WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene-physical activity interactions

  1. Gene-physical activity interactions and their impact on diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Franks, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    to an equal bout of physical activity. Individuals with specific genetic profiles are also expected to be more responsive to the beneficial effects of physical activity in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Identification of such gene-physical activity interactions could give new insights into the biological...... the reader to the recent advances in the genetics of type 2 diabetes, summarize the current evidence on gene-physical activity interactions in relation to type 2 diabetes, and outline how information on gene-physical activity interactions might help improve the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes....... Finally, we will discuss the existing and emerging strategies that might enhance our ability to identify and exploit gene-physical activity interactions in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  2. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  3. Activity-Based Collaboration for Interactive Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Esbensen, Morten; Tabard, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    Activity-based computing (ABC) is a conceptual and technological framework for designing interactive systems that offers a better mapping between the activities people conduct and the digital entities they use. In ABC, rather than interacting directly with lower-level technical entities like file...

  4. Cooperative Activities in Interactive Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Therese Bissen

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative learning activities in interactive distance learning classes at the University of Hawaii School of Library and Information Studies. Topics include dyad and small group discussions, group projects, evaluating cooperative learning on interactive television, effect on academic performance, students' evaluation, and…

  5. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  6. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  7. Designing Interactive Applications to Support Novel Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lee (Hyowon); N. Mohamad Ali; L. Hardman (Lynda)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractR&D in media-related technologies including multimedia, information retrieval, computer vision, and the semantic web is experimenting on a variety of computational tools that, if sufficiently matured, could support many novel activities that are not practiced today. Interactive

  8. Plasma-Surface Interaction Activities in KSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Yu, Y.; Kim, K. P.; Bak, J. G.; Park, H. J.; Oh, Y. S.; Chung, J.; Nam, Y. U.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, K. R.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, M.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, H. K.; Rho, T. H.; Chu, Y.; Oh, Y. K.; Yang, H. L.; Park, K. R.; Chung, K. S.; Kstar Team,

    2013-01-01

    Selected topics of Plasma-Surface Interaction (PSI) activities in KSTAR are briefly introduced. SOL parameter measurements, particle balance and fuel retention, in-vessel dust research, and finally tungsten R & D are discussed. Some quantitative numbers from the initial phase of the operation

  9. Development of semi-active hydraulic damper as active interaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Semi-automatic control systems have the characteristics of being adaptable and requiring low energy. The objective of this research was to study the performance of an improved DSHD (Displacement Semi-Active Hydraulic Damper) by converting it to AIC (Active Interaction Control Device) with the addition of an ...

  10. Development of semi-active hydraulic damper as active interaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of semi-active hydraulic damper as active interaction control device to withstand ... 1945 based on the development of industrial revolution with application of hydraulic devices and electric energy devices. Then, the ... by earthquake or wind from 2002. Energy-dissipating behaviour of these devices is achieved.

  11. Gene × physical activity interactions in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shafqat; Rukh, Gull; Varga, Tibor V

    2013-01-01

    Numerous obesity loci have been identified using genome-wide association studies. A UK study indicated that physical activity may attenuate the cumulative effect of 12 of these loci, but replication studies are lacking. Therefore, we tested whether the aggregate effect of these loci is diminished......-administered questionnaires. Multiplicative interactions between the GRS and physical activity on BMI were tested in linear and logistic regression models in each cohort, with adjustment for age, age(2), sex, study center (for multicenter studies), and the marginal terms for physical activity and the GRS. These results were...... in adults of European ancestry reporting high levels of physical activity. Twelve obesity-susceptibility loci were genotyped or imputed in 111,421 participants. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated by summing the BMI-associated alleles of each genetic variant. Physical activity was assessed using self...

  12. Solute-mediated interactions between active droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerman, Pepijn G.; Moyses, Henrique W.; van der Wee, Ernest B.; Grier, David G.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Kegel, Willem K.; Groenewold, Jan; Brujic, Jasna

    2017-09-01

    Concentration gradients play a critical role in embryogenesis, bacterial locomotion, as well as the motility of active particles. Particles develop concentration profiles around them by dissolution, adsorption, or the reactivity of surface species. These gradients change the surface energy of the particles, driving both their self-propulsion and governing their interactions. Here, we uncover a regime in which solute gradients mediate interactions between slowly dissolving droplets without causing autophoresis. This decoupling allows us to directly measure the steady-state, repulsive force, which scales with interparticle distance as F ˜1 /r2 . Our results show that the dissolution process is diffusion rather than reaction rate limited, and the theoretical model captures the dependence of the interactions on droplet size and solute concentration, using a single fit parameter, l =16 ±3 nm , which corresponds to the length scale of a swollen micelle. Our results shed light on the out-of-equilibrium behavior of particles with surface reactivity.

  13. Hydrodynamic Interactions in Active and Passive Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafnick, Ryan C.

    Active matter is present at all biological length scales, from molecular apparatuses interior to cells, to swimming microscopic organisms, to birds, fish, and people. Its properties are varied and its applications diverse, but our understanding of the fundamental driving forces of systems with these constituents remains incomplete. This thesis examines active matter suspensions, exploring the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the unique and emergent properties therein. Both qualitative and quantitative impacts are considered, and care is taken in determining the physical origin of the results in question. It is found that fluid dynamical interactions are fundamentally, qualitatively important, and much of the properties of a system can be explained with an effective energy density defined via the fluid fields arising from the embedded self-propelling entities themselves.

  14. Universe Interactive: Static Displays with Active Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Michelle B.

    2005-01-01

    As the World Year of Physics (WYP) approaches, the AAPT WYP Committee would like to encourage everyone to consider ways to engage those around us in celebrating the science that makes us the proud geeks we are. The geek sentiment is my own, and does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the committee. This paper offers simple and inexpensive astronomy-related ideas for a bulletin-board-type display. The particular ideas presented below are hands-on classroom activities that I've adapted for display purposes. The display is static in that once constructed it does not require a personal facilitator, but each component invites interaction. At the end of the paper I revisit the idea of building a sundial1 as a highly visible and artistic way to engage students and communities in physics. The activities presented here are available for use when constructing your own display. In addition, these examples are meant to illustrate how instructional products might be modified for display purposes, and I encourage others to consider their favorite activities for an interactive display.

  15. Scaling laws of human interaction activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybski, Diego; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2009-08-04

    Even though people in our contemporary technological society are depending on communication, our understanding of the underlying laws of human communicational behavior continues to be poorly understood. Here we investigate the communication patterns in 2 social Internet communities in search of statistical laws in human interaction activity. This research reveals that human communication networks dynamically follow scaling laws that may also explain the observed trends in economic growth. Specifically, we identify a generalized version of Gibrat's law of social activity expressed as a scaling law between the fluctuations in the number of messages sent by members and their level of activity. Gibrat's law has been essential in understanding economic growth patterns, yet without an underlying general principle for its origin. We attribute this scaling law to long-term correlation patterns in human activity, which surprisingly span from days to the entire period of the available data of more than 1 year. Further, we provide a mathematical framework that relates the generalized version of Gibrat's law to the long-term correlated dynamics, which suggests that the same underlying mechanism could be the source of Gibrat's law in economics, ranging from large firms, research and development expenditures, gross domestic product of countries, to city population growth. These findings are also of importance for designing communication networks and for the understanding of the dynamics of social systems in which communication plays a role, such as economic markets and political systems.

  16. Designing Interactive Applications to Support Novel Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyowon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available R&D in media-related technologies including multimedia, information retrieval, computer vision, and the semantic web is experimenting on a variety of computational tools that, if sufficiently matured, could support many novel activities that are not practiced today. Interactive technology demonstration systems produced typically at the end of their projects show great potential for taking advantage of technological possibilities. These demo systems or “demonstrators” are, even if crude or farfetched, a significant manifestation of the technologists’ visions in transforming emerging technologies into novel usage scenarios and applications. In this paper, we reflect on design processes and crucial design decisions made while designing some successful, web-based interactive demonstrators developed by the authors. We identify methodological issues in applying today’s requirement-driven usability engineering method to designing this type of novel applications and solicit a clearer distinction between designing mainstream applications and designing novel applications. More solution-oriented approaches leveraging design thinking are required, and more pragmatic evaluation criteria is needed that assess the role of the system in exploiting the technological possibilities to provoke further brainstorming and discussion. Such an approach will support a more efficient channelling of the technology-to-application transformation which are becoming increasingly crucial in today’s context of rich technological possibilities.

  17. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction

  18. Interactive activation and mutual constraint satisfaction in perception and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, James L; Mirman, Daniel; Bolger, Donald J; Khaitan, Pranav

    2014-08-01

    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis-the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation model of letter and word perception and the TRACE model of speech perception, as early attempts to explore this hypothesis, and review the experimental evidence relevant to their assumptions and predictions. We consider how well these models address the computational challenge posed by the problem of perception, and we consider how consistent they are with evidence from behavioral experiments. We examine empirical and theoretical controversies surrounding the idea of interactive processing, including a controversy that swirls around the relationship between interactive computation and optimal Bayesian inference. Some of the implementation details of early versions of interactive activation models caused deviation from optimality and from aspects of human performance data. More recent versions of these models, however, overcome these deficiencies. Among these is a model called the multinomial interactive activation model, which explicitly links interactive activation and Bayesian computations. We also review evidence from neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the view that interactive processing is a characteristic of the perceptual processing machinery in the brain. In sum, we argue that a computational analysis, as well as behavioral and neuroscience evidence, all support the Interactive Activation hypothesis. The evidence suggests that

  19. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Wood

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL, which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%, vicarious interactive (20% (involving questions to and from the lecturer, and noninteractive (55%. As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B, although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12% or on individual learning (10% and 7%. These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  20. Ferromagnetic interaction model of activity level in workplace communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Yano, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nature of human-human interaction, specifically, how people synchronize with each other in multiple-participant conversations, is described by a ferromagnetic interaction model of people’s activity levels. We found two microscopic human interaction characteristics from a real-environment face-to-face conversation. The first characteristic is that people quite regularly synchronize their activity level with that of the other participants in a conversation. The second characteristic is that the degree of synchronization increases as the number of participants increases. Based on these microscopic ferromagnetic characteristics, a “conversation activity level” was modeled according to the Ising model. The results of a simulation of activity level based on this model well reproduce macroscopic experimental measurements of activity level. This model will give a new insight into how people interact with each other in a conversation.

  1. Physical extracurricular activities in educational child-robot interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, Daniel Patrick; Schindler, Louisa; Reidsma, Dennis; Dautenhahn, K.; Baxter, P.; Weiss, A.; Salem, A.

    In an exploratory study on educational child-robot interaction we investigate the effect of alternating a learning activity with an additional shared activity. Our aim is to enhance and enrich the relationship between child and robot by introducing ``physical extracurricular activities''. This

  2. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete Casas, R.; Garcia Rodriguez, A.; Rey Bueno, F.; Espinola Lara, A.; Valenzuela Calahorro, C.; Navarrete Guijosa, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivatives by activated carbon sorbents in aqueous solutions. The study comprised both kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects. The kinetic results were reported in a previous paper; the equilibrium-related results are discussed here. The two types of carbon used exhibit some differences but the equilibrium isotherms obtained are all of the H-3 type in the classification of Giles. This suggests a high affinity of the sorbents for the sorbates. We also found that the overall adsorption process comprises more than one individual adsorption-desorption process of which one leads to the formation of a 'monolayer' and the other to the 'precipitation' of the sorbate on the sorbent surface (multilayer adsorption); the amount of sorbate adsorbed in monolayer form was seemingly greater in C-A14

  3. Playful Interactions Stimulating Physical Activity in Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Janienke; Bekker, Tilde; Vanden Abeele, Vero

    In this position paper we describe our vision on designing playful interactions to persuade people to be physically active in public spaces. Social embeddedness and playful interaction are the core elements of this vision. We illustrate how our design vision is incorporated into innovative concepts...... to motivate each other to be physically active by creating challenges for each other. Designing playful solutions for public spaces asks for low-threshold solutions that support easy stepping in and stepping out solutions....

  4. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, Evlyn; Queirolo, Jovel; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Crow, Sam; Allen, Kelsey; Mathur, Maya B; Gordon, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated.

  5. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evlyn Pless

    Full Text Available Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated.

  6. PARP-1 Interaction with and Activation by Histones and Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Colin; Kotova, Elena; Tulin, Alexei V

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP-1) is an abundant chromatin associated protein, typical for most eukaryotic nuclei. The localization of PARP-1 in chromatin and its enzymatic activation involves multiple interactions of PARP-1 with nucleosomal histones, other proteins, and DNA. We report a set of methods designed to reconstitute PARP-1 regulation in vitro. These methods involve the expression of PARP-1 and PARP-1-regulating proteins using bacterial and eukaryotic systems, purification of these proteins using chromatography, testing of individual interactions in vitro, assembly of active complexes, and reconstitution of PARP-1 regulating reactions in vitro.

  7. The interaction between ICT and human activity-travel behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwan, M.P.; Dijst, M.J.; Schwanen, T.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between information and communication technologies (ICT) and human activity-travel behavior has been an important theme in transportation research in recent years. Researchers have recognized that an increase in the use of ICT may lead to changes in the location, timing and duration

  8. ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Ternier, S., Tabuenca, B., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality. In M. Specht, J. Multisilta, & M. Sharples (Eds.), Proceedings of the Mobile Augmented Reality for Education Workshop (pp. 10-13). October, 16-17, 2012, Helsinki, Finland.

  9. Learner-Interface Interaction for Technology-Enhanced Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neelu; Khreisat, Laila; Sharma, Kiron

    2009-01-01

    Neelu Sinha, Laila Khreisat, and Kiron Sharma describe how learner-interface interaction promotes active learning in computer science education. In a pilot study using technology that combines DyKnow software with a hardware platform of pen-enabled HP Tablet notebook computers, Sinha, Khreisat, and Sharma created dynamic learning environments by…

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Interaction of Methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the antibacterial activity and interaction of methanolic extract of Physcia grisea and cephalosporin on the clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes. The isolates of S. pyogenes used were obtained from the department of Pharmaceutical microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

  11. NOX Activation by Subunit Interaction and Underlying Mechanisms in Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Radhika; Geng, Xiaokun; Li, Fengwu; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH) oxidase (NOX) is an enzyme complex with the sole function of producing superoxide anion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the expense of NADPH. Vital to the immune system as well as cellular signaling, NOX is also involved in the pathologies of a wide variety of disease states. Particularly, it is an integral player in many neurological diseases, including stroke, TBI, and neurodegenerative diseases. Pathologically, NOX produces an excessive amount of ROS that exceed the body's antioxidant ability to neutralize them, leading to oxidative stress and aberrant signaling. This prevalence makes it an attractive therapeutic target and as such, NOX inhibitors have been studied and developed to counter NOX's deleterious effects. However, recent studies of NOX have created a better understanding of the NOX complex. Comprised of independent cytosolic subunits, p47- phox , p67- phox , p40- phox and Rac , and membrane subunits, gp91- phox and p22- phox , the NOX complex requires a unique activation process through subunit interaction. Of these subunits, p47- phox plays the most important role in activation, binding and translocating the cytosolic subunits to the membrane and anchoring to p22- phox to organize the complex for NOX activation and function. Moreover, these interactions, particularly that between p47- phox and p22- phox , are dependent on phosphorylation initiated by upstream processes involving protein kinase C (PKC). This review will look at these interactions between subunits and with PKC. It will focus on the interaction involving p47- phox with p22- phox , key in bringing the cytosolic subunits to the membrane. Furthermore, the implication of these interactions as a target for NOX inhibitors such as apocynin will be discussed as a potential avenue for further investigation, in order to develop more specific NOX inhibitors based on the inhibition of NOX assembly and activation.

  12. Active-constructive-interactive: a conceptual framework for differentiating learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michelene T H

    2009-01-01

    Active, constructive, and interactive are terms that are commonly used in the cognitive and learning sciences. They describe activities that can be undertaken by learners. However, the literature is actually not explicit about how these terms can be defined; whether they are distinct; and whether they refer to overt manifestations, learning processes, or learning outcomes. Thus, a framework is provided here that offers a way to differentiate active, constructive, and interactive in terms of observable overt activities and underlying learning processes. The framework generates a testable hypothesis for learning: that interactive activities are most likely to be better than constructive activities, which in turn might be better than active activities, which are better than being passive. Studies from the literature are cited to provide evidence in support of this hypothesis. Moreover, postulating underlying learning processes allows us to interpret evidence in the literature more accurately. Specifying distinct overt activities for active, constructive, and interactive also offers suggestions for how learning activities can be coded and how each kind of activity might be elicited. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Linear response theory of activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti' nez-Casado, R. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sanz, A.S.; Vega, J.L. [Instituto de Fi' sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rojas-Lorenzo, G. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologi' as y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, 10400 La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Fi' sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cienti' ficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Miret-Artes, S., E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Instituto de Fi' sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cienti' ficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: Activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates is analyzed within the Linear Response Theory framework. The so-called interacting single adsorbate model is justified by means of a two-bath model, where one harmonic bath takes into account the interaction with the surface phonons, while the other one describes the surface coverage, this leading to defining a collisional friction. Here, the corresponding theory is applied to simple systems, such as diffusion on flat surfaces and the frustrated translational motion in a harmonic potential. Classical and quantum closed formulas are obtained. Furthermore, a more realistic problem, such as atomic Na diffusion on the corrugated Cu(0 0 1) surface, is presented and discussed within the classical context as well as within the framework of Kramer's theory. Quantum corrections to the classical results are also analyzed and discussed. - Abstract: Activated surface diffusion with interacting adsorbates is analyzed within the Linear Response Theory framework. The so-called interacting single adsorbate model is justified by means of a two-bath model, where one harmonic bath takes into account the interaction with the surface phonons, while the other one describes the surface coverage, this leading to defining a collisional friction. Here, the corresponding theory is applied to simple systems, such as diffusion on flat surfaces and the frustrated translational motion in a harmonic potential. Classical and quantum closed formulas are obtained. Furthermore, a more realistic problem, such as atomic Na diffusion on the corrugated Cu(0 0 1) surface, is presented and discussed within the classical context as well as within the framework of Kramer's theory. Quantum corrections to the classical results are also analyzed and discussed.

  14. Means of Question-Answer Interaction for Collaborative Development Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Sosnin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of successful developing of the software intensive system (SIS is adequate conceptual interactions of stakeholders at the early stages of designing. Nowadays the success of development is extremely low. It can be increased with using artificial intelligence (AI means including models of reasoning supported by the human-computer interaction in collaborative development activity. In this paper, a number of question-answer means for modeling reasoning are suggested. Such kind of means is defined and implemented in order to get effects of integrating the collective reasoning for their positive influence on the intellectual activity of designers. Question-answer means are arranged as a specialized processor opening the possibility to question-answer programming of the tasks on the conceptual stage of designing. Suggested and investigated means can be used for solving any complicated task.

  15. Serum Albumin Binding and Esterase Activity: Mechanistic Interactions with Organophosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Goncharov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The albumin molecule, in contrast to many other plasma proteins, is not covered with a carbohydrate moiety and can bind and transport various molecules of endogenous and exogenous origin. The enzymatic activity of albumin, the existence of which many scientists perceive skeptically, is much less studied. In toxicology, understanding the mechanistic interactions of organophosphates with albumin is a special problem, and its solution could help in the development of new types of antidotes. In the present work, the history of the issue is briefly examined, then our in silico data on the interaction of human serum albumin with soman, as well as comparative in silico data of human and bovine serum albumin activities in relation to paraoxon, are presented. Information is given on the substrate specificity of albumin and we consider the possibility of its affiliation to certain classes in the nomenclature of enzymes.

  16. Mathematical description of information interaction in investment and construction activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sborshchikov Sergey Borisovich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For effective management of investment and construction activity (ICA there must be a subsystem responsible for information interaction. The article considers the role of information in ICA, as well as the requirements and objectives of the information systems. Data collection, communication and processing, according to the authors, reflect the system running efficiency. Thanks to information security subsystem there is a possibility of measuring the efficiency of resource use and the relations between inputs and outputs of individual elements throughout investment and construction activities. Requirements of modern economic realities, particularly, investment and construction activities dynamics, should be adjusted to the flow of information: creating new connections, terminating the others. Developing the information management system, its structure and composition require consideration and planning. Development planning and management is closely related to the improvement of information links and upgrading the entire system of information security, its structure and functioning.

  17. Immunomodulator CD200 promotes neurotrophic activity by interacting with and activating the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Björnsdóttir, Halla; Christensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    in the suppression of microglia activation. We for the first time demonstrated that CD200 can interact with and transduce signaling through activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), thereby inducing neuritogenesis and promoting neuronal survival in primary neurons. CD200-induced FGFR...

  18. Interaction between functional health literacy, patient activation, and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodard LD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LeChauncy D Woodard, Cassie R Landrum, Amber B Amspoker, David Ramsey, Aanand D Naik Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Michael E DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Section of Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Background: Functional health literacy (FHL and patient activation can impact diabetes control through enhanced diabetes self-management. Less is known about the combined effect of these characteristics on diabetes outcomes. Using brief, validated measures, we examined the interaction between FHL and patient activation in predicting glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c control among a cohort of multimorbid diabetic patients.Methods: We administered a survey via mail to 387 diabetic patients with coexisting ­hypertension and ischemic heart disease who received outpatient care at one regional VA medical center between November 2010 and December 2010. We identified patients with the study conditions using the International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision-Clinical ­Modification (ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes and Current Procedure Terminology (CPT ­procedures codes. Surveys were returned by 195 (50.4% patients. We determined patient activation levels based on participant responses to the 13-item Patient Activation Measure and FHL levels using the single-item screening question, “How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself?” We reviewed patient medical records to assess glycemic control. We used multiple logistic regression to examine whether activation and FHL were individually or jointly related to HbA1c control.Results: Neither patient activation nor FHL was independently related to glycemic control in the unadjusted main effects model; however, the interaction between the two was significantly associated with glycemic control (odds ratio 1.05 [95% confidence

  19. Stigma's Effect on Social Interaction and Social Media Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudewyns, Vanessa; Himelboim, Itai; Hansen, Derek L; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatized topics, such as HIV/STD, likely constrain related information sharing in ways that should be apparent in social interactions both on and off the Internet. Specifically, the authors predicted that the more people perceive an issue as stigmatized, the less likely they are to talk about the issue both privately (with sexual partners and peers) and publicly (on Twitter). Study 1 tested the effect of stigma on conversations at the individual level: The authors asked a group of participants (N = 138) about perceived STD-testing stigma, interactions with a sexual partner, and conversations with peers about STD testing. Study 2 assessed whether health conditions, in the aggregate, were less likely to generate social media activity as a function of current stigmatization. Using 259,758 archived Twitter posts mentioning 13 medical conditions, the authors tested whether level of stigma predicted the volume of relevant social media conversation, controlling for each condition's amount of advocacy and Google search popularity from a user's perspective. Findings supported our hypotheses. Individuals who reported perceiving a given health conditions in more stigmatic ways also reported interacting less with others about that topic; Twitter results showed a similar pattern. Results also suggest a more complex story of influence, as funding from the National Institutes of Health (i.e., each conditions amount of advocacy) associated with the examined health conditions also predicted Twitter activity. Overall, these results indicated that stigma had a similar, dampening effect on face-to-face and Twitter interactions. Findings hold theoretical and practical implications, which are discussed.

  20. Herschel, Planck, and Chromoscope: Interactive Outreach Activities in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, C. E.; Lowe, S. R.; Simpson, R. J.

    2010-08-01

    With the launch of the Herschel and Planck missions coinciding with the International Year of Astronomy, the worldwide publicity for both of these missions is very high. To build on this publicity, the UK outreach activities were arranged by a group consisting of both academics and educators. A major component of the initial outreach was an exhibit at the Royal Society's Summer Science Exhibition in London, which involved interactive elements described here. The Chromoscope tool, first used at this exhibition, is introduced, and some of the features outlined.

  1. Interaction of physical activity and interoception in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleana eGeorgiou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity (PA is associated with positive health outcomes, whereas physical inactivity is related to an increased risk for various health issues including obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Previous research indicates that interindividual differences in the perception of bodily processes (interoceptive sensitivity, IS interact with the degree of PA in adults. Whether there is a similar relationship between PA and IS in children has not been investigated yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between IS and PA during physical performance tasks and in everyday situations. Methods: IS was assessed using a heartbeat perception task in a sample of 49 children within the health promotion program Join the Healthy Boat which is implemented in several primary schools in the southwest of Germany. PA was examined using a physical performance task, assessing the distance covered during a standardized 6-minute run. In a subsample of 21 children, everyday PA was measured by a multi-sensor device (Actiheart, CamNtech, Cambridge, UK during five consecutive days with more than 10 hours of daily data collection.Results: Children with higher IS performed better in the physical performance task. Additionally, based on energy expenditure defined as metabolic equivalents, IS was positively correlated with the extent of light PA levels in the morning and afternoon. Conclusions: Our finding reveal that IS interacts with the degree of PA in children supporting the idea that interoception is important for the self-regulation of health-related behavior.

  2. Stellar magnetic activity – Star-Planet Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stellar magnetic activity is an important factor in the formation and evolution of exoplanets. Magnetic phenomena like stellar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high-energy emission affect the exoplanetary atmosphere and its mass loss over time. One major question is whether the magnetic evolution of exoplanet host stars is the same as for stars without planets; tidal and magnetic interactions of a star and its close-in planets may play a role in this. Stellar magnetic activity also shapes our ability to detect exoplanets with different methods in the first place, and therefore we need to understand it properly to derive an accurate estimate of the existing exoplanet population. I will review recent theoretical and observational results, as well as outline some avenues for future progress.

  3. Synthesis, DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of three rimantadine analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxinlnu@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yang [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Niu, Hua-Ying [Jinan Dachpharm Development Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of three rimantadine analogues (RAs) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) in buffer solution (pH 7.4) were investigated using berberine (BR) as a probe by various methods. Fluorescence studies revealed that the RAs interacted with DNA in vitro and the quenchings were all static. Furthermore, the binding modes of these compounds to DNA were disclosed as groove binding supported by absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement and denatured DNA experiment. The antimicrobial activities of the RAs were also evaluated in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and they all exhibited good bacteriostasic effects. The results might provide an important reference for investigation of the molecular mechanism associated with the DNA binding of the RAs. - Highlights: • Three rimantadine analogues were synthesized. • The RAs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of DNA via a static combination. • These analogues can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. • The antimicrobial activities of three analogues were also evaluated by the disk diffusion method.

  4. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S Scholes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation domains (ADs are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators.

  5. Interacting CMEs and their associated flare and SEP activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Prasanna Subramanian, S.

    2014-08-01

    We have analyzed a set of 25 interacting events which are associated with the DH type II bursts. These events are selected from the Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed during the period 1997-2010 in SOHO/LASCO and DH type IIs observed in Wind/WAVES. Their pre and primary CMEs from nearby active regions are identified using SOHO/LASCO and EIT images and their height-time diagrams. Their interacting time and height are obtained, and their associated activities, such as, flares and Solar Energetic Particles (>10 pfu) are also investigated. Results from the analysis are: primary CMEs are much faster than the pre-CMEs, their X-ray flares are also stronger (X- and M-class) compared to the flares (C- and M-class) of pre-CMEs. Most of the events (22/25) occurred during the period 2000-2006. From the observed width and speed of pre and primary CMEs, it is found that the pre-CMEs are found to be less energetic than the primary CMEs. While the primary CMEs are tracked up to the end of LASCO field of view (30 Rs), most of the pre-CMEs can be tracked up to <26 Rs. The SEP intensity is found to be related with the integrated flux of X-ray flares associated with the primary CMEs for nine events originating from the western region.

  6. Pair Interaction of Catalytical Sphere Dimers in Chemically Active Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Min Shi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the pair dynamics of two self-propelled sphere dimers in the chemically active medium in which a cubic autocatalytic chemical reaction takes place. Concentration gradient around the dimer, created by reactions occurring on the catalytic sphere surface and responsible for the self-propulsion, is greatly influenced by the chemical activities of the environment. Consequently, the pair dynamics of two dimers mediated by the concentration field are affected. In the particle-based mesoscopic simulation, we combine molecular dynamics (MD for potential interactions and reactive multiparticle collision dynamics (RMPC for solvent flow and bulk reactions. Our results indicate three different configurations between a pair of dimers after the collision, i.e., two possible scenarios of bound dimer pairs and one unbound dimer pair. A phase diagram is sketched as a function of the rate coefficients of the environment reactions. Since the pair interactions are the basic elements of larger scale systems, we believe the results may shed light on the understanding of the collective dynamics.

  7. Interaction Effects of Happiness and Physical Activity on Smoking Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchyan, Armen A; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A; Aleid, Yazeed S; Nagshbandi, Ahmed A; Almousa, Fahad; Papikyan, Satenik L; Gosadi, Ibrahim M

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to assess the potential relationships among happiness, physical activity, and smoking initiation among undergraduate medical students in Saudi Arabia. We performed a cross-sectional study of randomly selected first- to fifth-year undergraduate medical students. Smoking initiation was defined as "ever trying smoking a cigarette, waterpipe, cigar/cigarillo, or other type of tobacco, even one or 2 puffs." The short scale Oxford Happiness Questionnaire was used to assess each student's happiness. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Of the 406 students surveyed (208 boys, 198 girls), 86 (21.1%) had initiated smoking. We found an interaction between physical activity (PA) and happiness on smoking initiation (p-interaction = .012). Among boys with low levels of PA, lower levels of happiness were associated with a greater likelihood of smoking initiation (OR = 5.8, 95%CI = 1.9 - 17.5). Also, high levels of PA increased the chance of smoking initiation among male students with high levels of happiness (OR = 5.6, 95%CI = 2.1 - 14.5). Our results suggest that young men with low levels of happiness and low levels of PA, as well as high levels of PA and high levels of happiness, may be targeted as a priority population in tobacco control intervention programs.

  8. Cyclin D3 interacts with human activating transcription factor 5 and potentiates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Shen Xiaoyun; Sun Qing; Liu Weicheng; Shen Hailian; Gu Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclin D3 protein is a member of the D-type cyclins. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins have been reported to be able to interact with several transcription factors and modulate their transcriptional activations. Here we report that human activating transcription factor 5 (hATF5) is a new interacting partner of Cyclin D3. The interaction was confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analysis. Neither interaction between Cyclin D1 and hATF5 nor interaction between Cyclin D2 and hATF5 was observed. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that Cyclin D3 could colocalize with hATF5 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 could potentiate hATF5 transcriptional activity independently of its Cdk4 partner. But Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 had no effect on hATF5 transcriptional activity. These data provide a new clue to understand the new role of Cyclin D3 as a transcriptional regulator

  9. Electromechanical Nanogenerator-Cell Interaction Modulates Cell Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Blanquer, Andreu; Vargas-Estevez, Carolina; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme; Esteve, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    Noninvasive methods for in situ electrical stimulation of human cells open new frontiers to future bioelectronic therapies, where controlled electrical impulses could replace the use of chemical drugs for disease treatment. Here, this study demonstrates that the interaction of living cells with piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) induces a local electric field that self-stimulates and modulates their cell activity, without applying an additional chemical or physical external stimulation. When cells are cultured on top of the NGs, based on 2D ZnO nanosheets, the electromechanical NG-cell interactions stimulate the motility of macrophages and trigger the opening of ion channels present in the plasma membrane of osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) inducing intracellular calcium transients. In addition, excellent cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation are validated. This in situ cell-scale electrical stimulation of osteoblast-like cells can be extrapolated to other excitable cells such as neurons or muscle cells, paving the way for future bioelectronic medicines based on cell-targeted electrical impulses. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Entertainment Capture through Heart Rate Activity in Physical Interactive Playgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannakakis, Georgios; Hallam, John; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2008-01-01

    An approach for capturing and modeling individual entertainment (“fun”) preferences is applied to users of the innovative Playware playground, an interactive physical playground inspired by computer games, in this study. The goal is to construct, using representative statistics computed from...... that predict reported entertainment preferences given HR features. These models are expressed as artificial neural networks and are demonstrated and evaluated on two Playware games and two control tasks requiring physical activity. The best network is able to correctly match expressed preferences in 64...... children’s physiological signals, an estimator of the degree to which games provided by the playground engage the players. For this purpose children’s heart rate (HR) signals, and their expressed preferences of how much “fun” particular game variants are, are obtained from experiments using games...

  11. Written feedback as interaction: Knowledge exchange or activity exchange?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Wharton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in-text, handwritten feedback comments on first year undergraduate writing in the discipline of Statistics. Using a small corpus of annotated assignments, I examine the grammar choices and content choices made by tutors as they comment on students’ work.  To better understand the purposes of the comments, I draw on an interview with a tutor. I make use of Halliday’s concepts of knowledge exchange and activity exchange to interpret the choices observed in the data, and the motivations discussed by the tutor, from the perspective of interaction. Finally, I discuss the implications of the analysis in terms of the formative potential of the feedback. 

  12. Biological activities and DNA interactions of Amanita ovoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Hasan Hüseyin; Arslan, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Amanita ovoidea (Bull.) Link (Amanitaceae) is a well-known species due to its pleasant aroma and flavor since ancient times in the worldwide. This species is also known in Turkey and people consume it extensively. To evaluate medicinal importance of A. ovoidea for human health, to explain the effect of mushroom extracts on bacterial DNA, and to find preventive role on bacterial disease. Chloroform, acetone, and methanol extracts of A. ovoidea were tested for the antimicrobial activities against four Gram-positive bacteria, five Gram-negative bacteria, and yeast using a micro-dilution method. In addition, DNA binding, DNA cleavage activity, and restriction enzyme digestion of the methanol extract of A. ovoidea were examined at different concentrations (40.000-78.125 µg/mL). The highest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value observed against the test micro-organisms was with the chloroform extract (MIC 19.5 µg/mL concentration) against Candida albicans. Other highest antimicrobial effects observed against the test micro-organisms were with the methanol extracts against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, and Salmonella enteritidis (MICs, 78 µg/mL concentrations). All concentrations reduced the mobility of plasmid DNA. BamHI and HindIII targeted specially to supercoils and cut them. Amanita ovoidea extract prevented cutting with HindIII by binding especially to the AA region in open circular DNA. Present results demonstrated that A. ovoidea has excellent antimicrobial and antifungal activities by its DNA interaction activity on pBR322.

  13. Motor cortical activity changes during neuroprosthetic-controlled object interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, John E; Brane, Lucas; Gaunt, Robert A; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Boninger, Michael L; Collinger, Jennifer L

    2017-12-05

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled prosthetic arms are being developed to restore function to people with upper-limb paralysis. This work provides an opportunity to analyze human cortical activity during complex tasks. Previously we observed that BCI control became more difficult during interactions with objects, although we did not quantify the neural origins of this phenomena. Here, we investigated how motor cortical activity changed in the presence of an object independently of the kinematics that were being generated using intracortical recordings from two people with tetraplegia. After identifying a population-wide increase in neural firing rates that corresponded with the hand being near an object, we developed an online scaling feature in the BCI system that operated without knowledge of the task. Online scaling increased the ability of two subjects to control the robotic arm when reaching to grasp and transport objects. This work suggests that neural representations of the environment, in this case the presence of an object, are strongly and consistently represented in motor cortex but can be accounted for to improve BCI performance.

  14. Physical Activity and Bone Accretion: Isotemporal Modeling and Genetic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan A; Chesi, Alessandra; McCormack, Shana E; Cousminer, Diana L; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Lappe, Joan M; Gilsanz, Vicente; Oberfield, Sharon E; Shepherd, John A; Kelly, Andrea; Grant, Struan F A; Zemel, Babette S

    2018-02-20

    To determine if replacing time spent in high and low impact physical activity (PA) predicts changes in pediatric bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC). We analyzed data from the longitudinal Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study (N=2,337 with up to 7 visits). The participants were aged 5-19 years at baseline, 51.2% were female and 80.6% were non-Black. Spine, total hip, and femoral neck areal BMD (aBMD) and total body less head (TBLH) BMC Z-scores were calculated. Hours per day (h/d) spent in high and low impact PA were self-reported. Standard covariate adjusted (partition model) and time allocation sensitive isotemporal substitution modeling frameworks were applied to linear mixed models. Statistical interactions with sex, self-reported ancestry, age and bone fragility genetic scores (percentage of aBMD lowering alleles carried) were tested. In standard models, high impact PA was positively associated with bone Z-score at all four skeletal sites (e.g., TBLH-BMC Z-score: beta=0.05, P=2.0x10), whereas low impact PA was not associated with any of the bone Z-scores. In isotemporal substitution models, replacing 1 h/d of low-for-high impact PA was associated with higher bone Z-scores (e.g., TBLH-BMC Z-score: beta=0.06, P=2.9x10). Conversely, replacing 1 h/d of high-for-low impact PA was associated with lower bone Z-scores (e.g., TBLH-BMC Z-score: beta=-0.06, P=2.9x10). The substitution associations were similar for each sex and ancestry group, and for those with higher and lower genetic scores for bone fragility (P-interactions >0.05), but increased in strength among the older adolescents (P-age interactions <0.05). Time sensitive models suggest that replacing low impact PA for high impact PA would be beneficial for the growing skeleton in the majority of children.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinases interacting kinases are autoinhibited by a reprogrammed activation segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Cho, Min-Kyu; Jäkel, Stefan; Netter, Catharina; Schreiter, Kay; Aicher, Babette; Zweckstetter, Markus; Jäckle, Herbert; Wahl, Markus C

    2006-09-06

    Autoinhibition is a recurring mode of protein kinase regulation and can be based on diverse molecular mechanisms. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based nucleotide affinity studies and rational mutagenesis that nonphosphorylated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases interacting kinase (Mnk) 1 is autoinhibited by conversion of the activation segment into an autoinhibitory module. In a Mnk1 crystal structure, the activation segment is repositioned via a Mnk-specific sequence insertion at the N-terminal lobe with the following consequences: (i) the peptide substrate binding site is deconstructed, (ii) the interlobal cleft is narrowed, (iii) an essential Lys-Glu pair is disrupted and (iv) the magnesium-binding loop is locked into an ATP-competitive conformation. Consistently, deletion of the Mnk-specific insertion or removal of a conserved phenylalanine side chain, which induces a blockade of the ATP pocket, increase the ATP affinity of Mnk1. Structural rearrangements required for the activation of Mnks are apparent from the cocrystal structure of a Mnk2 D228G -staurosporine complex and can be modeled on the basis of crystal packing interactions. Our data suggest a novel regulatory mechanism specific for the Mnk subfamily.

  16. Interacting temperature and water activity modulate production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Applied Ecology ... Concentrations of DA were further modulated by interactions of temperature and aw. ... was at 0.98 aw and 35°C while the lowest was at 0.96 aw and 35°C. The abiotic interactions that supported biomass production appeared different from what was required for production of DA.

  17. Interacting Temperature and Water Activity Modulate Production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Online2PDF.com

    Concentrations of DA were further modulated by interactions of temperature and aw. The retention time for DA in the ... was at 0.96 aw and 35°C. The abiotic interactions that supported biomass production appeared different from what was required for ... West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 24(1), 2016: 31–42.

  18. Control In Cellular Activity By Interaction Of Peptides | Umar Dikko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiments was conducted in the previous years using EGF, PTH-rP and PTH(1-34) to investigate the interaction between these peptides on the proliferation of JAR human chariocarcinoma cells. Here the interaction between some of the fragments of hypercalcaemic factor PTH-rP and PTH(1-34) were considered with ...

  19. Narrow line profiles and interacting gas flows in active galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardaljevic, J.; Raine, D.J.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The 'catapult model' of the narrow line region involves both infalling and outflowing clouds interacting with an outflowing wind. The emission line profiles in this model are derived and the results compared with observation. Supersonic and subsonic winds in the interaction zone produce distinct line profiles, both of which are observed. Flat-topped profiles, the presence of broad wings, asymmetry and line shifts are discussed. A relationship between profile shape and X-ray properties is predicted. (author)

  20. Is Peer Interaction Necessary for Optimal Active Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Debra L.; Farmer, Jan Keith; Peterson, Ernie

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analyses of active-learning research consistently show that active-learning techniques result in greater student performance than traditional lecture-based courses. However, some individual studies show no effect of active-learning interventions. This may be due to inexperienced implementation of active learning. To minimize the effect of…

  1. Caregivers' Interactions with Nonhandicapped and Mainstreamed Handicapped Children in Caregiving and Instructional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, Lorene C.

    1991-01-01

    Head Start caregivers' positive and neutral interactions with nonhandicapped, and mainstreamed handicapped, children were observed while the caregivers engaged in caregiving and instructional activities. Caregivers were found to have higher positive and neutral interaction rates and higher negative interaction rates, with handicapped than with…

  2. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O' Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  3. Impact of interspecific interactions on antimicrobial activity among soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Berg, van den M.; Gerards, S.; Veen, van J.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Boer, de W.; Garbeva, P.

    2014-01-01

    Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However, little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to

  4. DNA interactions and biocidal activity of metal complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narendrula Vamsikrishna

    cancer agents, and the binding between DNA and metal complexes were used in understanding the interaction between the drugs and DNA. In general, the tumour cells can be smashed by stopping the replication of the unnatural DNA. Using Schiff base transition metal complex in particular, affected DNA may be dented by.

  5. Focused Interactive Learning: A Tool for Active Class Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harton, Helen C.; Richardson, Deborah S.; Barreras, Ricardo E.; Rockloff, Matthew J.; Latane, Bibb

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of focused interactive learning (FIL), in which students participate in focused discussions with their peers to learn about psychological concepts. Evaluates the use of FIL at Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, Florida). Addresses student benefits resulting from this technique. (CMK)

  6. Spicing Up Information Literacy Tutorials: Interactive Class Activities that Worked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovic, Neda

    2010-01-01

    Constructivist learning theories promote students' engagement as one of the key factors in successful learning and knowledge building. Research indicates that the short attention span of adult learners, their need to "learn-by-doing," interact and multitask in the learning process can be accommodated with a positive outcome by…

  7. How Do Junior High School Students Utilize Interactional Strategies in Speaking Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayatul Avia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interactional strategies are very important especially for English as a foreign language learners which can help the learners negotiate of the meaning during the interaction in speaking activity. The aim of this research is to analyze the interactional strategies (ISs utilized by three students at different levels (Low, Average, High in speaking activity at the eighth grade students of SMP Islam As-Sakinah Sidoarjo. This research uses qualitative descriptive as a research design, which all of the data are obtained through observation and interview for three students at different level such as low level learner (LLL, average level learner (ALL and high level learner (HLL. In brief, the results of this research show that LLL uses all aspects of interactional strategies in her speaking activity, average level learner (ALL uses some aspects of interactional strategies and high level learner (HLL almost never use the aspects of interactional strategies in his speaking activities.

  8. Get up and move : An interactive cuddly toy that stimulates physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal Penados, A.; Gielen, M.A.; Stappers, P.J.; Jongert, T.

    2009-01-01

    Health experts are worried about the increase in the number of overweight children and the decrease in activity levels among this age group. This project explores the possibilities of using interactive toys and social interaction in encouraging children to become more physically active. To arrive at

  9. Get up and move: An interactive cuddly toy that stimulates physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal Penados, A.; Gielen, M.; Stappers, P.-J.; Jongert, T.

    2010-01-01

    Health experts are worried about the increase in the number of overweight children and the decrease in activity levels among this age group. This project explores the possibilities of using interactive toys and social interaction in encouraging children to become more physically active. To arrive at

  10. Is Peer Interaction Necessary for Optimal Active Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Debra L; Farmer, Jan Keith; Peterson, Ernie

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analyses of active-learning research consistently show that active-learning techniques result in greater student performance than traditional lecture-based courses. However, some individual studies show no effect of active-learning interventions. This may be due to inexperienced implementation of active learning. To minimize the effect of inexperience, we should try to provide more explicit implementation recommendations based on research into the key components of effective active learning. We investigated the optimal implementation of active-learning exercises within a "lecture" course. Two sections of nonmajors biology were taught by the same instructor, in the same semester, using the same instructional materials and assessments. Students in one section completed in-class active-learning exercises in cooperative groups, while students in the other section completed the same activities individually. Performance on low-level, multiple-choice assessments was not significantly different between sections. However, students who worked in cooperative groups on the in-class activities significantly outperformed students who completed the activities individually on the higher-level, extended-response questions. Our results provide additional evidence that group processing of activities should be the recommended mode of implementation for in-class active-learning exercises. © 2014 D. L. Linton et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Parallel Vortex Body Interaction Enabled by Active Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingaertner, Andre; Tewes, Philipp; Little, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study was conducted to explore the flow physics of parallel vortex body interaction between two NACA 0012 airfoils. Experiments were carried out at chord Reynolds numbers of 740,000. Initially, the leading airfoil was characterized without the target one being installed. Results are in good agreement with thin airfoil theory and data provided in the literature. Afterward, the leading airfoil was fixed at 18° incidence and the target airfoil was installed 6 chord lengths downstream. Plasma actuation (ns-DBD), originating close to the leading edge, was used to control vortex shedding from the leading airfoil at various frequencies (0.04 governing parameters of this vortex body interaction are explored. This work was supported by the Army Research Office under ARO Grant No. W911NF-14-1-0662.

  12. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles...

  13. Eye contact during live social interaction modulates infants' oscillatory brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehl, Stefanie; Michel, Christine; Reid, Vincent M; Parise, Eugenio; Striano, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    We examined infants' oscillatory brain activity during a live interaction with an adult who showed them novel objects. Activation in the alpha frequency range was assessed. Nine-month-old infants responded with desynchronization of alpha-band activity when looking at an object together with an adult during a social interaction involving eye contact. When infant and experimenter only looked at the object without engaging in eye contact, no such effect was observed. Results are interpreted in terms of activation of a generic semantic knowledge system induced by eye contact during a social interaction.

  14. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities.

  15. Beyond Lecture and Non-Lecture Classrooms: LA-student interactions in Active Learning Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Dayana; Kornreich, Hagit; Rodriguez, Idaykis; Monslave, Camila; Pena-Flores, Norma

    Our expanded multi-site study on active learning classrooms supported by Learning Assistants (LAs) aims to understand the connections between three classroom elements: the activity, student learning, and how LAs support the learning process in the classroom. At FIU, LAs are used in a variety of active learning settings, from large auditorium settings to studio classroom with movable tables. Our study uses the COPUS observation protocol as a way to characterize LAs behaviors in these classrooms. With a focus on LA-student interactions, our analysis of how LAs interact with students during a 'learning session' generated new observational codes for specific new categories of LA roles. Preliminary results show that LAs spend more time interacting with students in some classes, regardless of the classroom setting, while in other classrooms, LA-student interactions are mostly brief. We discuss how LA-student interactions contribute to the dynamics and mechanism of the socially shared learning activity.

  16. Implementation of ICT in Higher Education as Interacting Activity Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Implementation of ICT in higher education is not a trivial process. It is however a process leading to a number of challenges and problems. The paper develops a theoretical model of the implementation of ICT in higher education based on activity theory and on a case study in a Danish university. ...

  17. Exploratory qualitative case study of lab-type activity interactions in an online graduate geoscience course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, Veronica C.

    This exploratory qualitative case study investigated the use of lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course. Constructivism is the theoretical framework used to explain how learning happens in lab-type activity, and provided the goals to which successful learning in lab-type activity is compared. This study focused on the learner-instructor, learner-learner, and perceptions of the learner-content interactions that occurred related to lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course to determine: if the instructor appeared as a facilitator of the learning process in the interactions over the activities; if students engaged in discussion and reflection about the activities; if students perceived the activities as meaningful and authentic; and if students perceived using higher order thinking and prior knowledge while interacting with the content. Ten graduate students from three offerings of the course participated in this study, as well as the instructor and designer of the course content and lab-type activities. Data were collected through interviews, and observation and analysis of the lab-type activities, instructor feedback to students in their graded activities, and discussion that occurred between the instructor and students and among students about the lab-type activities in discussion forums. The nature of the instructor's interactions in discussion forums, in feedback to students on graded activities, and reported by students' in interviews supported that, in the learner-instructor interactions, the instructor of this course was a facilitator who guided and scaffolded the students towards successfully completing the activities. Students engaged in discussion and reflected on the activities, but most learner-learner interactions in discussion forums about the lab-type activities appeared to occur for the purpose of comparison of results, support, and empathy. Students' success at higher order thinking type questions in lab

  18. Social TV: How Social Media Activity Interacts With TV Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Fossen Beth L.; Schweidel David A.

