. Mental hospitals were not completely abolished. But they lost their importance in favour of decentralized psychiatric services including departments at general hospitals, day hospitals and outpatient services. Custodial care was largely successfully developed into therapeutic and rehabilitative care. This article attempts a mildly critical evaluation of the Enquête 40 years after.

  14. The Supreme Court of Canada Ruling on Physician-Assisted Death: Implications for Psychiatry in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Olivia Anne

    2015-12-01

    On February 6, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the prohibition of physician-assisted death (PAD) was unconstitutional for a competent adult person who "clearly consents to the termination of life" and has a "grievous and irremediable (including an illness, disease, or disability) condition that causes enduring suffering that is intolerable to the individual in the circumstances of his or her condition." The radically subjective nature of this ruling raises important questions about who will be involved and how this practice might be regulated. This paper aims to stimulate discussion about psychiatry's role in this heretofore illegal practice and to explore how psychiatry might become involved in end-of-life care in a meaningful, patient-centred way. First, I will review existing international legislation and professional regulatory standards regarding psychiatry and PAD. Second, I will discuss important challenges psychiatry might face regarding capacity assessment, the notion of rational suicide, and the assessment of suffering.

  15. Nightmares: Prevalence among the Finnish General Adult Population and War Veterans during 1972-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Ollila, Hanna M; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence of nightmares among the Finnish general adult population during 1972-2007 and the association between nightmare prevalence and symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety in World War II veterans. Eight independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study conducted in Finland in 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. Epidemiologic. A total of 69,813 people (33,811 men and 36,002 women) age 25-74 years. N/A. The investigation of nightmare prevalence and insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms was based on questionnaires completed by the participants. Among the whole sample, 3.5% of the men and 4.8% of the women reported frequent nightmares (P Sandman N; Valli K; Kronholm E; Ollila HM; Revonsuo A; Laatikainen T; Paunio T. Nightmares: prevalence among the Finnish general adult population and war veterans during 1972-2007. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1041-1050.

  16. Conditioned Pain Modulation and Pressure Pain Sensitivity in the Adult Danish General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Jørgensen, Torben; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Increased pressure pain sensitivity and impaired descending pain control have been associated with chronic pain, but knowledge on the variability in the adult general population is lacking. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and descending pain control assessed using conditioned pain modulation (CPM......) were recorded in a randomly selected sample (n = 2,199, 53% female) of the Danish adult general population aged 18 to 70 years. PPTs were recorded over the tibialis anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle. CPM was defined as the difference between PPT assessments before and during conditioning...... was associated with lower PPTs (P CPM potency was lower in female compared with male participants (P ≤ .003), whereas no association with age was found. Higher level of education (P ≤ .05), premature withdrawal from the cold pressor test...

  17. [Increasing immunization coverage in adults and elderly by creating structural relationships with general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversano, M; Busatta, M; Cipriani, R; Battista, T; Sponselli, G M; Caputi, G; Pesare, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach vaccination coverage in adults, the elderly and in high risk subjects, a tight network of collaboration between preventive medicine specialists and general practitioners must be created in the same way that they must be created with pediatricians. In fact, this strategy has brought about very high coverage rates in childhood vaccinations. The solution to propose once again would thus be to develop partnerships between the protagonists of the network (community health district, department of prevention, general practitioners, primary care physicians) so that synergies may be created which permit the realisation of common and specific training programs.

  18. The integrative approach to psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowski, Z J

    1990-12-01

    From the early days of psychiatry as a distinct field of knowledge and clinical practice two competing approaches to the etiology and treatment of mental disorders have vied for dominance: the somatic and the psychic ("moral"). We are witnessing the same struggle today. To speak metaphorically, we can opt for either brainless or mindless psychiatry, as Szasz proposed. He failed to consider a third option, however, one that may be called an integrative approach. The latter is neither mindless nor brainless but rather encompasses both the mind and the brain in its theoretical and practical consideration. I will formulate the integrative approach in this paper and argue that it has a distinct advantage for both the study and treatment of mental disorders.

  19. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-04-25

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry.

  20. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry. PMID:16759353

  1. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szasz Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry.

  2. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Franzan, Jamie; O'Connor, Ryan; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kitts, Robert; Boland, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatry residents have numerous online educational resources readily available to them although currently there are no data regarding residents' use and perception of such websites. A survey was offered to 62 residents from all four years of training as well as recent graduates of a single psychiatry residency training program. Residents reported utilizing online resources on average 68 % of the time, in comparison to 32 % on average for printed materials. Residents reported UpToDate, PubMed, and Wikipedia as the most visited websites and ranked each highly but for different purposes. Thirty-five percent of residents felt that insufficient faculty guidance was a barrier to use of these educational websites. Pilot data indicate psychiatry residents use online resources daily for their education in various settings. Resident perceptions of individual website's trustworthiness, ease of use, and sources of clinical decision-making and personal learning suggest potential opportunities for educators to better understand the current use of these resources in residency training. Reported barriers including lack of faculty guidance suggest opportunities for academic psychiatry. Further study is necessary at multiple sites before such results may be generalized.

  3. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of m...

  4. Factors Affecting the Choice of Psychiatry as a Specialty and Satisfaction among Turkish Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Urun; Ceri, Veysi; Carpar, Elif; Sancak, Baris; Yildirim, Fatma

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the choice of psychiatry among psychiatry residents, identify the fulfillment of expectations, and assess their satisfaction level. Anonymous questionnaires were administered to 98 psychiatry residents, and sociodemographic and professional data were collected. Among the reasons for choosing psychiatry, the opportunity to cultivate interest in humanities, importance of social and relational issues, and intellectual challenge were most frequently selected. The opportunity for complete use of medical training, salary, and opportunity to practice psychotherapy were the expectations least met. The largest group of participants was satisfied to have chosen psychiatry (41.5%), decided on psychiatry training after medical school (35.4%), and attached importance to becoming a clinician (70.7%). Although the satisfaction level was high in this study, addressing the areas in which expectations were not met may increase the satisfaction of psychiatry residents and the selection of psychiatry as a specialty.

  5. Psychiatry and humanism in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño Amieva, Alejandra

    2016-04-01

    The authors of the present selection of Latin American Psychiatry texts were characterized by a common deep humanistic attitude. These prolific writers were able to establish or extend the scope of the discipline in which they chose to act, questioning the establishment of rigid boundaries within the framework of a rigorous epistemological reflection. Thus the systematizing spirit of Jose Ingenieros' in the context of positivist evolutionism, resulted in the act of founding a discipline that integrated the biological and the social. In the case of Guillermo Vidal his conception of mental health went beyond the biomedical to consider psychotherapies as an emotional commitment, continence and empathic understanding; with regard to César Cabral his formation and extensive clinical practice resulted in a work defined by the inquiring into the theoretical concepts underlying Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology. This brief selection does not exhaust the issues or the level of ideas and discussions of Psychiatry in Argentina, but constitutes a textual corpus representative of a disciplinary conception understood as scientific and humanistic endeavor.

  6. [Research and Post-graduate in Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, A Palacio A

    2012-01-01

    The research component and the acquisition of skills related to the generation of knowledge in the training of medical and surgical specialists in the country is an issue that has recently begun to be discussed. For over 50 years this training has included only the area of professionalism as a copy of an educational model from the mid-twentieth century. Currently the country requires specialists with critical and analytical skills to question their actions and knowledge and generate alternative clinical care to apply to the general population in the search of bettering their own welfare. This article is a review in which the current situation of the teaching of psychiatry and the inclusion of research in the academic processes of our medical specialties in the country are analyzed. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Annotation: New research into general psychiatric services for adults with intellectual disability and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, R

    2009-03-01

    There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either model with research being often of a poor quality, lacking replication, and outcome measures were often inappropriate or varied between studies. This review aims assess differences in outcome for patients with ID and mental disorders treated in general or specialised ID mental health services. A literature review was conducted using electronic databases and websites of ID and mental health organisations to locate all references where people with ID receive mental health care in general psychiatric services from 2003. No meta-analysis was attempted because of the divergent nature of the studies. People with ID (especially severe ID) have reduced access to general psychiatric services. General psychiatric inpatient care is unpopular especially with carers but can be improved by providing specially trained staff and in-reach from community ID teams. Opportunities may exist to enhance the care of people with borderline intellectual functioning within general psychiatric services. Although no new randomised controlled trials have been published, the weight of research is accumulating to suggest that provision of general psychiatric services without extra help is not sufficient to meet the needs of people with ID.

  8. Relationship between Abuse Experience and General Health among Older Adults in Yazd City- Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Rezaeipandari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elder abuse may increase the vulnerability of ageing people to disease and decrease their general health status, so addressing the issue is essential for promoting elderly quality of life. The study aimed to examine the relation between abuse experience and general health among elderly people in Yazd city- Iran. Methods: The cross-sectional study carried out on 250 community-dwelling seniors in the city of Yazd who were selected with cluster random sampling. Data collection tools included, Iranian Domestic Elder Abuse Questionnaire and Persian version of the General Health Questionnaire 28. Data were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficient and linear regression tests. Results: Mean scores of abuse experience and general health among the elders were 11.84±12.70 (range 0-100 and 21.82±10.84 (range 0-84 respectively. General health status was more undesirable among elders who had experienced abuse than those who had not. Elder abuse subscales accounted for 17.2 % changes in general health, which had only care neglect and physical abuse subscales with significant prediction effect. Conclusion: Abuse experience has negative effects on older adults' general health. care neglect and physical abuse play a more important role.

  9. Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry and Psychiatry as a Career: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The discipline of psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career option, have been negatively regarded by medical students for decades. There is a large amount of literature on attitudes of students and the factors that attract them to and detract from psychiatry. The aim of this article is to systematically review this literature from 1990 to…

  10. Models of Integrated Training in Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexson, Sandra B.; Thomas, Christopher R.; Pope, Kayla

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies indicate declining interest in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) as a career choice during psychiatry residency training. Programs have developed integrated training in psychiatry and CAP as a means to address the workforce shortage in CAP, but little is known about the number or nature of these training tracks.…

  11. The troubled relationship between psychiatry and sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, David; Rogers, Anne

    2005-09-01

    The alienated relationship between psychiatry and sociology is explored. The two disciplines largely took divergent paths after 1970. On the one side, psychiatry manifested a pre-occupation with methodological questions and sought greater medical respectability, with a biomedical approach returning to the fore. Social psychiatry and its underpinning biopsychosocial model became increasingly marginalised and weakened. On the other side, many sociologists turned away from psychiatry and the epidemiological study of mental health problems and increasingly restricted their interest to social theory and qualitative research. An interdisciplinary void ensued, to the detriment of the investigation of social aspects of mental health.

  12. Positive psychiatry: its time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeste, Dilip V; Palmer, Barton W; Rettew, David C; Boardman, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, psychiatry has been defined and practiced as a branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses. Based on growing empirical evidence, we believe that this definition warrants expansion to include the concept of positive psychiatry. In the present article, we provide a critical overview of this emerging field and a select review of relevant scientific literature. Positive psychiatry may be defined as the science and practice of psychiatry that seeks to understand and promote well-being through assessment and interventions involving positive psychosocial characteristics (PPCs) in people who suffer from or are at high risk of developing mental or physical illnesses. It can also benefit nonclinical populations. Positive psychiatry has 4 main components: (1) positive mental health outcomes (eg, well-being), (2) PPCs that comprise psychological traits (resilience, optimism, personal mastery and coping self-efficacy, social engagement, spirituality and religiosity, and wisdom-including compassion) and environmental factors (family dynamics, social support, and other environmental determinants of overall health), (3) biology of positive psychiatry constructs, and (4) positive psychiatry interventions including preventive ones. There are promising empirical data to suggest that positive traits may be improved through psychosocial and biological interventions. As a branch of medicine rooted in biology, psychiatry, especially with the proposed conceptualization of positive psychiatry, is well poised to provide major contributions to the positive mental health movement, thereby impacting the overall health care of the population.

  13. Impact of the psychiatry clerkship on medical student attitudes towards psychiatry and to psychiatry as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza

    2014-02-01

    The psychiatry clerkship forms part of the core curriculum of medical schools worldwide and provides psychiatric educators with an ideal opportunity to positively influence students. The aim of this paper is to systematically review literature on the impact of the psychiatry clerkship to determine the effect on attitudes towards psychiatry and to psychiatry as a career. A systematic review was undertaken. The following key search words were used to search a number of electronic databases: medical student/s, attitude/s, psychiatry and clerkship. Studies published in the English language from 1990 to the present were included. Studies were included if they were based on a pre-/post-design, i.e. the same students must have participated in the study both before and after the clerkship. Twenty-six studies from 19 countries were identified for the review. Sixteen studies reported an overall improvement in attitudes towards psychiatry post-clerkship, and ten found no change in attitudes. In terms of career choice, nine studies reported an increase in the number of students interested in psychiatry as a career post-clerkship, nine found no impact on career choice and, in eight studies, it was not assessed. A number of positive and negative factors regarding the clerkship were identified. Overall, the psychiatry clerkship has a positive impact on students' attitudes towards psychiatry, but does not improve interest in psychiatry as a career option. For those students particularly interested in psychiatry, the challenge is to maintain their enthusiasm post-clerkship. Charismatic teachers, mentorship and stigma reduction may be effective strategies. Future research needs to more clearly identify specific components of the clerkship that are viewed favorably by students.

  14. Adult age differences in learning and generalization of feedback-based associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jessica R; Gluck, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Feedback-based associative learning (e.g., acquiring new associations from positive or negative outcomes) and generalization (e.g., applying past learning to new settings) are important cognitive skills that enable people to make economic decisions or social judgments. This ability to acquire new skills based on feedback and transfer those experiences to predict positive outcomes in novel situations is essential at all ages, but especially among older adults who must continually adapt to new people, environments, and technologies. Ample evidence from animal work, clinical research, and computational modeling has demonstrated that feedback-based associative learning is sensitive to basal ganglia dysfunction and generalization to medial temporal lobe dysfunction. This dissociation is relevant because of recent evidence that has suggested healthy aging compromises the basal ganglia system earlier than the medial temporal lobes. However, few studies have investigated how healthy aging influences these cognitive processes. Here, we examined both feedback-based associative learning and generalization in younger, middle-aged, and older adults using a computerized acquired equivalence task. Results revealed a significant effect of age group on feedback-based associative learning, consistent with evidence of persistent age-related declines in the basal ganglia. In contrast, generalization was spared in all but the oldest adult group, likely reflecting preserved medial temporal lobe function until advanced old age. Our findings add behavioral evidence to the emerging view that healthy aging affects the striatal system before the medial temporal lobes. Although further evidence is needed, this finding may shed light on the possible time course of neural system dysfunction in healthy aging. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Adults with mild to moderate depression exhibit more alcohol related problems compared to the general adult population: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhlin, Julia; Hallgren, Mats; Öjehagen, Agneta; Källmén, Håkan; Forsell, Yvonne

    2015-06-09

    Alcohol use has been shown to interfere with treatment for depression, but consumption habits are not routinely screened in primary care. To date, few studies have compared the alcohol consumption habits of patients with depression to the general population. The purpose of this study was to compare alcohol habits in adults diagnosed with depression in primary care to the general adult population in Sweden. Nine hundred fourty six patients diagnosed with mild to moderate depression, without a primary substance use disorder, in primary care settings located across Sweden completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Consumptions habits and alcohol related problems in the depressed sample were compared to those in the general adult population (n = 663). Analyses were stratified by gender and age. Ratings of alcohol problems and measures of hazardous drinking and binge drinking were significantly higher among patients seeking treatment for depression in primary care compared to the general population. Male patients scored higher on the AUDIT total and AUDIT-C (consumption) subscale than men in the general population. Compared to younger adults (aged 17-27) older depressed adults (aged 28-50 and 51-71) exhibited higher rates of consumption and problems related to alcohol. Compared to the general adult population, consumption and problems related to alcohol use were substantially higher among patients with mild to moderate depression in primary care. Routine screening of alcohol use in primary care is recommended for patients presenting with depression.

  16. [Future Psychiatry: a "Think Tank" for the Italian Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The Future Psychiatry Project was founded with the goal to address the critical ratio of research/training / clinic. Ina series of regular meetings, each devoted to a specific clinical topic, data and more advanced models for the clinical area in questionwill be analyzed in an integrated and multidisciplinary approach and the real possibility of extension of development andprospects of scientific advances to the clinic and therapy will be evaluated.The primary methodological objective of the FuturePsychiatry meetings is the training method to overcome the common type of teacher/learner classroom teaching, albeit dividedinto the various possibilities offered by different types of educational meetings.The structure is informal, with features of intensiveseminars and suggested modes for better interaction.The objective is the "Think Tank", a common space for study and exchangeof knowledge, experiences, opinions and expectations, aimed at producing an integrated and shared dynamic result, thatcan provide a real reference point for participants and for all researchers and clinicians engaged in improving their level of updatingand best clinical activity.The first Future Psychiatry meeting was held in Sermoneta (Latina) in the halls of the Castello Caetanion September 16th to 18th 2010.The chosen topic was "The Future of Depression: the development of knowledge, the evolutionof therapies". The currently most advanced data of research were discussed and developed in their potential to reach ashared model taking into account the etiological complexity of Depression and to be a real reference to the possibility of applicationto real clinical experience.The main guidelines of the current research and major prospects for development of this in thefield Depression have been outlined, also in relation to the ongoing evolution and the future outlook of the models and tools oftherapy. Psychiatrists' clinical needs and expectations in front of the development of scientific

  17. Dynamic balance during gait in children and adults with Generalized Joint Hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkerslev, S; Baagø, C; Alkjær, Tine;

    2013-01-01

    compared to 18 control adults. The subjects were tested during normal walking and walking on a line. Kinematics of head, shoulder, spine and pelvis rotations were measured by five digital video cameras in order to assess the segmental stability (angular dispersion) and stabilization strategies (anchoring...... index) in two rotational components: roll and yaw. FINDINGS: Hypermobile children and adults showed decreased lateral trunk stability in both walking conditions. In hypermobile children, it was accompanied with decreased head stability as the head was stabilized by the inferior segment when walking......BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to investigate if differences of the head and trunk stability and stabilization strategies exist between subjects classified with Generalized Joint Hypermobility and healthy controls during gait. It was hypothesized that joint hypermobility could lead...

  18. The Generality of Adult Development Stages and Transformations: Comparing Meaning-making and Logical Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Hagström

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human development theories differ in “context sensitivity,” covering those stressing development stages and those stressing continuously progressing changes. The former theories differ in whether, how and why the stages are regarded as being generalized across domains, i.e. their generality claims. Piaget’s developmental stage theory of logical complexity of children and adolescents fulfill “strong” such claims, including fixed stage sequentiality of increasing complexity levels and higher stage structures integrating earlier ones. His theory has inspired a number of adult development stage theories with varying generality claims. These provide suggestions of stages and stage transitions reaching beyond “pure” cognition, integrating more of e.g. emotional, value and moral dimensions. From a neo-Piagetian perspective, core generality aspects seem to concern on the one hand logical reasoning and on the other hand meaning-making. This raises questions of how these aspects are related to each other in terms of stage structures and transformations. The aim of the article is to discern general features in adult development stage structures and transitions, in terms of logical reasoning and meaning making. This is carried out by a “thought experiment” interrelating two theories that differ in these respects but that are both based on Piaget’s theory, namely Robert Kegan’s constructive developmental Subject-Object Theory (SOT and Michael Common´s behaviouristic Model of Hierarchical Complexity (MHC. This comparing approach concerns the 3rd, 4th and 5th order of consciousness as well as transitions between these according to SOT, and order 9 to 12 and corresponding transitions according to MHC. The thought experiment indicates that the generality claims of both models can be argued for without one of them necessarily being subordinated to the other one. Both theories are interpreted as differing but partly overlapping structures of

  19. On the specificity of face cognition compared with general cognitive functioning across adult age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver; Schmiedek, Florian; Herzmann, Grit; Sommer, Werner

    2011-09-01

    Face cognition is considered a specific human ability, clearly differentiable from general cognitive functioning. Its specificity is primarily supported by cognitive-experimental and neuroimaging research, but recently also from an individual differences perspective. However, no comprehensive behavioral data are available, which would allow estimating lifespan changes of the covariance structure of face-cognition abilities and general cognitive functioning as well as age-differences in face cognition after accounting for interindividual variability in general cognition. The present study aimed to fill this gap. In an age-heterogeneous (18-82 years) sample of 448 adults, we found no factorial dedifferentiation between face cognition and general cognition. Age-related differences in face memory were still salient after taking into account changes in general cognitive functioning. Face cognition thus remains a specific human ability compared with general cognition, even until old age. We discuss implications for models of cognitive aging and suggest that it is necessary to include more explicitly special social abilities in those models.

  20. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry. Kraniale Computertomographie in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkai, P. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany)); Bogerts, B. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry. Kernspintomographie in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, K. (Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.)

  2. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry. PET in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung und Neurologische Klinik der Universitaet Koeln (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Currently, clinical PET is mainly useful in psychiatry and related areas for differential diagnosis of dementia. In dementia of Alzheimer type reductions of glucose metabolism are found mainly in the temporoparietal assocaiton cortex, in Pick's disease mainly in the frontal cortex, and in Huntington's disease in the striatum. Other demential diseases usually show less toposelective metabolic impairment. In the future, new diagnostic possibilities may arise from analysis of functional stimulation of specific brain areas and from the use of ligands for specific neurotransmitter systems. (orig.)

  3. Comparing neighborhoods of adults with serious mental illness and of the general population: research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas; Prvu Bettger, Janet; Brusilovskiy, Eugene; Wong, Yin-Ling Irene; Metraux, Stephen; Salzer, Mark S

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health emphasizes the importance of assessing the impact of environmental factors on functioning and disability. Drawing on this emphasis, this study used a set of objective measures to compare the characteristics of neighborhoods of adults with serious mental illness and of the general population. It also examined the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and neighborhood concentration of persons with serious mental illness. The sample comprised 15,246 adults who were treated for serious mental illness in Philadelphia between 1997 and 2000. Principal-components analysis of 22 neighborhood characteristics resulted in an ideal-factor solution of six components. The mean values of each component in neighborhoods of persons with serious mental illness were compared with values in an equally sized group of neighborhoods created by randomly generated addresses representative of the city's general population. Ordinary least-squares regression was used to assess the association between neighborhood characteristics and neighborhood concentration of persons with serious mental illness. Neighborhoods in which adults with serious mental illness resided had higher levels of physical and structural inadequacy, drug-related activity, and crime than comparison neighborhoods. Higher levels of physical and structural inadequacy, crime, drug-related activity, social instability, and social isolation were associated with higher concentration of persons with serious mental illness in the neighborhood's adult population. The differences in neighborhood characteristics identified in this study point to factors that merit closer attention as potential barriers or facilitators in the functioning, participation, and community integration of persons with serious mental illness.

  4. [Specialized training in geriatric psychiatry during residency in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Alexis; Lavigne, Benjamin; Legros, Emilie; Herrmann, Mathieu; Sebbane, Déborah

    2014-09-01

    Aging of the population is a growing concern in developed countries. Therefore, geriatric psychiatry has gradually emerged from general psychiatry. Many names have been proposed to term this sub-specialty: old age psychiatry (OAP), psychogeriatrics, geropsychiatry. A working group of the French federation of psychiatric trainees (AFFEP) set up an inventory of the theoretical instruction and clinical practice of OAP during the training of psychiatrists in France. Methods. A survey of both academic teaching and practical training for OAP was carried out in the 28 local AFFEP representatives of every French medical residency district, including overseas. We assessed the supply of general courses and seminars devoted to OAP during the training of French residents in psychiatry, and the offer of university or inter-university degrees as well as the possibility of specialized internship in every residency district. Results. 96% of French medical residency districts offered general courses of OAP with a mean volume of 11.5 hours along the four years of psychiatric training in France. Fifty percent of medical residency districts proposed at least one seminar devoted to OAP. Half of medical residency districts also offer a specialized university or inter-university degree. Concerning clinical practice, 86% of medical residency districts had one internship dedicated to OAP, in 39% of cases in teaching hospitals. Conclusion. Nationwide, there is an overall effort to make OAP available to French psychiatric residents by general courses and internship, but some disparity appeared in academic teaching (i.e. offering seminars and university/inter-university degrees) according to various residency districts.

  5. General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumpton, Ben; Langhammer, Arnulf; Romundstad, Pål; Chen, Yue; Mai, Xiao-Mei

    2013-02-01

    Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI ≥30.0 kg·m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥88 cm in females and ≥102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.

  6. Dietary Patterns in Relation to General and Central Obesity among Adults in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xinguang; Liu, Zhitao; Varma, Deepthi S; Wan, Rong; Wan, Qingqing; Zhao, Shiwen

    2016-11-03

    Dietary patterns represent a broader picture of food consumption, and are better correlated with a variety of health outcomes. However, few studies have been conducted to explore the associations between dietary patterns and obesity in Southwest China. Data from the 2010-2012 National Nutrition Survey in the province of Yunnan, Southwest China, were analyzed (n = 1604, aged 18-80 years). Dietary data were collected using the 24 h dietary recall over three consecutive days. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured following standard methods. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between dietary patterns and obesity. Three distinct dietary patterns were identified, which were labeled as traditional, modern, and tuber according to their key components. With potential confounders adjusted, adults in the highest quartile of the modern pattern were at higher risk of general and central obesity (odds ratio (OR) 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-3.48; OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.37-2.93). In contrast, adults in the highest quartile of the tuber pattern were at lower risk of general and central obesity (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.61; OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43-0.95) but at higher risk of underweight (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.20-6.45). No significant association was found between the traditional pattern and obesity. Moreover, dietary pattern differences occurred due to the differences in socio-demographic characteristics. In conclusion, the modern dietary pattern was positively, and the tuber pattern negatively, associated with general and central obesity among adults in Southwest China.

  7. Dietary Patterns in Relation to General and Central Obesity among Adults in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dietary patterns represent a broader picture of food consumption, and are better correlated with a variety of health outcomes. However, few studies have been conducted to explore the associations between dietary patterns and obesity in Southwest China. Data from the 2010–2012 National Nutrition Survey in the province of Yunnan, Southwest China, were analyzed (n = 1604, aged 18–80 years. Dietary data were collected using the 24 h dietary recall over three consecutive days. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured following standard methods. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between dietary patterns and obesity. Three distinct dietary patterns were identified, which were labeled as traditional, modern, and tuber according to their key components. With potential confounders adjusted, adults in the highest quartile of the modern pattern were at higher risk of general and central obesity (odds ratio (OR 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.15–3.48; OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.37–2.93. In contrast, adults in the highest quartile of the tuber pattern were at lower risk of general and central obesity (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15–0.61; OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43–0.95 but at higher risk of underweight (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.20–6.45. No significant association was found between the traditional pattern and obesity. Moreover, dietary pattern differences occurred due to the differences in socio-demographic characteristics. In conclusion, the modern dietary pattern was positively, and the tuber pattern negatively, associated with general and central obesity among adults in Southwest China.

  8. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment.

  9. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in older adults: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Afari, Niloofar; Ayers, Catherine R; Stoddard, Jill A; Ruberg, Joshua; Sorrell, John T; Liu, Lin; Petkus, Andrew J; Thorp, Steven R; Kraft, Alexander; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-03-01

    Some evidence suggests that acceptance-based approaches such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be well-suited to geriatric generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The primary goal of this project was to determine whether ACT was feasible for this population. Seven older primary-care patients with GAD received 12 individual sessions of ACT; another 9 were treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy. No patients dropped out of ACT, and worry and depression improved. Findings suggest that ACT may warrant a large-scale investigation with anxious older adults. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Older Adults: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Afari, Niloofar; Ayers, Catherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Ruberg, Joshua; Sorrell, John T.; Liu, Lin; Petkus, Andrew J.; Thorp, Steven R.; Kraft, Alexander; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that acceptance-based approaches such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be well-suited to geriatric generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The primary goal of this project was to determine whether ACT was feasible for this population. Seven older primary-care patients with GAD received 12 individual sessions of ACT; another 9 were treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy. No patients dropped out of ACT, and worry and depression improved. Findings suggest that ACT may warrant a large-scale investigation with anxious older adults. PMID:21292059

  11. [Development of forensic psychiatry in Serbia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Srdjan; Jovanović, Aleksandar; Jasović-Gasić, Miroslava; Ilanković, Nikola; Dunjić, Dusan; Lakić, Aneta; Djukić-Dejanović, Slavica; Nenadović, Milutin; Randjelović, Dragisa; Milovanović, Dimitrije

    2013-01-01

    The development of legislation in the field of mental health in our region is linked with the emergence and development of the oldest psychiatric hospitals in Serbia.The principle that the mentally ill who committed a criminal offense need to be placed in a psychiatric hospital instead of a prison was introduced at the same time as in the most developed European countries. The founders of the Serbian forensic psychiatry, Dr. Jovan Danić, Dr.Vojislav Subotić Jr. and Dr. Dusan Subotić, were all trained at the first Serbian Psychiatric Hospital ("Home for the Unsound of Mind") that was founded in 1861 in the part of Belgrade called Guberevac. Their successors were psychiatric enthusiasts Prof. Dr.Vladimir F.Vujić and Prof. Dr. Laza Stanojević. A formal establishment of the School of Medicine of Belgrade, with acquirement of new experience and positive shifts within this field, based on the general act of the University in 1932, led to the formation of the Council of the School of Medicine, which, as a collective body passed expert opinions. Thus, the first Forensic Medicine Committee of the School of Medicine was formed and started its activities in 1931 when Forensic Medicine Committee Regulations were accepted. After the World War II prominent educators in the field of mental health, and who particularly contributed to further development of forensic psychiatry in Serbia were Prof. Dr. Uros Jekić, Prof Dr. Dusan Jevtić, Dr. Stevan Jovanović, Prof. Dr. Borislav Kapamadzija, Prof. Dr. Maksim Sternić, Prof. Dr. Josif Vesel and Prof. Dr. Dimitrije Milovanović.

  12. Polypharmacy in psychiatry: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kukreja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric polypharmacy refers to the prescription of two or more psychiatric medications concurrently to a patient. It can be categorised as same-class, multi-class, adjunctive, augmentation and total polypharmacy. Despite advances in psychopharmacology and a better understanding of the principles of therapeutics, its practice is increasing rapidly. The prevalence of polypharmacy in psychiatry varies between 13%-90%. There are various clinical and pharmaco-economic factors associated with it. Dealing with polypharmacy requires an understanding of its associated factors. Education, guidelines and algorithms for the appropriate management of various conditions are effective ways to avoid irrational polypharmacy.

  13. Some gestalt contributions to psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Kathleen A

    2010-07-01

    Gestalt theory and methods support significant behavioral change and personal growth, yet they have not been widely incorporated into modern psychiatric practice. Challenges to employing Gestalt principles in psychiatric practice exist, such as focus on diagnosis to guide treatment planning, key elements of psychiatric training, primacy of medication management in psychiatric practice, and financial pressures. However, the concepts of the co-created relational field in the here and now, the paradoxical theory of change, the cycle of experience, and the use of experiment are Gestalt concepts and methods that can be effectively applied in the modern practice of clinical psychiatry and psychiatric education.

  14. Polypharmacy In Psychiatry: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sanjay; Kalra, Gurvinder; Shah, Nilesh; Shrivastava, Amresh

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric polypharmacy refers to the prescription of two or more psychiatric medications concurrently to a patient. It can be categorised as same-class, multi-class, adjunctive, augmentation and total polypharmacy. Despite advances in psychopharmacology and a better understanding of the principles of therapeutics, its practice is increasing rapidly. The prevalence of polypharmacy in psychiatry varies between 13%-90%. There are various clinical and pharmaco-economic factors associated with it. Dealing with polypharmacy requires an understanding of its associated factors. Education, guidelines and algorithms for the appropriate management of various conditions are effective ways to avoid irrational polypharmacy. PMID:23678240

  15. [Towards European psychiatry based around shared values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Yvan; Müller, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In September 2005, the French and German national conferences of the presidents of specialised hospitals' medical committees co-signed a text relatingto the fundamental values and principles of psychiatry. Since then, several countries, such as Italy and Spain, have joined the movement. Among these values, the district is reaffirmed as the base unit, for the construction of psychiatry in Europe.

