WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene-environment interaction analysis

  1. Semiparametric bayesian analysis of gene-environment interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lobach, I.

    2010-01-01

    A key component to prevention and control of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, is to analyze the genetic and environmental factors that lead to the development of these complex diseases. We propose a Bayesian approach for analysis of gene-environment interactions that efficiently models information available in the observed data and a priori biomedical knowledge.

  2. Gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Stephen B; McCaffery, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly accessible technologies for typing genetic variation, studies of gene-environment (G×E) interactions have proliferated in psychological research. Among the aims of such studies are testing developmental hypotheses and models of the etiology of behavioral disorders, defining boundaries of genetic and environmental influences, and identifying individuals most susceptible to risk exposures or most amenable to preventive and therapeutic interventions. This research also coincides with the emergence of unanticipated difficulties in detecting genetic variants of direct association with behavioral traits and disorders, which may be obscured if genetic effects are expressed only in predisposing environments. In this essay we consider these and other rationales for positing G×E interactions, review conceptual models meant to inform G×E interpretations from a psychological perspective, discuss points of common critique to which G×E research is vulnerable, and address the role of the environment in G×E interactions.

  3. Case-control studies of gene-environment interaction: Bayesian design and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B; Ghosh, Malay; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2010-09-01

    With increasing frequency, epidemiologic studies are addressing hypotheses regarding gene-environment interaction. In many well-studied candidate genes and for standard dietary and behavioral epidemiologic exposures, there is often substantial prior information available that may be used to analyze current data as well as for designing a new study. In this article, first, we propose a proper full Bayesian approach for analyzing studies of gene-environment interaction. The Bayesian approach provides a natural way to incorporate uncertainties around the assumption of gene-environment independence, often used in such an analysis. We then consider Bayesian sample size determination criteria for both estimation and hypothesis testing regarding the multiplicative gene-environment interaction parameter. We illustrate our proposed methods using data from a large ongoing case-control study of colorectal cancer investigating the interaction of N-acetyl transferase type 2 (NAT2) with smoking and red meat consumption. We use the existing data to elicit a design prior and show how to use this information in allocating cases and controls in planning a future study that investigates the same interaction parameters. The Bayesian design and analysis strategies are compared with their corresponding frequentist counterparts.

  4. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna Lobach; Ruzong Fan

    2012-01-01

    A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolik...

  5. Genes-environment interactions in obesity- and diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer: A GWAS data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongwei; Wei, Peng; Duell, Eric J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Olson, Sara H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Bracci, Paige M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Peeters, Petra H.M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Amos, Christopher I; Li, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity and diabetes are potentially alterable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that modify the associations of obesity and diabetes with pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Methods Using GWAS genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study of 2,028 cases and 2,109 controls to examine gene-obesity and gene-diabetes interactions in relation to pancreatic cancer risk by employing the likelihood ratio test (LRT) nested in logistic regression models and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results After adjusting for multiple comparisons, a significant interaction of the chemokine signaling pathway with obesity (P = 3.29 × 10−6) and a near significant interaction of calcium signaling pathway with diabetes (P = 1.57 × 10−4) in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer was observed. These findings were supported by results from IPA analysis of the top genes with nominal interactions. The major contributing genes to the two top pathways include GNGT2, RELA, TIAM1 and GNAS. None of the individual genes or SNPs except one SNP remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Notably, SNP rs10818684 of the PTGS1 gene showed an interaction with diabetes (P = 7.91 × 10−7) at a false discovery rate of 6%. Conclusions Genetic variations in inflammatory response and insulin resistance may affect the risk of obesity and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. These observations should be replicated in additional large datasets. Impact Gene-environment interaction analysis may provide new insights into the genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. PMID:24136929

  6. Genes-environment interactions in obesity- and diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer: a GWAS data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongwei; Wei, Peng; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A; Petersen, Gloria M; Bracci, Paige M; McWilliams, Robert R; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Peeters, Petra H M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Amos, Christopher I; Li, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are potentially alterable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that modify the associations of obesity and diabetes with pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study of 2,028 cases and 2,109 controls to examine gene-obesity and gene-diabetes interactions in relation to pancreatic cancer risk by using the likelihood-ratio test nested in logistic regression models and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). After adjusting for multiple comparisons, a significant interaction of the chemokine signaling pathway with obesity (P = 3.29 × 10(-6)) and a near significant interaction of calcium signaling pathway with diabetes (P = 1.57 × 10(-4)) in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer were observed. These findings were supported by results from IPA analysis of the top genes with nominal interactions. The major contributing genes to the two top pathways include GNGT2, RELA, TIAM1, and GNAS. None of the individual genes or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) except one SNP remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Notably, SNP rs10818684 of the PTGS1 gene showed an interaction with diabetes (P = 7.91 × 10(-7)) at a false discovery rate of 6%. Genetic variations in inflammatory response and insulin resistance may affect the risk of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. These observations should be replicated in additional large datasets. A gene-environment interaction analysis may provide new insights into the genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer.

  7. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong

    A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolikelihood approach that accommodates linkage disequilibrium in genetic markers and misclassification in environmental factors. Since our approach is genotype based, it allows the observed genetic information to enter the model directly thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase and simplifying computations. Bayesian approach allows shrinking parameter estimates towards prior distribution to improve estimation and inference when environmental factors are subject to misclassification. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a case-control study of interaction between early onset of drinking and genes involved in dopamine pathway.

  8. Genotype-Based Bayesian Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Misclassification in Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lobach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A key component to understanding etiology of complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, alcohol dependence, is to investigate gene-environment interactions. This work is motivated by the following two concerns in the analysis of gene-environment interactions. First, multiple genetic markers in moderate linkage disequilibrium may be involved in susceptibility to a complex disease. Second, environmental factors may be subject to misclassification. We develop a genotype based Bayesian pseudolikelihood approach that accommodates linkage disequilibrium in genetic markers and misclassification in environmental factors. Since our approach is genotype based, it allows the observed genetic information to enter the model directly thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase and simplifying computations. Bayesian approach allows shrinking parameter estimates towards prior distribution to improve estimation and inference when environmental factors are subject to misclassification. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a case-control study of interaction between early onset of drinking and genes involved in dopamine pathway.

  9. Biological Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction (G x E) has been treated as both a statistical phenomenon and a biological reality. It is argued that, although there are important statistical issues that need to be considered, the focus has to be on the biological implications of G x E. Four reports of G x E deriving from the Dunedin longitudinal study are used as…

  10. Finding gene-environment interactions for Phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-01-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G × E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G × Es for phobias. In addition to the careful concep...

  11. Artificial neural networks modeling gene-environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Frauke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions play an important role in the etiological pathway of complex diseases. An appropriate statistical method for handling a wide variety of complex situations involving interactions between variables is still lacking, especially when continuous variables are involved. The aim of this paper is to explore the ability of neural networks to model different structures of gene-environment interactions. A simulation study is set up to compare neural networks with standard logistic regression models. Eight different structures of gene-environment interactions are investigated. These structures are characterized by penetrance functions that are based on sigmoid functions or on combinations of linear and non-linear effects of a continuous environmental factor and a genetic factor with main effect or with a masking effect only. Results In our simulation study, neural networks are more successful in modeling gene-environment interactions than logistic regression models. This outperfomance is especially pronounced when modeling sigmoid penetrance functions, when distinguishing between linear and nonlinear components, and when modeling masking effects of the genetic factor. Conclusion Our study shows that neural networks are a promising approach for analyzing gene-environment interactions. Especially, if no prior knowledge of the correct nature of the relationship between co-variables and response variable is present, neural networks provide a valuable alternative to regression methods that are limited to the analysis of linearly separable data.

  12. Finding gene-environment interactions for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-03-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G x E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G x Es for phobias. In addition to the careful conceptualisation of new studies, it is suggested that data already collected should be re-analysed in light of increased understanding of processes influencing phobias.

  13. Semiparametric Bayesian analysis of gene-environment interactions with error in measurement of environmental covariates and missing genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Iryna; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J

    2011-01-01

    Case-control studies are widely used to detect gene-environment interactions in the etiology of complex diseases. Many variables that are of interest to biomedical researchers are difficult to measure on an individual level, e.g. nutrient intake, cigarette smoking exposure, long-term toxic exposure. Measurement error causes bias in parameter estimates, thus masking key features of data and leading to loss of power and spurious/masked associations. We develop a Bayesian methodology for analysis of case-control studies for the case when measurement error is present in an environmental covariate and the genetic variable has missing data. This approach offers several advantages. It allows prior information to enter the model to make estimation and inference more precise. The environmental covariates measured exactly are modeled completely nonparametrically. Further, information about the probability of disease can be incorporated in the estimation procedure to improve quality of parameter estimates, what cannot be done in conventional case-control studies. A unique feature of the procedure under investigation is that the analysis is based on a pseudo-likelihood function therefore conventional Bayesian techniques may not be technically correct. We propose an approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling as well as a computationally simple method based on an asymptotic posterior distribution. Simulation experiments demonstrated that our method produced parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of the association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development.

  14. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  15. Replication and meta-analysis of the gene-environment interaction between body mass index and the interleukin-6 promoter polymorphism with higher insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Patricia C; Chamarthi, Bindu; Williams, Jonathan S; Sun, Bei; Vaidya, Anand; Raby, Benjamin A; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Hopkins, Paul N; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Gordon H

    2012-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a complex disorder caused by an interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies identified a significant interaction between body mass index (BMI) and the rs1800795 polymorphism of the interleukin-6 gene that influences both IR and onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with obese individuals homozygous for the C allele demonstrating the highest level of IR and greatest risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Replication of a gene-environment interaction is important to confirm the validity of the initial finding and extend the generalizability of the results to other populations. Thus, the objective of this study was to replicate this gene-environment interaction on IR in a hypertensive population and perform a meta-analysis with prior published results. The replication analysis was performed using white individuals with hypertension from the Hypertensive Pathotype cohort (N = 311), genotyped for rs1800795. Phenotype studies were conducted after participants consumed 2 diets--high sodium (200 mmol/d) and low sodium (10 mmol/d)--for 7 days each. Measurements for plasma glucose, insulin, and interleukin-6 were obtained after 8 hours of fasting. Insulin resistance was characterized by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). In Hypertensive Pathotype, BMI was a significant effect modifier of the relationship between rs1800795 and HOMA-IR; higher BMI was associated with higher HOMA-IR among homozygote CC individuals when compared with major allele G carriers (P = .003). Furthermore, the meta-analysis in 1028 individuals confirmed the result, demonstrating the same significant interaction between rs1800795 and BMI on HOMA-IR (P = 1.05 × 10(-6)). This rare replication of a gene-environment interaction extends the generalizability of the results to hypertension while highlighting this polymorphism as a marker of IR in obese individuals.

  16. Gene-Environment Interactions in Asthma: Genetic and Epigenetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Uk; Kim, Jeong Dong; Park, Choon-Sik

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three decades, a large number of genetic studies have been aimed at finding genetic variants associated with the risk of asthma, applying various genetic and genomic approaches including linkage analysis, candidate gene polymorphism studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, contrary to general expectation, even single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by GWAS failed to fully explain the heritability of asthma. Thus, application of rare allele polymorphisms in well defined phenotypes and clarification of environmental factors have been suggested to overcome the problem of 'missing' heritability. Such factors include allergens, cigarette smoke, air pollutants, and infectious agents during pre- and post-natal periods. The first and simplest interaction between a gene and the environment is a candidate interaction of both a well known gene and environmental factor in a direct physical or chemical interaction such as between CD14 and endotoxin or between HLA and allergens. Several GWAS have found environmental interactions with occupational asthma, aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease, tobacco smoke-related airway dysfunction, and farm-related atopic diseases. As one of the mechanisms behind gene-environment interaction is epigenetics, a few studies on DNA CpG methylation have been reported on subphenotypes of asthma, pitching the exciting idea that it may be possible to intervene at the junction between the genome and the environment. Epigenetic studies are starting to include data from clinical samples, which will make them another powerful tool for re-search on gene-environment interactions in asthma.