    2017-01-01

    Social TV is the simultaneous consumption of television alongside social media chatter about the programming. This topic is highly relevant for marketers. Usually it is considered as a bad thing for TV advertisers. While there can be distraction from the ads, marketers can also benefit from positive effects. Consumers’ multiscreen activities can be used to attract more viewers, to leverage TV campaigns and to increase sales. This chatter creates free exposure for the brand online, extends the...

  19. Speech Perception as a Cognitive Process: The Interactive Activation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    In several ways, either as one long word or several smaller words (e.g., sell ya light vs. cellulite )? These are all Important questions which are...Consider, for example, what would hap- pen If the system heard a string which could be Interpreted either as sell ya light or cellulite . Assume that...one another in COHORT, the nodes for sell, your, light, and cellulite , wil all bc in active competition with one another. The system will have no way

  20. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS IN THE PHYSICS LABORATORY ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Physics teachers should have professional competences, aimed at the use of online technologies associated with physical experiments. Lack of teaching materials for teachers in Ukrainian language leads to the use of virtual laboratories and computer simulations by traditional methods of education, not by the latest innovative modern educational technology, which may limit their use and greatly reduce their effectiveness. Ukrainian teaching literature has practically no information about the assessment of competencies, research skills of students for the laboratory activities. The aim of the article is to describe some components of instructional design for the Web site with simulations in school physical experiments and their evaluation.

  1. Learning from Instructional Explanations: Effects of Prompts Based on the Active-Constructive-Interactive Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelle, Julian; Müller, Claudia; Roelle, Detlev; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although instructional explanations are commonly provided when learners are introduced to new content, they often fail because they are not integrated into effective learning activities. The recently introduced active-constructive-interactive framework posits an effectiveness hierarchy in which interactive learning activities are at the top; these are then followed by constructive and active learning activities, respectively. Against this background, we combined instructional explanations with different types of prompts that were designed to elicit these learning activities and tested the central predictions of the active-constructive-interactive framework. In Experiment 1, N = 83 students were randomly assigned to one of four combinations of instructional explanations and prompts. To test the active constructive learning hypothesis, the learners received either (1) complete explanations and engaging prompts designed to elicit active activities or (2) explanations that were reduced by inferences and inference prompts designed to engage learners in constructing the withheld information. Furthermore, in order to explore how interactive learning activities can be elicited, we gave the learners who had difficulties in constructing the prompted inferences adapted remedial explanations with either (3) unspecific engaging prompts or (4) revision prompts. In support of the active constructive learning hypothesis, we found that the learners who received reduced explanations and inference prompts outperformed the learners who received complete explanations and engaging prompts. Moreover, revision prompts were more effective in eliciting interactive learning activities than engaging prompts. In Experiment 2, N = 40 students were randomly assigned to either (1) a reduced explanations and inference prompts or (2) a reduced explanations and inference prompts plus adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts condition. In support of the constructive interactive learning

  2. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  3. Stimulating parent-child interaction through storytelling activities of a family literacy program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, R.C.; Molenaar, I.; Oostdam, R.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool vocabulary knowledge develops mainly informally via parent-child interaction. Family literacy programs (FLP’s) aim to promote children's vocabulary by supporting parent-child interaction quantity and quality. In addition to traditional storytelling activities that are part of FLP's

  4. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Houk, Kendall N

    2017-08-14

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Interaction Activities in the Foreign Classroom, or How to Grow a Tulip-Rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Christina Bratt; Selekman, Howard R.

    1976-01-01

    A report is made on the use of foreign language for spontaneous communication in an elementary language class. Four correction-free, peer communicative/interaction activities are outlined according to procedures, objectives, and evaluations. (Author/RM)

  6. Promoting Active Learning in Calculus and General Physics through Interactive and Media-Enhanced Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Guoqing Tang; Aaron Titus

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach of incorporating interactive and media-enhanced lectures to promote active learning in Calculus and General Physics courses. The pedagogical practice of using interactive techniques in lectures to require "heads-on" and "hands-on" learning, and involve students more as active participants than passive receivers is a part of academic curricular reform efforts undertaken currently by the mathematics, physics and chemistry departments at North Carolina A&...

  7. Social TV: How Social Media Activity Interacts With TV Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossen Beth L.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Social TV is the simultaneous consumption of television alongside social media chatter about the programming. This topic is highly relevant for marketers. Usually it is considered as a bad thing for TV advertisers. While there can be distraction from the ads, marketers can also benefit from positive effects. Consumers’ multiscreen activities can be used to attract more viewers, to leverage TV campaigns and to increase sales. This chatter creates free exposure for the brand online, extends the reach of television ad campaigns to the online space, and offers real-time feedback to advertisers on how their ads are being received. To take advantage of social TV, marketers need to develop a social media and ad design strategy for TV shows. Not every “social show” is good for them. Many programs receive a high volume of program-related chatter at the expense of advertiser-related word-of-mouth, but some programs generate high levels of online conversations that can also benefit their advertisers. Marketers are well served to identify those programs that are conducive to advertiser-related chatter. Also, specific ad designs can further encourage buzz.

  8. Learning from instructional explanations: effects of prompts based on the active-constructive-interactive framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelle, Julian; Müller, Claudia; Roelle, Detlev; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although instructional explanations are commonly provided when learners are introduced to new content, they often fail because they are not integrated into effective learning activities. The recently introduced active-constructive-interactive framework posits an effectiveness hierarchy in which interactive learning activities are at the top; these are then followed by constructive and active learning activities, respectively. Against this background, we combined instructional explanations with different types of prompts that were designed to elicit these learning activities and tested the central predictions of the active-constructive-interactive framework. In Experiment 1, N = 83 students were randomly assigned to one of four combinations of instructional explanations and prompts. To test the active learners received either (1) complete explanations and engaging prompts designed to elicit active activities or (2) explanations that were reduced by inferences and inference prompts designed to engage learners in constructing the withheld information. Furthermore, in order to explore how interactive learning activities can be elicited, we gave the learners who had difficulties in constructing the prompted inferences adapted remedial explanations with either (3) unspecific engaging prompts or (4) revision prompts. In support of the active learners who received reduced explanations and inference prompts outperformed the learners who received complete explanations and engaging prompts. Moreover, revision prompts were more effective in eliciting interactive learning activities than engaging prompts. In Experiment 2, N = 40 students were randomly assigned to either (1) a reduced explanations and inference prompts or (2) a reduced explanations and inference prompts plus adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts condition. In support of the constructive learners who received adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts as add-ons to reduced explanations and

  9. Direct observation of children's preferences and activity levels during interactive and online electronic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cindy H P; Lam, Jessica W K; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2010-07-01

    Interactive electronic games have recently been popularized and are believed to help promote children's physical activity (PA). The purpose of the study was to examine preferences and PA levels during interactive and online electronic games among overweight and nonoverweight boys and girls. Using a modification of the SOFIT, we systematically observed 70 Hong Kong Chinese children (35 boys, 35 girls; 50 nonoverweight, 20 overweight), age 9 to 12 years, during 2 60-minute recreation sessions and recorded their game mode choices and PA levels. During Session One children could play either an interactive or an online electronic bowling game and during Session Two they could play an interactive or an online electronic running game. Children chose to play the games during 94% of session time and split this time between interactive (52%) and online (48%) versions. They engaged in significantly more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during interactive games than their online electronic versions (70% vs. 2% of game time). Boys and nonoverweight children expended relatively more energy during the interactive games than girls and overweight children, respectively. New-generation interactive games can facilitate physical activity in children, and given the opportunity children may select them over sedentary versions.

  10. Design activism as a new method for inquiring into mixed emotions in uncomfortable social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Knutz, Eva; Ulv Lenskjold, Tau

    2016-01-01

    for probing into the role of mixed emotions in interpersonal interaction. To set the scene, we critically examine recent sources on design activism in order provide a general characterisation of what constitute the approach. Next, we argue for how social game can be seen as an instantiation of design activism...

  11. Adult onset asthma and interaction between genes and active tobacco smoking : The GABRIEL consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, J. M.; Scholtens, S.; Postma, D. S.; Moffatt, M. F.; Jarvis, D.; Ramasamy, A.; Wjst, M.; Omenaas, E. R.; Bouzigon, E.; Demenais, F.; Nadif, R.; Siroux, V.; Polonikov, A. V.; Solodilova, M.; Ivanov, V. P.; Curjuric, I.; Imboden, M.; Kumar, A; Probst-Hensch, N.; Ogorodova, L. M.; Puzyrev, V. P.; Bragina, E. Yu; Freidin, M. B.; Nolte, I. M.; Farrall, A. M.; Cookson, W. O. C. M.; Strachan, D. P.; Koppelman, G. H.; Boezen, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have identified novel genetic associations for asthma, but without taking into account the role of active tobacco smoking. This study aimed to identify novel genes that interact with ever active tobacco smoking in adult onset asthma. METHODS: We performed

  12. SNPs in PPARG associate with type 2 diabetes and interact with physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Lakka, Timo A; Laaksonen, David E

    2008-01-01

    To study the associations of seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) gene with the conversion from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the interactions of the SNPs with physical activity (PA)....

  13. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  14. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. PMID:25903123

  16. Selection of distinct Hox–Extradenticle interaction modes fine-tunes Hox protein activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, Mehdi; Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Arbeille, Elise; Sambrani, Nagraj; Damen, Wim; Brena, Carlo; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors widely used for diversifying animal body plans in development and evolution. To achieve functional specificity, Hox proteins associate with PBC class proteins, Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (Pbx) in vertebrates, and Extradenticle (Exd) in Drosophila, and were thought to use a unique hexapeptide-dependent generic mode of interaction. Recent findings, however, revealed the existence of an alternative, UbdA-dependent paralog-specific interaction mode providing diversity in Hox–PBC interactions. In this study, we investigated the basis for the selection of one of these two Hox–PBC interaction modes. Using naturally occurring variations and mutations in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax protein, we found that the linker region, a short domain separating the hexapeptide from the homeodomain, promotes an interaction mediated by the UbdA domain in a context-dependent manner. While using a UbdA-dependent interaction for the repression of the limb-promoting gene Distalless, interaction with Exd during segment-identity specification still relies on the hexapeptide motif. We further show that distinctly assembled Hox–PBC complexes display subtle but distinct repressive activities. These findings identify Hox–PBC interaction as a template for subtle regulation of Hox protein activity that may have played a major role in the diversification of Hox protein function in development and evolution. PMID:21262810

  17. Selection of distinct Hox-Extradenticle interaction modes fine-tunes Hox protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, Mehdi; Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Arbeille, Elise; Sambrani, Nagraj; Damen, Wim; Brena, Carlo; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-02-08

    Hox genes encode transcription factors widely used for diversifying animal body plans in development and evolution. To achieve functional specificity, Hox proteins associate with PBC class proteins, Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (Pbx) in vertebrates, and Extradenticle (Exd) in Drosophila, and were thought to use a unique hexapeptide-dependent generic mode of interaction. Recent findings, however, revealed the existence of an alternative, UbdA-dependent paralog-specific interaction mode providing diversity in Hox-PBC interactions. In this study, we investigated the basis for the selection of one of these two Hox-PBC interaction modes. Using naturally occurring variations and mutations in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax protein, we found that the linker region, a short domain separating the hexapeptide from the homeodomain, promotes an interaction mediated by the UbdA domain in a context-dependent manner. While using a UbdA-dependent interaction for the repression of the limb-promoting gene Distalless, interaction with Exd during segment-identity specification still relies on the hexapeptide motif. We further show that distinctly assembled Hox-PBC complexes display subtle but distinct repressive activities. These findings identify Hox-PBC interaction as a template for subtle regulation of Hox protein activity that may have played a major role in the diversification of Hox protein function in development and evolution.

  18. Representing and estimating interactions between activities in a need-based model of activity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, L.; Arentze, T.; Timmermans, H.

    2013-01-01

    Although several activity-based models made the transition to practice in recent years, modeling dynamic activity generation and especially, the mechanisms underlying activity generation are not well incorporated in the current activity-based models. For instance, current models assume that

  19. Interactions of psychosocial factors with built environments in explaining adolescents' active transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Conway, Terry L; Cain, Kelli L; Frank, Lawrence D; Saelens, Brian E; Geremia, Carrie; Kerr, Jacqueline; Glanz, Karen; Carlson, Jordan A; Sallis, James F

    2017-07-01

    The present study examined independent and interacting associations of psychosocial and neighborhood built environment variables with adolescents' reported active transportation. Moderating effects of adolescent sex were explored. Mixed-effects regression models were conducted on data from the Teen Environment and Neighborhood observational study (N=928) in the Seattle, WA and Baltimore regions 2009-2011. Frequency index of active transportation to neighborhood destinations (dependent variable) and 7 psychosocial measures were reported by adolescents. Built environment measures included home walkability and count of nearby parks and recreation facilities using GIS procedures and streetscape quality from environmental audits. Results indicated all 3 environmental variables and 3 psychosocial variables (self-efficacy, social support from peers, and enjoyment of physical activity) had significant positive main effects with active transportation (Ps<0.05). Three of 21 two-way interactions were significant in explaining active transportation (Ps<0.1): self-efficacy×GIS-based walkability index, barriers to activity in neighborhood×MAPS streetscape scores, and self-efficacy×GIS-based counts of parks and recreation facilities. In each two-way interaction the highest active transportation was found among adolescents with the combination of activity-supportive built environment and positive psychosocial characteristics. Three-way interactions with sex indicated similar associations for girls and boys, with one exception. Results provided modest support for the ecological model principle of interactions across levels, highlight the importance of both built environment and psychosocial factors in shaping adolescents' active transportation, demonstrated the possibility of sex-specific findings, and suggested strategies for improving adolescents' active transportation may be most effective when targeting multiple levels of influence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  1. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  2. [Social interactions of preschool children with Down syndrome during extracurricular activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucisano, Renata Valdívia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pinto, Maria Paula Panuncio; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Anhão, Patrícia Páfaro Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify the process of social interaction of children with Down Syndrome (DS) during extracurricular activities in the regular early childhood education in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil. Six children aged 3-6 years participated in this study. There were two recordings of each child in situations of social interaction during extracurricular activities, and analyzed by 15 behaviors, divided into two categories of social skills: interpersonal and self-expression. The results demonstrate that, in the interpersonal skill category, the higher occurrence was the behavior "occurs interaction with other children". In the self-expression skills category, only the behaviors "smiles" and "imitates other children" have significant occurrence. The behaviors more frequently identified in this study permit to understand that the school environment is a facilitator for the interaction of child with DS with the typical developmental children, allowing him/her to develop the expected social skills.

  3. Interaction Design Beyond the Product : Creating Technology-Enhanced Activity Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptelinin, Victor; Bannon, Liam J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of interaction design to date has been predominantly concerned with designing products, that is, devices, systems, and more recently services. A growing body of theoretical and empirical analyses suggests that the scope of interaction design needs to be expanded: An explicit concern...... between intrinsic and extrinsic technology-enabled practice transformation, and foreground the need for interaction design research and practice to more directly deal with analysis and construction of technology-enhanced activity spaces. The implications of these notions for the research agenda...

  4. In Vitro Antioxidant Activities of Three Red Wine Polyphenols and Their Mixtures: An Interaction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kurin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The well-known antioxidant activity of red wine is explained mostly by its polyphenols content, where the final effect is based on the wine components’ interaction. The aim of our work was the study of the interaction of three red wine polyphenols—quercetin, resveratrol and caffeic acid—alone and in their equimolar binary and ternary mixtures in different antioxidant/scavenging assays (inhibition of 2-deoxy-D-ribose degradation by hydroxyl radical, FRAP, Fe(III reducing power, DPPH, ABTS and NO scavenging, respectively. Interaction analysis, based on median effect equation, was performed for the determination of synergy and/or antagonism. The obtained results indicate that the mutual interactions of tested polyphenols in their mixtures are markedly different from each other, depending on the reaction mechanism of the assay used. The measured antioxidant activity of individual polyphenols is not a constant value when other substances are present in the mixture with this polyphenol. Interactions can cause the finally observed synergy/antagonism/additive effects without any possibility of predicting them from the known activities of single compounds. This “unpredictability” claim based on in vitro assay results should be very important in multiple systems and processes in Nature, where the interactions among compounds in mixtures need to be take into account.

  5. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity......-contributing interactions are attributed to different domains and known to occur in two steps. Here, knowledge on chemokine and receptor domains involved in the first binding-step and the second activation-step is reviewed. A mechanism comprising at least two steps seems consistent; however, several intermediate...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  6. Stimulation of DNA Glycosylase Activities by XPC Protein Complex: Roles of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Shimizu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We showed that XPC complex, which is a DNA damage detector for nucleotide excision repair, stimulates activity of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG that initiates base excision repair. XPC appeared to facilitate the enzymatic turnover of TDG by promoting displacement from its own product abasic site, although the precise mechanism underlying this stimulation has not been clarified. Here we show that XPC has only marginal effects on the activity of E. coli TDG homolog (EcMUG, which remains bound to the abasic site like human TDG but does not significantly interacts with XPC. On the contrary, XPC significantly stimulates the activities of sumoylated TDG and SMUG1, both of which exhibit quite different enzymatic kinetics from unmodified TDG but interact with XPC. These results point to importance of physical interactions for stimulation of DNA glycosylases by XPC and have implications in the molecular mechanisms underlying mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in XP-C patients.

  7. Does serotonin influence aggression? Comparing regional activity before and during social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Summers, C.H.; Korzan, W.J.; Lukkes, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    in both dominant and subordinate males. As serotonergic activity does not appear to inhibit agonistic behavior during combative social interaction, we investigated the possibility that the negative correlation between serotonergic activity and aggression exists before aggressive behavior begins. To do...... this, putatively dominant and more aggressive males were determined by their speed overcoming stress ( latency to feeding after capture) and their celerity to court females. Serotonergic activities before aggression are differentiated by social rank in a region-specific manner. Among aggressive males......, where low serotonergic activity may help promote aggression, agonistic behavior also stimulates the greatest rise in serotonergic activity among the most aggressive males, most likely as a result of the stress associated with social interaction....

  8. Regulation of xanthine oxidase activity by substrates at active sites via cooperative interactions between catalytic subunits: implication to drug pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, L A; Hwang, K C

    2011-01-01

    Three xanthine oxidase substrates (i.e., xanthine, adenine, and 2-amino-4-hydroxypterin) show a "substrate inhibition" pattern (i.e., slower turnover rates at higher substrate concentrations), whereas another two substrates (i.e., xanthopterin and lumazine) show a "substrate activation" pattern (i.e., higher turnover rates at higher substrate concentrations). Binding of a 6-formylpterin at one of the two xanthine oxidase active sites slows down the turnover rate of xanthine at the adjacent active site from 17.0 s(-1) to 10.5 s(-1), and converts the V-[S] plot from "substrate inhibition" pattern to a classical Michaelis-Menten hyperbolic saturation pattern. In contrast, binding of xanthine at an active site accelerates the turnover rate of 6-formylpterin at the neighboring active site. The experimental results demonstrate that a substrate can regulate the activity of xanthine oxidase via binding at the active sites; or a xanthine oxidase catalytic subunit can simultaneously serve as a regulatory unit. Theoretical simulation based on the velocity equation derived from the extended Michaelis-Menten model shows that the substrate inhibition and the substrate activation behavior in the V-[S] plots could be obtained by introducing cooperative interactions between two catalytic subunits in homodimeric enzymes. The current work confirms that there exist very strong cooperative interactions between the two catalytic subunits of xanthine oxidase.

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  10. Interaction of perceived neighborhood walkability and self-efficacy on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Robertson-Wilson, Jennifer; Decloe, Melissa

    2012-02-01

    Few social ecological studies have considered the joint effects of intrapersonal and environmental influences on physical activity. This study investigated the interaction of self-efficacy and perceived neighborhood walkability in predicting neighborhood-based physical activity and how this relationship varied by gender and body mass index. Data were derived from a cross-sectional investigation of environmental and psychosocial correlates of physical activity among adults (n = 585). Participants completed a detailed 7-day physical activity log booklet, along with a questionnaire that included measures of neighborhood walkability, self-efficacy, and several sociodemographic items. Factorial analysis of variance tests were used to examine the main effects of and interaction between walkability and self-efficacy. In predicting neighborhood-based physical activity, significant interactions were observed between self-efficacy and neighborhood walkability for females (but not for males) and for overweight/obese participants (but not for healthy weight individuals). Women and overweight/obese individuals with low self-efficacy demonstrated substantially greater physical activity when living in a high walkable neighborhood. Physical activity research and promotion efforts should take into account both environmental and personal factors and the interrelationships between them that influence active living.

  11. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  12. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Promoting Active Learning in Calculus and General Physics through Interactive and Media-Enhanced Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Tang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an approach of incorporating interactive and media-enhanced lectures to promote active learning in Calculus and General Physics courses. The pedagogical practice of using interactive techniques in lectures to require "heads-on" and "hands-on" learning, and involve students more as active participants than passive receivers is a part of academic curricular reform efforts undertaken currently by the mathematics, physics and chemistry departments at North Carolina A&T State University under the NSF funded project "Talent-21: Gateway for Advancing Science and Mathematics Talents."

  14. Cortical activity and functional hyperconnectivity by simultaneous EEG recordings from interacting couples of professional pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Borghini, G; Vecchiato, G; He, E J; Roy, A; Cincotti, F; Salinari, S; Mattia, D; He, B; Babiloni, F

    2012-01-01

    Controlling an aircraft during a flight is a compelling condition, which requires a strict and well coded interaction between the crew. The interaction level between the Captain and the First Officer changes during the flight, ranging from a maximum (during takeoff and landing, as well as in case of a failure of the instrumentation or other emergency situations) to a minimum during quiet mid-flight. In this study, our aim is to investigate the neural correlates of different kinds and levels of interaction between couples of professional crew members by means of the innovative technique called brain hyperscanning, i.e. the simultaneous recording of the hemodynamic or neuroelectrical activity of different human subjects involved in interaction tasks. This approach allows the observation and modeling of the neural signature specifically dependent on the interaction between subjects, and, even more interestingly, of the functional links existing between the brain activities of the subjects interacting together. In this EEG hyperscanning study, different phases of a flight were reproduced in a professional flight simulator, which allowed, on one side, to reproduce the ecological setting of a real flight, and, on the other, to keep under control the different levels of interaction induced in the crew by means of systematic and simulated failures of the aircraft instrumentation. Results of the procedure of linear inverse estimation, together with functional hyperconnectivity estimated by means of Partial Directed Coherence, showed a dense network of connections between the activity in the two brains in the takeoff and landing phases, when the cooperation between the crew is maximal, while conversely no significant links were shown during the phases in which the activity of the two pilots was independent.

  15. Direct interaction of natural and synthetic catechins with signal transducer activator of transcription 1 affects both its phosphorylation and activity

    KAUST Repository

    Menegazzi, Marta

    2013-12-10

    Our previous studies showed that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibits signal transducer activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) activation. Since EGCG may be a promising lead compound for new anti-STAT1 drug design, 15 synthetic catechins, characterized by the (-)-gallocatechin-3-gallate stereochemistry, were studied in the human mammary MDA-MB-231 cell line to identify the minimal structural features that preserve the anti-STAT1 activity. We demonstrate that the presence of three hydroxyl groups of B ring and one hydroxyl group in D ring is essential to preserve their inhibitory action. Moreover, a possible molecular target of these compounds in the STAT1 pathway was investigated. Our results demonstrate a direct interaction between STAT1 protein and catechins displaying anti-STAT1 activity. In particular, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis and molecular modeling indicate the presence of two putative binding sites (a and b) with different affinity. Based on docking data, site-directed mutagenesis was performed, and interaction of the most active catechins with STAT1 was studied with SPR to test whether Gln518 on site a and His568 on site b could be important for the catechin-STAT1 interaction. Data indicate that site b has higher affinity for catechins than site a as the highest affinity constant disappears in the H568ASTAT1 mutant. Furthermore, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinase assay data suggest that the contemporary presence in vitro of STAT1 and catechins inhibits JAK2-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. The very tight catechin-STAT1 interaction prevents STAT1 phosphorylation and represents a novel, specific and efficient molecular mechanism for the inhibition of STAT1 activation. © Copyright 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  17. Interaction between Plectranthus barbatus herbal tea components and acetylcholinesterase: binding and activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falé, Pedro L V; Ascensão, Lia; Serralheiro, M Luisa; Haris, Parvez I

    2012-11-01

    Plectranthus barbatus water extracts, have been used as herbal teas, for the treatment of various diseases. In a previous study it was demonstrated that antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase active extract constituents and their metabolites were found in the plasma of rats after P. barbatus tea intraperitoneal administration. Consequently, a decrease in brain acetylcholinesterase activity occurred. The aim of the present research is to elucidate how P. barbatus extract components interact with acetylcholinesterase. The estimated thermodynamic parameters suggest that the main intermolecular interaction is hydrophobic association, although hydrogen bonds between flavonoids and the active gorge of the acetylcholinesterase molecule seem to occur and have a great impact on acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The hydroxyl positions in flavonoids seem to be of utmost importance for enzyme inhibition, as they interact with specific amino acid residues in the active gorge. FTIR analysis showed that the plant extract components do not interfere with the secondary structure of the enzyme, but decreases the rate of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, possibly by decreasing solvent accessibility in the acetylcholinesterase active gorge. The spectroscopic data complements docking studies of acetylcholinesterase inhibition by plant phenolic compounds, clarifying the dominant interactions between enzyme and inhibitor and the most important structural features of the inhibitor molecules.

  18. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Christin; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2016-01-01

    The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system's trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays.

  19. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrapetov Marina K

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1 binds to ATP, and the other (M2 acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator.

  20. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Suvankar Das; Cristiane J. da Silva; Marina de M. Silva; Maria Dayanne de A. Dantas; Ângelo de Fátima; Ana Lúcia T. Góis Ruiz; Cleiton M. da Silva; João Ernesto de Carvalho; Josué C.C. Santos; Isis M. Figueiredo; Edeildo F. da Silva-Júnior; Thiago M. de Aquino; João X. de Araújo-Júnior; Goutam Brahmachari; Luzia Valentina Modolo

    2018-01-01

    Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−). The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine...

  1. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  2. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T; Inwood, David W; Leach, Andrew S; Whalley, Penny S; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-22

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  3. Comparing Visual-Interactive Labeling with Active Learning: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jurgen; Hutter, Marco; Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Fellner, Dieter; Sedlmair, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Labeling data instances is an important task in machine learning and visual analytics. Both fields provide a broad set of labeling strategies, whereby machine learning (and in particular active learning) follows a rather model-centered approach and visual analytics employs rather user-centered approaches (visual-interactive labeling). Both approaches have individual strengths and weaknesses. In this work, we conduct an experiment with three parts to assess and compare the performance of these different labeling strategies. In our study, we (1) identify different visual labeling strategies for user-centered labeling, (2) investigate strengths and weaknesses of labeling strategies for different labeling tasks and task complexities, and (3) shed light on the effect of using different visual encodings to guide the visual-interactive labeling process. We further compare labeling of single versus multiple instances at a time, and quantify the impact on efficiency. We systematically compare the performance of visual interactive labeling with that of active learning. Our main findings are that visual-interactive labeling can outperform active learning, given the condition that dimension reduction separates well the class distributions. Moreover, using dimension reduction in combination with additional visual encodings that expose the internal state of the learning model turns out to improve the performance of visual-interactive labeling.

  4. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Shimamura

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA. Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1-0.5 mg/mL inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly interact with SEA after incubation of these test samples with SEA. As a result, 8 polyphenols (0.25 mg/mL significantly decreased SEA protein levels. In addition, the polyphenols that interacted with SEA inactivated the toxin activity of splenocyte proliferation induced by SEA. Polyphenols that exerted inhibitory effects on SEA toxic activity had a tendency to interact with SEA. In particular, polyphenol compounds with 1 or 2 hexahydroxydiphenoyl groups and/or a galloyl group, such as eugeniin, castalagin, punicalagin, pedunculagin, corilagin and geraniin, strongly interacted with SEA and inhibited toxin activity at a low concentration. These polyphenols may be used to prevent S. aureus infection and staphylococcal food poisoning.

  5. Coffee with cinnamon - impact of phytochemicals interactions on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory in vitro activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Agata; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Pecio, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    This paper evaluates the potential bioaccessibility and interactions between antiradical and anti-inflammatory compounds from coffee and cinnamon. Results obtained for whole plant material extracts were compared with those for chlorogenic and cinnamic acids (the main bioactive constituents of the study material). All samples, coffee, cinnamon and a mixture of the two showed abilities to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. Both activities increased after simulated gastrointestinal digestion. In the mixture antiradical phytochemicals acted antagonistically - isoboles adopted the convex form. The same interactions were determined for chemical standards. The water-extractable LOX inhibitors acted synergistically - the isobole curve was "concave". The same type of interaction was determined for standard compounds. Interestingly, after digestion in vitro a slight antagonism in the action of LOX inhibitors was observed. The results show that the food matrix and/or its changes during digestion may play an important role in creating the biological properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Social Interaction and the Formation of Entrepreneurial Characteristics: A Case Study in Authentic Enterprise Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Christina W. M.; Man, Thomas W. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is an empirical study which aims to investigate the development of social interaction and their impacts on developing learners' entrepreneurial characteristics throughout their participation in an authentic enterprise activity. Design/methodology/approach: The sample of this study was drawn from the participants of an…

  7. Antiviral activity of human lactoferrin : Inhibition of alphavirus interaction with heparan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, Barry-Lee; Aneke, Onwuchekwa J.C.; Smit, Jolanda; Kimata, Koji; Bittman, Robert; Meijer, Dirk K.F.; Wilschut, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Human lactoferrin is a component of the non-specific immune system with distinct antiviral properties. We used alphaviruses, adapted to interaction with heparan sulfate (HS), as a tool to investigate the mechanism of lactoferrin's antiviral activity. Lactoferrin inhibited infection of BHK-21 cells

  8. Studying Children’s friendship activities ethically using the Interaction Based Observation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hanne Værum

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to acknowledge the influence that the interaction based observation method developed by Mariane Hedegaard has had on my studies of young children’s friendship activities. Hedegaard has problematized how existing methods of evaluating children’s development were inadequate...

  9. Designing an Interactive Activity to Integrate Animal Physiology in the Context of Different Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Begona M.; Aguera, Estrella I.; Tovar, Pura

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose an activity which revolves around three elements (interactivity, team learning, and peer-to-peer instruction) and consists of the drafting of a "newspaper." The different characteristics of each of its sections permits the approach to the teaching/learning process, in the context of physiological…

  10. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  11. The Science of Chocolate: Interactive Activities on Phase Transitions, Emulsification, and Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Amy C.; Hollar, Kathryn A.; Stone, Howard A.; Rosenberg, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Nearly everyone loves chocolate, which makes this an excellent topic for communicating scientific concepts to the general public and to students in the classroom. Here we present the outline and activities for an interactive presentation on the science of chocolate for nonspecialists and their children ages 6 and up. We design the presentation…

  12. Interaction Analysis for Supporting Students' Self-Regulation during Blog-Based CSCL Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, Nikolaos; Kapravelos, Efstathios; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos

    2018-01-01

    Self-regulated learning is an important means of supporting students' self-awareness and self-regulation level so as to enhance their motivation and engagement. Interaction Analysis (IA) contributes to this end, and its use in studying learning dynamics involved in asynchronous Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) activities has…

  13. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  14. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  15. Interaction between organophosphate pesticide exposure and PON1 activity on thyroid function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacasana, Marina; Lopez-Flores, Inmaculada; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Aguilar-Garduno, Clemente; Blanco-Munoz, Julia; Perez-Mendez, Oscar; Gamboa, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Alzaga, Beatriz; Bassol, Susana; Cebrian, Mariano E.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are widely used in agricultural purposes. Recently, a few studies have demonstrated the ability of these chemicals to alter the function of the thyroid gland in human. Moreover, the paraoxonase-1 enzyme (PON1) plays an important role in the toxicity of some organophosphate pesticides, with low PON1 activity being associated with higher pesticide sensitivity. This study evaluates the interaction between exposure to organophosphate compounds and PON1 enzyme activity on serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones in a population of workers occupationally exposed to pesticides. A longitudinal study was conducted on a population of floriculture workers from Mexico, during two periods of high and low-intensity levels of pesticide application. A structured questionnaire was completed by workers containing questions on sociodemographic characteristics and other variables of interest. Urine and blood samples were taken, and biomarkers of exposure (dialkylphosphates), susceptibility (PON1 polymorphisms and activity) and effect (thyroid hormone levels) were determined. Interaction between dialkylphosphates and PON1 polymorphisms or PON1 activity on hormone levels was evaluated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. A significant interaction was found between serum diazoxonase activity and total dialkylphosphates (ΣDAP) on TSH levels. Thus, when PON1 activity was increased we observed a decrease in the percentage of variation of TSH level for each increment in one logarithmic unit of the ΣDAP levels. This interaction was also observed with the PON1 192 RR genotype. These results suggest a stronger association between organophosphate pesticides and thyroid function in individuals with lower PON1 activity.

  16. Green Care Farms as Innovative Nursing Homes, Promoting Activities and Social Interaction for People With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Bram; Hamers, Jan P H; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Tan, Frans E S; Beerens, Hanneke C; Verbeek, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Innovative care environments are developed for people with dementia to encourage person-centered care. This study aims to investigate whether residents of green care farms that provide 24-hour nursing care participate more in (physical) activities and social interaction compared with residents of other nursing homes. Longitudinal observation study. Nursing homes in the Netherlands (green care farms, traditional nursing homes, and regular small-scale living facilities). A total of 115 nursing home residents at baseline, 100 at follow-up. Ecological momentary assessments (n = 16,860) were conducted using the Maastricht Electronic Daily Life Observation Tool. Residents living at green care farms were compared with residents living in traditional nursing homes and regular small-scale living facilities. The following aspects were collected for this study: the activity performed by the participant or occurring in his or her vicinity, the engagement in the activity, the level of physical activity during the activity, the physical environment (location where the activity occurred), and the level of social interaction during the activity. In total, 9660 baseline observations and 7200 follow-up observations were conducted. Analyses showed that residents of green care farms significantly more often participated in domestic activities (P = .004, SE = 1.6) and outdoor/nature-related activities (P = .003, SE = 0.9), and significantly less often engaged in passive/purposeless activities (P farms had significantly more active engagement (P = .014, SE = 0.9), more social interaction (P = .006, SE = 1.1), and came outside significantly more (P = .010, SE = 1.1) than residents of traditional nursing homes. Residents of green care farms were significantly more physically active (P = .013, SE = 0.8) than were residents of regular small-scale living facilities. No other significant differences were found. Green care farms can be a valuable alternative to

  17. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvankar Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−. The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine 10. In general, U251, MCF7, NCI/ADR-RES, NCI-H460 and HT29 cells were least sensitive to the tested compounds and all compounds were considerably more toxic to the studied cancer cell lines than to the normal cell line HaCaT. The binding mode of the compounds and ctDNA was preferably via intercalation. In addition, these results were confirmed based on theoretical studies. Finally, a linear and exponential correlation between interaction constant (Kb and GI50 for several human cancer cell was observed.

  18. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  19. Interactions of Various types between Rock and Alkali-Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mec Pavel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alkali-activated binders (AAB are very intensively studied materials nowadays. Because of possible usage as secondary raw materials, they can be environmentally efficient. Intensive research is focused especially on binder matrix, composition and its structure. For industrial usage, it is necessary to work with some aggregate for the preparation of mortars and concretes. Due to different structures of alkali-activated binders, the interaction with the aggregate will be different in comparison to an ordinary Portland cement binder. This paper deals with the study of interactions between several types of rocks used as aggregate and alkali-activated blast furnace slag. The research was focused especially on mechanical properties of prepared mortars.

  20. Generic Long-Range Interactions Between Passive Bodies in an Active Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Yongjoo; Solon, Alexandre P.; Xu, Xinpeng; Nikola, Nikolai; Kafri, Yariv

    2018-02-01

    A single nonspherical body placed in an active fluid generates currents via breaking of time-reversal symmetry. We show that, when two or more passive bodies are placed in an active fluid, these currents lead to long-range interactions. Using a multipole expansion, we characterize their leading-order behaviors in terms of single-body properties and show that they decay as a power law with the distance between the bodies, are anisotropic, and do not obey an action-reaction principle. The interactions lead to rich dynamics of the bodies, illustrated by the spontaneous synchronized rotation of pinned nonchiral bodies and the formation of traveling bound pairs. The occurrence of these phenomena depends on tunable properties of the bodies, thus opening new possibilities for self-assembly mediated by active fluids.

  1. How Do Small Things Make a Big Difference? Activities to Teach about Human-Microbe Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Chandana; Hug, Barbara; Waters, Jillian L; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2014-11-01

    Recent scientific studies are providing increasing evidence for how microbes living in and on us are essential to our good health. However, many students still think of microbes only as germs that harm us. The classroom activities presented here are designed to shift student thinking on this topic. In these guided inquiry activities, students investigate human-microbe interactions as they work together to interpret and analyze authentic data from published articles and develop scientific models. Through the activities, students learn and apply ecological concepts as they come to see the human body as a fascinatingly complex ecosystem.

  2. How Do Small Things Make a Big Difference? Activities to Teach about Human–Microbe Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    JASTI, CHANDANA; HUG, BARBARA; WATERS, JILLIAN L.; WHITAKER, RACHEL J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific studies are providing increasing evidence for how microbes living in and on us are essential to our good health. However, many students still think of microbes only as germs that harm us. The classroom activities presented here are designed to shift student thinking on this topic. In these guided inquiry activities, students investigate human–microbe interactions as they work together to interpret and analyze authentic data from published articles and develop scientific models. Through the activities, students learn and apply ecological concepts as they come to see the human body as a fascinatingly complex ecosystem. PMID:25520526

  3. Learning Microbiology Through Cooperation: Designing Cooperative Learning Activities that Promote Interdependence, Interaction, and Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E. Trempy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A microbiology course and its corresponding learning activities have been structured according to the Cooperative Learning Model. This course, The World According to Microbes, integrates science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET majors and non-SMET majors into teams of students charged with problem solving activities that are microbial in origin. In this study we describe development of learning activities that utilize key components of Cooperative Learning—positive interdependence, promotive interaction, individual accountability, teamwork skills, and group processing. Assessments and evaluations over an 8-year period demonstrate high retention of key concepts in microbiology and high student satisfaction with the course.

  4. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  5. Influence of the interactions between tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts and ascorbic acid on their antioxidant activity: analysis with interaction indexes and isobolograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enko, Jolanta; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Products containing natural additives, including antioxidants, are usually perceived by consumers as safer than those with synthetic ones. Natural antioxidants, besides having a preservative activity, may exert beneficial health effects. Interactions between antioxidants may significantly change their antioxidant activity, thus in designing functional foods or food/cosmetic ingredients knowledge about the type of interactions could be useful. In the present study, the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA; vitamin C) and different black and green tea extracts and the influence on their antioxidant activities were investigated. The antioxidant activities of tea extracts and their mixtures with AA prepared in several different weight ratios were measured using the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The type of interaction was determined by interaction indexes and isobolograms. It was found that the weight ratio of extracts to AA significantly influenced the antioxidant activity of a mixture and the type of interaction between these components. The weight ratio of tea extract to AA can cause the change of interaction, e.g. from antagonism to additivism or from additivism to synergism. The observed differences in the type of interactions were probably also a result of different extracts' polyphenol composition and content. The type of interaction may also be affected by the medium in which extracts and AA interact, especially its pH and the solvent used. To obtain the best antioxidant effect, all these factors should be taken into account during the design of a tea extract-AA mixture.

  6. Violence-related PTSD and neural activation when seeing emotionally charged male-female interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Dominik A; Aue, Tatjana; Suardi, Francesca; Kutlikova, Hana; Cordero, Maria I; Rossignol, Ana Sancho; Favez, Nicolas; Rusconi Serpa, Sandra; Schechter, Daniel S

    2015-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disorder that involves impaired regulation of the fear response to traumatic reminders. This study tested how women with male-perpetrated interpersonal violence-related PTSD (IPV-PTSD) differed in their brain activation from healthy controls (HC) when exposed to scenes of male-female interaction of differing emotional content. Sixteen women with symptoms of IPV-PTSD and 19 HC participated in this study. During magnetic resonance imaging, participants watched a stimulus protocol of 23 different 20 s silent epochs of male-female interactions taken from feature films, which were neutral, menacing or prosocial. IPV-PTSD participants compared with HC showed (i) greater dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) activation in response to menacing vs prosocial scenes and (ii) greater anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right hippocampus activation and lower ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) activty in response to emotional vs neutral scenes. The fact that IPV-PTSD participants compared with HC showed lower activity of the ventral ACC during emotionally charged scenes regardless of the valence of the scenes suggests that impaired social perception among IPV-PTSD patients transcends menacing contexts and generalizes to a wider variety of emotionally charged male-female interactions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Interactions and incompatibilities of pharmaceutical excipients with active pharmaceutical ingredients: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali S. Bharate

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of active drug/excipient compatibility represent an important phase in the preformulation stage of the development of all dosage forms. The potential physical and chemical interactions between drugs and excipients can affect the chemical nature, the stability and bioavailability of drugs and, consequently, their therapeutic efficacy and safety. The present review covers the literature reports of interaction and incompatibilities of commonly used pharmaceutical excipients with different active pharmaceutical ingredients in solid dosage forms. Examples of active drug/excipient interactions, such as transacylation, the Maillard browning reaction, acid base reactions and physical changes are discussed for different active pharmaceutical ingredients belonging to different therapeutic categories viz antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-convulsant, antibiotic, bronchodialator, antimalarial, antiemetic, antiamoebic, antipsychotic, antidepressant, anticancer, anticoagulant and sedative/hypnotic drugs and vitamins. Once the solid-state reactions of a pharmaceutical system are understood, the necessary steps can be taken to avoid reactivity and improve the stability of drug substances and products.

  8. Antioxidant activity of melatonin and glutathione interacting with hydroxyl- and superoxide anion radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Y. Kuznetsova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the results obtained by quantum chemical modeling of interaction between reduced glutathione (GSH and melatonin (MLT molecules with oxygen radicals (•OH and • OOˉ it was found that this interaction occured following the acid-base mechanism, where MLT and GSH acted as a base in respect of •OH, and as acid in respect of •OOˉ. We have carried out the correlation of the results of quantum chemical calculations (density redistribution, energetic characteristics under the interaction of MLT and GSH molecules with •OH and •OOˉ in changing macroscopic properties of the process of electroreduction of free oxygen radicals in the presence of antioxidants (potential and maximal current wave reduction waves. This was a direct experimental macroscale evidence of the results of theoretical modeling at the nanoscale level that pointed to a marked antioxidant activity of glutathione compared with melatonin.

  9. PeV neutrinos from intergalactic interactions of cosmic rays emitted by active galactic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashev, Oleg E; Kusenko, Alexander; Essey, Warren

    2013-07-26

    The observed very high energy spectra of distant blazars are well described by secondary gamma rays produced in line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays with background photons. In the absence of the cosmic-ray contribution, one would not expect to observe very hard spectra from distant sources, but the cosmic ray interactions generate very high energy gamma rays relatively close to the observer, and they are not attenuated significantly. The same interactions of cosmic rays are expected to produce a flux of neutrinos with energies peaked around 1 PeV. We show that the diffuse isotropic neutrino background from many distant sources can be consistent with the neutrino events recently detected by the IceCube experiment. We also find that the flux from any individual nearby source is insufficient to account for these events. The narrow spectrum around 1 PeV implies that some active galactic nuclei can accelerate protons to EeV energies.

  10. Interaction of active compounds from Aegle marmelos CORREA with histamine-1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Agistia, Dany Dwi; Tegar, Maulana; Purnomo, Hari

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the affinity of six active compounds of Aegle Marmelos Correa, they are (E, R)-Marmin, skimmianine, (S)-aegeline, aurapten, zeorin, and dustanin as antihistamines in histamine H1 receptor in comparison to cetirizin, diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine as ligands comparison. Previously, in the in vitro study marmin obviously antagonized the histamine H1 receptor in a competitive manner. Methods: molecular docking to determine the interaction of ligand binding to its receptor. Lower docking score indicates more stable binding to that protein. Results: Marmin, skimmianine, aegeline, aurapten, zeorin, and dustanin were potential to develop as antihistamine agents, especially as histamine H1 receptor antagonists by interacting with amino acid residues, Asp107, Lys179, Lys191, Asn198, and Trp428 of histamine H1 receptor. Conclusions: Based on molecular docking, Amino acid residues involved in ligand protein interactions were Asp107, Lys179, Lys191, Asn198, and Trp428. PMID:23750086

  11. Numerical simulation of interaction between chemically active exhaust and a jet blast deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaeva, T. A.; Turchinovich, A. O.

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of chemically active exhausts of aircraft engines with jet blast deflector (JBD) of various configurations has been considered at the stage of ground run procedure. The problem is modeled in the 3-D approximation in the framework of the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations taking into account the kinetic model of the interaction of between the components of engine exhaust and air. A complex field of gasdynamic flow that is realized when jets emerge from nozzles and interact with each other, with air, with a gas deflector has been studied. The main purpose of the study is to prove the concept that it is possible to generate a vortex flow that can not only change the direction of the jets, but also contribute to the lifting of the mass of pollutants and their dispersion in the atmosphere using a gas deflector shape.

  12. Gβγ interacts with mTOR and promotes its activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Molina, Evelyn [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Dionisio-Vicuña, Misael [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Guzmán-Hernández, María Luisa [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Vázquez-Prado, José, E-mail: jvazquez@cinvestav.mx [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Gβγ interacts with mTOR kinase domain via a mechanism sensitive to chronic treatment with rapamycin. • Gβγ interacts with mTORC1 and mTORC2 which correlates with its ability to promote mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling. • Gβγ heterodimers containing different Gβ subunits, except Gβ{sub 4}, interact with mTOR. - Abstract: Diverse G protein-coupled receptors depend on Gβγ heterodimers to promote cell polarization and survival via direct activation of PI3Kγ and potentially other effectors. These events involve full activation of AKT via its phosphorylation at Ser473, suggesting that mTORC2, the kinase that phosphorylates AKT at Ser473, is activated downstream of Gβγ. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that Gβγ directly contributes to mTOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous mTOR interacts with Gβγ. Cell stimulation with serum modulates Gβγ interaction with mTOR. The carboxyl terminal region of mTOR, expressed as a GST-fusion protein, including the serine/threonine kinase domain, binds Gβγ heterodimers containing different Gβ subunits, except Gβ{sub 4}. Both, mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes interact with Gβ{sub 1}γ{sub 2} which promotes phosphorylation of their respective substrates, p70S6K and AKT. In addition, chronic treatment with rapamycin, a condition known to interfere with assembly of mTORC2, reduces the interaction between Gβγ and mTOR and the phosphorylation of AKT; whereas overexpression of Gαi interfered with the effect of Gβγ as promoter of p70S6K and AKT phosphorylation. Altogether, our results suggest that Gβγ positively regulates mTOR signaling via direct interactions and provide further support to emerging strategies based on the therapeutical potential of inhibiting different Gβγ signaling interfaces.