  16. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  17. Child Psychiatry Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Michael Gifford; Giesen, Femke; Walter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    A study to review the amount of time devoted to child psychiatry in undergraduate medical education is conducted. Results conclude that relatively low priority is given to child psychiatry in medical education with suggestions for international teaching standards on the subject.

  18. Comparison of Younger and Older Adults' Acceptability of Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder Co-Occurring with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Ament, Patrick A.; Holt, Peter S.; Hunt, Lauren S.

    2013-01-01

    Acceptability ratings of medication or Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT), for general anxiety disorder (GAD) co-occurring with Parkinson's Disease (PD) were obtained from younger ("n" = 79) and older ("n" = 54) adults. Participants read a case description of an older adult with PD and comorbid GAD followed by a description…

  19. Determinants of vitamin D status in a general population of Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, B.; Husemoen, L.; Fenger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aimsDanish legislation regarding food fortification has been very restrictive and vitamin D deficiency is thought to be common in Denmark due to inadequate dietary intakes and the fact that in Denmark (latitude 56°N) vitamin D is only synthesized in the skin after exposure to solar...... radiation during summertime (April–September). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vitamin D status of a general adult population in Denmark and, in addition, associations between vitamin D status and distinct lifestyle factors were studied. MethodsA random sample of 6784 persons from a general...... population aged 30–60years participated in a health examination in 1999–2001. Serum samples from all participants were stored and levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were measured by HPLC in 2009. The method was compared to another HPLC method. Information on dietary intake of vitamin D and other...

  20. Information processing bias and pharmacotherapy outcome in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Amanda R W; Petkus, Andrew J; Nguyen, Hoang; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2013-08-01

    Information processing bias was evaluated in a sample of 25 older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) over the course of 12 weeks of escitalopram pharmacotherapy. Using the CANTAB Affective Go/No Go test, treatment response (as measured by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale) was predicted from a bias score (i.e., difference score between response latencies for negative and positive words) using mixed-models regression. A more positive bias score across time predicted better response to treatment. Faster responses to positive words relative to negative words were associated with greater symptomatic improvement over time as reflected by scores on the GADSS. There was a trend toward significance for PSWQ scores and no significant effects related to HAMA outcomes. These preliminary findings offer further insights into the role of biased cognitive processing of emotional material in the manifestation of late-life anxiety symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Incidence of genital warts among the Hong Kong general adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to estimate the incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong and explore a way to establish a surveillance system for genital warts among the Hong Kong general population. Methods A total of 170 private doctors and all doctors working in the 5 local Social Hygiene Clinics (SHC) participated in this study. During the 14-day data collection period (January 5 through18, 2009), the participating doctors filled out a log-form on a daily basis to record the number of patients with genital warts. The total number of new cases of genital warts presented to private and public doctors in Hong Kong was projected using the stratification sampling method. Results A total of 721 (0.94%) adults presented with genital warts to the participating doctors during the two-week study period, amongst them 73 (10.1%) were new cases. The projected number of new cases of genital warts among Hong Kong adults was 442 (297 male and 144 female) during the study period. The incidence of genital warts in Hong Kong was estimated to be 203.7 per 100,000 person-years (respectively 292.2 and 124.9 per 100,000 person-years for males and females). Conclusions The incidence of genital warts is high among adults in Hong Kong. The study demonstrates the importance of collecting surveillance data from both private and public sectors. PMID:20849578

  2. Post Hoc Analyses of Anxiety Measures in Adult Patients With Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treated With Vilazodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Durgam, Suresh; Tang, Xiongwen; Ruth, Adam; Mathews, Maju; Gommoll, Carl P

    2016-01-01

    To investigate vilazodone, currently approved for major depressive disorder in adults, for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies showing positive results for vilazodone (2,040 mg/d) in adult patients with GAD (DSM-IV-TR) were pooled for analyses; data were collected from June 2012 to March 2014. Post hoc outcomes in the pooled intent-to-treat population (n = 1,462) included mean change from baseline to week 8 in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) total score, psychic and somatic anxiety subscale scores, and individual item scores; HARS response (≥ 50% total score improvement) and remission (total score ≤ 7) at week 8; and category shifts, defined as HARS item score ≥ 2 at baseline (moderate to very severe symptoms) and score of 0 at week 8 (no symptoms). The least squares mean difference was statistically significant for vilazodone versus placebo in change from baseline to week 8 in HARS total score (-1.83, P anxiety (-1.21, P anxiety (-0.63, P adult GAD patients, with significant differences between treatment groups found on both psychic and somatic HARS items. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01629966, NCT01766401, NCT01844115.

  3. [An analysis of advertisements for psychotropic drugs in the Dutch Journal of Psychiatry ('Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie')].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandereycken, W; Kuyken, K

    2009-01-01

    Through the marketing of psychotropics the pharmaceutical industry is able to influence the way in which psychiatrists practise their profession. To look at the image of psychiatry as reflected in advertisements for psychotropics. method Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the advertisements for psychotropics in the Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie between 1999 and 2006. On average 6 per cent of the total number of pages was given over annually to advertisements of psychotropics. The number of pages used for these advertisements changed over the years, with a sharp decline between 2002 and 2004. Before 2002 the majority of advertisements was for antidepressants, but later most of them were for antipsychotics. Three-quarters of the illustrations for antidepressants featured women whereas three-quarters of the illustrations for antipsychotics featured men. In general, the advertisements were of an 'emotional' nature and surprisingly few of them contained any scientific information. The advertisements for psychotropics portrayed a stereotyped image implying that it is mainly women who are depressed and mainly men who are psychotic. In its advertisements the pharmaceutical industry seeks primarily emotional reactions and uses hardly any scientific arguments. We wonder if the editorial boards of scientific journals should perhaps adopt a more critical attitude to these kinds of advertisements.

  4. ["Great jobs"-also in psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiessl, H; Hübner-Liebermann, B

    2003-09-01

    Against the background of a beginning shortage of psychiatrists, results from interviews with 112 employees of an automotive company with the topic "Great Job" are presented to discuss their relevance to psychiatry. The interviews were analysed by means of a qualitative content analysis. Most employees assigned importance to great pay, constructive collaboration with colleagues, and work appealing to personal interests. Further statements particularly relevant to psychiatry were: successful career, flexible working hours, manageable job, work-life balance, well-founded training, no bureaucracy within the company, and personal status in society. The well-known economic restrictions in health care and the still negative attitude towards psychiatry currently reduce the attraction of psychiatry as a profession. From the viewpoint of personnel management, the attractors of a great job revealed in this study are proposed as important clues for the recruitment of medical students for psychiatry and the development of psychiatric staff.

  5. The history of Italian psychiatry during Fascism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Andrea; Testa, Luana; Del Missier, Giovanni; Dario, Mariopaolo; Stocco, Ester

    2011-09-01

    Specific features characterized Italian psychiatry during Fascism (1922-45), distinguishing it from Nazi psychiatry and giving rise to different operational outcomes, so we have investigated the state of Italian psychiatry during this period. We review the historical situation that preceded it and describe the social and health policies that Fascism introduced following new legislative and regulatory acts. We examine the preventive and therapeutic role played by psychiatry (the electric shock was an Italian invention) and, thanks to the Enciclopedia Italiano published during those years, we are able to highlight psychiatry's relationship to psychology, psychoanalysis, philosophy and religion. The shortcomings of Italian psychiatric research and practice are also seen in terms of what the State failed to do rather than what it did.

  6. General coping strategies and their impact on quality of life in older adults with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Carl I; Hassamal, Sameer K; Begum, Nurun

    2011-04-01

    Both symptom specific and general coping strategies may affect the well-being of persons with schizophrenia. There are little data on how older adults with schizophrenia employ various coping styles. This study examines the types of general coping strategies used by older persons with schizophrenia and examines the extent to which the various coping strategies affect quality of life. The schizophrenia group consisted of 198 persons aged 55 and over living in the community who developed schizophrenia before age 45. A community comparison group (n=113) was recruited using randomly selected block-groups. Cognitive, instrumental, and avoidant coping scales were created based on a principal component analysis with equamax rotation of items from a self-report coping inventory. A modified version of Yanos and Moos' integrative model was used to assess the direct and mediating effects of each of the coping strategies scales on the Quality of Life Index. Older adults with schizophrenia and their age peers in the general community most commonly use cognitive coping strategies, and there was no significant difference in their scores on this scale. For persons with schizophrenia, the active coping strategies--cognitive and instrumental--were used more frequently than the avoidant strategies. Both active and avoidant strategies mediated the impact of psychiatric symptoms on quality of life as well as contributing independently to improving life quality; however, they had no impact on the other stressor variables. This study suggests that general coping strategies, especially more active approaches, may be useful in diminishing the adverse impact of psychiatric symptoms on quality of life as well as having direct effects on life quality. Such strategies can complement symptom specific approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adult attachment, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marganska, Anna; Gallagher, Michelle; Miranda, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Differences in attachment style have been linked to both emotion regulation and psychological functioning, but the emotion regulatory mechanism through which attachment style might impact symptoms of depression and anxiety is unclear. The present study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between adult attachment style and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of 284 adults. Secure attachment was associated with lower depression and GAD symptoms and lower emotion dysregulation, whereas insecure attachment styles were generally associated with higher depression and GAD scores and higher emotion dysregulation. Perceived inability to generate effective emotion regulation strategies mediated the relation between insecure attachment and both depression and GAD symptoms. Nonacceptance of negative emotions and inability to control impulsive behaviors emerged as additional mediators of the relation between insecure attachment styles and GAD symptoms. The differential contribution of attachment style and emotion regulation to the prediction of depression and GAD symptoms may reflect differences in vulnerability to depression and GAD.

  8. Changes in disability in older adults with generalized radiographic osteoarthritis: A complex relationship with physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, E C P M; van Meurs, J B; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Hofman, A; Hopman-Rock, M

    2017-04-10

    The aim of the present study was to report on factors associated with changes in disability after 5 years, with a focus on physical activity (PA) in community-dwelling older adults with generalized radiographic osteoarthritis (GROA). Assessment of GROA (hand, knee, hip) and disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire) in the Rotterdam Study (cohort RS-1, N = 7,983; with GROA, n = 821). A good outcome at follow-up was defined as improved or mild disability, and a poor outcome as worsened or severe disability. Factors potentially associated with outcome were demographics, joint complaints, other chronic health problems or limitations (body mass index, number of chronic conditions, cognition), and level of different types of PA. Some of these assessments were repeated in between 1997 and 1999 (RS-3), and between 2002 and 2004 (RS-4). A total of 309 older adults with GROA and valid measures on RS-3 and RS-4 showed mild to moderate disability, with minor increases over 5 years (follow-up N = 287 RS-3 to RS-4). PA levels decreased with increasing disability, especially in sport and walking. PA was univariately associated with a better outcome at follow-up but when adjusted for other factors (higher age, having knee pain and stiffness, and having more than two other chronic conditions) was associated with negative changes in general and lower limb disability, although not with upper limb disability. This was the first study to report that community-dwelling older adults with GROA show moderate levels of disability, and that reduced levels of disability are associated with higher levels of PA, but when adjusted for other confounders this association is lost. Further research is needed to study the complex relationships between PA and other determinants of disability. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. High blood pressure, antihypertensive medication and lung function in a general adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisinger Christa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies showed that blood pressure and lung function are associated. Additionally, a potential effect of antihypertensive medication, especially beta-blockers, on lung function has been discussed. However, side effects of beta-blockers have been investigated mainly in patients with already reduced lung function. Thus, aim of this analysis is to determine whether hypertension and antihypertensive medication have an adverse effect on lung function in a general adult population. Methods Within the population-based KORA F4 study 1319 adults aged 40-65 years performed lung function tests and blood pressure measurements. Additionally, information on anthropometric measurements, medical history and use of antihypertensive medication was available. Multivariable regression models were applied to study the association between blood pressure, antihypertensive medication and lung function. Results High blood pressure as well as antihypertensive medication were associated with lower forced expiratory volume in one second (p = 0.02 respectively p = 0.05; R2: 0.65 and forced vital capacity values (p = 0.01 respectively p = 0.05, R2: 0.73. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of antihypertensive medication pointed out that only the use of beta-blockers was associated with reduced lung function, whereas other antihypertensive medication had no effect on lung function. The adverse effect of beta-blockers was significant for forced vital capacity (p = 0.04; R2: 0.65, while the association with forced expiratory volume in one second showed a trend toward significance (p = 0.07; R2: 0.73. In the same model high blood pressure was associated with reduced forced vital capacity (p = 0.01 and forced expiratory volume in one second (p = 0.03 values, too. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that both high blood pressure and the use of beta-blockers, but not the use of other antihypertensive medication, are associated with reduced lung function in a

  10. The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population

    OpenAIRE

    Kanai Y.; Takaesu Y; Nakai Y; Ichiki M; Sato M; Matsumoto Y; Ishikawa J; Ono Y; Murakoshi A; Tanabe H; Kusumi I; Inoue T

    2016-01-01

    Yoshiaki Kanai,1,2 Yoshikazu Takaesu,1 Yukiei Nakai,3 Masahiko Ichiki,1 Mitsuhiko Sato,1 Yasunori Matsumoto,1 Jun Ishikawa,1 Yasuyuki Ono,1 Akiko Murakoshi,1 Hajime Tanabe,4 Ichiro Kusumi,3 Takeshi Inoue1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 4Department of Clinical Human Sciences, Graduate School of Humanities and So...

  11. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell's criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein's Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein's remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation.

  12. What Psychiatry Means to Me

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Herrman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving in early career from public health physician to psychiatrist gives me a public health view of psychiatry and an interest in pursuing the goals of widening access to community-based services for people with mental disorders and promoting mental health in communities. Training in social medicine in the UK and psychiatry in Australia lead to studies of homelessness in people living with psychotic disorders, the health of family caregivers, assessing quality of life and mental health promotion. Work with the World Health Organization (WHO in the Western Pacific Region and the World Psychiatric Association (WPA worldwide has given me opportunities to work with psychiatrists, mental health workers, service users and others in governments and non-government organisations implementing the recommendations of the World Health Report 2001 in countries with limited resources. My work as WPA Secretary for Publications seeks to improve information exchange in countries irrespective of their wealth. This is an exciting time to be working in a global village with technical capacity to reach into its furthest corners. Psychiatrists supported by WPA can help ensure that vulnerable people and communities and people living with mental disorders are well served in this new environment and no longer left out and left behind.

  13. Nutrient patterns and their relationship with general and central obesity in US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-03-10

    Despite growing evidence on the associations between nutrient patterns and obesity, very few studies have examined the association between patterns of nutrient intake and obesity. To identify major nutrient patterns in U.S. adults and investigate their association with general and central obesity. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) participants from 2005 to 2012 were included. General obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2, and central obesity as a waist circumference >102 cm for men and >88 cm for women. Intakes of 60 nutrients were calculated. Factor analysis was applied to derive the major nutrient patterns. Statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights. Overall 24,182 eligible individuals including 8155 with general obesity and 11730 with central obesity were included. Three nutrient patterns explaining 50.8% of the variance in dietary nutrients consumption, were identified. The odds of all types of obesity increased across quarters of the first nutrient patterns (mostly representative of saturated/mono-unsaturated fatty acids), such that the fourth quarter was associated with odds ratio of 1.31 (95%CI: 1.13-1.51) for general obesity and 1.47 (95%CI: 1.30-1.66) for central obesity, relative to the first quarter. The second nutrient patterns (mostly representative of micro nutrients and vitamins) was associated with lower odds of general [0.32 (95%CI: 0.61-0.77]) or central obesity [0.31 (95%CI: 0.62-0.78). Nutrient patterns may have deleterious or protective effects on the risk of general and central obesity, with implication for food-based strategies to prevent and control obesity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Adult language use and infant comprehension of English: associations with encoding and generalization across cues at 20 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Janice N; Milojevich, Helen M; Lukowski, Angela F

    2014-11-01

    Adult-provided language shapes event memory in children who are preverbal and in those who are able to discuss the past using language. The research conducted to date, however, has not yet established whether infant language comprehension abilities moderate the extent to which preverbal infants benefit from adult-provided supportive language. The present study was conducted to address this question by examining immediate imitation and 1-week delayed generalization across cues in 20-month-old infants as a function of (a) variability in adult-provided linguistic support at encoding and test, (b) infant language comprehension abilities, and (c) their interaction. The provision of supportive adult language at encoding and test was associated with delayed generalization across cues although supportive adult language at encoding did not influence performance at immediate imitation. Infant language comprehension abilities were associated with performance at immediate imitation and delayed generalization across cues. In addition, infant language comprehension abilities moderated the extent to which infants benefited from adult-provided supportive language at encoding and test. The findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating that adult language use and infant language comprehension are independently and differentially associated with immediate imitation and 1-week delayed generalization across cues but also serve to jointly structure event memory in the second year of life.

  15. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  16. psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'People have sought comfort for their miseries and a cure for ... and into the 20th century a medical, organic approach to mental ... tries differ widely from North America and Western Europe. Yet ... beliefs regarding human nature, and in many cultures this means ... The term implies that the responsibility for treatment is not.

  17. Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    but was only identified in 19589-4 In humans, melatonin is ... It acutely inhibits neuronal firing in the SCN ... and stimulates a number of antioxidative enzymes.1 This might ... secretion and white cell count peak during the transition from ... irregular sleep-wake pattern (ISWP) and non-24-hour sleep- .... same time every year.

  18. The PACE study: lifetime and past-year prevalence of headache in Parma's adult general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Arens; Russo, Marco; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Headache is a widespread disorder and therefore it has a strong impact on quality of life. In the present work we focused on lifetime and past-year prevalence of headache in general and by gender, in a population-based sample in Parma. A total of 904 subjects representative of Parma's adult general population were interviewed face-to-face by a physician from the Parma Headache Centre, using a validated questionnaire. The lifetime prevalence of headache was 69.1%, i.e. 75.8% in women and 60.6% in men; the crude past-year prevalence of headache was 42.8%, i.e. 52.0% in women and 31.1% in men. Both lifetime and past-year prevalence rates were significantly higher in females than in males (odds ratio, respectively, 2.0 and 2.4). In our study, past-year prevalence decreased after age 50 in both genders. Most people suffer from one headache subtype. In over 80% of cases, headache starts before age 40 and therefore people were not very likely to develop headache after 50 years. The past-year and lifetime prevalence rate of headache in general that we found in our study falls within the lower range of values for headache prevalence in European countries. Further researches need to be set in the Italian epidemiological background.

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Therapist Manual for Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project…

  20. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  1. Psychiatry outside the framework of empiricism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mume, Celestine Okorome

    2017-01-01

    Science is interested in whatever that is empirical and objective. Any claim that cannot be objectively demonstrated has no place in science, because the subject does not deviate from the role, which it has set out to play in the life of mankind. Psychiatry, as a scientific discipline, plays along these basic principles. In the etiology, symptomatology, and management of psychiatric disorders, the biopsychosocial model recognizes the role of biological, psychological, and social factors. This essay views psychiatry from the biopsychosocial perspective and asserts that certain elements, which may not be readily and empirically verifiable, are important in the practice of psychiatry.

  2. A Marxist approach to psychology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahem, J

    1982-01-01

    Marxism considers psychology and psychiatry to be young and complex sciences which are powerfully affected by the nature of society. Marxism contributes to these sciences by applying dialectical and historical materialism to their study and development. The Marxist critique of psychology and psychiatry under capitalism identifies the immense harmful effect on them of capitalist class ideology in a number of areas: anti-working class theories, racism, national chauvinism, sexism, theories of fixed evil human nature, and false or one-sided theories. Socialism is held to provide a healthy environment for individual psychological development and to utilize psychology and psychiatry for scientific and humane ends.

  3. Training for generalization in Theory of Mind: a study with older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA eCAVALLINI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Theory of Mind (ToM refers to the ability to attribute independent mental states to self and others in order to explain and predict social behavior. Recent research in this area has shown a decline in ToM abilities associated with normal aging that is of a moderate magnitude or greater. Very few studies have investigated whether it is possible to improve older adults’ ToM abilities.The present study was designed to address this gap in the literature by evaluating the impact of a ToM training on practiced and transfer tasks. We provided older adults with a variety of activities designed to facilitate the generalization of benefits to other ToM-demanding tasks.Participants were 63 healthy older adults, native Italian speakers (Mage = 71.44, SD = 5.24, age range: 63-81 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the ToM training (age range: 63-81 years and the physical-conversation training (age range: 64-81 years. Training effects were measured using the Strange Stories (practiced task and the Animation task (transfer task. Results revealed the efficacy of the training in producing improvements on practiced but also on transfer tasks.

  4. Prefrontal-limbic connectivity during worry in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Jan; Eldreth, Dana A; Price, Rebecca B; Staples, Alison M; Hanson, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Although generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders in older adults, very little is known about the neurobiology of worry, the hallmark symptom of GAD in adults over the age of 60. This study investigated the neurobiology and neural circuitry of worry in older GAD patients and controls. Twenty older GAD patients and 16 age-matched controls (mean age = 67.88) were compared on clinical measures and neural activity during worry using functional magnetic resonance imaging. As expected, worry elicited activation in frontal regions, amygdala, and insula within the GAD group, with a similar but less prominent frontal pattern was observed in controls. Effective connectivity analyses revealed a positive directional circuit in the GAD group extending from ventromedial through dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, converging on the amygdala. A less complex circuit was observed in controls with only dorsolateral prefrontal regions converging on the amygdala; however, a separate circuit passing through the orbitofrontal cortex converged on the insula. Results elucidate a different neurobiology of pathological versus normal worry in later life. A limited resource model is implicated wherein worry in GAD competes for the same neural resources (e.g. prefrontal cortical areas) that are involved in the adaptive regulation of emotion through cognitive and behavioral strategies.

  5. Major Dietary Patterns in Relation to General and Central Obesity among Chinese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canqing Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited evidence exists for the association between diet pattern and obesity phenotypes among Chinese adults. In the present study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data from 474,192 adults aged 30–79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank baseline survey. Food consumption was collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Three dietary patterns were extracted by factor analysis combined with cluster analysis. After being adjusted for potential confounders, individuals following a traditional southern dietary pattern had the lowest body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC; the Western/new affluence dietary pattern had the highest BMI; and the traditional northern dietary pattern had the highest WC. Compared to the traditional southern dietary pattern in multivariable adjusted logistic models, individuals following a Western/new affluence dietary pattern had a significantly increased risk of general obesity (prevalence ratio (PR: 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.03–1.08 and central obesity (PR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.06–1.08. The corresponding risks for the traditional northern dietary pattern were 1.05 (1.02–1.09 and 1.17 (1.25–1.18, respectively. In addition, the associations were modified by lifestyle behaviors, and the combined effects with alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, and physical activity were analyzed. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the diet-obesity relationships.

  6. The general functional fitness index and symptoms of depression in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiely Faccin Borges

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is considered the most common mental health disorder in older adults. Studies have shown that physical activity can reduce depressive symptoms in this population with immediate clinical effects. The objective of this study was to analyze the association between symptoms of depression and General Functional Fitness Index (GFFI in elderly physical exercise practitioners. The Geriatric Depression Scale of Yesavage (GDS-15 was used to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, and the AAHPERD (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance fitness test battery for assessment of GFFI. We used descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation with 95% confidence intervals. The population consisted of 146 elderly participants of the Floripa Ativa Program - Phase B, with the sample consisting of 77 older adults with a mean age of 67.9 (SD 5.7 years. Among them, 13 exhibited symptoms of depression and 33 were fit, with the GFFI within normal range. We found a negative (r = -0.307 and significant (p = 0.007 correlation between GDS and GFFI. This inversely proportional relationship demonstrates that subjects with a better GFFI had a lower incidence of depressive symptoms. As the GFFI value is obtained through physical tests, it can be suggested that physical exercise supported the reduction of depressive symptoms in the study group.

  7. More than words: fast acquisition and generalization of orthographic regularities during novel word learning in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Matti; Polonyi, Tünde; Abari, Kálmán

    2014-08-01

    In literates, reading is a fundamental channel for acquiring new vocabulary both in the mother tongue and in foreign languages. By using an artificial language learning task, we examined the acquisition of novel written words and their embedded regularities (an orthographic surface feature and a syllabic feature) in three groups of university students with different exposures (Group 1 saw 2 words once, Group 2 saw 20 words once, Group 3 saw 20 words three times). Recognition memory results for Groups 2 and 3 indicated that adults can learn novel written words even with just a single exposure, albeit repeated exposure improved target detection. A generalization task revealed that even the minimal exposure in Group 1 was enough for acquisition of the two embedded regularities. More exemplars and repeated exposure provided more robust effects for the syllable regularity. Finally, post-test interview showed that repeated exposure was needed to become aware of the regularities. The present results show that adults learn novel written words and their inherent regularities in a fast and effective fashion.

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for a general auditory prediction deficit in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Ayoub; Max, Ludo

    2015-11-01

    We previously found that stuttering individuals do not show the typical auditory modulation observed during speech planning in nonstuttering individuals. In this follow-up study, we further elucidate this difference by investigating whether stuttering speakers' atypical auditory modulation is observed only when sensory predictions are based on movement planning or also when predictable auditory input is not a consequence of one's own actions. We recorded 10 stuttering and 10 nonstuttering adults' auditory evoked potentials in response to random probe tones delivered while anticipating either speaking aloud or hearing one's own speech played back and in a control condition without auditory input (besides probe tones). N1 amplitude of nonstuttering speakers was reduced prior to both speaking and hearing versus the control condition. Stuttering speakers, however, showed no N1 amplitude reduction in either the speaking or hearing condition as compared with control. Thus, findings suggest that stuttering speakers have general auditory prediction difficulties.

  9. Lifestyle and genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 levels in a general adult population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina H; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Ovesen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    12 in the general population. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the folate and vitamin B12 status of Danish adults and to investigate associations between vitamin status and distinct lifestyle and genetic factors. The study included a random sample of 6784 individuals aged 30-60 years....... Information on lifestyle factors was obtained by questionnaires and blood samples were analysed for serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations and several genetic polymorphisms. The overall prevalence of low serum folate ( ... and the prevalence was lower with increasing age. Low serum folate was associated with smoking, low alcohol intake, high coffee intake, unhealthy diet, and the TT genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-C677T polymorphism. The overall prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 (

  10. Biological Psychiatry, Research And Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this section, we look at how the biological paradigm shift in psychiatry has been aided and abetted by industry for serving its own needs; which stymies other promising approaches; but which, nonetheless, can serve to advance biomedicine if checks and balances are in place. Industry, Biological Psychiatry And Non-pharmacological Advance The larger issue of benefit to society also concerns us when we realize that industry sponsorship is mainly for potential medications, not for trying to determine whether there may be non-pharmacological interventions that may be equally good, if not better. …a lack of balance in research activities, with a focus mainly on potential medications, is likely to divert talented researchers from the pursuit of profound scientific questions or divert them from the pursuit of questions without market relevance but with an aspect of public good. A company has little incentive to support trials evaluating whether inexpensive, off-patent drugs or whether non-pharmaceutical interventions, could replace their profitable patented drug (Baird, 2003 This is the reason why methods like yoga, psychotherapy, meditation, non-medicated non-mechanised relaxation will not find industry sponsors readily and may never be proved useful apart from anecdotal reporting.In which case to expect industry sponsorship to develop a larger therapeutic armamentarium, especially non-drug based, is wishful thinking. Moreover, non-pharmacological treatment procedures may not get desirable funding. This may not be as much of a problem in other branches of medicine as in psychiatry, wherein non-pharmacological interventions like psychotherapy still hold promise of therapeutic relief.If we do not see rigorous experimental research in psychotherapy or other non-drug modalities to the extent that we should, let us be careful before blaming the researchers for it. Where are the funds? Also, let us note that behind the great thrust towards Biological

  11. Relational agents in clinical psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, Timothy; Gruber, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Relational agents are computational artifacts, such as animated, screen-based characters or social robots, that are designed to establish a sense of rapport, trust, and even therapeutic alliance with patients, using ideal therapeutic relationships between human counselors and patients as role models. We describe the development and evaluation of several such agents designed for health counseling and behavioral-change interventions, in which a therapeutic alliance is established with patients in order to enhance the efficacy of the intervention. We also discuss the promise of using such agents as adjuncts to clinical psychiatry, a range of possible applications, and some of the challenges and ethical issues in developing and fielding them in psychiatric interventions.

  12. [Disaster psychiatry in late life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Shuichi

    2013-10-01

    Disaster preparedness in geriatric psychiatry was proposed on the basis of experience of the Great East Japan Earthquake. 1) Frail or demented elderly should be considered as a special population at risk for disaster victims and addressed in local disaster prevention programs. 2) To response to various psychiatric symptoms(delirium, BPSD, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder) caused by medical conditions and rapid environmental changes due to disaster, linkage and coordination systems between psychiatric and medical sections should be established. 3) As a medium- and long-term support for the elderly who lost the community familiar to them, creation of a new community should be promoted in order to prevent depression, alcohol dependence, BPSD, and suicide.

  13. [Clinical psychiatry and suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    People do not commit suicide all of a sudden. There is a suicidal process where negative life events are there in the beginning, and social support and help-seeking behavior play an important role in impeding the progress of the process. Mental disturbance would be deeply associated with the suicidal process around the final stage, thinking of the fact that approximately 90% of the suicides suffered from mental disorders at the time of suicide. In considering the strategies for suicide prevention, there are two perspectives: a community model and a medical model. A community model is thought to be related mainly to the first half of the suicidal process and a medical model to the latter half. It is an ideal that both community and medical approaches are put into practice simultaneously. However, if resources available for suicide prevention are limited, a medical-model approach would be more efficient and should be given priority. Starting from a medical model and considering treatment and social resources necessary for suicidal people, the range of suicide prevention activities would be expand more efficiently than starting from a community-model approach. Clinical psychiatry plays a greatly important role in preventing suicide. It is found that approximately 20% of seriously injured suicide attempters were diagnosed as adjustment disorder in Japan, which means that even the mildly depressed can commit suicide. Therefore, no one can take a hands-off approach to suicidality as long as he/she works in the field of clinical psychiatry. It is earnestly desired to detect and treat properly the suicidal patients, but there is no perfect method. It would be helpful to pay attention to patients' personality development, stress-coping style and present suicidal ideation. Besides, as suicide prevention is not completed only in a consulting room, it is important for psychiatrists to look for teamwork.

  14. Responses of FEV6, FVC, and FET to inhaled bronchodilator in the adult general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundbäck Bo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of bronchodilator-induced change in forced vital capacity (FVC is dependent on forced expiratory time (FET in subjects with airflow limitation. Limited information is available on the concurrent responses of FVC, forced expiratory volume in six seconds (FEV6, and FET in the bronchodilation test among patients with obstructive airways disease or in the general population. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in FEV6, FVC, and FET, and their relationships in a standardized bronchodilation test in the general population. Methods We studied bronchodilation response in a general adult population sample of 628 individuals (260 men, 368 women with flow-volume spirometry. The largest FVC, the corresponding FET and the largest FEV6 both at the baseline and after 0.4 mg of inhaled salbutamol were selected for analysis. Results After administration of salbutamol FEV6 decreased on average -13.4 (95% CI -22.3 to -4.5 ml or -0.2% (-0.4% to 0.0% from the baseline. The 95th percentile of change in FEV6 was 169.1 ml and 5.0%. FVC decreased on average -42.8 (-52.4 to -33.3 ml or -1.0% (-1.2% to -0.7%. Concurrently FET changed on average -0.2 (-0.4 to 0.0 seconds or 0.4% (-1.4% to 2.3%. There were four subjects with an increase of FVC over 12% and only one of these was associated with prolonged FET after salbutamol. Changes in FEV6 and FVC were more frequently positive in subjects with reduced FEV1/FVC in baseline spirometry. Conclusion In general adult population, both FEV6 and FVC tended to decrease, but FET remained almost unchanged, in the bronchodilation test. However, those subjects with signs of airflow limitation at the baseline showed frequently some increase of FEV6 and FVC in the bronchodilation test without change in FET. We suggest that FEV6 could be used in assessment of bronchodilation response in lieu of FVC removing the need for regulation of FET during bronchodilation testing.