  17. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    ) metabolizes caffeine; thus, gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and gender-matched controls), we assessed interactions between...... interactions for ADORA2A rs5760423 and heavy vs. light coffee consumption in incident (OR interaction = 0.66 [95% CI 0.46-0.94], p = 0.02) but not prevalent PD. We did not observe interactions for CYP1A2 rs762551 and rs2472304 in incident or prevalent PD. In meta-analyses, PD associations with daily coffee...... consumption were strongest among carriers of variant alleles in both ADORA2A and CYP1A2. CONCLUSION: We corroborated results from a previous report that described interactions between ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms and coffee consumption. Our results also suggest that survivor bias may affect results...

  18. NEXT-GENERATION ANALYSIS OF CATARACTS: DETERMINING KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS USING BIOFILTER, AND GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS USING THE PHENX TOOLKIT*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Verma, Shefali S.; Holzinger, Emily R.; Moore, Carrie B.; Wallace, John; Dudek, Scott M.; Huggins, Wayne; Kitchner, Terrie; Waudby, Carol; Berg, Richard; McCarty, Catherine A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the association between biobank derived genomic data and the information of linked electronic health records (EHRs) is an emerging area of research for dissecting the architecture of complex human traits, where cases and controls for study are defined through the use of electronic phenotyping algorithms deployed in large EHR systems. For our study, 2580 cataract cases and 1367 controls were identified within the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) Biobank and linked EHR, which is a member of the NHGRI-funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network. Our goal was to explore potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within these data for 529,431 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency > 1%, in order to explore higher level associations with cataract risk beyond investigations of single SNP-phenotype associations. To build our SNP-SNP interaction models we utilized a prior-knowledge driven filtering method called Biofilter to minimize the multiple testing burden of exploring the vast array of interaction models possible from our extensive number of SNPs. Using the Biofilter, we developed 57,376 prior-knowledge directed SNP-SNP models to test for association with cataract status. We selected models that required 6 sources of external domain knowledge. We identified 5 statistically significant models with an interaction term with p-value < 0.05, as well as an overall model with p-value < 0.05 associated with cataract status. We also conducted gene-environment interaction analyses for all GWAS SNPs and a set of environmental factors from the PhenX Toolkit: smoking, UV exposure, and alcohol use; these environmental factors have been previously associated with the formation of cataracts. We found a total of 288 models that exhibit an interaction term with a p-value ≤ 1×10−4 associated with cataract status. Our results show these approaches enable advanced searches for epistasis

  19. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of atopic diseases early in life suggests an important role of perinatal risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To study whether early-life exposures modify the genetic influence on atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: Questionnaire data on atopic diseases from 850....... Significant predictors of atopic diseases were identified with logistic regression and subsequently tested for genetic effect modification using variance components analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, prematurity (gestational age below 32 weeks) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, confidence interval (CI...... stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors...

  20. Neural correlates of gene-environment interactions in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The way we respond to our environment partly depends on our genes. So-called gene-environment interactions (GxE) may explain why some children develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) when exposed to a stressful environment, whereas others do not. Knowledge of GxE may therefore not on

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions in Severe Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eUher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe mental illness is a broad category that includes schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression. Both genetic disposition and environmental exposures play important roles in the development of severe mental illness. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the roles of genetic and environmental depend on each other. Gene-environment interactions may underlie the paradox of strong environmental factors for highly heritable disorders, the low estimates of shared environmental influences in twin studies of severe mental illness and the heritability gap between twin and molecular heritability estimates. Sons and daughters of parents with severe mental illness are more vulnerable to the effects of prenatal and postnatal environmental exposures, suggesting that the expression of genetic liability depends on environment. In the last decade, gene-environment interactions involving specific molecular variants in candidate genes have been identified. Replicated findings include an interaction between a polymorphism in the AKT1 gene and cannabis use in the development of psychosis and an interaction between the length polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene and childhood maltreatment in the development of persistent depressive disorder. Bipolar disorder has been underinvestigated, with only a single study showing an interaction between a functional polymorphism in BDNF and stressful life events triggering bipolar depressive episodes. The first systematic search for gene-environment interactions has found that a polymorphism in CTNNA3 may sensitise the developing brain to the pathogenic effect of cytomegalovirus in utero, leading to schizophrenia in adulthood. Strategies for genome-wide investigations will likely include coordination between epidemiological and genetic research efforts, systematic assessment of multiple environmental factors in large samples, and prioritization of genetic variants.

  2. The importance of gene-environment interactions in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddon, Hudson; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Meyre, David

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic has been mainly attributed to lifestyle changes. However, who becomes obese in an obesity-prone environment is largely determined by genetic factors. In the last 20 years, important progress has been made in the elucidation of the genetic architecture of obesity. In parallel with successful gene identifications, the number of gene-environment interaction (GEI) studies has grown rapidly. This paper reviews the growing body of evidence supporting gene-environment interactions in the field of obesity. Heritability, monogenic and polygenic obesity studies provide converging evidence that obesity-predisposing genes interact with a variety of environmental, lifestyle and treatment exposures. However, some skepticism remains regarding the validity of these studies based on several issues, which include statistical modelling, confounding, low replication rate, underpowered analyses, biological assumptions and measurement precision. What follows in this review includes (1) an introduction to the study of GEI, (2) the evidence of GEI in the field of obesity, (3) an outline of the biological mechanisms that may explain these interaction effects, (4) methodological challenges associated with GEI studies and potential solutions, and (5) future directions of GEI research. Thus far, this growing body of evidence has provided a deeper understanding of GEI influencing obesity and may have tremendous applications in the emerging field of personalized medicine and individualized lifestyle recommendations. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Gene-environment interactions in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoyal-Segal, Liat; Soreq, Hermona

    2006-06-01

    Much has been learned in recent years about the genetics of familial Parkinson's disease. However, far less is known about those malfunctioning genes which contribute to the emergence and/or progression of the vast majority of cases, the 'sporadic Parkinson's disease', which is the focus of our current review. Drastic differences in the reported prevalence of Parkinson's disease in different continents and countries suggest ethnic and/or environmental-associated multigenic contributions to this disease. Numerous association studies showing variable involvement of multiple tested genes in these distinct locations support this notion. Also, variable increases in the risk of Parkinson's disease due to exposure to agricultural insecticides indicate complex gene-environment interactions, especially when genes involved in protection from oxidative stress are explored. Further consideration of the brain regions damaged in Parkinson's disease points at the age-vulnerable cholinergic-dopaminergic balance as being involved in the emergence of sporadic Parkinson's disease in general and in the exposure-induced risks in particular. More specifically, the chromosome 7 ACHE/PON1 locus emerges as a key region controlling this sensitive balance, and animal model experiments are compatible with this concept. Future progress in the understanding of the genetics of sporadic Parkinson's disease depends on globally coordinated, multileveled studies of gene-environment interactions.

  4. Gene-environment interactions and alcohol use and dependence: current status and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaluw, C.S. van der; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    To discuss the current status of gene-environment interaction research with regard to alcohol use and dependence. Further, we highlight the difficulties concerning gene-environment studies. Overview of the current evidence for gene-environment interactions in alcohol outcomes, and of the associated

  5. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,47...

  6. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  7. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  8. Music training and speech perception: a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Claims of beneficial side effects of music training are made for many different abilities, including verbal and visuospatial abilities, executive functions, working memory, IQ, and speech perception in particular. Such claims assume that music training causes the associations even though children who take music lessons are likely to differ from other children in music aptitude, which is associated with many aspects of speech perception. Music training in childhood is also associated with cognitive, personality, and demographic variables, and it is well established that IQ and personality are determined largely by genetics. Recent evidence also indicates that the role of genetics in music aptitude and music achievement is much larger than previously thought. In short, music training is an ideal model for the study of gene-environment interactions but far less appropriate as a model for the study of plasticity. Children seek out environments, including those with music lessons, that are consistent with their predispositions; such environments exaggerate preexisting individual differences. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Subtle gene-environment interactions driving paranoia in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, C J P; Wichers, M; Derom, C; Thiery, E; Myin-Germeys, I; Krabbendam, L; van Os, J

    2009-02-01

    It has been suggested that genes impact on the degree to which minor daily stressors cause variation in the intensity of subtle paranoid experiences. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val(158)Met and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met in part mediate genetic effects on paranoid reactivity to minor stressors. In a general population sample of 579 young adult female twins, on the one hand, appraisals of (1) event-related stress and (2) social stress and, on the other hand, feelings of paranoia in the flow of daily life were assessed using momentary assessment technology for five consecutive days. Multilevel regression analyses were used to examine moderation of daily life stress-induced paranoia by COMT Val(158)Met and BDNF Val(66)Met genotypes. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val carriers displayed more feelings of paranoia in response to event stress compared with Met carriers. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Met carriers showed more social-stress-induced paranoia than individuals with the Val/Val genotype. Thus, paranoia in the flow of daily life may be the result of gene-environment interactions that can be traced to different types of stress being moderated by different types of genetic variation.

  10. A systematic gene-gene and gene-environment interaction analysis of DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC4, and oral cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Yen, Ching-Yui; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide with a high mortality rate. Biomarkers that anticipate susceptibility, prognosis, or response to treatments are much needed. Oral cancer is a polygenic disease involving complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors, which require multifaceted analyses. Here, we examined in a dataset of 103 oral cancer cases and 98 controls from Taiwan the association between oral cancer risk and the DNA repair genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group (XRCCs) 1-4, and the environmental factors of smoking, alcohol drinking, and betel quid (BQ) chewing. We employed logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and hierarchical interaction graphs for analyzing gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions. We identified a significantly elevated risk of the XRCC2 rs2040639 heterozygous variant among smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1-12.1] and alcohol drinkers [adjusted OR=5.7, 95% CI=1.4-23.2]. The best two-factor based G×G interaction of oral cancer included the XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 [OR=3.13, 95% CI=1.66-6.13]. For the G×E interaction, the estimated OR of oral cancer for two (drinking-BQ chewing), three (XRCC1-XRCC2-BQ chewing), four (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-BQ chewing), and five factors (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-drinking-BQ chewing) were 32.9 [95% CI=14.1-76.9], 31.0 [95% CI=14.0-64.7], 49.8 [95% CI=21.0-117.7] and 82.9 [95% CI=31.0-221.5], respectively. Taken together, the genotypes of XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 DNA repair genes appear to be significantly associated with oral cancer. These were enhanced by exposure to certain environmental factors. The observations presented here warrant further research in larger study samples to examine their relevance for routine clinical care in oncology.