  13. c-Met and Other Cell Surface Molecules: Interaction, Activation and Functional Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Viticchiè

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The c-Met receptor, also known as the HGF receptor, is one of the most studied tyrosine kinase receptors, yet its biological functions and activation mechanisms are still not fully understood. c-Met has been implicated in embryonic development and organogenesis, in tissue remodelling homeostasis and repair and in cancer metastasis. These functions are indicative of the many cellular processes in which the receptor plays a role, including cell motility, scattering, survival and proliferation. In the context of malignancy, sustained activation of c-Met leads to a signalling cascade involving a multitude of kinases that initiate an invasive and metastatic program. Many proteins can affect the activation of c-Met, including a variety of other cell surface and membrane-spanning molecules or receptors. Some cell surface molecules share structural homology with the c-Met extracellular domain and can activate c-Met via clustering through this domain (e.g., plexins, whereas other receptor tyrosine kinases can enhance c-Met activation and signalling through intracellular signalling cascades (e.g., EGFR. In this review, we provide an overview of c-Met interactions and crosstalk with partner molecules and the functional consequences of these interactions on c-Met activation and downstream signalling, c-Met intracellular localization/recycling and c-Met degradation.

  14. Interactive drivers of activity in a free-ranging estuarine predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Taylor

    Full Text Available Animal activity patterns evolve as an optimal balance between energy use, energy acquisition, and predation risk, so understanding how animals partition activity relative to extrinsic environmental fluctuations is central to understanding their ecology, biology and physiology. Here we use accelerometry to examine the degree to which activity patterns of an estuarine teleost predator are driven by a series of rhythmic and arrhythmic environmental fluctuations. We implanted free-ranging bream Acanthopagrus australis with acoustic transmitters that measured bi-axial acceleration and pressure (depth, and simultaneously monitored a series of environmental variables (photosynthetically active radiation, tidal height, temperature, turbidity, and lunar phase for a period of approximately four months. Linear modeling showed an interaction between fish activity, light level and tidal height; with activity rates also negatively correlated with fish depth. These patterns highlight the relatively-complex trade-offs that are required to persist in highly variable environments. This study demonstrates how novel acoustic sensor tags can reveal interactive links between environmental cycles and animal behavior.

  15. Activation of Penile Proadipogenic Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor with an Estrogen: Interaction with Estrogen Receptor Alpha during Postnatal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Mansour

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the estrogen receptor alpha (ER ligand diethylstilbesterol (DES between neonatal days 2 to 12 induces penile adipogenesis and adult infertility in rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo interaction between DES-activated ER and the proadipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR. Transcripts for PPARs , , and and 1a splice variant were detected in Sprague-Dawley normal rat penis with PPAR predominating. In addition, PPAR1b and PPAR2 were newly induced by DES. The PPAR transcripts were significantly upregulated with DES and reduced by antiestrogen ICI 182, 780. At the cellular level, PPAR protein was detected in urethral transitional epithelium and stromal, endothelial, neuronal, and smooth muscular cells. Treatment with DES activated ER and induced adipocyte differentiation in corpus cavernosum penis. Those adipocytes exhibited strong nuclear PPAR expression. These results suggest a biological overlap between PPAR and ER and highlight a mechanism for endocrine disruption.

  16. Quantum chemical study of agonist-receptor vibrational interactions for activation of the glutamate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M; Odai, K; Sugimoto, T; Ito, E

    2001-06-01

    To understand the mechanism of activation of a receptor by its agonist, the excitation and relaxation processes of the vibrational states of the receptor should be examined. As a first approach to this problem, we calculated the normal vibrational modes of agonists (glutamate and kainate) and an antagonist (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione: CNQX) of the glutamate receptor, and then investigated the vibrational interactions between kainate and the binding site of glutamate receptor subunit GluR2 by use of a semiempirical molecular orbital method (MOPAC2000-PM3). We found that two local vibrational modes of kainate, which were also observed in glutamate but not in CNQX, interacted through hydrogen bonds with the vibrational modes of GluR2: (i) the bending vibration of the amine group of kainate, interacting with the stretching vibration of the carboxyl group of Glu705 of GluR2, and (ii) the symmetric stretching vibration of the carboxyl group of kainate, interacting with the bending vibration of the guanidinium group of Arg485. We also found collective modes with low frequency at the binding site of GluR2 in the kainate-bound state. The vibrational energy supplied by an agonist may flow from the high-frequency local modes to the low-frequency collective modes in a receptor, resulting in receptor activation.

  17. GLAST stability and activity are enhanced by interaction with the PDZ scaffold NHERF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stefanie L; Asay, Matthew J; Paquet, Maryse; Paavola, Kevin J; Reiff, Rachel E; Yun, C Chris; Hall, Randy A

    2011-01-03

    The astrocytic glutamate transporter GLAST (also known as EAAT1) is a key regulator of extracellular glutamate levels in many regions of vertebrate brains. To identify novel interacting partners that might regulate the localization and function of GLAST in astrocytes, we screened the transporter's C-terminus (GLAST-CT) against a proteomic array of 96 different PDZ domains. The GLAST-CT robustly and specifically interacted with PDZ domains from two related scaffolding proteins, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factors 1 and 2 (NHERF-1 and NHERF-2). Studies on cultured rat cortical astrocytes revealed that these cells are highly enriched in NHERF-2 relative to NHERF-1. Endogenous GLAST and NHERF-2 from cultured astrocytes were found to robustly co-immunoprecipitate, and further co-immunoprecipitation studies on mutant versions of GLAST expressed in transfected cells revealed the GLAST/NHERF-2 interaction to be dependent on the last amino acid of the GLAST-CT. Knockdown of endogenous NHERF-2 in astrocytes via siRNA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in GLAST activity, which corresponded to significantly reduced total expression of GLAST protein and reduced half-life of GLAST, as assessed in pulse-chase metabolic labeling studies. These findings reveal that NHERF-2 can interact with GLAST in astrocytes to enhance GLAST stability and activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclin D3 interacts with vitamin D receptor and regulates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian Yongzhi; Yan Jun; Wang Hanzhou; Chen Chen; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Lu Jieqiong; Yang Yanzhong; Gu Jianxin

    2005-01-01

    D-type cyclins are essential for the progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins were recently reported to have transcription regulation functions. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is a new interacting partner of vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the superfamily of nuclear receptors for steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, and the fat-soluble vitamins A and D. The interaction was confirmed with methods of yeast two-hybrid system, in vitro binding analysis and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation. Cyclin D3 interacted with VDR in a ligand-independent manner, but treatment of the ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, strengthened the interaction. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that ligand-activated VDR led to an accumulation of cyclin D3 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 up-regulated transcriptional activity of VDR and this effect was counteracted by overexpression of CDK4 and CDK6. These findings provide us a new clue to understand the transcription regulation functions of D-type cyclins

  19. Monomerization of cytosolic mature smac attenuates interaction with IAPs and potentiation of caspase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Burke

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The four residues at the amino-terminus of mature Smac/DIABLO are an IAP binding motif (IBM. Upon exit from mitochondria, mature Smac interacts with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs, abrogating caspase inhibition. We used the ubiquitin fusion model to express mature Smac in the cytosol. Transiently expressed mature Smac56-239 (called Smac56 and Smac60-239 (called Smac60, which lacks the IBM, interacted with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP. However, stable expression produced wild type Smac56 that failed to homodimerize, interact with XIAP, and potentiate caspase activation. Cytosolic Smac60 retained these functions. Cytosolic Smac56 apparently becomes posttranslationally modified at the dimer interface region, which obliterated the epitope for a monoclonal antibody. Cytosolic Smacδ, which has the IBM but lacks amino acids 62-105, homodimerized and weakly interacted with XIAP, but failed to potentiate apoptosis. These findings suggest that the IBM of Smac is a recognition point for a posttranslational modification(s that blocks homodimerization and IAP interaction, and that amino acids 62-105 are required for the proapoptotic function of Smac.

  20. Annonalide and derivatives: Semisynthesis, cytotoxic activities and studies on interaction of annonalide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ricardo A; Gomes, Akenaton O C V; de Brito, Maria V; Dos Santos, Ana L P; da Silva, Gladyane S; de Lima, Leandro B; Nunes, Fátima M; de Mattos, Marcos C; de Oliveira, Fátima C E; do Ó Pessoa, Cláudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; de Fátima, Ângelo; Franco, Lucas L; Silva, Marina de M; Dantas, Maria Dayanne de A; Santos, Josué C C; Figueiredo, Isis M; da Silva-Júnior, Edeíldo F; de Aquino, Thiago M; de Araújo-Júnior, João X; de Oliveira, Maria C F; Leslie Gunatilaka, A A

    2018-02-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the pimarane diterpene annonalide (1) and nine of its semisynthetic derivatives (2-10) was investigated against the human tumor cell lines HL-60 (leukemia), PC-3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma), SF-295 (glioblastoma) and HCT-116 (colon cancer), and normal mouse fibroblast (L929) cells. The preparation of 2-10 involved derivatization of the side chain of 1 at C-13. Except for 2, all derivatives are being reported for the first time. Most of the tested compounds presented IC 50 s below 4.0 μM, being considered potential antitumor agents. The structures of all new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including 2D NMR and HRMS. Additionally, the interaction of annonalide (1) with ctDNA was evaluated using spectroscopic techniques, and the formation of a supramolecular complex with the macromolecule was confirmed. Competition assays with fluorescent probes (Hoechst and ethidium bromide) and theoretical studies confirmed that 1 interacts preferentially via DNA intercalation with stoichiometric ratio of 1:1 (1:ctDNA). The ΔG value was calculated as -28.24 kJ mol -1 , and indicated that the interaction process occurs spontaneously. Docking studies revealed that van der Walls is the most important interaction in 1-DNA and EB-DNA complexes, and that both ligands (1 and EB) interact with the same DNA residues (DA6, DA17 and DT19). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Specific interaction with cardiolipin triggers functional activation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsasne Bustillo-Zabalbeitia

    Full Text Available Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (Drp1, a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is required for mitochondrial fission in healthy and apoptotic cells. Drp1 activation is a complex process that involves translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM and assembly into rings/spirals at the MOM, leading to membrane constriction/division. Similar to dynamins, Drp1 contains GTPase (G, bundle signaling element (BSE and stalk domains. However, instead of the lipid-interacting Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain present in the dynamins, Drp1 contains the so-called B insert or variable domain that has been suggested to play an important role in Drp1 regulation. Different proteins have been implicated in Drp1 recruitment to the MOM, although how MOM-localized Drp1 acquires its fully functional status remains poorly understood. We found that Drp1 can interact with pure lipid bilayers enriched in the mitochondrion-specific phospholipid cardiolipin (CL. Building on our previous study, we now explore the specificity and functional consequences of this interaction. We show that a four lysine module located within the B insert of Drp1 interacts preferentially with CL over other anionic lipids. This interaction dramatically enhances Drp1 oligomerization and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that CL is an important regulator of many essential mitochondrial functions.

  2. Initial activation state, stimulation intensity and timing of stimulation interact in producing behavioral effects of TMS

    OpenAIRE

    Silvanto, Juha; Bona, Silvia; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have been shown to depend on various factors, such as neural activation state, stimulation intensity, and timing of stimulation. Here we examined whether these factors interact, by applying TMS at either sub- or suprathreshold intensity (relative to phosphene threshold, PT) and at different time points during a state-dependent TMS paradigm. The state manipulation involved a behavioral task in which a visual prime (color grating) wa...

  3. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winge, Mårten C G; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N; Boxer, Lisa M; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Kislat, Andreas; Nguyen, Ngon T; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions.

  4. Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Guérin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P<.05 but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed.

  5. Onset timing of cross-sensory activations and multisensory interactions in auditory and visual sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raij, Tommi; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Letham, Benjamin; Israeli, Emily; Sahyoun, Cherif; Vasios, Christos; Stufflebeam, Steven; Hämäläinen, Matti; Belliveau, John W

    2010-05-01

    Here we report early cross-sensory activations and audiovisual interactions at the visual and auditory cortices using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to obtain accurate timing information. Data from an identical fMRI experiment were employed to support MEG source localization results. Simple auditory and visual stimuli (300-ms noise bursts and checkerboards) were presented to seven healthy humans. MEG source analysis suggested generators in the auditory and visual sensory cortices for both within-modality and cross-sensory activations. fMRI cross-sensory activations were strong in the visual but almost absent in the auditory cortex; this discrepancy with MEG possibly reflects the influence of acoustical scanner noise in fMRI. In the primary auditory cortices (Heschl's gyrus) the onset of activity to auditory stimuli was observed at 23 ms in both hemispheres, and to visual stimuli at 82 ms in the left and at 75 ms in the right hemisphere. In the primary visual cortex (Calcarine fissure) the activations to visual stimuli started at 43 ms and to auditory stimuli at 53 ms. Cross-sensory activations thus started later than sensory-specific activations, by 55 ms in the auditory cortex and by 10 ms in the visual cortex, suggesting that the origins of the cross-sensory activations may be in the primary sensory cortices of the opposite modality, with conduction delays (from one sensory cortex to another) of 30-35 ms. Audiovisual interactions started at 85 ms in the left auditory, 80 ms in the right auditory and 74 ms in the visual cortex, i.e., 3-21 ms after inputs from the two modalities converged.

  6. Studies of beneficial interactions between active medicaments and excipients in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinkova, G N

    1999-09-30

    A review of "up to date" research findings leading to new concepts of the pharmaceutical formulations and their interactions has been presented. The rational approaches to the excipients choice as well as to their interactions with medicaments have been shown as a basis for modern modelling of pharmaceutical formulations. The importance of complexation, hydrogen bonding, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole and van der Waals attractions as the tools which can modify the physicochemical, pharmacological or pharmacokinetical behaviour of the medicaments has been emphasised. In vivo studies (carried out in healthy human subjects-volunteers, in beagle dogs, in rats etc.) and in vitro studies (on excised human skin, hairless mouse skin etc.) as well as studies of chemical stability and bioavailability serve also as a proof of these interactions. Therefore, excipients are important components of pharmaceutical formulations and they can take an active part in the improvement of the characteristics of formulations (but they may also reduce the effectiveness of some preparations). In this context, the so called active and inactive ingredients in pharmaceutical formulations are inexact, old and "out-of date". Their further use is only conventional. In conclusion, among the various modern techniques applied the combination of infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction has been estimated as the most successful in proving the interactions between drugs and excipients. Finally, pharmaceutical formulations and their interactions have constituted a diverse and rapidly expanding field of Pharmacy (Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmaceutical Industry and Pharmaceutical Sciences) which covers a wide range of numerical topics within an unified framework.

  7. Reliability of a Novel Social Activity Questionnaire: Perceived Social Support and Verbal Interaction in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuelsdorff, Megan L; Koscik, Rebecca L; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Peppard, Paul E; Hermann, Bruce P; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Engelman, Corinne D

    2018-02-01

    Social activity is associated with healthy aging and preserved cognition. Such activity includes a confluence of social support and verbal interaction, each influencing cognition through rarely parsed, mechanistically distinct pathways. We created a novel verbal interaction measure for the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) and assessed reliability of resultant data, a first step toward mechanism-driven examination of social activity as a modifiable predictor of cognitive health. Two WRAP subsamples completed a test-retest study to determine 8-week stability ( n = 107) and 2-year stability ( n = 136) of verbal interaction, and 2-year stability of perceived social support. Reliability was determined using quadratic-weighted kappa, percent agreement, or correlation coefficients. Reliability was fair to almost perfect. The association between social support and interaction quantity decreased with age. Social activity data demonstrate moderate to excellent temporal stability. Moreover, in older individuals, social support and verbal interaction represent two distinct dimensions of social activity.

  8. Contextual and individual predictors of physical activity: Interactions between environmental factors and health cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Wurm, Susanne; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wolff, Julia K; Warner, Lisa M; Schwarzer, Ralf; Tesch-Römer, Clemens

    2012-11-01

    Although health behavior theories assume a role of the context in health behavior self-regulation, this role is often weakly specified and rarely examined. The two studies in this article test whether properties of the environment (districts) affect if and how health-related cognitions are translated into physical activity. Multilevel modeling was used to examine the assumed cross-level interactions. Study 1 is a large-scale survey representative of the German adult population (N = 6,201). Gross domestic product (GDP) on the level of administrative districts was used to indicate environmental opportunities and barriers. Study 2 examined cross-level interactions of proximal predictors of physical activity (intentions, action planning, and coping planning) in older adults with multiple illnesses (N = 309), a high-risk group for health deteriorations. Study 1 showed that on the individual level, health attitudes (B = .11) and education (B = .71) were significantly associated with physical activity. GDP moderated the attitudes-behavior relation (B = .01), with higher attitude-behavior relations in districts with higher GDP. Study 2 finds that intention (B = .16), action planning (B = .17), and coping planning (B = .13) significantly predict activity. In addition, district-level GDP significantly moderated the relations between action planning and coping planning, but not intention, on physical activity. Results suggest that the effects of health attitudes and planning on physical activity are moderated by environmental factors. Districts with higher GDP provide better contextual opportunities for the enactment of concrete if-then plans for physical activity. This has implications for both theory and health promotion.

  9. Interactions with polynucleotides and antitumor activity of amidino and imidazolinyl substituted 2-phenylbenzothiazole mesylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racané, Livio; Stojković, Ranko; Tralić-Kulenović, Vesna; Cerić, Helena; Đaković, Marijana; Ester, Katja; Krpan, Ana Mišir; Stojković, Marijana Radić

    2014-10-30

    Based on previously reported antiproliferative activity screening, four most promising disubstituted 2-phenylbenzothiazole hydrochlorides were chosen for detailed study. Water solubility, as well as liphophilicity/hydrophilicity balance of organic core were modified by conversion to mesylate salts. For purpose of structure/activity studies their structures were determined by X-ray structure analysis. Detailed analysis of interactions of new compounds with double stranded (ds-) DNA/RNA by UV/Vis and CD titrations, thermal melting and viscometry experiments revealed that most of studied compounds intercalate into ds-RNA but bind into minor groove of AT-DNA, and agglomerate along GC-DNA. Furthermore, compounds also interact with ss-RNA, but only amino-imidazolinyl 2-phenylbenzothiazole, 4b displayed well defined orientation and dominant binding mode (by induced CD signals) with poly A and poly G. Besides, in vitro investigations revealed moderate to high antiproliferative activity of benzothiazoles against seven human cancer cell lines, while in some cases (HTC 116, SW620, MIA PaCa-2) high correlation between the type of the amidino group and cytotoxic activity was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding and quantitative (for predicting mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA; all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy-methyl]-6-(phenylthiothymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1 and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis, respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  12. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-11-19

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail.

  13. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  14. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction

  15. A Development of Game-Based Learning Environment to Activate Interaction among Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Ryo; Shimokawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Toshio

    Many studies and systems that incorporate elements such as “pleasure” and “fun” in the game to improve a learner's motivation have been developed in the field of learning environments. However, few are the studies of situations where many learners gather at a single computer and participate in a game-based learning environment (GBLE), and where the GBLE designs the learning process by controlling the interactions between learners such as competition, collaboration, and learning by teaching. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to propose a framework of educational control that induces and activates interaction between learners intentionally to create a learning opportunity that is based on the knowledge understanding model of each learner. In this paper, we explain the design philosophy and the framework of our GBLE called “Who becomes the king in the country of mathematics?” from a game viewpoint and describe the method of learning support control in the learning environment. In addition, we report the results of the learning experiment with our GBLE, which we carried out in a junior high school, and include some comments by a principal and a teacher. From the results of the experiment and some comments, we noticed that a game may play a significant role in weakening the learning relationship among students and creating new relationships in the world of the game. Furthermore, we discovered that learning support control of the GBLE has led to activation of the interaction between learners to some extent.

  16. Fha Interaction with Phosphothreonine of TssL Activates Type VI Secretion in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jer-Sheng; Wu, Hsin-Hui; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Ma, Lay-Sun; Pang, Yin-Yuin; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Lai, Erh-Min

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread protein secretion system found in many Gram-negative bacteria. T6SSs are highly regulated by various regulatory systems at multiple levels, including post-translational regulation via threonine (Thr) phosphorylation. The Ser/Thr protein kinase PpkA is responsible for this Thr phosphorylation regulation, and the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-containing Fha-family protein is the sole T6SS phosphorylation substrate identified to date. Here we discovered that TssL, the T6SS inner-membrane core component, is phosphorylated and the phosphorylated TssL (p-TssL) activates type VI subassembly and secretion in a plant pathogenic bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Combining genetic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that TssL is phosphorylated at Thr 14 in a PpkA-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the PpkA kinase activity is responsible for the Thr 14 phosphorylation, which is critical for the secretion of the T6SS hallmark protein Hcp and the putative toxin effector Atu4347. TssL phosphorylation is not required for the formation of the TssM-TssL inner-membrane complex but is critical for TssM conformational change and binding to Hcp and Atu4347. Importantly, Fha specifically interacts with phosphothreonine of TssL via its pThr-binding motif in vivo and in vitro and this interaction is crucial for TssL interaction with Hcp and Atu4347 and activation of type VI secretion. In contrast, pThr-binding ability of Fha is dispensable for TssM structural transition. In conclusion, we discover a novel Thr phosphorylation event, in which PpkA phosphorylates TssL to activate type VI secretion via its direct binding to Fha in A. tumefaciens. A model depicting an ordered TssL phosphorylation-induced T6SS assembly pathway is proposed. PMID:24626341

  17. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Alexander R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  18. Linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 for interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalla, Abdelhay; Houssou, Mohamed; Charif, Moussa

    2010-08-01

    This paper deals with the linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 (ASM1) in the scope of interaction analysis. For consistency, the linearization procedure is developed and validated within the BSM1 simulation benchmark framework. It is based on reaction rate approximation by linear combinations of states. The linear rate models are identified and incorporated in the mass balance equations, yielding a linear locally equivalent to the ASM1 model. Linear models for anoxic and aerated compartments are proposed. It is observed that the presented models track very closely the nonlinear ASM1 responses to various influent data. The key feature of this linearization strategy is that the gotten linear version of the ASM1 model is linear time invariant (LTI) and that it conserves the states biological interpretation and the original ASM1 dimension. It allows, therefore, application of interaction analysis methods and makes it possible to determine motivated control configurations for the ASM1 model.

  19. A Collaborative Platform to Support the Enterprise 2.0 in Active Interactions with Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico CONSOLI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new model of Enterprise 2.0, which interacts actively with customers using web 2.0 tools (chat, forum, blog, wiki, is developing. The enterprises, listening opinions and suggestions of customers, can improve the product/service. For a company, customer's opinions are very important both for the improvement of products and also for the reinforcement of the customer loyalty. The customer will be motivated to be loyal if the enterprise shows a strong attention to his/her needs. This paper presents a model of a collaborative and interactive platform that supports the Enterprise 2.0 in the management of communications and relationships with all stakeholder of the supply chain and in particular with customers. A good e-reputation of the company improves business performances.

  20. An Activity-Centric Approach to Configuration Work in Distributed Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven

    be distributed, fragmented and used across multiple devices and users. Second, I present a technical infrastructure and four applications that apply the concepts of activity configuration. The infrastructure is a general purpose platform for the design, development and deployment of distributed activitycentric......The widespread introduction of new types of computing devices, such as smartphones, tablet computers, large interactive displays or even wearable devices, has led to setups in which users are interacting with a rich ecology of devices. These new device ecologies have the potential to introduce...... these kind of complex device ecologies, which I refer to as configuration work. It is the effort required to set up, manage, communicate, understand and use information, applications and services that are distributed over all devices in use and people involved. Because current devices and their containing...

  1. Conformation and activity alteration of horseradish peroxidase induced by the interaction with gene carrier polyethyleneimines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aimin; Wei, Bangzhi; Mo, Junyong; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has long been considered as ;golden standard; for polymeric gene delivery carriers. However the molecular basis of the cytotoxicity of PEI is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy were conducted to investigate the influence of PEI of average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa (denoted as PEI25k, PEI10k and PEI1.8k) on the conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its catalytic efficiency. Zeta-potential measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to reveal the mechanism of the interaction between PEIs and HRP. PEIs were found to bind onto the surface of HRP predominantly via hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond or van der Waals interaction. The complex formation between HRP and PEI induced a more compact conformation of the enzyme and an increased hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding heme pocket. The conformational change of HRP had little impact on the affinity towards H2O2 and phenol. However, the increase in the non-planarity of porphyrin ring in the heme group led to an increase in the exposure degree of the active center and thus an enhancement of catalytic efficiency of HRP in the presence of high molecular weight PEIs (PEI25k and PEI10k). The polymer size played an important role in PEI-HRP interaction. PEI of low molecular weight (PEI1.8k) was less efficient to alter the conformation and catalytic activity of HRP in aqueous solutions.

  2. Regulation of floral meristem activity through the interaction of AGAMOUS, SUPERMAN, and CLAVATA3 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Akira; Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Xu, Yifeng; Wee, WanYi; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Shibata, Arisa; Shirasu, Ken; Ito, Toshiro

    2017-12-07

    Floral meristem size is redundantly controlled by CLAVATA3, AGAMOUS , and SUPERMAN in Arabidopsis. The proper regulation of floral meristem activity is key to the formation of optimally sized flowers with a fixed number of organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, multiple regulators determine this activity. A small secreted peptide, CLAVATA3 (CLV3), functions as an important negative regulator of stem cell activity. Two transcription factors, AGAMOUS (AG) and SUPERMAN (SUP), act in different pathways to regulate the termination of floral meristem activity. Previous research has not addressed the genetic interactions among these three genes. Here, we quantified the floral developmental stage-specific phenotypic consequences of combining mutations of AG, SUP, and CLV3. Our detailed phenotypic and genetic analyses revealed that these three genes act in partially redundant pathways to coordinately modulate floral meristem sizes in a spatial and temporal manner. Analyses of the ag sup clv3 triple mutant, which developed a mass of undifferentiated cells in its flowers, allowed us to identify downstream targets of AG with roles in reproductive development and in the termination of floral meristem activity. Our study highlights the role of AG in repressing genes that are expressed in organ initial cells to control floral meristem activity.

  3. Activity in the superior temporal sulcus highlights learning competence in an interaction game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruno, Masahiko; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2009-04-08

    During behavioral adaptation through interaction with human and nonhuman agents, marked individual differences are seen in both real-life situations and games. However, the underlying neural mechanism is not well understood. We conducted a neuroimaging experiment in which subjects maximized monetary rewards by learning in a prisoner's dilemma game with two computer agents: agent A, a tit-for-tat player who repeats the subject's previous action, and agent B, a simple stochastic cooperator oblivious to the subject's action. Approximately 1/3 of the subjects (group I) learned optimally in relation to both A and B, while another 1/3 (group II) did so only for B. Post-experiment interviews indicated that group I exploited the agent strategies more often than group II. Significant differences in learning-related brain activity between the two groups were only found in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for both A and B. Furthermore, the learning performance of each group I subject was predictable based on this STS activity, but not in the group II subjects. This differential activity could not be attributed to a behavioral difference since it persisted in relation to agent B for which the two groups behaved similarly. In sharp contrast, the brain structures for reward processing were recruited similarly by both groups. These results suggest that STS provides knowledge of the other agent's strategies for association between action and reward and highlights learning competence during interactive reinforcement learning.

  4. Activating Humans with Humor——A Dialogue System That Users Want to Interact with

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybala, Pawel; Ptaszynski, Michal; Rzepka, Rafal; Araki, Kenji

    The topic of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) has been gathering more and more scientific attention of late. A very important, but often undervalued area in this field is human engagement. That is, a person's commitment to take part in and continue the interaction. In this paper we describe work on a humor-equipped casual conversational system (chatterbot) and investigate the effect of humor on a user's engagement in the conversation. A group of users was made to converse with two systems: one with and one without humor. The chat logs were then analyzed using an emotive analysis system to check user reactions and attitudes towards each system. Results were projected on Russell's two-dimensional emotiveness space to evaluate the positivity/negativity and activation/deactivation of these emotions. This analysis indicated emotions elicited by the humor-equipped system were more positively active and less negatively active than by the system without humor. The implications of results and relation between them and user engagement in the conversation are discussed. We also propose a distinction between positive and negative engagement.

  5. Adult wheel access interaction with activity and boldness personality in Siberian dwarf hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, L Leann; Abdulhay, Amir; Erickson, Caitlin

    2017-05-01

    Individual animal personalities interact with environmental conditions to generate differences in behavior, a phenomenon of growing interest for understanding the effects of environmental enrichment on captive animals. Wheels are common environmental enrichment for laboratory rodents, but studies conflict on how this influences behavior, and interaction of wheels with individual personalities has rarely been examined. We examined whether wheel access altered personality profiles in adult Siberian dwarf hamsters. We assayed animals in a tunnel maze twice for baseline personality, then again at two and at seven weeks after the experimental group was provisioned with wheels in their home cages. Linear mixed model selection was used to assess changes in behavior over time and across environmental gradient of wheel exposure. While animals showed consistent inter-individual differences in activity, activity personality did not change upon exposure to a wheel. Boldness also varies among individuals, and there is evidence for female boldness scores converging after wheel exposure, that is, opposite shifts in behavior by high and low boldness individuals, although sample size is too small for the mixed model results to be robust. In general, Siberian dwarf hamsters appear to show low behavioral plasticity, particularly in general activity, in response to running wheels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of kinase activating and inactivating patient mutations on binary PKA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Ruth; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Bachmann, Verena; Stefan, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger molecule cAMP links extracellular signals to intracellular responses. The main cellular cAMP effector is the compartmentalized protein kinase A (PKA). Upon receptor initiated cAMP-mobilization, PKA regulatory subunits (R) bind cAMP thereby triggering dissociation and activation of bound PKA catalytic subunits (PKAc). Mutations in PKAc or RIa subunits manipulate PKA dynamics and activities which contribute to specific disease patterns. Mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling contribute to carcinogenesis or hormone excess, while inactivating mutations cause hormone deficiency or resistance. Here we extended the application spectrum of a Protein-fragment Complementation Assay based on the Renilla Luciferase to determine binary protein:protein interactions (PPIs) of the PKA network. We compared time- and dose-dependent influences of cAMP-elevation on mutually exclusive PPIs of PKAc with the phosphotransferase inhibiting RIIb and RIa subunits and the protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI). We analyzed PKA dynamics following integration of patient mutations into PKAc and RIa. We observed that oncogenic modifications of PKAc(L206R) and RIa(Δ184-236) as well as rare disease mutations in RIa(R368X) affect complex formation of PKA and its responsiveness to cAMP elevation. With the cell-based PKA PPI reporter platform we precisely quantified the mechanistic details how inhibitory PKA interactions and defined patient mutations contribute to PKA functions.

  7. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp. Bark Water Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Durak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia. Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study.

  8. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E. (SBU)

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  9. Interaction between BDNF Polymorphism and Physical Activity on Inhibitory Performance in the Elderly without Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Canivet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the elderly, physical activity (PA enhances cognitive performances, increases brain plasticity and improves brain health. The neurotrophic hypothesis is that the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is implicated in brain plasticity and cognition, is triggered by PA because motoneurons secrete BDNF into the bloodstream during exercise. Individual differences in cognitive performance may be explained by individual differences in genetic predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism on the BDNF gene, BDNFVal66Met, affects activity-dependent BDNF secretion. This study investigated the influence of the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism on the relationship between PA and controlled inhibition performance in older adults.Methods: A total of 114 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age = 71.53 years old were evaluated. Participants were genotyped for the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism. We evaluated inhibitory performance using choice reaction times (RT and error rates from a Simon-like task and estimated their PA using two self-reported questionnaires. We established four groups according to PA level (active vs. inactive and BDNFVal66Met genotype (Met carriers vs. Val-homozygous. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and ANCOVA, including age, gender and body mass index as covariates.Results: The BDNFVal66Met polymorphism interacted with PA on controlled inhibition performance. More specifically, inactive Val-homozygous participants exhibited a lower inhibition performance than active Val homozygotes and inactive Met carriers; the former had a higher error rate without differences in RT.Conclusion: Differences between individuals on inhibitory performance may be partially understood by the interaction between genetic influence in BDNF secretion and PA level. The results of this study clearly support the neurotrophic hypothesis that BDNF synthesis is an important mechanism underlying the influence of physical activity on brain

  10. [Active oxygen species in pea seedlings during the interactions with symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, G G; Glian'ko, A K; Mironova, N V; Putilina, T E; Luzova, G B

    2007-01-01

    The level of active oxygen species (AOS)--superoxide anion radical (O2*-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)--in pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar Marat seedlings was studied upon their inoculation with symbiotic (Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae strain CIAM 1026) and pathogenic (Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi Sackett) microorganisms. Different patterns of the changes in AOS in pea seedlings during the interactions with the symbiont and the phytopathogen were recorded. It is assumed that O2*- and H2O2 are involved in the defense and regulatory mechanisms of the host plant.

  11. Kinetic and docking studies of the interaction of quinones with the quinone reductase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhigang; Fisher, Derek; Spidel, Jared; Greenfield, Jodi; Patson, Brian; Fazal, Aleem; Wigal, Carl; Moe, Owen A; Madura, Jeffry D

    2003-02-25

    NAD(P)H/quinone acceptor oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) protects cells from cytotoxic and neoplastic effects of quinones though two-electron reduction. Kinetic experiments, docking, and binding affinity calculations were performed on a series of structurally varied quinone substrates. A good correlation between calculated and measured binding affinities from kinetic determinations was obtained. The experimental and theoretical studies independently support a model in which quinones (with one to three fused aromatic rings) bind in the QR1 active site utilizing a pi-stacking interaction with the isoalloxazine ring of the FAD cofactor.

  12. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna Wiktoria

    2015-06-17

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein ‘nanomachines’ to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  13. DataHigh: graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R; Kaufman, Matthew T; Churchland, Mark M; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V; Yu, Byron M

    2012-01-01

    The activity of tens to hundreds of neurons can be succinctly summarized by a smaller number of latent variables extracted using dimensionality reduction methods. These latent variables define a reduced-dimensional space in which we can study how population activity varies over time, across trials, and across experimental conditions. Ideally, we would like to visualize the population activity directly in the reduced-dimensional space, whose optimal dimensionality (as determined from the data) is typically greater than 3. However, direct plotting can only provide a 2D or 3D view. To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) that allows the user to quickly navigate through a continuum of different 2D projections of the reduced-dimensional space. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of this GUI, we applied it to visualize population activity recorded in premotor and motor cortices during reaching tasks. Examples include single-trial population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded sequentially using single electrodes. Because any single 2D projection may provide a misleading impression of the data, being able to see a large number of 2D projections is critical for intuition-and hypothesis-building during exploratory data analysis. The GUI includes a suite of additional interactive tools, including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses. The use of visualization tools like the GUI developed here, in tandem with dimensionality reduction methods, has the potential to further our understanding of neural population activity.

  14. Protein-Nanoparticle Interactions: Improving Immobilized Lytic Enzyme Activity and Surface Energy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Emily Elizabeth

    Protein-nanostructure conjugates, particularly particles, are a subject of significant interest due to changes in their fundamental behavior compared to bulk surfaces. As the size scale of nano-structured materials and proteins are on the same order of magnitude, nanomaterial properties can heavily influence how proteins adsorb and conform to the surface. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of nanoscale surfaces to modulate protein activity, conformation, and retention by modifying the particle surface curvature, morphology, and surface charge. This work has improved our understanding of the protein material interactions, but a complete understanding is still lacking. The goal of this thesis is to investigate two missing areas of understanding using two distinct systems. The first system utilizes a particle with controlled surface energy to observe the impact of surface energy on protein-particle interactions, while the second system uses a modified Listeria-specific protein to determine how protein structure and flexibility affects protein adsorption and activity on particles. Spherical, amorphous, and uniformly doped Zn-silica particles with tailored surface energies were synthesized to understand the impact of surface energy on protein adsorption behavior. Particle surface energy increased with a decrease in particle size and greater dopant concentrations. Protein adsorption and structural loss increased with both particle size and particle surface energy. Higher surface energies promoted protein-particle association and increased protein unfolding. Particle curvature and protein steric hindrance effects limited adsorption and structural loss on smaller particles. Protein surface charge heterogeneity was also found to be linked to both protein adsorption and unfolding behavior on larger particles. Greater surface charge heterogeneity led to higher adsorption concentrations and multilayer formation. These multilayers transitioned from protein

  15. Antioxidant activity and protein-polyphenol interactions in a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros, Lorena; Wojdyło, Aneta; Sendra, Esther

    2014-07-09

    Pomegranate juice (PGJ) is rich in phenolics which are potent antioxidants but also prone to interact with proteins. A yogurt rich in PGJ (40%) made from arils was elaborated (PGY) to determine the antioxidant activity and to estimate the phenolics-proteins interaction during 28 days of cold storage. Juice, yogurts, and protein-free permeates were analyzed for phenolic composition. Yogurt fermentation modified the anthocyanin profile of the initial PGJ, especially the content in cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. During storage, individual anthocyanin content in PGY decreased but it did not modify yogurt color. The analysis of permeates revealed that the degree of phenol-protein interaction depends on the type of phenolic, ellagic acid and dephinidin-3,5-O-diglucoside being the least bound phenolic compounds. The presence of PGJ in yogurt enhanced radical scavenging performance, whereas all the observed ferric reducing power ability of PGY was strictly due to the PGJ present. The 84.73% of total anthocyanins remained bound to proteins at the first day of storage and 90.06% after 28 days of cold storage, revealing the high affinity of anthocyanins for milk proteins.

  16. First-Principles Interaction Analysis Assessment of the Manganese Cation in the Catalytic Activity of Glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladek, Vladimir; Tvaroška, Igor

    2017-06-29

    The energetic effect of water substitution reactions in hexacoordinated [Mn(H 2 O) 6-n L z n ] 2+nz complexes with L = methanol, formic acid, formamide, formate, imidazole, and diphosphate is quantitatively analyzed at the MP2/triple-ζ level of theory. Subsequently, the state-of-the-art open shell symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) analysis of the interaction energies of Mn 2+ ···ligand dimers with selected O-, S-, and N-binding ligands is presented and compared to similar interactions of Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ ions. We find that the induction energies in the dimers with manganese are almost twice as large as in dimers with magnesium. The total interaction energies rise in the order Mn 2+ < Mg 2+ < Zn 2+ . The calculations of the Mn 2+ → Mg 2+ replacement reaction suggest that metal-dependent glycosyltransferases influence the binding preference of Mn 2+ over Mg 2+ by inserting amino acids that coordinate the metal via nitrogen or sulfur into their active site.

  17. Activation of Baculovirus Very Late Promoters by Interaction with Very Late Factor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song; Miller, Lois K.

    1999-01-01

    Very late factor 1 (VLF-1) of Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) activates the transcription of two genes, polyhedrin (polh) and p10, during the final, occlusion-specific phase of infection. Using transient expression assays responsive to VLF-1, we identified linker scan mutations in the polh and p10 promoters which abolished or weakened the ability of the promoters to respond to stimulation by VLF-1. These mutations were located between the transcriptional and translational initiation sites, a region previously shown to be essential for the burst of expression during the very late phase. Addition of partially purified, epitope-tagged VLF-1 to DNA encompassing this “burst sequence” resulted in a shift in the gel electrophoretic mobility of the DNA, indicating that VLF-1 forms a complex with DNA. Addition of an antibody specific for the epitope tag of VLF-1 decreased the mobility of the DNA further, confirming the presence of VLF-1 in the complex. DNase I footprint assays revealed that VLF-1 partially purified from either insect cells or bacterial cells interacted with the burst sequences of both the polh and p10 very-late promoters. Linker scan mutations within the burst sequences severely impaired interaction between VLF-1 and the promoters. We propose that VLF-1 transactivates the polh and p10 promoters by interacting with the burst sequences. PMID:10074194

  18. Annotating activation/inhibition relationships to protein-protein interactions using gene ontology relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Soorin; Yu, Hasun; Jang, Dongjin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-04-11

    Signaling pathways can be reconstructed by identifying 'effect types' (i.e. activation/inhibition) of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Effect types are composed of 'directions' (i.e. upstream/downstream) and 'signs' (i.e. positive/negative), thereby requiring directions as well as signs of PPIs to predict signaling events from PPI networks. Here, we propose a computational method for systemically annotating effect types to PPIs using relations between functional information of proteins. We used regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in Gene Ontology (GO) to predict directions and signs of PPIs. These relations indicate both directions and signs between GO terms so that we can project directions and signs between relevant GO terms to PPIs. Independent test results showed that our method is effective for predicting both directions and signs of PPIs. Moreover, our method outperformed a previous GO-based method that did not consider the relations between GO terms. We annotated effect types to human PPIs and validated several highly confident effect types against literature. The annotated human PPIs are available in Additional file 2 to aid signaling pathway reconstruction and network biology research. We annotated effect types to PPIs by using regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in GO. We demonstrated that those relations are effective for predicting not only signs, but also directions of PPIs. The usefulness of those relations suggests their potential applications to other types of interactions such as protein-DNA interactions.

  19. Diagnostic and interactive systems of strategic risk indicators of management accounting in innovation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Ivankov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the investigation of main trends of the development of innovative activity in Ukraine during last years. It is determined that the quantity of innovatively active Ukrainian enterprises is growing, and this trend continues existing. The statistic indicators of innovative activity of industrial enterprises for 2014-2015 years are investigated. It is determined that the world market of technologies remains the engine of economic growth in modern economic conditions. It is proved, that the reliable information provision of needs in management of innovative processes requires argumentation of new accounting technologies that must consider risk nature of innovations and main trends of the development of instruments of the strategic management accounting. The characteristics of diagnostic and interactive systems of indicators are investigated and it is identified that both systems are interactive and may function simultaneously for control of realization of chosen strategy (diagnostic system and for testing of non-standard situations in conditions of uncertainty and risk (interactive system. It is identified, that the peculiarity of interactive systems is still the adaptation of one or two indicators of diagnostic systems by means of focusing on influence of uncertainty and risk on the results of realization of strategic goals or on the indicators of risk-result. Taking into consideration the risk nature of innovative activity, the author investigates the approaches upon the possible usage of instruments of risk-management in the concepts of management accounting, namely balanced scorecard. It is identified that the modern approach provides the inspection of strategic goals realization as the chances, and the risks as factors, that inhibit their achievement. This allows determining the influence of all the identified risks on deviations from the target (normative values of strategic indicators, which are the expression of a

  20. Interaction with Shc prevents aberrant Erk activation in the absence of extracellular stimuli

    KAUST Repository

    Suen, KinMan

    2013-05-01

    Control mechanisms that prevent aberrant signaling are necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis. We describe a new mechanism by which the adaptor protein Shc directly binds the MAP kinase Erk, thus preventing its activation in the absence of extracellular stimuli. The Shc-Erk complex restricts Erk nuclear translocation, restraining Erk-dependent transcription of genes, including those responsible for oncogenic growth. The complex forms through unique binding sites on both the Shc PTB domain and the N-terminal lobe of Erk. Upon receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation, a conformational change within Shc - induced through interaction with the phosphorylated receptor - releases Erk, allowing it to fulfill its role in signaling. Thus, in addition to its established role in promoting MAP kinase signaling in stimulated cells, Shc negatively regulates Erk activation in the absence of growth factors and thus could be considered a tumor suppressor in human cells. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Energy intake/physical activity interactions in the homeostasis of body weight regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Andrew; Jebb, Susan

    2004-07-01

    The agricultural and technological revolutions of the late 20th century have influenced both of the discretionary components of the energy balance equation, namely energy intake and physical activity. These changes act synergistically in the direction of encouraging weight gain and represent an unprecedented change in man's ecological niche. Obesity is the predictable biologic response to these external changes. This paper reviews the physiologic responses to modern diets and their effect on energy regulation. The energy density of foods is identified as a key element in influencing energy intake due to weak satiety signals that fail to compensate for very energy-dense foods. Evidence is also presented to show that interactions between energy-dense diets and low-levels of physical activity are key elements in encouraging weight gain due to an asymmetry between the hunger and satiety arms of human appetite control.

  2. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  3. Altered cognition-related brain activity and interactions with acute pain in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani A. Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effect of migraine on neural cognitive networks. However, cognitive dysfunction is increasingly being recognized as a comorbidity of chronic pain. Pain appears to affect cognitive ability and the function of cognitive networks over time, and decrements in cognitive function can exacerbate affective and sensory components of pain. We investigated differences in cognitive processing and pain–cognition interactions between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched healthy controls using an fMRI block-design with two levels of task difficulty and concurrent heat (painful and not painful stimuli. Across groups, cognitive networks were recruited in response to a difficult cognitive task, and a pain–task interaction was found in the right (contralateral to pain stimulus posterior insula (pINS, such that activity was modulated by decreasing the thermal pain stimulus or by engaging the difficult cognitive task. Migraine patients had less task-related deactivation within the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and left dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC compared to controls. These regions have been reported to have decreased cortical thickness and cognitive-related deactivation within other pain populations, and are also associated with pain regulation, suggesting that the current findings may reflect altered cognitive function and top-down regulation of pain. During pain conditions, patients had decreased task-related activity, but more widespread task-related reductions in pain-related activity, compared to controls, suggesting cognitive resources may be diverted from task-related to pain-reduction-related processes in migraine. Overall, these findings suggest that migraine is associated with altered cognitive-related neural activity, which may reflect altered pain regulatory processes as well as broader functional restructuring.

  4. Aurora-A interacts with AP-2α and down regulates its transcription activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zou

    Full Text Available Aurora-A is a serine/threonine protein kinase and plays an important role in the control of mitotic progression. Dysregulated expression of Aurora-A impairs centrosome separation and maturation, which lead to disrupted cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which Aurora-A causes cell malignant transformation remains to be further defined. In this report, using transcription factors array and mRNA expression profiling array, we found that overexpression of Aurora-A suppressed transcription activity of AP-2α, a tumor suppressor that is often downregulated in variety of tumors, and inhibited expression of AP-2α-regulated downstream genes. These array-based observations were further confirmed by microwell colorimetric TF assay and luciferase reporter assay. Downregulated transcription activity of AP-2α by Aurora-A was found to be associated with reduced AP-2α protein stability, which appeared to be mediated by Aurora-A enhanced ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of AP-2α protein. Interestingly, Aurora-A-mediated AP-2α degradation was likely dependent Aurora-A kinase activity since inhibition of Aurora-A kinase activity was able to rescue Aurora-A-induced degradation of AP-2α. Moreover, we defined a physical interaction between Aurora-A and AP-2α, and such interaction might bridge the suppressive effect of Aurora-A on AP-2α protein stability. These findings provide new insights into molecular mechanism by which Aurora-A acts as an oncogenic molecule in tumor occurrence and malignant development.

  5. Interaction and sonodynamic damage activity of acridine red (AD-R) to bovine serum albumin (BSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dandan; Xie, Jinhui; Wu, Qiong; Fan, Ping; Wang, Jun, E-mail: wangjun888tg@126.com

    2015-04-15

    The sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has become an attractive antitumor treatment method in recent years, but the selection of sonosensitizer, mechanism of damage biomolecule and kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during sonodynamic process have not been investigated in detail. In this paper, the acridine red (AD-R), as a sonosensitizer, combining with ultrasonic irradiation to damage bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated. At first, the interaction of AD-R to BSA molecules in aqueous solution was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. As judged from the experimental results, the quenching mechanism of BSA fluorescence belongs to a static process. Synchronous fluorescence spectra demonstrate that the binding and damage sites to BSA molecules are mainly on the tryptophan residues. The generation and kind of generated ROS were also estimated by the method of oxidation and extraction photometry. This paper may offer some valuable references for the study of the sonodynamic activity and application of AD-R in SDT for tumor treatment. - Highlights: ●Acridine red (AD-R) is used to study interaction with BSA. ●Spectroscopy is used to study sonodynamic damage activity of AD-R to BSA. ●Generation of ROS caused by AD-R under ultrasonic irradiation was determined.