  15. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Results All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Conclusions Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  16. Syphilis, sex and psychiatry, 1789-1925: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert M

    2010-02-01

    Syphilis has changed the course of history, shaped the path of medicine and had more influence on psychiatry than any other illness. This paper, part one of a two-part series, investigates the historical, social and cultural aspects of the interaction of syphilis and psychiatry. Syphilis did not manifest as a psychiatric illness until the French Revolution. At the time, the Pinel School was focussing on the environment and moral therapy. Bayle, who made the first discovery of the cause of a psychiatric disease - chronic arachnoiditis - paid the price for his discovery by being driven from psychiatry. The 19th century led to the rise of a new medical polymath: the syphilologist - a specialist in every aspect of a disease that showed a remarkable capacity to affect every organ and tissue in the body and produce symptoms resembling other illnesses. The field was dominated by Frenchmen, Philippe Ricord and Alfred Fournier, and Englishman Jonathan Hutchinson. A middle-class illness, neurosyphilis struck at the heart of the class interests - property. This reeked havoc with the family business or finances, causing considerable distress to their relatives. General paresis of the insane became associated in the public eye with creative, intellectual or philosophical activity. It affected a long list of artists, writers and musicians, including Oscar Wilde, Robert Schumann, Baudelaire, Schubert and Ivan the Terrible. While the features of syphilis were delineated, confirmation remained elusive and neurosyphilis continued to hide its secrets. It remained the grand cause that defined psychiatry and it was not until the middle of the 20th century that it ceased to play a part in the daily life of doctors in psychiatric wards.

  17. [Psychiatry, the field of all risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders lead patients along paths of irrationality. Insanity is perceived as excessiveness, often associated with violence. Risk in psychiatry is omnipresent and nursing practice is performed within a narrow safety zone. The media coverage of sensitive situations does not help. Ensuring the patient's recovery, respecting the fundamental principles of individual freedom while assuring the utmost safety of others is the constant challenge facing caregivers in psychiatry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Why is psychiatry prone to fads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Joel

    2013-10-01

    Psychiatry has long been prone to fads. The main reason is that mental illness is poorly understood and can be difficult to treat. Most diagnostic fads have involved the extension of well-known categories into broader spectra. The most prominent treatment fads have involved the overuse of pharmacological interventions and a proliferation of methods for psychotherapy. The best antidote to fads is a commitment to evidence-based psychiatry.

  19. Alcohol use, anxiety, and insomnia in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, M Cristina; Amspoker, Amber B; Nadorff, Michael R; Kunik, Mark E; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-09-01

    To examine alcohol consumption among older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD); its relationship to demographic variables, insomnia, worry, and anxiety; and its moderating role on the anxiety-insomnia relationship. We expected alcohol use to be similar to previous reports, correlate with higher anxiety and insomnia, and worsen the anxiety-insomnia relationship. Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine. 223 patients, 60 years and older, with GAD. Frequency of alcohol use, insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire - Abbreviated, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait subscale, Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [SIGH-A]). Most patients endorsed alcohol use, but frequency was low. Presence and frequency were greater than in previous reports of primary care samples. Alcohol use was associated with higher education, female gender, less severe insomnia, and lower worry (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale) and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait subscale; SIGH-A). Whites reported more drinks/week than African-Americans. More drinks/week were associated with higher education and lower anxiety (SIGH-A). Weaker relationships between worry/anxiety and insomnia occurred for those drinking. Drink frequency moderated the positive association between the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated and insomnia, which was lower with higher frequency of drinking. Older adults with GAD use alcohol at an increased rate, but mild to moderate drinkers do not experience sleep difficulties. A modest amount of alcohol may minimize the association between anxiety/worry and insomnia among this group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Reaching rural Ohio with intellectual disability psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Julie P; Cowan, Allison E; Harper, Beth; Mast, Ryan; Merrill, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability experience higher rates of mental illness when compared with the general population, and there is a lack of medical and mental health professionals in rural and under-served areas. With the increase in discharge of individuals from institutional settings back to their home communities into the least restrictive environments, there are more patients with complex needs being added to the schedules of physicians in the outpatient delivery care system. Patients with disabilities may not travel well or tolerate changes in routine so may not have access to psychiatry. Utilization of telepsychiatry is well suited to this specialized patient population because it allows a highly traumatized group to meet with a psychiatrist and other mental health professionals from a location of their choice. Ohio's Telepsychiatry Project for Intellectual Disability was initiated in 2012 to serve outlying communities with a lack of infrastructure and resources, to provide specialized mental health services to individuals with co-occurring mental illness and intellectual disability. After five years, over 900 patients with intellectual disability from 64 of Ohio's 88 counties receive specialized mental health treatment through this statewide grant-funded project.

  1. Morale is high in acute inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Jones, Julia; Whittington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Morale on acute psychiatric wards has been considered to be problematic, and is reported to contribute to low quality patient care. To assess the relationship of staff morale to patient, service environment, physical environment, patient routines, conflict, containment, staff demographics, and staff group variables. A multivariate cross sectional study was undertaken collecting data on morale, as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and other variables on 136 acute admission psychiatric wards in England. Morale was higher than published comparison samples. Length of time in post was correlated with low morale, and qualified nurses had higher emotional exhaustion but also higher personal accomplishment. The level of verbal abuse on a ward was associated with low morale, as was a higher level of social deprivation among patients. Higher levels of order and organisation correlated with better morale. Clear policies relating to the management of verbal abuse by patients, high levels of order and organisation, and staff rotation and education, may all support high morale. Acute inpatient psychiatry is generally a happy and rewarding work environment, and identified problems are likely to be due to other factors.

  2. Effects of particulate matter on inflammatory markers in the general adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Dai-Hua

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Although the precise mechanisms underlying this association are still unclear, the induction of systemic inflammation following particle inhalation represents a plausible mechanistic pathway. Methods We used baseline data from the CoLaus Study including 6183 adult participants residing in Lausanne, Switzerland. We analyzed the association of short-term exposure to PM10 (on the day of examination visit with continuous circulating serum levels of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and tumor-necrosis-factor alpha (TNF-α by robust linear regressions, controlling for potential confounding factors and assessing effect modification. Results In adjusted analyses, for every 10 μg/m3 elevation in PM10, IL-1ß increased by 0.034 (95 % confidence interval, 0.007-0.060 pg/mL, IL-6 by 0.036 (0.015-0.057 pg/mL, and TNF-α by 0.024 (0.013-0.035 pg/mL, whereas no significant association was found with hs-CRP levels. Conclusions Short-term exposure to PM10 was positively associated with higher levels of circulating IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF-α in the adult general population. This positive association suggests a link between air pollution and cardiovascular risk, although further studies are needed to clarify the mechanistic pathway linking PM10 to cardiovascular risk.

  3. Associations of Sex Hormones and Anthropometry with the Speaking Voice Profile in the Adult General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Lasse; Fuchs, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Kratzsch, Juergen; Berger, Thomas; Engel, Christoph

    2017-07-21

    There is evidence that sexual hormone concentrations and anthropometric factors influence the human voice. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent body mass index (BMI), body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone are associated with the sound pressure level and the fundamental frequency of the speaking voice in a cross-sectional approach among adults in the general population. Speaking voice profiles with four different intensity levels, hormone concentrations, and anthropometric parameters were assessed for 2,381 individuals aged 40-79 years, who were randomly sampled from the population of a large city in Germany. Multivariate analysis was performed, adjusting for age and stratified by sex. Taller body height was associated with lower frequencies. Higher body weight was associated with lower frequencies and higher sound pressure levels. The ratio of chest to abdominal circumference was associated with the sound pressure levels in males and females: participants with larger breast-to-abdomen-ratio were found to have higher sound pressure levels. Among the sexual hormones, higher concentrations of DHEA-S were associated with lower fundamental frequencies of the voice while using the normal speaking voice. In addition, bioavailable testosterone was associated with the sound pressure level of the normal speaking voice in men and the softest speaking voice in women. Our findings suggest that BMI, body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, bioavailable testosterone, and DHEA-S are associated with the speaking voice in adults. No associations between testosterone and the frequency of the speaking voice were found. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorder in Older Adults: Neglected and Treatable Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Christoffel; Tang, Yilang; Drexler, Karen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and opioid use disorder (OUD) in older adults for general psychiatrists. The rapid growth of the geriatric population in the USA has wide-ranging implications as the baby boomer generation ages. Various types of substance use disorders (SUDs) are common in older adults, and they often take a greater toll on affected older adults than on younger adults. Due to multiple reasons, SUDs in older adults are often under-reported, under-detected, and under-treated. Older adults often use substances, which leads to various clinical problems. Space limitations prevents a comprehensive review; therefore, we primarily focus on alcohol use disorder and the problem of opioid use disorder, with more emphasis given to the latter, because the opioid use epidemic in the USA has gained much attention. We reviewed the literature on the topics, integrated across geriatric psychiatry, addiction psychiatry, research, and national trends. We discuss unique vulnerabilities of older adults to SUDs with regard to management of SUDs in older adults, medication-assisted treatment (MAT), and psychosocial treatments. We encourage general psychiatrists to raise their awareness of SUDs in older adults and to provide brief intervention or referral for further assessment.

  5. Divergent Fates of the Medical Humanities in Psychiatry and Internal Medicine: Should Psychiatry Be Rehumanized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Bret R.; Hellerstein, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree to which the medical humanities have been integrated into the fields of internal medicine and psychiatry, the authors assessed the presence of medical humanities articles in selected psychiatry and internal medicine journals from 1950 to 2000. Methods: The journals searched were the three highest-ranking…

  6. Attitudes of Medical Students towards Psychiatry: Effects of Training, Courses in Psychiatry, Psychiatric Experience and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Strebel, Bernd; Schilauske, Joerg; Jueptner, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The attitudes of medical students towards psychiatry and psychotherapy were examined considering the extent of their education, previous psychiatry experience, the evaluation of the course, their career intentions and socio-demographic variables. Methods: Five hundred and eight medical students in their second, fifth, ninth and tenth…

  7. Physicians as Managers: Psychiatry Residents' Perceived Gaps in Knowledge and Skills in Administrative Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Maggi, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors determine psychiatry residents' perceived needs and educational preferences for a physician-manager curriculum. Method: The authors surveyed 102 psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto for their perceived current and desired knowledge and skills in specific administrative areas, and their educational preferences…

  8. New image of psychiatry, mass media impact and public relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, Miro; Tomić, Zoran; Maslov, Boris; Skoko, Iko

    2010-06-01

    The mass media has a powerful impact on public attitudes about mental health and psychiatry. The question of identity of psychiatry as a medical profession as well as of the future of psychiatry has been the subject of much controversial discussion. Psychiatry today has the historical opportunity to shape the future of mental health care, medicine and society. It has gained in scientific and professional status by the tremendous increase of knowledge and treatment skills. Psychiatry should build up new transdisciplinary and integrative image of a specialized profession, promote it and make it public. Good public relations are very important for the future of psychiatry.

  9. Workplace Based Assessment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Devrim Basterzi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Workplace based assessment refers to the assessment of working practices based on what doctors actually do in the workplace, and is predominantly carried out in the workplace itself. Assessment drives learning and it is therefore essential that workplace-based assessment focuses on important attributes rather than what is easiest to assess. Workplacebased assessment is usually competency based. Workplace based assesments may well facilitate and enhance various aspects of educational supervisions, including its structure, frequency and duration etc. The structure and content of workplace based assesments should be monitored to ensure that its benefits are maximised by remaining tailored to individual trainees' needs. Workplace based assesment should be used for formative and summative assessments. Several formative assessment methods have been developed for use in the workplace such as mini clinical evaluation exercise (mini-cex, evidence based journal club assesment and case based discussion, multi source feedback etc. This review discusses the need of workplace based assesments in psychiatry graduate education and introduces some of the work place based assesment methods.

  10. Cultural competency training in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, A; Collazos, F; Ramos, M; Casas, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that the quality of care provided to immigrant and ethnic minority patients is not at the same level as that provided to majority group patients. Although the European Board of Medical Specialists recognizes awareness of cultural issues as a core component of the psychiatry specialization, few medical schools provide training in cultural issues. Cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant and ethnic minority patients. Cultural competence training involves the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. Cognitive cultural competence involves awareness of the various ways in which culture, immigration status, and race impact psychosocial development, psychopathology, and therapeutic transactions. Technical cultural competence involves the application of cognitive cultural competence, and requires proficiency in intercultural communication, the capacity to develop a therapeutic relationship with a culturally different patient, and the ability to adapt diagnosis and treatment in response to cultural difference. Perhaps the greatest challenge in cultural competence training involves the development of attitudinal competence inasmuch as it requires exploration of cultural and racial preconceptions. Although research is in its infancy, there are increasing indications that cultural competence can improve key aspects of the psychiatric treatment of immigrant and minority group patients.

  11. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions.

  12. Mortality by causes in HIV-infected adults: comparison with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floristan Yugo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared mortality by cause of death in HIV-infected adults in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy with mortality in the general population in the same age and sex groups. Methods Mortality by cause of death was analyzed for the period 1999-2006 in the cohort of persons aged 20-59 years diagnosed with HIV infection and residing in Navarre (Spain. This was compared with mortality from the same causes in the general population of the same age and sex using standardized mortality ratios (SMR. Results There were 210 deaths among 1145 persons diagnosed with HIV (29.5 per 1000 person-years. About 50% of these deaths were from AIDS. Persons diagnosed with HIV infection had exceeded all-cause mortality (SMR 14.0, 95% CI 12.2 to 16.1 and non-AIDS mortality (SMR 6.9, 5.7 to 8.5. The analysis showed excess mortality from hepatic disease (SMR 69.0, 48.1 to 78.6, drug overdose or addiction (SMR 46.0, 29.2 to 69.0, suicide (SMR 9.6, 3.8 to 19.7, cancer (SMR 3.2, 1.8 to 5.1 and cardiovascular disease (SMR 3.1, 1.3 to 6.1. Mortality in HIV-infected intravenous drug users did not change significantly between the periods 1999-2002 and 2003-2006, but it declined by 56% in non-injecting drug users (P = 0.007. Conclusions Persons with HIV infection continue to have considerable excess mortality despite the availability of effective antiretroviral treatments. However, excess mortality in the HIV patients has declined since these treatments were introduced, especially in persons without a history of intravenous drug use.

  13. Mental-Physical Comorbidity in Korean Adults: Results from a Nationwide General Population Survey in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Bae, Jae Nam; Cho, Seong-Jin; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Byung-Soo; Cho, Maeng Je

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of mental-physical comorbidity and health-threatening risk factors in subjects with mental disorders, and the risks of mental disorders in those with physical diseases for the last 12 months in the general Korean population. Methods Korean Epidemiologic Catchment Area study replication (KECA-R) was conducted for 6,510 adults between August 2006 and April 2007. The Korean version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 (K-CIDI) was used in the survey. Prevalence of mental and physical disorders, and risk factors for physical health were calculated, and their associations were evaluated with adjustment for age and sex. Results Subjects with any mental disorder showed significantly higher prevalence of chronic physical conditions (adjusted odds ratio, AOR=1.5 to 2.8, psmoking, heavy drinking, overweight, and hypertension (AOR=1.5 to 4.0, p<0.001). Of those with chronic physical conditions, 21.6% had one or more comorbid mental disorder compared with 10.5% of the subjects without chronic physical disorders (AOR=2.6, p<0.001). Contrary to expectations, depressive disorders did not show significant association with hypertension and prevalence of obesity was not influenced by presence of mental disorders. Further studies should assess these findings. Conclusion This is the first identification of significant mental-physical comorbidity in the general Korean population. Clinicians and health care officials should keep in mind of its potential adverse effects on treatment outcome and aggravated disease-related socioeconomic burden.

  14. Mouthwash Use in General Population: Results from Adult Dental Health Survey in Grampian, Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Rhodes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of mouthwash use and to investigate the associated factors in general population.Material and Methods: An Adult Dental Health Survey was conducted on 3,022 residents of Grampian region of Scotland (adjusted participation rate 58.2%. Participants received a questionnaire consisting of questions on oral health and behavioural factors.Results: The majority of participants (38.1% have never used mouthwash, 17.5% used mouthwash less than once a month, 19.4% used mouthwash once every few days and 25.1% used mouthwash daily.Prevalence of use decreased with age (P < 0.001. Woman were more likely to use mouthwash than men (P = 0.004. Mouthwash use decreased with decrease in the level of deprivation (P < 0.001. Never-smokers were less likely to use mouthwash (40.3% compared to smokers (53.1% or those who stopped smoking (46.5% (P < 0.001. Mouthwash was used by smaller proportion of people drinking alcohol on daily basis (36.6%, than by abstainers (42.2% (P = 0.012.There was a positive relationship between flossing or brushing pattern and mouthwash use (P < 0.001. There was statistically significant relationship between mouthwash use and reasons for the last dental visit (P = 0.009.When compared to healthy individuals, mouthwash was used by higher proportion of people reporting that they had gum disease (P = 0.001, ulcers (P = 0.001, oral infections or swelling (P = 0.002 or other problems (P = 0.025.Conclusions: Mouthwash use in general population is associated with socio-demographic, health and behavioural factors.

  15. Attentional bias in older adults: effects of generalized anxiety disorder and cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Jan; Price, Rebecca B; Vietri, Jeff

    2013-08-01

    Attentional biases are known to play a contributing, and perhaps even causal role in the etiology of anxiety and other negative affective states. The prevalence of anxiety disorders in the older cohort is growing, and there are both theoretical and empirical reasons to suspect that age-related factors could moderate attentional bias effects in the context of late-life anxiety. The current study included one of the most widely-used measures of attentional bias, the dot-probe task (Mathews & MacLeod, 1985). Participants were older adults who were either nonanxious or diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. The patient subsample also completed cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or an equivalent wait list condition, after which the dot probe was administered a second time. Results showed that clinical anxiety had no particular importance for the deployment of attention, casting doubt on the universality of biased attention in older anxiety patients. Although there were no maladaptive biases detected toward either threat or depression words at pretreatment, there was nevertheless a marginally significant differential reduction in bias toward threat words following CBT. This reduction did not occur among those in the wait list condition. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. General and Specific Culture Learning in EFL Textbooks Aimed at Adult Learners in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Antonio R. Raigón

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since language teaching in modern-day society is closely linked to cultural instruction, this study employs the model of a cultural learning analysis based on the earlier work of Paige and Lee. Using this model, the authors analysed the cultural content of six B1 and B2-level textbooks for teaching English to adults in Spain, and carried out a comparative study of the results, contrasting the two levels. Findings show that the subjective aspects of culture receive less coverage in textbooks, despite being fundamental to an understanding of the values of a society. Regarding the comparison between B1 and B2 levels, the data indicate that the number of big “C” Culture occurrences is similar for both levels, although there are differences in other cultural aspects. So, for example, culture in general is dealt with more at the B1 level, whereas small “c” culture is dealt with more at the B2 level.

  17. Pattern of gastrointestinal diseases in adult patients admitted to Samtah General Hospital, Gizan region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderoju Emmanuel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the relative frequencies of gastrointestinal diseases (GI in patients admitted to Samtah General Hospital, Gizan, the records of 2,442 adults admitted to the medical and surgical services for gastrointestinal diseases during the period 1413 to 1416 were analyzed retrospectively. 1,028 patients had acute appendicitis. The remaining 1,414 patients were admitted for various other GI diseases. In these 1,414 patients the commonest diseases were gastrointestinal infections (36.4%, peptic ulcer disease (19%, gall bladder disease (18.5%, viral hepatitis and its sequelae (20.7%. Despite the high prevalence of cholelithiasis, acute pancreatitis was uncommon (0.1 %. Inflammatory bowel disease was rare. There was no gender - related difference in the prevalence of gastrointestinal infections, peptic ulcer disease and carcinoma of the stomach. Males were significantly more afflicted than females with viral hepatitis (p< 0.0001, cirrhosis of the liver (p< 0.0001, hepatocellular carcinoma (p< 0.0005, variceal bleeding (p< 0.0005, and peptic ulcer bleeding (p< 0.005. As a large proportion of our patients had preventable diseases, it is expected that immunization and other public health measures will reduce the frequency of these diseases in the future.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Slovak Version of sEMBU on General Adult Sample

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    Gugová Gabriela Rozvadský

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The factorial stability and reliability of the 23-item s(short- EMBU previously demonstrated to be satisfactory in the samples of students from Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Italy (1999, East-Germany and Sweden (Arrindell et al., 2001. The Slovak translation of the original sEMBU was published in 2007 (Poliaková, Mojžišová, & Hašto, 2007. We decided to explore the psychometric properties of the translation of sEMBU on a general adult sample (N=970 in Slovakia, because the translated version of sEMBU is already utilized in research projects in Slovakia. The results show a very good alpha reliability of sEMBU. In the Slovak translation, we found similar scores of Rejection and Emotional warmth and Overprotection. A factor analysis with forced 3-factor solution sorted items to scales exactly as authors of sEMBU presupposed. Overprotection (father has the highest share for classification and differentiation in the cluster. Emotional warmth (mother has the highest share for classification and differentiation in the cluster. We discussed our results with the results from other studies and we suggest to continue in the research of the Slovak version of sEMBU focused on types of attachment, especially on the secure type of attachment.

  19. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Applied Relaxation for Adults With Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Dugas, Michel J.; Brillon, Pascale; Savard, Pierre; Turcotte, Julie; Gaudet, Adrienne; Ladouceur,Robert; Leblanc, Renée; Gervais, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), applied relaxation (AR), and wait-list control (WL) in a sample of 65 adults with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The CBT condition was based on the intolerance of uncertainty model of GAD, whereas the AR condition was based on general theories of anxiety. Both manualized treatments were administered over 12 weekly 1-hour sessions. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report questionnaire...

  20. South African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid appraisal of the status of mental health support in post-rape care ... Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: A database analysis of South African private ... of depressive features amongst older adults in an urban city in eastern China ... knowledge about and attitudes towards electroconvulsive therapy in a South ...

  1. Effects of Social Reinforcement Contingent on Conventional or Unconventional Responses on Generalized Creativity by Older Adults in Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenick, Courtney Allyn; Flora, Stephen Ray

    2012-01-01

    The effects of social praise contingent on either usual (conventional) or unusual (unconventional) responses during an object uses task were assessed on measures of generalized creativity in two novel, unrelated tasks. Participants were 20 older adults, ages 63 to 89 years (M = 80.90), who were recruited from a joint skilled nursing and assisted…

  2. Cognitive behaviour therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: Is CBT equally efficacious in adults of working age and older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishita, Naoko; Laidlaw, Ken

    2017-03-01

    The current meta-analysis compared the efficacy of CBT for GAD between adults of working age and older people. In addition, we conducted a qualitative content analysis of treatment protocols used in studies with older clients to explore potential factors that may enhance treatment outcomes with this particular client group. Applying the inclusion criteria resulted in the identification of 15 studies with 22 comparisons between CBT and control groups (770 patients). When examining overall effect sizes for CBT for GAD between older people and adults of working age there were no statistically significant differences in outcome. However, overall effect size of CBT for GAD was moderate for older people (g=0.55, 95% CI 0.22-0.88) and large for adults of working age (g=0.94, 95% CI 0.52-1.36), suggesting that there is still room for improvement in CBT with older people. The main difference in outcome between CBT for GAD between the two age groups was related to methodological quality in that no older people studies used an intention-to-treat design. The content analysis demonstrated that studies with older clients were conducted according to robust CBT protocols but did not take account of gerontological evidence to make them more age-appropriate. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  4. [Where is going philosophy of psychiatry ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Elisabetta

    2016-12-01

    This contribution provides a critical outline of the current trends in the field of "philosophy of psychiatry" by following their developments in the last decade. The first part of the paper focuses on the evolution of this field from a strictly conceptual approach to a perspective more attentive to the social, practical, and clinical dimension of psychiatry. The second part of the paper points out that the need of a mutual commitment of philosophy and psychiatry is perceived according to different ways by the countries involved in this research area. The paper deals especially with the case of France, where the enthusiasm for the "new philosophy of psychiatry" has not had the same impact on the philosophical scene as in the English speaking countries. In conclusion, the paper shows that the field of philosophy of psychiatry stands as a fertile ground for new forms of interaction between the analytic, and the continental philosophical traditions. This interaction takes place, more particularly, as regards such topics as normativity, language, and interpretation.

  5. Attitudes of psychiatry residents toward mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović-Milovančević Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Attitudes of lay people and physicians towards mentally ill patients are frequently highly biased. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in attitudes of psychiatry and internal medicine residents toward mental illness and to establish the relationship between their attitudes and their personal characteristics. Material and methods. The sample consisted of 45 psychiatry and 36 internal medicine residents. The attitudes toward mental illness were assessed using Opinions about Mental Illness Questionnaire (OMI and personality traits were examined using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ. Results. Our findings showed that in regard to internal medicine residents, psychiatry residents do not consider mentally ill patients to be inferior and dangerous. Psychiatry residents have a benevolent attitude toward the mentally ill. Personality traits of psychiatry residents were not related to their opinions about mental illness. Discussion. The results suggest that there is a need to develop strategies that would bring about changes in the curriculum of training programs for medical residents, including proper training in mental health issues. Such strategies should help in destigmatization of persons with mental disorders and increase the competence of physicians to deal with mentally ill. .

  6. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros , George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admi...

  7. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were...... efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management...

  8. Training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatry Residency: An Overview for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudak, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2001, Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education accredited general psychiatry training programs were charged with the requirement to train residents in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to a level of competence. Programs were given the responsibility to delineate standards for trainees, to determine measures of competence,…

  9. Trends in Psychotherapy Training: A National Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudak, Donna M.; Goldberg, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine current trends in residency training of psychiatrists. Method: The authors surveyed U.S. general-psychiatry training directors about the amount of didactic training, supervised clinical experience, and numbers of patients treated in the RRC-mandated models of psychotherapy (psychodynamic,…

  10. Combined effects of major depression, pain and somatic disorders on general functioning in the general adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baune, Bernhard T; Caniato, Riccardo N; Garcia-Alcaraz, Miguel A; Berger, Klaus

    2008-08-31

    This study was carried out to assess the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in persons suffering from pain symptoms in various locations, both with and without comorbid somatic disorders and to analyze the single and combined effects of MDD, pain symptoms and somatic disorders on general functioning in the community. The 12-month prevalence of MDD, somatic disorders and pain symptoms, grouped according to location, were determined among 4181 participants from a community sample. Depression was assessed utilising the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Pain symptoms were self-reported by participants whereas medical diagnoses were validated by medical examinations. General functioning was evaluated utilising the established MOS-SF-36 scale. The prevalence of MDD was significantly increased for persons with pain in any location. In the absence of a somatic disorder, MDD prevalence was highest in persons with abdominal/chest pain (9.3%) and arm or leg pain (7.9%) and lowest in persons with back pain (6.2%). Mental and physical well-being were lowest for persons with both MDD and a somatic disorder, irrespective of pain locations. Increasing numbers of pain locations impaired mental and physical well-being across all groups, but the effect on mental well-being was most marked in participants with MDD and comorbid somatic disorders. The presence of pain increases risk of associated MDD. The number of pain locations experienced, rather than the specific location of pain, has the greatest impact on general functioning. Not only chronic pain, but pain of any type may be an indicator of MDD and decreased general functioning.

  11. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry.

  12. Musings: What child and adolescent psychiatry means to me

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Eugene Arnold

    2008-01-01

    has been to participate in research on nutritional aspects of child psychiatry. Equally gratifying is to participate in efforts to make such interest and research respectable. The implicit double standard about drugs and psychosocial treatments on the one hand and nutrition and other complementary considerations on the other seems to make many intelligent colleagues reluctant to acknowledge any interest in this area. The discovery of closet nutritionists after boldly speaking out on the subject has been a repeated joy.The experience of observing nature's healing power, coupled with the interest in research, has led me to a great interest in placebo/Hawthorne effect. I'm fascinated by the fact that this no-risk treatment can produce an improvement, depending on the disorder, that is a tenth to twice as much as active medication. For example, if an antidepressant has a 60% response rate and placebo 40% response rate, then the pharmacological effect is 20% response, the difference. In this case, the placebo effect is twice as strong as the pharmacological effect and when you give an antidepressant, 2/3 of the effect is placebo. This is why witch doctors, shamans and charlatans thrive: in the example given, they can be 2/3 as effective as the most expert allopathic psychiatrist. We need to understand this effect better: how much of it is real improvement, how much statistical regression to the mean, how much rater expectation, etc.? Mastery of placebo effect for the good of our patients is particularly important in child psychiatry because children are subject to two sets of expectations: their own and their parents'; and they are probably more sensitive to the expectation matrix than adults are. We should strive to be good witch doctors as well as good psychotherapy technicians, pharmacologists and nutrition experts. I can proudly (and humbly say that I've become the best witch doctor I can be.And that's what child and adolescent psychiatry means to me.

  13. A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana A.; Jesse, Alexandra; Groen, Margriet A.; McQueen, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Because reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia. Method: We tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of…

  14. A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana A.; Jesse, Alexandra; Groen, Margriet A.; McQueen, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Because reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia. Method: We tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of…

  15. Challenges in conducting psychiatry studies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifuddin Kharawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of psychiatry studies are conducted in India. Psychiatry studies are complex and present unique challenges in the Indian setting. Ethical issues pertaining to the risk of worsening of illness, use of placebo and validity of informed consents are commonly faced. Site selection can be difficult due to the relative paucity of ICH-GCP (International Conference on Harmonisation - Good Clinical Practice trained psychiatry investigators in India. Recruitment can be challenging due to issues such as strict eligibility criteria, (lack of availability of caregiver, illness-related considerations, etc. Assessment of the consent capacity of patients is not simple, while structured assessments are not commonly employed. As the illness fluctuates, the consent capacity may change, thus requiring continued assessment of consent capacity. Study patients run the risk of worsening of illness and suicide due to exposure to inactive treatments; this risk is counterbalanced by use of appropriate study designs, as well as the indirect psychotherapeutic support received. Psychiatry studies are associated with a high placebo response. This necessitates conduct of placebo-controlled studies despite the attendant difficulties. Also, the high placebo response is often the cause of failed trials. Rating scales are essential for assessment of drug response. Some rating instruments as well as some rater training procedures may not be suitable for the Indian setting. Technological advancements may increase the procedural complexity but improve the quality of ratings. Psychiatry studies present monitors and auditors with unique scenarios too. Utilization of psychiatry specific training and expertise is recommended to ensure successful conduct of these studies in India.