  11. Gene-environment Interactions in the Etiology of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, G; Ermis, R B; Calapoglu, N S; Celik, E U; Türel, G Y

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that can be conceptualized as an interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of AMELX, CA6, DEFB1, and TAS2R38 gene polymorphism and gene-environment interactions on caries etiology and susceptibility in adults. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal mucosa, and adults aged 20 to 60 y were placed into 1 of 2 groups: low caries risk (DMFT ≤ 5; n = 77) and high caries risk (DMFT ≥ 14; n = 77). The frequency of AMELX (+522), CA6 (T55M), DEFB1 (G-20A), and TAS2R38 (A49P) single-nucleotide polymorphisms was genotyped with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Environmental risk factors examined in the study included plaque amount, toothbrushing frequency, dietary intake between meals, saliva secretion rate, saliva buffer capacity, mutans streptococci counts, and lactobacilli counts. There was no difference between the caries risk groups in relation to AMELX (+522) polymorphism (χ(2) test, P > 0.05). The distribution of CA6 genotype and allele frequencies in the low caries risk group did not differ from the high caries risk group (χ(2) test, P > 0.05). Polymorphism of DEFB1 (G-20A) was positively associated, and TAS2R38 (A49P) negatively associated, with caries risk (χ(2) test, P = 0.000). There were significant differences between caries susceptibility and each environmental risk factor, except for the saliva secretion rate (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.000). Based on stepwise multiple linear regression analyses, dental plaque amount, lactobacilli count, age, and saliva buffer capacity, as well as DEFB1 (G-20A), TAS2R38 (A49P), and CA6 (T55M) gene polymorphism, explained a total of 87.8% of the variations in DMFT scores. It can be concluded that variation in CA6 (T55M), DEFB1 (G-20A), and TAS2R38 (A49P) may be associated with caries experience in Turkish adults with a high level of dental plaque, lactobacilli count

  12. Comparisons of power of statistical methods for gene-environment interaction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ege, Markus J; Strachan, David P

    2013-10-01

    Any genome-wide analysis is hampered by reduced statistical power due to multiple comparisons. This is particularly true for interaction analyses, which have lower statistical power than analyses of associations. To assess gene-environment interactions in population settings we have recently proposed a statistical method based on a modified two-step approach, where first genetic loci are selected by their associations with disease and environment, respectively, and subsequently tested for interactions. We have simulated various data sets resembling real world scenarios and compared single-step and two-step approaches with respect to true positive rate (TPR) in 486 scenarios and (study-wide) false positive rate (FPR) in 252 scenarios. Our simulations confirmed that in all two-step methods the two steps are not correlated. In terms of TPR, two-step approaches combining information on gene-disease association and gene-environment association in the first step were superior to all other methods, while preserving a low FPR in over 250 million simulations under the null hypothesis. Our weighted modification yielded the highest power across various degrees of gene-environment association in the controls. An optimal threshold for step 1 depended on the interacting allele frequency and the disease prevalence. In all scenarios, the least powerful method was to proceed directly to an unbiased full interaction model, applying conventional genome-wide significance thresholds. This simulation study confirms the practical advantage of two-step approaches to interaction testing over more conventional one-step designs, at least in the context of dichotomous disease outcomes and other parameters that might apply in real-world settings.

  13. Testing gene-environment interaction in large-scale case-control association studies: possible choices and comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2012-02-01

    Several methods for screening gene-environment interaction have recently been proposed that address the issue of using gene-environment independence in a data-adaptive way. In this report, the authors present a comparative simulation study of power and type I error properties of 3 classes of procedures: 1) the standard 1-step case-control method; 2) the case-only method that requires an assumption of gene-environment independence for the underlying population; and 3) a variety of hybrid methods, including empirical-Bayes, 2-step, and model averaging, that aim at gaining power by exploiting the assumption of gene-environment independence and yet can protect against false positives when the independence assumption is violated. These studies suggest that, although the case-only method generally has maximum power, it has the potential to create substantial false positives in large-scale studies even when a small fraction of markers are associated with the exposure under study in the underlying population. All the hybrid methods perform well in protecting against such false positives and yet can retain substantial power advantages over standard case-control tests. The authors conclude that, for future genome-wide scans for gene-environment interactions, major power gain is possible by using alternatives to standard case-control analysis. Whether a case-only type scan or one of the hybrid methods should be used depends on the strength and direction of gene-environment interaction and association, the level of tolerance for false positives, and the nature of replication strategies.

  14. A Fast Multiple-Kernel Method With Applications to Detect Gene-Environment Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Rachel; Lu, Wenbin; Holloway, Shannon; Sale, Michèle M; Worrall, Bradford B; Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    Kernel machine (KM) models are a powerful tool for exploring associations between sets of genetic variants and complex traits. Although most KM methods use a single kernel function to assess the marginal effect of a variable set, KM analyses involving multiple kernels have become increasingly popular. Multikernel analysis allows researchers to study more complex problems, such as assessing gene-gene or gene-environment interactions, incorporating variance-component based methods for population substructure into rare-variant association testing, and assessing the conditional effects of a variable set adjusting for other variable sets. The KM framework is robust, powerful, and provides efficient dimension reduction for multifactor analyses, but requires the estimation of high dimensional nuisance parameters. Traditional estimation techniques, including regularization and the "expectation-maximization (EM)" algorithm, have a large computational cost and are not scalable to large sample sizes needed for rare variant analysis. Therefore, under the context of gene-environment interaction, we propose a computationally efficient and statistically rigorous "fastKM" algorithm for multikernel analysis that is based on a low-rank approximation to the nuisance effect kernel matrices. Our algorithm is applicable to various trait types (e.g., continuous, binary, and survival traits) and can be implemented using any existing single-kernel analysis software. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our algorithm has similar performance to an EM-based KM approach for quantitative traits while running much faster. We also apply our method to the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, examining gene-by-vitamin effects on recurrent stroke risk and gene-by-age effects on change in homocysteine level.

  15. The heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in cardiometabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Alaitz; Chen, Yan; Brändström, Anders; Engberg, Elisabeth; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Renström, Frida; Kurbasic, Azra; Franks, Paul W

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in humans. We therefore screened multiple cardiometabolic traits to assess the probability that they are influenced by genotype-environment interactions. Fourteen established environmental risk exposures and 11 cardiometabolic traits were analysed in the VIKING study, a cohort of 16,430 Swedish adults from 1682 extended pedigrees with available detailed genealogical, phenotypic and demographic information, using a maximum likelihood variance decomposition method in Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software. All cardiometabolic traits had statistically significant heritability estimates, with narrow-sense heritabilities (h (2)) ranging from 24% to 47%. Genotype-environment interactions were detected for age and sex (for the majority of traits), physical activity (for triacylglycerols, 2 h glucose and diastolic BP), smoking (for weight), alcohol intake (for weight, BMI and 2 h glucose) and diet pattern (for weight, BMI, glycaemic traits and systolic BP). Genotype-age interactions for weight and systolic BP, genotype-sex interactions for BMI and triacylglycerols and genotype-alcohol intake interactions for weight remained significant after multiple test correction. Age, sex and alcohol intake are likely to be major modifiers of genetic effects for a range of cardiometabolic traits. This information may prove valuable for studies that seek to identify specific loci that modify the effects of lifestyle in cardiometabolic disease.

  16. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood : implications for cocaine intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Rixt van der

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in drug-intak

  17. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized…

  18. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  19. Population stratification bias in the case-only study for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Yi; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2008-07-15

    The case-only study is a convenient approach and provides increased statistical efficiency in detecting gene-environment interactions. The validity of a case-only study hinges on one well-recognized assumption: The susceptibility genotypes and the environmental exposures of interest are independent in the population. Otherwise, the study will be biased. The authors show that hidden stratification in the study population could also ruin a case-only study. They derive the formulas for population stratification bias. The bias involves three terms: 1) the coefficient of variation of the exposure prevalence odds, 2) the coefficient of variation of the genotype frequency odds, and 3) the correlation coefficient between the exposure prevalence odds and the genotype frequency odds. The authors perform simulation to investigate the magnitude of bias over a wide range of realistic scenarios. It is found that the estimated interaction effect is frequently biased by more than 5%. For a rarer gene and a rarer exposure, the bias becomes even larger (>30%). Because of the potentially large bias, researchers conducting case-only studies should use the boundary formula presented in this paper to make more prudent interpretations of their results, or they should use stratified analysis or a modeling approach to adjust for population stratification bias in their studies.

  20. Advances in adult asthma diagnosis and treatment in 2012: potential therapeutics and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Andrea J

    2013-01-01

    In the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2012, research reports related to asthma in adults clustered around mechanisms of disease, with a special focus on their potential for informing new therapies. There was also consideration of the effect of the environment on health from pollution, climate change, and epigenetic influences, underlining the importance of understanding gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of asthma and response to treatment.

  1. A methodology to establish a database to study gene environment interactions for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are likely to explain some of the heterogeneity in childhood asthma. Here, we describe the methodology and experiences in establishing a database for childhood asthma designed to study gene-environment interactions (PAGES - Paediatric Asthma Gene Environment Study. Methods Children with asthma and under the care of a respiratory paediatrician are being recruited from 15 hospitals between 2008 and 2011. An asthma questionnaire is completed and returned by post. At a routine clinic visit saliva is collected for DNA extraction. Detailed phenotyping in a proportion of children includes spirometry, bronchodilator response (BDR, skin prick reactivity, exhaled nitric oxide and salivary cotinine. Dietary and quality of life questionnaires are completed. Data are entered onto a purpose-built database. Results To date 1045 children have been invited to participate and data collected in 501 (48%. The mean age (SD of participants is 8.6 (3.9 years, 57% male. DNA has been collected in 436 children. Spirometry has been obtained in 172 children, mean % predicted (SD FEV1 97% (15 and median (IQR BDR is 5% (2, 9. There were differences in age, socioeconomic status, severity and %FEV1 between the different centres (p≤0.024. Reasons for non-participation included parents not having time to take part, children not attending clinics and, in a small proportion, refusal to take part. Conclusions It is feasible to establish a national database to study gene-environment interactions within an asthmatic paediatric population; there are barriers to participation and some different characteristics in individuals recruited from different centres. Recruitment to our study continues and is anticipated to extend current understanding of asthma heterogeneity.

  2. Sample size requirements for indirect association studies of gene-environment interactions (G x E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Rebecca; Beckmann, Lars; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2008-04-01

    Association studies accounting for gene-environment interactions (G x E) may be useful for detecting genetic effects. Although current technology enables very dense marker spacing in genetic association studies, the true disease variants may not be genotyped. Thus, causal genes are searched for by indirect association using genetic markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true disease variants. Sample sizes needed to detect G x E effects in indirect case-control association studies depend on the true genetic main effects, disease allele frequencies, whether marker and disease allele frequencies match, LD between loci, main effects and prevalence of environmental exposures, and the magnitude of interactions. We explored variables influencing sample sizes needed to detect G x E, compared these sample sizes with those required to detect genetic marginal effects, and provide an algorithm for power and sample size estimations. Required sample sizes may be heavily inflated if LD between marker and disease loci decreases. More than 10,000 case-control pairs may be required to detect G x E. However, given weak true genetic main effects, moderate prevalence of environmental exposures, as well as strong interactions, G x E effects may be detected with smaller sample sizes than those needed for the detection of genetic marginal effects. Moreover, in this scenario, rare disease variants may only be detectable when G x E is included in the analyses. Thus, the analysis of G x E appears to be an attractive option for the detection of weak genetic main effects of rare variants that may not be detectable in the analysis of genetic marginal effects only.

  3. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Matsui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C ('E37', a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C. Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose and temperature (30 or 37°C in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur.

  4. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of nonsyndromic cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    consortium. Family-based association tests of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and three common maternal exposures (maternal smoking, alcohol consumption, and multivitamin supplementation) were used in a combined 2 df test for gene (G) and gene-environment (G × E) interaction simultaneously, plus...... G × E interaction was included. Among these, MLLT3 and SMC2 on chromosome 9 showed multiple SNPs resulting in an increased risk if the mother consumed alcohol during the peri-conceptual period (3 months prior to conception through the first trimester). TBK1 on chr. 12 and ZNF236 on chr. 18 showed...