  6. Interaction of adrenocortical activity and autonomic arousal on children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frances R; Raine, Adrian; Soyfer, Liana; Granger, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    The psychobiology of stress involves two major components, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Research has revealed the association between behavior problems and the psychobiology of stress, yet findings are inconsistent and few studies have addressed the moderate correlations between behavior problems. This study examines the individual and interactive effects of HPA and ANS on child behavior problems while taking into account the comorbidity of externalizing and internalizing problems. Four saliva samples were collected from each participant in a community sample (N = 429; aged 11-12 years; 50.49 % male), which were assayed for cortisol (HPA) and alpha-amylase, sAA (ANS). Children's behavior problems were assessed using parent-report and self-report versions of the Child Behavior Checklist. Latent variables were constructed to represent trait-like individual differences in cortisol and sAA. Low levels of HPA axis activity were associated with higher levels of both externalizing and internalizing problems, but only among children with low ANS arousal. The association between externalizing and internalizing problems diminished to non-significant after taking into account the influence of HPA axis activity and ANS arousal, which suggests that the psychobiology of stress explains a fair proportion of comorbidity of behavior problems. The findings support that interaction between HPA axis and ANS functioning has potential to clarify prior mixed findings and advance our understanding of the child behavior problems.

  7. INTERACTIVE CHANGE DETECTION USING HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON ACTIVE LEARNING WITH GAUSSIAN PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  8. Intercultural Interactions of Mono-Cultural, Mono-Lingual Local Students in Small Group Learning Activities: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Cassandra; Fozdar, Farida; Volet, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the understandings and experiences of mono-cultural, mono-lingual local students in relation to intercultural interactions within small group learning activities at university. Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital are employed to illuminate a number of barriers to intercultural interaction. Using qualitative…

  9. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-01-01

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC. PMID:26549759

  10. One-year outcome of an interactive internet-based physical activity intervention among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kanzo; Okano, Shinji; Haga, Shinichiro; Seki, Akiho; Suzuki, Hisao; Takahashi, Kayo

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether improvement in physical activity of students following a 4-month intervention of a university course was maintained 8 months later. Data on 77 students who responded to our scheduled inquiries completely through 1 year were analyzed. Participants of the intervention group (n=49) using the internet-based physical activity program exhibited significant increases in energy expenditures measured by IPAQ compared with the no-treatment control group (n=28) through 1 year. Participants who did not engage in regular university sports activities (baseline: 450±351kcalday(-1); post: 587±320kcalday(-1); 8-month follow-up: 580±394kcalday(-1)) only exhibited significant increases in energy expenditures compared with those of the control group (baseline: 498±341kcalday(-1); post: 414±242kcalday(-1); 8-month follow-up: 347±275kcalday(-1)). These results suggested that an internet-based interactive intervention could become a helpful tool in promoting and maintaining physical activity in the long term. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Collaborative Relationships Among Couples: Frames of Interaction During Everyday Household Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcidiacono Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of collaborative exchanges of couples during their household activities is at the core of this paper. Although the management of responsibilities around household tasks is a potential source of contention within the decision-making process about home activities, another complementary perspective considers practices of communication during household activities as ways to build or reinforce the family educational processes. Our goal is to capture these daily interactions as indicators of collaborative relationships among couples, exemplifying how communicative exchanges contribute to the creation of frames for family participation in routines. In the first part of the paper, a review of issues regarding the division of labor within the family setting will be introduced in order to examine how these aspects relate to the ongoing negotiation of responsibilities and expectations between women and men. Thereafter, the methodological design of the study will be presented, as well as the qualitative analysis of data based on the argumentative topic model. A discussion of participants’ responsibilities in household tasks will be presented as indicators of their collaborative relationships during everyday activities. Lastly, implications for family studies will be highlighted in order to illustrate how family members ascribe meanings during routines.

  12. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  13. Direct configuration interaction and multiconfigurational self-consistent-field method for multiple active spaces with variable occupations. I. Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    In order to reduce the number of ineffective configurations in a priori generated configuration spaces, a direct configuration interaction method has been developed which limits the electron occupations of orbital groups making up a total active space. A wave function is specified by first partitioning an active space into an unrestricted number of orbital groups and second by providing limiting values, in the form of minima and maxima, for the electron occupancies of each group. The configuration interaction problem corresponding to all possible determinants satisfying these conditions is solved in a fully direct manner by the use of Slater-Condon expressions in conjunction with single and double replacements. This configuration interaction approach, termed occupation restricted multiple active space-configuration interaction, has also been linked with orbital optimization programs to produce the occupation restricted multiple active space-self consistent field method.

  14. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities-Optimized Stroke Minimization. I. A New Adaptive Interaction Matrix Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoyer, J.; Pueyo, L.; N'Diaye, M.; Fogarty, K.; Zimmerman, N.; Leboulleux, L.; St. Laurent, K. E.; Soummer, R.; Shaklan, S.; Norman, C.

    2018-01-01

    Future searches for bio-markers on habitable exoplanets will rely on telescope instruments that achieve extremely high contrast at small planet-to-star angular separations. Coronagraphy is a promising starlight suppression technique, providing excellent contrast and throughput for off-axis sources on clear apertures. However, the complexity of space- and ground-based telescope apertures goes on increasing over time, owing to the combination of primary mirror segmentation, the secondary mirror, and its support structures. These discontinuities in the telescope aperture limit the coronagraph performance. In this paper, we present ACAD-OSM, a novel active method to correct for the diffractive effects of aperture discontinuities in the final image plane of a coronagraph. Active methods use one or several deformable mirrors that are controlled with an interaction matrix to correct for the aberrations in the pupil. However, they are often limited by the amount of aberrations introduced by aperture discontinuities. This algorithm relies on the recalibration of the interaction matrix during the correction process to overcome this limitation. We first describe the ACAD-OSM technique and compare it to the previous active methods for the correction of aperture discontinuities. We then show its performance in terms of contrast and off-axis throughput for static aperture discontinuities (segmentation, struts) and for some aberrations evolving over the life of the instrument (residual phase aberrations, artifacts in the aperture, misalignments in the coronagraph design). This technique can now obtain the Earth-like planet detection threshold of {10}10 contrast on any given aperture over at least a 10% spectral bandwidth, with several coronagraph designs.

  16. A game theory approach for competition and cooperation among project’s subcontractors with interaction activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Hafezalkotob

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Some projects are often performed by many subcontractors that cooperate with each other and some of them are conducted by outsourcing them to several firms; so subcontractors carry out activities in competition. Appropriate trade-off between time and cost and achieving more benefit and cost saving are objectives of both models. In this paper, it is investigated that how different subcontractors of a project can cooperate to achieve more advantages if possible and how sub-contractors can compete to make the results better and find the optimum cost to minimize the time for each of them. The competition here does not mean eliminating a competitor, but the aim is to challenge the contractors in order to choose the best decision. The purpose of this study is to address the challenges in time and cost management and to find more profit allocation among subcontractors and fair competition for fair allocation as well. A model based on cooperative game theory in time/cost trade-off problem of projects is suggested and then a competition model among subcontractors based on non-cooperative game theory is proposed. A case study is rep-resented to comprehensively illustrate the problem, the cooperative techniques of cooperative game theory, and the payoff matrix of non-cooperative model among subcontractors. Results of the proposed model reveal that subcontractors can obtain higher profit from cooperation if pos-sible. When they outsource the project and compete with each other, they must consider the in-teraction activities and choose the best strategies for cost saving and gain more reward from the client. Moreover, it is found that some techniques such as Shapley value, Core, Max-Min Core, or Equal Profit Method (EPM are able to fairly assign extra profit of cooperation, and using the payoff matrix, Nash equilibrium, and Nash bargaining helps to find the optimum point to mini-mize time and cost for interaction activities state.

  17. Taking Up an Active Role: Emerging Participation in Early Mother–Infant Interaction during Peekaboo Routines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Nomikou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical systems approaches to social coordination underscore how participants' local actions give rise to and maintain global interactive patterns and how, in turn, they are also shaped by them. Developmental research can deliver important insights into both processes: (1 the stabilization of ways of interacting, and (2 the gradual shaping of the agentivity of the individuals. In this article we propose that infants' agentivity develops out of participation, i.e., acting a part in an interaction system. To investigate this development this article focuses on the ways in which participation in routinized episodes may shape infant's agentivity in social events. In contrast to existing research addressing more advanced forms of participating in social routines, our goal was to assess infants' early participation as evidence of infants' agentivity. In our study, 19 Polish mother–infant dyads were filmed playing peekaboo when the infants were 4 and 6 months of age. We operationalized infants' participation in the peekaboo in terms of their use of various behaviors across modalities during specific phases of the game: We included smiles, vocalizations, and attempts to cover and uncover themselves or their mothers. We hypothesized that infants and mothers would participate actively in the routine by regulating their behavior so as to adhere to the routine format. Furthermore, we hypothesized that infants who experienced more scaffolding would be able to adopt a more active role in the routine. We operationalized scaffolding as mothers' use of specific peekaboo structures that allowed infants to anticipate when it was their turn to act. Results suggested that infants as young as 4 months of age engaged in peekaboo and took up turns in the game, and that their participation increased at 6 months of age. Crucially, our results suggest that infants' behavior was organized by the global structure of the peekaboo game, because smiles, vocalizations, and

  18. Understanding Trends in Catalytic Activity: The Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions for CO Oxidation Over Transition Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabow, Lars; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2010-01-01

    Using high temperature CO oxidation as the example, trends in the reactivity of transition metals are discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Volcano type relations between the catalytic rate and adsorption energies of important intermediates are introduced...... and the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on the trends is discussed. We find that adsorbate-adsorbate interactions significantly increase the activity of strong binding metals (left side of the volcano) but the interactions do not change the relative activity of different metals and have a very small...... influence on the position of the top of the volcano, that is, on which metal is the best catalyst....

  19. Structural Mutations that Probe the Interactions between the Catalytic and Dianion Activation Sites at Triosephosphate Isomerase‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang; Amyes, Tina L.; Wierenga, Rik K.; Loria, J. Patrick; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The effects of two structural mutations at TIM on the kinetic parameters for catalysis of the reaction of the truncated substrate glycolaldehyde (GA) and the activation of this reaction by phosphite dianion are reported. The P168A mutation results in similar 50-fold and 80-fold decreases, respectively, in (kcat/Km)E and (kcat/Km)E•HPi for deprotonation of GA catalyzed by free TIM and by the TIM•HPO32− complex. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphite dianion binding energy, or on the magnitude of phosphite dianion activation of TIM for catalysis of deprotonation of GA. A loop 7 replacement mutant (L7RM) of TIM from chicken muscle was prepared by substitution of the archaeal sequence 208-TGAG for 208-YGGS. The L7RM exhibits a 25-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E and a larger 170-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E•HPi for reactions of GA. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy, and only a modest effect on phosphite dianion activation of TIM. The observation that both the P168A and loop 7 replacement mutations affect mainly the kinetic parameters for TIM-catalyzed deprotonation, but result in much smaller changes in the parameters for enzyme activation by phosphite dianion provide support for the conclusion that catalysis of proton transfer and dianion activation of TIM take place at separate, weakly interacting, sites in the protein catalyst. PMID:23909928

  20. Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 interacts with SPA1 to suppress COP1 activity in response to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Zuo, Zecheng; Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Xuanming; Lin, Chentao

    2011-01-01

    Plant photoreceptors mediate light suppression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1) to affect gene expression and photomorphogenesis. However, how photoreceptors mediate light regulation of COP1 activity remains unknown. We report here that Arabidopsis blue-light receptor cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) undergoes blue-light-dependent interaction with the COP1-interacting protein SPA1 (SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A). We further show that the CRY1–SPA1 interaction suppresses the SPA1–COP1 interaction and COP1-dependent degradation of the transcription factor HY5. These results are consistent with a hypothesis that photoexcited CRY1 interacts with SPA1 to modulate COP1 activity and plant development. PMID:21511871

  1. Interaction between DRD2 variation and sound environment on mood and emotion-related brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, T; Fasano, M C; Taurisano, P; Fazio, L; Antonucci, L A; Gelao, B; Romano, R; Mancini, M; Porcelli, A; Masellis, R; Pallesen, K J; Bertolino, A; Blasi, G; Brattico, E

    2017-01-26

    Sounds, like music and noise, are capable of reliably affecting individuals' mood and emotions. However, these effects are highly variable across individuals. A putative source of variability is genetic background. Here we explored the interaction between a functional polymorphism of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 rs1076560, G>T, previously associated with the relative expression of D2S/L isoforms) and sound environment on mood and emotion-related brain activity. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were genotyped for DRD2 rs1076560 (G/G=26; G/T=12) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of an implicit emotion-processing task while listening to music or noise. Individual variation in mood induction was assessed before and after the task. Results showed mood improvement after music exposure in DRD2GG subjects and mood deterioration after noise exposure in GT subjects. Moreover, the music, as opposed to noise environment, decreased the striatal activity of GT subjects as well as the prefrontal activity of GG subjects while processing emotional faces. These findings suggest that genetic variability of dopamine receptors affects sound environment modulations of mood and emotion processing. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Retinoblastoma protein directly interacts with and activates the transcription factor NF-IL6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P L; Riley, D J; Chen-Kiang, S; Lee, W H

    1996-01-09

    The biological function of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) in the cell division cycle has been extensively documented, but its apparent role in differentiation remains largely unexplored. To investigate how RB is involved in differentiation, the U937 large-cell lymphoma line was induced to differentiate along a monocyte/macrophage lineage. During differentiation RB was found to interact directly through its simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen)-binding domain with NF-IL6, a member of the CAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors. NF-IL6 utilizes two distinct regions to bind to the hypophosphorylated form of RB in vitro and in cells. Wild-type but not mutant RB enhanced both binding activity of NF-IL6 to its cognate DNA sequences in vitro and promoter transactivation by NF-IL6 in cells. These findings indicate a novel biochemical function of RB: it activates, by an apparent chaperone-like activity, specific transcription factors important for differentiation. This contrasts with its sequestration and inactivation of other transcription factors, such as E2F-1, which promote progression of the cell cycle. Such disparate mechanisms may help to explain the dual role of RB in cell differentiation and the cell division cycle.

  3. Robot- and computer-assisted craniotomy (CRANIO): from active systems to synergistic man-machine interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, V; Follmann, A; Popovic, A; Bast, P; Wu, T; Heger, S; Engelhardt, M; Schmieder, K; Radermacher, K

    2010-01-01

    Computer and robot assistance in craniotomy/craniectomy procedures is intended to increase precision and efficiency of the removal of calvarial tumours, enabling the preoperative design and manufacturing of the corresponding implant. In the framework of the CRANIO project, an active robotic system was developed to automate the milling processes based on a predefined resection planning. This approach allows for a very efficient milling process, but lacks feedback of the intra-operative process to the surgeon. To better integrate the surgeon into the process, a new teleoperated synergistic architecture was designed. This enables the surgeon to realize changes during the procedure and use their human cognitive capabilities. The preoperative planning information is used as guidance for the user interacting with the system through a master-slave architecture. In this article, the CRANIO system is presented together with this new synergistic approach. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the system in active and synergistic modes for the bone milling procedure. The laboratory studies showed the general feasibility of the new concept for the selected medical procedure and determined the accuracy of the system. Although the integration of the surgeon partially reduces the efficiency of the milling process compared with a purely active (automatic) milling, it provides more feedback and flexibility to the user during the intra-operative procedure.

  4. Toward Multimodal Human-Robot Interaction to Enhance Active Participation of Users in Gait Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Kai; Liu, Honghai; Zhang, Dingguo

    2017-11-01

    Robotic exoskeletons for physical rehabilitation have been utilized for retraining patients suffering from paraplegia and enhancing motor recovery in recent years. However, users are not voluntarily involved in most systems. This paper aims to develop a locomotion trainer with multiple gait patterns, which can be controlled by the active motion intention of users. A multimodal human-robot interaction (HRI) system is established to enhance subject's active participation during gait rehabilitation, which includes cognitive HRI (cHRI) and physical HRI (pHRI). The cHRI adopts brain-computer interface based on steady-state visual evoked potential. The pHRI is realized via admittance control based on electromyography. A central pattern generator is utilized to produce rhythmic and continuous lower joint trajectories, and its state variables are regulated by cHRI and pHRI. A custom-made leg exoskeleton prototype with the proposed multimodal HRI is tested on healthy subjects and stroke patients. The results show that voluntary and active participation can be effectively involved to achieve various assistive gait patterns.

  5. Speculative bubbles and crashes in stock markets: an interacting-agent model of speculative activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizoji, Taisei

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we present an interacting-agent model of speculative activity explaining bubbles and crashes in stock markets. We describe stock markets through an infinite-range Ising model to formulate the tendency of traders getting influenced by the investment attitude of other traders. Bubbles and crashes are understood and described qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of the classical phase transitions. When the interactions among traders become stronger and reach some critical values, a second-order phase transition and critical behavior can be observed, and a bull market phase and a bear market phase appear. When the system stays at the bull market phase, speculative bubbles occur in the stock market. For a certain range of the investment environment (the external field), multistability and hysteresis phenomena are observed. When the investment environment reaches some critical values, the rapid changes (the first-order phase transitions) in the distribution of investment attitude are caused. The phase transition from a bull market phase to a bear market phase is considered as a stock market crash. Furthermore, we estimate the parameters of the model using the actual financial data. As an example of large crashes we analyze Japan crisis (the bubble and the subsequent crash in the Japanese stock market in 1987-1992), and show that the good quality of the fits, as well as the consistency of the parameter values are obtained from Japan crisis. The results of the empirical study demonstrate that Japan crisis can be explained quite naturally by the model that bubbles and crashes have their origin in the collective crowd behavior of many interacting agents.

  6. Synthesis of biological active thiosemicarbazone and characterization of the interaction with human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wangshu; Shi, Lei; Hui, Guangquan; Cui, Fengling

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of a new biological active reagent, 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone) aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS), was designed. The interaction between DHAQTS and HSA was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling under simulation of physiological conditions. According to the results of fluorescence measurements, the quenching mechanism was suggested to be static. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the complex. The number of binding sites (n) was calculated. Through the site marker competitive experiment, DHAQTS was confirmed to be located in site I of HSA. The binding distance r=2.83 nm between the donor HSA and acceptor DHAQTS was obtained according to Förster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results showed the conformation and microenvironment of HSA changed in the presence of DHAQTS. The effects of common ions on the binding of DHAQTS to HSA were also evaluated. The experimental results were in agreement with the results obtained via a molecular docking study. - Highlights: ► 2-((1,4-dihydroxy)-9,10-anthraquinone)aldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DHAQTS) was synthesized. ► DHAQTS can quench the fluorescence of human serum albumin (HSA) by static quenching mechanism. ► Hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces. ► The competitive experiment was carried out to identify the DHAQTS binding site on HSA. ► Three-dimensional spectra confirmed DHAQTS caused the conformational change of HSA.

  7. Role of Subunit Exchange and Electrostatic Interactions on the Chaperone Activity of Mycobacterium leprae HSP18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Panda, Alok Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Sinha Ray, Sougata; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae HSP18, a major immunodominant antigen of M. leprae pathogen, is a small heat shock protein. Previously, we reported that HSP18 is a molecular chaperone that prevents aggregation of different chemically and thermally stressed client proteins and assists refolding of denatured enzyme at normal temperature. We also demonstrated that it can efficiently prevent the thermal killing of E. coli at higher temperature. However, molecular mechanism behind the chaperone function of HSP18 is still unclear. Therefore, we studied the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 at normal temperature (25°C) as well as at higher temperatures (31-43°C). Our study revealed that the chaperone function of HSP18 is enhanced significantly with increasing temperature. Far- and near-UV CD experiments suggested that its secondary and tertiary structure remain intact in this temperature range (25-43°C). Besides, temperature has no effect on the static oligomeric size of this protein. Subunit exchange study demonstrated that subunits of HSP18 exchange at 25°C with a rate constant of 0.018 min(-1). Both rate of subunit exchange and chaperone activity of HSP18 is found to increase with rise in temperature. However, the surface hydrophobicity of HSP18 decreases markedly upon heating and has no correlation with its chaperone function in this temperature range. Furthermore, we observed that HSP18 exhibits diminished chaperone function in the presence of NaCl at 25°C. At elevated temperatures, weakening of interactions between HSP18 and stressed client proteins in the presence of NaCl results in greater reduction of its chaperone function. The oligomeric size, rate of subunit exchange and structural stability of HSP18 were also found to decrease when electrostatic interactions were weakened. These results clearly indicated that subunit exchange and electrostatic interactions play a major role in the chaperone function of HSP18.

  8. DMSO containing ruthenium(ii) hydrazone complexes: in vitro evaluation of biomolecular interaction and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, M; Sathyadevi, P; Krishnamoorthy, P; Bhuvanesh, N S P; Dharmaraj, N

    2014-11-14

    Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical and single crystal X-ray diffraction data of a new series of DMSO containing bivalent ruthenium hydrazone complexes are presented. XRD data of two of the new complexes revealed an octahedral coordination around the ruthenium ion satisfied by NOS2Cl2 atoms. Electrochemical studies showed the metal centred, quasi-reversible, one-electron redox behaviour of the new complexes. The binding of these complexes with biomolecules such as calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein investigated by different spectrophotometric methods revealed an intercalative mode of interaction. The in vitro cytotoxicity of these complexes evaluated by the MTT assay on a panel of cancer and normal cell lines indicated that the above complexes are more toxic to cancer cells with a few micromolar concentrations as the IC50 value, but are significantly less toxic to normal cell lines. The observed variations in the binding interactions and cytotoxicity of the complexes were attributed to the nature of the hydrazide moiety of the hydrazones that influences their biological activities.

  9. Interactions between electricity generation sources and economic activity in Greece: A VECM approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, António Cardoso; Fuinhas, José Alberto; Menegaki, Angeliki N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Adjustment dynamics in electricity sources and industrial production are examined. • The Johansen’s method with a conditional VEC model was pursued. • Results confirm endogeneity among variables. • Cointegration relationships for fossil and for renewables sources were founded. • Renewables are less affected by disturbance in economic activity. - Abstract: The interactions between electricity generation sources and industrial production in Greece were analysed from August 2004 to October 2013. Greece has been subject to a tough economic adjustment under external financial assistance guidelines. In the meantime, the country has remained committed to international agreements concerning the use of renewables. The variables interact with each other, and this endogeneity has been analysed using a VECM model. A short-run, causal relationship from conventional fossil sources to economic growth, was proved. However, there is no evidence of causal relationships from renewable electricity to economic growth, either in the short- or long-run. Only economic growth gives rise to renewable electricity, whether in the short- or long-run. A fresh insight on the current state of dynamics between electricity sources within an electricity generation system, is thus added to the literature. These findings will inform energy policymakers in designing policies both to encourage the incorporation of national technology into renewables and to reduce electricity consumption without hampering economic growth

  10. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming, E-mail: qmchen@scu.edu.cn

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  11. Interactive Cell Segmentation Based on Active and Semi-Supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Yin, Zhaozheng; Huh, Seungil; Kanade, Takeo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Automatic cell segmentation can hardly be flawless due to the complexity of image data particularly when time-lapse experiments last for a long time without biomarkers. To address this issue, we propose an interactive cell segmentation method by classifying feature-homogeneous superpixels into specific classes, which is guided by human interventions. Specifically, we propose to actively select the most informative superpixels by minimizing the expected prediction error which is upper bounded by the transductive Rademacher complexity, and then query for human annotations. After propagating the user-specified labels to the remaining unlabeled superpixels via an affinity graph, the error-prone superpixels are selected automatically and request for human verification on them; once erroneous segmentation is detected and subsequently corrected, the information is propagated efficiently over a gradually-augmented graph to un-labeled superpixels such that the analogous errors are fixed meanwhile. The correction propagation step is efficiently conducted by introducing a verification propagation matrix rather than rebuilding the affinity graph and re-performing the label propagation from the beginning. We repeat this procedure until most superpixels are classified into a specific category with high confidence. Experimental results performed on three types of cell populations validate that our interactive cell segmentation algorithm quickly reaches high quality results with minimal human interventions and is significantly more efficient than alternative methods, since the most informative samples are selected for human annotation/verification early.

  12. Applications of snake venom components to modulate integrin activities in cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom proteins are broadly investigated in the different areas of life science. Direct interaction of these compounds with cells may involve a variety of mechanisms that result in diverse cellular responses leading to the activation or blocking of physiological functions of the cell. In this review, the snake venom components interacting with integrins will be characterized in context of their effect on cellular response. Currently, two major families of snake venom proteins are considered as integrin-binding molecules. The most attention has been devoted to the disintegrin family, which binds certain types of integrins through specific motifs recognized as a tri-peptide structurally localized on an integrin-binding loop. Other snake venom integrin-binding proteins belong to the C-type lectin family. Snake venom molecules bind to the cellular integrins resulting in a modulation of cell signaling and in consequence, the regulation of cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Therefore, snake venom research on the integrin-binding molecules may have significance in biomedicine and basic cell biology. PMID:23811033

  13. Interactions between noradrenaline and corticosteroids in the brain: from electrical activity to cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen J Krugers

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the core reactions in response to a stressful situation is the activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis which increases the release of glucocorticoid hormones from the adrenal glands. In concert with other neuro-modulators, such as (noradrenaline, these hormones enable and promote cognitive adaptation to stressful events. Recent studies have demonstrated that glucocorticoid hormones and noradrenaline, via their receptors, can both rapidly and persistently regulate the function of excitatory synapses which are critical for storage of information. Here we will review how glucocorticoids and noradrenaline alone and in synergy dynamically tune these synapses in the hippocampus and amygdala, and discuss how these hormones interact to promote behavioral adaptation to stressful situations.

  14. Interaction of an immunodominant epitope with Ia molecules in T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adorini, L; Sette, A; Buus, S

    1988-01-01

    but not the binding to I-Ed molecules, whereas, as shown by binding data and competition experiments, an Arg----His substitution at position 114 profoundly impairs the capacity of the peptide to interact with I-Ed molecules. In agreement with these results, [Lys113]HEL-(105-120)-peptide but not [His114]HEL-(105......-120)-peptide binds to I-Ed but not to I-Ad molecules. Conservative or semiconservative substitutions at positions 113 (Asn----Lys), 114 (Arg----His), or 115 (Cys----Ala) abrogate the ability of HEL-(105-120) to activate T cells. Substitutions at residues 113 and 115 affect T-cell recognition...

  15. Study on the antioxidant activity and membrane interaction of a multiple antioxidant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jodko-Jodko-Piórecka, Kasia; Klösgen, Beate; Litwinienko, Grzegorz

    Catecholamines, including dopamine, have a role in the transduction of nervous stimuli. Apart from that, they might behave as endogenous phenolic antioxidants protecting the neuronal tissue from deleterious effects of oxidative stress. Results from our preliminary study1 even indicate a synergistic...... effect: an interplay of catecholamines with other molecules seems to enhance their antioxidant activity (e.g. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA -, and 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-hydroxychroman - PMHC -, an analogue of α-tocopherol). Addition of small amounts of catecholamines suppresses or largely...... inhibits the peroxidation of lipids2. The understanding of the mechanism of antioxidant action of catecholamines and their interplay with other antioxidants in lipid membranes requires interdisciplinary research on the kinetics and thermodynamics of antioxidant(s)/membrane interactions. Here we report...

  16. Towards passive and active laser stabilization using cavity-enhanced atomic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäffer, Stefan Alaric; Christensen, Bjarke Takashi Røjle; Rathmann, Stefan Mossor

    2017-01-01

    Ultra stable frequency references such as the ones used in optical atomic clocks and for quantum metrology may be obtained by stabilizing a laser to an optical cavity that is stable over time. State-of-the-art frequency references are constructed in this way, but their stabilities are currently...... experimental efforts derived from these proposals, to use cavity-enhanced interaction with atomic 88Sr samples as a frequency reference for laser stabilization. Such systems can be realized using both passive and active approaches where either the atomic phase response is used as an error signal, or the narrow...... atomic transition itself is used as a source for a spectrally pure laser. Both approaches shows the promise of being able to compete with the current state of the art in stable lasers and have similar limitations on their ultimately achievable linewidths [1, 2]....

  17. Study of the interaction of enzyme Heparanase 1 (HPSE1) active with deoxyribonucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, Gisele da Silva

    2016-01-01

    The human heparanase 1 (HPSE 1) is a protein with multiple functions and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the context of antitumor therapy. This fact is due to its clinical relevance in the tumor development and progression, as determined by their enzymatic ability to degrade heparan sulfate (HS), the main constituent of the extracellular matrix, providing a tumor microenvironment to tumor dissemination. In addition, this protein plays a significant role in the increase of tumor cells migration ionizing radiation dose delivery in radiotherapy from the increase in the expression levels of HPSE1. In order to evaluate in more detail the functions of active HPSE1, it has been proposed to characterize the interaction of human heparanase protein 1 with deoxyribonucleic acids. Our results are original and point to a new function of HPSE1 of the endonuclease type. (author)

  18. Interactive Whiteboard Integration in Classrooms: Active Teachers Understanding about Their Training Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Meritxell Cortada; Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    With the incorporation in education of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), emerges the need for a proper teacher training process due to adequate the integration and the didactic use of this tool in the classroom. This article discusses the teachers' perception on the training process for ICT integration. Its main aim is to contribute to the unification of minimum criteria for effective ICT implementation in any training process for active teachers. This case study begins from the development of a training model called Eduticom which was putted into practice in 4 schools in Catalonia, Spain. Findings indicated different teachers' needs such as an appropriate infrastructure, a proper management and a flexible training model which essentially addresses methodological and didactic aspects of IWB uses in the classroom.

  19. Active Interaction Mapping as a tool to elucidate hierarchical functions of biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Jean-Claude; Kramer, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Subramani, Suresh

    2017-07-03

    Increasingly, various 'omics data are contributing significantly to our understanding of novel biological processes, but it has not been possible to iteratively elucidate hierarchical functions in complex phenomena. We describe a general systems biology approach called Active Interaction Mapping (AI-MAP), which elucidates the hierarchy of functions for any biological process. Existing and new 'omics data sets can be iteratively added to create and improve hierarchical models which enhance our understanding of particular biological processes. The best datatypes to further improve an AI-MAP model are predicted computationally. We applied this approach to our understanding of general and selective autophagy, which are conserved in most eukaryotes, setting the stage for the broader application to other cellular processes of interest. In the particular application to autophagy-related processes, we uncovered and validated new autophagy and autophagy-related processes, expanded known autophagy processes with new components, integrated known non-autophagic processes with autophagy and predict other unexplored connections.

  20. Web interactive non intrusive load disaggregation system for active demand in smart grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Tina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Smart Grid combines the use of traditional technology with innovative digital solutions, making the management of the electricity grid more flexible. It allows for monitoring, analysis, control and communication within the supply chain to improve efficiency, reduce the energy consumption and cost, and maximize the transparency and reliability of the energy supply chain. The optimization of energy consumption in Smart Grids is possible by using an innovative system based on Non Intrusive Appliance Load Monitoring (NIALM algorithms, in which individual appliance power consumption information is disaggregated from single-point measurements, that provide a feedback in such a way to make energy more visible and more amenable to understanding and control. We contribute with an approach for monitoring consumption of electric power in households based on both a NILM algorithm, that uses a simple load signatures, and a web interactive systems that allows an active role played by users.

  1. Partial activation of SA- and JA-defensive pathways in strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO AMIL-RUIZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5 and FaPR10 were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen.

  2. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T.; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  3. Anti-Leishmania activity of new ruthenium(II) complexes: Effect on parasite-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mônica S; Gonçalves, Yasmim G; Nunes, Débora C O; Napolitano, Danielle R; Maia, Pedro I S; Rodrigues, Renata S; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Von Poelhsitz, Gustavo; Yoneyama, Kelly A G

    2017-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. The many complications presented by the current treatment - including high toxicity, high cost and parasite resistance - make the development of new therapeutic agents indispensable. The present study aims to evaluate the anti-Leishmania potential of new ruthenium(II) complexes, cis‑[Ru II (η 2 -O 2 CR)(dppm) 2 ]PF 6 , with dppm=bis(diphenylphosphino)methane and R=4-butylbenzoate (bbato) 1, 4-(methylthio)benzoate (mtbato) 2 and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoate (hmxbato) 3, in promastigote cytotoxicity and their effect on parasite-host interaction. The cytotoxicity of complexes was analyzed by MTT assay against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum promastigotes and the murine macrophage (RAW 264.7). The effect of complexes on parasite-host interaction was evaluated by in vitro infectivity assay performed in the presence of two different concentrations of each complex: the promastigote IC 50 value and the concentration nontoxic to 90% of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Complexes 1-3 exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against all Leishmania species assayed. The IC 50 values ranged from 7.52-12.59μM (complex 1); 0.70-3.28μM (complex 2) and 0.52-1.75μM (complex 3). All complexes significantly inhibited the infectivity index at both tested concentrations. The infectivity inhibitions ranged from 37 to 85%. Interestingly, the infectivity inhibitions due to complex action did not differ significantly at either of the tested concentrations, except for the complex 1 against Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. The infectivity inhibitions resulted from reductions in both percentage of infected macrophages and number of parasites per macrophage. Taken together the results suggest remarkable leishmanicidal activity in vitro by these new ruthenium(II) complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis on the binding interaction of biologically active pyrimidine derivative with bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas D. Suryawanshi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A biologically active antibacterial reagent, 2–amino-6-hydroxy–4–(4-N, N-dimethylaminophenyl-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (AHDMAPPC, was synthesized. It was employed to investigate the binding interaction with the bovine serum albumin (BSA in detail using different spectroscopic methods. It exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus which are common food poisoning bacteria. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of model carrier protein BSA by AHDMAPPC was due to static quenching. The site binding constants and number of binding sites (n≈1 were determined at three different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching results. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH, free energy (ΔG and entropy change (ΔS for the reaction were calculated to be 15.15 kJ/mol, –36.11 kJ/mol and 51.26 J/mol K according to van't Hoff equation, respectively. The results indicated that the reaction was an endothermic and spontaneous process, and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in the binding between drug and BSA. The distance between donor and acceptor is 2.79 nm according to Förster's theory. The alterations of the BSA secondary structure in the presence of AHDMAPPC were confirmed by UV–visible, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. All these results indicated that AHDMAPPC can bind to BSA and be effectively transported and eliminated in the body. It can be a useful guideline for further drug design.

  5. The Solar Wind and Geomagnetic Activity as a Function of Time Relative to Corotating Interaction Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Weygand, James

    2006-01-01

    Corotating interaction regions during the declining phase of the solar cycle are the cause of recurrent geomagnetic storms and are responsible for the generation of high fluxes of relativistic electrons. These regions are produced by the collision of a high-speed stream of solar wind with a slow-speed stream. The interface between the two streams is easily identified with plasma and field data from a solar wind monitor upstream of the Earth. The properties of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are systematic functions of time relative to the stream interface. Consequently the coupling of the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere produces a predictable sequence of events. Because the streams persist for many solar rotations it should be possible to use terrestrial observations of past magnetic activity to predict future activity. Also the high-speed streams are produced by large unipolar magnetic regions on the Sun so that empirical models can be used to predict the velocity profile of a stream expected at the Earth. In either case knowledge of the statistical properties of the solar wind and geomagnetic activity as a function of time relative to a stream interface provides the basis for medium term forecasting of geomagnetic activity. In this report we use lists of stream interfaces identified in solar wind data during the years 1995 and 2004 to develop probability distribution functions for a variety of different variables as a function of time relative to the interface. The results are presented as temporal profiles of the quartiles of the cumulative probability distributions of these variables. We demonstrate that the storms produced by these interaction regions are generally very weak. Despite this the fluxes of relativistic electrons produced during those storms are the highest seen in the solar cycle. We attribute this to the specific sequence of events produced by the organization of the solar wind relative to the stream interfaces. We also

  6. Interactive Mapping of the Planets: An Online Activity Using the Google Earth Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.; Gilbert, A.; Harrison, T. N.; Mader, M. M.; Shankar, B.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    With funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada's PromoScience program and support from the Department of Earth Sciences at The University of Western Ontario, the Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration (CPSX) has developed a new web-based initiative called Interactive Mapping of the Planets (IMAPS). Additional components include in person school visits to deliver inquiry-based workshops, week-long summer camps, and pre-prepared impact rock lending kits, all framed around the IMAPS activity. IMAPS will is now in beta testing mode and will be demonstrated in this session. The general objective of the online activity is for participants to plan and design a rover mission to Mars based on a given mission goal - e.g., to find evidence for past water flow. The activity begins with participants receiving image-analysis training to learn about the different landforms on Mars and which ones are potentially caused by water flow. They then need to pass a short test to show they can consistently identify Martian landforms. From there, the participants choose a landing site and plan a traverse - utilizing the free Google Earth plug-in - and taking into account factors such as hazards and their sites of interest. A mission control blog will provide updates on the status of their mission and a 'choose your rover' option provides the opportunity to unlock more advanced rovers by collaborating with other scientists and rating their missions. Indeed, evaluation of missions will be done using a crowd-sourcing method. In addition to being fully accessible online, CPSX will also target primary- and secondary-school grades in which astronomy and space science is taught. Teachers in K-12 classrooms will be able to sign-up for the activity ahead of time in order to receive a workshop package, which will guide them on how to use the IMAPS online activity with their class. Teachers will be able to set up groups for their classroom so that they can

  7. Manipulation of Intermolecular Interactions for Active Layer Morphology Optimization in Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, Leonel

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are an attractive solar energy technology for low-current applications. Herein is described the supramolecular design and methodology to manipulate intermolecular interactions in order to create an active layer in OPVs devices composed of crystalline and amorphous donor-acceptor domains, which has been proposed as the ideal morphology for high performance. To this end, a series of symmetric and asymmetric diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives containing either an amide (capable of hydrogen-bonding) or ester endgroups were synthesized. The symmetric designs faced problems with solubility, strong segregation and low performance, so asymmetric donors having one amide/ester were used. Upon addressing initial stability problems, analysis of the ester films with X-ray diffraction displayed greater crystallinity and pi-pi stacking. The amide formed short aggregates with smaller, less ordered domains, resulting from competition between hydrogen bonding and pi-pi stacking, which interestingly endowed devices with higher current and 50% increase in device efficiency over the ester. To better match solar emission, the DPP core was substituted by benzodithiophene (BDT). Amides again outperformed esters, but introduction of a benzothiadiazole ?-spacer between the amide/ester endgroups led to electron traps and lowered performance; replacing it with phenyldithiophene reduced stacking ability. A recurring issue was the competition between noncovalent interactions, which motivated the use of barbituric acid endgroups, but solubility was compromised. After addressing each problem, a design having a BDT core with planar ?-spacers, connected by an alkyl linker to the hydrogen-bonding endgroups is predicted to display optimized optoelectronic properties and cooperative noncovalent interaction. Next, a series of BDT-core molecules with DPP endgroups and alkyl tails resembling solvent additives (which improve donor-acceptor interaction but increase

  8. Inhibition of AmpC beta-lactamase through a destabilizing interaction in the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trehan, I.; Beadle, B.M.; Shoichet, B.K. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    {beta}-Lactamases hydrolyze {beta}-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins; these enzymes are the most widespread resistance mechanism to these drugs and pose a growing threat to public health. {beta}-Lactams that contain a bulky 6(7){alpha} substituent, such as imipenem and moxalactam, actually inhibit serine {beta}-lactamases and are widely used for this reason. Although mutant serine {beta}-lactamases have arisen that hydrolyze {beta}-lactamase resistant {beta}-lactams (e.g., ceftazidime) or avoid mechanism-based inhibitors (e.g., clavulanate), mutant serine {beta}-lactamases have not yet arisen in the clinic with imipenemase or moxalactamase activity. Structural and thermodynamic studies suggest that the 6(7){alpha} substituents of these inhibitors form destabilizing contacts within the covalent adduct with the conserved Asn152 in class C {beta}-lactamases (Asn132 in class A {beta}-lactamases). This unfavorable interaction may be crucial to inhibition. To test this destabilization hypothesis, we replaced Asn152 with Ala in the class C {beta}-lactamase AmpC from Escherichia coli and examined the mutant enzyme's thermodynamic stability in complex with imipenem and moxalactam. Consistent with the hypothesis, the Asn152 {yields} Ala substitution relieved 0.44 and 1.10 kcal/mol of strain introduced by imipenem and moxalactam, respectively, relative to the wild-type complexes. However, the kinetic efficiency of AmpC N152A was reduced by 6300-fold relative to that of the wild-type enzyme. To further investigate the inhibitor's interaction with the mutant enzyme, the X-ray crystal structure of moxalactam in complex with N152A was determined to a resolution of 1.83 {angstrom}. Moxalactam in the mutant complex is significantly displaced from its orientation in the wild-type complex; however, moxalactam does not adopt an orientation that would restore competence for hydrolysis. Although Asn152 forces {beta}-lactams with 6(7){alpha

  9. Interactive effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and food quality on zooplankton alkaline phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Laura; Modenutti, Beatriz; Souza, Maria Sol; Balseiro, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) is a stressor for aquatic organisms affecting enzyme activities in planktonic populations because of the increase in reactive oxygen species. In addition, UVR exposure combined with other environmental factors (i.e. temperature and food quality) could have even higher detrimental effects. In this work, we aimed to determine the effect of UVR on somatic Alkaline Phosphatase Activity (APA) and Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity on the cladoceran Daphnia commutata under two different temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and under three food qualities (carbon:phosphorus ratios: 1150, 850 and 550). APA is a biomarker that is considered as a P deficiency indicator in zooplankton. Since recovery from UVR damage under dark conditions is an ATP depending reaction we also measured APA during recovery phases. We carried out a laboratory experiment combining different temperatures and food qualities with exposition to UVR followed by luminic and dark phases for recovery. In addition, we exposed organisms to H2O2, to establish if the response on APA to UVR was a consequence of the reactive oxygen species produced these short wavelengths. Our results showed that somatic APA was negatively affected by UVR exposure and this effect was enhanced under high temperature and low food quality. Consistently, GST activity was higher when exposed to UVR under both temperatures. The H2O2 experiments showed the same trend as UVR exposure, indicating that APA is affected mainly by oxidative stress than by direct effect of UVR on the enzyme. Finally, APA was affected in the dark phase of recovery confirming the P demands. These results enlighten the importance of food quality in the interacting effect of UVR and temperature, showing that C:P food ratio could determine the success or failure of zooplanktonic populations in a context of global change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in generalized aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yalin; Lu, Ruifang; Meng, Huanxin; Wang, Xian'e; Hou, Jianxia

    2016-11-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is an inflammatory disease of host response to bacterial challenge. To explore the role of platelets in host-microbial interactions in patients with periodontitis, 124 patients with GAgP and 57 healthy subjects were enrolled. Reliable indicators of subclinical platelet functional status, platelet count (PLT), platelet large cell ratio (PLCR), and mean platelet volume (MPV), were significantly lower in the GAgP group than in the control group and were negatively correlated with clinical periodontal parameters. The levels of important cytosolic protein in neutrophils, calprotectin (S100A8/A9) in plasma, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were significantly higher in patients with GAgP compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, the GCF calprotectin level was negatively correlated with PLCR and MPV values. To explore the possible mechanisms of changes in platelet indices in periodontitis, flow cytometry analysis was performed, and patients with GAgP were found to have a higher status of platelet activation compared with healthy controls. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and recombinant human S100A8/A9 (rhS100A8/A9) induced platelet activation and facilitated platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation in whole blood of healthy subjects. In response to P. gingivalis and rhS100A8/A9, platelets from patients with GAgP increased activation and increased formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates compared with those from healthy subjects. Platelet aggregates and platelets attached to leukocytes were found on gingival tissues from patients with GAgP, suggesting that decreased platelet size and count in the circulation might be related to consumption of large, activated platelets at inflamed gingiva. Platelets may have a previously unrecognized role in host response to periodontal infection. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/endo180 is coexpressed with its interaction partners urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and matrix metalloprotease-13 during osteogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, L H; Nielsen, B S; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180 (uPARAP/Endo180) is a newly discovered member of the macrophage mannose receptor family that was reported to interact with ligand-bound urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP-13), and ...

  12. Interactive Whiteboards and All that Jazz: The Contribution of Musical Metaphors to the Analysis of Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gary; Kennewell, Steve; Tanner, Howard; Jones, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    The teacher's role has often been described as one of "orchestration", and this musical analogy is a powerful one in characterising the manipulation of features in the classroom setting in order to generate activity or "performance" which leads to learning. However, a classical view of orchestration would fail to recognise the extent to which…

  13. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  14. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L. (UW-MED); (UCB)

    2015-04-22

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  15. Applied neuroanatomy elective to reinforce and promote engagement with neurosensory pathways using interactive and artistic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Vinh; Yeh, Pon-Hsiu; Vogel, Kristine S; Moore, Charleen M

    2015-01-01

    One in six Americans is currently affected by neurologic disease. As the United States population ages, the number of neurologic complaints is expected to increase. Thus, there is a pressing need for more neurologists as well as more neurology training in other specialties. Often interest in neurology begins during medical school, so improving education in medical neural courses is a critical step toward producing more neurologists and better neurology training in other specialists. To this end, a novel applied neuroanatomy elective was designed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to complement the traditional first-year medical neuroscience course and promote engagement and deep learning of the material with a focus on neurosensory pathways. The elective covered four neurosensory modalities (proprioception/balance, vision, auditory, and taste/olfaction) over four sessions, each with a short classroom component and a much longer activity component. At each session, students reviewed the neurosensory pathways through structured presentations and then applied them to preplanned interactive activities, many of which allowed students to utilize their artistic talents. Students were required to complete subjective pre-course and post-course surveys and reflections. The survey results and positive student comments suggest that the elective was a valuable tool when used in parallel with the traditional medical neuroscience course in promoting engagement and reinforcement of the neurosensory material. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  17. Interactions between Lactobacillus sakei and CNC (Staphylococcus xylosus and Kocuria varians) and their influence on proteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremonte, P; Reale, A; Di Renzo, T; Tipaldi, L; Di Luccia, A; Coppola, R; Sorrentino, E; Succi, M

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate interactions between Lactobacillus sakei and coagulase negative cocci (CNC) (Staphylococcus xylosus and Kocuria varians) and to investigate the influence of these interactions on their own proteolytic activity. Interactions occurring between strains of Lact. sakei and CNC were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis. The growth of 35 strains of Lact. sakei, used as indicators, was compared to that obtained combining the same strains with growing cells or cell-free supernatants of 20 CNC (18 Staph. xylosus and 2 K. varians). The proteolytic activity expressed by single strains or by their combinations was assessed on sarcoplasmic protein extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results evidenced that interactions are able to affect not only the growth but also the in vitro proteolytic activity of Lact. sakei and CNC used in combination. A relationship between the presence of interactions among useful strains and the strength of technological characteristics, such as proteolysis, was defined. The study highlighted that CNC are able to stimulate the growth of some Lact. sakei strains. At the same time, this interaction positively influences the proteolytic activity of strains used in combination. Given the importance of proteolysis during the ripening of fermented meats, this phenomenon should be taken into account to select meat starter cultures. © 2010 The Authors. © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. The influence of the interactions between anthropogenic activities and multiple ecological factors on land surface temperatures of urban forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Context Land surface temperatures (LSTs) spatio-temporal distribution pattern of urban forests are influenced by many ecological factors; the identification of interaction between these factors can improve simulations and predictions of spatial patterns of urban cold islands. This quantitative research requires an integrated method that combines multiple sources data with spatial statistical analysis. Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify urban forest LST influence interaction between anthropogenic activities and multiple ecological factors using cluster analysis of hot and cold spots and Geogdetector model. We introduced the hypothesis that anthropogenic activity interacts with certain ecological factors, and their combination influences urban forests LST. We also assumed that spatio-temporal distributions of urban forest LST should be similar to those of ecological factors and can be represented quantitatively. Methods We used Jinjiang as a representative city in China as a case study. Population density was employed to represent anthropogenic activity. We built up a multi-source data (forest inventory, digital elevation models (DEM), population, and remote sensing imagery) on a unified urban scale to support urban forest LST influence interaction research. Through a combination of spatial statistical analysis results, multi-source spatial data, and Geogdetector model, the interaction mechanisms of urban forest LST were revealed. Results Although different ecological factors have different influences on forest LST, in two periods with different hot spots and cold spots, the patch area and dominant tree species were the main factors contributing to LST clustering in urban forests. The interaction between anthropogenic activity and multiple ecological factors increased LST in urban forest stands, linearly and nonlinearly. Strong interactions between elevation and dominant species were generally observed and were prevalent in either hot or cold spots

  19. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  20. SUMO-interacting motifs of human TRIM5α are important for antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Arriagada

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human TRIM5α potently restricts particular strains of murine leukemia viruses (the so-called N-tropic strains but not others (the B- or NB-tropic strains during early stages of infection. We show that overexpression of SUMO-1 in human 293T cells, but not in mouse MDTF cells, profoundly blocks N-MLV infection. This block is dependent on the tropism of the incoming virus, as neither B-, NB-, nor the mutant R110E of N-MLV CA (a B-tropic switch are affected by SUMO-1 overexpression. The block occurred prior to reverse transcription and could be abrogated by large amounts of restricted virus. Knockdown of TRIM5α in 293T SUMO-1-overexpressing cells resulted in ablation of the SUMO-1 antiviral effects, and this loss of restriction could be restored by expression of a human TRIM5α shRNA-resistant plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis of human TRIM5α revealed a consensus SUMO conjugation site at the N-terminus and three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs in the B30.2 domain. Mutations of the TRIM5α consensus SUMO conjugation site did not affect the antiviral activity of TRIM5α in any of the cell types tested. Mutation of the SIM consensus sequences, however, abolished TRIM5α antiviral activity against N-MLV. Mutation of lysines at a potential site of SUMOylation in the CA region of the Gag gene reduced the SUMO-1 block and the TRIM5α restriction of N-MLV. Our data suggest a novel aspect of TRIM5α-mediated restriction, in which the presence of intact SIMs in TRIM5α, and also the SUMO conjugation of CA, are required for restriction. We propose that at least a portion of the antiviral activity of TRIM5α is mediated through the binding of its SIMs to SUMO-conjugated CA.