  16. Teaching Psychiatry Residents to Teach: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp-Han, Holly; Chambliss, R. Bryan; Coverdale, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because there have been no previously published national surveys on teaching psychiatry residents about how to teach, the authors surveyed United States psychiatry program directors on what and how residents are taught about teaching. Methods: All psychiatry training programs across the United States were mailed a semistructured…

  17. Survey of Threats and Assaults by Patients on Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Yael; Moniwa, Emiko; Crisp-Han, Holly; Levy, Dana; Coverdale, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine the prevalence of threats and assaults by patients on psychiatry residents, their consequences, and the perceived adequacy of supports and institutional responses. Method: Authors conducted an anonymous survey of 519 psychiatry residents in 13 psychiatry programs across the United States. The survey…

  18. Associations of Proatrial Natriuretic Peptide with Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents and Young Adults from the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goharian, Tina S; Gøtze, Jens P; Faber, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In middle-aged and elderly populations, circulating natriuretic peptide concentrations are negatively associated with several components of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these negative associations are also present in healthy adolescents and young adults from the general population...... with triglycerides (β = -0.13, P = 0.01), diastolic BP (β = -0.12, P = 0.01) and systolic BP (β = -0.10, P = 0.10), although the latter association was of borderline significance. CONCLUSIONS: The young adults displayed significant negative associations between MR-proANP and several components of the metabolic...... syndrome, whereas such associations were not found among the adolescents besides triglycerides and diastolic BP....

  19. Sagittal standing posture, back pain, and quality of life among adults from the general population: a sex-specific association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Fábio; Lucas, Raquel; Alegrete, Nuno; Azevedo, Ana; Barros, Henrique

    2014-06-01

    A prospective radiographical study of sagittal standing posture among adults consecutively recruited from the general population. To analyze the relation of suboptimal sagittal standing posture with back pain and health-related quality of life in general adult males and females. Clinical studies have shown the association of sagittal standing posture with pain and reduced quality of life, but this relation has not been assessed in the general adult population. As part of the EPIPorto population-based study of adults, 178 males and 311 females were evaluated. Age, education, and body mass index were recorded. Radiographical data collection consisted of 36-in. standing sagittal radiographs. Creation of 3 groups for individual spinopelvic parameters was performed (low, intermediate, or high), and 1 of 4 sagittal types of postural patterns attributed to each participant (Roussouly classification). Back pain prevalence and severity were assessed on the basis of self-reported data and health-related quality of life using 2 main components of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. In males, differences in back pain severity were observed only among pelvic tilt/pelvic incidence ratio groups. Females presenting high pelvic incidence and sacral slope exhibited higher odds of severe back pain than those with intermediate values (adjusted odds ratios = 2.21 and 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-3.97 and 1.21-3.86; respectively). Sagittal vertical axis showed the largest differences in physical quality of life of females: high group had 8.8 lower score than the low group (P posture was not consistently associated with quality of life measures in males. Increased pelvic incidence and sacral slope may be involved in causing severe back pain among females. Monitoring sagittal postural parameters has limited usefulness as a screening tool for causes of unspecific musculoskeletal symptoms in the general adult population. 3.

  20. Disease mongering in psychiatry: fact or fiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saddichha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Disease mongering starts at the top of recent accusations being hurled at psychiatry. It is used to refer to the attempts by pharmaceutical companies or others who have similar interests, to enlarge the market for a treatment by convincing people that they are sick and need medical intervention. This paper critically analyses the 'for' and 'against' arguments of disease mongering in psychiatric disorders, both new and old, such as Bipolar disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Restless legs syndrome, Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, female sexual dysfunction, social phobia, metabolic syndrome and road rage disorder. Keywords: disease mongeringpharmaceutical companies, psychiatry.

  1. Why do we need a social psychiatry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Gupta, Susham; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2016-07-01

    Human beings are social animals, and familial or social relationships can cause a variety of difficulties as well as providing support in our social functioning. The traditional way of looking at mental illness has focused on abnormal thoughts, actions and behaviours in response to internal causes (such as biological factors) as well as external ones such as social determinants and social stressors. We contend that psychiatry is social. Mental illness and interventions in psychiatry should be considered in the framework of social context where patients live and factors they face on a daily basis.

  2. Computational Psychiatry and the Challenge of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, John H; Murray, John D; Chekroud, Adam M; Corlett, Philip R; Yang, Genevieve; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Anticevic, Alan

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia research is plagued by enormous challenges in integrating and analyzing large datasets and difficulties developing formal theories related to the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of this disorder. Computational psychiatry provides a path to enhance analyses of these large and complex datasets and to promote the development and refinement of formal models for features of this disorder. This presentation introduces the reader to the notion of computational psychiatry and describes discovery-oriented and theory-driven applications to schizophrenia involving machine learning, reinforcement learning theory, and biophysically-informed neural circuit models. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center 2017.

  3. Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). Diagnosis and treatment of adults in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jens Georg

    2014-02-01

    The idea behind this thesis is to present how ARS and especially acute maxillary sinusitis in adults is diagnosed and treated in general practice. The study extends over many years, beginning with the first survey in 1991. Based on doctors' answers, we then investigated the diagnostic values ​​of the symptoms, signs and examinations which the doctors reported using. All patients over 18 years suspected of acute maxillary sinusitis were included consecutively and only once and, after a clinical examination with the GP, they were offered the opportunity to enter into the prospective study referred to acute CT scan and by changes in the CT, immediately referred to sinus puncture. Both examinations were conducted at Aalborg Hospital. The disease was found most frequently in younger and 2/3 were women. The reason for this gender difference is unknown. We have assessed the diagnostic values of the symptoms, objective findings and investigations ​​using 3 different reference standards: sinus puncture, microbiological diagnosis and CT scan described in three articles. In all examinations, it appeared that the usual signs and symptoms of acute maxillary sinusitis occur almost equally often and with a few exceptions in patients, with and without pus in the sinus cavities. Pain in the sinus cavities occurring in 95% of patients, and only elevated levels of CRP and ESR are significantly and independently associated with pus in the sinus cavities. This finding is surprising, because they are two nonspecific markers. CRP tested by near-patient testing has, within the investigations period, been introduced in general practice, and from 1999 the doctors also get reimbursed for performing the test. We have on this background originally defined a clinical criterion with pain over the sinuses accompanied by elevated values ​​of CRP and/or ESR giving a sensitivity of 0.82, specificity 0.57, ppv 0.68 and npv 0.74. But looking at the ROC curve we suggest that a more clinical

  4. [Challenges for the future of psychiatry and psychiatric medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the prolonged economic recession and global financial crisis, the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 2011 has caused great fear and devastation in Japan. In the midst of these, Japanese people have felt to lose the traditional values and common sense they used to share, and it has become necessary to build a new consciousness. Engaged in psychiatry and psychiatric care under these circumstances, we have to analyze the challenges we face and to brainstorm on appropriate prescriptions that can be applied to solve the problems. Five points in particular were brought up: [1] The persistently high number of suicides. [2] The increase in depression and overflowing numbers of patients visiting clinics and outpatient departments at hospitals. [3] The absolute shortage of child psychiatrists. [4] Little progress with the transition from hospitalization-centered to community-centered medical care. [5] The disappearance of beds for psychiatry patients from general hospitals. The situations surrounding these five issues were briefly analyzed and problems were pointed out. The following are five problems that psychiatry is facing: 1) A lack of large clinical trials compared to the rest of the world. 2) The drug lag and handling of global trials. 3) The lack of staff involved in education and research (in the field of psychiatry). 4) Following the DSM diagnostic criteria dogmatically, without differentiating therapeutics. 5) Other medical departments, the industry, patients, and their families are demanding objective diagnostic techniques. After analyzing the problems, and discussing to some extent what kind of prescription may be considered to solve the problems, I gave my opinion. (1) The first problem is the deep-rooted prejudice and discrimination against psychiatric disorders that continue to be present among Japanese people. The second problem is the government's policy of low remuneration (fees) for psychiatric services. The third problem, symbolic of the

  5. Senior medical students' attitudes toward psychiatry as a career choice before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Homayoun; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Esmaeili, Sara; Kaviani, Hosein; Shoar, Saeed; Shabani, Amir; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Akhlaghi, Amir Abbas Keshavarz; Noroozi, Alireza; Mafi, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    The study aimed to assess 1) the attitudes of medical students in the sixth and seventh years (known as interns in Iran) toward psychiatry as a career choice, and 2) the degree of attractiveness of psychiatry as a career choice, with regard to various defined aspects, before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship (similar to the medical school psychiatry rotation in the United States, but mandatory in Iran) in three major medical schools in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Sixth- and seventh-year medical students (locally called interns, N=347) at Tehran, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences were consecutively invited to complete anonymous self-report questionnaires designed to assess their perceptions of careers in psychiatry before and after internship in psychiatry wards. Also, students evaluated psychiatry in terms of the factors that reflected the degree of attractiveness of this specialty. Positive responses toward choosing psychiatry as a career were seen in 18.8% before and 20.0% after psychiatry rotation. No significant differences were observed in the positive responses before and after psychiatry internship. The students' opinions changed to a more attractive degree in terms of only 3 out of the 13 defined aspects. There was also no significant difference in the total score on attractiveness of psychiatry before and after the psychiatry internship. The study indicated that undergraduate psychiatry internship might not induce more students to consider psychiatry as a possible career. The present pattern of psychiatry education in Iran seems not to positively affect most aspects of medical students' attitudes toward psychiatry.

  6. Moderation of adult depression by the serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR), childhood abuse and adult traumatic events in a general population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Schwahn, Christian; Mahler, Jessie; Schulz, Andrea; Spitzer, Carsten; Fenske, Kristin; Appel, Katja; Barnow, Sven; Nauck, Matthias; Schomerus, Georg; Biffar, Reiner; Rosskopf, Dieter; John, Ulrich; Völzke, Henry; Freyberger, Harald Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    The impact of the promoter polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) on mood has been studied by two-way interaction models comprising one environmental factor and genotype variants. However, childhood abuse is assumed to be associated with different psychobiological long-term effects than adult traumatic events. Both types of trauma may interact on an individual basis throughout the lifespan moderating the impact of the 5-HTTLPR s allele on depressive disorders. Therefore, the hypothesis of a three-way interaction among the 5-HTTLPR, childhood abuse and adult traumatic experience was tested. Caucasian subjects (1,974) from the general population in Germany (Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)) were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Childhood abuse was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Adult traumatic events were derived from the SCID interview (DSM-IV) on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Global three-way interactions among the 5-HTTLPR, adult traumatic experiences and childhood abuse (P = 0.0007) were found. Carriers of the ss or sl genotypes who had been exposed to childhood abuse and to more than two adult traumatic events had higher mean BDI-II scores (16.0 [95% CI 8.4-23.6]) compared to those carrying the ll genotype (7.6 [4.5-10.7]). These results were supported using a second, more severe definition of childhood abuse (P = 0.02). No two-way interactions were observed (P > 0.05). Childhood abuse and adult traumatic events may act synergistically in interaction with the s allele of the 5-HTTLPR to increase the risk for depressive symptoms independently from the lifetime diagnosis of PTSD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Relationship between practice counselling and referral to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J; Parham, A

    1998-08-01

    Although reduction in the use of secondary care mental health services is a suggested benefit of counselling in general practice, there has been little empirical investigation of this relationship. To investigate the relationship between the provision of counselling in general practice and the use of outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology services across a geographical area. Information on referrals to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology from all general practices in the London Borough of Islington over one year (October 1993 to September 1994) was collected from the routine information systems of the main hospital departments serving this area. Referral rates per 1000 practice population were compared for practices with and without a practice-based counsellor. Fifteen (35%) of the 43 practices had a counsellor based in the practice. The median referral rate to clinical psychology was higher in practices with a counsellor (4.1 per 1000) than in practices without a counsellor (0.8 per 1000). There was no relationship between the provision of practice counselling and median referral rates to outpatient psychiatry (1.8 per 1000 with a counsellor, 1.7 per 1000 without a counsellor). Provision of practice counselling in the study was associated with higher referral rates to clinical psychology and no difference in referral rates to outpatient psychiatry. This is in contrast to the hypothesis that counselling reduces the use of secondary care mental health services.

  8. Differential stigmatizing attitudes of healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems : Something to worry about? A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.M.; Swart, M.; Slooff, C.; van Weeghel, J.; Knegtering, H.; Castelein, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compares stigmatizing attitudes of different healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems. Methods The Mental Illness Clinicians Attitude (MICA) questionnaire is used to assess stigmatizing attitudes in three groups: general practitioners

  9. Differential stigmatizing attitudes of healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems : something to worry about? A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Laura M.; Swart, Marte; Slooff, Cees J.; van Weeghel, Jaap; Knegtering, Henderikus; Castelein, Stynke

    This study compares stigmatizing attitudes of different healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems. The Mental Illness Clinicians Attitude (MICA) questionnaire is used to assess stigmatizing attitudes in three groups: general practitioners (GPs, n = 55),

  10. Differential stigmatizing attitudes of healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems : something to worry about? A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Laura M.; Swart, Marte; Slooff, Cees J.; van Weeghel, Jaap; Knegtering, Henderikus; Castelein, Stynke

    2015-01-01

    This study compares stigmatizing attitudes of different healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems. The Mental Illness Clinicians Attitude (MICA) questionnaire is used to assess stigmatizing attitudes in three groups: general practitioners (GPs, n = 55), men

  11. Differential stigmatizing attitudes of healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems : Something to worry about? A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.M.; Swart, M.; Slooff, C.; van Weeghel, J.; Knegtering, H.; Castelein, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compares stigmatizing attitudes of different healthcare professionals towards psychiatry and patients with mental health problems. Methods The Mental Illness Clinicians Attitude (MICA) questionnaire is used to assess stigmatizing attitudes in three groups: general practitioners (G

  12. Senior Medical Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry as a Career Choice before and after an Undergraduate Psychiatry Internship in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Homayoun; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Esmaeili, Sara; Kaviani, Hosein; Shoar, Saeed; Shabani, Amir; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Akhlaghi, Amir Abbas Keshavarz; Noroozi, Alireza; Mafi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess 1) the attitudes of medical students in the sixth and seventh years (known as interns in Iran) toward psychiatry as a career choice, and 2) the degree of attractiveness of psychiatry as a career choice, with regard to various defined aspects, before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship (similar to…

  13. Effect of generalized joint hypermobility on knee function and muscle activation in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Olesen, Annesofie T.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2013-01-01

    were evaluated in 39 children and 36 adults during isometric knee extension and flexion. Subjects performed isometric maximum contractions, submaximal contractions at 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and explosive contractions. Results: Agonist activation was reduced, and coactivation ratio...

  14. Impact of duration of psychiatry rotation on medical interns’ attitude towards psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical Council of India allowed the interns to take up an extra 15 days of elective posting in psychiatry along with the mandatory posting of 15 days. The study was planned to assess the effect of the additional period of psychiatry internship on the attitude of interns towards psychiatry. Material and methods: The consenting interns were given a semi structured proforma enquiring about their age and gender and were asked to fill up Attitude Towards Psychiatry (ATP scale. The assessment was done at the beginning and then after 15 days of mandatory posting. Those participants who were willing to do an additional 15 days of elective posting in psychiatry were assessed again on the 30th day of the training. Results: Mean age of the participating interns (n=47 was 25.44±1.52 and the male female ratio was 0.8. Twenty six interns did only the 15 days mandatory psychiatry internship posting (Group 1 and the remaining 21 interns took up the additional elective 15 days posting (Group 2. At the end of the 15 days posting, Mean ATP score of the group 1 increased from 88.34±6.07 to 88.46±6.19 (p=0.80 whereas the same increased from 88.04±7.06 to 88.19±7.65 (p=0.7 in the group 2 and further increased to 91.09±8.3 at the end of the additional 15 days of elective posting (p<0.05. Conclusion: A thirty days exposure of psychiatry during internship had more favourable impact on the attitude of interns towards psychiatry.

  15. Nursing Diagnoses in Inpatient Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Achterberg, T. van; Needham, I.; Staub, M. Muller

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study explored how well NANDA-I covers the reality of adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. METHODS: Patient observations documented by registered nurses in records were analyzed using content analysis and mapped with the classification NANDA-I. FINDINGS: A total of 1,818 notes wer

  16. Imaging-Genetics Applications in Child Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To place imaging-genetics research in the context of child psychiatry. Method: A conceptual overview is provided, followed by discussion of specific research examples. Results: Imaging-genetics research is described linking brain function to two specific genes, for the serotonin-reuptake-transporter protein and a monoamine oxidase…

  17. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  18. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... latest Policy Statement on Psychologists Prescribing. Be CAPtivated - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as a Career AACAP Latest News AACAP Statement on DACA Rescission More... AACAP Applauds Oregon Governor’s Veto of Psychology Prescribing Bill More... In Response to "13 Reasons ...

  19. Undergraduate Child Psychiatry Teaching in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jenny K.; McCallum, Zoe; Bevan, Catherine; Vance, Alasdair

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The teaching of child psychiatry in Australian medical schools is under review: the content, the placement of the field within medical curricula, and the appropriate teaching and learning methods are all contested. The authors developed a 1-day program in the 9-week child and adolescent health course conducted in the final two semesters…

  20. Neurology is psychiatry--and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Adam

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores the relationship between neurology and psychiatry. It marshals evidence that disorders of the brain typically have neurological and psychological-cognitive, affective, behavioural-manifestations, while disorders of the psyche are based in the brain. Given the inseparability of neurological and psychiatric disorders, their disease classifications should eventually fuse, and joint initiatives in training, service and research should be strongly encouraged.

  1. Assisting Undergraduate Physician Assistant Training in Psychiatry: The Role of Academic Psychiatry Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Ferguson, Britnay A

    2015-12-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) are medical professionals who practice medicine with the supervision of a physician through delegated autonomy. PA school accreditation standards provide limited guidance for training PAs in psychiatry. As a result, PA students may receive inconsistent and possibly inadequate exposure to psychiatry. Providing broad and in-depth exposure to the field of psychiatry is important to attract PA students to pursue careers in psychiatry and provide a possible solution to the shortage of psychiatrists nationwide. Additionally, this level of exposure will prepare PA students who pursue careers in other fields of medicine to recognize and address their patient's psychiatric symptoms in an appropriate manner. This training can be provided by an academic department of psychiatry invested in the education of PA students. We describe a training model implemented at our university that emphasizes psychiatrist involvement in the preclinical year of PA school and full integration of PA students into the medical student psychiatry clerkship during the clinical years. The benefits and challenges to implementing this model are discussed as well.

  2. [Shall psychiatry change its target? Reflections on the evolving role of psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Federica; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Luciano, Mario; Sampogna, Gaia; De Rosa, Corrado; Ferrari, Silvia; Pingani, Luca; Tarricone, Ilaria; Volpe, Umberto; Carrà, Giuseppe; Roncone, Rita; Catapano, Francesco; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we will describe cultural, social and scientific changes occurred in psychiatry in the last years, identifying the new target for mental health professionals. Groups of young psychiatrists from the Italian Psychiatric Association, the European Psychiatric Association and the World Psychiatric Association have established an international network that launched a debate on the future role of psychiatry. In a rapidly changing world, there is the need to: 1) adapt training in psychiatry to the modern world; 2) identify the new target of mental health professionals; 3) enhance the image of psychiatry in the society; 4) overcome stigma towards people with mental disorders. In recent years, socio-cultural and scientific changes have had a significant impact on the psychiatrists' clinical practice. Mental health professionals should deal with these changes appropriately in order to overcome the current "crisis" of psychiatry, which should be considered as a developmental phase rather than a conceptual one. From time to time psychiatry is criticized both from inside and outside the profession. The current crisis was unavoidable due to the recent socio-cultural changes, but it should be considered an opportunity to adapt the profession to modern times.

  3. Dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression among adult patients with dental anxiety but with different dental-attendance patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernson, Jenny M; Elfström, Magnus L; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression in relation to regularity of dental treatment among persons with either regular dental care or phobic avoidance, whilst controlling for sociodemographic factors. Psychometric questionnaires on dental anxiety, dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression were delivered to 263 adult patients with dental phobic avoidance behavior who were seeking help from a specialized dental fear clinic and to 141 adult patients with dental anxiety who were receiving regular dental care from various public dental clinics. The results showed that the levels of dental and general anxiety and of depression were significantly higher among irregular attendees compared with regular attendees. Irregular attendees admitted fewer adaptive coping strategies. Predictive of irregular dental care were gender, dental anxiety, general anxiety, and the nonuse of the coping strategy 'optimism'. This study further confirms earlier preliminary results that the use of optimistic thinking is predictive for regular dental attendance habits and that male gender is a risk factor for irregular attendance. Moreover, this study adds that a high level of general anxiety indicates a higher risk for irregular dental care.

  4. The prevalence of mental disorders in adults in different level general medical facilities in Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuria Mary W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibility that a significant proportion of the patients attending a general health facility may have a mental disorder means that psychiatric conditions must be recognised and managed appropriately. This study sought to determine the prevalence of common psychiatric disorders in adult (aged 18 years and over inpatients and outpatients seen in public, private and faith-based general hospitals, health centres and specialised clinics and units of general hospitals. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 10 health facilities. All the patients in psychiatric wards and clinics were excluded. Stratified and systematic sampling methods were used. Informed consent was obtained from all study participants. Data were collected over a 4-week period in November 2005 using various psychiatric instruments for adults. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS V. 11.5. Results A total of 2,770 male and female inpatients and outpatients participated in the study. In all, 42% of the subjects had symptoms of mild and severe depression. Only 114 (4.1% subjects had a file or working diagnosis of a psychiatric condition, which included bipolar mood disorder, schizophrenia, psychosis and depression. Conclusion The 4.1% clinician detection rate for mental disorders means that most psychiatric disorders in general medical facilities remain undiagnosed and thus, unmanaged. This calls for improved diagnostic practices in general medical facilities in Kenya and in other similar countries.

  5. Neuroscience and humanistic psychiatry: a residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James L

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatry residencies with a commitment to humanism commonly prioritize training in psychotherapy, cultural psychiatry, mental health policy, promotion of human rights, and similar areas reliant upon dialogue and collaborative therapeutic relationships. The advent of neuroscience as a defining paradigm for psychiatry has challenged residencies with a humanistic focus due to common perceptions that it would entail constriction of psychiatric practice to diagnostic and psychopharmacology roles. The author describes a neuroscience curriculum that has taught psychopharmacology effectively, while also advancing effectiveness of language-based and relationship-based therapeutics. In 2000, the George Washington University psychiatry residency initiated a neuroscience curriculum consisting of (1) a foundational postgraduate year 2 seminar teaching cognitive and social neuroscience and its integration into clinical psychopharmacology, (2) advanced seminars that utilized a neuroscience perspective in teaching specific psychotherapeutic skill sets, and (3) case-based teaching in outpatient clinical supervisions that incorporated a neuroscience perspective into traditional psychotherapy supervisions. Curricular assessment was conducted by (1) RRC reaccreditation site visit feedback, (2) examining career trajectories of residency graduates, (3) comparing PRITE exam Somatic Treatments subscale scores for 2010-2012 residents with pre-implementation residents, and (4) postresidency survey assessment by 2010-2012 graduates. The 2011 RRC site visit report recommended a "notable practice" citation for "innovative neurosciences curriculum." Three of twenty 2010-2012 graduates entered neuroscience research fellowships, as compared to none before the new curriculum. PRITE Somatic Treatments subscale scores improved from the 23rd percentile to the 62nd percentile in pre- to post-implementation of curriculum (p neuroscience curriculum for a residency committed to humanistic psychiatry

  6. Seroepidemiology of pertussis in a cross-sectional study of an adult general population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, P F; Dalby, T; Simonsen, J

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An increase in pertussis has been observed in several countries over the last decades, especially in adult populations. The seroprevalence of pertussis was determined in a cross-sectional study of the adult population in the Copenhagen area, Denmark, conducted between 2006 and 2008....../1000 person-years. In contrast, an incidence of 0·03/1000 person-years was estimated from the official data of notified cases during the same period. Of the investigated risk factors, only age and education were significantly associated with pertussis infection. This study indicates that pertussis is highly...

  7. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI: perspectives in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulert, Christoph; Pogarell, Oliver; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    Neurophysiological findings such as reduced amplitudes of the P300 potential in patients with schizophrenia are among the most robust findings in biological psychiatry. An enormous literature with findings of abnormal central processing in psychiatric diseases has been acquired during the last decades. However, the benefit of this research has been limited in part due to the unresolved problem of precise and correct localization of the underlying neural generators. The difficulty of correct localization is due to the fact that different constellations of cortical neuroelectric generators can produce identical EEG activity. Therefore, even concerning several major event related potentials no generally accepted knowledge about their cerebral generation exists. While correct localization can easily be obtained by imaging methods based on hemodynamic changes such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), these techniques can not distinguish between different aspects of neural activity such as oscillation modes or stages of information processing that are only some milliseconds apart. Accordingly, the integration of simultaneous measurements of EEG and fMRI has become a methodological key issue today. EEG-fMRI may prove to be crucial in providing much deeper understanding of brain activity over the next decades. This review summarizes the basic physiology, methodological issues and interesting applications in psychiatry.

  8. The Mental Health of British Adults with Intellectual Impairments Living in General Households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Robertson, Janet; Baines, Susannah

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability or borderline intellectual functioning may have poorer mental health than their peers. The present authors sought to (i) estimate the risk of poorer mental health among British adults with and without intellectual impairments and (ii) estimate the extent to which any between-group differences in…

  9. Learned Attention in Adult Language Acquisition: A Replication and Generalization Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Nick C.; Sagarra, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates associative learning explanations of the limited attainment of adult compared to child language acquisition in terms of learned attention to cues. It replicates and extends Ellis and Sagarra (2010) in demonstrating short- and long-term learned attention in the acquisition of temporal reference in Latin. In Experiment 1,…

  10. An Economical Method for the Evaluation of General Intelligence in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodrill, Carl B.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluated the ability of the Wonderlic Personnel Test to replicate the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) with (N=120) normal persons divided into principal and cross-validation groups. Correlations between the Wonderlic IQs and the WAIS Full Scale IQs were .93 for the main group and .91 for the cross-validation group. (Author)

  11. Group cognitive behavioral therapy targeting intolerance of uncertainty: a randomized trial for older Chinese adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chen; Zhihui, Yang

    2016-09-03

    China has entered the aging society, but the social support systems for the elderly are underdeveloped, which may make the elderly feel anxiety about their health and life quality. Given the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in the elderly, it is very important to pay more attention to the treatment for old adults. Although cognitive behavioral therapy targeting intolerance of uncertainty (CBT-IU) has been applied to different groups of patients with GAD, few studies have been performed to date. In addition, the effects of CBT-IU are not well understood, especially when applied to older adults with GAD. Sixty-three Chinese older adults with a principal diagnosis of GAD were enrolled. Of these, 32 were randomized to receive group CBT-IU (intervention group) and 31 were untreated (control group). GAD and related symptoms were assessed using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-Chinese Version, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Why Worry-II scale, Cognitive Avoidance Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale across the intervention. The changes between pre and after the intervention were collected, as well as the six-month follow-up. F test and repeated-measures ANOVA were conducted to analyze the data. Compared to control group, the measures' scores of experimental group decreased significantly after the intervention and six-month follow-up. Besides the main effects for time and group were significant, the interaction effect for group × time was also significant. These results indicated the improvement of the CBT-IU group and the persistence of effect after six months. Group CBT-IU is effective in Chinese older adults with GAD. The effects of CBT-IU on GAD symptoms persist for at least six months after treatment.

  12. Cultural psychiatry. Theoretical, clinical, and research issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, R; Kleinman, A

    1995-09-01

    As a discipline, cultural psychiatry has matured considerably in recent years and the ongoing quality of its theoretical, clinical, and research development holds great promise. The contemporary emphasis on culture as process permits a deeper analysis of the complexities of sociosomatics--the translation of meanings and social relations into bodily experience--and, thus, of the social course of illness. We also are learning a great deal more about cultural processes that affect therapy, including ethnopharmacologic and culturally valid family interventions that are directly relevant to patient care and mental health policy. And an important set of studies is examining the trauma experienced by refugees and immigrants. But at the same time many disquieting findings still point to the limited impact of cultural psychiatry on knowledge creation and clinical application in psychiatry. The failure of the cultural validation of DSM-IV is only the most dismaying. The persistent misdiagnosis of minority patients and the continued presence of racial bias in some treatment recommendations are also disheartening, as is the seeming contempt of many mainstream psychiatrists for culturally defined syndromes and folk healing systems. Widespread inattention to ethnic issues in medical ethics is another source of dismay. It is for these reasons that the culture of psychiatry itself becomes as important as the culture of patients as a topic for research and intervention. Most of the world still suffers from a terrible lack of basic mental health services, including life-saving medications and hospital beds. In the face of these limitations, and because of the increasing multicultural and pluralistic reality of contemporary life, the growing interpretive bridges linking indigenous systems of illness classification and healing to Western nosologies and therapeutic modalities become even more essential and the reluctance of mainstream clinicians to explore folk healing methods more

  13. Prevalence of tension-type headache in adult general population: the PACE study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, T; Manzoni, G C; Russo, M; Camarda, C; Taga, A; Veronesi, L; Pasquarella, C; Sansebastiano, G; Torelli, P

    2013-05-01

    The mean global prevalence of tension-type headache (TTH) in adult is 42 %. To date, there have been no Italian studies on TTH prevalence in the adult general population. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study, called PACE (PArma CEfalea, or "Headache in Parma"), aimed at detecting the prevalence and clinical features of primary headaches in the city of Parma's adult general population. Crude past-year prevalence for definite TTH was 19.4 % (95 % CI 16.8-21.9), namely 9.0 % (95 % CI 7.1-10.8) for infrequent TTH, 9.8 % (95 % CI 7.9-11.8) for frequent TTH, and 0.6 % (95 % CI 0.1-1) for chronic TTH. Crude prevalence for probable TTH was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.3). Our study results indicate a TTH prevalence rate (19.4 %) at the lower limit of data ranges currently available for Western countries, and prevalence rates for infrequent forms (9 %) do not appear much different from those of frequent forms (9.8 %).

  14. Assessment of the factor structure and reliability of the Portuguese version of the General Health Questionnaire-28 among adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Almeida Vieira Monteiro, Ana Paula Teixeira

    2011-02-01

    The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ, Goldberg & Hillier, 1979 , Psychological Medicine, 9, 139-145) is a self-administered questionnaire used to measure non-psychotic psychiatric disorders. There is a study using a Portuguese version of this questionnaire (n = 60) including a group of inpatients with infectious diseases (Ribeiro & Antunes, 2003 , Revista Portuguesa de Psicossomática, 5(1), 37-45), but there are no larger studies in non-clinical Portuguese population. The primary aim of the study was to confirm the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the GHQ-28 among 171 Portuguese adults in non-clinical settings. The Portuguese version of the GHQ-28 was administered to 171 adult subjects of Portuguese general population. The Portuguese version of the GHQ-28 has an internally consistent measure Cronbach's α 0.922 for the GHQ-28 total scale. For the subscale somatic symptoms Cronbach's α was 0.825; for the subscale Anxiety/ Insomnia, Cronbach's α was 0.873; for the subscale Social dysfunction Cronbach's α was 0.873 and for the subscale Severe Depression was 0.838. Four factors were extracted using factor analysis: somatic symptoms (items 1-7); anxiety/insomnia (items 8-14); psychosocial dysfunction (items 15-21); and severe depression (items 22-28). The findings suggest that the GHQ-28 is a suitable screening instrument for adult Portuguese population in non-clinical settings.

  15. General health checks in adults for reducing morbidity and mortality from disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    General health checks are common elements of health care in some countries. These aim to detect disease and risk factors for disease with the purpose of reducing morbidity and mortality. Most of the commonly used screening tests offered in general health checks have been incompletely studied. Also...