  5. Tests for gene-environment interaction from case-control data: a novel study of type I error, power and designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Victor; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of a disease associated with the joint effects of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposures, epidemiologic researchers often test for non-multiplicative gene-environment effects from case-control studies. In this article, we present a comparative study of four alternative tests for interactions: (i) the standard case-control method; (ii) the case-only method, which requires an assumption of gene-environment independence for the underlying population; (iii) a two-step method that decides between the case-only and case-control estimators depending on a statistical test for the gene-environment independence assumption and (iv) a novel empirical-Bayes (EB) method that combines the case-control and case-only estimators depending on the sample size and strength of the gene-environment association in the data. We evaluate the methods in terms of integrated Type I error and power, averaged with respect to varying scenarios for gene-environment association that are likely to appear in practice. These unique studies suggest that the novel EB procedure overall is a promising approach for detection of gene-environment interactions from case-control studies. In particular, the EB procedure, unlike the case-only or two-step methods, can closely maintain a desired Type I error under realistic scenarios of gene-environment dependence and yet can be substantially more powerful than the traditional case-control analysis when the gene-environment independence assumption is satisfied, exactly or approximately. Our studies also reveal potential utility of some non-traditional case-control designs that samples controls at a smaller rate than the cases. Apart from the simulation studies, we also illustrate the different methods by analyzing interactions of two commonly studied genes, N-acetyl transferase type 2 and glutathione s-transferase M1, with smoking and dietary exposures, in a large case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  6. Genome-wide gene-environment interactions on quantitative traits using family data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitlani, Colleen M; Dupuis, Josée; Rice, Kenneth M; Sun, Fangui; Pitsillides, Achilleas N; Cupples, L Adrienne; Psaty, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    Gene-environment interactions may provide a mechanism for targeting interventions to those individuals who would gain the most benefit from them. Searching for interactions agnostically on a genome-wide scale requires large sample sizes, often achieved through collaboration among multiple studies in a consortium. Family studies can contribute to consortia, but to do so they must account for correlation within families by using specialized analytic methods. In this paper, we investigate the performance of methods that account for within-family correlation, in the context of gene-environment interactions with binary exposures and quantitative outcomes. We simulate both cross-sectional and longitudinal measurements, and analyze the simulated data taking family structure into account, via generalized estimating equations (GEE) and linear mixed-effects models. With sufficient exposure prevalence and correct model specification, all methods perform well. However, when models are misspecified, mixed modeling approaches have seriously inflated type I error rates. GEE methods with robust variance estimates are less sensitive to model misspecification; however, when exposures are infrequent, GEE methods require modifications to preserve type I error rate. We illustrate the practical use of these methods by evaluating gene-drug interactions on fasting glucose levels in data from the Framingham Heart Study, a cohort that includes related individuals.

  7. Gene-Gene-Environment Interactions of Serotonin Transporter, Monoamine Oxidase A and Childhood Maltreatment Predict Aggressive Behavior in Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Ming, Qing-sen; Yi, Jin-yao; Wang, Xiang; Chai, Qiao-lian; Yao, Shu-qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions that moderate aggressive behavior have been identified independently in the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA). The aim of the present study was to investigate epistasis interactions between MAOA-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), 5-HTTlinked polymorphism (LPR) and child abuse and the effects of these on aggressive tendencies in a group of otherwise healthy adolescents. A group of 546 Chinese male adolescents completed the Child Trauma Questionnaire and Youth self-report of the Child Behavior Checklist. Buccal cells were collected for DNA analysis. The effects of childhood abuse, MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR genotypes and their interactive gene-gene-environmental effects on aggressive behavior were analyzed using a linear regression model. The effect of child maltreatment was significant, and a three-way interaction among MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR and sexual abuse (SA) relating to aggressive behaviors was identified. Chinese male adolescents with high expression of the MAOA-VNTR allele and 5-HTTLPR “SS” genotype exhibited the highest aggression tendencies with an increase in SA during childhood. The findings reported support aggression being a complex behavior involving the synergistic effects of gene-gene-environment interactions. PMID:28203149

  8. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood: implications for cocaine intake

    OpenAIRE

    van der Veen, Rixt

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in drug-intake and to be differentially sensitive to several stressors. We studied the impact of early life experiences (long-term influence) as well as a later life psychosocial stressor (short-term influence)...

  9. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker.

  10. Review of the Gene-Environment Interaction Literature in Cancer: What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Naoko I; Ghazarian, Armen A; Pimentel, Camilla B; Schully, Sheri D; Ellison, Gary L; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Mechanic, Leah E

    2016-07-01

    Risk of cancer is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Although the study of gene-environment interactions (G×E) has been an active area of research, little is reported about the known findings in the literature. To examine the state of the science in G×E research in cancer, we performed a systematic review of published literature using gene-environment or pharmacogenomic flags from two curated databases of genetic association studies, the Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) literature finder and Cancer Genome-Wide Association and Meta Analyses Database (CancerGAMAdb), from January 1, 2001, to January 31, 2011. A supplemental search using HuGE was conducted for articles published from February 1, 2011, to April 11, 2013. A 25% sample of the supplemental publications was reviewed. A total of 3,019 articles were identified in the original search. From these articles, 243 articles were determined to be relevant based on inclusion criteria (more than 3,500 interactions). From the supplemental search (1,400 articles identified), 29 additional relevant articles (1,370 interactions) were included. The majority of publications in both searches examined G×E in colon, rectal, or colorectal; breast; or lung cancer. Specific interactions examined most frequently included environmental factors categorized as energy balance (e.g., body mass index, diet), exogenous (e.g., oral contraceptives) and endogenous hormones (e.g., menopausal status), chemical environment (e.g., grilled meats), and lifestyle (e.g., smoking, alcohol intake). In both searches, the majority of interactions examined were using loci from candidate genes studies and none of the studies were genome-wide interaction studies (GEWIS). The most commonly reported measure was the interaction P-value, of which a sizable number of P-values were considered statistically significant (i.e., article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Bisphenol-A and Female Infertility: A Possible Role of Gene-Environment Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Huo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA is widely used and ubiquitous in the environment. Animal studies indicate that BPA affects reproduction, however, the gene-environment interaction mechanism(s involved in this association remains unclear. We performed a literature review to summarize the evidence on this topic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed using as keywords BPA, gene, infertility and female reproduction. Full-text articles in both human and animals published in English prior to December 2014 were selected. Results: Evidence shows that BPA can interfere with endocrine function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis, such as by changing gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH secretion in hypothalamus and promoting pituitary proliferation. Such actions affect puberty, ovulation and may even result in infertility. Ovary, uterus and other reproductive organs are also targets of BPA. BPA exposure impairs the structure and functions of female reproductive system in different times of life cycle and may contribute to infertility. Both epidemiological and experimental evidences demonstrate that BPA affects reproduction-related gene expression and epigenetic modification that are closely associated with infertility. The detrimental effects on reproduction may be lifelong and transgenerational. Conclusions: Evidence on gene-environment interactions, especially from human studies, is still limited. Further research on this topic is warranted.

  12. Gene-Environment Interaction Research and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chouliaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD remains largely unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that gene-environment interactions (GxE may play a crucial role in its development and progression. Whereas various susceptibility loci have been identified, like the apolipoprotein E4 allele, these cannot fully explain the increasing prevalence of AD observed with aging. In addition to such genetic risk factors, various environmental factors have been proposed to alter the risk of developing AD as well as to affect the rate of cognitive decline in AD patients. Nevertheless, aside from the independent effects of genetic and environmental risk factors, their synergistic participation in increasing the risk of developing AD has been sparsely investigated, even though evidence points towards such a direction. Advances in the genetic manipulation of mice, modeling various aspects of the AD pathology, have provided an excellent tool to dissect the effects of genes, environment, and their interactions. In this paper we present several environmental factors implicated in the etiology of AD that have been tested in transgenic animal models of the disease. The focus lies on the concept of GxE and its importance in a multifactorial disease like AD. Additionally, possible mediating mechanisms and future challenges are discussed.

  13. Environmental and gene-environment interactions and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Deane, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors including hormones, dietary factors, infections and exposure to tobacco smoke as well as gene-environment interactions have been associated with increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Importantly, the growing understanding of the prolonged period prior to the first onset of symptoms of RA suggests that these environmental and genetic factors are likely acting to drive the development of RA-related autoimmunity long before the appearance of the first joint symptoms and clinical findings that are characteristic of RA. Herein we will review these factors and interactions, especially those that have been investigated in a prospective fashion prior to the symptomatic onset of RA. We will also discuss how these factors may be explored in future study to further the understanding of the pathogenesis of RA, and ultimately perhaps develop preventive measures for this disease. PMID:22819092

  14. The role of gene-environment interactions in the development of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeland, Melanie R; Martino, David J; Allen, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    The rates of IgE-mediated food allergy have increased globally, particularly in developed countries. The rising incidence is occurring more rapidly than changes to the genome sequence would allow, suggesting that environmental exposures that alter the immune response play an important role. Genetic factors may also be used to predict an increased predisposition to these environmental risk factors, giving rise to the concept of gene-environment interactions, whereby differential risk of environmental exposures is mediated through the genome. Increasing evidence also suggests a role for epigenetic mechanisms, which are sensitive to environmental exposures, in the development of food allergy. This paper discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the environmental and genetic risk factors for food allergy and how environmental exposures may interact with immune genes to modify disease risk or outcome.

  15. MAOA genotype, social exclusion and aggression: an experimental test of a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Pujol, D; Andrés-Pueyo, A; Maydeu-Olivares, A

    2013-02-01

    In 2002, Caspi and colleagues provided the first epidemiological evidence that genotype may moderate individuals' responses to environmental determinants. However, in a correlational study great care must be taken to ensure the proper estimation of the causal relationship. Here, a randomized experiment was performed to test the hypothesis that the MAOA gene promoter polymorphism (MAOA-LPR) interacts with environmental adversity in determining aggressive behavior using laboratory analogs of real-life conditions. A sample of 57 Caucasian male students of Catalan and Spanish origin was recruited at the University of Barcelona. Ostracism, or social exclusion, was induced as environmental adversity using the Cyberball software. Laboratory aggression was assessed with the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP), which was used as an analog of antisocial behavior. We also measured aggressiveness by means of the reduced version of the Aggression Questionnaire. The MAOA-LPR polymorphism showed a significant effect on the number of aggressive responses in the PSAP (F(1,53) = 4.63, P = 0.03, partial η(2) = 0.08), as well as social exclusion (F(1,53) = 8.03, P = 0.01, partial η(2) = 0.13). Most notably, however, we found that the MAOA-LPR polymorphism interacts significantly with social exclusion in order to provoke aggressive behavior (F(1,53) = 4.42, P = 0.04, partial η(2) = 0.08), remarkably, the low-activity allele of the MAOA-LPR polymorphism carriers in the ostracized group show significantly higher aggression scores than the rest. Our results support the notion that gene-environment interactions can be successfully reproduced within a laboratory using analogs and an appropriate design. We provide guidelines to test gene-environment interactions hypotheses under controlled, experimental settings.

  16. Evaluation of two methods for assessing gene-environment interactions using data from the Danish case-control study of facial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etheredge, Analee J; Christensen, Kaare; Del Junco, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological investigations have begun to consider gene-environment (GE) interactions as potential risk factors for many diseases, including several different birth defects. However, traditional methodological approaches for the analysis of case-control data tend to have low power...

  17. Gene-environment interaction effects on lung function- a genome-wide association study within the Framingham heart study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies in occupational exposure and lung function have focused only on the main effect of occupational exposure or genetics on lung function. Some disease-susceptible genes may be missed due to their low marginal effects, despite potential involvement in the disease process through interactions with the environment. Through comprehensive genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies, we can uncover these susceptibility genes. Our objective in this study was to explore gene by occupational exposure interaction effects on lung function using both the individual SNPs approach and the genetic network approach. Methods The study population comprised the Offspring Cohort and the Third Generation from the Framingham Heart Study. We used forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) as outcomes. Occupational exposures were classified using a population-specific job exposure matrix. We performed genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis, using the Affymetrix 550 K mapping array for genotyping. A linear regression-based generalized estimating equation was applied to account for within-family relatedness. Network analysis was conducted using results from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-level analyses and from gene expression study results. Results There were 4,785 participants in total. SNP-level analysis and network analysis identified SNP rs9931086 (Pinteraction =1.16 × 10-7) in gene SLC38A8, which may significantly modify the effects of occupational exposure on FEV1. Genes identified from the network analysis included CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha. Conclusions Our study implies that SNP rs9931086 in SLC38A8 and genes CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha, which are related to inflammatory processes, may modify the effect of occupational exposure on lung function. PMID:24289273

  18. Key Considerations and Methods in the Study of Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Paul H G; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    With increased involvement of genetic data in most epidemiological investigations, gene-environment (G × E) interactions now stand as a topic, which must be meticulously assessed and thoroughly understood. The level, mode, and outcomes of interactions between environmental factors and genetic traits have the capacity to modulate disease risk. These must, therefore, be carefully evaluated as they have the potential to offer novel insights on the "missing heritability problem", reaching beyond our current limitations. First, we review a definition of G × E interactions. We then explore how concepts such as the early manifestation of the genetic components of a disease, the heterogeneity of complex traits, the clear definition of epidemiological strata, and the effect of varying physiological conditions can affect our capacity to detect (or miss) G × E interactions. Lastly, we discuss the shortfalls of regression models to study G × E interactions and how other methods such as the ReliefF algorithm, pattern recognition methods, or the LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) method can enable us to more adequately model G × E interactions. Overall, we present the elements to consider and a path to follow when studying genetic determinants of disease in order to uncover potential G × E interactions.