  1. Collaborative filtering for brain-computer interaction using transfer learning and active class selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongrui Wu

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interaction (BCI and physiological computing are terms that refer to using processed neural or physiological signals to influence human interaction with computers, environment, and each other. A major challenge in developing these systems arises from the large individual differences typically seen in the neural/physiological responses. As a result, many researchers use individually-trained recognition algorithms to process this data. In order to minimize time, cost, and barriers to use, there is a need to minimize the amount of individual training data required, or equivalently, to increase the recognition accuracy without increasing the number of user-specific training samples. One promising method for achieving this is collaborative filtering, which combines training data from the individual subject with additional training data from other, similar subjects. This paper describes a successful application of a collaborative filtering approach intended for a BCI system. This approach is based on transfer learning (TL, active class selection (ACS, and a mean squared difference user-similarity heuristic. The resulting BCI system uses neural and physiological signals for automatic task difficulty recognition. TL improves the learning performance by combining a small number of user-specific training samples with a large number of auxiliary training samples from other similar subjects. ACS optimally selects the classes to generate user-specific training samples. Experimental results on 18 subjects, using both k nearest neighbors and support vector machine classifiers, demonstrate that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the number of user-specific training data samples. This collaborative filtering approach will also be generalizable to handling individual differences in many other applications that involve human neural or physiological data, such as affective computing.

  2. Interactive effects of water quality, physical habitat, and watershed anthropogenic activities on stream ecosystem health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hehuan; Sarver, Emily; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H

    2018-03-01

    Ecological degradation of streams remains a major environmental concern worldwide. While stream restoration has received considerable attention, mitigation efforts focused on the improvement of physical habitat have not proven completely effective. Several small-scale studies have emphasized that effective restoration strategies require a more holistic understanding of the variables at play, although the generalization of the findings based on the small-scale studies remains unclear. Using a comprehensive statewide stream monitoring database from West Virginia (WV), a detailed landscape dataset, and a machine learning algorithm, this study explores the interactive impacts of water quality and physical habitat on stream ecosystem health as indicated by benthic macroinvertebrate scores. Given the long history of energy extraction in this region (i.e., coal mining and oil/gas production), investigation of energy extraction influences is highlighted. Our results demonstrate that a combination of good habitat and low specific conductance is generally associated with favorable benthic macroinvertebrate scores, whereas poor habitat combined with water quality conditions typically indicative of high ionic strength are associated with impaired stream status. In addition, streams impacted by both energy extraction and residential development had a higher percentage of impairment compared to those impacted predominantly by energy extraction or residential development alone. While water quality played a more important role in the ecosystem health of streams impacted primarily by energy extraction activities, habitat seems to be more influential in streams impacted by residential development. Together, these findings emphasize that stream restoration strategies should consider interactive effects of multiple environmental stressors tailored to specific sites or site types - as opposed to considering a single stressor or multiple stressors separately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  3. Collaborative filtering for brain-computer interaction using transfer learning and active class selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongrui; Lance, Brent J; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction (BCI) and physiological computing are terms that refer to using processed neural or physiological signals to influence human interaction with computers, environment, and each other. A major challenge in developing these systems arises from the large individual differences typically seen in the neural/physiological responses. As a result, many researchers use individually-trained recognition algorithms to process this data. In order to minimize time, cost, and barriers to use, there is a need to minimize the amount of individual training data required, or equivalently, to increase the recognition accuracy without increasing the number of user-specific training samples. One promising method for achieving this is collaborative filtering, which combines training data from the individual subject with additional training data from other, similar subjects. This paper describes a successful application of a collaborative filtering approach intended for a BCI system. This approach is based on transfer learning (TL), active class selection (ACS), and a mean squared difference user-similarity heuristic. The resulting BCI system uses neural and physiological signals for automatic task difficulty recognition. TL improves the learning performance by combining a small number of user-specific training samples with a large number of auxiliary training samples from other similar subjects. ACS optimally selects the classes to generate user-specific training samples. Experimental results on 18 subjects, using both k nearest neighbors and support vector machine classifiers, demonstrate that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the number of user-specific training data samples. This collaborative filtering approach will also be generalizable to handling individual differences in many other applications that involve human neural or physiological data, such as affective computing.

  4. Collaborative Filtering for Brain-Computer Interaction Using Transfer Learning and Active Class Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongrui; Lance, Brent J.; Parsons, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction (BCI) and physiological computing are terms that refer to using processed neural or physiological signals to influence human interaction with computers, environment, and each other. A major challenge in developing these systems arises from the large individual differences typically seen in the neural/physiological responses. As a result, many researchers use individually-trained recognition algorithms to process this data. In order to minimize time, cost, and barriers to use, there is a need to minimize the amount of individual training data required, or equivalently, to increase the recognition accuracy without increasing the number of user-specific training samples. One promising method for achieving this is collaborative filtering, which combines training data from the individual subject with additional training data from other, similar subjects. This paper describes a successful application of a collaborative filtering approach intended for a BCI system. This approach is based on transfer learning (TL), active class selection (ACS), and a mean squared difference user-similarity heuristic. The resulting BCI system uses neural and physiological signals for automatic task difficulty recognition. TL improves the learning performance by combining a small number of user-specific training samples with a large number of auxiliary training samples from other similar subjects. ACS optimally selects the classes to generate user-specific training samples. Experimental results on 18 subjects, using both nearest neighbors and support vector machine classifiers, demonstrate that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the number of user-specific training data samples. This collaborative filtering approach will also be generalizable to handling individual differences in many other applications that involve human neural or physiological data, such as affective computing. PMID:23437188

  5. Active learning in Operations Management: interactive multimedia software for teaching JIT/Lean Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Medina-López

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Information & Communication Technologies (ICT can be a fundamental aid for the design of new teaching methods that better adapt to the framework of the European Higher Education Area. In this context, this study aims to develop and assess a complex and truly interactive ICT-based teaching tool for instruction in OM.Design/methodology/approach: A multimedia application for Just-in-Time (JIT / Lean Production has been conceived, designed and assessed. A constructivist focus was followed in its conception and design to encourage active and flexible learning adapted to each individual’s own requirements. Using empirical research the tool has been assessed by students and compared to the traditional teaching methods.Findings: The interactive multimedia application has been clearly valued for the way it conveys information and for its usability, for the way the application is structured and the improvements to students’ understanding of the knowledge. Students are also in favour of ICT being incorporated into teaching over more traditional methods. The assessment took students’ gender and the average overall mark on their academic records as control variables but, broadly-speaking, no significant differences were found. Research limitations/implications: The study was carried out in a controlled environment and not in the normal on-site university teaching process. Conclusions could be extended to OM and other related subjects, especially if they make use of similar tools to the one described in this paper. Practical implications: This study provides a contribution that allows reflections to be made on the design of specific software for OM and students’ perceptions when using it.Originality/value: Through this paper we contribute to an improvement in learning methods in general and to higher education in OM in particular.

  6. Impacts of manganese mining activity on the environment: interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Becerril, Facundo; Juárez-Vázquez, Lucía V; Hernández-Cervantes, Saúl C; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Vela-Correa, Gilberto; Cruz-Chávez, Enrique; Moreno-Espíndola, Iván P; Esquivel-Herrera, Alfonso; de León-González, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    The mining district of Molango in the Hidalgo State, Mexico, possesses one of the largest deposits of manganese (Mn) ore in the world. This research assessed the impacts of Mn mining activity on the environment, particularly the interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) at a location under the influence of an open Mn mine. Soils and plants from three sites (soil under maize, soil under native vegetation, and mine wastes with some vegetation) were analyzed. Available Mn in both soil types and mine wastes did not reach toxic levels. Samples of the two soil types were similar regarding physical, chemical, and biological properties; mine wastes were characterized by poor physical structure, nutrient deficiencies, and a decreased number of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) spores. Tissues of six plant species accumulated Mn at normal levels. AM was absent in the five plant species (Ambrosia psilostachya, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Cynodon dactylon, Polygonum hydropiperoides, and Wigandia urens) established in mine wastes, which was consistent with the significantly lower number of AMF spores compared with both soil types. A. psilostachya (native vegetation) and Zea mays showed mycorrhizal colonization in their root systems; in the former, AM significantly decreased Mn uptake. The following was concluded: (1) soils, mine wastes, and plant tissues did not accumulate Mn at toxic levels; (2) despite its poor physical structure and nutrient deficiencies, the mine waste site was colonized by at least five plant species; (3) plants growing in both soil types interacted with AMF; and (4) mycorrhizal colonization of A. psilostachya influenced low uptake of Mn by plant tissues.

  7. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis to predict drug-drug interactions of ABC transporter ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Hirano, H; Saito, H; Sano, K; Ikegami, Y; Yamaotsu, N; Hirono, S

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a practical approach by which chemical structure is quantitatively correlated with biological activity or chemical reactivity. Human ABC transporter ABCG2 exhibits broad substrate specificity toward structurally diverse compounds. To gain insight into the relationship between the molecular structures of compounds and the interaction with ABCG2, we have developed an algorithm that analyzes QSAR to evaluate ABCG2-drug interactions. In addition, to support QSAR analysis, we developed a high-speed screening method for analyzing the drug-drug interactions of ABCG2. Based on both experimental results and computational QSAR analysis data, we propose a hypothetical mechanism underlying ABC-mediated drug transport and its interaction with drugs.

  8. Physical human-robot interaction of an active pelvis orthosis: toward ergonomic assessment of wearable robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Elia, Nicolò; Vanetti, Federica; Cempini, Marco; Pasquini, Guido; Parri, Andrea; Rabuffetti, Marco; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Molino Lova, Raffaele; Vitiello, Nicola

    2017-04-14

    In human-centered robotics, exoskeletons are becoming relevant for addressing needs in the healthcare and industrial domains. Owing to their close interaction with the user, the safety and ergonomics of these systems are critical design features that require systematic evaluation methodologies. Proper transfer of mechanical power requires optimal tuning of the kinematic coupling between the robotic and anatomical joint rotation axes. We present the methods and results of an experimental evaluation of the physical interaction with an active pelvis orthosis (APO). This device was designed to effectively assist in hip flexion-extension during locomotion with a minimum impact on the physiological human kinematics, owing to a set of passive degrees of freedom for self-alignment of the human and robotic hip flexion-extension axes. Five healthy volunteers walked on a treadmill at different speeds without and with the APO under different levels of assistance. The user-APO physical interaction was evaluated in terms of: (i) the deviation of human lower-limb joint kinematics when wearing the APO with respect to the physiological behavior (i.e., without the APO); (ii) relative displacements between the APO orthotic shells and the corresponding body segments; and (iii) the discrepancy between the kinematics of the APO and the wearer's hip joints. The results show: (i) negligible interference of the APO in human kinematics under all the experimented conditions; (ii) small (i.e., body segments (called stability); and (iii) significant increment in the human-robot kinematics discrepancy at the hip flexion-extension joint associated with speed and assistance level increase. APO mechanics and actuation have negligible interference in human locomotion. Human kinematics was not affected by the APO under all tested conditions. In addition, under all tested conditions, there was no relevant relative displacement between the orthotic cuffs and the corresponding anatomical segments

  9. Cytotoxicity, radiosensitization, antitumor activity, and interaction with hyperthermia of a Co(III) mustard complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicher, B A; Abrams, M J; Rosbe, K W; Herman, T S

    1990-11-01

    A complex of Co(III) with a nitro group and a bis(2-chloroethyl)amine moiety was prepared in an effort to develop a new anticancer agent with radiosensitizing capabilities, direct antitumor activity, and the ability to interact positively with clinically relevant hyperthermia temperatures. The activity of this drug was compared to a similar Co(III) complex, nitro-bis(2,4-pentanedionato)(pyridine)cobalt(III) [Co(Py)], which bears a pyridine moiety mustard of bis(2-chloroethyl)amine and should have no alkylating abilities. In EMT6 cells nitro-bis(2,4- pentanedionato)(bis(2-chloroethyl)amine)cobalt(III) [Co(BCA)] was significantly more cytotoxic than Co(Py) and both drugs were more toxic toward normally oxygenated than hypoxic cells. Hyperthermia (42 degrees C, 1 h) increased the slope of the concentration-dependent survival curve for Co(BCA) but not for Co(Py) in normally oxygenated EMT6 cells. Co(BCA) was an effective radiosensitizer of hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro, producing a dose-modifying factor of 2.40. In the human squamous cell line SCC-25 and the nitrogen mustard-resistant subline SCC-25/HN2 Co(BCA) was more cytotoxic than Co(Py), and the lethality of Co(BCA) was only minimally diminished in the SCC-25/HN2 line. In mice bearing the L1210 leukemia i.p., Co(BCA) had a broad range of therapeutically effective dosage and produced a greater than 60-day increase in life span at a dose 20-fold less than was lethally toxic. In addition, in the FSaIIC murine fibrosarcoma, Co(BCA) produced a tumor growth delay of 9.4 days at 75 mg/kg i.p. daily x 5, but Co(Py) produced a delay of only 2.9 days at 50 mg/kg daily x 5 and was lethally toxic above this dose. These results indicate that Co(BCA) has significant antineoplastic effects in vitro and in vivo and interacts positively with both radiation and mild hyperthermia. Its broad therapeutic dose range further suggests potential clinical utility.

  10. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia.

  11. Starting a Conversation: Engaging Scientists with the Public through Interactive Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    While demonstrations are a handy tool, research shows conversations are an even more effective way to have a lasting impact. UNAVCO joined the Portal to the Public Network (PoPNet) in March 2016 to offer PoPNet-style hands-on communication training to the geodetic scientific community. Portal to the Public is a system of professional development tools designed to better connect scientists and the public in positive dialogue, in informal education settings such as museums. The framework focuses not on one-way messaging, but on conversations. PoPNet is the network of museums and other institutions implementing PoP training. UNAVCO developed and launched a pilot program in summer 2016 with a cohort of graduate students. In the PoPNet model, museums bring local scientists to the museum to learn about and practice science communication to the general public. UNAVCO does not have a museum but rather is an international community of geoscientists who can receive training on informal communications and then practice their skills at a museum local to them. The skills learned are useful in communicating science not only to the public, but also to policy makers, funders, and anyone outside the immediate scientific discipline. Developing communications skills also encourages scientists to think more holistically about their research and its impacts.In the 2016 pilot program, UNAVCO offered a seven-week workshop to UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP) interns. The students spent two hours per week working on communication skills through hands-on activities and discussions, and developed tabletop activities based on their research. These tabletop activities are hands-on demonstrations of scientific concepts such as tsunami early warning and volcano deformation designed for interaction rather than one-way show-and-tell. The program culminated in an evening with the tabletop activities at the Boulder County Farmers Market. All six participating interns indicated on the exit

  12. Gene × physical activity interactions in obesity: combined analysis of 111,421 individuals of European ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Ahmad

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity loci have been identified using genome-wide association studies. A UK study indicated that physical activity may attenuate the cumulative effect of 12 of these loci, but replication studies are lacking. Therefore, we tested whether the aggregate effect of these loci is diminished in adults of European ancestry reporting high levels of physical activity. Twelve obesity-susceptibility loci were genotyped or imputed in 111,421 participants. A genetic risk score (GRS was calculated by summing the BMI-associated alleles of each genetic variant. Physical activity was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Multiplicative interactions between the GRS and physical activity on BMI were tested in linear and logistic regression models in each cohort, with adjustment for age, age(2, sex, study center (for multicenter studies, and the marginal terms for physical activity and the GRS. These results were combined using meta-analysis weighted by cohort sample size. The meta-analysis yielded a statistically significant GRS × physical activity interaction effect estimate (Pinteraction  = 0.015. However, a statistically significant interaction effect was only apparent in North American cohorts (n = 39,810, Pinteraction  = 0.014 vs. n = 71,611, Pinteraction  = 0.275 for Europeans. In secondary analyses, both the FTO rs1121980 (Pinteraction  = 0.003 and the SEC16B rs10913469 (Pinteraction  = 0.025 variants showed evidence of SNP × physical activity interactions. This meta-analysis of 111,421 individuals provides further support for an interaction between physical activity and a GRS in obesity disposition, although these findings hinge on the inclusion of cohorts from North America, indicating that these results are either population-specific or non-causal.

  13. Correlation and interaction visualization of altmetric indicators extracted from scholarly social network activities: dimensions and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun Li; Xu, Yue Quan; Wu, Hui; Chen, Si Si; Guo, Ji Jun

    2013-11-25

    Citation counts for peer-reviewed articles and the impact factor of journals have long been indicators of article importance or quality. In the Web 2.0 era, growing numbers of scholars are using scholarly social network tools to communicate scientific ideas with colleagues, thereby making traditional indicators less sufficient, immediate, and comprehensive. In these new situations, the altmetric indicators offer alternative measures that reflect the multidimensional nature of scholarly impact in an immediate, open, and individualized way. In this direction of research, some studies have demonstrated the correlation between altmetrics and traditional metrics with different samples. However, up to now, there has been relatively little research done on the dimension and interaction structure of altmetrics. Our goal was to reveal the number of dimensions that altmetric indicators should be divided into and the structure in which altmetric indicators interact with each other. Because an article-level metrics dataset is collected from scholarly social media and open access platforms, it is one of the most robust samples available to study altmetric indicators. Therefore, we downloaded a large dataset containing activity data in 20 types of metrics present in 33,128 academic articles from the application programming interface website. First, we analyzed the correlation among altmetric indicators using Spearman rank correlation. Second, we visualized the multiple correlation coefficient matrixes with graduated colors. Third, inputting the correlation matrix, we drew an MDS diagram to demonstrate the dimension for altmetric indicators. For correlation structure, we used a social network map to represent the social relationships and the strength of relations. We found that the distribution of altmetric indicators is significantly non-normal and positively skewed. The distribution of downloads and page views follows the Pareto law. Moreover, we found that the Spearman

  14. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin, E-mail: martin.ehrenschwender@ukr.de

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  15. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves

  16. Consumption of dietary caffeine and coffee in physically active populations: physiological interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Reimer, Raylene A; Lun, Victor; Shearer, Jane

    2008-12-01

    Caffeine is a proven ergogenic aid, increasing athletic performance, endurance, and mental chronometry at doses as low as 1-3 mg.kg-1. As coffee is a readily available and commonly ingested form of caffeine, the two are often equated. However, coffee also contains hundreds of other biologically active compounds, many of which are metabolically distinct from caffeine. The purpose of this review was to examine the prevalence of coffee and (or) caffeine consumption among elite Canadian athletes, and to delineate the effects of coffee and caffeine on physical activity, weight maintenance, performance, and metabolism. A total of 270 self-reported 3-day food records were examined for caffeine intake from athletes registered with Canadian Sport Centres in 2005 and 2006. Athletes ranged in age from 16-45 years, and competed in 38 different sports. Results showed that 30% of athletes ingested >1 mg.kg-1.day-1 from a variety of sources. Average daily intake was 0.85 +/- 13 mg.kg-1. Caffeine intake was not correlated with any 1 sport; the 10 highest caffeine users were athletes from 9 different sports, including skill, endurance, and power sports. No differences were noted for average caffeine ingestion between summer and winter sports. High caffeine intakes corresponded to coffee ingestion, with the 25 highest individual intakes (193-895 mg.day-1) from coffee drinkers. In summary, it can be concluded that the majority of high-level Canadian athletes consume dietary caffeine primarily in the form of coffee. However, levels consumed are insufficient to elicit performance enhancement. Potential detrimental effects of caffeine consumption on exercise performance include gastric upset, withdrawal, sleep disturbance, and interactions with other dietary supplements.

  17. Active galactic nuclei, neutrinos, and interacting cosmic rays in NGC 253 and NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gallagher III, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Everett, John E., E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    The galaxies M82, NGC 253, NGC 1068, and NGC 4945 have been detected in γ-rays by Fermi. Previously, we developed and tested a model for cosmic-ray interactions in the starburst galaxy M82. Now, we aim to explore the differences between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) environments by applying our self-consistent model to the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. Assuming a constant cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency by supernova remnants with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations, predict the radio and γ-ray spectra, and compare with published measurements. We find that our models easily fit the observed γ-ray spectrum for NGC 253 while constraining the cosmic-ray source spectral index and acceleration efficiency. However, we encountered difficultly modeling the observed radio data and constraining the speed of the galactic wind and the magnetic field strength, unless the gas mass is less than currently preferred values. Additionally, our starburst model consistently underestimates the observed γ-ray flux and overestimates the radio flux for NGC 1068; these issues would be resolved if the AGN is the primary source of γ-rays. We discuss the implications of these results and make predictions for the neutrino fluxes for both galaxies.

  18. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eLaing

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we use amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only or auditory-visual (AV trials in the scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent or different modulation rates (AV incongruent. Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for auditory-visual integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies.

  19. Development of biological movement recognition by interaction between active basis model and fuzzy optical flow division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bardia; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach.

  20. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  1. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  2. Simulations and experimental evaluation of an active orthosis for interaction in virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsveov Mihail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a human arm active orthosis is presented. The orthosis is designed primarily for training and rehabilitation in virtual environments.The orthosis system is intended for embodiment in virtual reality where it is allowing human to perceive forces at different body parts or the weight of lifted objects. In the paper the choice of a mechanical structure is shown equivalent to the structure of the human arm. A mechanical model of the orthosis arm as haptic device is built, where kinematic and dynamic parameters are evaluated. Impedance control scheme is selected as the most suitable for force refection at the hand or arm. An open-loop impedance controller is presented in the paper. Computer experiments are carried out using the dimensions of a real arm orthosis. Computer experiments have been carried out to provide force reflection by VR, according to virtual scenario. The conducted simulations show the range of the forces on the operator hand, orthosis can provide. The results of additional measurements and experimental evaluations of physical quantities in the interaction in a virtual environment are revealed in the paper.

  3. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies.

  4. INDUCTION AND/OR MAINTENANCE OF TUMOR DORMANCY BY DISRUPTION OF UROKINASE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR-INTEGRIN INTERACTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of inducing cancer cells into dormancy and treating cancer in a subject. This method involves administering to a subject an effective amount of a compound that disrupts interaction between urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and integrin, thereby...... including cancer cells into dormancy and treating cancer in the subject. Also disclosed is a method of disrupting interaction between integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on cancer cells. The present invention also relates to a method of screening for compounds effective in inducing tumor...... dormancy and treating cancer in a subject....

  5. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity ― A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A.; Justice, Anne E.

    2017-01-01

    ,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity......Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200...

  6. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  7. Marital conflict and children's externalizing behavior: interactions between parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Moore, Ginger A

    2009-01-01

    "Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS...

  8. Applying systemic-structural activity theory to design of human-computer interaction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bedny, Gregory Z; Bedny, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has gained recognition as an important field in ergonomics. HCI draws on ideas and theoretical concepts from computer science, psychology, industrial design, and other fields. Human-Computer Interaction is no longer limited to trained software users. Today people interact with various devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and laptops. How can you make such interaction user friendly, even when user proficiency levels vary? This book explores methods for assessing the psychological complexity of computer-based tasks. It also p

  9. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  10. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components: protein adsorption, coagulation, activation of the complement system and hemolysis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-04-14

    The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising alternative for delivery of drugs to specific cells. However, studies on their interaction with diverse blood components using different techniques are still lacking. Therefore, in the present work, the interaction of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components was described using different complementary techniques. The influence of different encapsulated compounds/functionalizing agents on these interactions was also reported. It is worth noting that all these techniques can be simply performed, without the need for highly sophisticated apparatus or skills. Moreover, their transference to industries and application of quality control could be easily performed. Serum albumin was adsorbed onto all types of tested nanoparticles. The saturation concentration was dependent on the nanoparticle size. In contrast, fibrinogen aggregation was dependent on nanoparticle surface charge. The complement activation was also influenced by the nanoparticle functionalization; the presence of a functionalizing agent increased complement activation, while the addition of an encapsulated compound only caused a slight increase. None of the nanoparticles influenced the coagulation cascade at low concentrations. However, at high concentrations, cationized nanoparticles did activate the coagulation cascade. Interactions of nanoparticles with erythrocytes did not reveal any hemolysis. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood proteins depended both on the nanoparticle properties and the protein studied. Independent of their loading/surface functionalization, PLGA nanoparticles did not influence the coagulation cascade and did not induce hemolysis of erythrocytes; they could be defined as safe concerning induction of embolization and cell lysis.

  11. Robot-assisted therapy for improving social interactions and activity participation among institutionalized older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Shu-Min; Chin, Mau-Yu; Lee, Wen-Li

    2015-03-01

    Animal-assisted therapy is gaining popularity as part of therapeutic activities for older adults in many long-term care facilities. However, concerns about dog bites, allergic responses to pets, disease, and insufficient available resources to care for a real pet have led to many residential care facilities to ban this therapy. There are situations where a substitute artificial companion, such as robotic pet, may serve as a better alternative. This pilot study used a one-group pre- and posttest design to evaluate the effect of a robot-assisted therapy for older adults. Sixteen eligible participants participated in the study and received a group robot-assisted therapy using a seal-like robot pet for 30 minutes twice a week for 4 weeks. All participants received assessments of their communication and interaction skills using the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills (ACIS-C) and activity participation using the Activity Participation Scale at baseline and at week 4. A total of 12 participants completed the study. Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that participants' communication and interaction skills (z = -2.94, P = 0.003) and activity participation (z = -2.66, P = 0.008) were significantly improved after receiving 4-week robot-assisted therapy. By interacting with a robot pet, such as Paro, the communication, interaction skills, and activity participation of the older adults can be improved. The robot-assisted therapy can be provided as a routine activity program and has the potential to improve social health of older adults in residential care facilities. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Critical thinking and social interaction in active learning: A conceptual analysis of class discussion from Iranian students’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mansoureh Hajhosseini; Saeid Zandi; Sediqeh Hosseini Shabanan; Yaser Madani

    2016-01-01

    Following the failures in traditional methods of teaching, theorists have recently emphasized students’ active role in education in which the teacher is no longer a mere transmitter of knowledge. Discussion-based teaching has been regarded as a route to improving students’ active role. The current study intended to discover the benefits of using discussion for social interaction and critical thinking disposition from Iranian students’ perspective. Participants included 14 first-year education...

  13. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.W. Galvão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs can interact with the H. seropedicaeRecA protein (RecA Hs and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs. RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA, inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  14. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, C.W.; Souza, E.M.; Etto, R.M.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.; Steffens, M.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs ) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA Hs ) and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs . RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions

  15. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvão, C.W. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Etto, R.M. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schumacher, J.; Buck, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Steffens, M.B.R. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX{sub Hs}) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA{sub Hs}) and that RecA{sub Hs} possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX{sub Hs} inhibited 90% of the RecA{sub Hs} DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA{sub Hs}. RecA{sub Hs} ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX{sub Hs} was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX{sub Hs} protein negatively modulates the RecA{sub Hs} activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  16. Player-Game Interaction: An Ecological Analysis of Foreign Language Gameplay Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Karim

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how the literature on game-based foreign language (FL) learning has demonstrated that player-game interactions have a strong potential for FL learning. However, little is known about the fine-grained dynamics of these interactions, or how they could facilitate FL learning. To address this gap, the researcher conducted a…

  17. Enhanced Hippocampal Neurogenesis in the Absence of Microglia T Cell Interaction and Microglia Activation in the Murine Running Wheel Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, Marta; Ping, Gao; De Haas, Alexander H.; Brouwer, Niesike; Meerlo, Peter; Van Der Zee, Eddy A.; Biber, Knut; Boddeike, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Brouwer, Nieske; Boddeke, Hendrikus W.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, activated microglia have been shown to be involved in the regulation of several aspects of neurogenesis under certain experimental conditions both in vitro and in vivo. A neurogenesis supportive microglia phenotype has been suggested to arise from the interaction of microglia with homing

  18. Language-Building Activities and Interaction Variations with Mixed-Ability ESL University Learners in a Content-Based Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna Dimas, Héctor Manuel; Ruíz Castellanos, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of both language-building activities and a variety of teacher/student interaction patterns increase both oral language participation and content learning in a course of manual therapy with mixed-language ability students. In this article, the researchers describe their collaboration in a content-based course in English with English…

  19. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A; Justice, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    ,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity...

  20. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A; Justice, Anne E; Young, Kristin L; Feitosa, Mary F; Barata, Llilda; Winkler, Thomas W; Chu, Audrey Y; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Qi, Qibin; Ngwa, Julius S; Renström, Frida; Quaye, Lydia; Eicher, John D; Hayes, James E; Cornelis, Marilyn; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lim, Elise; Luan, Jian'an; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; Griffin, Paula J; Haller, Toomas; Ahmad, Shafqat; Marques-Vidal, Pedro M; Bien, Stephanie; Yengo, Loic; Teumer, Alexander; Smith, Albert Vernon; Kumari, Meena; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kleber, Marcus E; Hollensted, Mette; Lohman, Kurt; Rivera, Natalia V; Whitfield, John B; Zhao, Jing Hua; Stringham, Heather M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Huppertz, Charlotte; Willemsen, Gonneke; Peyrot, Wouter J; Wu, Ying; Kristiansson, Kati; Demirkan, Ayse; Fornage, Myriam; Hassinen, Maija; Bielak, Lawrence F; Cadby, Gemma; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mägi, Reedik; van der Most, Peter J; Jackson, Anne U; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Vitart, Veronique; Marten, Jonathan; Navarro, Pau; Bellis, Claire; Pasko, Dorota; Johansson, Åsa; Snitker, Søren; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Eriksson, Joel; Lim, Unhee; Aadahl, Mette; Adair, Linda S; Amin, Najaf; Balkau, Beverley; Auvinen, Juha; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Bertoni, Alain G; Blangero, John; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borja, Judith B; Brage, Søren; Busonero, Fabio; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Corre, Tanguy; Smith, George Davey; Delgado, Graciela E; Dueker, Nicole; Dörr, Marcus; Ebeling, Tapani; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D; Fu, Mao; Færch, Kristine; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; Gong, Jian; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; van Grootheest, Gerard; Harald, Kennet; Hastie, Nicholas D; Havulinna, Aki S; Hernandez, Dena G; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J; Holmens, Oddgeir L; Holzapfel, Christina; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jie; Huang, Tao; Hui, Jennie; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; James, Alan L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jhun, Min A; Juonala, Markus; Kinnunen, Leena; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Kähönen, Mika; Lakka, Timo A; Launer, Lenore J; Lehne, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Marre, Michel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Monda, Keri L; Montgomery, Grant W; De Moor, Marleen H M; Mulas, Antonella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, A.W.; Männikkö, Reija; Männistö, Satu; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Nolte, Ilja M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perez, Jeremiah; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Peyser, Patricia A; Prokopenko, Inga; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rawal, Rajesh; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Rudan, Igor; Sarti, Cinzia; Sarzynski, Mark A; Savonen, Kai; Scott, William R; Sanna, Serena; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sidney, Steve; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Blair H; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Sternfeld, Barbara; Swift, Amy J; Tammelin, Tuija; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothée; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vestergaard, Henrik; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Waeber, Gérard; Walker, Mark; Wild, Sarah; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Zubair, Niha; Haiman, Christopher A; Lemarchand, Loic; Gyllensten, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Pérusse, Louis; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Cucca, Francesco; Hveem, Kristian; Hartman, Catharina A; Tönjes, Anke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Palmer, Lyle J; Kardia, Sharon L R; Rauramaa, Rainer; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco J C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mangino, Massimo; Laakso, Markku; Bouchard, Claude; Martin, Nicholas G; Kuh, Diana; Liu, YongMei; Linneberg, Allan; März, Winfried; Strauch, Konstantin; Kivimäki, Mika; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Völzke, Henry; Qi, Lu; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Froguel, Philippe; Kooperberg, Charles; Vollenweider, Peter; Hallmans, Göran; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Weir, David R; Porteous, David J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel I; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Frayling, Timothy M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boehnke, Michael; Heid, Iris M; Mohlke, Karen L; Strachan, David P; Fox, Caroline S; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Klein, Robert J; Johnson, Andrew D; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults

  1. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  2. Effect of the acylation of TEAD4 on its interaction with co-activators YAP and TAZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrouze, Yannick; Meyerhofer, Marco; Bokhovchuk, Fedir; Fontana, Patrizia; Zimmermann, Catherine; Martin, Typhaine; Delaunay, Clara; Izaac, Aude; Kallen, Joerg; Schmelzle, Tobias; Erdmann, Dirk; Chène, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    The Hippo pathway is deregulated in various cancers, and the discovery of molecules that modulate this pathway may open new therapeutic avenues in oncology. TEA/ATTS domain (TEAD) transcription factors are the most distal elements of the Hippo pathway and their transcriptional activity is regulated by the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Amongst the various possibilities for targeting this pathway, inhibition of the YAP:TEAD interaction is an attractive strategy. It has been shown recently that TEAD proteins are covalently linked via a conserved cysteine to a fatty acid molecule (palmitate) that binds to a deep hydrophobic cavity present in these proteins. This acylation of TEAD seems to be required for efficient binding to YAP, and understanding how it modulates the YAP:TEAD interaction may provide useful information on the regulation of TEAD function. In this report we have studied the effect of TEAD4 acylation on its interaction with YAP and the other co-activator transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). We show in our biochemical and cellular assays that YAP and TAZ bind in a similar manner to acylated and non-acylated TEAD4. This indicates that TEAD4 acylation is not a prerequisite for its interaction with YAP or TAZ. However, we observed that TEAD4 acylation significantly enhances its stability, suggesting that it may help this transcription factor to acquire and/or maintain its active conformation. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...... at sites of active inflammation....

  4. Interaction between Antarctic sea ice and synoptic activity in the circumpolar trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Different from conditions in the Arctic, total Antarctic sea ice extent does not show large interannual variability and almost no long-term trend is found. On a regional/monthly scale, however, large differences are observed, depending on winds and oceanic currents, thus on the prevailing synoptic weather situation. At the same time, the sea ice influences atmospheric conditions: presence of sea ice considerably changes the energy exchange between ocean and atmosphere, thus the meridional air temperature gradient, which is usually strongest at the sea ice edge. This leads to high baroclinicity in this area and thus favours cyclogenesis. The position and movement of low pressure systems, in turn, together with the local heat balance, determines sea ice extent and concentration. Divergence and convergence of sea ice also depends on the position of the circumpolar trough relative to the sea ice edge, since its position determines whether the atmospheric flow is predominantly easterly or westerly, which leads to sea ice transport to the southwest or the northeast, respectively. The circumpolar trough is usually situated closer to the coast in spring and autumn and moves north in summer and winter. In this study, meteorological data from the ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis as well as sea ice extent and concentration derived from passive microwave data (SSMI/SMMR) are used to investigate the interactions between Antarctic sea ice and synoptic activity in the polar ocean. Special consideration is given to the frequency of regional sea ice minima and warm air advection from lower latitudes. A stable synoptic situation with amplified Rossby waves can lead to regional extrema in sea ice extent. An extreme case was observed in the austral summer of 2001/2002 in the Weddell Sea, when continuous northwesterly winds removed the ice from the northwestern part of the Weddell Sea and drove it to the coast of Coats Land, where usually coastal polynyas are observed in summer.

  5. Membrane-interaction quantitative structure--activity relationship (MI-QSAR) analyses of skin penetration enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tao; Hopfinger, A J; Esposito, Emilio X; Liu, Jianzhong; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2008-06-01

    Membrane-interaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (MI-QSAR) models for two skin penetration enhancer data sets of 61 and 42 compounds were constructed and compared to QSAR models constructed for the same two data sets using only classic intramolecular QSAR descriptors. These two data sets involve skin penetration enhancement of hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone acetate, and the enhancers are generally similar in structure to lipids and surfactants. A new MI-QSAR descriptor, the difference in the integrated cylindrical distribution functions over the phospholipid monolayer model, in and out of the presence of the skin penetration enhancer, DeltaSigma h(r), was developed. This descriptor is dominant in the optimized MI-QSAR models of both training sets studied and greatly reduces the size and complexity of the MI-QSAR models as compared to those QSAR models developed using the classic intramolecular descriptors. The MI-QSAR models indicate that good penetration enhancers make bigger "holes" in the monolayer and are less aqueous-soluble, so as to preferentially enter the monolayer, than are poor penetration enhancers. The skin penetration enhancer thus alters the structure and organization of the monolayer. This space and time alteration in the structure and dynamics of the membrane monolayer is captured by DeltaSigma h(r) and is simplistically referred to as "holes" in the monolayer. The MI-QSAR models explain 70-80% of the variance in skin penetration enhancement across each of the two training sets and are stable predictive models using accepted diagnostic measures of robustness and predictivity.

  6. Antimycotic activity of fengycin C biosurfactant and its interaction with phosphatidylcholine model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jaramillo, Lina María; Aranda, Francisco José; Teruel, José Antonio; Villegas-Escobar, Valeska; Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Lipopeptide biosurfactants constitute one of the most promising groups of compounds for the treatment and prevention of fungal diseases in plants. Bacillus subtilis strain EA-CB0015 produces iturin A, fengycin C and surfactin and it has been proven useful for the treatment of black Sigatoka disease in banana plants, an important pathology caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet). We have found that B. subtilis EA-CB0015 cell free supernatants and purified fractions inhibit M. fijiensis cellular growth. The effect of the purified lipopeptides mentioned above on fungal growth has been also evaluated, observing that iturin A and fengycin C inhibit mycelial growth and ascospore germination, whereas surfactin is not effective. On the hypothesis that the antifungal action of the lipopeptides is associated to their incorporation into biological membranes, ultimately leading to membrane permeabilization, a detailed biophysical study on the interaction of a new isoform of fengycin C with model dipalmitoyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes has been carried out. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that fengycin C alters the thermotropic phase transitions of DPPC, and is laterally segregated in the fluid bilayer forming domains. Fluorescent probe polarization measurements show that fengycin C does not affect the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. This latter perturbation is concomitant with a strong dehydration of the polar region of DPPC, as shown by FTIR. Fengycin-rich domains, where the surrounding DPPC molecules are highly dehydrated, may well constitute sites of membrane permeabilization leading to a leaky target membrane. These results are a solid support to explain the membrane perturbing action of fengycin, which has been related to its antifungal activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Alex L.; Erickson, Kristen J.; Bilsky, Edward J.; Hillman, Susan J.; Burman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England’s Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students’ academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we’ve organized our themes in a “Grow-up, Grow-out” approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students’ skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we’re having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general. PMID:25565921

  8. Interaction of a dinoflagellate neurotoxin with voltage-activated ion channels in a marine diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Sheila A; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Taylor, Alison R

    2018-01-01

    The potent neurotoxins produced by the harmful algal bloom species Karenia brevis are activators of sodium voltage-gated channels (VGC) in animals, resulting in altered channel kinetics and membrane hyperexcitability. Recent biophysical and genomic evidence supports widespread presence of homologous sodium (Na + ) and calcium (Ca 2+ ) permeable VGCs in unicellular algae, including marine phytoplankton. We therefore hypothesized that VGCs of these phytoplankton may be an allelopathic target for waterborne neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms that could lead to ion channel dysfunction and disruption of signaling in a similar manner to animal Na + VGCs. We examined the interaction of brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3), a K. brevis neurotoxin, with the Na + /Ca 2+ VGC of the non-toxic diatom Odontella sinensi s using electrophysiology. Single electrode current- and voltage- clamp recordings from O. sinensis in the presence of PbTx-3 were used to examine the toxin's effect on voltage gated Na + /Ca 2+ currents. In silico analysis was used to identify the putative PbTx binding site in the diatoms. We identified Na + /Ca 2+ VCG homologs from the transcriptomes and genomes of 12 diatoms, including three transcripts from O. sinensis and aligned them with site-5 of Na + VGCs, previously identified as the PbTx binding site in animals. Up to 1 µM PbTx had no effect on diatom resting membrane potential or membrane excitability. The kinetics of fast inward Na + /Ca 2+ currents that underlie diatom action potentials were also unaffected. However, the peak inward current was inhibited by 33%, delayed outward current was inhibited by 25%, and reversal potential of the currents shifted positive, indicating a change in permeability of the underlying channels. Sequence analysis showed a lack of conservation of the PbTx binding site in diatom VGC homologs, many of which share molecular features more similar to single-domain bacterial Na + /Ca 2+ VGCs than the 4-domain eukaryote channels

  9. Interaction between Sex Hormones and Matricaria Chamomilla Hydroalcholic Extract on Motor Activity Behavior in Gonadectomized Male and Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Raie

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Locomotor activity is an important physiologic phenomenon that is influenced by several factors. In previous study we showed that the matricaria chamomilla (chamomile hydroalcholic extract acts differently in male and female mice. Therefore in this study, the role of sex hormones and chamomile hydroalcholic extract were investigated on motor activity behavior in absence of sex glands in adult male and female NMRI mice. Materials and Methods: Gonadectomized male and female mice were divided into groups (seven mice in each group including: receiving testosterone (2 mg/kg S.C., estradiol benzoate (0.1 mg/kg S.C., and progesterone (0.5 mg/kg S.C. with and without hydroalcholic extract of chamomile (50 mg/kg i.p. Motor activity monitor system was used to evaluate locomotor activity parameters (fast and slow activity, fast and slow stereotype activity, fast and slow rearing in all groups. Results: 1 Testosterone had no any effect on motor activity parameters, but extract of chamomile with and without testosterone decreased motor activity parameters in male mice. 2 Estradiol benzoate and chamomile hydroalcholic extract in presence and absence of each other increased locomotor activity parameters in female mice. 3 Progesterone also did not change motor activity parameters in presence and absence of chamomile hydroalcholic extract in female mice. 4 Administration of Estradiol benzoate with progestrone in presence and absence of chamomile hydroalcholic extract did not alter motor activity parameters in female mice. Conclusion: It seems both of the chamomile hydroalcholic extract and estradiol enhance motor activity and probably act through same system and potentiate the effect of each other. Also it seems there are interaction between estradiol and progesterone and also between chamomile extract and progesterone. Testosterone probably did not have any interaction with chamomile extract in locomotor activity.

  10. The Molecular Chaperone Hsc70 Interacts with Tyrosine Hydroxylase to Regulate Enzyme Activity and Synaptic Vesicle Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Leonardo A; Baust, Tracy B; Smith, Amanda D; Jaumotte, Juliann D; Zigmond, Michael J; Torres, Soledad; Leak, Rehana K; Pino, Jose A; Torres, Gonzalo E

    2016-08-19

    We previously reported that the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is physically and functionally coupled with Hsc70 as well as with the dopamine synthesis enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, providing a novel mechanism for dopamine homeostasis regulation. Here we expand those findings to demonstrate that Hsc70 physically and functionally interacts with TH to regulate the enzyme activity and synaptic vesicle targeting. Co-immunoprecipitation assays performed in brain tissue and heterologous cells demonstrated that Hsc70 interacts with TH and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays showed that TH directly binds the substrate binding and carboxyl-terminal domains of Hsc70. Immunocytochemical studies indicated that Hsc70 and TH co-localize in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The functional significance of the Hsc70-TH interaction was then investigated using TH activity assays. In both dopaminergic MN9D cells and mouse brain synaptic vesicles, purified Hsc70 facilitated an increase in TH activity. Neither the closely related protein Hsp70 nor the unrelated Hsp60 altered TH activity, confirming the specificity of the Hsc70 effect. Overexpression of Hsc70 in dopaminergic MN9D cells consistently resulted in increased TH activity whereas knockdown of Hsc70 by short hairpin RNA resulted in decreased TH activity and dopamine levels. Finally, in cells with reduced levels of Hsc70, the amount of TH associated with synaptic vesicles was decreased. This effect was rescued by addition of purified Hsc70. Together, these data demonstrate a novel interaction between Hsc70 and TH that regulates the activity and localization of the enzyme to synaptic vesicles, suggesting an important role for Hsc70 in dopamine homeostasis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Study of interaction between protein and main active components in Citrus aurantium L. by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yantao [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Zhang Haitao; Sun Ye; Zhang Yupu; Liu He [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Cheng Jianhua [College of Environmental and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Bi Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Zhang Hanqi, E-mail: analchem@jlu.edu.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2010-02-15

    The interaction between flavonoids and proteins was investigated by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The binding parameters of drugs with proteins were obtained according to the corrected fluorescence data by an improved calculation method. The DELTAH, DELTAS and DELTAG obtained indicate that the van der Waals or hydrogen bond, electrostatic force and hydrophobic forces all play a role in the interaction of drugs with proteins. Based on Foerster's theory, the binding average distance r between the protein and drug was evaluated and found to be less than 3 nm. The interaction of drug-metal ion complexes and proteins was also investigated.

  12. Study of interaction between protein and main active components in Citrus aurantium L. by optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yantao; Zhang Haitao; Sun Ye; Zhang Yupu; Liu He; Cheng Jianhua; Bi Shuyun; Zhang Hanqi

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between flavonoids and proteins was investigated by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The binding parameters of drugs with proteins were obtained according to the corrected fluorescence data by an improved calculation method. The ΔH, ΔS and ΔG obtained indicate that the van der Waals or hydrogen bond, electrostatic force and hydrophobic forces all play a role in the interaction of drugs with proteins. Based on Foerster's theory, the binding average distance r between the protein and drug was evaluated and found to be less than 3 nm. The interaction of drug-metal ion complexes and proteins was also investigated.