  16. Generalized Linear Models of home activity for automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Ahmad; Snoek, Jasper; Mihailidis, Alex

    2014-01-01

    With a globally aging population, the burden of care of cognitively impaired older adults is becoming increasingly concerning. Instances of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are becoming ever more frequent. Earlier detection of cognitive impairment offers significant benefits, but remains difficult to do in practice. In this paper, we develop statistical models of the behavior of older adults within their homes using sensor data in order to detect the early onset of cognitive decline. Specifically, we use inhomogenous Poisson processes to model the presence of subjects within different rooms throughout the day in the home using unobtrusive sensing technologies. We compare the distributions learned from cognitively intact and impaired subjects using information theoretic tools and observe statistical differences between the two populations which we believe can be used to help detect the onset of cognitive decline.

  17. Horatio Alger and the GED (General Education Development Diploma: Narratives of success in adult literacy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Sandlin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a qualitative analysis of stories of successful students told in adult literacy education. These stories follow a similar narrative, beginning with a protagonist who must overcome life obstacles, makes a conscious decision to change her life, rejects dependency, is of high moral character, remains optimistic despite challenges, and who ultimately succeeds through determination, perseverance, and hard work. After presenting these stories I argue that they are the latest manifestation of a genre of stories told for centuries in the United States and that comprise what many have called the ‘American Myth of Success’. This myth, which has its roots in seventeenth-century Puritanism, states that every person, as a result of hard work and effort, can create the life they want for themselves. While these myths might provide hope for some adult literacy learners and teachers, I conclude that unquestioningly telling these success stories help to perpetuate the assumptions of this myth of success, and results in blaming adult learners for their own failure while ignoring social and structural factors that impede success.

  18. [Malaise in psychiatry and its history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebili, S

    2016-04-01

    The main hypothesis of this paper is the presence of malaise in psychiatry. The malaise has two sides: on one hand, the end of psychiatry hegemony that dominated the theoretical field of psychiatry until the 1990s. The loss of influence of psychoanalysis is due to its inability to be submitted to any kind of assessment. On the other hand, the supremacy of neurosciences. The idea is not to underestimate the importance of neurosciences but rather to affirm that they occupy the whole theoretical field of psychiatry. This is an unusual situation that is specific to our time. Indeed, this monism has succeeded to an epistemological dualism that has existed throughout the history of psychiatry. In this article, we'll try to draw a history of dualism in psychiatry. Firstly, with Pinel, we find a tension between a metaphysical philosophical pole and a physiological one. Pinel's philosophy has something to do with Condillac's ideology as Pinel applies the analytical method to mental diseases. Under Cabanis's influence, the author of the famous Rapports du physique et du moral de l'homme, this ideology is under pressure with physiologism. As a materialist, he gives an essential part to the brain that distributes pieces of information throughout the body because he thinks that mind influences body. Secondly, dualism lies between the doctrine of localizations defended by Gall and the theory of degeneration elaborated by Magnan. Gall, in Anatomie et physiologie du système nerveux en général, seeks to know how bumps or hollows that are found on the skull are shaped. Gall is for the theory of delocalizations. He is the counterpart of Magnan who wrote a work about Les Dégénérés, that takes its part in the physiological trend with the famous theory of degeneration. For him, degeneration means the imperfect state of a subject whose cerebral functions are in a noticeably imperfect state. Thirdly, with Henry Ey, dualism starts to be less important. Indeed, he tends a monist

  19. [Philosophy against psychiatry, right up against it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demazeux, Steeves

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1990s, there has been a tremendous new interest at the international level for researches at the crossroad between philosophy and psychiatry. This interest has been supported and quite stimulated by the foundation of a dedicated association, as well as by the establishment of a journal and the promotion of a new collection. My aim in this paper is to trace the origins of the so-called "new philosophy of psychiatry" field and to reconstruct its global intellectual dynamics during the past two decades. I try to identify, through the big diversity of the individual contributions, its dominant theoretical orientations but also what may appear as some of its philosophical blind spots.

  20. Forensic psychiatry determination of mental capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Aleksandar A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forensic psychiatry determination is, ordered by a court, the analysis and interpretation of medical facts with important legal implications. In that sense, psychiatrists (or neuropsychiatrists, apart from their professional expertise, must be familiar with legal, economical and social significance of medical data, so that their forensic reports are clear and useful in the context of legal procedure. This review deals with forensic psychiatry aspects of mental capacity. In the introduction of the article, the explanation of relevant concepts such as mental capacity, contractual and testamentary capacity, informed consent, undue influence and forensic determination in light of Serbian statutory law is presented. Further, the authors present basic principles of making forensic reports on mental capacity as well as contractual and testamentary capacity, and informed consent for eventual medical examination and treatment.

  1. Advances in IT and social psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese P Punnoose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IT has revolutionized the way individuals carry on with their lives and has been harnessed for varied applications like business management, classroom teaching, online sales and ticketing, and so forth.[1],[2] IT itself has seen development over the course of the last few decades and has seen greater access to the population, increase in computing power and speed, and enrichment in terms of content. The scope of IT has been appropriately recognized for health-care delivery and has led to the emergence of offshoot disciplines of eHealth and mHealth. Consequently, social psychiatry has also been favorably impacted, either directly or indirectly, by the ever expanding horizons of IT. This editorial discusses the application of IT in the realm of social psychiatry

  2. Logical and conceptual problems of existential psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, C

    1985-05-01

    The author has argued that existential psychology and psychiatry are not consistent with existential philosophy, from which they derive their basic concepts. Existential philosophy treats consciousness as an epistemic and ontological absolute while existential psychology and psychiatry acknowledge the existence of unconscious mental processes. It is not possible to base a viable concept of psychodynamic psychotherapy, the nature of transference, or the efficacy of interpretation upon the radical concept of freedom, which is basic to existential philosophy. If psychiatrists wish to experiment with nonpsychoanalytic dynamic psychologies, then it is the author's opinion that the advancement of knowledge would be better served either by using existentialist concepts and principles consistently or by explicitly altering them in clearly defined ways for stated reasons, or by formulating psychodynamic hypotheses that do not lay claim to any foundation in existential philosophy.

  3. Psychiatry and neurology: from dualism to integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobański, Jerzy A; Dudek, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    The two objectives of the following paper are: to make few remarks on the topic absorbing neurologists, psychiatrists, and neuropsychiatrists - integration and division of their specialties; and to describe the situation in Poland, reflected in the latest literature. The authors describe the former and present processes of approaches and divisions in psychiatry and neurology. They indicate dissemination of mutual methods of structural and action brain neuroimaging, neurophysiology, neurogenetics, and advanced neurophysiology diagnostics. As it seems, even the effectiveness of psychotherapy, has recently been associated with changes in brain in functional and even structural markers. The authors indicate the value of the strive to join the still divided specialties, reflected worldwide in attempts of common education and clinical cooperation of physicians. It can be expected that subsequent years will bring further triumphs of neuropsychiatry - a field that combines psychiatry and neurology.

  4. Computational Psychiatry in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Sarah K; Stahl, Dylan; Corlett, Philip

    2017-03-01

    We review the literature on the use and potential use of computational psychiatry methods in Borderline Personality Disorder. Computational approaches have been used in psychiatry to increase our understanding of the molecular, circuit, and behavioral basis of mental illness. This is of particular interest in BPD, where the collection of ecologically valid data, especially in interpersonal settings, is becoming more common and more often subject to quantification. Methods that test learning and memory in social contexts, collect data from real-world settings, and relate behavior to molecular and circuit networks are yielding data of particular interest. Research in BPD should focus on collaborative efforts to design and interpret experiments with direct relevance to core BPD symptoms and potential for translation to the clinic.

  5. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  6. The Many Faces of Dissociation: Opportunities for Innovative Research in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders. PMID:25598819

  7. Artiss Symposium 2013: Psychiatry and Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Saturdays. They increase caffeine con- sumption. They use over the counter or even prescription sleep aids in a chronic fashion. They become over-focused on...cognitive side effects. Your ability to do a 46 Artiss Symposium 2013—Psychiatry and Sleep Disorders neurological exam may be impaired if a patient is...Patient education includes talking to your patients about caffeine use, alcohol use, exercise, and stimulus control. Stimulus control addresses what you

  8. European psychiatry: needs, challenges and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höschl, Cyril

    2009-11-01

    European psychiatry stays now on the crossroad due to conceptual challenges, drifts of political power from the national to the European level, the current economical situation, arising ethical concerns and an emphasis on patients rights. The latter challenge mainly the structure of mental health care demanding a more important role of patients and families. The needs of harmonisation of research, educational, legislative, and political activities in the field of mental health on the European level are briefly discussed.

  9. Associations between cortical thickness and general intelligence in children, adolescents and young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Menary (Kyle); P.F. Collins (Paul); J.N. Porter (James); R.L. Muetzel (Ryan); E.A. Olson (Elizabeth); V. Kumar (Vipin); D. Steinbach; K.O. Lim (Kelvin); M. Luciana (Monica)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNeuroimaging research indicates that human intellectual ability is related to brain structure including the thickness of the cerebral cortex. Most studies indicate that general intelligence is positively associated with cortical thickness in areas of association cortex distributed

  10. Associations between cortical thickness and general intelligence in children, adolescents and young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Menary (Kyle); P.F. Collins (Paul); J.N. Porter (James); R.L. Muetzel (Ryan); E.A. Olson (Elizabeth); V. Kumar (Vipin); D. Steinbach; K.O. Lim (Kelvin); M. Luciana (Monica)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNeuroimaging research indicates that human intellectual ability is related to brain structure including the thickness of the cerebral cortex. Most studies indicate that general intelligence is positively associated with cortical thickness in areas of association cortex distributed throug

  11. The Generality of Adult Development Stages and Transformations: Comparing Meaning-making and Logical Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Hagström; Kristian Stålne

    2015-01-01

    Human development theories differ in “context sensitivity,” covering those stressing development stages and those stressing continuously progressing changes. The former theories differ in whether, how and why the stages are regarded as being generalized across domains, i.e. their generality claims. Piaget’s developmental stage theory of logical complexity of children and adolescents fulfill “strong” such claims, including fixed stage sequentiality of increasing complexity levels and higher st...

  12. The Third Wave of Biological Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eWalter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will argue that we are witnessing at this moment the third wave of biological psychiatry. This framework conceptualizes mental disorders as brain disorders of a special kind that requires a multilevel approach ranging from genes to psychosocial mechanisms. In contrast to earlier biological psychiatry approaches the mental plays a more prominent role in the third wave. This will become apparent by discussing the recent controversy evolving around the recently published DSM-5 and the competing transdiagnostic Research Domain Criteria approach of the National Institute of Mental Health that is build on concepts of cognitive neuroscience. A look at current conceptualizations in biological psychiatry as well as at some discussions in current philosophy of mind on situated cognition, reveals that the thesis, that mental brain disorders are brain disorders has to be qualified with respect to how mental states are constituted and with respect to multilevel explanations of which factors contribute to stable patterns of psychopathological signs and symptoms.

  13. Women in academic psychiatry in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, P S

    1987-11-01

    A comparison of numbers of women psychiatrists with faculty appointments and women residents in Departments of Psychiatry in Canada in 1975 and 1985 showed that the average percentage of women faculty has increased from 11.4% to 14.3% and of women residents from 23.5% to 43.4%. Some departments appeared to be oblivious to the special educational role of women faculty and had not discussed the discrepancy between the numbers of faculty and residents. Only two departments were actively recruiting women faculty. The study also demonstrated a continued concentration of women in the lower ranks. Barriers to recruiting women faculty include lack of academic role models, job advertising not specifically designed to attract women candidates, rigid requirements for appointments, women's lack of access to male corridors of power, pervasive underlying doubts about women's abilities and competence based on cultural stereotypes, female socialization which does not lend itself readily to roles of authority, assertiveness and leadership, and the role strain that ensues when women psychiatrists try to combine career, marriage and motherhood. If women psychiatrists are to fill some of the positions in Departments of Psychiatry, which will fall vacant over the next decade, much more attention must be paid to eliminating or diminishing the multiple obstacles for women who chose a career in academic psychiatry.

  14. A frame of mind from psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintiadis, Elly

    2015-11-01

    A distinctive characteristic of psychiatry is that it is a discipline that deals with both the physical and the mental lives of individuals. Largely because of this characteristic, different models are used for different disorders, however, there is still a remnant tendency towards reductionist views in the field. In this paper I argue that the available empirical evidence from psychiatry gives us reasons to question biological reductionism and that, in its place, we should adopt a pluralistic explanatory model that is more suited to the needs of the discipline and to the needs of the patients it is meant to help. This will allow us to retain psychiatry as an autonomous science that can productively co-exist with neuroscience while also giving patients the kind of attention they need. I further argue that this same evidence supports a view of the mind that is anti-reductive and that allows that causation can be both bottom-up and top-down and that such a view is available in emergentism coupled with an interventionist model of causation.

  15. Neuropsychiatrie of biologische psychiatrie; een toekomstvisie in historisch perspectief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, W M; Tuinier, S

    1999-06-01

    Neuropsychiatry or Biological Psychiatry There is an urgent need to reconsider the position of psychiatry within the neurosciences because of the exploding knowledge about the relationship between brain and behaviour and the delay in implementation of new findings due to the separation of neurology and psychiatry. Biological psychiatry and psychopharmacology originate from the discovery by chance of psycho-active compounds in the early fifties and have contributed to the scientification of psychiatry. The impact of biological psychiatry for the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, however, is limited as a result of its biased orientation on neurotransmitters and receptors. The neuropsychiatric paradigm integrates knowledge from several domains, such as functional neuroanatomy, genetics and endocrinology and opens new vistas for the involvement of neuronal circuits in the initiation and maintenance of behavioural disturbances. In addition, novel and more specific treatment modalities may emerge.

  16. "Aging males" symptoms and general health of adult males: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W; Ng, Chi-Fai; Chiu, Peter Ka Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen Chun; Yee, C H

    2016-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore the prevalence and severity of health-related complaints perceived by adult males of Hong Kong by using the Hong Kong Traditional Chinese versions of the Aging males' symptoms (AMS) scale and the 5-dimensional and 3-level European Quality of life (EQ-5D-3L) questionnaire. A total of 825 adult males aged 40 years or above were surveyed, and observed that 80% of the population was living with little-to-mild levels of aging symptoms with mean total scores ranged between 26.02 ± 7.91 and 32.99 ± 7.91 in different age groups. Such symptoms were correlated with age, especially for the somato-vegetative and sexual symptoms. The most severe AMS symptoms were observed in the oldest age group at 70 years or above, with 76%, 34% and 70% living with moderate-to-severe levels of somato-vegetative, psychological and sexual symptoms, respectively. The result was highly correlated with the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire. Secondly, the Hong Kong Aging males' symptoms (AMS) scale was shown to have good reliability with test-retest coefficient at 0.79 (ranged 0.66-0.87) and Cronbach's alpha coefficient at 0.88 (ranged 0.70-0.84). In summary, the population of Hong Kong male adults was commonly living with little-to-mild levels of aging symptoms, whereas their severity was correlated with age.

  17. General anaesthesia in an adult patient with Morquio syndrom with emphasis on airway issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadic, Lajla; Driessen, Jacques J

    2012-05-01

    Patients with Morquio syndrome possess a number of characteristics which may complicate an anaesthetic procedure. The most important is that a deposition of mucopolysaccharides in the soft tissues of the oro-pharynx distorts the airway, making the airway management difficult, while the atlanto-axial instability puts these patients at risk of subluxation and quadriparesis. As the endotracheal intubation in Morquio syndrome patients may be difficult or even impossible, we recommend the technique of awake fiberoptic intubation to be considered. Our approach to awake fiberoptic intubation in an adult patient is described in this case report.

  18. Acute diarrhea in adults consulting a general practitioner in France during winter: incidence, clinical characteristics, management and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Christophe; Amoros, Jean Pierre; Vaillant, Véronique; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Chikhi-Brachet, Roxane; Jourdan-Da Silva, Nathalie; Varesi, Laurent; Arrighi, Jean; Souty, Cécile; Blanchon, Thierry; Falchi, Alessandra; Hanslik, Thomas

    2014-10-30

    Data describing the epidemiology and management of viral acute diarrhea (AD) in adults are scant. The objective of this study was to identify the incidence, clinical characteristics, management and risk factors of winter viral AD in adults. The incidence of AD in adults during two consecutive winters (from December 2010 to April 2011 and from December 2011 to April 2012) was estimated from the French Sentinelles network. During these two winters, a subset of Sentinelles general practitioners (GPs) identified and included adult patients who presented with AD and who filled out a questionnaire and returned a stool specimen for virological examination. All stool specimens were tested for astrovirus, group A rotavirus, human enteric adenovirus, and norovirus of genogroup I and genogroup II. Age- and sex-matched controls were included to permit a case-control analysis with the aim of identifying risk factors for viral AD. During the studied winters, the average incidence of AD in adults was estimated to be 3,158 per 100,000 French adults (95% CI [2,321 - 3,997]). The most reported clinical signs were abdominal pain (91.1%), watery diarrhea (88.5%), and nausea (83.3%). GPs prescribed a treatment in 95% of the patients with AD, and 80% of the working patients with AD could not go to work. Stool examinations were positive for at least one enteric virus in 65% (95% CI [57 - 73]) of patients with AD with a predominance of noroviruses (49%). Having been in contact with a person who has suffered from AD in the last 7 days, whether within or outside the household, and having a job (or being a student) were risk factors significantly associated with acquiring viral AD. During the winter, AD of viral origin is a frequent disease in adults, and noroviruses are most often the cause. No preventable risk factor was identified other than contact with a person with AD. Thus, at the present time, reinforcement of education related to hand hygiene remains the only way to reduce the

  19. An Innovative Use of Case Conference to Teach Future Educators in Addiction Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muvvala, Srinivas B; Marienfeld, Carla; Encandela, John; Petrakis, Ismene; Edens, Ellen Lockard

    2016-06-01

    Objective An innovative course was developed for fellows enrolled in the Yale School of Medicine Addiction Psychiatry program to educate them in key principles of adult learning, apply these principles in a case conference presentation, and to improve skills in providing and receiving feedback. Methods An initial training module on educational skills was followed by individual mentorship to prepare a case presentation. A feedback module provided space to learn and practice skills in feedback delivery. Results The program showed positive results and improved confidence levels of the participants in presenting and providing/receiving feedback. Conclusions Implementing a course designed to improve teaching and feedback skills is feasible in a 1-year Addiction Psychiatry fellowship.

  20. Evolutionary psychiatry: a new College special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Riadh; St John-Smith, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary science remains an overlooked area in psychiatry and medicine. The newly established Royal College of Psychiatrists' Evolutionary Psychiatry Special Interest Group aims to reverse this trend by raising the profile of evolutionary thinking among College members and others further afield. Here we provide a brief outline of the importance of the evolutionary approach to both the theory and practice of psychiatry and for future research.

  1. Evolutionary psychiatry: a new College special interest group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Riadh; St John-Smith, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary science remains an overlooked area in psychiatry and medicine. The newly established Royal College of Psychiatrists' Evolutionary Psychiatry Special Interest Group aims to reverse this trend by raising the profile of evolutionary thinking among College members and others further afield. Here we provide a brief outline of the importance of the evolutionary approach to both the theory and practice of psychiatry and for future research.

  2. The assessment of the prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions in older adults presenting to general practice: a research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clements Charlotte

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal conditions represent a common reason for consulting general practice yet with the exception of low back pain, relatively little is known about the prognosis of these disorders. Recent evidence suggests that common 'generic' factors may be of value when assessing prognosis, irrespective of the location of the pain. This study will test a generic assessment tool used as part of the general practice consultation to determine prognosis of musculoskeletal complaints. Methods/Design Older adults (aged 50 years and over presenting to six general practices with musculoskeletal complaints will be assessed as part of the routine consultation using a generic assessment of prognosis. Participants will receive a self-completion questionnaire at baseline, three, six and 12 months post consultation to gather further data on pain, disability and psychological status. The primary outcome measure is participant's global rating of change. Discussion Prognosis is considered to be a fundamental component of scientific medicine yet prognostic research in primary care settings is currently neglected and prognostic enquiry is disappearing from general medical textbooks. This study aims to address this issue by examining the use of generic prognostic factors in a general practice setting.

  3. Central corneal thickness in adult Chinese. Association with ocular and general parameters. The Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Liang; Chen, Changxi; Jonas, Jost B

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the distribution of central corneal thickness and its associations in the adult Chinese population. The Beijing Eye Study 2006 is a population-based study including 3,251 (73.3%) subjects (aged 45+ years) out of 4,439 subjects who participated in the survey in 2001 and who returned for re-examination. Central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements were performed by slit lamp-based optical coherence tomography. Central corneal thickness measurement data were available for 3,100 (95.4%) subjects. Mean CCT was 556.2+/-33.1 microm (median: 553 microm; range: 429-688 microm). In multiple regression analysis, CCT was significantly associated with optic disc area (P = 0.043), urban region (P measurements (P measured by pneumotonometry) increased for each microm central corneal thickness increase by 0.03 mmHg. In the adult Chinese population, CCT was significantly associated optic disc area, urban region, and male gender. Intraocular pneumotonometric pressure measurements increased for each microm increase in central corneal thickness by 0.03 mmHg. CCT was not associated with age and refractive error.

  4. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, W. E.; Troscianko, J.; Langmore, N. E.; Spottiswoode, C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host–parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  5. [Perspectives on researches in disaster psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    After experiencing the catastrophic Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami disaster in 2011, Tohoku University founded the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) in April, 2012. IRIDeS, comprising 7 divisions and 36 laboratories with broad areas of specialization, from the humanities to natural sciences, aims to become a global center for the study of disasters and disaster mitigation, learning from and building upon past lessons in disaster management from Japan and around the world. In IRIDeS, the Department of Disaster Psychiatry is in charge of dealing with issues related to disaster psychiatry, including the psychosocial impact of disasters. Now, at more than 2 and a half years after the catastrophic disaster, the psychological impact actually seems to be getting stronger and wider, whereas the memory of the disaster seems to be waning in other areas of the country. In such a situation, where a number of problems need to be resolved, what can/should we do as psychiatrists? On the other hand, other natural disasters, such as storms and floods, have kept hitting Japan, and catastrophes seem to strike somewhere in the world every year. In addition, we need to prepare for the possibility of a Nankai Trough Quake and an earthquake directly hitting the Tokyo area, which may occur sometime in the future. Considering the situation, we need to establish an education system for disaster psychiatry, and proceed with research to collect useful information to prepare for coming disasters. The aim of our department is to integrate multi-faceted basic and clinical research approaches to investigate the following topics: 1) to identify social, psychological, and biological factors involved in the pathophysiology of and recovery from disaster-related mental health problems; 2) to develop systems for disaster prevention, disaster response, and recovery, considering disaster-related psychiatric and psychological issues; 3) to develop useful tools for the

  6. Initiatives in biological research in Indian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivatava, Amresh

    2010-01-01

    Biological psychiatry is an exploratory science for mental health. These biological changes provide some explicit insight into the complex area of 'brain-mind and behavior'. One major achievement of research in biological field is the finding to explain how biological factors cause changes in behavior. In India, we have a clear history of initiatives in research from a biological perspective, which goes back to 1958. In the last 61 years, this field has seen significant evolution, precision and effective utilization of contemporary technological advances. It is a matter of great pride to see that in spite of difficult times in terms of challenges of practice and services, administration, resource, funding and manpower the zest for research was very forthcoming. There was neither dedicated time nor any funding for conducting research. It came from the intellectual insight of our fore fathers in the field of mental health to gradually grow to the state of strategic education in research, training in research, international research collaborations and setting up of internationally accredited centers. During difficult economic conditions in the past, the hypothesis tested and conclusions derived have not been so important. It is more important how it was done, how it was made possible and how robust traditions were established. Almost an entire spectrum of biological research has been touched upon by Indian researchers. Some of these are electroconvulsive therapy, biological markers, neurocognition, neuroimaging, neuroendocrine, neurochemistry, electrophysiology and genetics. A lot has been published given the limited space in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry and other medical journals published in India. A large body of biological research conducted on Indian patients has also been published in International literature (which I prefer to call non-Indian journals). Newer research questions in biological psychiatry, keeping with trend of international standards are

  7. In India, Psychiatry Has Come a Long Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Parikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This Presidential Address of the Bombay Psychiatry Society covers the state of psychiatry in India in 1997. It posits that with the advent of newer brain imaging technologies in India such as computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computerised tomography and brain electrical activity mapping, an era of evidence-based psychiatry in India has arrived. The Address cautions against the dehumanising potential of excessive reliance on technology. The need for a greater emphasis on psychiatry during undergraduate medical education is discussed along with the need to destigmatise psychiatric disorders. Finally, the need to encourage quality research in psychiatric disorders is stressed.

  8. Cognitive behavioral treatment for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. A therapist manual for primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Hopko, Derek R

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project suggested the potential benefits of a new version of CBT for GAD among older patients in primary care. The manual developed and tested in this pilot project is presented here. Treatment components include motivation and education, relaxation skills, cognitive therapy, problem-solving-skills training, exposure exercises, and sleep-management-skills training. Procedures are designed to be administered flexibly to maximize attention to individual patient needs. Examples of session summaries, patient handouts, and homework forms are provided.

  9. Error-related brain activity in youth and young adults before and after treatment for generalized or social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Autumn; Weinberg, Anna; Bunford, Nora; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Hanna, Gregory L; Monk, Christopher S; Kennedy, Amy E; Klumpp, Heide; Hajcak, Greg; Phan, K Luan

    2016-11-03

    Increased error monitoring, as measured by the error-related negativity (ERN), has been shown to persist after treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder in youth and adults; however, no previous studies have examined the ERN following treatment for related anxiety disorders. We used a flanker task to elicit the ERN in 28 youth and young adults (8-26years old) with primary diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 35 healthy controls. Patients were assessed before and after treatment with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), and healthy controls were assessed at a comparable interval. The ERN increased across assessments in the combined sample. Patients with SAD exhibited an enhanced ERN relative to healthy controls prior to and following treatment, even when analyses were limited to SAD patients who responded to treatment. Patients with GAD did not significantly differ from healthy controls at either assessment. Results provide preliminary evidence that enhanced error monitoring persists following treatment for SAD in youth and young adults, and support conceptualizations of increased error monitoring as a trait-like vulnerability that may contribute to risk for recurrence and impaired functioning later in life. Future work is needed to further evaluate the ERN in GAD across development, including whether an enhanced ERN develops in adulthood or is most apparent when worries focus on internal sources of threat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Usability of teleshopping systems by young and older adults : General performance, task analysis and subjective evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raad, KJE; Dekker, MR; Sikken, JA; DenBrinker, BPL; Beek, PJ; Brand, AN; Maarse, FJ; Mulder, LJM

    1999-01-01

    Older people generally experience more difficulty learning to work with new information technologies than younger people. This may be partly due to age-related impairments of memory and information processing. To determine which aspects of user interfaces pose too high demands on order users, an exp

  11. Caution: Alcohol Advertising and the Surgeon General's Alcohol Warnings May Have Adverse Effects on Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Deborah J.; Snyder, Leslie B.

    A study investigated the effects of the newly introduced Surgeon General's alcohol warnings and advertisements on college students. One hundred fifty-nine undergraduates in communication sciences at the University of Connecticut viewed slides of alcohol products, with or without advertisements and warnings. Following the viewings, subjects filled…

  12. Mid-life socioeconomic status, depressive symptomatology and general cognitive status among older adults: inter-relationships and temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Chi; Weng, Li-Jen

    2016-04-20

    Few longitudinal studies have analyzed how socioeconomic status (SES) influences both depressive and cognitive development over an individual's life course. This study investigates the change trajectories of both depressive symptomatology and general cognitive status, as well as their associations over time, focusing on the effects of mid-life SES. Data were obtained from the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging (1993-2007), a nationally representative cohort study of older adults in Taiwan. The short form of the Center of Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale that measures depressive symptomatology in two domains (negative affect and lack of positive affect) was used. General cognitive status was assessed using the brief Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire scale. Assessments of the subjects' mid-life SES included measurement of the participant's education and occupation. Analyses were conducted by the parallel latent growth curve modeling. The participants' initial levels of depressive symptomatology and general cognitive status were significantly and negatively correlated; furthermore, any changes in these two outcomes were also correlated over time. The initial assessment of general cognitive status significantly contributed to any advancement towards more severe depressive symptomatology over time, particularly when this occurred in a negative manner. Furthermore, a mid-life SES advantage resulted in a significant reduction in late-life depressive symptomatology and also produced a slower decline in general cognitive status during later life. In contrast, lower mid-life SES exacerbated depressive symptomatology during old age, both at the initial assessment and in terms of the change over time. In addition, female gender was significantly associated with lower general cognitive status and more severe depressive symptomatology in negative affect. These findings suggest a complex and longitudinal association between depressive symptomatology and

  13. Estrutura fatorial do questionário de morbidade psiquiátrica de adultos aplicado em amostras populacionais de cidades brasileiras The factor structure of the adult psychiatry morbidity questionnaire (QMPA in a community sample of Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Baxter Andreoli

    1994-08-01

    psychiatric disorders. It has been applied to the study of the Factorial Structure of a Brazilian screening questionnaire, the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Questionnaire (QMPA. The questionnaire is made up of 45 yes/no items for the identification of psychiatric symptons and the use of psychiatric services and psychotropic drugs. The questionnaire was applied to 6.470 subjects over 15 years old in representative samples from three urban areas: Brasília, Porto Alegre and S. Paulo. Seven factors were found to explain 42.7% of the total variance: Anxiety/Somatization (eigenvalue=3.81, 10.9%; Irritability/Depression (eigenvalue =2.41, 6.9%; Cognitive Impairment (eigenvalue = 2.01, 5.8%; Alcoholism (eigenvalue =1.90, 5.4%; Mood Elation (eigenvalue = 1.62, 4.6%; Hallucinatory/ Delusional Disorders (eigenvalue = 1.60, 4.6%; and Drug/Therapies (eigenvalue = 1.60, 4.5%. A similar pattern of results was found when the analysis was carried out in the three places. It is suggested, on the banis of these findings, that some questions should be modified and some excluded in any future version of the questionnaire.