  19. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  20. Gene-environment interactions in psychopathology throughout early childhood: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Raquel Q; Soares, Isabel; Carvalho-Correia, Eduarda; Mesquita, Ana R

    2015-12-01

    Up to 20% of children and adolescents worldwide suffer from mental health problems. Epidemiological studies have shown that some of these problems are already present at an early age. The recognition that psychopathology is a result of an interaction between individual experiences and genetic characteristics has led to an increase in the number of studies using a gene-environment approach (G×E). However, to date, there has been no systematic review of G×E studies on psychopathology in the first 6 years of life. Following a literature search and a selection process, 14 studies were identified and most (n=12) of the studies found at least one significant G×E effect. This review provides a systematic characterization of the published G×E studies, providing insights into the neurobiological and environmental determinants involved in the etiology of children's psychopathology.

  1. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4)). Overall...

  2. Leveraging gene-environment interactions and endotypes for asthma gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Ober, Carole

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that includes subtypes of disease with different underlying causes and disease mechanisms. Asthma is caused by a complex interaction between genes and environmental exposures; early-life exposures in particular play an important role. Asthma is also heritable, and a number of susceptibility variants have been discovered in genome-wide association studies, although the known risk alleles explain only a small proportion of the heritability. In this review, we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that focusing on more specific asthma phenotypes, such as childhood asthma with severe exacerbations, and on relevant exposures that are involved in gene-environment interactions (GEIs), such as rhinovirus infections, will improve detection of asthma genes and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We will discuss the challenges of considering GEIs and the advantages of studying responses to asthma-associated exposures in clinical birth cohorts, as well as in cell models of GEIs, to dissect the context-specific nature of genotypic risks, to prioritize variants in genome-wide association studies, and to identify pathways involved in pathogenesis in subgroups of patients. We propose that such approaches, in spite of their many challenges, present great opportunities for better understanding of asthma pathogenesis and heterogeneity and, ultimately, for improving prevention and treatment of disease.

  3. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  4. Detecting gene-environment interactions in human birth defects: Study designs and statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Caroline G; Graff, Rebecca E; Liu, Jinghua; Passarelli, Michael N; Mefford, Joel A; Shaw, Gary M; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Witte, John S

    2015-08-01

    The National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) contains a wealth of information on affected and unaffected family triads, and thus provides numerous opportunities to study gene-environment interactions (G×E) in the etiology of birth defect outcomes. Depending on the research objective, several analytic options exist to estimate G×E effects that use varying combinations of individuals drawn from available triads. In this study, we discuss important considerations in the collection of genetic data and environmental exposures. We will also present several population- and family-based approaches that can be applied to data from the NBDPS including case-control, case-only, family-based trio, and maternal versus fetal effects. For each, we describe the data requirements, applicable statistical methods, advantages, and disadvantages. A range of approaches can be used to evaluate potentially important G×E effects in the NBDPS. Investigators should be aware of the limitations inherent to each approach when choosing a study design and interpreting results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Rethinking expertise: A multifactorial gene-environment interaction model of expert performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullén, Fredrik; Hambrick, David Zachary; Mosing, Miriam Anna

    2016-04-01

    Scientific interest in expertise-superior performance within a specific domain-has a long history in psychology. Although there is a broad consensus that a long period of practice is essential for expertise, a long-standing controversy in the field concerns the importance of other variables such as cognitive abilities and genetic factors. According to the influential deliberate practice theory, expert performance is essentially limited by a single variable: the amount of deliberate practice an individual has accumulated. Here, we provide a review of the literature on deliberate practice, expert performance, and its neural correlates. A particular emphasis is on recent studies indicating that expertise is related to numerous traits other than practice as well as genetic factors. We argue that deliberate practice theory is unable to account for major recent findings relating to expertise and expert performance, and propose an alternative multifactorial gene-environment interaction model of expertise, which provides an adequate explanation for the available empirical data and may serve as a useful framework for future empirical and theoretical work on expert performance.

  6. Education and alcohol use: A study of gene-environment interaction in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter B; Salvatore, Jessica E; Maes, Hermine; Aliev, Fazil; Latvala, Antti; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Dick, Danielle M

    2016-08-01

    The consequences of heavy alcohol use remain a serious public health problem. Consistent evidence has demonstrated that both genetic and social influences contribute to alcohol use. Research on gene-environment interaction (GxE) has also demonstrated that these social and genetic influences do not act independently. Instead, certain environmental contexts may limit or exacerbate an underlying genetic predisposition. However, much of the work on GxE and alcohol use has focused on adolescence and less is known about the important environmental contexts in young adulthood. Using data from the young adult wave of the Finnish Twin Study, FinnTwin12 (N = 3402), we used biometric twin modeling to test whether education moderated genetic risk for alcohol use as assessed by drinking frequency and intoxication frequency. Education is important because it offers greater access to personal resources and helps determine one's position in the broader stratification system. Results from the twin models show that education did not moderate genetic variance components and that genetic risk was constant across levels of education. Instead, education moderated environmental variance so that under conditions of low education, environmental influences explained more of the variation in alcohol use outcomes. The implications and limitations of these results are discussed.

  7. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Szentágotai-Tătar

    Full Text Available Rooted in people's preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology.

  8. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora; Chiș, Adina; Vulturar, Romana; Dobrean, Anca; Cândea, Diana Mirela; Miu, Andrei C

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people's preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR) on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology.

  9. Environmental factors as modulators of neurodegeneration: insights from gene-environment interactions in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Christina; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2015-05-01

    Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases with established gene-environment interactions, Huntington's disease (HD) is viewed as a disorder governed by genetics. The cause of the disease is a highly penetrant tandem repeat expansion encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. In the year 2000, a pioneering study showed that the disease could be delayed in transgenic mice by enriched housing conditions. This review describes subsequent human and preclinical studies identifying environmental modulation of motor, cognitive, affective and other symptoms found in HD. Alongside the behavioral observations we also discuss potential mechanisms and the relevance to other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In mouse models of HD, increased sensorimotor and cognitive stimulation can delay or ameliorate various endophenotypes. Potential mechanisms include increased trophic support, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and other forms of experience-dependent cellular plasticity. Subsequent clinical investigations support a role for lifetime activity levels in modulating the onset and progression of HD. Stress can accelerate memory and olfactory deficits and exacerbate cellular dysfunctions in HD mice. In the absence of effective treatments to slow the course of HD, environmental interventions offer feasible approaches to delay the disease, however further preclinical and human studies are needed in order to generate clinical recommendations. Environmental interventions could be combined with future pharmacological therapies and stimulate the identification of enviromimetics, drugs which mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity.

  10. Cognitive endophenotypes, gene-environment interactions and experience-dependent plasticity in animal models of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Emma L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating brain disorder caused by a complex and heterogeneous combination of genetic and environmental factors. In order to develop effective new strategies to prevent and treat schizophrenia, valid animal models are required which accurately model the disorder, and ideally provide construct, face and predictive validity. The cognitive deficits in schizophrenia represent some of the most debilitating symptoms and are also currently the most poorly treated. Therefore it is crucial that animal models are able to capture the cognitive dysfunction that characterizes schizophrenia, as well as the negative and psychotic symptoms. The genomes of mice have, prior to the recent gene-editing revolution, proven the most easily manipulable of mammalian laboratory species, and hence most genetic targeting has been performed using mouse models. Importantly, when key environmental factors of relevance to schizophrenia are experimentally manipulated, dramatic changes in the phenotypes of these animal models are often observed. We will review recent studies in rodent models which provide insight into gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. We will focus specifically on environmental factors which modulate levels of experience-dependent plasticity, including environmental enrichment, cognitive stimulation, physical activity and stress. The insights provided by this research will not only help refine the establishment of optimally valid animal models which facilitate development of novel therapeutics, but will also provide insight into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, thus identifying molecular and cellular targets for future preclinical and clinical investigations.

  11. Drug metabolism and liver disease: a drug-gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, Nathalie K; Branch, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the central role of the liver in drug metabolism, surprisingly there is lack of certainty in anticipating the extent of modification of the clearance of a given drug in a given patient. The intent of this review is to provide a conceptual framework in considering the impact of liver disease on drug disposition and reciprocally the impact of drug disposition on liver disease. It is proposed that improved understanding of the situation is gained by considering the issue as a special example of a drug-gene-environment interaction. This requires an integration of knowledge of the drug's properties, knowledge of the gene products involved in its metabolism, and knowledge of the pathophysiology of its disposition. This will enhance the level of predictability of drug disposition and toxicity for a drug of interest in an individual patient. It is our contention that advances in pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, and hepatology, together with concerted interests in the academic, regulatory, and pharmaceutical industry communities provide an ideal immediate environment to move from a qualitative reactive approach to quantitative proactive approach in individualizing patient therapy in liver disease.

  12. Identifying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia: contemporary challenges for integrated, large-scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Kempton, Matthew J; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Üçok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbaşoğlu, E Cem; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burçin; Karadağ, Hasan; Soygür, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Şahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga; Ayer, Ahmet; Noyan, Handan; Karadayı, Gülşah; Akturan, Elçin; Ulaş, Halis; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara; Bernardo, Miguel; Sanjuán, Julio; Bobes, Julio; Arrojo, Manuel; Santos, Jose Luis; Cuadrado, Pedro; Rodríguez Solano, José Juan; Carracedo, Angel; García Bernardo, Enrique; Roldán, Laura; López, Gonzalo; Cabrera, Bibiana; Cruz, Sabrina; Díaz Mesa, Eva Ma; Pouso, María; Jiménez, Estela; Sánchez, Teresa; Rapado, Marta; González, Emiliano; Martínez, Covadonga; Sánchez, Emilio; Olmeda, Ma Soledad; de Haan, Lieuwe; Velthorst, Eva; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; van Dam, Daniella; van der Ven, Elsje; van der Meer, Floor; Messchaert, Elles; Kraan, Tamar; Burger, Nadine; Leboyer, Marion; Szoke, Andrei; Schürhoff, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Jamain, Stéphane; Tortelli, Andrea; Frijda, Flora; Vilain, Jeanne; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Baudin, Grégoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Bulzacka, Ewa; Charpeaud, Thomas; Tronche, Anne-Marie; De Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud; Decoster, Jeroen; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Stefanis, Nikos C; Sachs, Gabriele; Aschauer, Harald; Lasser, Iris; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Schlögelhofer, Monika; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Smieskova, Renata; Rapp, Charlotte; Ittig, Sarah; Soguel-dit-Piquard, Fabienne; Studerus, Erich; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Paruch, Julia; Julkowski, Dominika; Hilboll, Desiree; Sham, Pak C; Cherny, Stacey S; Chen, Eric Y H; Campbell, Desmond D; Li, Miaoxin; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos María; Emaldi Cirión, Aitziber; Urruela Mora, Asier; Jones, Peter; Kirkbride, James; Cannon, Mary; Rujescu, Dan; Tarricone, Ilaria; Berardi, Domenico; Bonora, Elena; Seri, Marco; Marcacci, Thomas; Chiri, Luigi; Chierzi, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Braca, Mauro; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Donegani, Ivonne; Fioritti, Angelo; La Barbera, Daniele; La Cascia, Caterina Erika; Mulè, Alice; Sideli, Lucia; Sartorio, Rachele; Ferraro, Laura; Tripoli, Giada; Seminerio, Fabio; Marinaro, Anna Maria; McGorry, Patrick; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G Paul; Pantelis, Christos; Menezes, Paulo R; Del-Ben, Cristina M; Gallo Tenan, Silvia H; Shuhama, Rosana; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Ira, Elisa; Nordentoft, Merete; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Cristóbal, Paula; Kwapil, Thomas R; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Gadelha, Ary; Maric, Nadja P; Andric, Sanja; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mirjanic, Tijana

    2014-07-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular genetic variants is small. There are now also a limited number of studies that have investigated molecular genetic candidate gene-environment interactions (G × E), however, so far, thorough replication of findings is rare and G × E research still faces several conceptual and methodological challenges. In this article, we aim to review these recent developments and illustrate how integrated, large-scale investigations may overcome contemporary challenges in G × E research, drawing on the example of a large, international, multi-center study into the identification and translational application of G × E in schizophrenia. While such investigations are now well underway, new challenges emerge for G × E research from late-breaking evidence that genetic variation and environmental exposures are, to a significant degree, shared across a range of psychiatric disorders, with potential overlap in phenotype.