  13. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  14. Perceiving emotions in human-human and human-animal interactions: Hemodynamic prefrontal activity (fNIRS) and empathic concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanutelli, Maria Elide; Balconi, Michela

    2015-09-25

    In the last years social neuroscience research attempted to identify the neural networks underlying the human ability to perceive others' emotions, a core process in establishing meaningful social bonds. A large amount of papers arose and identified common and specific empathy-based networks with respect to stimulus type and task. Despite the great majority of studies focused on human-human contexts, we do not establish relations with only other humans, but also with non-human animals. The aim of the present work was to explore the brain mechanisms involved in empathic concern for people who interacts with both peers and other species. Participants have been assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) while viewing pictures depicting humans interacting with both other men and women (human-human condition: HH), or with dogs and cats (human-animal: HA). Results showed that aggressive HH interactions elicited greater prefrontal activity (PFC) than HA ones while, when considering HA interactions, friendly ones were related to higher cortical activity. Finally, oxy (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) increasing related to the processing of aggressive interactions positively correlated with different empathic measures, within more specific brain regions. Results were elucidated with respect to available evidence on emotion perception, empathic neural mechanisms and their functional meaning for human-animal contexts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron/argillite interactions in radioactive waste disposal context: Oxidising transient and bacterial activities influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, Camille; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Maillet, Anais

    2014-01-01

    disposal conditions. Indeed, the nature, the quantity of nutrients and the environmental conditions (space, temperature, water, radioactivity and pressure) are key parameters for bacterial development. Even though disposal conditions may be not favourable during a part of the thermal transient characterised by high temperature, irradiation conditions and heterogeneous water saturation, bacterial activity may resume when environmental conditions become more suitable. Moreover, argillite cracks and residual voids between the waste packages and the liner create additional space for bacterial development. Concerning the nutrient content, significant amounts of hydrogen (an energetic substrate for bacteria) produced by anoxic corrosion of metallic materials are expected, which will favour the development of hydrogenotrophic bacteria. Furthermore, it is widely accepted that micro-organisms may locally affect the corrosion processes and the corrosion rates due to their influence on the water composition, pH and redox potential of the metal/environment interface. More specifically, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may produce ferrous sulphide, a corrosive product that may lead to significant pits on steel surface. Also, under anaerobic conditions, the iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) can reduce Fe(III) from iron oxides composing passive layers, which may impact corrosion by re-exposing the metal surfaces to corrosion. Therefore, the survival of bacteria cannot be excluded and their impact on corrosion phenomena must be investigated. In this context, this paper focuses on two studies regarding iron/argillite interactions. The first one addresses these interactions under oxidising and reducing conditions, while the second one tackles bacteria effects on corrosion in conditions that may prevail in a repository. These studies are both based on laboratory and in situ experiments. Iron and carbon steel have been chosen as typical of metallic components, and the Tournemire Toarcian argillite

  16. Social reward: interactions with social status, social communication, aggression, and associated neural activation in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Mario; Nguyen, Ngoc-Thao; McDonald, Mark; Albers, H Elliott

    2013-07-01

    Nearly all species engage in a variety of intraspecific social interactions, and there is evidence that these interactions are rewarding. Less is known, however, about the factors that influence social reward. Using the conditioned place preference paradigm, we tested whether social interactions are rewarding for male Syrian hamsters. We also tested whether social stimuli increase neural activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a component of the mesolimbic reward system, and how individual differences in social behavior and experience influence neural activation. In the present study, we found that hamsters developed a conditioned place preference for social interactions, but the effects were significantly stronger in dominant animals compared with subordinates. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the VTA was significantly higher in hamsters that had engaged in a direct social encounter compared with hamsters exposed to a caged stimulus hamster or controls. Interestingly, socially experienced males had more Fos-immunoreactive cells in the VTA than socially naive males after exposure to a social stimulus. Surprisingly, the amount of Fos immunoreactivity in the VTA induced by a social stimulus was correlated with the amount of aggressive/dominance behaviors that had been observed during interactions that had occurred 2 months earlier. Our results indicate that social interactions between males are rewarding, and that social dominance increases the reward value. Social interactions stimulate the mesolimbic reward system, and social experience enhances its response to novel social stimuli and may produce long-term changes in the neural mechanisms that mediate the maintenance of dominance over long periods of time. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. No interactions between previously associated 2-hour glucose gene variants and physical activity or BMI on 2-hour glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Robert A; Chu, Audrey Y; Grarup, Niels

    2012-01-01

    to determine 2-h glucose levels is unknown. We meta-analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) × BMI and SNP × physical activity (PA) interaction regression models for five SNPs previously associated with 2-h glucose levels from up to 22 studies comprising 54,884 individuals without diabetes. PA levels were...... dichotomized, with individuals below the first quintile classified as inactive (20%) and the remainder as active (80%). BMI was considered a continuous trait. Inactive individuals had higher 2-h glucose levels than active individuals (ß = 0.22 mmol/L [95% CI 0.13-0.31], P = 1.63 × 10(-6)). All SNPs were...... associated with 2-h glucose (ß = 0.06-0.12 mmol/allele, P = 1.53 × 10(-7)), but no significant interactions were found with PA (P > 0.18) or BMI (P = 0.04). In this large study of gene-lifestyle interaction, we observed no interactions between genetic and lifestyle factors, both of which were associated...

  18. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure and theoretical analysis of intermolecular interactions in two biologically active derivatives of 1,2,4-triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rahul; Mohan, T. P.; Vishalakshi, B.; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized and structurally characterized two biologically active derivatives of 1,2,4 triazoles, namely 3-(4-fluoro-3-phenoxyphenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione (TR) and 1-((3-(4-fluoro-3-phenoxyphenyl)-5-(methylthio)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)methyl)piperidine (TR1) via single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both the structures show the presence of various intermolecular interactions in the crystalline solid such as Csbnd H…F, Csbnd H…S, Csbnd H…N, Csbnd H…O, Csbnd H … π, and π … π intermolecular interactions. The role of these interactions in molecular packing was analyzed, and the nature of these interactions was evaluated through computational procedures using PIXEL. Hirshfeld analysis further reveals that the contribution of H…F interactions was more prominent towards packing as compared to H…N/O intermolecular interactions.

  20. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 Interacts with Ribonucleoprotein Complexes To Enhance Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunyan; Zeng, Xiangwei; Yao, Shuai; Gao, Li; Zhang, Lizhou; Qi, Xiaole; Duan, Yulu; Yang, Bo; Gao, Yulong; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2017-08-15

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus. Segment A contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), which encode viral proteins VP2, VP3, VP4, and VP5. Segment B contains one ORF and encodes the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, VP1. IBDV ribonucleoprotein complexes are composed of VP1, VP3, and dsRNA and play a critical role in mediating viral replication and transcription during the virus life cycle. In the present study, we identified a cellular factor, VDAC1, which was upregulated during IBDV infection and found to mediate IBDV polymerase activity. VDAC1 senses IBDV infection by interacting with viral proteins VP1 and VP3. This association is caused by RNA bridging, and all three proteins colocalize in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of VDAC1 resulted in a reduction in viral polymerase activity and a subsequent decrease in viral yield. Moreover, overexpression of VDAC1 enhanced IBDV polymerase activity. We also found that the viral protein VP3 can replace segment A to execute polymerase activity. A previous study showed that mutations in the C terminus of VP3 directly influence the formation of VP1-VP3 complexes. Our immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that protein-protein interactions between VDAC1 and VP3 and between VDAC1 and VP1 play a role in stabilizing the interaction between VP3 and VP1, further promoting IBDV polymerase activity. IMPORTANCE The cellular factor VDAC1 controls the entry and exit of mitochondrial metabolites and plays a pivotal role during intrinsic apoptosis by mediating the release of many apoptogenic molecules. Here we identify a novel role of VDAC1, showing that VDAC1 interacts with IBDV ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and facilitates IBDV replication by enhancing IBDV polymerase activity through its ability to stabilize interactions in RNP complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first report that VDAC1 is specifically involved in

  1. Adhesive activity of Lu glycoproteins is regulated by interaction with spectrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xiuli; Gauthier, Emilie; Zhang, Xihui; Guo, Xinhua; Anstee, David; Mohandas, Narla; Anne Chasis, Joel

    2008-03-18

    The Lutheran (Lu) and Lu(v13) blood group glycoproteins function as receptors for extracellular matrix laminins. Lu and Lu(v13) are linked to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton through a direct interaction with spectrin. However, neither the molecular basis of the interaction nor its functional consequences have previously been delineated. In the present study, we defined the binding motifs of Lu and Lu(v13) on spectrin and identified a functional role for this interaction. We found that the cytoplasmic domains of both Lu and Lu(v13) bound to repeat 4 of the spectrin chain. The interaction of full-length spectrin dimer to Lu and Lu(v13) was inhibited by repeat 4 of {alpha}-spectrin. Further, resealing of this repeat peptide into erythrocytes led to weakened Lu-cytoskeleton interaction as demonstrated by increased detergent extractability of Lu. Importantly, disruption of the Lu-spectrin linkage was accompanied by enhanced cell adhesion to laminin. We conclude that the interaction of the Lu cytoplasmic tail with the cytoskeleton regulates its adhesive receptor function.

  2. Fluid Mechanical Interactions In The Active Creeping Chihshang Fault Zone In Eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Mu, C.; Lee, J.; Guglielmi, Y.; Angelier, J.; Lin, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Chihshang thrust fault is one of the most active segments of the Longitudinal Valley fault (LVF) situated along the plate suture between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate in eastern Taiwan. During the past two decades, different surface monitoring efforts have been undertaken across the Chihshang fault at different spatial and temporal scales. Some interesting phenomena were observed, revealing a close interactions between fluids, creep in the shallow fault segment and seismogenic zone at depth : (1) seasonal variation clearly influence Chihshang fault creep rate; (2) coseismic slip propagation was attenuated at shallow depth during the 2003 Mw=6.5 Chengkung earthquake and followed by a dramatic postseismic creep; (3) a decreasing creep rate was observed before the 2003 earthquake and the total crust shortening after Chengkung earthquake compensated the deficit of surface creep about 3-4 years before the earthquake. To better understand the role of fluids in the creeping of Chihchang fault, subsurface geophysical investigation, in-situ hydro-mechanical tests and long-term pressure, deformation and seismic monitoring were initiated within the frame of an integrated project called Chihshang Fault Monitoring Observatory.. Eight boreholes were drilled at a depth of 30-100 m through the Chihshang fault fault zone at the Chinyuan site. Pore pressure variations in hydraulic observation wells induced by artificial pumping and injections and natural seasonal variation were monitored, together with surface electrical 4D tomography. Creeping was monitored with both creepmeters and tiltmeters set in surface and TDRs set in boreholes. First results show a complex fault zone affecting several hydrogeological sedimentary units with a high variability of hydraulic properties, 6 10-4 to 2 10-8 of storativity values and 10-4 to 4 10-6 m2/s transmissivity values respectively. Groundwater flow is parallel to the deformation zone direction that is characterized by

  3. Interaction of a dinoflagellate neurotoxin with voltage-activated ion channels in a marine diatom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila A. Kitchen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The potent neurotoxins produced by the harmful algal bloom species Karenia brevis are activators of sodium voltage-gated channels (VGC in animals, resulting in altered channel kinetics and membrane hyperexcitability. Recent biophysical and genomic evidence supports widespread presence of homologous sodium (Na+ and calcium (Ca2+ permeable VGCs in unicellular algae, including marine phytoplankton. We therefore hypothesized that VGCs of these phytoplankton may be an allelopathic target for waterborne neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms that could lead to ion channel dysfunction and disruption of signaling in a similar manner to animal Na+ VGCs. Methods We examined the interaction of brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3, a K. brevis neurotoxin, with the Na+/Ca2+ VGC of the non-toxic diatom Odontella sinensis using electrophysiology. Single electrode current- and voltage- clamp recordings from O. sinensis in the presence of PbTx-3 were used to examine the toxin’s effect on voltage gated Na+/Ca2+ currents. In silico analysis was used to identify the putative PbTx binding site in the diatoms. We identified Na+/Ca2+ VCG homologs from the transcriptomes and genomes of 12 diatoms, including three transcripts from O. sinensis and aligned them with site-5 of Na+ VGCs, previously identified as the PbTx binding site in animals. Results Up to 1 µM PbTx had no effect on diatom resting membrane potential or membrane excitability. The kinetics of fast inward Na+/Ca2+ currents that underlie diatom action potentials were also unaffected. However, the peak inward current was inhibited by 33%, delayed outward current was inhibited by 25%, and reversal potential of the currents shifted positive, indicating a change in permeability of the underlying channels. Sequence analysis showed a lack of conservation of the PbTx binding site in diatom VGC homologs, many of which share molecular features more similar to single-domain bacterial Na+/Ca2+ VGCs than the 4-domain

  4. Hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 3 interacts with cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase and partially inhibits its activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Ping Fang

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is etiologically involved in liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and B-cell lymphomas. It has been demonstrated previously that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3 is involved in cell transformation. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment was conducted to identify cellular proteins interacting with HCV NS3 protein. Cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase (cdN, dNT-1 was found to interact with HCV NS3 protein. Binding domains of HCV NS3 and cellular cdN proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions between HCV NS3 and cdN proteins were further demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis in cultured cells. The cellular cdN activity was partially repressed by NS3 protein in both the transiently-transfected and the stably-transfected systems. Furthermore, HCV partially repressed the cdN activity while had no effect on its protein expression in the systems of HCV sub-genomic replicons and infectious HCV virions. Deoxyribonucleotidases are present in most mammalian cells and involve in the regulation of intracellular deoxyribonucleotides pools by substrate cycles. Control of DNA precursor concentration is essential for the maintenance of genetic stability. Reduction of cdN activity would result in the imbalance of DNA precursor concentrations. Thus, our results suggested that HCV partially reduced the cdN activity via its NS3 protein and this may in turn cause diseases.

  5. RIM proteins tether Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S.; Deng, Lunbin; Wang, Yun; Dulubova, Irina; Liu, Xinran; Rizo, Josep; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY At a synapse, fast synchronous neurotransmitter release requires localization of Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones. How Ca2+-channels are recruited to active zones, however, remains unknown. Using unbiased yeast two-hybrid screens, we here identify a direct interaction of the central PDZ-domain of the active-zone protein RIM with the C-termini of presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels, but not L-type Ca2+-channels. To test the physiological significance of this interaction, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking all presynaptic RIM isoforms. Deletion of all RIMs ablated most neurotransmitter release by simultaneously impairing the priming of synaptic vesicles and by decreasing the presynaptic localization of Ca2+-channels. Strikingly, rescue of the decreased Ca2+-channel localization required the RIM PDZ-domain, whereas rescue of vesicle priming required the RIM N-terminus. We propose that RIMs tether N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain mediated interaction, thereby enabling fast, synchronous triggering of neurotransmitter release at a synapse. PMID:21241895

  6. Multiple sclerosis outpatient future groups: improving the quality of participant interaction and ideation tools within service improvement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alison; Rivas, Carol; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2015-04-23

    Improving the patient experience is a key focus within the National Health Service. This has led us to consider how health services are experienced, from both staff and patient perspectives. Novel service improvement activities bring staff and patients together to use design-led methods to improve how health services are delivered. The Multiple Sclerosis Outpatient Future Group study aimed to explore how analogies and props can be used to facilitate rich interactions between staff and patients within these activities. This paper will consider how these interactions supported participants to share experiences, generate ideas and suggest service improvements. Qualitative explorative study using 'future groups,' a reinterpretation of the recognised focus groups method directed towards exploring future alternatives through employing analogies and physical props to engage participants to speculate about future service interactions and health experiences. Participants were people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and outpatient staff: staff nurses, nursing assistants, junior sisters and reception staff. Use of future groups, analogies and physical props enabled PwMS and outpatient staff to invest their own ideas and feelings in the service improvement activity and envisage alternative health care scenarios. The combination of participants in the groups with their diverse perspectives and knowledge of the service led to a collaborative approach in which staff highlighted potential practical problems and patients ensured ideas were holistic. Service improvements were prototyped and tested in the outpatient clinic. Design-led methods such as future groups using analogies and physical props can be used to facilitate interactions between staff and patients in service improvement activities, leading to the generation of meaningful ideas. It is hoped that improving the quality of ideation tools within design-led methods can contribute to developing successful service interventions

  7. FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interaction sites required for defense signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Koller

    Full Text Available Signaling initiation by receptor-like kinases (RLKs at the plasma membrane of plant cells often requires regulatory leucine-rich repeat (LRR RLK proteins such as SERK or BIR proteins. The present work examined how the microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP receptor FLS2 builds signaling complexes with BAK1 (SERK3. We first, using in vivo methods that validate separate findings by others, demonstrated that flg22 (flagellin epitope ligand-initiated FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interactions can proceed independent of intracellular domain interactions. We then explored a candidate SERK protein interaction site in the extracellular domains (ectodomains; ECDs of the significantly different receptors FLS2, EFR (MAMP receptors, PEPR1 (damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP receptor, and BRI1 (hormone receptor. Repeat conservation mapping revealed a cluster of conserved solvent-exposed residues near the C-terminus of models of the folded LRR domains. However, site-directed mutagenesis of this conserved site in FLS2 did not impair FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions, and mutations in the analogous site of EFR caused receptor maturation defects. Hence this conserved LRR C-terminal region apparently has functions other than mediating interactions with BAK1. In vivo tests of the subsequently published FLS2-flg22-BAK1 ECD co-crystal structure were then performed to functionally evaluate some of the unexpected configurations predicted by that crystal structure. In support of the crystal structure data, FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions were no longer detected in in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments after site-directed mutagenesis of the FLS2 BAK1-interaction residues S554, Q530, Q627 or N674. In contrast, in vivo FLS2-mediated signaling persisted and was only minimally reduced, suggesting residual FLS2-BAK1 interaction and the limited sensitivity of co-immunoprecipitation data relative to in vivo assays for signaling outputs. However, Arabidopsis plants

  8. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...... to be an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anisomycin- and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser-392, which is important for the transcriptional activity of this growth suppressor protein, requires p38 MAP kinase and CK2 activities....

  9. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; Khedr, D. M.; El-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R.

    2013-01-01

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron–positron–ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  10. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; Khedr, D. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  11. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; EL-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R.; Khedr, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  12. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zong-Sian, E-mail: gary810426@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Che Fu, E-mail: s9823002@m98.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fu, Brian, E-mail: brianfu9@gmail.com [Northwood High School, Irvine, CA (United States); Chou, Ruey-Hwang, E-mail: rhchou@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-02

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs. - Highlights: • The interfacial residues on hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. • hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex models were generated from NMR restraints by using HADDOCK program. • We analyzed hFGF1-Suramin complex models and found the interaction between hFGF1-Suramin is hydrophobic. • The bioactivity of the hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex was studied by using WST1 assay.

  13. Monomerization of cytosolic mature smac attenuates interaction with IAPs and potentiation of caspase activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen P Burke; Jeffrey B Smith

    2010-01-01

    The four residues at the amino-terminus of mature Smac/DIABLO are an IAP binding motif (IBM). Upon exit from mitochondria, mature Smac interacts with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), abrogating caspase inhibition. We used the ubiquitin fusion model to express mature Smac in the cytosol. Transiently expressed mature Smac56-239 (called Smac56) and Smac60-239 (called Smac60), which lacks the IBM, interacted with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). However, stable expression pr...

  14. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with free radicals and their role in enhancing the scavenging activity of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Humaira; Saira, Farhat; Yaqub, Azra; Qureshi, Rumana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Saleemi, Samia

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the interaction of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles (12±1.5nm) (GNPs) with free radicals; 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) stable and electrochemically generated superoxide, O2(-). Different experiments were designed to understand the interaction between GNPs and DPPH by employing cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis spectroscopy and computational chemistry using 6-311G basis set. The increase in heterogeneous rate constant, ksh, of DPPH upon addition of GNPs pointed towards possible complex formation, DPPH-GNPs which were further explained by a model assuming surface adsorption of DPPH on GNPs. Further, the model was validated by studying interaction of GNPs with a biologically important free radical, O2(-). Exciting result in terms of disappearance of anodic peak after GNPs addition confirmed that gold nanoparticles interacted with stable as well as unstable free radicals. Also, the stoichiometry of the most stable complex GNP-DPPH was determined from UV-vis spectroscopy by applying Job's method. The GNP-DPPH complex was found to be active with 46.0% reduction of the IC50 value of standard antioxidant, ascorbic acid (AA), indicating its role in enhancing antioxidant activity. Hence, this study presents a simple and potential approach to enhance the efficiency of natural antioxidants without modifying their structure, or involving the complex functionalization of GNPs with antioxidants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Interactive lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoff

    2011-12-01

    Lectures can vary from being entirely teacher-centred through to those that value learner-teacher and learner-learner interaction. Advocates of the exclusively didactic (teacher-centred) lecture aim to maximise the amount of lecture time available to their delivery of content, and regard other activities as 'lost' lecture time. Educational research has, however, identified the potential benefit of interactivity that promotes mentally active learning and improved learning outcomes. This article reviews the notion of 'active learning', outlines how active learning is promoted by interactivity and concludes with strategies for including interactivity within lectures. Narrative review and discussion. The article begins with a summary of the purposes of lecturing, and the distinctions between mentally active and passive learning. The associations between interactivity, cognitively active learning and improved learning outcomes are considered, and strategies for promoting interactivity and active learning are explored. Three student-student interaction strategies are discussed, and an exemplar of each of these strategies in action is provided. The exemplar addresses the 'lost time' concern of some advocates of the exclusively didactic lecture. Interactivity can be readily introduced to lectures without a significant reduction in the amount of time available for didactic lecturing. This paper challenges the view that the inclusion of interactivity equates to a loss of learning time, by showing that students' achievement of learning outcomes is enhanced by planned and structured engagement with others. The paper concludes with an example of how interactivity can be incorporated within the traditional lecture format. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  16. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study was to characte......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...... fluid and reduced the antiviral activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. HNP-1 and -2 differed somewhat in their independent antiviral activity and their binding to SP-D. These results are relevant to the early phase of host defense against IAV, and suggest a complex interplay between SP-D and HNPs...

  17. Theoretical study of the interaction between vanadium oxide and HY-Zeolite elucidating loss activity of the catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineo Pedro Zaragoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction between vanadium oxide and the HY-zeolite using molecular dynamics interaction was carried out for two systems: i when vanadium oxide penetrates a zeolite ring at its center, and ii when vanadium oxide impacts the zeolite surface model. The dynamical effects are used to investigate the reduced activity and eventual degradation of the catalyst for the vanadium oxide presence. In the first case, we observe the breaking of an OH-bond that belongs to the acid site. This is related to an initial loss activity stage of the catalyst. In the second case, vanadium oxide is weakly adsorbed onto the zeolite surface velocity depending. Density functional theory, with nonlocal exchange and correlation functional and the basis set of double numerical accuracy, is used to analyze the electronic structure. It was used in combination with Born-Oppenheimer dynamics to perform calculations.

  18. Fine structure of carcinosarcoma cells and peritoneal macrophages activated by photodynamic therapy during their interaction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Coman, Niculina; Dima, Stefan V.

    1996-12-01

    The interaction of the photodynamic therapy activated macrophages (PDT-AM0) of the host and rat Walker-256 carcinosarcoma target cells (ascitic form) was investigated. The periotoneal macrophages were sensitized with different concentrations of Photofrin II (0.1 to 12 (mu) g/2.5 multiplied by 106 cells) and irradiated with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm; 10 mW) at different dose fluences varying between 1.5 and 15 kJ/m2. The degree of macrophage activation by PDT was estimated by means of the following parameters: (1) in vitro assay of cytotoxic and cytostatic activities and (2) observation at the electron microscopy. The results obtained indicate the following: (1) the highest rate of cytotoxic activity against Walker-256 (39.7%) and K562 (21.6%) cells was found in Photofrin II sensitized with 0.8 mg and exposure to He-Ne laser irradiation (3.0 kJ/m2): (2) the cytostatic activity of PDT-AM0 was higher against murine Walker-256 (54.7%) and lower on human K562 (28.1%) cells, in comparison with normal macrophages (NM0); (3) during interaction of PDT-AM0 in peritoneal cavity, the tumor cells were accompanied by strong changes in nuclear and cytoplasmic fine structure. Summing up, in photobioactivated macrophages by PDT some functional activities (cytotoxic, cytostatic and phagocytosis) were enhanced and induced ultrastructural changes in Walker-256 ascites carcinosarcoma cells by their interaction 'in vivo.'

  19. Phytosterol moiety effects on stability, tocopherol interaction, and anti-polymerization activity of phytosteryl ferulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antioxidant, anti-polymerization, stability, and interaction with tocopherols of corn and rice phytosteryl ferulates have been compared in several heating and frying studies. We have found that corn steryl ferulates are very protective of soybean oil from polymerization during heating and frying...

  20. Making Learning Active with Interactive Whiteboards, Podcasts, and Digital Storytelling in ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jung Won; Suh, Suhyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effective ways to integrate an interactive whiteboard, podcast, and digital storytelling for language proficiency development in English language learners. Researchers integrated these three technologies into a 60-hour intensive summer English program and investigated their impacts on student vocabulary…

  1. Numerical simulation of the interaction of elements of active protection with metal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper is aimed at working out the algorithm of multi-contact interaction of solid bodies; it studies the influence of the shape of projectile (damage agent) on its penetration capability. Steel projectiles of different shape have been considered as damage agents: sphere, regular tetrahedron, cube, cylinder and plate. The weight of projectiles has been kept the same. Antitank grenade has been used as a target. The study has been conducted by means of numerical simulation using finite element analysis. The simulation is three-dimensional. Behavior of materials has been described by elasto-plastic model taking into consideration the fracture and fragmentation of interacting bodies. The speed of interaction has been considered within the range of 800 to 2000 m/s. Research results demonstrated significant influence of the projectile shape on its penetration capability. Projectile in the shape of elongated cylinder has shown better penetration capability. Considering the weight of damage agents (except for sphere and plate) their maximum penetration capability has been reached at the speed of 1400 m/s. Increase of the speed of interaction has been followed by intensive fracture of damage agents and their penetration capability thus has worsened.

  2. Interaction of neuropeptide Y genotype and childhood emotional maltreatment on brain activity during emotional processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opmeer, Esther M.; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, Andre

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been associated with stress reactivity in affective disorders and is most densely expressed in the amygdala. An important stressor associated with affective disorders is the experience of childhood emotional maltreatment (CEM). We investigated whether the interaction of NPY

  3. Chemical Interactions of Surface-Active Agents with Growing Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Gels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirglová, Hana; Maldonato-Hódar, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 20 (2010), s. 16103-16109 ISSN 0743-7463 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : chemical interactions * FTIR * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.269, year: 2010

  4. Interaction between the triglyceride lipase ATGL and the arf1 activator GBF1

    KAUST Repository

    Ellong, Emy Njoh

    2011-07-18

    The Arf1 exchange factor GBF1 (Golgi Brefeldin A resistance factor 1) and its effector COPI are required for delivery of ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) to lipid droplets (LDs). Using yeast two hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and direct protein binding approaches, we report here that GBF1 and ATGL interact directly and in cells, through multiple contact sites on each protein. The C-terminal region of ATGL interacts with N-terminal domains of GBF1, including the catalytic Sec7 domain, but not with full-length GBF1 or its entire N-terminus. The N-terminal lipase domain of ATGL (called the patatin domain) interacts with two C-terminal domains of GBF1, HDS (Homology downstream of Sec7) 1 and HDS2. These two domains of GBF1 localize to lipid droplets when expressed alone in cells, but not to the Golgi, unlike the full-length GBF1 protein, which localizes to both. We suggest that interaction of GBF1 with ATGL may be involved in the membrane trafficking pathway mediated by GBF1, Arf1 and COPI that contributes to the localization of ATGL to lipid droplets.

  5. Cofactor interactions in the activation of tissue non-specific alkaline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    phosphatase: Synergistic effects of Zn. 2+ and Mg. 2+ ions ... Keywords: Alkaline phosphatase; kinetics; Enzyme-cofactor interaction; synergism ... subject, we have been studying the effect of cofactors and inhibitors on the catalytic properties of mammalian ALPs5,8. Kinetic analysis shows that high concentrations of Mg2+.

  6. Assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions during southern African biomass burning activity, employing cloud parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiston, Modise; McFiggans, Gordon; Schultz, David

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we perform a simulation of the spatial distributions of particle and gas concentrations from a significantly large source of pollution event during a dry season in southern Africa and their interactions with cloud processes. Specific focus is on the extent to which cloud-aerosol interactions are affected by various inputs (i.e. emissions) and parameterizations and feedback mechanisms in a coupled mesoscale chemistry-meteorology model -herein Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). The southern African dry season (May-Sep) is characterised by biomass burning (BB) type of pollution. During this period, BB particles are frequently observed over the subcontinent, at the same time a persistent deck of stratocumulus covers the south West African coast, favouring long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean of aerosols above clouds. While anthropogenic pollutants tend to spread more over the entire domain, biomass pollutants are concentrated around the burning areas, especially the savannah and tropical rainforest of the Congo Basin. BB is linked to agricultural practice at latitudes south of 10° N. During an intense burning event, there is a clear signal of strong interactions of aerosols and cloud microphysics. These species interfere with the radiative budget, and directly affect the amount of solar radiation reflected and scattered back to space and partly absorbed by the atmosphere. Aerosols also affect cloud microphysics by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying precipitation pattern and the cloud albedo. Key area is to understand the role of pollution on convective cloud processes and its impacts on cloud dynamics. The hypothesis is that an environment of potentially high pollution enables the probability of interactions between co-located aerosols and cloud layers. To investigate this hypothesis, we outline an approach to integrate three elements: i) focusing on regime(s) where there are strong indications of

  7. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  8. Groundwater and surface-water interactions and impacts of human activities in the Hailiutu catchment, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Yangxiao; Wenninger, Jochen; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Wang, Xusheng; Wan, Li

    2017-08-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water have been significantly affected by human activities in the semi-arid Hailiutu catchment, northwest China. Several methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal interactions between groundwater and surface water. Isotopic and chemical analyses of water samples determined that groundwater discharges to the Hailiutu River, and mass balance equations were employed to estimate groundwater seepage rates along the river using chemical profiles. The hydrograph separation method was used to estimate temporal variations of groundwater discharges to the river. A numerical groundwater model was constructed to simulate groundwater discharges along the river and to analyze effects of water use in the catchment. The simulated seepage rates along the river compare reasonably well with the seepage estimates derived from a chemical profile in 2012. The impacts of human activities (river-water diversion and groundwater abstraction) on the river discharge were analyzed by calculating the differences between the simulated natural groundwater discharge and the measured river discharge. Water use associated with the Hailiutu River increased from 1986 to 1991, reached its highest level from 1992 to 2000, and decreased from 2001 onwards. The reduction of river discharge might have negative impacts on the riparian ecosystem and the water availability for downstream users. The interactions between groundwater and surface water as well as the consequences of human activities should be taken into account when implementing sustainable water resources management in the Hailiutu catchment.

  9. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelisa Graff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423 or other ancestry (n = 20,029. We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.

  10. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A; Justice, Anne E; Young, Kristin L; Feitosa, Mary F; Barata, Llilda; Winkler, Thomas W; Chu, Audrey Y; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Qi, Qibin; Ngwa, Julius S; Renström, Frida; Quaye, Lydia; Eicher, John D; Hayes, James E; Cornelis, Marilyn; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lim, Elise; Luan, Jian'an; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; Griffin, Paula J; Haller, Toomas; Ahmad, Shafqat; Marques-Vidal, Pedro M; Bien, Stephanie; Yengo, Loic; Teumer, Alexander; Smith, Albert Vernon; Kumari, Meena; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kleber, Marcus E; Hollensted, Mette; Lohman, Kurt; Rivera, Natalia V; Whitfield, John B; Zhao, Jing Hua; Stringham, Heather M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Huppertz, Charlotte; Willemsen, Gonneke; Peyrot, Wouter J; Wu, Ying; Kristiansson, Kati; Demirkan, Ayse; Fornage, Myriam; Hassinen, Maija; Bielak, Lawrence F; Cadby, Gemma; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mägi, Reedik; van der Most, Peter J; Jackson, Anne U; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Vitart, Veronique; Marten, Jonathan; Navarro, Pau; Bellis, Claire; Pasko, Dorota; Johansson, Åsa; Snitker, Søren; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Eriksson, Joel; Lim, Unhee; Aadahl, Mette; Adair, Linda S; Amin, Najaf; Balkau, Beverley; Auvinen, Juha; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Bertoni, Alain G; Blangero, John; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borja, Judith B; Brage, Søren; Busonero, Fabio; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Corre, Tanguy; Smith, George Davey; Delgado, Graciela E; Dueker, Nicole; Dörr, Marcus; Ebeling, Tapani; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D; Fu, Mao; Færch, Kristine; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; Gong, Jian; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; van Grootheest, Gerard; Harald, Kennet; Hastie, Nicholas D; Havulinna, Aki S; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J; Holmens, Oddgeir L; Holzapfel, Christina; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jie; Huang, Tao; Hui, Jennie; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; James, Alan L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jhun, Min A; Juonala, Markus; Kinnunen, Leena; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Kähönen, Mika; Lakka, Timo A; Launer, Lenore J; Lehne, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Marre, Michel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Monda, Keri L; Montgomery, Grant W; De Moor, Marleen H M; Mulas, Antonella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, A W; Männikkö, Reija; Männistö, Satu; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Nolte, Ilja M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perez, Jeremiah; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Peyser, Patricia A; Prokopenko, Inga; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rawal, Rajesh; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Rudan, Igor; Sarti, Cinzia; Sarzynski, Mark A; Savonen, Kai; Scott, William R; Sanna, Serena; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sidney, Steve; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Blair H; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Sternfeld, Barbara; Swift, Amy J; Tammelin, Tuija; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothée; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vestergaard, Henrik; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Waeber, Gérard; Walker, Mark; Wild, Sarah; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Zubair, Niha; Haiman, Christopher A; Lemarchand, Loic; Gyllensten, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Pérusse, Louis; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Cucca, Francesco; Hveem, Kristian; Hartman, Catharina A; Tönjes, Anke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Palmer, Lyle J; Kardia, Sharon L R; Rauramaa, Rainer; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco J C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mangino, Massimo; Laakso, Markku; Bouchard, Claude; Martin, Nicholas G; Kuh, Diana; Liu, Yongmei; Linneberg, Allan; März, Winfried; Strauch, Konstantin; Kivimäki, Mika; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Völzke, Henry; Qi, Lu; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Froguel, Philippe; Kooperberg, Charles; Vollenweider, Peter; Hallmans, Göran; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Weir, David R; Porteous, David J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel I; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Frayling, Timothy M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boehnke, Michael; Heid, Iris M; Mohlke, Karen L; Strachan, David P; Fox, Caroline S; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Klein, Robert J; Johnson, Andrew D; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O

    2017-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.

  11. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity ― A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Barata, Llilda; Chu, Audrey Y.; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Qi, Qibin; Ngwa, Julius S.; Quaye, Lydia; Eicher, John D.; Hayes, James E.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lim, Elise; Luan, Jian’an; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; Griffin, Paula J.; Haller, Toomas; Ahmad, Shafqat; Marques-Vidal, Pedro M.; Bien, Stephanie; Yengo, Loic; Teumer, Alexander; Smith, Albert Vernon; Kumari, Meena; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kleber, Marcus E.; Hollensted, Mette; Lohman, Kurt; Rivera, Natalia V.; Whitfield, John B.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Stringham, Heather M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Huppertz, Charlotte; Willemsen, Gonneke; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Wu, Ying; Kristiansson, Kati; Demirkan, Ayse; Fornage, Myriam; Hassinen, Maija; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Cadby, Gemma; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mägi, Reedik; van der Most, Peter J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Vitart, Veronique; Marten, Jonathan; Navarro, Pau; Bellis, Claire; Pasko, Dorota; Johansson, Åsa; Snitker, Søren; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Eriksson, Joel; Lim, Unhee; Aadahl, Mette; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Balkau, Beverley; Auvinen, Juha; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bertoni, Alain G.; Blangero, John; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Borja, Judith B.; Brage, Søren; Busonero, Fabio; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Corre, Tanguy; Smith, George Davey; Delgado, Graciela E.; Dueker, Nicole; Dörr, Marcus; Ebeling, Tapani; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D.; Fu, Mao; Færch, Kristine; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; Gong, Jian; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; van Grootheest, Gerard; Harald, Kennet; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holmens, Oddgeir L.; Holzapfel, Christina; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jie; Huang, Tao; Hui, Jennie; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; James, Alan L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jhun, Min A.; Juonala, Markus; Kinnunen, Leena; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Kähönen, Mika; Lakka, Timo A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehne, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Marre, Michel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Monda, Keri L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Mulas, Antonella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, A. W.; Männikkö, Reija; Männistö, Satu; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Perez, Jeremiah; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Peyser, Patricia A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rawal, Rajesh; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Rudan, Igor; Sarti, Cinzia; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Savonen, Kai; Scott, William R.; Sanna, Serena; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sidney, Steve; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Sternfeld, Barbara; Swift, Amy J.; Tammelin, Tuija; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothée; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vestergaard, Henrik; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Waeber, Gérard; Walker, Mark; Wild, Sarah; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zubair, Niha; Haiman, Christopher A.; Lemarchand, Loic; Gyllensten, Ulf; Ohlsson, Claes; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Pérusse, Louis; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Cucca, Francesco; Hveem, Kristian; Hartman, Catharina A.; Tönjes, Anke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Palmer, Lyle J.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mangino, Massimo; Laakso, Markku; Bouchard, Claude; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kuh, Diana; Liu, Yongmei; Linneberg, Allan; März, Winfried; Strauch, Konstantin; Kivimäki, Mika; Harris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Völzke, Henry; Qi, Lu; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Froguel, Philippe; Kooperberg, Charles; Vollenweider, Peter; Hallmans, Göran; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Weir, David R.; Porteous, David J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel I.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Frayling, Timothy M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boehnke, Michael; Heid, Iris M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Fox, Caroline S.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Franks, Paul W.; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery. PMID:28448500

  12. A Sonic hedgehog coreceptor, BOC regulates neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth via interaction with ABL and JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Tuan Anh; Leem, Young-Eun; Kim, Bok-Geon; Cho, Hana; Lee, Sang-Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a critical step for neurogenesis and remodeling synaptic circuitry during neuronal development and regeneration. An immunoglobulin superfamily member, BOC functions as Sonic hedgehog (Shh) coreceptor in canonical and noncanonical Shh signaling in neuronal development and axon outgrowth/guidance. However signaling mechanisms responsible for BOC action during these processes remain unknown. In our previous studies, a multiprotein complex containing BOC and a closely related protein CDO promotes myogenic differentiation through activation of multiple signaling pathways, including non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL. Given that ABL and Jun. N-terminal kinase (JNK) are implicated in actin cytoskeletal dynamics required for neurogenesis, we investigated the relationship between BOC, ABL and JNK during neuronal differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that BOC and ABL are induced in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells and cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs) during neuronal differentiation. BOC-depleted EC cells or Boc -/- NPCs exhibit impaired neuronal differentiation with shorter neurite formation. BOC interacts with ABL through its putative SH2 binding domain and seems to be phosphorylated in an ABL activity-dependent manner. Unlike wildtype BOC, ABL-binding defective BOC mutants exhibit impaired JNK activation and neuronal differentiation. Finally, Shh treatment enhances JNK activation which is diminished by BOC depletion. These data suggest that BOC interacts with ABL and activates JNK thereby promoting neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension...... of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online...... and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned...

  14. Multiagent-Based Simulation of Temporal-Spatial Characteristics of Activity-Travel Patterns Using Interactive Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a multiagent-based reinforcement learning algorithm, in which the interactions between travelers and the environment are considered to simulate temporal-spatial characteristics of activity-travel patterns in a city. Road congestion degree is added to the reinforcement learning algorithm as a medium that passes the influence of one traveler’s decision to others. Meanwhile, the agents used in the algorithm are initialized from typical activity patterns extracted from the travel survey diary data of Shangyu city in China. In the simulation, both macroscopic activity-travel characteristics such as traffic flow spatial-temporal distribution and microscopic characteristics such as activity-travel schedules of each agent are obtained. Comparing the simulation results with the survey data, we find that deviation of the peak-hour traffic flow is less than 5%, while the correlation of the simulated versus survey location choice distribution is over 0.9.

  15. Chronic nicotine modifies skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase activity through its interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phospholemman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Chibalin

    Full Text Available Our previous finding that the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR and the Na,K-ATPase interact as a regulatory complex to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity suggested that chronic, circulating nicotine may alter this interaction, with long-term changes in the membrane potential. To test this hypothesis, we chronically exposed rats to nicotine delivered orally for 21-31 days. Chronic nicotine produced a steady membrane depolarization of ∼3 mV in the diaphragm muscle, which resulted from a net change in electrogenic transport by the Na,K-ATPase α2 and α1 isoforms. Electrogenic transport by the α2 isoform increased (+1.8 mV while the activity of the α1 isoform decreased (-4.4 mV. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 isoforms and the nAChR did not change; however, the content of α2 subunit in the plasma membrane decreased by 25%, indicating that its stimulated electrogenic transport is due to an increase in specific activity. The physical association between the nAChR, the Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 subunits, and the regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, phospholemman (PLM, measured by co-immuno precipitation, was stable and unchanged. Chronic nicotine treatment activated PKCα/β2 and PKCδ and was accompanied by parallel increases in PLM phosphorylation at Ser(63 and Ser(68. Collectively, these results demonstrate that nicotine at chronic doses, acting through the nAChR-Na,K-ATPase complex, is able to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity in an isoform-specific manner and that the regulatory range includes both stimulation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Cholinergic modulation of Na,K-ATPase activity is achieved, in part, through activation of PKC and phosphorylation of PLM.

  16. The interaction between the activator agents batrachotoxin and veratridine and the gating processes of neuronal sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, T A; Wang, G K; Strichartz, G R

    1986-05-01

    The depolarization of frog sciatic nerves by the Na channel-activating toxins, batrachotoxin and veratridine, was studied using the sucrose-gap technique. To study the interaction between the activators and the gating processes of Na channels, we measured the depolarizations of unstimulated nerves, of nerves during repetitive stimulation, and of nerves whose Na channel inactivation process had been pharmacologically modified. Stimulation enhanced the rates of depolarization by the activators but did not effect the steady state depolarization values. Of the three inhibitors of Na channel inactivation that were tested (Leiurus alpha-scorpion toxin, chloramine T, and Ni2+), only Leiurus toxin enhanced the potencies of the activators. Neither chloramine T nor Ni2+ had any effect on the steady state level of depolarization produced by either activator. Both chloramine T and Ni2+, however, enhanced the rate of batrachotoxin action, although neither affected the rate of veratridine action. Leiurus toxin also potentiated the effects of the activators in chloramine T-treated nerves. We tested the interaction between the Na channel activators and a class of agents, local anesthetics, that stabilize a non-conducting state of the Na channel. The presence of lidocaine inhibited the depolarization produced by addition of either activator, although the addition of lidocaine subsequent to the development of batrachotoxin-induced depolarization produced repolarization very weakly and slowly. We also found that the lidocaine homologue, RAC 109I, was about 3 times as potent as its stereoisomer, RAC 109II, in its ability both to reduce the compound action potential amplitude and to inhibit the veratridine-induced depolarization.

  17. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, Arata, E-mail: anishimo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Li, Tao-Sheng [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Hamano, Kimikazu [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  18. Interactive user's application to Genie 2000 spectroscopy system for automation of hair neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiev, S.A.; Danilova, E.A.; Kadirova, M.; Kadirov, U.S.; Kist, A.A.; Osinskaya, N.S.; Rakhmanov, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In recent years lower plants such as mosses or lichens and for arid countries bark and leaves of tree have been used as biomonitors in environmental studies. Alongside with plants the trace elemental human hair composition also has been used as an indicator of pollution of natural and industrial environments. Because of convenience, easy access, nondestruction of sampling, and also preservation of information for a long time period, human hair even more often and widely used in various researches. In the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan hair trace element analysis in environment monitoring and mapping and in health status studies have been used. Scientist of activation analysis laboratory always has a lot of routine work on biological objects analysis, so they regularly improved applied nuclear techniques. At present one of such good work-out technique is consider a hair multielement instrumental neutron activation analysis using single comparator standard method. Since in frames of the 'Enhanced nuclear techniques for materials identification' STCU project, the Radioanalytical Center (RAC) was created in October 2004, for analysis such objects as metals and alloys, minerals and ores, hydrogeological samples, technological products, soils, fertilizers, biological samples, foodstuff, water, sediments, construction materials, as well as materials of unknown composition the unique equipment of RAC have been used. For example, human hair analysis has performed on the base of HP Ge-detector with high resolution gamma-spectrometer of Canberra Industries, Inc. Genie-2000 Spectroscopy System of Canberra spectrometers, represents the true state of the art in spectroscopy software platforms. Genie 2000 is a comprehensive set of capabilities for acquiring and analyzing spectra from Multichannel Analyzers (MCA). Its functions include MCA control, spectral display and manipulation, basic spectrum analysis and

  19. The New Digital Media Value Network: Proposing an Interactive Model of Digital Media Value Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Chan-Olmsted

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study models the dynamic nature of today’s media markets using the framework of value-adding activities in the provision and consumption of media products. The proposed user-centric approach introduces the notion that the actions of external users, social media, and interfaces affect the internal value activities of media firms via a feedback loop, and therefore should themselves be considered value activities. The model also suggests a more comprehensive list of indicators for value assessment.

  20. MEK1 inhibits cardiac PPARα activity by direct interaction and prevents its nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid el Azzouzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The response of the postnatal heart to growth and stress stimuli includes activation of a network of signal transduction cascades, including the stress activated protein kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 pathways. In response to increased workload, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK MEK1 has been shown to be active. Studies embarking on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades in the heart have indicated peroxisome-proliferators activated-receptors (PPARs as downstream effectors that can be regulated by this signaling cascade. Despite the importance of PPARα in controlling cardiac metabolism, little is known about the relationship between MAPK signaling and cardiac PPARα signaling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence approaches we show a complex formation of PPARα with MEK1 and not with ERK1/2. Binding of PPARα to MEK1 is mediated via a LXXLL motif and results in translocation from the nucleus towards the cytoplasm, hereby disabling the transcriptional activity of PPARα. Mice subjected to voluntary running-wheel exercise showed increased cardiac MEK1 activation and complex formation with PPARα, subsequently resulting in reduced PPARα activity. Inhibition of MEK1, using U0126, blunted this effect. CONCLUSION: Here we show that activation of the MEK1-ERK1/2 pathway leads to specific inhibition of PPARα transcriptional activity. Furthermore we show that this inhibitory effect is mediated by MEK1, and not by its downstream effector kinase ERK1/2, through a mechanism involving direct binding to PPARα and subsequent stimulation of PPARα export from the nucleus.

  1. SCIENTIFIC AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION: THE ESSENCE AND INTERACTION OF THE COMPONENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Meniailo, Viktorija

    2017-01-01

    One of the main directions of state policy in education is the development of scientific and innovation activities at institutions of higher education. It imposes on them additional features related to the inclusion of scientific activities in universities united innovative process for the creating and practical application of new knowledge. The purpose of the article is to establish the relationship between scientific and innovation activities and clarify the essence of scientific and innova...

  2. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits.