  14. Vaccination rates among the general adult population and high-risk groups in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Annunziata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of vaccination in helping to control vaccine-preventable infectious disease, it is important to identify the adherence and uptake of risk-based recommendations. METHODS: The current project includes data from five consecutive datasets of the National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS: 2007 through 2011. The NHWS is an annual, Internet-based health questionnaire, administered to a nationwide sample of adults (aged 18 or older which included items on vaccination history as well as high-risk group status. Vaccination rates and characteristics of vaccinees were reported descriptively. Logistic regressions were conducted to predict vaccination behavior from sociodemographics and risk-related variables. RESULTS: The influenza vaccination rate for all adults 18 years and older has increased significantly from 28.0% to 36.2% from 2007 to 2011 (ps<.05. Compared with those not at high risk (25.1%, all high-risk groups were vaccinated at a higher rate, from 36.8% (pregnant women to 69.7% (those with renal/kidney disease; however, considerable variability among high-risk groups was observed. Vaccination rates among high-risk groups for other vaccines varied considerably though all were below 50%, with the exception of immunocompromised respondents (57.5% for the hepatitis B vaccine and 52.5% for the pneumococcal vaccine and the elderly (50.4% for the pneumococcal. Multiple risk factors were associated with increased rate of vaccination for most vaccines. Significant racial/ethnic differences with influenza, hepatitis, and herpes zoster vaccination rates were also observed (ps<.05. CONCLUSIONS: Rates of influenza vaccination have increased over time. Rates varied by high-risk status, demographics, and vaccine. There was a pattern of modest vaccination rate increases for individuals with multiple risk factors. However, there were relatively low rates of vaccination for most risk-based recommendations

  15. [Economic impact of consultation-liaison psychiatry in a French University Hospital Centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrondi, A; Petiot, D; Arbus, C; Schmitt, L

    2016-02-01

    In times of fiscal restraint for health structures, apart from the clinical input, it seems important to discuss the economic impact of liaison psychiatry. There are only a few studies on the economic added value provided by a liaison psychiatry team. In addition to this, only a few psychiatric pathologies are coded as they should be, hence we make the assumption of an additional development provided by a specialised team. Over a short period of 4months, in three departments of the Toulouse University Hospital Centre, the added value to the general pricing system of liaison psychiatry was studied. The population was represented by all the consecutive requests for consultations from patients over 18years old, men and women, hospitalised at that time. These three departments frequently request consultations with the psychiatry liaison team. They set a diagnostic, and if this is associated with a higher Homogeneous Group of Patients (HGP), it provides added value. Fifty-two patients benefited from a psychiatric consultation over 4months. The results highlight a development of € 8630.43 for the traumatology department, € 3325.03 for the internal medicine department, and € 513.61 for the haematology department over the study period. The overall development over this period was € 12,469.07. To our knowledge, this approach is one of the first in France to highlight an economic impact of the intervention of liaison psychiatry in the claiming departments. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Is psychiatry only neurology? Or only abnormal psychology? Déjà vu after 100 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Forgetting history, which frequently repeats itself, is a mistake. In General Psychopathology, Jaspers criticised early 20th century psychiatrists, including those who thought psychiatry was only neurology (Wernicke) or only abnormal psychology (Freud), or who did not see the limitations of the medical model in psychiatry (Kraepelin). Jaspers proposed that some psychiatric disorders follow the medical model (Group I), while others are variations of normality (Group III), or comprise schizophrenia and severe mood disorders (Group II). In the early 21st century, the players' names have changed but the game remains the same. The US NIMH is reprising both Wernicke's brain mythology and Kraepelin's marketing promises. The neo-Kraepelinian revolution started at Washington University, became pre-eminent through the DSM-III developed by Spitzer, but reached a dead end with the DSM-5. McHugh, who described four perspectives in psychiatry, is the leading contemporary representative of the Jaspersian diagnostic approach. Other neo-Jaspersians are: Berrios, Wiggins and Schwartz, Ghaemi, Stanghellini, Parnas and Sass. Can psychiatry learn from its mistakes? The current psychiatric language, organised at its three levels, symptoms, syndromes, and disorders, was developed in the 19th century but is obsolete for the 21st century. Scientific advances in Jaspers' Group III disorders require collaborating with researchers in the social and psychological sciences. Jaspers' Group II disorders, redefined by the author as schizophrenia, catatonic syndromes, and severe mood disorders, are the core of psychiatry. Scientific advancement in them is not easy because we are not sure how to delineate between and within them correctly.

  17. Prevention in old age psychiatry in low-resource settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bichitra Nanda Patra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the global population is aging as a result of demographic transition. The elderly are at a higher risk of developing mental illness. This could be due to many reasons including biological factors such as multiple physical illnesses and their treatments and psychosocial factors such as migration, social isolation, and changing family structure. At times, the psychiatric illnesses in the elderly present with atypical features and often go unnoticed. There is a huge treatment gap in addressing the mental health issues of older adults in low-resource countries like India. So far, the preventive aspects in psychiatry are less developed and the mental health care mainly focuses on sickness and treatment. As the number of trained mental health professionals and resources allocated to the field of mental health is meager in low-resource settings, prevention of psychiatric disorders in older adults seems to be a cost-effective option for these settings. In this article, various measures for prevention of psychiatric disorders in elderly low-resource settings have been discussed.

  18. Validation of a General and Sport Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire in Adolescents and Young Adults: GeSNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Calella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Good knowledge of nutrition is widely thought to be an important aspect to maintaining a balanced and healthy diet. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new reliable tool to measure the general and the sport nutrition knowledge (GeSNK in people who used to practice sports at different levels. The development of (GeSNK was carried out in six phases as follows: (1 item development and selection by a panel of experts; (2 pilot study in order to assess item difficulty and item discrimination; (3 measurement of the internal consistency; (4 reliability assessment with a 2-week test-retest analysis; (5 concurrent validity was tested by administering the questionnaire along with other two similar tools; (6 construct validity by administering the questionnaire to three groups of young adults with different general nutrition and sport nutrition knowledge. The final questionnaire, consisted of 62 items of the original 183 questions. It is a consistent, valid, and suitable instrument that can be applied over time, making it a promising tool to look at the relationship between nutrition knowledge, demographic characteristics, and dietary behavior in adolescents and young adults.

  19. Does life course socio-economic position influence chronic disabling pain in older adults? A general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Rosie J; Belcher, John; Croft, Peter R

    2013-08-01

    Chronic pain is the leading cause of disability in developed countries. Prevalence is linked with socio-economic position (SEP), but little is known about the influence of SEP on disabling pain over the life course. We have investigated the influence of different life course trajectories of SEP on disabling pain ('pain interference') in postal surveys of adults aged ≥50 years sampled from the general population of adults registered with three UK general practices. Current pain interference was measured using the dichotomized 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) health survey. Three recalled SEP measures (age left school, longest job and current/most recent job) were dichotomized into low SEP (left school at or before minimum school leaving age; reported routine or manual occupations) and high SEP, from which eight life course SEP trajectories were constructed. Associations of (i) eight SEP trajectories and (ii) three individual SEP measures adjusted for each other, with pain interference, adjusted for potential confounders, were calculated using logistic regression. A total of 2533 individuals provided data on all three SEP measures. A consistently low life course SEP trajectory was significantly associated with current pain interference compared with a high trajectory [odds ratio (OR) = 2.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.19-3.47], even after adjustment for age and gender. Further adjustment reduced the association but it remained significant (OR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.55-2.68). In the model with individual measures, low age left school (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.15-1.82) and manual longest job (OR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.13-1.91) were independently associated with pain interference. Our results highlight the potential for reducing chronic disabling pain in later life by addressing inequalities in both childhood education and adult occupational opportunities.

  20. Six-year course and prognosis of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Marlous; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Belo, Janneke N; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2011-09-01

    To examine the 6-year course of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice, to identify prognostic factors for unfavorable outcome, and to develop a clinical prediction rule. Adults (ages >35 years) with incident nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 549) were followed for 6 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors associated with an unfavorable outcome, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was calculated to determine discriminative ability, and a clinical prediction rule was developed. Unfavorable outcome is defined as persistent knee symptoms at 6-year followup or having undergone knee replacement surgery during followup. At 6-year followup, 42.1% of patients had an unfavorable outcome. Having persistent knee symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 5.31, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 3.27-8.61) and fulfilling the clinical American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for osteoarthritis (OA; OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.48-4.73) at 1-year followup were significantly associated with unfavorable outcome, while fulfilling the clinical ACR criteria for OA at baseline was not. Baseline factors independently associated with an unfavorable outcome were low/middle education level, comorbidity of the skeletal system, duration of knee symptoms of >3 months, bilateral knee symptoms, self-reported warm knee, history of nontraumatic knee symptoms, valgus alignment, pain at passive knee flexion/extension, and bony enlargement of the knee joint (AUC 0.80). Nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice appear to become a chronic disorder in nearly half of the patients. The developed clinical prediction rule with 10 baseline prognostic factors can be used to select high-risk patients for an unfavorable outcome at long-term followup. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Departments applying for consultation-liaison psychiatry and distribution of diagnosed different psychiatric diseases in general hospitals: Analysis of 154 cases%综合医院内联络精神病学会诊科室及病种分布特征:154例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林志雄; 邹晓波; 林举达; 陆兰; 律东

    2006-01-01

    背景:在综合医院临床专科存在着越来越多的精神心理问题,需要在医院内进行联络会诊.目的:在综合医院中,通过开展精神心理的联络会诊,加强非精神科临床医师对精神医学疾病的认识.设计:病例分析.单位:广东医学院附属医院心理科.对象:选择广东医学院附属医院2003-04/2004-04心理科会诊,不同性别、年龄与文化程度的住院患者154例.方法:统计会诊例数,对154例患者进行申请精神心理科会诊的科室分布和精神障碍病种的分布情况的调查.主要观察指标:①申请精神心理科会诊的科室分布.②精神障碍病种的分布情况. 结果:纳入患者154例,均进入结果分析,无脱落者.①申请精神心理科会诊的科室分布:申请会诊的科室中,内科占首位57例(37.0%),其次是急诊科26例(16.8%),传染科17例(11.0%)和神经内科13例(8.4%).②精神障碍病种的分布情况:会诊诊断最多见的是脑器质性神经症性障碍(31.1%)、精神障碍(25.3%)和躯体疾病所致的精神障碍(13.6%).结论:在综合医院临床各科均存在精神医学问题.在综合医院中,加强开展联络精神病学会诊是必要的.%BACKGROUND: More and more psychiatric problems require liaison consultation in specific clinical departments of general hospital.OBJECTIVE: To enhance the recognition of physicians in non-psychiatric departments on psychiatric illness by carrying on psychiatric liaison consultation in general hospital.DESIGN: Case analysis.SETTING: Department of Psychology in the affiliated hospital to Guangdong Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 154 inpatients for the consultation in Department of Psychology were selected in the Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College from April 2003 to April 2004, of either sex and different age and educational backgrounds.METHODS: It was to investigate the distributions of departments and diseases with consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP) in

  2. [Forensic psychiatry problems in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, C; Harrer, G

    1985-02-15

    Forensic complications involving criminal or civil law are generally rare in depressive disorders, but are of varied nature and of great consequence to the person concerned. Suicide, which is the problem of greatest practical importance may have far-reaching consequences with regard to legal insurance, apart from the medical responsibility or liability. From the point of view of civil law, moreover, the effects of depression on thought and action, as well as on free will with respect to legal capacity, testifiability, marriageability, actionability and potential considerations of interdiction ought to be examined. Last, but not least, consequences of a socio-legal nature may ensue. The spectrum of possible crimes by depressed subjects essentially comprises disease-characteristic offences, amongst which the desperate deed of extended suicide is foremost, as well as other criminal acts with a less direct connection to the depressive syndrome. Additional factors such as alcohol and medication may further complicate the relationship and also the assessment of culpability. In the forensic judgment of depressed subjects diagnostic classification is not alone decisive, but depends to a greater extent on the nature and severity of the psychopathological state and its influence on motivational aspects.

  3. [Brachial plexus palsy in adults with radicular lesions, general concepts, diagnostic approach and results ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, C

    2003-12-01

    In post-traumatic brachial plexus lesions in adults, early repair will necessitate a variety of nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures. In complete palsies, a graft is performed from a radicular stump, using intercostal nerve transfers, partial cross C7 transfer, and the distal spinal accessory nerve. This will provide elbow flexion and extension in 75% of cases, and shoulder abduction or rotation in 50% of cases. In the upper type palsies, ulnar-biceps transfer is the standard procedure. Grafting from a ruptured cervical root, when available, is performed to reanimate the shoulder. In C5 C6 and C7 palsies, extension of the wrist and fingers is provided by tendon transfers. In chronic palsies, elbow flexion and extension loss is treated by means of free muscle transfers, (latissimus dorsi or gracilis) combined with nerve transfers (intercostals or spinal accessory). Secondary procedures are routinely necessary following recovery of elbow flexion. For the shoulder-humeral shaft osteotomy or fusion, for the hand-cosmetic fusion of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint in the prone position, or palliative treatment in case of partial recovery. For such weak "plexic hands", we have developed a specific hierarchical functional scale, useful for surgical decisions.

  4. [Geriatric emergencies versus adult emergencies: retrospective analysis of medical emergencies at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; González Montalvo, J I; Sanz Segovia, F; Jaramillo Gómez, E; Banegas Banegas, J R; Rodríguez Mañas, L; Carbonell Collar, A

    1989-10-14

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the process of the attention to emergencies in patients older than 65 years and to compare it with the same process in adult patients. To this end, 965 clinical records of medical emergencies from the Hospital Central de la Cruz Roja in Madrid were retrospectively evaluated, and data were obtained regarding age, the cause for consultation, the investigations performed and their yield, the administration of drug therapy, the major diagnosis at the time of discharge from the service and the clinical course. It was found that all evaluated diagnostic investigations were carried out with equal or higher frequency in patients older than 65 years and that their mean clinical effectiveness was also higher. In addition, it was found that the patients older than 65 years were more commonly admitted to the hospital through the emergency service than the rest of the population. It was concluded, therefore, that the process of attention to emergencies has differential characteristics in the elderly population, and that if the number and proportion of old people increase as it will presumably happen during the two next decades, the cost of attention to emergencies and the number of emergency hospital admissions will also increase.

  5. [Academic presentation of neurology and psychiatry of Keijo Imperial University at annual meetings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Keijo Imperial University, Medical School, Psychiatry course, and presentation at the Annual Meetings of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology and The Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology were investigated from its establishment to 1945. Keijo was the name used for the capital city of Korea, Seoul, when Korea was under Japanese rule. We believe the Keijo Imperial University evolved out of the Governor-General of Korea Hospital and Keijo Medical Professional School. The first Professor at the University was Shinji Suitsu, who studied under Shuzo Kure. He visited Shizuoka prefecture when he collaborated in Kure's "Actual situation and statistical observation on home custody of mental patients" (1918). This was confirmed by photographic materials from this time. The year after the visit to Shizuoka, Suitsu was sent to the Korean Peninsula. In 1913, Suitsu established the Department of Psychiatry at the Governor-General of Korea Hospital, and the institution had 500 tsubo (approximately 1,650 m2) of land within Keijo (Seoul), with floor space of 160 tsubo (approximately 528 m2) and 24 beds. Treatments were performed by Suitsu, an assistant, and 8-9 nurses. The number of hospitalized patients was 30-50 patients per year. Cells had floor heating. Keijo Imperial University was established in 1924, and was called Jodai. In 1925, Suitsu retired from his Professorship of Psychiatry at Keijo Medical Professional School. Suitsu was from Kyoto Imperial University, and had studied abroad. In 1925, Suitsu's father-in-law, and a long-time friend of Shuzo Kure, Seiji Yamane, passed away. The professor who took up the position after Suitsu was Kiyoji Kubo, who was originally supposed to go to Hokkaido Imperial University. When the medical school was established at Keijo Imperial University in 1926, Kubo was offered a professorship there. Jodai was under the jurisdiction of the Governor-General of Korea, and not the Ministry of Education. Later

  6. Shorter Psychiatry Clerkship Length Is Associated with Lower NBME Psychiatry Shelf Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. Michael; Alexander, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a recent medical school curriculum change at our institution 3 years ago; specifically: shortening the Psychiatry core clerkship from 4 to 3 weeks and adding an optional 6-week core/elective combination rotation in lieu of the 3-week core. The authors aimed to determine whether clerkship length was…

  7. The Psychiatry Major: A Curricular Innovation to Improve Undergraduate Psychiatry Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ling; Chang, Wing Chung; Rohrbaugh, Robert; Ouyang, Xuan; Chen, Eric; Liu, Zhening; Hu, Xinran

    2017-06-02

    In China, a psychiatry major curriculum (PMC) has been implemented in select medical schools to improve the quality of undergraduate psychiatry education (UPE). Our aim was to describe this PMC and compare it with UPE in the standard Chinese clinical medicine curriculum (CMC). We also benchmarked PMC to UPE programs in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China and the United States of America (USA) to determine how well it met standards of well-established programs and to highlight areas for improvement. Based on archival information, relevant literature, and communication with key informants, we described PMC and CMC in a Chinese school with both curriculums. We then compared PMC to UPE curriculums in Hong Kong and the USA. PMC provides substantially more comprehensive exposure to psychiatry than CMC, with more preclinical experiences and psychiatry clerkship course hours, greater diversity of clinical sites, and exploration of subspecialties. PMC employs a variety of teaching methods and offers mentoring for students. PMC has similar UPE preclinical content and course hours as programs in Hong Kong and the USA. PMC also provides more clinical exposure than programs in Hong Kong or the USA, although there is less variety in clinical settings. We recommend implementation of concrete measures to improve UPE in Chinese medical schools, using the PMC curriculum as a model that has been successfully implemented in China. We also recommend improvements to PMC based on comparisons with existing programs outside Mainland China.

  8. Shorter Psychiatry Clerkship Length Is Associated with Lower NBME Psychiatry Shelf Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. Michael; Alexander, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a recent medical school curriculum change at our institution 3 years ago; specifically: shortening the Psychiatry core clerkship from 4 to 3 weeks and adding an optional 6-week core/elective combination rotation in lieu of the 3-week core. The authors aimed to determine whether clerkship length was…

  9. Co-opting psychiatry: the alliance between academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    The editorial presents the arguments that an alliance between academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry is harmful through a critical review of the academic literature and media coverage of activities of the pharmaceutical industry. The industry and the psychiatric profession both gain advantages from promoting biomedical models of psychiatric disturbance and pharmacological treatment. This confluence of interests has lead to the exaggeration of the efficacy of psychiatric drugs and neglect of their adverse effects and has distorted psychiatric knowledge and practice. Academic psychiatry has helped the industry to colonise more and more areas of modern life in order to expand the market for psychotropic drugs. Persuading people to understand their problems as biological deficiencies obscures the social origin and context of distress and prevents people from seeking social or political solutions. Psychiatry has the power to challenge the dominance of the pharmaceutical industry and should put its efforts into developing alternatives to routine drug treatment. Psychiatry needs to disengage from the industry if it wants to make genuine advances in understanding psychiatric disorder and help reverse the harmful social consequences of the widening med-icalisation of human experience.

  10. Simultaneous investigation of influenza and enteric viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting in general practice for acute diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arena Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal symptoms are not an uncommon manifestation of an influenza virus infection. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the presence of influenza viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting their general practitioner for uncomplicated acute diarrhea (AD and the proportion of concurrent infections by enteric and influenza viruses. Method A case-control study was conducted from December 2010 to April 2011. Stool specimens were collected and tested for influenza viruses A (seasonal A/H3N2 and pandemic A/H1N1 and B, and for four enteric viruses (astrovirus, group A rotavirus, human enteric adenovirus, norovirus of genogroups I – NoVGI - and genogroup II - NoVGII. Results General practitioners enrolled 138 cases and 93 controls. Of the 138 stool specimens collected, 92 (66.7% were positive for at least one of the four enteric viruses analysed and 10 (7.2% tested positive for one influenza virus. None of these 10 influenza positive patients reported respiratory symptoms. In five influenza-positive patients (3.6%, we also detected one enteric virus, with 4 of them being positive for influenza B (2 had co-detection with NoVGI, 1 with NoVGII, and 1 with astrovirus. None of the 93 controls tested positive for one of the enteric and/or other influenza viruses we investigated. Conclusions In this study we showed that the simultaneous detection of influenza and enteric viruses is not a rare event. We have also reported, for the first time in general practice, the presence of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting for uncomplicated AD. A simultaneous investigation of enteric and influenza viruses in patients complaining of gastrointestinal symptoms could be useful for future studies to better identify the agents responsible for AD.

  11. Associations between cortical thickness and general intelligence in children, adolescents and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menary, Kyle; Collins, Paul F.; Porter, James N.; Muetzel, Ryan; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Kumar, Vipin; Steinbach, Michael; Lim, Kelvin O.; Luciana, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging research indicates that human intellectual ability is related to brain structure including the thickness of the cerebral cortex. Most studies indicate that general intelligence is positively associated with cortical thickness in areas of association cortex distributed throughout both brain hemispheres. In this study, we performed a cortical thickness mapping analysis on data from 182 healthy typically developing males and females ages 9 to 24 years to identify correlates of general intelligence (g) scores. To determine if these correlates also mediate associations of specific cognitive abilities with cortical thickness, we regressed specific cognitive test scores on g scores and analyzed the residuals with respect to cortical thickness. The effect of age on the association between cortical thickness and intelligence was examined. We found a widely distributed pattern of positive associations between cortical thickness and g scores, as derived from the first unrotated principal factor of a factor analysis of Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) subtest scores. After WASI specific cognitive subtest scores were regressed on g factor scores, the residual score variances did not correlate significantly with cortical thickness in the full sample with age covaried. When participants were grouped at the age median, significant positive associations of cortical thickness were obtained in the older group for g-residualized scores on Block Design (a measure of visual-motor integrative processing) while significant negative associations of cortical thickness were observed in the younger group for g-residualized Vocabulary scores. These results regarding correlates of general intelligence are concordant with the existing literature, while the findings from younger versus older subgroups have implications for future research on brain structural correlates of specific cognitive abilities, as well as the cognitive domain specificity of behavioral

  12. Associations between cortical thickness and general intelligence in children, adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menary, Kyle; Collins, Paul F; Porter, James N; Muetzel, Ryan; Olson, Elizabeth A; Kumar, Vipin; Steinbach, Michael; Lim, Kelvin O; Luciana, Monica

    2013-09-01

    Neuroimaging research indicates that human intellectual ability is related to brain structure including the thickness of the cerebral cortex. Most studies indicate that general intelligence is positively associated with cortical thickness in areas of association cortex distributed throughout both brain hemispheres. In this study, we performed a cortical thickness mapping analysis on data from 182 healthy typically developing males and females ages 9 to 24 years to identify correlates of general intelligence (g) scores. To determine if these correlates also mediate associations of specific cognitive abilities with cortical thickness, we regressed specific cognitive test scores on g scores and analyzed the residuals with respect to cortical thickness. The effect of age on the association between cortical thickness and intelligence was examined. We found a widely distributed pattern of positive associations between cortical thickness and g scores, as derived from the first unrotated principal factor of a factor analysis of Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) subtest scores. After WASI specific cognitive subtest scores were regressed on g factor scores, the residual score variances did not correlate significantly with cortical thickness in the full sample with age covaried. When participants were grouped at the age median, significant positive associations of cortical thickness were obtained in the older group for g-residualized scores on Block Design (a measure of visual-motor integrative processing) while significant negative associations of cortical thickness were observed in the younger group for g-residualized Vocabulary scores. These results regarding correlates of general intelligence are concordant with the existing literature, while the findings from younger versus older subgroups have implications for future research on brain structural correlates of specific cognitive abilities, as well as the cognitive domain specificity of behavioral

  13. Adult patient with pulmonary agenesis: focusing on one-lung ventilation during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuetian; Zhu, Cheng; Qian, Xiaozhe; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary agenesis is a rare condition with high mortality. Mechanical ventilation in these patients is challenging and there has no such case been reported in the literature. We reported a 61-year-old female with lung agenesis who presented to our hospital with pneumonia and pelvic mass. In the past, she had undergone repairing of atrial septal defect and mitral valve forming surgery at 6-year-old. Thereafter she had remained asymptomatic until this time of hospital admission. The patient underwent operation for the pelvic mass with one-lung ventilation (OLV) under general anesthesia. We highlighted the use of protective ventilation (PV) strategy during OLV.

  14. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of dementias in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihl, Ralf; Bunevicius, Robertas; Frölich, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define a practice guideline for biological treatment of dementias for general practitioners in primary care. METHODS: This paper is a short and practical summary of the World Federation of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the Biological treatment of Alzheimer's disease a...

  15. [Charisma and leadership: new challenges for psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, G; Ducasse, D; Attal, J; Larue, A; Macgregor, A; Brittner, M; Capdevielle, D

    2013-12-01

    New challenges arise in medicine, particularly in psychiatry. In the near future, psychiatrists' role may evolve into management of mental health care teams (GPs, nurses, psychologists…) thus creating the need for charisma and leadership. Charisma is defined as « a quality that allows it's possessor to exercise influence, authority over a group »; leadership as « the function, the position of chief, and by extension, a dominant position ». To offer some reflections on charisma and leadership and the ways to develop them in three situations common in clinical practice: dual communication (between caregivers or with patients), oral communication (e.g., during a symposium) and managing a mental health care team. Medline (1966-hits) and Web of Science (1975-hits) were explored according to the PRISMA criteria. The research paradigm was [(psychiatrist OR physician) AND mental health AND (leadership OR charisma)]. Two hundred and eighty articles were found, but only 34 corresponded to our subject and were included in the qualitative analysis. The leader must first ask himself/herself about his/her vision of the future, so as to share it with passion with his/her mental health team. Charisma and leadership are based on several values, among which we can mention: providing understandable, personalized care for the patient, in continuity and confidentiality; adapting care to the general population's request, maintaining one's own physical and mental health, submitting one's daily practice to peer review, engaging in continuous improvement of one's practices in response to new requirements, and recognizing that research and instruction are part of an M.D's professional obligations. The clinician will work on ways to develop his/her own charisma, through interactions with peers and team members, the care of his/her appearance (especially for first meetings) and workplace, and through positive reinforcement (some cognitive-behavioral techniques like assertiveness

  16. Evolutionary Psychiatry and Nosology: Prospects and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Faucher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I explain why evolutionary psychiatry is not where the next revolution in psychiatry will come from. I will proceed as follows. Firstly, I will review some of the problems commonly attributed to current nosologies, more specifically to the DSM. One of these problems is the lack of a clear and consensual definition of mental disorder; I will then examine specific attempts to spell out such a definition that use the evolutionary framework. One definition that deserves particular attention (for a number of reasons that I will mention later, is one put forward by Jerome Wakefield. Despite my sympathy for his position, I must indicate a few reasons why I think his attempt might not be able to resolve the problems related to current nosologies. I suggest that it might be wiser for an evolutionary psychiatrist to adopt the more integrative framework of “treatable conditions” (Cosmides and Tooby, 1999. As it is thought that an evolutionary approach can contribute to transforming the way we look at mental disorders, I will provide the reader with a brief sketch of the basic tenets of evolutionary psychology. The picture of the architecture of the human mind that emerges from evolutionary psychology is thought by some to be the crucial backdrop to identifying specific mental disorders and distinguishing them from normal conditions. I will also provide two examples of how evolutionary thinking is supposed to change our thinking about some disorders. Using the case of depression, I will then show what kind of problems evolutionary explanations of particular psychopathologies encounter. In conclusion, I will evaluate where evolutionary thinking leaves us in regard to what I identify as the main problems of our current nosologies. I’ll then argue that the prospects of evolutionary psychiatry are not good.

  17. [Moderate asthma in adults: diagnosis and management in general medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernejoux, J M; Tunon De Lara, J M; Guizard, A V; Villanueva, P; Taytard, A

    1996-10-01

    Moderate asthma is a frequent disorder in general medicine. In 1990, the British Thoracic Society published their first guidelines on the management of asthma. Three years later, we have studied, using a questionnaire, the diagnosis and therapeutic criteria of moderate asthma used by general physicians, and comparing these to the guideline recommendations. Out of 46 physicians questioned in Bordeaux, 40 (87 per cent) agreed to participate in the study. Thirty two physicians (80 per cent) described as moderate an asthma which was mild according to the guidelines; eight physicians (20 per cent) described a moderate asthma according to the guidelines; twenty five (63 per cent) considered as severe a moderate asthma according to the recommendations, although eleven (28 per cent) considered it as moderate and four (10 per cent) did not give an opinion. In total, four (10 per cent) judged asthma severity according to the guidelines (Group R), twenty one (52 per cent) over-estimated the severity of moderate asthma (Group S), and fifteen (37 per cent) gave an inconsistent assessment (Group 1). Twenty six (65 per cent) prescribed an association of beta-2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids for moderate asthma. Although most of the questioned physicians gave an appropriate treatment for moderate asthma treatment adapted to the severity of the situation, their therapeutic approach did not seem to be based upon the same criteria than that recommended in the guidelines.

  18. Optogenetics in psychiatry: The light ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexities of the human mind have been beyond the scope of understanding because a intricate neuronal network and difficulty in specific localization and assessment of area responsible for a specific behavior; more so in a freely moving living being. Optogenetics off late has been able to address this issue to great extent and holds promises for future. Relevant literatures in this direction were looked into and the salient aspects of this science is being discussed here with specific relevance to psychiatry.

  19. Encompassing Sexual Medicine within Psychiatry: Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segraves, Robert Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the positive and negative aspects of psychiatry encompassing sexual medicine within its purview. Methods: MEDLINE searches for the period between 1980 to the present were performed with the terms "psychiatry," "sexual medicine," and "sexual dysfunction." In addition, sexual medicine texts were reviewed for chapters…

  20. Evaluation of Professional Role Competency during Psychiatry Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujich, Nikola N.; Razmy, Ajmal; Zaretsky, Ari; Styra, Rima G.; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine psychiatry residents' perceptions on the current method of evaluating professional role competency and the use of multi-source feedback (MSF) as an assessment tool. Method: Authors disseminated a structured, anonymous survey to 128 University of Toronto psychiatry residents, evaluating the current mode of…

  1. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  2. An Investigation of Psychiatry Residents' Important Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jody

    2011-01-01

    This research study was conducted to explore the phenomenon of the third-year experiences of the psychiatry residents. A review of the literature identified themes and subthemes related to the third-year of psychiatry education. The study was conducted at a university health science center. Data were collected from five residents using participant…

  3. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  4. Psychiatry Residency Education in Canada: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of the history of psychiatry residency training in Canada,and outlines the rationale for the current training requirements, changes to the final certification examination,and factors influencing future trends in psychiatry education and training. Method: The author compiled findings and reports on…

  5. Turnover of First-Time Chairs in Departments of Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Peter F.; Rayburn, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the tenure of first-time Chairs in academic departments of psychiatry in order to stimulate discussion on extant workforce and leadership issues. Method: Data on tenure of Chairs in psychiatry and other nonsurgical specialties were derived from the longitudinal database of the Association of American Medical Colleges…

  6. The Recruitment Problem in Psychiatry: A Critical Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The continuing shortfall in recruitment to Psychiatry is examined with suggestions for affirmative action. Recruitment may improve in the near future because of the high demand for psychiatrists, the incentives offered, greater competition for other specialties and a pool of international graduates willing to work in Psychiatry. There remains the…

  7. Using the Technique of Journal Writing to Learn Emergency Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Stern, Theodore; Beresin, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss journal writing in learning emergency psychiatry. Methods: The journal of a psychiatry intern rotating through an emergency department is used as sample material for analysis that could take place in supervision or a resident support group. A range of articles are reviewed that illuminate the relevance of journal…

  8. The Triple Jump: Assessing Problem Solving in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Ethna C.; Trimble, Peter; Smyth, Joe

    1998-01-01

    Describes an attempt to assess a final-year course in psychiatry using the Triple Jump. In this course, students on placement in psychiatric units perfect psychiatry skills that were acquired during the previous year by direct contact with patients. The Triple Jump is used to assess problem-solving skills in management strategy on cases. (PVD)

  9. Research in child and adolescent psychiatry in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Priyavadan Chandrakant; Shastri, Jay P.; Shastri, Dimple

    2010-01-01

    The primary source for this annotation on child and adolescent psychiatry is Indian Journal of Psychiatry. Articles covering various dimensions of child and adolescent mental health were searched from its electronic data base to discuss relevant articles. Literature was mainly in the form of original research articles, review articles, case reports, editorials, orations and presidential address. PMID:21836681

  10. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  11. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  12. Using the Technique of Journal Writing to Learn Emergency Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Stern, Theodore; Beresin, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss journal writing in learning emergency psychiatry. Methods: The journal of a psychiatry intern rotating through an emergency department is used as sample material for analysis that could take place in supervision or a resident support group. A range of articles are reviewed that illuminate the relevance of journal…

  13. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  14. Generalized convulsive status epilepticus in adults and children: treatment guidelines and protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Peter; Riviello, James

    2011-02-01

    Generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) has a high morbidity and mortality, such that the rapid delivery of anticonvulsant therapy should be initiated within minutes of seizure onset to prevent permanent neuronal damage. GCSE is not a specific disease but is a manifestation of either a primary central nervous system (CNS) insult or a systemic disorder with secondary CNS effects. It is mandatory to look for an underlying cause. First-line therapies for seizures and status epilepticus include the use of a benzodiazepine, followed by an infusion of a phenytoin with a possible role for intravenous valproate or phenobarbital. If these first-line medications fail to terminate the GCSE, treatment includes the continuous infusion of midazolam, pentobarbital, or propofol.