  13. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  14. Gene-Environment Interaction in Externalizing Problems among Adolescents: Evidence from the Pelotas 1993 Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieling, Christian; Hutz, Mara H.; Genro, Julia P.; Polanczyk, Guilherme V.; Anselmi, Luciana; Camey, Suzi; Hallal, Pedro C.; Barros, Fernando C.; Victora, Cesar G.; Menezes, Ana M. B.; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study of gene-environment interactions (G by E) is one of the most promising strategies to uncover the origins of mental disorders. Replication of initial findings, however, is essential because there is a strong possibility of publication bias in the literature. In addition, there is a scarcity of research on the topic originated…

  15. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  16. A maximum likelihood method for studying gene-environment interactions under conditional independence of genotype and exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K F

    2006-09-30

    Given the biomedical interest in gene-environment interactions along with the difficulties inherent in gathering genetic data from controls, epidemiologists need methodologies that can increase precision of estimating interactions while minimizing the genotyping of controls. To achieve this purpose, many epidemiologists suggested that one can use case-only design. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood method for making inference about gene-environment interactions using case-only data. The probability of disease development is described by a logistic risk model. Thus the interactions are model parameters measuring the departure of joint effects of exposure and genotype from multiplicative odds ratios. We extend the typical inference method derived under the assumption of independence between genotype and exposure to that under a more general assumption of conditional independence. Our maximum likelihood method can be applied to analyse both categorical and continuous environmental factors, and generalized to make inference about gene-gene-environment interactions. Moreover, the application of this method can be reduced to simply fitting a multinomial logistic model when we have case-only data. As a consequence, the maximum likelihood estimates of interactions and likelihood ratio tests for hypotheses concerning interactions can be easily computed. The methodology is illustrated through an example based on a study about the joint effects of XRCC1 polymorphisms and smoking on bladder cancer. We also give two simulation studies to show that the proposed method is reliable in finite sample situation.

  17. DISC1 mouse models as a tool to decipher gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders

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    Tyler eCash-Padgett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available DISC1 was discovered in a Scottish pedigree in which a chromosomal translocation that breaks this gene segregates with psychiatric disorders, mainly depression and schizophrenia. Linkage and association studies in diverse populations support DISC1 as a susceptibility gene to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many Disc1 mouse models have been generated to study its neuronal functions. These mouse models display variable phenotypes, some of them relevant to schizophrenia, others to depression.The Disc1 mouse models are popular genetic models for studying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. Five different Disc1 models have been combined with environmental factors. The environmental stressors employed can be classified as either early immune activation or later social paradigms. These studies cover major time points along the neurodevelopmental trajectory: prenatal, early postnatal, adolescence, and adulthood. Various combinations of molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods have been used to assess the outcomes. Additionally, three of the studies sought to rescue the resulting abnormalities.Here we provide background on the environmental paradigms used, summarize the results of these studies combining Disc1 mouse models with environmental stressors and discuss what we can learn and how to proceed. A major question is how the genetic and environmental factors determine which psychiatric disorder will be clinically manifested. To address this we can take advantage of the many Disc1 models available and expose them to the same environmental stressor. The complementary experiment would be to expose the same model to different environmental stressors. DISC1 is an ideal gene for this approach, since in the Scottish pedigree the same chromosomal translocation results in different psychiatric conditions.

  18. Genotype-based association models of complex diseases to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

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    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong; Manga, Prashiela

    A central problem in genetic epidemiology is to identify and rank genetic markers involved in a disease. Complex diseases, such as cancer, hypertension, diabetes, are thought to be caused by an interaction of a panel of genetic factors, that can be identified by markers, which modulate environmental factors. Moreover, the effect of each genetic marker may be small. Hence, the association signal may be missed unless a large sample is considered, or a priori biomedical data are used. Recent advances generated a vast variety of a priori information, including linkage maps and information about gene regulatory dependence assembled into curated pathway databases. We propose a genotype-based approach that takes into account linkage disequilibrium (LD) information between genetic markers that are in moderate LD while modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A major advantage of our method is that the observed genetic information enters a model directly thus eliminating the need to estimate haplotype-phase. Our approach results in an algorithm that is inexpensive computationally and does not suffer from bias induced by haplotype-phase ambiguity. We investigated our model in a series of simulation experiments and demonstrated that the proposed approach results in estimates that are nearly unbiased and have small variability. We applied our method to the analysis of data from a melanoma case-control study and investigated interaction between a set of pigmentation genes and environmental factors defined by age and gender. Furthermore, an application of our method is demonstrated using a study of Alcohol Dependence.

  19. Perinatal Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions on IgE Production and Asthma Development

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    Jen-Chieh Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic asthma is a complex disease associated with IgE-mediated immune reactions. Numerous genome-wide studies identified more than 100 genes in 22 chromosomes associated with atopic asthma, and different genetic backgrounds in different environments could modulate susceptibility to atopic asthma. Current knowledge emphasizes the effect of tobacco smoke on the development of childhood asthma. This suggests that asthma, although heritable, is significantly affected by gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Evidence has recently shown that molecular mechanism of a complex disease may be limited to not only DNA sequence differences, but also gene-environmental interactions for epigenetic difference. This paper reviews and summarizes how gene-gene and gene-environment interactions affect IgE production and the development of atopic asthma in prenatal and childhood stages. Based on the mechanisms responsible for perinatal gene-environment interactions on IgE production and development of asthma, we formulate several potential strategies to prevent the development of asthma in the perinatal stage.

  20. Genetic risk for violent behavior and environmental exposure to disadvantage and violent crime: the case for gene-environment interaction.

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    Barnes, J C; Jacobs, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Despite mounds of evidence to suggest that neighborhood structural factors predict violent behavior, almost no attention has been given to how these influences work synergistically (i.e., interact) with an individual's genetic propensity toward violent behavior. Indeed, two streams of research have, heretofore, flowed independently of one another. On one hand, criminologists have underscored the importance of neighborhood context in the etiology of violence. On the other hand, behavioral geneticists have argued that individual-level genetic propensities are important for understanding violence. The current study seeks to integrate these two compatible frameworks by exploring gene-environment interactions (GxE). Two GxEs were examined and supported by the data (i.e., the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health). Using a scale of genetic risk based on three dopamine genes, the analysis revealed that genetic risk had a greater influence on violent behavior when the individual was also exposed to neighborhood disadvantage or when the individual was exposed to higher violent crime rates. The relevance of these findings for criminological theorizing was considered.

  1. The challenge of causal inference in gene-environment interaction research: leveraging research designs from the social sciences.

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    Fletcher, Jason M; Conley, Dalton

    2013-10-01

    The integration of genetics and the social sciences will lead to a more complex understanding of the articulation between social and biological processes, although the empirical difficulties inherent in this integration are large. One key challenge is the implications of moving "outside the lab" and away from the experimental tools available for research with model organisms. Social science research methods used to examine human behavior in nonexperimental, real-world settings to date have not been fully taken advantage of during this disciplinary integration, especially in the form of gene-environment interaction research. This article outlines and provides examples of several prominent research designs that should be used in gene-environment research and highlights a key benefit to geneticists of working with social scientists.

  2. Nrf2 regulates gene-environment interactions in an animal model of intrauterine inflammation: Implications for preterm birth and prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussan, Thomas E.; Sudini, Kuladeep; Talbot, C. Conover; Wang, Xiaobin; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Burd, Irina; Biswal, Shyam

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal mortality, and surviving infants are at increased risk for lifelong disabilities. Intrauterine inflammation is an etiological factor that drives PTB, and oxidative stress is associated with PTB. Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that is the key regulator of the response to oxidative and inflammatory stress. Here, we used the established mouse model of intrauterine inflammation-induced PTB to determine whether Nrf2 is a modifier of susceptibility to PTB and prematurity-related morbidity and mortality in the offspring. We determined that Nr2-deficient (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited a greater sensitivity to intrauterine inflammation, as indicated by decreased time to delivery, reduced birthweight, and 100% mortality. Placentas from preterm Nrf2−/− mice showed elevated levels of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death, and transcriptomic analysis identified numerous key signaling pathways that were differentially expressed between wild-type (WT) and Nrf2−/− mice in both preterm and control samples. Thus, Nrf2 could be a critical factor for gene-environment interactions that may determine susceptibility to PTB. Further studies are needed to determine if Nrf2 is a viable therapeutic target in women who are at risk for PTB and associated complications in the affected offspring. PMID:28071748

  3. Estimating genetic effect sizes under joint disease-endophenotype models in presence of gene-environment interactions

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    Alexandre eBureau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of genetic variants on the risk of complex diseases estimated from association studies are typically small. Nonetheless, variants may have important effects in presence of specific levels of environmental exposures, and when a trait related to the disease (endophenotype is either normal or impaired. We propose polytomous and transition models to represent the relationship between disease, endophenotype, genotype and environmental exposure in family studies. Model coefficients were estimated using generalized estimating equations and were used to derive gene-environment interaction effects and genotype effects at specific levels of exposure. In a simulation study, estimates of the effect of a genetic variant were substantially higher when both an endophenotype and an environmental exposure modifying the variant effect were taken into account, particularly under transition models, compared to the alternative of ignoring the endophenotype. Illustration of the proposed modeling with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, physical activity and polymorphisms in the NOX3 gene in the Quebec Family Study revealed that the positive association of the A allele of rs1375713 with the metabolic syndrome at high levels of physical activity was only detectable in subjects without abdominal obesity, illustrating the importance of taking into account the abdominal obesity endophenotype in this analysis.

  4. Gene environment interaction in urinary bladder cancer with special reference to organochlorine pesticide: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tusha; Jain, Smita; Verma, Ankur; Sharma, Nivedita; Gupta, Sanjay; Arora, Vinod Kumar; Dev Banerjee, Basu

    2013-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is a common disease worldwide with a higher incidence rate in developed countries. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), potent endocrine disrupters, are found to be associated with several cancers such as prostate, breast, bladder, etc. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a polymorphic supergene family involved in the detoxification of numerous environmental toxins including OCPs. The present study was carried out in UBC subjects (n=50) and healthy control subjects (n=50) with an aim to determine the role of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphism and its implication on the OCP detoxification or bioaccumulation which may increase the risk of UBC in humans. This study was also designed to identify the "gene-environment interaction" specifically between gene polymorphism in xenobiotic metabolizing genetic enzyme(s) and blood OCP levels. GSTM1/GSTT1 gene polymorphism was analysed by using multiplex PCR. OCPs levels in whole blood were estimated by Gas chromatography equipped with electron capture detector. The results demonstrated a significant (p^{-}/GSTT1^{-} (null) genotype in UBC cases without interfering the distribution of other GSTT1/GSTM1 genotypes. The blood levels of alpha (α), Beta (β), Gamma (γ), total - Hexachlorcyclohexane (HCH) and para-para - dichlorodiphenyltrichloroetane (p,p'-DDT) were found to be significantly (pcases as compared to controls. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant interaction between β-HCH and GSTM1^{-} genotype (p^{-} genotype (penvironment interaction" may play a key role in increasing the risk for UBC in individuals who are genetically more susceptible due to presence of GSTM1/GSTT1 null deletion during their routine encounter with or exposure to OCPs.