  3. The Pathway Active Learning Environment: An interactive web-based tool for physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Christopher Matthew

    The work described here represents an effort to design, construct, and test an interactive online multimedia learning environment that can provide physics instruction to students in their homes. The system was designed with one-on-one human tutoring in mind as the mode of instruction. The system uses an original combination of a video-based tutor that incorporates natural language processing video-centered lessons and additional illustrative multimedia. Our Synthetic Interview (SI) tutor provides pre-recorded video answers from expert physics instructors in response to students' typed natural language questions. Our lessons cover Newton's laws and provide a context for the tutoring interaction to occur, connect physics ideas to real-world behavior of mechanical systems, and allow for quantitative testing of physics. Additional multimedia can be used to supplement the SI tutors' explanations and illustrate the physics of interest. The system is targeted at students of algebra-based and concept-based physics at the college and high school level. The system logs queries to the SI tutor, responses to lesson questions and several other interactions with the system, tagging those interactions with a username and timestamp. We have provided several groups of students with access to our system under several different conditions ranging from the controlled conditions of our interview facility to the naturalistic conditions of use at home. In total nearly two-hundred students have accessed the system. To gain insight into the ways students might use the system and understand the utility of its various components we analyzed qualitative interview data collected with 22 algebra-based physics students who worked with our system in our interview facility. We also performed a descriptive analysis of data from the system's log of user interactions. Finally we explored the use of machine learning to explore the possibility of using automated assessment to augment the interactive

  4. Ketolide antimicrobial activity persists after disruption of interactions with domain II of 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Guy W; Jakobsen, Lene; Andersen, Niels M; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    Ketolides are the latest derivatives developed from the macrolide erythromycin to improve antimicrobial activity. All macrolides and ketolides bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit, where they come into contact with adenosine 2058 (A2058) within domain V of the 23S rRNA and block protein synthesis. An additional interaction at nucleotide A752 in the rRNA domain II is made via the synthetic carbamate-alkyl-aryl substituent in the ketolides HMR3647 (telithromycin) and HMR3004, and this interaction contributes to their improved activities. Only a few macrolides, including tylosin, come into contact with domain II of the rRNA and do so via interactions with nucleotides G748 and A752. We have disrupted these macrolide-ketolide interaction sites in the rRNA to assess their relative importance for binding. Base substitutions at A752 were shown to confer low levels of resistance to telithromycin but not to HMR3004, while deletion of A752 confers low levels of resistance to both ketolides. Mutations at position 748 confer no resistance. Substitution of guanine at A2058 gives rise to the MLS(B) (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype, which confers resistance to all the drugs. However, resistance to ketolides was abolished when the mutation at position 2058 was combined with a mutation in domain II of the same rRNA. In contrast, the same dual mutations in rRNAs conferred enhanced resistance to tylosin. Our results show that the domain II interactions of telithromycin and HMR3004 differ from each other and from those of tylosin. The data provide no indication that mutations within domain II, either alone or in combination with an A2058 mutation, can confer significant levels of telithromycin resistance.

  5. Modeling the Surface Water-Groundwater Interaction in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Impacted by Agricultural Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Wu, B.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In many semi-arid and arid regions, interaction between surface water and groundwater plays an important role in the eco-hydrological system. The interaction is often complicated by agricultural activities such as surface water diversion, groundwater pumping, and irrigation. In existing surface water-groundwater integrated models, simulation of the interaction is often simplified, which could introduce significant simulation uncertainty under certain circumstance. In this study, GSFLOW, a USGS model coupling PRMS and MODFLOW, was improved to better characterize the surface water-groundwater interaction. The practices of water diversion from rivers, groundwater pumping and irrigation are explicitly simulated. In addition, the original kinematic wave routing method was replaced by a dynamic wave routing method. The improved model was then applied in Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe River Baisn), China, where the famous 'Silk Road' came through. It is a typical semi-arid region of the western China, with extensive agriculture in its oasis. The model was established and calibrated using the data in 2000-2008. A series of numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of those improvements. It has been demonstrated that with the improvements, the observed streamflow and groundwater level were better reproduced by the model. The improvements have a significant impact on the simulation of multiple fluxes associated with the interaction, such as groundwater discharge, riverbed seepage, infiltration, etc. Human activities were proved to be key elements of the water cycle in the study area. The study results have important implications to the water resources modeling and management in semi-arid and arid basins.

  6. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor interacts with HBx and inhibits its apoptotic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shimeng; Lin Ruxian; Zhou Zhe; Wen Siyuan; Lin Li; Chen Suhong; Shan Yajun; Cong Yuwen; Wang Shengqi

    2006-01-01

    HBx, a transcriptional transactivating protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify that HBx interacts with MIF directly. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation, cell growth, and even tumor formation. The interaction between HBx and MIF was verified with co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and cellular colocalization. The expression of MIF was up-regulated in HBV particle producing cell 2.2.15 compared with HepG2 cell. Both HBx and MIF cause HepG2 cell G /G 1 phase arrest, proliferation inhibition, and apoptosis. However, MIF can counteract the apoptotic effect of HBx. These results may provide evidence to explain the link between HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma

  7. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Maribel; Betancourt, Adelmo; Hernandez, Clara; Marchan, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl 2 (phen)] and [PdCl 2 (phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 μmol L -1 in 48 h. (author)

  8. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Maribel [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Centro de Quimica; Betancourt, Adelmo [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad Experimental de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica; Hernandez, Clara [Universidad de Carabobo Sede Aragua, Maracay (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Marchan, Edgar [Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela). Inst. de Investigaciones en Biomedicina y Ciencias Aplicadas. Nucleo de Sucre

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl{sub 2}(phen)] and [PdCl{sub 2}(phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in 48 h. (author)

  9. The diversity of travel behaviour: Motives and social interactions in leisure time activities

    OpenAIRE

    Stauffacher, Michael; Schlich, Robert; Axhausen, Kay W.; Scholz, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Influencing travel behaviour towards a more sustainable form has long been the subject of lively discussion. Whilst some claim that urban form can influence mobility patterns, others stress personal characteristics. Still, psychological factors like personal need and motives (e.g., social interaction, recreation, variety seeking and curiosity) are also relevant, especially for the highly individualistic behaviour of leisure travel, but have been largely neglected in travel behaviour studies. ...

  10. Retinoblastoma protein directly interacts with and activates the transcription factor NF-IL6.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, P L; Riley, D J; Chen-Kiang, S; Lee, W H

    1996-01-01

    The biological function of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) in the cell division cycle has been extensively documented, but its apparent role in differentiation remains largely unexplored. To investigate how RB is involved in differentiation, the U937 large-cell lymphoma line was induced to differentiate along a monocyte/macrophage lineage. During differentiation RB was found to interact directly through its simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen)-binding domain with NF-IL6, a member o...

  11. Evidence for activation of a respiratory burst in the interaction of human neutrophils with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    May, M E; Spagnuolo, P J

    1987-01-01

    We examined the capacity of human neutrophils to develop a respiratory burst, as monitored by superoxide release, in response to interaction with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Serum-opsonized, heat-killed mycobacteria induced significant release of superoxide from neutrophils after 30 min of exposure, with a maximum release of 34 +/- 1.7 nmol/30 min per 5 X 10(6) neutrophils occurring with a mycobacterium/neutrophil ratio of 40:1. Similar levels of superoxide release were induced by live mycoba...

  12. How Do Small Things Make a Big Difference? Activities to Teach about Human-Microbe Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Chandana; Hug, Barbara; Waters, Jillian L.; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific studies are providing increasing evidence for how microbes living in and on us are essential to our good health. However, many students still think of microbes only as germs that harm us. The classroom activities presented here are designed to shift student thinking on this topic. In these guided inquiry activities, students…

  13. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  14. Interactive program packages for preparing nuclear activation data in the high-energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, A.A.; Kuptsov, I.S.; Natalenko, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The author describes integrated program packages intended to increase the efficiency of basic and applied research aimed at providing nuclear activation data necessary for calculations of projected nuclear power facilities. An algorithm is described for obtaining estimated nuclear activation data with the aid of the proposed programs based on modern methods of multicriterial theory of decision-making [ru

  15. Interacting Patients: The construction of active patientship in quality improvement initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D. Vennik (Femke)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe promotion of active patient participation in healthcare quality improvement projects is an important policy goal in the Netherlands and other Western countries. Healthcare quality improvement is no longer perceived to be an exclusive professional activity; patients, who may be

  16. Identification of small-molecule antagonists that inhibit an activator: coactivator interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jennifer L; Amezcua, Carlos A; Mayr, Bernhard; Flechner, Lawrence; Murawsky, Christopher M; Emerson, Beverly; Zor, Tsaffrir; Gardner, Kevin H; Montminy, Marc

    2004-12-21

    Phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) at Ser-133 in response to hormonal stimuli triggers cellular gene expression via the recruitment of the histone acetylase coactivator paralogs CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300 to the promoter. The NMR structure of the CREB:CBP complex, using relevant interaction domains called KID and KIX, respectively, reveals a shallow hydrophobic groove on the surface of KIX that accommodates an amphipathic helix in phospho (Ser-133) KID. Using an NMR-based screening approach on a preselected small-molecule library, we identified several compounds that bind to different surfaces on KIX. One of these, KG-501 (2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate), targeted a surface distal to the CREB binding groove that includes Arg-600, a residue that is required for the CREB:CBP interaction. When added to live cells, KG-501 disrupted the CREB: CBP complex and attenuated target gene induction in response to cAMP agonist. These results demonstrate the ability of small molecules to interfere with second-messenger signaling cascades by inhibiting specific protein-protein interactions in the nucleus.

  17. Neuronal activity (c-Fos delineating interactions of the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hong eQiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex and basal ganglia (BG form a neural circuit that is disrupted in disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. We found that neuronal activity (c-Fos in the BG followed cortical activity, i.e., high in arousal state and low in sleep state. To determine if cortical activity is necessary for BG activity, we administered atropine to rats to induce a dissociative state resulting in slow-wave EEG but hyperactive motor behaviors. Atropine blocked c-Fos expression in the cortex and BG, despite high c-Fos expression in the sub-cortical arousal neuronal groups and thalamus, indicating that cortical activity is required for BG activation. To identify which glutamate receptors in the BG that mediate cortical inputs, we injected ketamine (NMDA receptor antagonist and 6-cyano-nitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (CNQX, a non-NMDA receptor antagonist. Systemic ketamine and CNQX administration revealed that NMDA receptors mediated subthalamic nucleus (STN input to internal globus pallidus (GPi and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, while non-NMDA receptor mediated cortical input to the STN. Both types of glutamate receptors were involved in mediating cortical input to the striatum. Dorsal striatal (caudoputamen, CPu dopamine depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in reduced activity of the CPu, globus pallidus externa (GPe, and STN but increased activity of the GPi, SNr and putative layer V neurons in the motor cortex. Our results reveal that the cortical activity is necessary for BG activity and clarifies the pathways and properties of the BG-cortical network and their putative role in the pathophysiology of BG disorders.

  18. Interacting psychosocial and environmental correlates of leisure-time physical activity: a three-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Cerin, Ester; Conway, Terry L; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Owen, Neville; Kerr, Jacqueline; Cardon, Greet; Sallis, James F

    2014-07-01

    The main study objective was to examine the moderating effects of perceived enjoyment, barriers/benefits, perceived social support and self-efficacy, on the associations of perceived environmental attributes with walking for recreation and leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and whether these potential moderating effects differed by gender and study site. Data from three observational studies in the United States (Seattle and Baltimore), Australia (Adelaide), and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. In total, 6014 adults (20-65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkable and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale, a validated questionnaire on psychosocial attributes, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. General additive mixed models were conducted in R. Enjoyment of physical activity, perceived barriers to physical activity, perceived benefits of physical activity, social support from family and friends, and self-efficacy for physical activity moderated the relationships of specific perceived environmental characteristics with walking for recreation and/or leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Overall, moderating effects were in the same direction: environmental perceptions were positively associated with leisure-time activity, but associations were strongest in adults with less positive scores on psychosocial attributes. The findings were fairly consistent across gender and study sites. The present study findings are promising, as it seems that those who might benefit most from environmental interventions to promote physical activity, may mainly be adults at risk of being insufficiently active or those difficult to reach through individual health promotion programs.

  19. Interactions between procedural learning and cocaine exposure alter spontaneous and cortically-evoked spike activity in the dorsal striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janie eOndracek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that cocaine enhances gene regulation in the sensorimotor striatum associated with procedural learning in a running-wheel paradigm. Here we assessed whether cocaine produces enduring modifications of learning-related changes in striatal neuron activity, using single-unit recordings in anesthetized rats 1 day after the wheel training. Spontaneous and cortically-evoked spike activity was compared between groups treated with cocaine or vehicle immediately prior to the running-wheel training or placement in a locked wheel (control conditions. We found that wheel training in vehicle-treated rats increased the average firing rate of spontaneously active neurons without changing the relative proportion of active to quiescent cells. In contrast, in rats trained under the influence of cocaine, the proportion of spontaneously firing to quiescent cells was significantly greater than in vehicle-treated, trained rats. However, this effect was associated with a lower average firing rate in these spontaneously active cells, suggesting that training under the influence of cocaine recruited additional low-firing cells. Measures of cortically-evoked activity revealed a second interaction between cocaine treatment and wheel training, namely, a cocaine-induced decrease in spike onset latency in control rats (locked wheel. This facilitatory effect of cocaine was abolished when rats trained in the running wheel during cocaine action. These findings highlight important interactions between cocaine and procedural learning, which act to modify population firing activity and the responsiveness of striatal neurons to excitatory inputs. Moreover, these effects were found 24 hours after the training and last drug exposure indicating that cocaine exposure during the learning phase triggers long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity in the dorsal striatum. Such changes may contribute to the transition from recreational to habitual or compulsive drug

  20. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph, E-mail: kappock@purdue.edu [Purdue University, 175 South University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2063 (United States)

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 Å resolution contains tail–active site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  1. Antibacterial activity of essential oils on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and measurement of their binding interaction using optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyong-Hwan; Yang, Ki-Sook; Kim, Jin; Kim, Jin-Chul; Lee, Ki-Young

    2007-11-01

    Antibacterial activity of essential oils (Tea tree, Chamomile, Eucalyptus) on Staphylococcus aureus growth was evaluated as well as the essential oil-loaded alginate beads. The binding interactions between the cell and the essential oils were measured using an optical biosensor. The antibacterial activity of the essential oils to the cell was evaluated with their binding interaction and affinity. The antibacterial activity appeared in the order of Tea Tree> Chamomile>Eucalyptus, in comparison of the inhibition effects of the cell growth to the essential oils. The association rate constant and affinity of the cell binding on Tea Tree essential oil were 5.0 x 10(-13) ml/(CFU-s) and 5.0 x 10(5) ml/CFU, respectively. The affinity of the cell binding on Tea Tree was about twice higher than those on the other essential oils. It might be possible that an effective antibacterial activity of Tea Tree essential oil was derived from its strong adhesive ability to the cell, more so than those of the other essential oils.

  2. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  3. Inhibitory effects of spirulina platensis on carcinogen-activating cytochrome P450 isozymes and potential for drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savranoglu, Seda; Tumer, Tugba Boyunegmez

    2013-01-01

    Spirulina platensis (SP) has been considered as potential food source of 21st century due to its remarkable nutrient profile and therapeutic benefits. However, the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated drug/chemical interaction potential of SP has not yet been pursued. We investigated the effects of SP on the expressions and enzymatic activities of main CYP isozymes. After the rats were orally administered with SP daily for 5 consecutive weeks, there were significant downregulations in hepatic expression levels and inhibition in enzymatic activities of CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 compared to controls. In addition, a significant decrease was observed in CYP2C6-associated enzyme activity with no remarkable changes in messenger RNA (mRNA)/protein levels. The SP application resulted in significant increases in mRNA/protein levels of both CYP2B1 and CYP3A1 without a significant change in enzyme activities. These findings partly explain the chemopreventive properties of SP toward various organ toxicities, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis; however, its coadministration with some CYP substrates may lead to undesirable drug interactions.

  4. The antiproliferative activity of di-2-pyridylketone dithiocarbamate is partly attributed to catalase inhibition: detailing the interaction by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Liu, Youxun; Fu, Yun; Huang, Tengfei; Kang, Lixia; Li, Changzheng

    2017-08-22

    The bioactivity of drugs is attributed to their interaction with biological molecules, embodied in either their direct or indirect influence on enzyme activity and conformation. Di-2-pyridylketone hydrazine dithiocarbamate (DpdtC) exhibits significant antitumor activity in our preliminary study. We speculated that its activity may partly stem from enzyme inhibition due to strong metal chelating ability. To this end, we assessed its effect on catalase from erythrocytes and found evidence of inhibition, which was further confirmed by ROS determination in vivo. Thus, detailing the interaction between the agent and catalase via spectroscopic methods and molecular docking was required to obtain information on both the dynamics and thermodynamic parameters. The Lineweaver-Burk plot implied an uncompetitive pattern between DpdtC and catalase from beef liver, and IC 50 = ∼7 μM. The thermodynamic parameters from fluorescence quenching measurements indicated that DpdtC could bind to catalase with moderate affinity (K a = approximately 10 4 M -1 ). CD spectra revealed that DpdtC could significantly disrupt the secondary structure of catalase. Docking studies indicated that DpdtC bound to a flexible region of catalase, involving hydrogen bonds and salt bond; this was consistent with thermodynamic results from spectral investigations. Our data clearly showed that catalase inhibition of DpdtC was not due to direct chelation of iron from heme (killing), but through an allosteric effect. Thus, it can be concluded that the antiproliferative activity of DpdtC is partially attributed to its catalase inhibition.

  5. Addressing key concepts in physical geography through interactive learning activities in an online geo-ICT environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Gert; Steegen, An; Martens, Lotte

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number of geospatial datasets and free online geo-ICT tools offers new opportunities for education in Earth Sciences. Geospatial technology indeed provides an environment through which interactive learning can be introduced in Earth Sciences curricula. However, the effectiveness of such e-learning approaches in terms of learning outcomes has rarely been addressed. Here, we present our experience with the implementation of digital interactive learning activities within an introductory Physical Geography course attended by 90 undergraduate students in Geography, Geology, Biology and Archaeology. Two traditional lectures were replaced by interactive sessions (each 2 h) in a flexible classroom where students had to work both in team and individually in order to explore some key concepts through the integrated use of geospatial data within Google EarthTM. A first interactive lesson dealt with the classification of river systems and aimed to examine the conditions under which rivers tend to meander or to develop a braided pattern. Students were required to collect properties of rivers (river channel pattern, channel slope, climate, discharge, lithology, vegetation, etc). All these data are available on a global scale and have been added as separate map layers in Google EarthTM. Each student collected data for at least two rivers and added this information to a Google Drive Spreadsheet accessible to the entire group. This resulted in a database of more than one hundred rivers spread over various environments worldwide. In a second phase small groups of students discussed the potential relationships between river channel pattern and its controlling factors. Afterwards, the findings of each discussion group were presented to the entire audience. The same set-up was followed in a second interactive session to explore spatial variations in ecosystem properties such as net primary production and soil carbon content. The qualitative evaluation of both interactive

  6. Negative stereotype activation alters interaction between neural correlates of arousal, inhibition and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Cox, Christine L; Schmader, Toni; Ryan, Lee

    2012-10-01

    Priming negative stereotypes of African Americans can bias perceptions toward novel Black targets, but less is known about how these perceptions ultimately arise. Examining how neural regions involved in arousal, inhibition and control covary when negative stereotypes are activated can provide insight into whether individuals attempt to downregulate biases. Using fMRI, White egalitarian-motivated participants were shown Black and White faces at fast (32 ms) or slow (525 ms) presentation speeds. To create a racially negative stereotypic context, participants listened to violent and misogynistic rap (VMR) in the background. No music (NM) and death metal (DM) were used as control conditions in separate blocks. Fast exposure of Black faces elicited amygdala activation in the NM and VMR conditions (but not DM), that also negatively covaried with activation in prefrontal regions. Only in VMR, however, did amygdala activation for Black faces persist during slow exposure and positively covary with activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while negatively covarying with activation in orbitofrontal cortex. Findings suggest that contexts that prime negative racial stereotypes seem to hinder the downregulation of amygdala activation that typically occurs when egalitarian perceivers are exposed to Black faces.

  7. Interactive Timetabling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Tomas; Bartak, Roman

    2001-01-01

    Timetabling is a typical application of constraint programming whose task is to allocate activities to slots in available resources respecting various constraints like precedence and capacity. In this paper we present a basic concept, a constraint model, and the solving algorithms for interactive timetabling. Interactive timetabling combines automated timetabling (the machine allocates the activities) with user interaction (the user can interfere with the process of timetabling). Because the ...

  8. Different modes of APC/C activation control growth and neuron-glia interaction in the developing Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuert, Helen; Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Silies, Marion; Klämbt, Christian

    2017-12-15

    The development of the nervous system requires tight control of cell division, fate specification and migration. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that affects different steps of cell cycle progression, as well as having postmitotic functions in nervous system development. It can therefore link different developmental stages in one tissue. The two adaptor proteins, Fizzy/Cdc20 and Fizzy-related/Cdh1, confer APC/C substrate specificity. Here, we show that two distinct modes of APC/C function act during Drosophila eye development. Fizzy/Cdc20 controls the early growth of the eye disc anlage and the concomitant entry of glial cells onto the disc. In contrast, fzr/cdh1 acts during neuronal patterning and photoreceptor axon growth, and subsequently affects neuron-glia interaction. To further address the postmitotic role of Fzr/Cdh1 in controlling neuron-glia interaction, we identified a series of novel APC/C candidate substrates. Four of our candidate genes are required for fzr/cdh1 -dependent neuron-glia interaction, including the dynein light chain Dlc90F Taken together, our data show how different modes of APC/C activation can couple early growth and neuron-glia interaction during eye disc development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianlong [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Blissard, Gary W. [Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United State (United States); Liu, Tong-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Zhaofei, E-mail: zhaofeili73@outlook.com [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  11. High-Affinity Interaction of the K-Ras4B Hypervariable Region with the Ras Active Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Tanmay S.; Jang, Hyunbum; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Banerjee, Avik; Freed, Benjamin C.; Johannessen, Liv; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth; Tarasova, Nadya I.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that act as signal transducers between cell surface receptors and several intracellular signaling cascades. They contain highly homologous catalytic domains and flexible C-terminal hypervariable regions (HVRs) that differ across Ras isoforms. KRAS is among the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human tumors. Surprisingly, we found that the C-terminal HVR of K-Ras4B, thought to minimally impact the catalytic domain, directly interacts with the active site of the protein. The interaction is almost 100-fold tighter with the GDP-bound than the GTP-bound protein. HVR binding interferes with Ras-Raf interaction, modulates binding to phospholipids, and slightly slows down nucleotide exchange. The data indicate that contrary to previously suggested models of K-Ras4B signaling, HVR plays essential roles in regulation of signaling. High affinity binding of short peptide analogs of HVR to K-Ras active site suggests that targeting this surface with inhibitory synthetic molecules for the therapy of KRAS-dependent tumors is feasible. PMID:26682817

  12. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  13. Activation of Xer-recombination at dif: structural basis of the FtsKγ-XerD interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Andrew N; Xin, Yue; Boer, Stephanie; Reinhardt, Jonathan; Baker, Rachel; Arciszewska, Lidia K; Lewis, Peter J; Sherratt, David J; Löwe, Jan; Grainge, Ian

    2016-10-06

    Bacterial chromosomes are most often circular DNA molecules. This can produce a topological problem; a genetic crossover from homologous recombination results in dimerization of the chromosome. A chromosome dimer is lethal unless resolved. A site-specific recombination system catalyses this dimer-resolution reaction at the chromosomal site dif. In Escherichia coli, two tyrosine-family recombinases, XerC and XerD, bind to dif and carry out two pairs of sequential strand exchange reactions. However, what makes the reaction unique among site-specific recombination reactions is that the first step, XerD-mediated strand exchange, relies on interaction with the very C-terminus of the FtsK DNA translocase. FtsK is a powerful molecular motor that functions in cell division, co-ordinating division with clearing chromosomal DNA from the site of septation and also acts to position the dif sites for recombination. This is a model system for unlinking, separating and segregating large DNA molecules. Here we describe the molecular detail of the interaction between XerD and FtsK that leads to activation of recombination as deduced from a co-crystal structure, biochemical and in vivo experiments. FtsKγ interacts with the C-terminal domain of XerD, above a cleft where XerC is thought to bind. We present a model for activation of recombination based on structural data.

  14. Antifungal activity of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil and its constituent phytochemicals against Rhizopus oryzae: interaction with ergosterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lira Mota, Kelly Samara; de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; de Oliveira, Wylly Araújo; Lima, Igara Oliveira; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2012-12-05

    Mucormycoses are emerging infections that have high rates of morbidity and mortality. They show high resistance to antifungal agents, and there is a limited therapeutic arsenal currently available, therefore, there is a great need to give priority to testing therapeutic agents for the treatment of mucormycosis. Along this line, the use of essential oils and phytoconstituents has been emphasized as a new therapeutic approach. The objective of this work was to investigate the antifungal activity of the essential oil (EO) of Thymus vulgaris, and its constituents thymol and p-cymene against Rhizopus oryzae, through microbiological screening, determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFCs), effects on mycelial growth and germination of sporangiospores and interaction with ergosterol. The MIC of EO and thymol varied 128-512 µg/mL, but the MFC of EO and thymol varied 512-1024 µg/mL and 128-1024 µg/mL, respectively. The results also showed that EO and thymol significantly inhibited mycelial development and germination of sporangiospores. Investigation of the mechanism of antifungal action showed that EO and thymol interact with ergosterol. These data indicate that EO of T. vulgaris and thymol possess strong antifungal activity, which can be related to their interaction with ergosterol, supporting the possible use of these products in the treatment of mucormycosis.

  15. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  16. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis.The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined.McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy.Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  17. Effect of zinc insertion and hydrophobicity on the membrane interactions and PDT activity of porphyrin photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Christiane; Uchoa, Adjaci F; Oliveira, Carla S; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Baptista, Maurício S

    2009-02-01

    A series of photosensitizers (PS), which are meso-substituted tetra-cationic porphyrins, was synthesized in order to study the role of amphiphilicity and zinc insertion in photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy. Several properties of the PS were evaluated and compared within the series including photophysical properties (absorption spectra, fluorescence quantum yield Phif, and singlet oxygen quantum yield PhiDelta), uptake by vesicles, mitochondria and HeLa cells, dark and phototoxicity in HeLa cells. The photophysical properties of all compounds are quite similar (Phifinteraction of the zinc-substituted porphyrins is attributed to a complexing effect with phosphate groups of the phospholipids. Zinc insertion was also shown to decrease the interaction with isolated mitochondria and with the mitochondria of HeLa cells, an effect that has been explained by the particular characteristics of the mitochondrial internal membrane. Phototoxicity was shown to increase proportionally with membrane binding efficiency, which is attributed to favorable membrane interactions which allow more efficient membrane photooxidation. For this series of compounds, photodynamic efficiency is directly proportional to the membrane binding and cell uptake, but it is not totally related to mitochondrial targeting.

  18. Studies on levels and interactions of contact activation factors in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoem, N.O.

    1992-01-01

    Summary of findings and conclusions of relevance: A part of the thesis concerns the effects of intravenous contrast media on the blood pressure and on factors of the contact activation system in the rat. The intravenous injection of dextran induced a profound and lasting fall in blood pressure, preceded by significant lowering in prekallikrein and activation factor 12. The non-ionic radiographic contrast media iohexol caused no significant alterations, neither in blood pressure, nor in levels of contact factors, whereas the ionic radiographic contrast media iodipamide had effects. It induced a rapid, but short-lived, fall in blood pressure and a small, but statistically significant reduction in the measurable amount of activation factor 12a. An observation of significance was that pretreatment of the rats with iodipamide almost blocked the dextran-induced blood pressure fall, and abolished the reduction in prekallikrein and activation factor 12a. It is concluded that the ionic radiographic contrast media used was capable of blocking dextran shock in the rat by preventing an activation of contact activation system. 130 refs., 5 figs

  19. Natural Interactions in Artifical Situations: Focus Groups as an Active Social Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discuss the question of how the validity of focus group data can be reframed when approaching focus groups as social experiments in a science and technology approach. By using this frame we first of all comes to perceive the focus group discussion as an artificial situation, while...... the interactions going on in the group can be described as natural occurring data (cf. Silverman, 2007). Thus this approach comes to terms with some of the problems addressed within both positivistic as well as constructivist uses of focus group methods. Secondly, framing focus groups as social experiments also...

  20. Interaction of cadmium(2) trifluoroacetate with activated aromatic compounds: a new reaction of direct metallation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, V.I.; Denisov, S.P.; Moskalenko, A.I.; Stamova, L.G.; Gulin, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of cadmium trifluoroacetate with aniline, 4-bromo-aniline, indole and benzimidazole was studied to develop a simple method for synthesizing cadmium organic compounds by direct electrophilic metallation of aromatic compounds. It is shown that heating of the reagents in anhydrous ethanol for several hours or without a solvent at 100-120 deg C for 5-10 min with subsequent treatment of the reacting mass by sodium chloride involves formation of the relevant cadmium organic compounds. The substances prepared were characterized by the methods of element analysis, IR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy [ru

  1. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. Methods During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers) living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Results Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p parents who provided above average levels of support had children who participated in more minutes of MVPA (114.2 vs. 98.3, p = 0.03). While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher levels of child

  2. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Erin; Hughes, Sheryl O; Goldberg, Jeanne P; Hyatt, Raymond R; Economos, Christina D

    2010-10-07

    Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers) living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p parents who provided above average levels of support had children who participated in more minutes of MVPA (114.2 vs. 98.3, p = 0.03). While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher levels of child physical activity. This work

  3. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyatt Raymond R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and children's PA level. Methods During the spring of 2007 a diverse group of 99 parent-child dyads (29% White, 49% Black, 22% Hispanic; 89% mothers living in low-income rural areas of the US participated in a cross-sectional study. Using validated questionnaires, parents self-reported their parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved and activity-related parenting practices. Height and weight were measured for each dyad and parents reported demographic information. Child PA was measured objectively through accelerometers and expressed as absolute counts and minutes engaged in intensity-specific activity. Results Seventy-six children had valid accelerometer data. Children engaged in 113.4 ± 37.0 min. of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA per day. Children of permissive parents accumulated more minutes of MVPA than those of uninvolved parents (127.5 vs. 97.1, p p = 0.03. While controlling for known covariates, an uninvolved parenting style was the only parenting behavior associated with child physical activity. Parenting style moderated the association between two parenting practices - reinforcement and monitoring - and child physical activity. Specifically, post-hoc analyses revealed that for the permissive parenting style group, higher levels of parental reinforcement or monitoring were associated with higher levels of child physical activity. Conclusions This work extends the current literature by demonstrating the potential

  4. Interactive augmented reality using Scratch 2.0 to improve physical activities for children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ming

    2015-02-01

    This study uses a body motion interactive game developed in Scratch 2.0 to enhance the body strength of children with disabilities. Scratch 2.0, using an augmented-reality function on a program platform, creates real world and virtual reality displays at the same time. This study uses a webcam integration that tracks movements and allows participants to interact physically with the project, to enhance the motivation of children with developmental disabilities to perform physical activities. This study follows a single-case research using an ABAB structure, in which A is the baseline and B is the intervention. The experimental period was 2 months. The experimental results demonstrated that the scores for 3 children with developmental disabilities increased considerably during the intervention phrases. The developmental applications of these results are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. I. Nonrelativisticand scalar-relativistic general active space implementationwith application to (Rb-Ba)+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2008-01-01

    discuss the parallel speedup with respect to machine-dependent aspects. The largest sample MRCI calculation includes 1.5x109 Slater determinants. Using the new code we determine for the first time the full short-range electronic potentials and spectroscopic constants for the ground state and for eight low......We present a parallel implementation of a string-driven general active space configuration interaction program for nonrelativistic and scalar-relativistic electronic-structure calculations. The code has been modularly incorporated in the DIRAC quantum chemistry program package. The implementation...... is based on the message passing interface and a distributed data model in order to efficiently exploit key features of various modern computer architectures. We exemplify the nearly linear scalability of our parallel code in large-scale multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations, and we...

  6. The Procoagulant Activity of Apoptotic Cells Is Mediated by Interaction with Factor XII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizhen Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptotic cells, by externalizing phosphatidylserine (PS as a hallmark feature, are procoagulant. However, the mechanism by which apoptotic cells activate coagulation system remains unknown. Intrinsic coagulation pathway is initiated by coagulation factor XII (FXII of contact activation system. The purpose of this study was to determine whether FXII is involved in procoagulant activity of apoptotic cells. Using western blotting and chromogenic substrate assay, we found that incubation with apoptotic cells, but not with viable cells, resulted in rapid cleavage and activation of FXII in the presence of prekallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen (HK, other two components of contact activation system. As detected by flow cytometry, FXII bound to apoptotic cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by annexin V and PS liposome. Direct association of FXII with PS was confirmed in a surface plasmon resonance assay. Clotting time of FXII-deficient plasma induced by apoptotic cells was significantly prolonged, which was fully reversed by replenishment with FXII. Corn trypsin inhibitor, a FXII inhibitor, completely prevented apoptotic cells-induced intrinsic tenase complex formation. Consistently, apoptotic cells significantly increased thrombin production in normal plasma, which was not affected by an inhibitory anti-tissue factor antibody. However, blocking of PS by annexin V, inhibition of FXII, or the deficiency of FXII suppressed apoptotic cells-induced thrombin generation. Addition of purified FXII to FXII-deficient plasma recovered thrombin generation to the normal plasma level. In conclusion, FXII binds to apoptotic cells via PS and becomes activated, thereby constituting a novel mechanism mediating the procoagulant activity of apoptotic cells.

  7. Final report: Mapping Interactions in Hybrid Systems with Active Scanning Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezovsky, Jesse [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This project aimed to study and map interactions between components of hybrid nanodevices using a novel scanning probe approach. To enable this work, we initially constructed a flexible experimental apparatus allowing for simultaneous scanning probe and confocal optical microscopy measurements. This setup was first used for all-optical measurements of nanostructures, with the focus then shifting to hybrid devices in which single coherent electron spins are coupled to micron-scale ferromagnetic elements, which may prove useful for addressing single spins, enhanced sensing, or spin-wave-mediated coupling of spins for quantum information applications. A significant breakthrough was the realization that it is not necessary to fabricate a magnetic structure on a scanning probe – instead a ferromagnetic vortex core can act as an integrated, solid state, scanning probe. The core of the vortex produces a very strong, localized fringe field which can be used analogously to an MFM tip. Unlike a traditional MFM tip, however, the vortex core is scanned within an integrated device (eliminating drift), and can be moved on vastly faster timescales. This approach allows the detailed investigation of interactions between single spins and complex driven ferromagnetic dynamics.

  8. HOW FUNGI INTERACT WITH NEMATODE TO ACTIVATE THE PLANT DEFENCE RESPONSE TO TOMATO PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, P; Costanza, A; Zonno, M C; Molinari, S; Altomare, C

    2014-01-01

    Management of plant parasitic nematodes with nematode predators, parasites or antagonists is an eco-friendly approach that may avoid the problems arisen by the use of toxic chemicals. Fungi belonging to Trichoderma spp. are well known in literature for their role in control of plant parasitic nematodes. Root-knot nematodes (RKNs), Meloidogyne spp., are obligate parasites that cause the formation of familiar galls on the roots of many cultivated plants. The interaction between the M. incognita motile second stage juveniles (J2s) and the isolate ITEM 908 of Trichoderma harzianum was examined in its effect on the nematode infestation level of susceptible tomato plants. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ITEM 908 interacts with nematode-infected tomato plants, the expression patterns of the genes PR1 (marker of Salycilic Acid-depending resistance signalling pathway) and JERF3 (marker of the Jasmonic Acid/Ethylene-depending resistance signalling pathway) were detected over time in: i) untreated roots; ii) roots pre-treated with the fungus; iii) roots inoculated with the nematode; iv) pre-treated and inoculated roots. Infestation parameters were checked in untreated plants and plants treated with the fungus to test the effect of the fungus on nematode infestation level and to compare this effect with the expression of the genes PR1 and JERF3, involved in induced resistance.

  9. Robust interactions between the effects of auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations on cell activities in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihisa

    2017-04-15

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a cluster of GABAergic cells, is thought to regulate bottom-up and top-down streams of sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex. Provided that sensory inputs of different modalities interact in the TRN, the TRN could contribute to fast and flexible cross-modal modulation of attention and perception that incessantly takes place in our everyday life. Indeed, diverse subthreshold interactions of auditory and visual inputs have been revealed in TRN cells (Kimura, 2014). To determine whether such sensory interaction could extend across modalities as a universal neural mechanism, the present study examined TRN cell activities elicited by auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations in anesthetized rats. Juxta-cellular recording and labeling techniques were used. Recordings were obtained from 129 cells. Auditory or somatosensory responses were modulated by subthreshold electrical stimulation or sound (noise burst) in the majority of recordings (77 of 85 auditory and 13 of 15 somatosensory cells). Additionally, 22 bimodal cells and seven cells that responded only to combined stimulation were recognized. Suppression was predominant in modulation that was observed in both early and repeatedly evoked late responses. Combined stimulation also induced de novo cell activities. Further, response latency and burst spiking were modulated. Axonal projections of cells showing modulation terminated in first- or higher-order thalamic nuclei. Nine auditory cells projected to somatosensory thalamic nuclei. These results suggest that the TRN could regulate sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex through the sensory interaction pervasive across modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  11. Gene-environment interactions in considering physical activity for the prevention of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristyn Alissa Bates

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, ranks as one of the most feared diseases in the world. Similarly, recent studies suggest that AD may be the third leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer. In the absence of a cure or effective treatment, strategies to prevent or delay the onset and progression of the disease are desperately needed. Decades of research have identified key risk and protective factors including genetic polymorphism in the APOE gene, age and lifestyle factors. Physical activity (PA is emerging as an attractive primary prevention strategy. This review will summarise the latest findings supporting the role of physical activity in the prevention of AD, including possible mechanisms and the influence of genetics on disease prevention. Given that AD and other dementias are recognised as a world health priority, public health strategies are needed to incorporate promoting the health benefits of physical activity across the lifespan.

  12. [Analysis of the question-answer activity of a hospital pharmacy. Example of the handling of drug interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueroux, E; Lalande, L; Meddour, N; Papailhau, C; Bernard, E; Charroin, C; Perichou, J; Charpiat, B; Locher, F; Garcia, S

    2015-05-01

    The medical care of patients generates questions among healthcare professionals. Some will necessitate an advanced research. The hospital pharmacist is at the interface between prescribers, caregivers and the medicines and is requested to answer these requests. Studies conducted in other countries showed that this question-answer activity represents a significant amount of time in daily work. In France, this topic was poorly explored. The objective of our work was to study the volume and the type of questions, the clinical situations, the time required, the medicines implicated and the sources of information used. A prospective study was conducted in the pharmacy of a university hospital. All the requests answered by the pharmaceutical team, which needed a specific research, analysis and writing of an answer were collected. A hundred and one questions were analyzed, originating from doctors or medicals interns. Almost half concerned drug interactions, and among them, almost a fourth were not mentioned in the Summary of Product Characteristics of the medicines involved. A pharmaceutical advice was provided in 91.5% of the cases. Time dedicated to the research varied between less than 30 minutes and more than 8 hours. This study illustrates the question-answer activity of a hospital pharmacy, which is currently not taken into account as an indicator of pharmaceutical activity. A large part concerns analysis and management of drug interactions and requires a significant amount of pharmaceutical time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. dlk acts as a negative regulator of Notch1 activation through interactions with specific EGF-like repeats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baladron, Victoriano; Ruiz-Hidalgo, Maria Jose; Nueda, Maria Luisa; Diaz-Guerra, Maria Jose M.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose Javier; Bonvini, Ezio; Gubina, Elena; Laborda, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The protein dlk, encoded by the Dlk1 gene, belongs to the Notch epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like family of receptors and ligands, which participate in cell fate decisions during development. The molecular mechanisms by which dlk regulates cell differentiation remain unknown. By using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that dlk interacts with Notch1 in a specific manner. Moreover, by using luciferase as a reporter gene under the control of a CSL/RBP-Jk/CBF-1-dependent promoter in the dlk-negative, Notch1-positive Balb/c 14 cell line, we found that addition of synthetic dlk EGF-like peptides to the culture medium or forced expression of dlk decreases endogenous Notch activity. Furthermore, the expression of the gene Hes-1, a target for Notch1 activation, diminishes in confluent Balb/c14 cells transfected with an expression construct encoding for the extracellular EGF-like region of dlk. The expression of Dlk1 and Notch1 increases in 3T3-L1 cells maintained in a confluent state for several days, which is associated with a concomitant decrease in Hes-1 expression. On the other hand, the decrease of Dlk1 expression in 3T3-L1 cells by antisense cDNA transfection is associated with an increase in Hes-1 expression. These results suggest that dlk functionally interacts in vivo with Notch1, which may lead to the regulation of differentiation processes modulated by Notch1 activation and signaling, including adipogenesis

  14. Structure of expert players' activity during competitive interaction in table tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sève, Carole; Saury, Jacques; Ria, Luc; Durand, Marc

    2003-03-01

    This study analyzed the activity of expert table tennis players during a match, in reference to course of action theory (Theureau, 1992). Matches were videotaped, and the players' verbalizations as they viewed the tapes were collected a posteriori. The data was analyzed by (a) transcribing the players' actions and verbalizations, (b) decomposing their activity into elementary units of meaning, and (c) grouping the elementary units into larger sets. The results showed that the matches began with an inquiry into the specific features of the opponent's play. This was followed by reproducing the actions identified as effective during the inquiry. The results are discussed in relation to the role of training in expert performance.

  15. Transcription of human resistin gene involves an interaction of Sp1 with peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor gamma (PPARgamma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Singh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistin is a cysteine rich protein, mainly expressed and secreted by circulating human mononuclear cells. While several factors responsible for transcription of mouse resistin gene have been identified, not much is known about the factors responsible for the differential expression of human resistin.We show that the minimal promoter of human resistin lies within approximately 80 bp sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (-240 whereas binding sites for cRel, CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP-alpha, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2 and activator protein 1 (AP-1 transcription factors, important for induced expression, are present within sequences up to -619. Specificity Protein 1(Sp1 binding site (-276 to -295 is also present and an interaction of Sp1 with peroxisome proliferator activating receptor gamma (PPARgamma is necessary for constitutive expression in U937 cells. Indeed co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated a direct physical interaction of Sp1 with PPARgamma in whole cell extracts of U937 cells. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA upregulated the expression of resistin mRNA in U937 cells by increasing the recruitment of Sp1, ATF-2 and PPARgamma on the resistin gene promoter. Furthermore, PMA stimulation of U937 cells resulted in the disruption of Sp1 and PPARgamma interaction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay confirmed the recruitment of transcription factors phospho ATF-2, Sp1, Sp3, PPARgamma, chromatin modifier histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 and the acetylated form of histone H3 but not cRel, C/EBP-alpha and phospho c-Jun during resistin gene transcription.Our findings suggest a complex interplay of Sp1 and PPARgamma along with other transcription factors that drives the expression of resistin in human monocytic U937 cells.

  16. Skin Cancer Risk Is Modified by KIR/HLA Interactions That Influence the Activation of Natural Killer Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineretsky, Karin A; Karagas, Margaret R; Christensen, Brock C; Kuriger-Laber, Jacquelyn K; Perry, Ann E; Storm, Craig A; Nelson, Heather H

    2016-01-15

    Natural killer (NK)-cell phenotype is partially mediated through binding of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with HLA class I ligands. The KIR gene family is highly polymorphic and not well captured by standard genome-wide association study approaches. Here, we tested the hypothesis that variations in KIR gene content combined with HLA class I ligand status is associated with keratinocyte skin cancers using a population-based study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We conducted an interaction analysis of KIR gene content variation and HLA-B (Bw4 vs. Bw6) and HLA-C (C1 vs. C2). KIR centromeric B haplotype was associated with significant risk of multiple BCC tumors (OR, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.21), and there was a significant interaction between HLA-C and the activating gene KIR2DS3 for BCC (Pinteraction = 0.005). Furthermore, there was significant interaction between HLA-B and telomeric KIR B haplotype (containing the activating genes KIR3DS1 and KIR2DS1) as well as HLA-B and the activating KIR gene KIR2DS5 (Pinteraction 0.001 and 0.012, respectively). Similar but greatly attenuated associations were observed for SCC. Moreover, previous in vitro models demonstrated that p53 is required for upregulation of NK ligands, and accordingly, we observed there was a strong association between the KIR B haplotype and p53 alteration in BCC tumors, with a higher likelihood that KIR B carriers harbor abnormal p53 (P KIR and HLA modify risks of BCC and SCC and that KIR encoded by the B genes provides selective pressure for altered p53 in BCC tumors. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Physical education in secondary schools located in low-income communities: Physical activity levels, lesson context and teacher interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Rachel; Campbell, Elizabeth; Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Okely, Anthony D; Nathan, Nicole; Gillham, Karen; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Wiggers, John

    2016-02-01

    Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower than recommended. Little is known about the PA levels of students from disadvantaged schools within PE. This study aimed to describe: (i) the PA levels of students from disadvantaged secondary schools during PE lessons, (ii) the lesson context and teacher interactions occurring during PE, and (iii) the associations between teacher, school or PE lesson characteristics with student physical activity levels in PE. Cross-sectional study of 100 Grade 7 PE lessons across 10 secondary schools. System for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) was used to assess student PA, lesson context, and teacher interaction. Teacher and school characteristics were collected via survey. Mean proportion of lesson time was used to describe PA, lesson context and teacher interaction. Associations between each outcome variable and each characteristic were examined using 2-sample t-tests, ANOVAs and linear regression. Thirty-nine percent of PE lesson was spent in MVPA, and less than 10% spent in VA. Lessons in schools in urban areas included significantly more MVPA than rural areas (P=0.04). Male teachers and more experienced teachers conducted lessons with significantly more VA than female and less experienced teachers (P=0.04 and 0.02). MVPA was also higher in lessons conducted by more experienced teachers. PA during PE lessons within disadvantaged secondary schools is below international recommendations. Male teachers, more experienced teachers and schools in urban regions teach more active lessons. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quinoline drug-heme interactions and implications for antimalarial cytostatic versus cytocidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Alexander P; de Dios, Angel; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-07-11

    Historically, the most successful molecular target for antimalarial drugs has been heme biomineralization within the malarial parasite digestive vacuole. Heme released from catabolized host red blood cell hemoglobin is toxic, so malarial parasites crystallize heme to nontoxic hemozoin. For years it has been accepted that a number of effective quinoline antimalarial drugs (e.g., chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine) function by preventing hemozoin crystallization. However, recent studies over the past decade have revealed a surprising molecular diversity in quinoline-heme molecular interactions. This diversity shows that even closely related quinoline drugs may have quite different molecular pharmacology. This paper reviews the molecular diversity and highlights important implications for understanding quinoline antimalarial drug resistance and for future drug design.

  19. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshia Hematpoor

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480, the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271 and anionic binding site (W83. The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket.

  20. Collagencin, an antibacterial peptide from fish collagen: Activity, structure and interaction dynamics with membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaas, Nadia [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada); Hammami, Riadh, E-mail: riadh.hammami@fsaa.ulaval.ca [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada); Gomaa, Ahmed [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada); Bédard, François; Biron, Éric [Faculty of Pharmacy, Université Laval and Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, CHU de Québec Research Centre, G1V 4G2 Québec, QC (Canada); Subirade, Muriel [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.beaulieu@fsaa.ulaval.ca [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada); Department of Biology, Chemistry and Geography, Université du Québec à Rimouski (UQAR), 300 Allée des Ursulines, Rimouski, QC G5L 3A1 (Canada); Fliss, Ismail, E-mail: ismail.fliss@fsaa.ulaval.ca [STELA Dairy Research Centre, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Université Laval, G1V 0A6 Québec, QC (Canada)

    2016-04-29

    In this study, we first report characterization of collagencin, an antimicrobial peptide identified from fish collagen hydrolysate. The peptide completely inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus at 1.88 mM. Although non-toxic up to 470 μM, collagencin was hemolytic at higher concentrations. The secondary structure of collagencin was mainly composed by β-sheet and β-turn as determined by CD measurements and molecular dynamics. The peptide is likely to form β-sheet structure under hydrophobic environments and interacts with both anionic (phosphatidylglycerol) and zwitterionic (phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine) lipids as shown with CD spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The peptide formed several hydrogen bonds with both POPG and POPE lipids and remained at membrane–water interface, suggesting that collagencin antibacterial action follows a carpet mechanism. Collagenous fish wastes could be processed by enzymatic hydrolysis and transformed into products of high value having functional or biological properties. Marine collagens are a promising source of antimicrobial peptides with new implications in food safety and human health. - Highlights: • Collagencin, an antibacterial (G+ & G-) peptide identified from fish collagen hydrolysate. • The peptide completely inhibited the growth of S. aureus at 1.88 mM and non-toxic at 470 μM. • The secondary structure was mainly composed by β-sheet and turn as determined by CD and MD. • Collagencin interacts with both anionic and zwitterionic lipids as shown with CD and MD. • Collagencin antibacterial action probably follows a carpet mechanism.