  15. Generalized morphea, lichen sclerosis et atrophicus associated with oral submucosal fibrosis in an adult male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virdi Sarvjit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized morphea is a disease characterized by wide-spread sclerosis of the skin. A 39-year-old man presented with history of multiple pigmented and bound-down plaques on the body along with mucosal involvement. Dermatological examination showed multiple indurated and sclerosed plaques with follicular plugging in few of them and gross thickened eroded and glazed tongue. The constellation of these findings with histopathological correlation led us to diagnosis of this spectrum of cutaneous involvement. The coexistence of localized morphea with lichen sclerosis et atrophicus has been reported earlier but existence of these entities with submucosal fibrosis in a same patient is documented here and is the first of its kind.

  16. The Coexistence of Generalized and Lateralized Periodic Discharges: Report of Two Adult Cases with SSPE and MELAS Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslıhan Taşkıran

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and lateralized periodic discharges have not been reported previously in the same EEG simultaneously. Here, we report two adult patients who suffered from rare clinical conditions [subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE and nitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome]. Their EEGs showed the same pattern consisting of generalized periodic discharges and lateralized periodic discharges in the same EEG simultaneously. Although the appearances of the EEG were very similar, discharges became more prominent after intravenous diazepam injection in the case with SSPE but were suppressed in the case with MELAS. Lesions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were located posteriorly in both patients, involving mainly subcortical white matter in the case with SSPE, but mainly the cortical area in the case with MELAS. Generalized periodic discharges are also reported in MELAS for the first time. The underlying mechanisms of the genesis of periodic discharges are still not known, and these two patients may help us to learn more about these rare patterns.

  17. Notes on a Few Issues in the Philosophy of Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ajai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part called the Preamble tackles: (a the issues of silence and speech, and life and disease; (b whether we need to know some or all of the truth, and how are exact science and philosophical reason related; (c the phenomenon of Why, How, and What; (d how are mind and brain related; (e what is robust eclecticism, empirical/scientific enquiry, replicability/refutability, and the role of diagnosis and medical model in psychiatry; (f bioethics and the four principles of beneficence, non-malfeasance, autonomy, and justice; (g the four concepts of disease, illness, sickness, and disorder; how confusion is confounded by these concepts but clarity is imperative if we want to make sense out of them; and how psychiatry is an interim medical discipline. The second part called The Issues deals with: (a the concepts of nature and nurture; the biological and the psychosocial; and psychiatric disease and brain pathophysiology; (b biology, Freud and the reinvention of psychiatry; (c critics of psychiatry, mind-body problem and paradigm shifts in psychiatry; (d the biological, the psychoanalytic, the psychosocial and the cognitive; (e the issues of clarity, reductionism, and integration; (f what are the fool-proof criteria, which are false leads, and what is the need for questioning assumptions in psychiatry. The third part is called Psychiatric Disorder, Psychiatric Ethics, and Psychiatry Connected Disciplines. It includes topics like (a psychiatric disorder, mental health, and mental phenomena; (b issues in psychiatric ethics; (c social psychiatry, liaison psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine, forensic psychiatry, and neuropsychiatry. The fourth part is called Antipsychiatry, Blunting Creativity, etc. It includes topics like (a antipsychiatry revisited; (b basic arguments of antipsychiatry, Szasz, etc.; (c psychiatric classification and value judgment; (d conformity, labeling, and blunting creativity. The fifth part is called The Role of Philosophy

  18. Vigorous, Aerobic Exercise versus General Motor Training Activities: Effects on Maladaptive and Stereotypic Behaviors of Adults with Both Autism and Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Reed O., Jr.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Six adults with both autism and moderate/profound mental retardation were assessed in a controlled environment for changes in frequency of maladaptive and stereotypic behaviors following nonexercise activities, general motor training activities, and aerobic exercise. Although antecedent aerobic exercise reduced undesirable behaviors, general motor…

  19. Psychiatry Resident Training in Cultural Competence: An Educator's Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Irma; Johnson, Toni L; Shelton, Pheston G; Glass, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Resident physicians training in psychiatry in the U.S. are required to master a body of knowledge related to cultural psychiatry; are expected to adopt attitudes that endorse the principles of cultural competence; and finally are expected to acquire specific cultural competence skills that facilitate working effectively with diverse patients. This article first provides an overview of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies related to cultural competence, as well as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's (AACAP) recommendations for the cultural competence training of child/adolescent fellows. Next, numerous print and electronic resources that can be used in cultural competence education in psychiatry are reviewed and discussed. Finally, we conclude by providing recommendations for psychiatry residency programs that we culled from model cultural competence curricula.

  20. Less indoor cleaning is associated with poor health and unhappiness in adults: Japanese General Social Survey, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-12-01

    Indoor environment is important to human health and well-being. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among indoor cleaning, rubbish disposal and human health and well-being in a national and population-based setting. Data was retrieved from the Japanese General Social Survey, 2010. Information on demographics, lifestyle factors, frequency of indoor cleaning and rubbish disposal and self-reported health and well-being in Japanese adults was obtained by household interview. Analysis included chi-square test, logistic and multi-nominal regression modelling. Of 5003 Japanese adults (aged 20-89) included in the study cohort, 11.4 % (n = 566) never cleaned their living place, 39.1 % had occasional cleaning and 49.6 % had frequent cleaning. Moreover, 17.5 % (n = 869) never disposed rubbish, 24.9 % had occasional rubbish disposal and 57.6 % had frequent rubbish disposal. 15.0 % of Japanese adults claimed poor self-rated health, and 5.9 % reported unhappiness. Compared to people who frequently cleaned the living place, others tended to report poor self-rated health condition (relative risk ratios (RRR) 1.52, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 1.24-1.85, P self-rated health (RRR 2.61, 95 % CI 1.40-4.88, P = 0.003) and unhappiness (RRR 2.72, 95 % CI 1.72-4.30, P self-rated health, subjective happiness and potentially other health conditions. Public education on maintaining clean indoor environments to optimise psychological well-being in addition to the known physical health would be suggested.

  1. Bad dream frequency in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder: prevalence, correlates, and effect of cognitive behavioral treatment for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadorff, Michael R; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety to enhanced usual care (EUC) assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post treatment (3 months), and at 6, 9, 12, and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post treatment and throughout follow up compared to EUC.

  2. [Innovative healthcare strategies in geriatric psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, V

    2015-04-01

    The development of efficacious treatment strategies in older adults with mental illnesses is necessary. The growing number of homebound patients and the incidence of physical comorbidities and impairment of activities of daily living are important factors for interdisciplinary treatment strategies in old age and there is a need for home-based services providing medical and psychosocial interventions. Recent studies have provided information on home-based and collaborative treatment strategies in mentally ill elderly patients. This article provides an overview on selected randomized controlled trials (RCT) conducted with mentally ill older adults. Studies have shown promising effects when applying stepped care interventions, collaborative care and assertive community treatment in old patients suffering from mental diseases when compared to usual care. Long-standing home-based mental health programs have been designed and successfully implemented showing improved identification, treatment and ongoing care of mental health problems. In-home tele-psychotherapy has been shown to be efficacious in homebound older adults with limited access to evidence-based psychotherapy and showed a sustained effect in one study. Collaborative care models, stepped care interventions in primary care settings and an enhanced inter-professional approach to patient care in old age psychiatry is necessary to improve detection, treatment and ongoing care. Tele-mental health services may become important parts of the provision of mental health services and the effectiveness revealed for in-home tele-health problem solving therapy in old age depression may be an approach to make psychotherapy available to a large number of underserved elderly patients with mental illness.

  3. Diagnosis and management of generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Amy B; Kirst, Nell; Shultz, Cameron G

    2015-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD) are among the most common mental disorders in the United States, and they can negatively impact a patient's quality of life and disrupt important activities of daily living. Evidence suggests that the rates of missed diagnoses and misdiagnosis of GAD and PD are high, with symptoms often ascribed to physical causes. Diagnosing GAD and PD requires a broad differential and caution to identify confounding variables and comorbid conditions. Screening and monitoring tools can be used to help make the diagnosis and monitor response to therapy. The GAD-7 and the Severity Measure for Panic Disorder are free diagnostic tools. Successful outcomes may require a combination of treatment modalities tailored to the individual patient. Treatment often includes medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and/or psychotherapy, both of which are highly effective. Among psychotherapeutic treatments, cognitive behavior therapy has been studied widely and has an extensive evidence base. Benzodiazepines are effective in reducing anxiety symptoms, but their use is limited by risk of abuse and adverse effect profiles. Physical activity can reduce symptoms of GAD and PD. A number of complementary and alternative treatments are often used; however, evidence is limited for most. Several common botanicals and supplements can potentiate serotonin syndrome when used in combination with antidepressants. Medication should be continued for 12 months before tapering to prevent relapse.

  4. IgE antibodies to alpha-gal in the general adult population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Dam Laursen, A S; Vidal, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The carbohydrate alpha-gal epitope is present in many animal proteins, including those of red meat and animal immunoglobulins, such as cat IgA. Systemic anaphylaxis to the alpha-gal epitope has recently been described. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the prevalence of alpha......IgE was assessed by ImmunoCAP to bovine thyroglobulin. Additional assessments included a panel of skin prick test (SPT) to common aeroallergens and epidemiological factors, including the history of tick bites in the Danish series. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive (≥ 0.1 kUA /L) sIgE to alpha-gal was 5.5% and 8...... was associated with atopy (SPT positivity) in both series, although it was not associated with SPT positivity to cat or dog dander. Alpha-gal sIgE positivity was strongly associated with a history of tick bites. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The prevalence of alpha-gal sIgE antibodies in these general...

  5. The Relationship between General Causality Orientation and Treatment Outcome among Marijuana-Dependent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Claire E.; Banes, Kelsey E.; Walker, Denise D.; Stephens, Robert S.; Roffman, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    General causality orientations are motivational styles that are indicative of a person’s belief about personal change and their motivation to change. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether causality orientations were associated with marijuana treatment outcomes in a sample of marijuana-dependent individuals. A total of 74 participants (66% male) were recruited from the Seattle, Washington area and randomly assigned to receive a combination of motivational enhancement and cognitive behavioral therapy or the combination treatment plus additional “check-up” sessions. Follow-up assessments evaluated frequency of use, use-related problems, and marijuana use disorder symptoms through 9 months. Causality orientations were relatively stable over time. Posttreatment Autonomy orientations were associated with lower frequency of use and Controlled orientations were associated with a reduction in use, problems, and marijuana use disorder symptoms. Autonomy and Controlled orientations were associated with readiness to change. Results suggest that both autonomous and controlled orientations have implications for response to treatment; perhaps for different reasons. Causality orientations may be a promising avenue of research to predict treatment response and outcome. PMID:26562679

  6. Psychoactive substance use in forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, E J; Castaneda, R

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the interface between judicial discipline and behavioral science in the context of substance-related disorders. We review the epidemiology of psychoactive drug use and crime and discuss the courts' decisions on relevant landmark cases, particularly as they influence the practice of psychiatry. (1) The phenomenology of addiction and crime is of great epidemiological import. (2) Our legal system inclines toward the view that the use of alcohol or other substances involves an element of choice and therefore would not amount to a legal insanity defense if the substance abuser commits a crime while intoxicated. (3) A state can confine an addict or alcoholic for compulsory treatment if that individual presents a danger to self or others. (4) The law has found that alcoholism and drug abuse are both "willful misconduct" and a disabling condition; the former definition contains the end in view of punitive action. The latter is aimed toward treatment and rehabilitation. (5) The law gives the right to the employer to test a suspected employee for drug abuse. The addicted or alcoholic employee has the choice to either go for treatment or face job termination. (6) Our judicial system gives serious consideration to the welfare of a child whose parents are alcoholic or drug addicted. The two disciplines of psychiatry and law follow their own modes in resolving issues in alcoholism and other substance abuse. We need research and new approaches to build a bridge between the two.

  7. What kind of science for psychiatry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence J Kirmayer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry has invested its hopes in neuroscience as a path to understanding mental disorders and developing more effective treatments and ultimately cures. Recently, the U.S. NIMH has elaborated this vision through a new framework for mental health research, the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. This framework aims to orient mental health research toward the discovery of underlying neurobiological and biobehavioral mechanisms of mental disorders that will eventually lead to definitive treatments. In this article we consider the rationale of the RDoC and what it reveals about implicit models of mental disorders. As an overall framework for understanding mental disorders, RDoC is impoverished and conceptually flawed. These limitations are not accidental but stem from disciplinary commitments and interests that are at odds with the larger concerns of psychiatry. A multilevel, ecosocial approach to biobhavioral systems is needed both to guide relevant neuroscience research and insure the inclusion of social processes that may be fundamental contributors to psychopathology and recovery.

  8. Psychiatry as ideology in the USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, S

    1978-09-01

    This paper was given as a talk at the Venice Biennale on 9 December 1977. It was part of a symposium on "The Freedom of Science--Problems of Science of Scientists in Eastern Europe". Dr Bloch details some of the problems of psychiatry and its vulnerability to improper use and thus the dilemmas which must ensue in day to day practice. He looks at psychiatry in the USSR and the system within which Soviet psychiatrists must work. The Communist Party and career advancement for psychiatrists would appear to be closely related and it is suggested that, in all probability, the majority of psychiatrists are as perturbed at the misuse of their profession as their Western colleagues, but act compliantly out of fear. Severe punishments have been imposed on those psychiatrists who have dared to speak out against the régime and the system as operated. Dr Bloch concludes by urging Western psychiatrists to do all they can to help their Soviet colleagues to initiate a return to an independent and automous psychiatric profession.

  9. The historical development of psychiatry in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Srdan; Jasović-Gasić, Miroslava; Pantović, Mihailo; Dukić-Dejanović, Slavica; Jovanović, Aleksandar A; Damjanović, Aleksandar; Ravanić, Dragan

    2009-06-01

    The authors present the development of the concept of mental disease and treatment in Serbian medicine. Serbian medieval medicine did not acknowledge fortune telling, sorcery, the use of amulets and magical rituals and formulas. These progressive concepts were confirmed by the Church and the Serbian state in what is known as Dusan's Code. The Historical data on the establishment of the first psychiatric hospital in the Balkans "Home for the Unsound of Mind" at Guberevac, Belgrade, in 1861 and its founders is reviewed. After World War I, in 1923, the Faculty of Medicine was established in Belgrade to which the coryphaei of Serbian medicine educated in Europe, mostly in France and Germany, flocked and that same year the Psychiatry Clinic of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade was set up. Its first seat was on the premises of the Mental Hospital in Belgrade, and it became a training base and laid the foundations of the future Neuropsychiatry Clinic in Belgrade, which in time evolved into the nursery of psychiatric professionals for all of Serbia. The most important data on the further development of psychiatry up to date are presented.

  10. [Psychiatry periodicals in Spain up to 1931].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolín Guillén, J M

    1992-01-01

    The development of psychiatry, as it happens with other medical specialties, has been linked to that of the journals dedicated to it. They are a good exponent of its state of growing or consolidation. The first psychiatric journal in Spain appeared in 1865 and 27 years later the next one was founded. None of the three journals which existed in the 19th century continued at the beginning of the 20th century. During the first three decades of this century, nine specialized journals were founded, among which the "Revista Frenopática Española" in the first place, and the "Archivos de Neurobiología" afterwards, were the most outstanding in our country and the "Revista Frenopática Española" was that of the greatest international projection. Although the importance of a constellation of prestigious journals which were not dedicated to psychiatry was decisive for the development of this discipline in our country, the professionals organized themselves in the monographic journals about this subject, linked to mental hospitals.

  11. Diagnosis and causal explanation in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Hane Htut

    2016-12-01

    In clinical medicine, a diagnosis can offer an explanation of a patient's symptoms by specifying the pathology that is causing them. Diagnoses in psychiatry are also sometimes presented in clinical texts as if they pick out pathological processes that cause sets of symptoms. However, current evidence suggests the possibility that many diagnostic categories in psychiatry are highly causally heterogeneous. For example, major depressive disorder may not be associated with a single type of underlying pathological process, but with a range of different causal pathways, each involving complex interactions of various biological, psychological, and social factors. This paper explores the implications of causal heterogeneity for whether psychiatric diagnoses can be said to serve causal explanatory roles in clinical practice. I argue that while they may fall short of picking out a specific cause of the patient's symptoms, they can nonetheless supply different sorts of clinically relevant causal information. In particular, I suggest that some psychiatric diagnoses provide negative information that rules out certain causes, some provide approximate or disjunctive information about the range of possible causal processes, and some provide causal information about the relations between the symptoms themselves.

  12. Cognitive control adjustments in healthy older and younger adults: Conflict adaptation, the error-related negativity (ERN), and evidence of generalized decline with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Michael J; Clayson, Peter E; Keith, Cierra M; Hunt, Isaac J; Hedges, Dawson W; Nielsen, Brent L; Call, Vaughn R A

    2016-03-01

    Older adults display alterations in neural reflections of conflict-related processing. We examined response times (RTs), error rates, and event-related potential (ERP; N2 and P3 components) indices of conflict adaptation (i.e., congruency sequence effects) a cognitive control process wherein previous-trial congruency influences current-trial performance, along with post-error slowing, correct-related negativity (CRN), error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) amplitudes in 65 healthy older adults and 94 healthy younger adults. Older adults showed generalized slowing, had decreased post-error slowing, and committed more errors than younger adults. Both older and younger adults showed conflict adaptation effects; magnitude of conflict adaptation did not differ by age. N2 amplitudes were similar between groups; younger, but not older, adults showed conflict adaptation effects for P3 component amplitudes. CRN and Pe, but not ERN, amplitudes differed between groups. Data support generalized declines in cognitive control processes in older adults without specific deficits in conflict adaptation.

  13. What Is Constructionism in Psychiatry? From Social Causes to Psychiatric Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    It is common to note that social environment and cultural formation shape mental disorders. The details of this claim are, however, not well understood. The paper takes a look at the claim that culture has an impact on psychiatry from the perspective of metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Its aim is to offer, in a general fashion, partial explications of some significant versions of the thesis that culture and social environment shape mental disorders and to highlight some of the consequences social constructionism about psychiatry has for psychiatric explanation. In particular, it will be argued that the alleged dependence of facts about particular mental disorders and about the second order property of being a mental disorder on social facts amounts to a robust form of constructivism, whereas the view that clinician-patient interaction is influenced by cultural facts is perfectly compatible with an anti-constructivist stance.

  14. [Madness and malaria--intersections and boundary blurring between psychiatry and tropical medicine in Hamburg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Stefan; Schmiedebach, Heinz-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The object of this article is to point out and to discuss the significant intersections and boundary blurring between psychiatry and tropical medicine while treating malaria in the German "colonial metropolis" Hamburg. The focus of this study is the Hamburg asylum at Friedrichsberg and the Institute for Maritime and Tropical Diseases (Hamburg Tropical Institute). Under analysis are two groups of patients as well as the means with which their doctors treated them: 1. patients who have been sent back from the German colonies in Africa after mental disorders had been diagnosed, and 2. patients suffering from general paralysis and treated in Friedrichsberg after 1919 using the then newly developed malaria fever therapy (according to Wagner-Jauregg). The implementation of this latter led to an intensification of the cooperation between psychiatry and tropical medicine in Hamburg which prior to this had been only very sporadic.

  15. What Is Constructionism in Psychiatry? From Social Causes to Psychiatric Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    It is common to note that social environment and cultural formation shape mental disorders. The details of this claim are, however, not well understood. The paper takes a look at the claim that culture has an impact on psychiatry from the perspective of metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Its aim is to offer, in a general fashion, partial explications of some significant versions of the thesis that culture and social environment shape mental disorders and to highlight some of the consequences social constructionism about psychiatry has for psychiatric explanation. In particular, it will be argued that the alleged dependence of facts about particular mental disorders and about the second order property of being a mental disorder on social facts amounts to a robust form of constructivism, whereas the view that clinician–patient interaction is influenced by cultural facts is perfectly compatible with an anti-constructivist stance. PMID:27148086

  16. [Psychiatry as a practical science : Considerations following Wolfgang Wieland (1933-2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, M; Wigand, M E; Becker, T

    2017-01-01

    In the light of historical and modern criticism of the discipline of psychiatry and psychotherapy as a medical subspecialty, this paper deals with aspects of the theory of medicine as postulated by the physician and philosopher Wolfgang Wieland. According to his contributions medicine is a practical science aiming at establishing rational action. Central to this model is a diagnosis, which helps to subsume individual cases under general principles from which essential therapeutic options can be derived. Hence, psychiatry and psychotherapy become a medical subspecialty by adopting the basic model of medical reasoning and action as described by Wieland. Nevertheless, the limits of such an approach must be taken into consideration. Especially in a psychiatric and psychotherapeutic context it is of particular importance that even when being guided by general principles the responsibility for the personality of each individual patient should be adequately met. Furthermore, attention should be paid to the limits of the subspecialty of psychiatry and psychotherapy as a medical discipline, which also requires a critical analysis of the concept of psychiatric illness.

  17. A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoong Sze

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a significant public health concern. General practitioners (GPs see a large percentage of the population and are well placed to provide weight management advice. There has been little examination of the types of weight loss strategies used in Australian general practice patients. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the proportion of normal weight, overweight and obese general practice patients who report trying to lose weight in the past 12 months, the types of weight loss strategies and diets used as well as the proportion consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. Methods Adult patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for their appointment. Responses from 1335 patients in twelve Australian practices are reported. Results A larger proportion of obese patients had tried to lose weight in the past 12 months (73% compared to those who were overweight (55% and normal weight (33%. The most commonly used strategy used was changing diet and increasing exercise in all BMI categories. Less than 10% used strategies such as prescription medication, over the counter supplements and consulted a weight loss specialist. Low calorie and low fat diets were the most frequently reported diets used to lose weight in those who were normal weight, overweight and obese. Overall, the proportion seeking GP advice was low, with 12% of normal weight, 15% of overweight and 43% of obese patients consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. Conclusions A large proportion of overweight or obese patients have tried to lose weight and utilized strategies such as changing diet and increasing exercise. Most attempts however were unassisted, with low rates of consultation with GPs and weight loss specialists. Ways to assist overweight and obese general practice patients with their weight loss attempts need to be identified.

  18. [Hundred years' psychiatry in Korea (1899-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhi, B Y

    1999-01-01

    The western medical knowledges of the human anatomy and physiology including knowledges of central nervous system have probably been introduced into Korea by Prince Sohyŏn Seja in 1645. The authentic education for the western medicine at the governmental and private medical schools, however, originated from 1899 and the education of mental disease was included in curriculum of Tai-Han-uiwon, the governmental medical school before 1910. In 1913 the first department of psychiatry (Department of Mental Disease) was established at the Chongdokbu-uiwon, the clinic of the Japanese colonial government, the former Korean governmental hospital which has later developed to the Kyŏngs ŏng Imperial University Hospital. On the other hand, there was in Severance Hospital Medical College, one Australian missionary psychiatrist McLaren, who has served at Paton Memorial Hospital in Jinju, Korea from 1911, taught neurology and psychiatry from 1913 at Severance Hospital Medical College, established psychiatry ward in 1923 at the Hospital, conducted the ward in humanistic way until 1940. It was the German psychiatry which the Japanese psychiatrists have brought to the Korean peninsula and it remained as major trends of psychiatry in Korea during the Japanese occupation between 1911 and 1945. The academic levels of Kyŏngsŏng Imperial University in psychiatry as well as the quality of mental care seemed to be almost equivocal to the psychiatry in Japan. However, psychiatrists scope of social psychiatric issues and of the research interests seemed to be somewhat narrow. Due to the political discrimination for the Korean students, the Koreans had less opportunity for the promotion at the university than Japanese residents in Korea. In 1945, after the end of the Pacific War only about 11 Korean psychiatrists were left in Korea, who organized Korean Neuropsychiatric Association. The Department of Neuropsychiatry of Seoul National University (former Department of Neurology and

  19. Schizotypal personality can be perceived as a personality trait and considered as a dimension. In recent decades, this way of thinking has been promoted by a British psychologist Gordon Clar - idge, the main author of the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE schizotypy scale, which is the subject of this arti - cle. In such dimensional model, schizotypy rep - resents a continuum, including the characteris - tics predisposing to psychosis. Thus, schizotypal features are observed in the general population, Daria Dembińska-Krajewska, Janusz Rybakowski : De - patrtment of Adult Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Scienc - es. Correspondence address : dembinska.daria@gmail.com Acknowledgements : The authors thank Prof. Geoffrey Shaw for his linguistic review of the text . and they may sometimes be linked with health and sometimes with disease [1, 2]. Schizophren - ic subjects, even when in remission, achieve high scores on schizotypy tests. However, “non-clini - cal” subjects can obtain high scores on these tests but do not necessarily present symptoms of the schizophrenia spectrum [3]. Schizotypal dimensions correspond to the fac - torial models of schizophrenia. The two-factor model reflects both positive and negative schizo - typy. The three-factor model adds cognitive dis - organization. Negative schizotypal symptoms include withdrawal from social activities, distur - bances in close relationships and anhedonia, all similar to the symptoms of schizophrenic defi - cit. Positive schizotypy includes features such as ideas of reference, perceptual and cognitive dis - tortion and magical thinking, all related to psy - chotic symptoms [4]. The positive schizotypal The Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE schizotypy scale in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembińska-Krajewska, Daria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a schizotypy scale, the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE, and its use in psychiatry. Schizotypy is a strongly biologically determined personality phenomenon. Schizotypal disorder, as a diagnostic category in contemporary psychiatric classifications, has been included in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This may reflect similarities in neurobiological and neuropsychological features between persons with schizotypy and patients with schizophrenia. However, schizotypal traits are also more marked in bipolar disorder (BD compared with those in healthy subjects. The O-LIFE was created by Claridge and his co-workers and consists of four dimensions: unusual expe - riences, cognitive disorganisation, introvertive anhedonia and impulsive nonconformity. Studies using O- LIFE in psychiatry, demonstrated a number of associations between the dimensions of the O-LIFE and the clinical features of schizophrenia, in mood disorders and in healthy persons. In patients with BD treat - ed with lithium carbonate, worse effects of lithium were observed in subjects with high scores on the O- LIFE dimensions (particularly cognitive disorganisation. Recently, some molecular-genetic associations have also been shown between O-LIFE dimensions and polymorphisms of the dopaminergic system and circadian rhythm genes.

  20. [Between law and psychiatry: homosexuality in the project of the Swiss penal code (1918)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delessert, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    In 1942 the Swiss penal code depenalises homosexual acts between agreeing adults under some conditions. The genesis of the penal article shows that it was constructed before the First World War and bears marks of the forensic theories of the turn of the century. Both by direct contacts and the authority of its eminent figures, Swiss psychiatry exerts an unquestionable influence on the depenalisation. The conceptualisation of homosexuality is also strongly influenced by the German psychiatric theories and discussed in reference to Germanic law. By the penal article, the Swiss lawyers and psychiatrists link the homosexual question with the determination of the irresponsibility of criminal mental patients and degeneracy.

  1. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy and applied relaxation for adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michel J; Brillon, Pascale; Savard, Pierre; Turcotte, Julie; Gaudet, Adrienne; Ladouceur, Robert; Leblanc, Renée; Gervais, Nicole J

    2010-03-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), applied relaxation (AR), and wait-list control (WL) in a sample of 65 adults with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The CBT condition was based on the intolerance of uncertainty model of GAD, whereas the AR condition was based on general theories of anxiety. Both manualized treatments were administered over 12 weekly 1-hour sessions. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report questionnaires were used to assess GAD and related symptoms at pretest, posttest, and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups. At posttest, CBT was clearly superior to WL, AR was marginally superior to WL, and CBT was marginally superior to AR. Over follow-up, CBT and AR were equivalent, but only CBT led to continued improvement. Thus, direct comparisons of CBT and AR indicated that the treatments were comparable; however, comparisons of each treatment with another point of reference (either waiting list or no change over follow-up) provided greater support for the efficacy of CBT than AR. 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Improving Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Education for Medical Students: An Inter-Organizational Collaborative Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Geraldine S.; Stock, Saundra; Briscoe, Gregory W.; Beck, Gary L.; Horton, Rita; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liu, Howard Y.; Rutter, Ashley Partner; Sexson, Sandra; Schlozman, Steven C.; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Stuber, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A new Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Medical Education (CAPME) Task Force, sponsored by the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP), has created an inter-organizational partnership between child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) educators and medical student educators in psychiatry. This paper…

  3. Does a short-term intervention promote mental and general health among young adults? – An evaluation of counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brucefors Agneta

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1988, self-reported mental health problems in Sweden have increased more among young people than in any other age group. Young adults aged 18 – 29 with minor mental health problems were welcomed to four (at most counselling sessions led by psychotherapists. The present study aimed to evaluate the method's appropriateness and usefulness. Methods The study population was recruited consecutively during six months (N = 74 and consisted of 59 women and 15 men. Fifty-one, 46 women and five men, met the criterion for a personal semi-structured interview three months post intervention. Self-assessed health data were collected on three occasions using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Pearlin's Personal Mastery Scale and two items from the Swedish Living Conditions Surveys. Thirteen women and six men were not statistically assessed due to incomplete data, but were interviewed by telephone. Four men refused to be interviewed and became dropouts. Results The largest group of the study population had long been troubled by their problem(s: 43 percent for over three years and 28 percent for over one year. Among those personally interviewed, 76 percent reported psychological distress (> 3 GHQ points before the counselling. After the counselling, GHQ-12 distress decreased by 50 percent while mastery and perceived health status increased significantly. A majority experienced an improved life situation, found out something new about themselves and could make use of the sessions afterwards. Personal participant session contentment was about 70 percent and all counsellees would recommend the intervention to a friend. Those interviewed by telephone were not statistically assessed due to incomplete health data. Their personal contentment was just under 50 percent, though all except one would recommend the counselling to a friend. Their expectations of the intervention were more result-orientated compared to the more process

  4. How psychiatry journals support the unbiased translation of clinical research. A cross-sectional study of editorial policies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Knüppel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Reporting guidelines (e.g. CONSORT have been developed as tools to improve quality and reduce bias in reporting research findings. Trial registration has been recommended for countering selective publication. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE encourages the implementation of reporting guidelines and trial registration as uniform requirements (URM. For the last two decades, however, biased reporting and insufficient registration of clinical trials has been identified in several literature reviews and other investigations. No study has so far investigated the extent to which author instructions in psychiatry journals encourage following reporting guidelines and trial registration. METHOD: Psychiatry Journals were identified from the 2011 Journal Citation Report. Information given in the author instructions and during the submission procedure of all journals was assessed on whether major reporting guidelines, trial registration and the ICMJE's URM in general were mentioned and adherence recommended. RESULTS: We included 123 psychiatry journals (English and German language in our analysis. A minority recommend or require 1 following the URM (21%, 2 adherence to reporting guidelines such as CONSORT, PRISMA, STROBE (23%, 7%, 4%, or 3 registration of clinical trials (34%. The subsample of the top-10 psychiatry journals (ranked by impact factor provided much better but still improvable rates. For example, 70% of the top-10 psychiatry journals do not ask for the specific trial registration number. DISCUSSION: Under the assumption that better reported and better registered clinical research that does not lack substantial information will improve the understanding, credibility, and unbiased translation of clinical research findings, several stakeholders including readers (physicians, patients, authors, reviewers, and editors might benefit from improved author instructions in psychiatry journals. A first step of

  5. [The transfer of psychiatry-narratives, termini and cross-cultural psychiatry in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on German and Japanese sources and shows how around 1900 European psychiatric concepts and practices embedded themselves into emerging scientific Japanese discourses. The article argues that now forgotten German-Japanese exchanges in the field of psychiatric pathology, together with the historical development of psychiatric care, were central mechanisms for the establishment of a distinctly psychiatric discourse in Japan priot to its broad institutionalization. Three discursive strategies were key: Japanese and German experts from a range of medical fields reinvented a body of traditions loosely related to actual pre-modern cultural practices; they engaged in comparative evaluations of psychiatric conditions; and, through the simple but effective transformation of specific concepts and termini at the margins of European psychiatry, these experts contributed to the transfer not only of a psychiatric discourse but also affected the power relations on a national and international scale as European psychiatry permeated into new territory, namely the Japanese landscape of emerging modern scientific disciplines.