  5. Comparison of 2 models for gene-environment interactions: an example of simulated gene-medication interactions on systolic blood pressure in family-based data.

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    Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Hodonsky, Chani J; Graff, Mariaelisa; Love, Shelly-Ann M; Howard, Annie Green; Seyerle, Amanda A; Avery, Christy L; Chittoor, Geetha; Franceschini, Nora; Voruganti, V Saroja; Young, Kristin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; North, Kari E; Justice, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of adults in the United States who are diagnosed with hypertension use blood-pressure-lowering medications. Yet there is a large interindividual variability in the response to these medications. Two complementary gene-environment interaction methods have been published and incorporated into publicly available software packages to examine interaction effects, including whether genetic variants modify the association between medication use and blood pressure. The first approach uses a gene-environment interaction term to measure the change in outcome when both the genetic marker and medication are present (the "interaction model"). The second approach tests for effect-size differences between strata of an environmental exposure (the "med-diff" approach). However, no studies have quantitatively compared how these methods perform with respect to 1 or 2 degree of freedom (DF) tests or in family-based data sets. We evaluated these 2 approaches using simulated genotype-medication response interactions at 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across a range of minor allele frequencies (MAFs 0.1-5.4 %) using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 family sample. The estimated interaction effect sizes were on average larger in the interaction model approach compared to the med-diff approach. The true positive proportion was higher for the med-diff approach for SNPs less than 1 % MAF, but higher for the interaction model when common variants were evaluated (MAF >5 %). The interaction model produced lower false-positive proportions than expected (5 %) across a range of MAFs for both the 1DF and 2DF tests. In contrast, the med-diff approach produced higher but stable false-positive proportions around 5 % across MAFs for both tests. Although the 1DF tests both performed similarly for common variants, the interaction model estimated true interaction effects with less bias and higher true positive proportions than the med-diff approach. However, if rare variation (MAF

  6. Epigenetic genes and emotional reactivity to daily life events: a multi-step gene-environment interaction study.

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    Ehsan Pishva

    Full Text Available Recent human and animal studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms mediate the impact of environment on development of mental disorders. Therefore, we hypothesized that polymorphisms in epigenetic-regulatory genes impact stress-induced emotional changes. A multi-step, multi-sample gene-environment interaction analysis was conducted to test whether 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in epigenetic-regulatory genes, i.e. three DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, moderate emotional responses to stressful and pleasant stimuli in daily life as measured by Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM. In the first step, main and interactive effects were tested in a sample of 112 healthy individuals. Significant associations in this discovery sample were then investigated in a population-based sample of 434 individuals for replication. SNPs showing significant effects in both the discovery and replication samples were subsequently tested in three other samples of: (i 85 unaffected siblings of patients with psychosis, (ii 110 patients with psychotic disorders, and iii 126 patients with a history of major depressive disorder. Multilevel linear regression analyses showed no significant association between SNPs and negative affect or positive affect. No SNPs moderated the effect of pleasant stimuli on positive affect. Three SNPs of DNMT3A (rs11683424, rs1465764, rs1465825 and 1 SNP of MTHFR (rs1801131 moderated the effect of stressful events on negative affect. Only rs11683424 of DNMT3A showed consistent directions of effect in the majority of the 5 samples. These data provide the first evidence that emotional responses to daily life stressors may be moderated by genetic variation in the genes involved in the epigenetic machinery.

  7. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Gene-environment interactions: key to unraveling the mystery of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. The gradual, irreversible loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra is the signature lesion of PD. Clinical symptoms of PD become apparent when 50-60% of nigral dopamine neurons are lost. PD progresses insidiously for 5-7 years (preclinical period) and then continues to worsen even under the symptomatic treatment. To determine what triggers the disease onset and what drives the chronic, self-propelling neurodegenerative process becomes critical and urgent, since lack of such knowledge impedes the discovery of effective treatments to retard PD progression. At present, available therapeutics only temporarily relieve PD symptoms. While the identification of causative gene defects in familial PD uncovers important genetic influences in this disease, the majority of PD cases are sporadic and idiopathic. The current consensus suggests that PD develops from multiple risk factors including aging, genetic predisposition, and environmental exposure. Here, we briefly review research on the genetic and environmental causes of PD. We also summarize very recent genome-wide association studies on risk gene polymorphisms in the emergence of PD. We highlight the new converging evidence on gene-environment interplay in the development of PD with an emphasis on newly developed multiple-hit PD models involving both genetic lesions and environmental triggers.

  9. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  10. Allowing for population stratification in case-only studies of gene-environment interaction, using genomic control.

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    Yadav, Pankaj; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Lieb, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Krawczak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Gene-environment interactions (G × E) have attracted considerable research interest in the past owing to their scientific and public health implications, but powerful statistical methods are required to successfully track down G × E, particularly at a genome-wide level. Previously, a case-only (CO) design has been proposed as a means to identify G × E with greater efficiency than traditional case-control or cohort studies. However, as with genotype-phenotype association studies themselves, hidden population stratification (PS) can impact the validity of G × E studies using a CO design. Since this problem has been subject to little research to date, we used comprehensive simulation to systematically assess the type I error rate, power and effect size bias of CO studies of G × E in the presence of PS. Three types of PS were considered, namely genetic-only (PSG), environment-only (PSE), and joint genetic and environmental stratification (PSGE). Our results reveal that the type I error rate of an unadjusted Wald test, appropriate for the CO design, would be close to its nominal level (0.05 in our study) as long as PS involves only one interaction partner (i.e., either PSG or PSE). In contrast, if the study population is stratified with respect to both G and E (i.e., if there is PSGE), then the type I error rate is seriously inflated and estimates of the underlying G × E interaction are biased. Comparison of CO to a family-based case-parents design confirmed that the latter is more robust against PSGE, as expected. However, case-parent trios may be particularly unsuitable for G × E studies in view of the fact that they require genotype data from parents and that many diseases with an environmental component are likely to be of late onset. An alternative approach to adjusting for PS is principal component analysis (PCA), which has been widely used for this very purpose in past genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, resolving genetic PS properly by PCA

  11. Multiple Gene-Environment Interactions on the Angiogenesis Gene-Pathway Impact Rectal Cancer Risk and Survival

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    Noha Sharafeldin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of gene-environment interactions (GEIs in cancer is limited. We aimed at identifying GEIs in rectal cancer focusing on a relevant biologic process involving the angiogenesis pathway and relevant environmental exposures: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and animal protein intake. We analyzed data from 747 rectal cancer cases and 956 controls from the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Rectal Cancer study. We applied a 3-step analysis approach: first, we searched for interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms on the pathway genes; second, we searched for interactions among the genes, both steps using Logic regression; third, we examined the GEIs significant at the 5% level using logistic regression for cancer risk and Cox proportional hazards models for survival. Permutation-based test was used for multiple testing adjustment. We identified 8 significant GEIs associated with risk among 6 genes adjusting for multiple testing: TNF (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.11, TLR4 (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.38, 3.98, and EGR2 (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.04, 4.78 with smoking; IGF1R (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.72, TLR4 (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.60 and EGR2 (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.46 with alcohol; and PDGFB (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.92 and MMP1 (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.24, 4.81 with protein. Five GEIs were associated with survival at the 5% significance level but not after multiple testing adjustment: CXCR1 (HR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.75 with smoking; and KDR (HR = 4.36, 95% CI: 1.62, 11.73, TLR2 (HR = 9.06, 95% CI: 1.14, 72.11, EGR2 (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.42, 4.22, and EGFR (HR = 6.33, 95% CI: 1.95, 20.54 with protein. GEIs between angiogenesis genes and smoking, alcohol, and animal protein impact rectal cancer risk. Our results support the importance of considering the biologic hypothesis to characterize GEIs associated with cancer outcomes.

  12. Rigorous tests of gene-environment interactions in a lab study of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), alcohol exposure, and aggression.

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    LoParo, Devon; Johansson, Ada; Walum, Hasse; Westberg, Lars; Santtila, Pekka; Waldman, Irwin

    2016-07-01

    Naturalistic studies of gene-environment interactions (G X E) have been plagued by several limitations, including difficulty isolating specific environmental risk factors from other correlated aspects of the environment, gene-environment correlation (rGE ), and the use of a single genetic variant to represent the influence of a gene. We present results from 235 Finnish young men in two lab studies of aggression and alcohol challenge that attempt to redress these limitations of the extant G X E literature. Specifically, we use a latent variable modeling approach in an attempt to more fully account for genetic variation across the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and to robustly test its main effects on aggression and its interaction with alcohol exposure. We also modeled aggression as a latent variable comprising various indices, including the average and maximum levels of aggression, the earliest trial on which aggression was expressed, and the proportion of trials on which the minimum and maximum levels of aggression were expressed. The best fitting model for the genetic variation across OXTR included six factors derived from an exploratory factor analysis, roughly corresponding to six haplotype blocks. Aggression levels were higher on trials in which participants were administered alcohol, won, or were provoked. There was a significant main effect of OXTR on aggression across studies after controlling for covariates. The interaction of OXTR and alcohol was also significant across studies, such that OXTR had stronger effects on aggression in the alcohol administration condition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multiple analytical approaches reveal distinct gene-environment interactions in smokers and non smokers in lung cancer.

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    Rakhshan Ihsan

    SULT1A1 Arg213His and EPHX1 Tyr113His in smokers and SULT1A1 Arg213His with GSTP1 Ile105Val and CYP1A1*2C in nonsmokers. These results identified distinct gene-gene and gene environment interactions in smokers and non-smokers, which confirms the importance of multifactorial interaction in risk assessment of lung cancer.

  14. The heritability of personality is not always 50%: gene-environment interactions and correlations between personality and parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Robert F; South, Susan; Johnson, Wendy; Iacono, William

    2008-12-01

    Twin studies of personality are consistent in attributing approximately half of the variance in personality to genetic effects, with the remaining variance attributed to environments that make people within the same families different. Such conclusions, however, are based on quantitative models of human individual differences that estimate genetic and environmental contributions as constants for entire populations. Recent advances in statistical modeling allow for the possibility of estimating genetic and environmental contributions contingent on other variables, allowing the quantification of phenomena that have traditionally been characterized as gene-environment interaction and correlation. We applied these newer models to understand how adolescents' descriptions of their relationships with their parents might change or moderate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on personality. We documented notable moderation in the domains of positive and negative emotionality, with parental relationships acting both to enhance and diminish both genetic and environmental effects. We discuss how genetic and environmental contributions to personality might be more richly conceptualized as dynamic systems of gene-environment interplay--systems that are not captured by classical concepts, such as the overall heritability of personality.

  15. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A; Hopper, John L; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Southey, Melissa C; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine M; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4)). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of environmental risk factors.

  16. Gene Environment Interaction: A Trigger Point of Developing Polyglandular Autoimmunity in A Minor Girl from Rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastidar Rinini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A six-year-old girl from rural Bengal was admitted in our hospital with complaints of thirst, frequent micturition, pain in abdomen and constipation. Polyglandular endocrinopathies were identified in the girl thorough clinical and biochemical examination. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis along with Type 1 diabetes mellitus made her a candidate of Polyglandular Autoimmune disease type IIIA. Patient’s history revealed that she was on cow milk since birth. Presence of high risk alleles for T1DM HLA DQA1*0101-DQB1*0302 and DQA1*0301-DQB1*0501 in the girl was disclosed by genetic study. The effect of environmental factors along with genetic susceptibility might contribute to the aggravation and early expression of these rare autoimmune diseases in this girl. This could be a classic example of gene environment interaction in case of unexplained endocrinopathies

  17. Gene, environment, and brain-gut interactions in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Shin; Kanazawa, Motoyori

    2011-04-01

    The genetic predisposition and influence of environment may underlie in the pathogenesis and/or pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This phenomenon, gene x environment interaction together with brain-gut interactions is emerging area to be clarified in IBS research. Earlier studies focused on candidate genes of neurotransmitters, cytokines, and growth factors. Among them, some studies but not all studies revealed association between phenotypes of IBS and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-related genes, noradrenaline-related genes, and cytokine genes. Recent prospective cohort study showed that genes encoding immune and adhesion molecules were associated with post-infectious etiology of IBS. Psychosocial stressors and intraluminal factors especially microbiota are keys to develop IBS. IBS patients may have abnormal gut microbiota as well as increased organic acids. IBS is disorder that relates to brain-gut interactions, emotional dysregulation, and illness behaviors. Brain imaging with or without combination of visceral stimulation enables us to depict the detailed information of brain-gut interactions. In IBS patients, thalamus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, and brainstem were more activated in response to visceral stimulation than controls. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and 5-HT are the candidate substances which regulate exaggerated brain-gut response. In conclusion, gene x environment interaction together with brain-gut interactions may play crucial roles in IBS development. Further fundamental research on this issue is warranted.