  1. Interactions between noradrenaline and corticosteroids in the brain: from electrical activity to cognitive performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krugers, H.J.; Karst, H.; Joëls, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the core reactions in response to a stressful situation is the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis which increases the release of glucocorticoid hormones from the adrenal glands. In concert with other neuro-modulators, such as (nor)adrenaline, these hormones enable and

  2. Young Children with ASD: Parent Strategies for Interaction during Adapted Book Reading Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Leigh Ann; Blacher, Jan B.; Eisenhower, Abbey S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify how parents' use of language and literacy strategies during an adapted shared book reading activity relate to social, behavioral, and cognitive skills for their children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 111 young children (ages 4-7 years) with ASD and their mothers. A factor analysis…

  3. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g...

  4. A Hypothalamic Leptin-Glutamate Interaction in the Regulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence indicates that obesity-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with enhanced sympathetic activation. The present study was conducted to investigate the role for leptin-glutamate signaling within the hypothalamus in regulating sympathetic nerve activity. In anesthetized rats, microinjections of leptin (5 ng ~ 100 ng into the arcuate nucleus (ARCN and paraventricular nucleus (PVN induced increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA, blood pressure (BP, and heart rate (HR. Prior microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 (16 pmol into the ARCN or PVN reduced leptin-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in both ARCN and PVN. Knockdown of a leptin receptor with siRNA inhibited NMDA-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in the ARCN but not in the PVN. Confocal calcium imaging in the neuronal NG108 and astrocytic C6 cells demonstrated that preincubation with leptin induced an increase in intracellular calcium green fluorescence when the cells were challenged with glutamate. In high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin-induced T2D rats, we found that leptin receptor and NMDA NR1 receptor expressions in the ARCN and PVN were significantly increased. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that within the hypothalamic nuclei, leptin-glutamate signaling regulates the sympathetic activation. This may contribute to the sympathoexcitation commonly observed in obesity-related T2D.

  5. Correlations between human mobility and social interaction reveal general activity patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollgaard, Anders; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    A day in the life of a person involves a broad range of activities which are common across many people. Going beyond diurnal cycles, a central question is: to what extent do individuals act according to patterns shared across an entire population? Here we investigate the interplay between differe...... they be of social or of physical character....

  6. Using Audience Response Systems during Interactive Lectures to Promote Active Learning and Conceptual Understanding of Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Sandra; Cotuá, José

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a method of instruction using an active learning strategy for teaching stoichiometry through a process of gradual knowledge building. Students identify their misconceptions and progress through a sequence of questions based on the same chemical equation. An infrared device and software registered as the TurningPoint Audience…

  7. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-15

    Activation Model Rumelhart & McClelland Part II 90 References Anderson, J. A. Neural models with cognitive implications. In D. LaBerge & S. J. Samuels...University *Springfield, VA 22151 200 Larsen Nall, Appian Way I Dr. Stephen KosslynCabigM023 Harvard University I Dr. David J. Weiss Department of

  8. Environmental interaction influences muscle activation strategy during sand-swimming in the sandfish lizard Scincus scincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Sarah S; Ding, Yang; Goldman, Daniel I

    2013-01-15

    Animals like the sandfish lizard (Scincus scincus) that live in desert sand locomote on and within a granular medium whose resistance to intrusion is dominated by frictional forces. Recent kinematic studies revealed that the sandfish utilizes a wave of body undulation during swimming. Models predict that a particular combination of wave amplitude and wavelength yields maximum speed for a given frequency, and experiments have suggested that the sandfish targets this kinematic waveform. To investigate the neuromechanical strategy of the sandfish during walking, burial and swimming, here we use high-speed X-ray and visible light imaging with synchronized electromyogram (EMG) recordings of epaxial muscle activity. While moving on the surface, body undulation was not observed and EMG showed no muscle activation. During subsurface sand-swimming, EMG revealed an anterior-to-posterior traveling wave of muscle activation which traveled faster than the kinematic wave. Muscle activation intensity increased as the animal swam deeper into the material but was insensitive to undulation frequency. These findings were in accord with empirical force measurements, which showed that resistance force increased with depth but was independent of speed. The change in EMG intensity with depth indicates that the sandfish targets a kinematic waveform (a template) that models predict maximizes swimming speed and minimizes the mechanical cost of transport as the animal descends into granular media. The differences in the EMG pattern compared with EMG of undulatory swimmers in fluids can be attributed to the friction-dominated intrusion forces of granular media.

  9. Interaction Between Physical Environment, Social Environment, and Child Characteristics in Determining Physical Activity at Child Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, J.S.; Kremers, S.P.J.; Kann, D.H.H. van; Stafleu, A.; Candel, M.J.J.M.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Thijs, C.; Vries, N.K.de

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between the child-care environment and physical activity of 2- and 3-year-olds. Based on an ecological view of environmental influences on health behavior, we hypothesized that the social and physical environment, as well as child characteristics (age and

  10. Parental work demands and the frequency of child-related routine and interactive activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.; Lippe, A.G. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the frequency of child-related activities was associated with parents' own work demands and those of their partners. In addition to parental paid working hours, we considered the parents' organizational culture and experienced job insecurity. Moreover, we differentiated

  11. 200 terms for 'embodied activity'. The body in interaction: terminology for the body in ROLSI papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this guest blog, Maurice Nevile tracks the way that articles in ROLSI have coped with the complex task of choosing what terms to use in describing …. well, what to call it? Bodily movement? Embodied activity? Gesture? Each of these (and many more) have pros and cons as descriptors. But with th...

  12. Mother-Child Interactions during Shared Literacy Activities: Education in a Fractured Bilingual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Blanca; Dixon, L. Quentin

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that mothers scaffold the literacy skills of their children when jointly engaged in literacy-related activities in monolingual families (Tamis-LeMonda et al., 2001). Yet little is known about the linguistic environment of English language learners in the USA, a group at high risk for reading difficulties if they are only taught…

  13. Simultaneous interaction of bacteria and tissue cells with photocatalytically activated, anodized titanium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Chongxia; Kuijer, Roelof; Kaper, H. J.; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik; Kuijer, Roelof

    Photocatalytic-activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces has been demonstrated to yield antibacterial and tissue integrating effects, but effects on simultaneous growth of tissue cells and bacteria in co-culture have never been studied. Moreover, it is unknown how human-bone-marrow-mesenchymal-stem

  14. Child-Robot Interaction in the Wild : Field Testing Activities of the ALIZ-E Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greeff, J. de; Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Fraaije, A.; Solms, L.; Wigdor, N.; Bierman, B.

    2014-01-01

    A field study was conducted in which CRI activities developed by the ALIZ-E project were tested with the project's primary user group: children with diabetes. This field study resulted in new insights in the modalities and roles a robot aimed at CRI in a healthcare setting might utilise, while in

  15. Priming for Social Activities: Effects on Interactions between Children with Autism and Typically Developing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gengoux, Grace W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether brief priming sessions (i.e., previewing activities with an adult ahead of time) would increase the rate of initiations made by children with autism to peers in inclusive settings. A multiple baseline across participants design assessed changes in rate of initiations, as well as statements reflecting target child…

  16. FOXP3 can modulate TAL1 transcriptional activity through interaction with LMO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleskens, V.; Mokry, M.; van der Leun, A. M.; Huppelschoten, S.; Pals, C. E G M; Peeters, J.; Coenen, S.; Cardoso, B. A.; Barata, J. T.; van Loosdregt, J.; Coffer, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) frequently involves aberrant expression of TAL1 (T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1) and LMO2, oncogenic members of the TAL1 transcriptional complex. Transcriptional activity of the TAL1-complex is thought to have a pivotal role in the transformation of

  17. Parental work demands and the frequency of child-related routine and interactive activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the frequency of child-related activities was associated with parents’ own work demands and those of their partners. In addition to parental paid working hours, we considered the parents’ organizational culture and experienced job insecurity. Moreover, we differentiated

  18. Interactions between microbial activity and distribution and mineral coatings on sand grains from rapid sand filters treating groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Tatari, Karolina; Musovic, Sanin

    . Preliminarily, we detected a strong relation between the amount of DNA and mineral coating mass. We hypothesized that the accumulated mineral coatings have a positive effect on amount of bacterial biomass, its spatial distribution and substrate removal rates. In this study, we combined molecular, microscopic......, physico-chemical and biokinetic techniques to determine the interaction between attached bacteria and attached minerals in rapid sand filters as well as the causality of the relation. Strong pairwise correlations revealed the strong relation between mineral physical properties and bacterial activity...... and abundance indicated that attached minerals are an important factor controlling bacterial colonization, growth, distribution and substrate utilization in these systems....

  19. Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity ― A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults

    OpenAIRE

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Scott, Robert A.; Justice, Anne E.; Young, Kristin L.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Barata, Llilda; Winkler, Thomas W.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Mahajan, Anubha; Hadley, David; Xue, Luting; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; den Hoed, Marcel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and ...

  20. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E., E-mail: m.j.e.roelofs@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  1. Gamma irradiation effect on soy protein modification, protein - phenolic interaction and antioxidant activity in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Sweta; Dahuja, Anil; Vinutha, T.; Singh, Bhupinder

    2014-01-01

    Soy protein is one of the most important sources of protein to feed the world population in the future. Consumption of soybean quality protein and their texture is dependent on the protein modification. In the present study, four soybean genotypes PL5039 (black), EC 472143 (black), Pusa 9814 (yellow) and SL525 (yellow), differing in their seed coat colour were gamma irradiated at 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 kGy and the extent of protein modification and parameters affecting it viz. free phenolics, bound phenolics, lip oxygenase and antioxidant activity were analysed. Modifications of soybean proteins were investigated by chemical analysis and electrophoresis. The irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy showed decreased turbidity, protein oxidation, surface hydrophobicity but increased solubility and sulfhydryl and disulfide contents in all the genotypes. Further, SDS PAGE profile of treated soybean seeds revealed remarkable difference in electrophoretic bands as compared to the untreated seeds. Lipoxygense activity in all the genotypes decreased with increased exposure of gamma irradiation, which produced peroxide products that changes the structural characteristics of soy protein. Free phenolics, bound phenolics and total antioxidant activity measured in terms of FRAP in all the genotypes increased significantly at a dose of 2.0 kGy and it declined at a dose of 5.0 kGy. Antioxidant potential measured in terms of 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity showed an increasing trend with dose, indicating that radiation processing as a method of food preservation has a positive nutritional implication. Hence, it is suggested that, mild gamma irradiation upto 2.0 kGy may reduce the protein oxidation, enhance the antioxidant activity and improve the soybean protein quality compared to higher dose 5.0 kGy, which reduced the protein quality. (author)

  2. Interactions of theBacillus subtilisDnaE polymerase with replisomal proteins modulate its activity and fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Vasileios; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Green, Matthew; Képès, François; Soultanas, Panos; Janniere, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    During Bacillus subtilis replication two replicative polymerases function at the replisome to collectively carry out genome replication. In a reconstituted in vitro replication assay, PolC is the main polymerase while the lagging strand DnaE polymerase briefly extends RNA primers synthesized by the primase DnaG prior to handing-off DNA synthesis to PolC. Here, we show in vivo that (i) the polymerase activity of DnaE is essential for both the initiation and elongation stages of DNA replication, (ii) its error rate varies inversely with PolC concentration, and (iii) its misincorporations are corrected by the mismatch repair system post-replication. We also found that the error rates in cells encoding mutator forms of both PolC and DnaE are significantly higher (up to 15-fold) than in PolC mutants. In vitro , we showed that (i) the polymerase activity of DnaE is considerably stimulated by DnaN, SSB and PolC, (ii) its error-prone activity is strongly inhibited by DnaN, and (iii) its errors are proofread by the 3' > 5' exonuclease activity of PolC in a stable template-DnaE-PolC complex. Collectively our data show that protein-protein interactions within the replisome modulate the activity and fidelity of DnaE, and confirm the prominent role of DnaE during B. subtilis replication. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Interaction between leptin and leisure-time physical activity and development of hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla Lundegaard; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The mechanisms by which overweight and physical inactivity lead to hypertension are complex. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, has been linked with hypertension. We wanted to investigate the relationship between leptin, physical activity and new-onset hypertension. METHODS. The study...... was a prospective cohort study of 744 women and 367 men, who were normotensive in the third Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) examination, performed 1991−94. Based on questionnaire items, the participants were divided into two groups with low (n = 674) and high (n = 437) levels of leisure-time physical activity......, respectively. RESULTS. Between the third and the fourth CCHS examination, performed 2001?03, 304 had developed hypertension, defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mmHg or use of antihypertensive medication. In a logistic regression model, including age, sex...

  4. Interaction between leptin and leisure-time physical activity and development of hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The mechanisms by which overweight and physical inactivity lead to hypertension are complex. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, has been linked with hypertension. We wanted to investigate the relationship between leptin, physical activity and new-onset hypertension. METHODS. The study...... was a prospective cohort study of 744 women and 367 men, who were normotensive in the third Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) examination, performed 1991-94. Based on questionnaire items, the participants were divided into two groups with low (n = 674) and high (n = 437) levels of leisure-time physical activity......, respectively. RESULTS. Between the third and the fourth CCHS examination, performed 2001?03, 304 had developed hypertension, defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) =140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) =90 mmHg or use of antihypertensive medication. In a logistic regression model, including age, sex...

  5. Predictions of lithium interactions with earth's bow shock in the presence of wave activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Vlahos, L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a test-particle simulation studying the movement of a lithium tracer ion injected upstream of the bow shock are reported. Wave activity consists of parallel and antiparallel propagating Alfven waves characterized by a frequency power spectrum within a frequency or range of amplitudes defined separately in the upstream and downstream regions. The results show that even a moderate level of wave activity can substantially change the results obtained in the absence of waves. Among the effects observed are: (1) increased ion transmission; (2) both the average energy gain and spread about the average are increased for transmitted and reflected particles; (3) the average final pitch angle for transmitted particles tends to 90 deg, and the spread of reflected particles is reduced; and (4) the spatial dispersion of the ions on the bow shock after a single encounter is increased.

  6. Interactions between sleeping position and feeding on cardiorespiratory activity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Sahni, Rakesh; Ohira-Kist, Kiyoko; Kashyap, Sudha; Stark, Raymond I; Schulze, Karl F

    2005-11-01

    Infants sleeping in the prone position are at greater risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Sleep position-dependent changes in cardiorespiratory activity may contribute to this increased risk. Cardiorespiratory activity is also affected by feeding. Twenty prematurely-born infants were studied at 31-36 weeks postconceptional age while sleeping in the prone and supine positions. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and patterns of variability were recorded during interfeed intervals, and effects of position and time after feeding were analyzed by repeated measures analyses of variance. There were significant effects of both sleeping position and time after feeding. Heart rate is higher and heart period variability is lower in the prone position, and the effects of sleeping position on cardiac functioning are more pronounced during the middle of the intrafeed interval. In preterm infants, autonomic responses to nutrient processing modulate the cardiorespiratory effects of sleeping position. Prone sleeping risk may vary with time after feeding. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Activation of Progestin Receptors in Female Reproductive Behavior: Interactions with Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Shaila; Portillo, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The steroid hormone, progesterone (P), modulates neuroendocrine functions in the central nervous system resulting in alterations in physiology and reproductive behavior in female mammals. A wide body of evidence indicates that these neural effects of P are predominantly mediated via their intracellular progestin receptors (PRs) functioning as “ligand-dependent” transcription factors in the steroid-sensitive neurons regulating genes and genomic networks. In addition to P, intracellular PRs can be activated by neurotransmitters, growth factors and cyclic nucleotides in a ligand-independent manner via crosstalk and convergence of pathways. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that rapid signaling events associated with membrane PRs and/or extra-nuclear, cytoplasmic PRs converge with classical PR activated pathways in neuroendocrine regulation of female reproductive behavior. The molecular mechanisms, by which multiple signaling pathways converge on PRs to modulate PR-dependent female reproductive behavior, are discussed in this review. PMID:20116396

  8. Interactions of [3H]amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-[ 3 H]amphetamine (d-[ 3 H]AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-[ 3 H]AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-[ 3 H]AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of [ 3 H] dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-[ 3 H]AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed

  9. Moral Disengagement in media and Moral Identity activation: their interactive effect on support of war

    OpenAIRE

    Liebnitzky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    People can disengage from their internalized moral standards and self-regulation in order to perform immoral behaviour by using different Moral Disengagement mechanisms. These mechanisms within media have a positive effect on immoral behaviour. However, Moral Identity activation is said to counter arguments of Moral Disengagement. In this study, both concepts are applied to the context of war. An additional assumption took into account in how far participants’ internalized moral standards con...

  10. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Hyatt Raymond R; Goldberg Jeanne P; Hughes Sheryl O; Hennessy Erin; Economos Christina D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g. monitoring) the relationship is not clear. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between parent's PA-related practices, general parenting style, and ...

  11. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. (Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  12. Interaction of Active MMIC with Package/Housing -Theory, Analysis and Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarvaiya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents enclosure effect comprehensive by 3D Electromagnetic modeling, simulation and measurement of active MMIC with Package/housing. When put inside a test box or package with a cavity, MMIC shows significant deviation from it RFOW measurement data. Cavity resonance’s adverse effects are analyzed by Eigen mode solver using CST Microwave Studio and RFOW measurement and in test box data is matched by simulating package/house with the best suited RF absorbers.

  13. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  14. PAMP Activity of Cerato-Platanin during Plant Interaction: An -Omic Approach

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    Simone Luti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerato-platanin (CP is the founder of a fungal protein family consisting in non-catalytic secreted proteins, which work as virulence factors and/or as elicitors of defense responses and systemic resistance, thus acting as PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Moreover, CP has been defined an expansin-like protein showing the ability to weaken cellulose aggregates, like the canonical plant expansins do. Here, we deepen the knowledge on CP PAMP activity by the use of a multi-disciplinary approach: proteomic analysis, VOC (volatile organic compound measurements, and gas exchange determination. The treatment of Arabidopsis with CP induces a differential profile either in protein expression or in VOC emission, as well changes in photosynthetic activity. In agreement with its role of defense activator, CP treatment induces down-expression of enzymes related to primary metabolism, such as RuBisCO, triosephosphate isomerase, and ATP-synthase, and reduces the photosynthesis rate. Conversely, CP increases expression of defense-related proteins and emission of some VOCs. Interestingly, CP exposure triggered the increase in enzymes involved in GSH metabolism and redox homeostasis (glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, Cys-peroxiredoxin, catalase and in enzymes related to the “glucosinolate-myrosinase” system, which are the premise for synthesis of defence compounds, such as camalexin and some VOCs, respectively. The presented results are in agreement with the accepted role of CP as a PAMP and greatly increase the knowledge of plant primary defences induced by a purified fungal elicitor.

  15. Predicting Kinase Activity in Angiotensin Receptor Phosphoproteomes Based on Sequence-Motifs and Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgebo, Rikke; Horn, Heiko; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR) signalling has promoted the development of a new generation of pathway selective ligands. The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1aR) is one of the most studied 7TMRs with respect to selective activation of the β-arrestin ......Recent progress in the understanding of seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR) signalling has promoted the development of a new generation of pathway selective ligands. The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1aR) is one of the most studied 7TMRs with respect to selective activation of the β......-arrestin dependent signalling. Two complimentary global phosphoproteomics studies have analyzed the complex signalling induced by the AT1aR. Here we integrate the data sets from these studies and perform a joint analysis using a novel method for prediction of differential kinase activity from phosphoproteomics data....... The method builds upon NetworKIN, which applies sophisticated linear motif analysis in combination with contextual network modelling to predict kinase-substrate associations with high accuracy and sensitivity. These predictions form the basis for subsequently nonparametric statistical analysis to identify...

  16. Interaction Between Subjective Well-Being, Economic Activity and Education in the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artūras Gataūlinas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the impact of professional well-being of EU citizens on their life satisfaction at both micro and macro levels. The following indicators were selected to describe the professional well-being: involvment in the official employment, level of education, and job satisfaction. The findings of the article suggest that employed respondents evaluated their subjective well-being significantly higher as compared to those not participating in the labour market. Similar findings were drawn when comparing subjective well-being of the respondents in relation to their education. Respondents with higher education reported significantly higher statistically proven subjective well-being than those with lower education. In the article, the interpretation of the findings is based on the conceptual model of subjective well-being of needs as well as on the role of employment and education in satisfaction of physiological and socially acceptable needs of individuals. Work activity is more directly linked with the satisfaction of individual needs than education. However, engagement in work has only an impact on subjective well-being if work activity is perceived as job satisfaction. If employment is perceived by individuals as providing greater satisfaction, it tends to make a more positive impact on the subjective well-being of individuals compared to activities that are perceived as providing less satisfaction.

  17. MGluR5 mediates the interaction between late-LTP, network activity, and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Bikbaev

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning are strongly regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and particularly by mGluR5. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying mGluR5-modulation of these phenomena. Prolonged pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 with MPEP produced a profound impairment of spatial memory. Effects were associated with 1 a reduction of mGluR1a-expression in the dentate gyrus; 2 impaired dentate gyrus LTP; 3 enhanced CA1-LTP and 4 suppressed theta (5-10 Hz and gamma (30-100 Hz oscillations in the dentate gyrus. Allosteric potentiation of mGluR1 after mGluR5 blockade significantly ameliorated dentate gyrus LTP, as well as suppression of gamma oscillatory activity. CA3-lesioning prevented MPEP effects on CA1-LTP, suggesting that plasticity levels in CA1 are driven by mGluR5-dependent synaptic and network activity in the dentate gyrus. These data support the hypothesis that prolonged mGluR5-inactivation causes altered hippocampal LTP levels and network activity, which is mediated in part by impaired mGluR1-expression in the dentate gyrus. The consequence is impairment of long-term learning.

  18. Regulation of Candida albicans Interaction with Macrophages through the Activation of HOG Pathway by Genistein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuna Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The severity of infections caused by Candida albicans, the most common opportunistic human fungal pathogen, needs rapid and effective antifungal treatments. One of the effective ways is to control the virulence factors of the pathogen. Therefore, the current study examined the effects of genistein, a natural isoflavone present in soybeans, on C. albicans. The genistein-treated C. albicans cells were then exposed to macrophages. Although no inhibition effect on the growth rates of C. albicans was noted an enhancement of the immune response to macrophages has been observed, indicated by phagocytosis and release of cytokines TNF-α and IL-10. The effect of genistein on the enhanced phagocytosis can be mimicked by the fungicides fludioxonil or iprodione, which inhibit the histidine kinase Cos1p and lead to activation of HOG pathway. The western blot results showed a clear phosphorylation of Hog1p in the wild type strain of C. albicans after incubation with genistein. In addition, effects of genistein on the phosphorylation of Hog1p in the histidine kinase mutants Δcos1 and Δsln1 were also observed. Our results thus indicate a new bio-activity of genistein on C. albicans by activation of the HOG pathway of the human pathogen C. albicans.

  19. The Histone Chaperone NRP1 Interacts with WEREWOLF to ActivateGLABRA2in Arabidopsis Root Hair Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Rong, Liang; Luo, Qiang; Wang, Baihui; Zhou, Nana; Yang, Yue; Zhang, Chi; Feng, Haiyang; Zheng, Lina; Shen, Wen-Hui; Ma, Jinbiao; Dong, Aiwu

    2017-02-01

    NUCLEOSOME ASSEMBLY PROTEIN1 (NAP1) defines an evolutionarily conserved family of histone chaperones and loss of function of the Arabidopsis thaliana NAP1 family genes NAP1-RELATED PROTEIN1 ( NRP1 ) and NRP2 causes abnormal root hair formation. Yet, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that NRP1 interacts with the transcription factor WEREWOLF (WER) in vitro and in vivo and enriches at the GLABRA2 ( GL2 ) promoter in a WER-dependent manner. Crystallographic analysis indicates that NRP1 forms a dimer via its N-terminal α-helix. Mutants of NRP1 that either disrupt the α-helix dimerization or remove the C-terminal acidic tail, impair its binding to histones and WER and concomitantly lead to failure to activate GL2 transcription and to rescue the nrp1-1 nrp2-1 mutant phenotype. Our results further demonstrate that WER-dependent enrichment of NRP1 at the GL2 promoter is involved in local histone eviction and nucleosome loss in vivo. Biochemical competition assays imply that the association between NRP1 and histones may counteract the inhibitory effect of histones on the WER-DNA interaction. Collectively, our study provides important insight into the molecular mechanisms by which histone chaperones are recruited to target chromatin via interaction with a gene-specific transcription factor to moderate chromatin structure for proper root hair development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-Synonymous Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Physical Activity Interactions on Adiposity Parameters in Malaysian Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Lisa Zaharan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs have been shown to be associated with obesity. Little is known about their associations and interactions with physical activity (PA in relation to adiposity parameters among adolescents in Malaysia.MethodsWe examined whether (a PA and (b selected nsSNPs are associated with adiposity parameters and whether PA interacts with these nsSNPs on these outcomes in adolescents from the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Longitudinal Research Team study (n = 1,151. Body mass indices, waist–hip ratio, and percentage body fat (% BF were obtained. PA was assessed using Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C. Five nsSNPs were included: beta-3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3 rs4994, FABP2 rs1799883, GHRL rs696217, MC3R rs3827103, and vitamin D receptor rs2228570, individually and as combined genetic risk score (GRS. Associations and interactions between nsSNPs and PAQ-C scores were examined using generalized linear model.ResultsPAQ-C scores were associated with % BF (β = −0.44 [95% confidence interval −0.72, −0.16], p = 0.002. The CC genotype of ADRB3 rs4994 (β = −0.16 [−0.28, −0.05], corrected p = 0.01 and AA genotype of MC3R rs3827103 (β = −0.06 [−0.12, −0.00], p = 0.02 were significantly associated with % BF compared to TT and GG genotypes, respectively. Significant interactions with PA were found between ADRB3 rs4994 (β = −0.05 [−0.10, −0.01], p = 0.02 and combined GRS (β = −0.03 [−0.04, −0.01], p = 0.01 for % BF.ConclusionHigher PA score was associated with reduced % BF in Malaysian adolescents. Of the nsSNPs, ADRB3 rs4994 and MC3R rs3827103 were associated with % BF. Significant interactions with PA were found for ADRB3 rs4994 and combined GRS on % BF but not on measurements of weight or circumferences. Targeting body fat represent prospects for molecular studies and lifestyle intervention

  1. Phototoxic Activity and DNA Interactions of Water-Soluble Porphyrins and Their Rhenium(I) Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, Giuliana; Gianferrara, Teresa; Bergamo, Alberta; Gasser, Gilles; Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Vilar, Ramon; Leczkowska, Anna; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-11-01

    In the search for alternative photosensitizers for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), herein we describe two new water-soluble porphyrins, a neutral fourfold-symmetric compound and a +3-charged tris-methylpyridinium derivative, in which either four or one [1,4,7]-triazacyclononane (TACN) units are connected to the porphyrin macrocycle through a hydrophilic linker; we also report their corresponding tetracationic Re(I) conjugates. The in vitro (photo)toxic effects of the compounds toward the human cell lines HeLa (cervical cancer), H460M2 (non-small-cell lung carcinoma), and HBL-100 (non-tumorigenic epithelial cells) are reported. Three of the compounds are not cytotoxic in the dark up to 100 μm, and the fourfold-symmetric couple revealed very good phototoxic indexes (PIs). The intracellular localization of all derivatives was studied in HeLa cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Although low nuclear localization was observed for some of them, it still prompted us to investigate their capacity to bind both quadruplex and duplex DNA; we observed significant selectivity in the tris-methylpyridinium derivatives for G-quadruplex interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT expression through the long range interaction between promoter and intronic enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Genjie; Hu, Qingzhu; Xiao, Xichun; Chen, Shuxia

    2018-04-01

    The AML1/ETO onco-fusion protein is crucial for the genesis of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is well documented as a transcriptional repressor through dominant-negative effect. However, little is known about the transactivation mechanism of AML1/ETO. Through large cohort of patient's expression level data analysis and a series of experimental validation, we report here that AML1/ETO transactivates c-KIT expression through directly binding to and mediating the long-range interaction between the promoter and intronic enhancer regions of c-KIT. Gene expression analyses verify that c-KIT expression is significantly high in t(8;21) AML. Further ChIP-seq analysis and motif scanning identify two regulatory regions located in the promoter and intronic enhancer region of c-KIT, respectively. Both regions are enriched by co-factors of AML1/ETO, such as AML1, CEBPe, c-Jun, and c-Fos. Further luciferase reporter assays show that AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT promoter activity through directly recognizing the AML1 motif and the co-existence of co-factors. The induction of c-KIT promoter activity is reinforced with the existence of intronic enhancer region. Furthermore, ChIP-3C-qPCR assays verify that AML1/ETO mediates the formation of DNA-looping between the c-KIT promoter and intronic enhancer region through the long-range interaction. Collectively, our data uncover a novel transcriptional activity mechanism of AML1/ETO and enrich our knowledge of the onco-fusion protein mediated transcription regulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Using fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the interaction of membrane-active peptides with the lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, Benjamin C; Chugh, Jeetender; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Marsh, E Neil G

    2010-07-13

    A variety of biologically active peptides exert their function through direct interactions with the lipid membrane of the cell. These surface interactions are generally transient and highly dynamic, making them hard to study. Here we have examined the feasibility of using solution phase (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study peptide-membrane interactions. Using the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 as a model system, we demonstrate that peptide binding to either small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) or bicelles can readily be detected by simple one-dimensional (19)F NMR experiments with peptides labeled with l-4,4,4-trifluoroethylglycine. The (19)F chemical shift associated with the peptide-membrane complex is sensitive both to the position of the trifluoromethyl reporter group (whether in the hydrophobic face or positively charged face of the amphipathic peptide) and to the curvature of the lipid bilayer (whether the peptide is bound to SUVs or bicelles). (19)F spin echo experiments using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence were used to measure the transverse relaxation (T(2)) of the nucleus and thereby examine the local mobility of the MSI-78 analogues bound to bicelles. The fluorine probe positioned in the hydrophobic face of the peptide relaxes at a rate that correlates with the tumbling of the bicelle, suggesting that it is relatively immobile, whereas the probe at the positively charged face relaxes more slowly, indicating this position is much more dynamic. These results are in accord with structural models of MSI-78 bound to lipids and point to the feasibility of using fluorine-labeled peptides to monitor peptide-membrane interactions in living cells.

  4. TCR signal strength alters T-DC activation and interaction times and directs the outcome of differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eVan Panhuys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into effector subsets underpins their ability to shape the immune response and mediate host protection. During T cell receptor induced activation of CD4+ T cells both the quality and quantity of specific activatory peptide/MHC ligands have been shown to control the polarization of naïve CD4+ T cells in addition to co-stimulatory and cytokine based signals. Recently, advances in two photon microscopy and tetramer based cell tracking methods have allowed investigators to greatly extend the study of the role of TCR signaling in effector differentiation under in vivo conditions. In this review we consider data from recent in vivo studies analyzing the role of TCR signal strength in controlling the outcome of CD4+ T cell differentiation and discuss the role of the TCR in controlling the critical nature of CD4+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells during activation. We further propose a model whereby TCR signal strength controls the temporal aspects of T:DC interactions and the implications for this in mediating the downstream signaling events which influence the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of effector differentiation.

  5. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Shih-Hsin Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI, with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population.

  6. Systematic expression profiling analysis identifies specific microRNA-gene interactions that may differentiate between active and latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Lee, Shih-Wei; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic--the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population.

  7. Critical thinking and social interaction in active learning: A conceptual analysis of class discussion from Iranian students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Hajhosseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the failures in traditional methods of teaching, theorists have recently emphasized students’ active role in education in which the teacher is no longer a mere transmitter of knowledge. Discussion-based teaching has been regarded as a route to improving students’ active role. The current study intended to discover the benefits of using discussion for social interaction and critical thinking disposition from Iranian students’ perspective. Participants included 14 first-year educational psychology students who were selected through purposive sampling method. A general psychology course at the University of Tehran was held based on proposed patterns for class discussion. The data were collected through structured interviews, and analyzed through interpretive analysis. Findings showed that the components of critical thinking dispositions and social interaction were mostly exhibited during discussions. It seems that involvement of students in class discussions have benefits over the traditional realms of education. These positive effects are seen at personal and social levels, bringing forth more dynamic aspects of culture.

  8. Prediction of Physical Activity Level Using Processes of Change From the Transtheoretical Model: Experiential, Behavioral, or an Interaction Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Ahmed Jérôme; Horwath, Caroline; Bernard, Paquito

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare prediction of physical activity (PA) by experiential or behavioral processes of change (POCs) or an interaction between both types of processes. A cross-sectional study. This study was conducted using an online questionnaire. A total of 394 participants (244 women, 150 men), with a mean age of 35.12 ± 12.04 years and a mean body mass index of 22.97 ± 4.25 kg/m 2 were included. Participants completed the Processes of Change, Stages of Change questionnaires, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to evaluate self-reported PA level (total, vigorous, and moderate PA). Hierarchical multiple regression models were used to test the prediction of PA level. For both total PA (β = .261; P processes are most prominent in PA behavior. Nevertheless, it is of interest to note that the interaction between experiential and behavioral POCs was the only element predicting moderate PA level. Experiential processes were not associated with PA level.

  9. The interaction of a model active pharmaceutical with cationic surfactant and the subsequent design of drug based ionic liquid surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Sara; Brown, Paul; Ferguson, Steven; Khan, Rafaqat Ali; Ismail, Bushra; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Sayed, Murtaza; Khan, Asad Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Interactions of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) with surfactants remain an important research area due to the need to improve drug delivery systems. In this study, UV-Visible spectrophotometry was used to investigate the interactions between a model low molecular weight hydrophilic drug sodium valproate (SV) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Changes in the spectra of SV were observed in pre- and post-micellar concentrations of CTAB. The binding constant (Kb) values and the number of drug molecules encapsulated per micelle were calculated, which posed the possibility of mixed micelle formation and strong complexation between SV and CTAB. These results were compared to those of a novel room temperature surface active ionic liquid, which was synthesized by the removal of inorganic counterions from a 1:1 mixture of CTAB and SV. In this new compound the drug now constitutes a building block of the carrier and, as such, has considerably different surfactant properties to its building blocks. In addition, enhanced solubility in a range of solvents, including simulated gastric fluid, was observed. The study provides valuable experimental evidence concerning the performance of drug based surfactant ionic liquids and how their chemical manipulation, without altering the architecture of the API, leads to control of surfactant behavior and physicochemical properties. In turn, this should feed through to improved and controlled drug release rates and delivery mechanisms, and the prevention of precipitation or formation of polymorphs typical of crystalline form APIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Dual Luciferase Reporter System for B. burgdorferi Measures Transcriptional Activity during Tick-Pathogen Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Adams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the transcriptional responses of vector-borne pathogens at the vector-pathogen interface is critical for understanding disease transmission. Borrelia (Borreliella burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease in the United States, is transmitted by the bite of infected Ixodes sp. ticks. It is known that B. burgdorferi has altered patterns of gene expression during tick acquisition, persistence and transmission. Recently, we and others have discovered in vitro expression of RNAs found internal, overlapping, and antisense to annotated open reading frames in the B. burgdorferi genome. However, there is a lack of molecular genetic tools for B. burgdorferi for quantitative, strand-specific, comparative analysis of these transcripts in distinct environments such as the arthropod vector. To address this need, we have developed a dual luciferase reporter system to quantify B. burgdorferi promoter activities in a strand-specific manner. We demonstrate that constitutive expression of a B. burgdorferi codon-optimized Renilla reniformis luciferase gene (rlucBb allows normalization of the activity of a promoter of interest when fused to the B. burgdorferi codon-optimized Photinus pyralis luciferase gene (flucBb on the same plasmid. Using the well characterized, differentially regulated, promoters for flagellin (flaBp, outer surface protein A (ospAp and outer surface protein C (ospCp, we document the efficacy of the dual luciferase system for quantitation of promoter activities during in vitro growth and in infected ticks. Cumulatively, the dual luciferase method outlined herein is the first dual reporter system for B. burgdorferi, providing a novel and highly versatile approach for strand-specific molecular genetic analyses.

  11. Direct HPV E6/Myc interactions induce histone modifications, Pol II phosphorylation, and hTERT promoter activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renxiang; Dai, Yuhai; Schlegel, Richard; Liu, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus Viruses (HPVs) are associated with the majority of human cervical and anal cancers and 10-30% of head and neck squamous carcinomas. E6 oncoprotein from high risk HPVs interacts with the p53 tumor suppressor protein to facilitate its degradation and increases telomerase activity for extending the life span of host cells. We published previously that the Myc cellular transcription factor associates with the high-risk HPV E6 protein in vivo and participates in the transactivation of the hTERT promoter. In the present study, we further analyzed the role of E6 and the Myc-Max-Mad network in regulating the hTERT promoter. We confirmed that E6 and Myc interact independently and that Max can also form a complex with E6. However, the E6/Max complex is observed only in the presence of Myc, suggesting that E6 associates with Myc/Max dimers. Consistent with the hypothesis that Myc is required for E6 induction of the hTERT promoter, Myc antagonists (Mad or Mnt) significantly blocked E6-mediated transactivation of the hTERT promoter. Analysis of Myc mutants demonstrated that both the transactivation domain and HLH domain of Myc protein were required for binding E6 and for the consequent transactivation of the hTERT promoter, by either Myc or E6. We also showed that E6 increased phosphorylation of Pol II on the hTERT promoter and induced epigenetic histone modifications of the hTERT promoter. More important, knockdown of Myc expression dramatically decreased engagement of acetyl-histones and Pol II at the hTERT promoter in E6-expressing cells. Thus, E6/Myc interaction triggers the transactivation of the hTERT promoter by modulating both histone modifications, Pol II phosphorylation and promoter engagement, suggesting a novel mechanism for telomerase activation and a new target for HPV- associated human cancer. PMID:29221209

  12. Interaction Between Troponin and Myosin Enhances Contractile Activity of Myosin in Cardiac Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Schoffstall, Brenda; LaBarbera, Vincent A.; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Gavino, Belinda J.; Herring, Lauren; Heshmati, Sara; Kraft, Brittany H.; Inchausti, Vanessa; Meyer, Nancy L.; Moonoo, Danamarie; Takeda, Aya K.; Chase, Prescott Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling in striated muscle cells is critically dependent upon thin filament proteins tropomyosin (Tm) and troponin (Tn) to regulate mechanical output. Using in vitro measurements of contractility, we demonstrate that even in the absence of actin and Tm, human cardiac Tn (cTn) enhances heavy meromyosin MgATPase activity by up to 2.5-fold in solution. In addition, cTn without Tm significantly increases, or superactivates sliding speed of filamentous actin (F-actin) in skeletal motility a...

  13. Selective Coactivator Interactions in Gene Activation by SREBP-1a and -1c

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Julia I.; Datta, Shrimati; Athanikar, Jyoti N.; Freedman, Leonard P.; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    Requisite levels of intracellular cholesterol and fatty acids are maintained in part by the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). Three major SREBP isoforms exist; SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c are expressed from overlapping mRNAs, whereas SREBP-2 is encoded by a separate gene. The active forms of SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c differ only at their extreme N termini; SREBP-1c lacks 28 aa present in SREBP-1a and instead contains 4 unique aa of its own. While the SREBP-1a and -1c isoforms differe...

  14. GENDER FEATURES OF INTERACTION HORMONAL ACTIVITY ADIPOSE TISSUE AND PROINFLAMMATORY STATUS IN HYPERTENSION WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Bespalova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: research gender features of relationship of hormonal activity of adipose tissue and proinflammatory status with essential hypertension (EH in combination with metabolic syndrome (MS.Material and methods. Were examined 46 patients with essential hypertension stage (BP < 180/110 mm Hg. in conjunction with the metabolic syndrome. Along with a complete clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination adopted in specialized cardiological clinic, were defined concentrations in serum leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin and the level of markers of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein, neopterin and fibrinogen, was assessed the level of spontaneous production of cytokines and active oxygen species and the expression level of CD4, CD8 and CD36 – blood mononuclear leukocytes markers.Results and conclusions. It was established that the hormonal status of adipose tissue have women with EH combined with MS are characterized by higher levels of leptin and adiponectin in blood serum than in men.It was established not only a significant role adipokin imbalance in mechanisms of MS and systemic inflammation in these patients category, but also were studied gender characteristics. While for men in the development of the above pathological manifestations hipoadiponektinemia has the most meaning, and for women – hyperleptinemia.

  15. Interaction Between Familial Transmission and a Constitutively Active Immune System Shapes Gut Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rupal; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Resident gut bacteria are constantly influencing the immune system, yet the role of the immune system in shaping microbiota composition during an organism’s life span has remained unclear. Experiments in mice have been inconclusive due to differences in husbandry schemes that led to conflicting results. We used Drosophila as a genetically tractable system with a simpler gut bacterial population structure streamlined genetic backgrounds and established cross schemes to address this issue. We found that, depending on their genetic background, young flies had microbiota of different diversities that converged with age to the same Acetobacteraceae-dominated pattern in healthy flies. This pattern was accelerated in immune-compromised flies with higher bacterial load and gut cell death. Nevertheless, immune-compromised flies resembled their genetic background, indicating that familial transmission was the main force regulating gut microbiota. In contrast, flies with a constitutively active immune system had microbiota readily distinguishable from their genetic background with the introduction and establishment of previously undetectable bacterial families. This indicated the influence of immunity over familial transmission. Moreover, hyperactive immunity and increased enterocyte death resulted in the highest bacterial load observed starting from early adulthood. Cohousing experiments showed that the microenvironment also played an important role in the structure of the microbiota where flies with constitutive immunity defined the gut microbiota of their cohabitants. Our data show that, in Drosophila, constitutively active immunity shapes the structure and density of gut microbiota. PMID:28413160

  16. Desmoglein 3, via an interaction with E-cadherin, is associated with activation of Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu Man Tsang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3, a desmosomal adhesion protein, is expressed in basal and immediate suprabasal layers of skin and across the entire stratified squamous epithelium of oral mucosa. However, increasing evidence suggests that the role of Dsg3 may involve more than just cell-cell adhesion.To determine possible additional roles of Dsg3 during epithelial cell adhesion we used overexpression of full-length human Dsg3 cDNA, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of this molecule in various epithelial cell types. Overexpression of Dsg3 resulted in a reduced level of E-cadherin but a colocalisation with the E-cadherin-catenin complex of the adherens junctions. Concomitantly these transfected cells exhibited marked migratory capacity and the formation of filopodial protrusions. These latter events are consistent with Src activation and, indeed, Src-specific inhibition reversed these phenotypes. Moreover Dsg3 knockdown, which also reversed the decreased level of E-cadherin, partially blocked Src phosphorylation.Our data are consistent with the possibility that Dsg3, as an up-stream regulator of Src activity, helps regulate adherens junction formation.

  17. Noncoded amino acids in protein engineering: Structure-activity relationship studies of hirudin-thrombin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Vincenzo; Acquasaliente, Laura; Pontarollo, Giulia; Peterle, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    The advent of recombinant DNA technology allowed to site-specifically insert, delete, or mutate almost any amino acid in a given protein, significantly improving our knowledge of protein structure, stability, and function. Nevertheless, a quantitative description of the physical and chemical basis that makes a polypeptide chain to efficiently fold into a stable and functionally active conformation is still elusive. This mainly originates from the fact that nature combined, in a yet unknown manner, different properties (i.e., hydrophobicity, conformational propensity, polarizability, and hydrogen bonding capability) into the 20 standard natural amino acids, thus making difficult, if not impossible, to univocally relate the change in protein stability or function to the alteration of physicochemical properties caused by amino acid exchange(s). In this view, incorporation of noncoded amino acids with tailored side chains, allowing to finely tune the structure at a protein site, would facilitate to dissect the effects of a given mutation in terms of one or a few physicochemical properties, thus much expanding the scope of physical organic chemistry in the study of proteins. In this review, relevant applications from our laboratory will be presented on the use of noncoded amino acids in structure-activity relationships studies of hirudin binding to thrombin. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Feto-maternal interactions in pregnancies: placental microparticles activate peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, M; May, K; Hansson, S R; Schneider, H; Holzgreve, W; Hahn, S; Rusterholz, C

    2010-02-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with a systemic maternal inflammatory reaction, including the activation of peripheral blood monocytes. This reaction is exaggerated in pre-eclampsia, a severe placenta-dependent disorder of pregnancy specific to humans. It has been suggested that placental syncytiotrophoblast membrane microparticles (STBM), which are released into the peripheral blood, may contribute to the maternal response. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory properties of STBM generated by four different approaches on primary human monocytes in vitro. Cellular viability, phenotype and functional response were analysed. STBM isolated by mechanical dissection and STBM generated from villous explant cultures incubated in hypoxic conditions had only minor influences on the monocytic phenotype and failed to induce a proinflammatory response. By contrast, STBM washed from the maternal side of a placental cotyledon and STBM shed by explants cultured in air up-regulated cell surface expression of the adhesion molecule CD54 and induced the production of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and IL-1beta. Cytokine production was time- and dose-dependent. Our study, therefore, suggests that monocyte activation in normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia may be induced by STBM released by the placenta. The higher amounts of STBM circulating in maternal blood in pre-eclampsia might lead to the excessive maternal inflammatory reaction. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F [Federal State Agency ' 27 Scientific Centre of Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation' (Russian Federation); Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K [Department of Physics, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-19

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  20. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of ph on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D.; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK[subscript a] are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK[subscript a]. Students explore these concepts by examining…

  1. VANGL2 interacts with integrin αv to regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Tammy N; Jessen, Jason R

    2017-12-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are implicated in a variety of morphogenetic processes including embryonic cell migration and potentially cancer progression. During zebrafish gastrulation, the transmembrane protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) is required for PCP and directed cell migration. These cell behaviors occur in the context of a fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is thought that interactions with the ECM regulate cell migration, it is unclear how PCP proteins such as VANGL2 influence these events. Using an in vitro cell culture model system, we previously showed that human VANGL2 negatively regulates membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) and activation of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Here, we investigated the functional relationship between VANGL2, integrin αvβ3, and MMP2 activation. We provide evidence that VANGL2 regulates cell surface integrin αvβ3 expression and adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin. Inhibition of MMP14/MMP2 activity suppressed the cell adhesion defect in VANGL2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, our data show that MMP14 and integrin αv are required for increased proteolysis by VANGL2 knockdown cells. Lastly, we have identified integrin αvβ3 as a novel VANGL2 binding partner. Together, these findings begin to dissect the molecular underpinnings of how VANGL2 regulates MMP activity and cell adhesion to the ECM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potent synergistic in vitro interaction between nonantimicrobial membrane-active compounds and itraconazole against clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus resistant to itraconazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afeltra, J.; Vitale, R.G.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    To develop new approaches for the treatment of invasive infections caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, the in vitro interactions between itraconazole (ITZ) and seven different nonantimicrobial membrane-active compounds--amiodarone (AMD), amiloride, lidocaine, lansoprazole (LAN), nifedipine (NIF),

  3. Homocysteine directly