  6. General and abdominal adiposity in a representative sample of Portuguese adults: dependency of measures and socio-demographic factors' influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowska, Joanna; Poínhos, Rui; Franchini, Bela; Afonso, Cláudia; Correia, Flora; Pinhão, Sílvia; Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel; Rodrigues, Sara

    2016-01-14

    The aims of this study were: (i) to estimate the dependency between BMI and waist:height ratio (WHtR) as measures of general and abdominal adiposity, and (ii) to evaluate the influence of socio-demographic factors on both measures and on their dependency in risk classification. Data from a cross-sectional study conducted in 2009 among a representative sample of 3529 Portuguese adults were used. Height, weight and waist were measured and socio-demographic data (sex, age, education level, occupational status, marital status, region of residence) were obtained. Using logistic regression, crude and adjusted OR for high general (BMI≥25·0 kg/m²) and abdominal (WHtR≥0·5) adiposity, and for incompatible classification between them, were calculated. Above half (50·8%) of the respondents had high BMI and 42·1% had high WHtR, and the rates were higher in men than in women. There was an inverse association between education level and both adiposity measures. The lowest prevalence of high general and abdominal adiposity was observed in students and singles, whereas the highest was found in retired, widowed and respondents from Azores, Madeira and Alentejo. Nearly a quarter of respondents (24·0%) were incompatibly classified by BMI and WHtR, with higher prevalence in men than in women and in low- than in high-educated people. Future surveys should focus on developing at least sex-specific cut-offs for both measures. Implementation of effective strategies for preventing and reducing high adiposity levels in Portugal should be directed primarily to men, older, low-educated individuals, as well as those living in the islands and poor regions of the country.

  7. [Some reflections on evidence based psychiatry and its impact on contemporary psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Norberto A

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the proposal of evidence based psychiatry (EBP) is presented together with a critical reflection about its paradigmatic perspective, taking into account Thomas S. Khun's epistemological lineaments. It is also shown how blurring of language in its approximation to the human behavioral disorders is EBP point of major inconsistency, as demonstrates a marked epistemological reductionism. Finally, consequences of its restrictive employment both to psychiatrists teaching and to the treatments they provide to their patients are also discussed.

  8. Functional MRT in psychiatry and neurology; Funktionelle MRT in Psychiatrie und Neurologie

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    Schneider, F. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie; Fink, G.R. (eds.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Almost no other method has reach such an interest as the functional imaging in psychiatric and neurological science; it is fascinating to observe the brain at work. The fundamentals of functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) and the interpretation of MRT images are explained; the state-of-the-art is discussed. The book is focussed on the functional imaging within psychiatry and neurology. The book contains 45 contributions within the following chapters: fundamentals, higher brain accomplishments, disease pattern, examinatory examples, perspectives.

  9. How new is the new philosophy of psychiatry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Damiaan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In their recent paper, Natalie Banner and Tim Thornton evaluate seven volumes of the Oxford University Press series “International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry,” an international book series begun in 2003 focusing on the emerging interdisciplinary field at the interface of philosophy and psychiatry. According to Natalie Banner and Tim Thornton, the series represents a clear indication that the interdisciplinary field of philosophy of psychiatry has been flourishing lately. Philosophers and psychiatrists face a “new philosophy of psychiatry”. However, the optimism which the “new” philosophy of psychiatry celebrates is precisely the exiling of philosophy from the foundations of psychiatry. The 150 year old belief that psychopathology cannot do without philosophical reflection has virtually disappeared from common psychiatric education and daily clinical practice. Though the discipline of psychiatry is particularly suited to contributions from philosophy, the impact of philosophy on psychiatry nowadays remains limited. With some exceptions, philosophical papers are embedded in a philosophical context inscrutable to ordinary psychiatrists. Much current philosophical work is perceived by psychiatrists as negativistic. I would encourage the field of psychiatry to incorporate once again basic philosophical attitudes which render possible true dialogue with philosophy and enrich both disciplines. The views developed here should not discredit the value and importance of Natalie Banner and Tim Thornton’s paper and the excellent series “International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry.” As Jaspers said “Everybody inclined to disregard philosophy will be overwhelmed by philosophy in an unperceived way”.

  10. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among U.S. Adults Any Disorder Among Children Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults Any Anxiety Disorder Among Children Agoraphobia Among Adults Agoraphobia Among Children Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Adults Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Children Obsessive Compulsive Disorder ...

  11. Patient aggression in clinical psychiatry: perceptions of mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, E J; Goossens, P J J; Steenhuis, I H M; Oud, N E

    2008-08-01

    Mental health nurses are faced with an increasing number of aggressive incidents during their daily practice. The coercive intervention of seclusion is often used to manage patient aggression in the Netherlands. However, GGZ Nederland, the Dutch association of service providers for mental health and addition care, has initiated a project to decrease the number of seclusions in clinical psychiatry. A first step in this project is to gain insight into the current situation: the perceived prevalence of patient aggression, the attitudes of mental health nurses towards patient aggression and those socio-demographic and psychosocial factors that contribute to the use of coercive interventions. A survey was undertaken among 113 nurses from six closed and semi-closed wards. In this survey, two questionnaires were used: (1) the Attitude Toward Aggression Scale; and (2) the Perceptions of the Prevalence of Aggression Scale. Variables derived from the Theory of Planned Behaviour were also measured. Nurses reported being regularly confronted with aggression in general and mostly with non-threatening verbal aggression. They perceived patient aggression as being destructive or offensive and not serving a protective or communicative function. The nurses generally perceived themselves as having control over patient behaviour (i.e. considerable self-efficacy) and reported considerable social support from colleagues. Although the nurses in this study were frequently confronted with aggression, they did not experience the aggression as a major problem.

  12. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study

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    Ana M. López-Sobaler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18–64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI and waist to height ratio (WHtR were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415–2.104; p=0.000 and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045–1.064; p=0.000. The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5 was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m2, WHtR < 0.5, whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, WHtR ≥ 0.5. Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future.

  13. Epidemiology of multimorbidity within the Brazilian adult general population: Evidence from the 2013 National Health Survey (PNS 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo-Marques, João Mazzoncini; Coxon, Domenica; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Middle-income countries are facing a growing challenge of adequate health care provision for people with multimorbidity. The objectives of this study were to explore the distribution of multimorbidity and to identify patterns of multimorbidity in the Brazilian general adult population. Data from 60202 adults, aged ≥18 years that completed the individual questionnaire of the National Health Survey 2013 (Portuguese: “Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde”–“PNS”) was used. We defined multimorbidity as the presence of two or more chronic conditions, including self-reported diagnoses and responses to the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire for depression. Multivariate Poisson regression analyses were used to explore relationship between multimorbidity and demographic factors. Exploratory tetrachoric factor analysis was performed to identify multimorbidity patterns. 24.2% (95% CI 23.5–24.9) of the study population were multimorbid, with prevalence rate ratios being significantly higher in women, older people and those with lowest educational level. Multimorbidity occurred earlier in women than in men, with half of the women and men aged 55–59 years and 65–69 years, respectively, were multimorbid. The absolute number of people with multimorbidity was approximately 2.5-fold higher in people younger than 65 years than older counterparts (9920 vs 3945). Prevalence rate ratios of any mental health disorder significantly increased with the number of physical conditions. 46.7% of the persons were assigned to at least one of three identified patterns of multimorbidity, including: “cardio-metabolic”, “musculoskeletal-mental” and “respiratory” disorders. Multimorbidity in Brazil is as common as in more affluent countries. Women in Brazil develop diseases at younger ages than men. Our findings can inform a national action plan to prevent multimorbidity, reduce its burden and align health-care services more closely with patients’ needs. PMID:28182778

  14. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sobaler, Ana M.; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Ortega, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18–64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW) was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB) was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415–2.104; p = 0.000) and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045–1.064; p = 0.000). The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5) was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m2, WHtR < 0.5), whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, WHtR ≥ 0.5). Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future. PMID:27382572

  15. [Interdisciplinarity and psychiatry: is it time not to know?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Mardônio Parente; Yasui, Silvio

    2013-06-01

    This article deals with interdisciplinarity as well as psychiatric and psychosocial care. Throughout the text, a historical account of the constitution and the crisis of scientific knowledge is presented and organized into disciplines. The theoretical difficulty of conceptualizing interdisciplinarity is analyzed and, in the concluding remarks, psychiatry and its relationship to psychosocial care is discussed. The argument is that, because of its history, psychiatry has singularities that differentiate it from other medical specialties and these singularities could initially cause psychiatry to go in the opposite direction in relation to interdisciplinarity. The conclusion is that because of their inherent characteristics psychosocial care services are privileged places for psychiatric training with interdisciplinary characteristics.

  16. [The making of madness: counterculture and anti-psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, William Vaz de

    2011-03-01

    The 1950s and especially the 1960s saw constant revisions of social values and customs, with young people's movements playing a major role, above all the so-called counter-culture. The powers-that-be categorized the behavior and attitudes of the movement's followers as constituting madness. This making of madness gave rise to a stream of thought known as anti-psychiatry, which calls into question the very essence of psychiatry. The present article criticizes the psychiatric models of that era and draws links between counter-culture movements and anti-psychiatry.

  17. Plaguicidas organoclorados en población general adulta de Bizkaia Organochlorine pesticides in the general adult population of Biscay (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Begoña Zubero

    2010-08-01

    models for continuous variables. Results: We detected p,p´-DDE in 100% of the volunteers (mean: 191.43ng/g lipid, while 31% had detectable levels of p,p´-DDT (mean: 18.9ng/g lipid. Detectable levels of HCB were found in 96.5% of the volunteers (mean: 78.56ng/g lipid, β-HCH in 90.4% (mean: 42.78ng/g lipid and γ-HCH in 3.5%. Heptachlor epoxide and beta-endosulfan were not detected. In the regression model higher levels of all pesticides were found with increasing age (p<0.05. There were no significant differences by area of residence, except for HCB and p,p´-DDE. Women had significantly higher levels of HCB and β-HCH (p<0.001. Body mass index showed a significant positive gradient in HCB and β-HCH (p<0.05. There was no association between pesticides and other variables, breast feeding, occupation or social class. Conclusions: These results indicate that the general adult population of Biscay has been and is exposed to organochlorine pesticides. However, their levels are within the range observed by other authors.

  18. The genomic psychiatry cohort: partners in discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Michele T; Sobell, Janet L; Medeiros, Helena; Abbott, Colony; Sklar, Brooke M; Buckley, Peter F; Bromet, Evelyn J; Escamilla, Michael A; Fanous, Ayman H; Lehrer, Douglas S; Macciardi, Fabio; Malaspina, Dolores; McCarroll, Steve A; Marder, Stephen R; Moran, Jennifer; Morley, Christopher P; Nicolini, Humberto; Perkins, Diana O; Purcell, Shaun M; Rapaport, Mark H; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Knowles, James A; Pato, Carlos N

    2013-06-01

    The Genomic Psychiatry Cohort (GPC) is a longitudinal resource designed to provide the necessary population-based sample for large-scale genomic studies, studies focusing on Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) and/or other alternate phenotype constructs, clinical and interventional studies, nested case-control studies, long-term disease course studies, and genomic variant-to-phenotype studies. We provide and will continue to encourage access to the GPC as an international resource. DNA and other biological samples and diagnostic data are available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Repository. After appropriate review and approval by an advisory board, investigators are able to collaborate in, propose, and co-lead studies involving cohort participants. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Biologism controversy: ethical implications for psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, M; Muders, S; Rüther, M; Schöne-Seifert, B

    2013-10-01

    Current biological psychiatry, it is frequently claimed by its opponents, is "biologistic" and unduly narrows psychological disorders to neurobiology and molecular biology. They deem a complete neuroscientific reduction of the mental phenomena to be impossible because of the impossibility of reducing certain phenomena, such as the individual subjective experience. If such a reduction is nevertheless undertaken it is ultimately to the disadvantage of the patients. We argue in this article that the very term "biologism" has to be put under scrutiny in the first place. As a result it becomes obvious that "biologism", as a subclass of "philosophical naturalism", is ultimately quite unproblematic. Biologism is dangerous only if it implies an eliminative rejection or an inappropriate underestimation of the relevance of the psyche. On closer examination it gets evident that such implications do not follow necessarily from biologism but cannot be precluded either. To better identify and possibly prevent such dangers, a more differentiated terminology seems helpful.

  20. Use of Telepsychiatry in Psychodynamic Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Anand, Vivek

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the organization, infrastructure basics, applications, effectiveness, outreach, and implementation barriers related to telepsychiatry. We highlight the tremendous potential and promise that this technology holds and also discuss the importance that telepsychiatry may play in the field of psychodynamic psychiatry. Given the growing effectiveness evidence base for therapy delivered over the Internet, telepsychiatry holds a large unexplored territory to help psychodynamically minded patients connect with psychodynamically oriented psychiatrists. This economically advantageous medium can be utilized to deliver psychodynamically guided approaches to the patient, alone or in combination with pharmacological and other psychosocial interventions. We hope, this article will help psychodynamically trained psychiatrists to consider bridging the gap with the remotely located, chronically mentally ill population which oftentimes has scarcity of resources.

  1. [Community psychiatry. Evaluation and research perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmann, J

    1986-01-01

    The author deals with 3 possible types of epidemiological studies in community mental health services: studies on the efficiency measuring the difference between the objectives of each team and the results; studies on the distribution between the teams and within each team, institutionalised models and implicit defensive modalities elaborated by the staff against the fear of the insane; studies on the populations considered at risk by psychoanalytical theories en vogue (depressive mothers, relationship anomalies). These studies would have the advantage to limit the "etiopathogenic pretentions" in psychiatry and avoid the "realistic slide" of imaginary constructions (myths or fiction of origin) which the community health service psychiatrist needs to work with but which has only an uncertain relationship with historical truth.

  2. [The cultural psychiatry in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Bayardo, Sergio J; Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Aceves-Pulido, Martha P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents only some of the most important contributions in the development of cultural psychiatry in Latin America. The continental efforts to understand the role that culture plays in the manifestation and treatment of mental disorders have been fruitful. The authors included are: Fernando Pagés of Argentina; Mario G. Hollweg of Bolivia; Rubim Alvaro de Pinho and Adalberto Barreto of Brazil; Carlos A. Leon and Carlos A. Uribe of Colombia; Antonio José A. Bustamante and Santa Cruz de Cuba, Carlos Leon Andrade of Ecuador, Guatemala Cristina Chavez; Sergio Villasenor J. Bayardo of Mexico; Carlos A. Seguin, Hermilio Valdizán and Javier Mariátegui in Peru; Y. Bespaldi of Consens of Uruguay; Rojas and Carlos Malpica and Jacqueline Briceño Clarac of Venezuela.

  3. Descartes' dogma and damage to Western psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, A; Bhugra, D

    2015-10-01

    René Descartes described the concept of mind-body dualism in the 16th century. This concept has been called his error but we prefer to call it his dogma because the error was recognised much later. We studied the original writings translated by various scholars. We believe that his dogma has caused tremendous amount of damage to Western psychiatry. This dualism has created boundaries between mind and body but as we know they are inextricably interlinked and influence each other. This has affected clinical practice and has increased the dichotomy between psychiatric services and the physical health care services in the West at least. This dualism has also contributed to stigma against mental illness, the mentally ill and the psychiatric services. We propose that it is time to abandon this mind-body dualism and to look at the whole patient and their illness experiences as is done in some other health care systems such as Ayurveda.

  4. Psychiatry, religion, positive emotions and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, George E

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love/attachment, trust/faith, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology. Rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection that are more dependent on the limbic system than the cortex. Specific religions, for all their limitations, are often the portal through which positive emotions are brought into conscious attention. Neither Freud nor psychiatric textbooks ever mention emotions like joy and gratitude. Hymns and psalms give these emotions pride of place. Our whole concept of psychotherapy might change, if clinicians set about enhancing positive emotions, rather than focusing only on the negative ones.

  5. Psychiatrie in meervoud. De wetenschappelijke oriëntaties van de Nederlandse psychiatrie in het interbellum (1918-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Vijselaar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry in multiplicity According to a widespread interpretation, the history of psychiatry is characterized by a strong opposition between biological and psychological paradigms, which would dominate consecutive periods in history. The image of a swinging pendulum is a popular metaphor to describe this idea. The culture of Dutch psychiatry in the interwar years (1918-1940 seems to gainsay this image. Psychological, biological and socials models of explanation and therapy were used alongside each other without apparent debate and conflict. Influential professors of psychiatry like H.C. Rümke (Utrecht University even pleaded for a conscious integration of these approaches. Some historians have interpreted this stance as a sign of scientific ‘vagueness’ and ‘anarchy’. Analyzing the work of three major representatives of Dutch psychiatry in the Interbellum (Leendert Bouman, Han Rümke and Lammert van der Horst, the authors (former students of the master Historical and Comparative Studies of the Sciences and the Humanities shed light on the psychiatric climate of this era, dealing with themes like the openness of psychiatry to other sciences, the interactions of psychiatry and literature, and the relationship between theory and clinical practice. As a result a further qualification of the image of the pendulum is argued for.

  6. Injuries Reported and Recorded for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Live with Paid Support in Scotland: A Comparison with Scottish Adults in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Evangelia; Finlayson, Janet; Hay, Margaret; Spencer, Wendy; Park, Richard; Tannock, Hugh; Galbraith, Erin; Godwin, Jon; Skelton, Dawn A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Providers of supported living services to adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) in the United Kingdom have procedures in place to monitor injuries; this provides opportunity to learn about the injuries being reported and recorded. The aim was to determine the incidence, causes and types of injuries experienced by 593 adults with…

  7. Paradigms lost and gained: has psychiatry in Australasia lost its voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gordon; Paterson, Amelia

    2013-08-01

    The evolution of views about causes and management models in psychiatry is of keen interest to those who respect the field's history. The objective of this study was to identify international paradigm shifts since 1950 in psychiatric theorising and management models. Multiple methods were used, including citation analysis, qualitative judgments by highly cited researchers and obtaining the views of historians of psychiatry. The quantitative citation analysis was of low yield, seemingly reflecting limitations intrinsic to such an approach, but it did identify some 'signals' to broader domain shifts, such as the progressive loss of salience of psychoanalysis and a contrasting emphasis on a science-weighted model. Also, the highly cited researchers tend to nominate narrow exemplars. Nominations by the historians were more panoramic and, while capturing the domains identified by the two other strategies, went further in proposing a wide set of additional candidates for consideration. Of the three strategies employed, the qualitative approach (canvassing the views of historians and of highly cited authors) captured the paradigm changes, or at least theoretical or research trends, more accurately than the quantitative citation analysis. Changes in Australasian psychiatry would appear to generally mirror such international changes, rather than evidence a distinctive voice.

  8. Teaching undergraduate psychiatry in primary care: the impact on student learning and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kate; Raven, Peter; Rosenthal, Joe; Russell, Jill; Humphrey, Charlotte; Buszewicz, Marta

    2007-01-01

    To explore the impact of undergraduate psychiatry placements in primary care settings on students' learning and attitudes to mental illness. Questionnaire survey and qualitative in-depth interviews. A primary care-based psychiatry undergraduate teaching programme at Royal Free and University College Medical School, London. A total of 145/183 (79.2%) students attending the primary care-based programme over 2 academic years completed a questionnaire survey. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 students, 12 general practitioner (GP) tutors and 20 patients participating in the course. In the questionnaire survey, 121/144 (84.0%) students valued the primary care-based teaching highly. In total, 87/139 (62.6%) students felt their attitudes to mental illness had changed as a result of the course. In-depth interviews demonstrated 4 key benefits of the teaching programme: increasing breadth of experience, understanding the patients' experience, learning about mental illness from a GP's perspective and changing students' attitudes towards mental illness. The students' attitudinal shift comprised 2 main dimensions; 'normalisation' of mental illness and increased empathy. Learning psychiatry in primary care settings offers students a broader experience of a range of patients than in hospital settings and encourages a 'person-centred' approach, which in turn can have a positive impact on their attitudes to mental illness, reducing stereotyping and increasing empathy.

  9. Is there a role for psychiatry in late termination of pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kirsty; Orr, Fran

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present review was to explore the role of the psychiatrist in late terminations of pregnancy. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and psycINFO databases, focussing on articles that explored (i) existing decision-making processes in late terminations; (ii) psychological sequelae of both early and late termination of pregnancy; (iii) the role of psychiatry in both early and late termination of pregnancy; and (iv) the involvement of psychiatry in complex medical decisions. The decision to perform a late termination of pregnancy is complex. Contributing to its complexity is an array of political, legal, societal, and ethical factors. The literature regarding psychological sequelae is frequently confusing and weakened by methodological problems. Methods of assisting in this decision-making process include the involvement of committees and psychiatrists. There are precedents for the involvement of psychiatrists in such a setting. Historically, psychiatrists played a role in screening women who requested an early termination. Psychiatrists are often involved in ethically challenging and complex clinical decisions in the general hospital setting. The involvement of psychiatry in this complex decision-making process has potential advantages and disadvantages. It is timely for psychiatrists to consider their position on their discipline's involvement.

  10. Genome-wide association study of autistic-like traits in a general population study of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel Maree; Cadby, Gemma; Melton, Phillip E; Abraham, Lawrence J; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Moses, Eric K

    2013-01-01

    Lay abstract: It has been proposed that autistic-like traits in the general population lie on a continuum, with clinical Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), representing the extreme end of this distribution. The current study undertook a genome-wide association (GWA) scan of 965 young Western Australian adults to identify novel risk variants associated with autistic-like traits. No associations reached genome-wide significance; however, a review of nominally associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) indicated two positional candidate loci that have been previously implicated in autistic-like trait etiology. Scientific abstract: Research has proposed that autistic-like traits in the general population lie on a continuum, with clinical ASD representing the extreme end of this distribution. Inherent in this proposal is that biological mechanisms associated with clinical ASD may also underpin variation in autistic-like traits within the general population. A GWA study using 2,462,046 SNPs was undertaken for ASD in 965 individuals from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. No SNP associations reached genome-wide significance (p CBLN1. The rs198198 SNP (p = 9.587 × 10(-6)), is located within an intron of the protein kinase C, beta 1 (PRKCB1) gene on chromosome 16p11. The PRKCB1 gene has been previously reported in linkage and association studies for ASD, and its mRNA expression has been shown to be significantly down regulated in ASD cases compared with controls. The rs16946931 SNP (p = 1.78 × 10(-6)) is located in a region flanking the Cerebellin 1 (CBLN1) gene on chromosome 16q12.1. The CBLN1 gene is involved with synaptogenesis and is part of a gene family previously implicated in ASD. This GWA study is only the second to examine SNPs associated with autistic-like traits in the general population, and provides evidence to support roles for the PRKCB1 and CBLN1 genes in risk of clinical ASD.

  11. Pilot Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Psychiatry Residents Using Standardized Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Kissane, David; Loughland, Carmel

    2016-10-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience difficulties communicating diagnostic information to patients and their families/carers, especially about distressing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. There is evidence for the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) for improving diagnostic discussions, particularly in specialties such as oncology, but only limited evidence exists about CST for psychiatry. This study evaluated a CST program specifically developed for psychiatry residents called ComPsych that focuses on conveying diagnostic and prognostic information about schizophrenia. The ComPsych program consists of an introductory lecture, module booklets for trainees, and exemplary skills videos, followed by small group role-plays with simulated patients (SPs) led by a trained facilitator. A standardized patient assessment (SPA) was digitally recorded pre- and post-training with a SP using a standardized scenario in a time-limited (15 min) period. Recorded SPAs were independently rated using a validated coding system (ComSkil) to identify frequency of skills used in five skills categories (agenda setting, checking, questioning, information organization, and empathic communication). Thirty trainees (15 males and 15 females; median age = 32) undertaking their vocational specialty training in psychiatry participated in ComPsych training and pre- and post-ComPsych SPAs. Skills increased post-training for agenda setting (d = -0.82), while questioning skills (d = 0.56) decreased. There were no significant differences in any other skills grouping, although checking, information organization, and empathic communication skills tended to increase post-training. A dose effect was observed for agenda setting, with trainees who attended more CST sessions outperforming those attending fewer. Findings support the generalization and translation of ComPsych CST to psychiatry.

  12. Attitudes toward neuroscience education in psychiatry: a national multi-stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Akil, Mayada; Widge, Alik; Roberts, Laura Weiss; Etkin, Amit

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes of chairs of psychiatry departments, psychiatrists, and psychiatry trainees toward neuroscience education in residency programs and beyond in order to inform future neuroscience education approaches. This multi-stakeholder survey captured data on demographics, self-assessments of neuroscience knowledge, attitudes toward neuroscience education, preferences in learning modalities, and interests in specific neuroscience topics. In 2012, the authors distributed the surveys: by paper to 133 US psychiatry department chairs and electronically through the American Psychiatric Association to 3,563 of its members (1,000 psychiatrists and 2,563 trainees). The response rates for the chair, psychiatrist, and trainee surveys were 53, 9, and 18 %, respectively. A large majority of respondents agreed with the need for more neuroscience education in general and with respect to their own training. Most respondents believed that neuroscience will help destigmatize mental illness and begin producing new treatments or personalized medicines in 5-10 years. Only a small proportion of trainees and psychiatrists, however, reported a strong knowledge base in neuroscience. Respondents also reported broad enthusiasm for transdiagnostic topics in neuroscience (such as emotion regulation and attention/cognition) and description at the level of neural circuits. This study demonstrates the opportunity and enthusiasm for teaching more neuroscience in psychiatry among a broad range of stakeholder groups. A high level of interest was also found for transdiagnostic topics and approaches. We suggest that a transdiagnostic framework may be an effective way to deliver neuroscience education to the psychiatric community and illustrate this through a case example, drawing the similarity between this neuroscience approach and problem-based formulations familiar to clinicians.

  13. Validation of the geriatric anxiety inventory in a duloxetine clinical trial for elderly adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Susan G; Lipsius, Sarah; Escobar, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Inventory (GAI) has been developed for use in the assessment of anxiety symptoms in older adults (≥ 65 years), but previous validation work has not examined the psychometric qualities of the instrument in relation to treatment. The objective of this study was to examine the performance of the GAI for its internal reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and its sensitivity to treatment. Elderly patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) participated in a 10-week double-blind study of duloxetine treatment for patients with GAD. Anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) anxiety and depression subscales, and the GAI. Internal reliability of the GAI was assessed with Cronbach's α. Correlations among the HAMA, HADS, and GAI scores were analyzed to determine convergent and divergent validity. Patients were also compared on remission status using recommended cut-off scores for the GAI. Patients with GAD, who were at least 65 years of age, were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with either duloxetine (N = 151) or placebo (N = 140) for 10 weeks acute therapy. The mean change on the GAI was significantly greater with duloxetine compared with placebo treatment (-8.36 vs. -4.96, respectively, p ≤ 0.001). The GAI demonstrated good internal consistency, good convergent and divergent validity, but suggested cut-off values for caseness with the GAI did not correspond to remission status as measured by the HAMA. Within an elderly patient population with GAD, the GAI demonstrated sound psychometric qualities and sensitivity to change with treatment.

  14. Editorial cognition, neurology, psychiatry: golden triangle or bermuda triangle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, A D

    1996-08-01

    Cognitive neuropsychiatry occupies the comparatively neglected research region that lies between neurology, psychiatry, and cognitive psychology. Reasons for this neglect are discussed, together with arguments as to why it may be timely to focus on this intellectual no man's land.

  15. Epigenetics and Child Psychiatry: Ethical and Legal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher R

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetics has the potential to revolutionize diagnosis and treatment in psychiatry, especially child psychiatry, as it may offer the opportunity for early detection and prevention, as well as development of new treatments. As with the previous introduction of genetic research in psychiatry, there is also the problem of unrealistic expectations and new legal and ethical problems. This article reviews the potential contributions and problems of epigenetic research in child psychiatry. Previous legal and ethical issues in genetic research serve as a guide to those in epigenetic research. Recommendations for safeguards and guidelines on the use of epigenetics with children and adolescents are outlined based on the identified issues. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The assessment of undergraduate psychiatry training: a paradigm shift

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-24

    Oct 24, 2005 ... conduct assessments accountably and according to the latest ... Department of Neurosciences, Division of Psychiatry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South ... of view essays are easy to set but are notoriously time.

  17. [Epistemologic perspectives for a nosography in child psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquez, G

    1988-01-01

    The author tries to question psychiatric nosography based on references. To do so, after defining nosography as well as psychiatric and medical nosography, he studies two ideas of thought. The first is a causal medical way dealing with child schizophrenia as developed in Eastern European psychiatry, whereas the second deals with the structural psychopathological way which describes the concept of child psychosis, the dominant way of dealing with child psychiatry in France.

  18. Musings: What child and adolescent psychiatry means to me

    OpenAIRE

    L Eugene Arnold

    2008-01-01

    I have been a grandfather for only 12 years, but for 37 years I have lived a grandparent's dream: people pay me to tell them how to raise their children. This is only one of the many rewards child and adolescent psychiatry has offered me. Table 1 lists some more of them.Probably the greatest satisfaction in child psychiatry is the wide selection of options for specialization: psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, nutrition, biochemistry, genetics, family therapy, parent guidance, custody and vis...

  19. A social paradigm in psychiatry - themes and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, S

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatry as science is underpinned by paradigms. Considering whether a social paradigm may help to advance the current state of psychiatry, the review provides a reference to the rich, but fragmented past of related initiatives in the history of psychiatry and a personal view of themes, challenges and perspectives of using a social paradigm in psychiatry. Major themes are the evidence on social determinants of mental health; the value-based importance of integrating people with mental disorders in society; options to overcome the social isolation and improve the networks of psychiatric patients; utilising a systemic approach for interventions in families and communities; and understanding group and one-to-one treatments in psychiatry primarily as social interactions. Whilst all these themes open up perspectives for future action and/or research, there are also conceptual challenges through the limitations of the current construct of mental disorders and the dominating terminology. Initiatives for using a social paradigm in psychiatry may refer to important achievements in the past, but need to go beyond this and consider on-going societal changes. Innovation may benefit from close collaboration with social sciences and humanities.

  20. Telephone-delivered psychotherapy for rural-dwelling older adults with generalized anxiety disorder: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Danhauer, Suzanne C; Lyles, Mary F; Miller, Michael E

    2014-02-08

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), characterized by excessive and uncontrollable worry, has a negative impact on the health, well-being, and functioning of older adults. Cognitive behavioral therapy has demonstrated efficacy in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but the generalizability of these findings to community-dwelling older adults is unknown. The aim of the current study is to examine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention delivered by telephone in reducing anxiety and worry in rural community-dwelling older adults with GAD. We propose a randomized controlled trial comparing telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-T) with nondirective supportive therapy (NST-T). One hundred seventy six adults 60 years and older diagnosed with GAD will be randomized to one of the two treatment conditions. The primary outcomes are self-report worry and clinician-rated anxiety. Secondary outcomes include depressive symptoms, sleep, quality of life, and functional status. It is hypothesized that CBT-T will be superior to NST-T in reducing anxiety and worry among older adults with GAD. Further, CBT-T is hypothesized to be superior to NST-T in reducing problems with depressive symptoms, sleep, functional status and quality of life. If this program is successful, it could be implemented as a low-cost program to treat late-life anxiety, especially in rural areas or in circumstances where older adults may not have access to qualified mental health providers. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01259596.