  18. Gene-Environment Interactions Controlling Energy and Glucose Homeostasis and the Developmental Origins of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Sebastien; Levin, Barry E.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often occur together and affect a growing number of individuals in both the developed and developing worlds. Both are associated with a number of other serious illnesses that lead to increased rates of mortality. There is likely a polygenic mode of inheritance underlying both disorders, but it has become increasingly clear that the pre- and postnatal environments play critical roles in pushing predisposed individuals over the edge into a disease state. This review focuses on the many genetic and environmental variables that interact to cause predisposed individuals to become obese and diabetic. The brain and its interactions with the external and internal environment are a major focus given the prominent role these interactions play in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in health and disease. PMID:25540138

  19. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Candidate Genes, Obesity, and Hormone-Related Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Webb, Penelope; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Berchuck, Andrew; Brinton, Louise; Cunningham, Julie M; DeFazio, Anna; Doherty, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert P; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Johnatty, Sharon E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Larson, Melissa C; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Ramus, Susan J; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph; Song, Honglin; Thompson, Pamela J; van den Berg, David J; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pharoah, Paul; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2016-05-01

    Many epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk factors relate to hormone exposure and elevated estrogen levels are associated with obesity in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene-environment interactions related to hormone-related risk factors could differ between obese and non-obese women. We considered interactions between 11,441 SNPs within 80 candidate genes related to hormone biosynthesis and metabolism and insulin-like growth factors with six hormone-related factors (oral contraceptive use, parity, endometriosis, tubal ligation, hormone replacement therapy, and estrogen use) and assessed whether these interactions differed between obese and non-obese women. Interactions were assessed using logistic regression models and data from 14 case-control studies (6,247 cases; 10,379 controls). Histotype-specific analyses were also completed. SNPs in the following candidate genes showed notable interaction: IGF1R (rs41497346, estrogen plus progesterone hormone therapy, histology = all, P = 4.9 × 10(-6)) and ESR1 (rs12661437, endometriosis, histology = all, P = 1.5 × 10(-5)). The most notable obesity-gene-hormone risk factor interaction was within INSR (rs113759408, parity, histology = endometrioid, P = 8.8 × 10(-6)). We have demonstrated the feasibility of assessing multifactor interactions in large genetic epidemiology studies. Follow-up studies are necessary to assess the robustness of our findings for ESR1, CYP11A1, IGF1R, CYP11B1, INSR, and IGFBP2 Future work is needed to develop powerful statistical methods able to detect these complex interactions. Assessment of multifactor interaction is feasible, and, here, suggests that the relationship between genetic variants within candidate genes and hormone-related risk factors may vary EOC susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 780-90. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    , parity, histology = endometrioid, P = 8.8 × 10(-6)). CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated the feasibility of assessing multifactor interactions in large genetic epidemiology studies. Follow-up studies are necessary to assess the robustness of our findings for ESR1, CYP11A1, IGF1R, CYP11B1, INSR, and IGFBP2...

  1. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  2. Gene-environment interaction between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and parenting behaviour on children's theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mark; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is the ability to interpret and understand human behaviour by representing the mental states of others. Like many human capacities, ToM is thought to develop through both complex biological and socialization mechanisms. However, no study has examined the joint effect of genetic and environmental influences on ToM. This study examined how variability in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and parenting behavior--two widely studied factors in ToM development-interacted to predict ToM in pre-school-aged children. Participants were 301 children who were part of an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study. ToM was assessed at age 4.5 using a previously validated scale. Parenting was assessed through observations of mothers' cognitively sensitive behaviours. Using a family-based association design, it was suggestive that a particular variant (rs11131149) interacted with maternal cognitive sensitivity on children's ToM (P = 0.019). More copies of the major allele were associated with higher ToM as a function of increasing cognitive sensitivity. A sizeable 26% of the variability in ToM was accounted for by this interaction. This study provides the first empirical evidence of gene-environment interactions on ToM, supporting the notion that genetic factors may be modulated by potent environmental influences early in development.

  3. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E;

    2015-01-01

    , MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta......-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium....... RESULTS: We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed...

  4. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

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    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  5. Plasma selenium levels and oxidative stress biomarkers: a gene-environment interaction population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Chilet, Inmaculada; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; De Marco, Griselda; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raul; Gonzalez-Manzano, Isabel; Carmen Tormos, M; Martin-Nuñez, Gracia M; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Saez, Guillermo T; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Redon, Josep; Javier Chaves, F

    2014-09-01

    The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 µg/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 μg/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

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    Stefan Nickels

    Full Text Available Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6 and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4. Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16 in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10 in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37 in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98 in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85 in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5, with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17 in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05 in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  7. Does Parental Divorce Moderate the Heritability of Body Dissatisfaction? An Extension of Previous Gene-Environment Interaction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Shannon M.; Klump, Kelly L.; VanHuysse, Jessica L.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous research suggests that parental divorce moderates genetic influences on body dissatisfaction. Specifically, the heritability of body dissatisfaction is higher in children of divorced versus intact families, suggesting possible gene-environment interaction effects. However, prior research is limited to a single, self-report measure of body dissatisfaction. The primary aim of the present study was to examine whether these findings extend to a different dimension of body dissatisfaction, body image perceptions. Method Participants were 1,534 female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study, ages 16–20 years. The Body Rating Scale (BRS) was used to assess body image perceptions. Results Although BRS scores were heritable in twins from divorced and intact families, the heritability estimates in the divorced group were not significantly greater than estimates in the intact group. However, there were differences in nonshared environmental effects, where the magnitude of these environmental influences was larger in the divorced as compared to the intact families. Discussion Different dimensions of body dissatisfaction (i.e., negative self-evaluation versus body image perceptions) may interact with environmental risk, such as parental divorce, in discrete ways. Future research should examine this possibility and explore differential gene x environment interactions using diverse measures. PMID:26314278

  8. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W. Heyne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect.

  9. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Galen W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Melberg, Cal G.; Fink, Dustin M.; Parins, Kia F.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Ulschmid, Caden M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect. PMID:27585885

  10. Gene-Environment Interactions in Preventive Medicine: Current Status and Expectations for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimatsu, Hiroto

    2017-01-30

    The progression of many common disorders involves a complex interplay of multiple factors, including numerous different genes and environmental factors. Gene-environmental cohort studies focus on the identification of risk factors that cannot be discovered by conventional epidemiological methodologies. Such epidemiological methodologies preclude precise predictions, because the exact risk factors can be revealed only after detailed analyses of the interactions among multiple factors, that is, between genes and environmental factors. To date, these cohort studies have reported some promising results. However, the findings do not yet have sufficient clinical significance for the development of precise, personalized preventive medicine. Especially, some promising preliminary studies have been conducted in terms of the prevention of obesity. Large-scale validation studies of those preliminary studies, using a prospective cohort design and long follow-ups, will produce useful and practical evidence for the development of preventive medicine in the future.

  11. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Simpson, Angela; Palmer, Colin N A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether...... there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites) in relation to the development of eczema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort...... in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379), FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p...

  12. Gene - environment interaction in programming hippocampal plasticity: focus on adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel eKoehl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between genes and environment are a critical feature of development and both contribute to shape individuality. They are at the chore of vulnerability / resiliency for mental illnesses. During the early postnatal period, several brain structures involved in cognitive and emotional processing, such as the hippocampus, still develop and it is likely that interferences with this neuronal development, which is genetically determined, might lead to long-lasting structural and functional consequences and increase the risk of developing psychopathology. One particular target is adult neurogenesis, which is involved in the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes. Insights into the dynamic interplay between genes and environmental factors in setting up individual rates of neurogenesis have come from laboratory studies exploring experience-dependent changes in adult neurogenesis as a function of individual’s genetic makeup. These studies have implications for our understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis, which could constitute a link between environmental challenges and psychopathology.

  13. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in prostate, breast and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov

    transporters and IL-10 in relation to CRC. Paper V illustrated that genetic variations in CYP19A1 predicts circulating sex-hormone levels in postmenopausal women, and that alcohol intake affects female sex-hormone concentrations in the blood. However, it was not possible to put PPARγ and the aromatase...... single-gene mutations due to their low frequency in the general population. Overall, the contribution from hereditary factors to the causation of BC is only 27%, whereas genetics contributes to 35% and 42% for CRC and PC, respectively. Additionally, immigrations studies point to environmental factors......, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, inflammation and high meat intake; whereas other factors protect against cancer, such as high intake of dietary fibre, fruits and vegetables, and physical activity. Investigating the interactions between genetic variations and environmental factors, such as dietary...

  14. Progress in the epidemiological understanding of gene-environment interactions in major diseases: cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-04-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the 1950s. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung, larynx, and bladder cancer. Major chemical, physical, and biological carcinogenic agents have been identified in the working environment and in the overall environment. The chain of events from environmental exposures to cancer requires hundreds of polymorphic genes coding for proteins involved in the transport and metabolism of xenobiotics, or in repair, or in an immune or inflammatory response. The multifactorial and multistage characteristics of cancer create the theoretical conditions for statistical interactions that have been exceptionally detected. Over the last two decades, a considerable mass of data has been generated, mostly addressing the interactions between smoking and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in smoking-related cancers. They were sometimes considered disappointing, but they actually brought a lot of information and raised many methodological issues. In parallel, the number of polymorphisms that can be considered candidate per function increased so much that multiple testing has become a major issue, and genome wide-screening approaches have more and more gained in interest. Facing the resulting complexity, some instruments are being set up: our studies are now equipped with carefully sampled biological collections, high-throughput genotyping systems are becoming available, work on statistical methodologies is ongoing, bioinformatics databases are growing larger and access to them is becoming simpler; international consortiums are being organized. The roles of environmental and genetic factors are being jointly elucidated. The basic rules of epidemiology, which are demanding with respect to sampling, with respect to the histological and molecular criteria for cancer classification, with respect to the evaluation of environmental exposures

  15. A new clinical evidence-based gene-environment interaction model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdy, Gyorgy; Juhasz, Gabriella; Gonda, Xenia

    2012-12-01

    In our current understanding of mood disorders, the role of genes is diverse including the mediation of the effects of provoking and protective factors. Different or partially overlapping gene sets play a major role in the development of personality traits including also affective temperaments, in the mediation of the effects of environmental factors, and in the interaction of these elements in the development of depression. Certain genes are associated with personality traits and temperaments including e.g., neuroticism, impulsivity, openness, rumination and extroversion. Environmental factors consist of external (early and provoking life events, seasonal changes, social support etc.) and internal factors (hormones, biological rhythm generators, comorbid disorders etc). Some of these environmental factors, such as early life events and some prenatal events directly influence the development of personality traits and temperaments. In the NEWMOOD cohort polymorphisms of the genes of the serotonin transporter, 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A and endocannabinoid CB1 receptors, tryptophan hydroxylase, CREB1, BDNF and GIRK provide evidence for the involvement of these genes in the development of depression. Based on their role in this process they could be assigned to different gene sets. The role of certain genes, such as promoter polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and CB1 receptor has been shown in more than one of the above factors. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions of these promoters associated with anxiety suggest the application of these polymorphisms in personalized medicine. In this review we introduce a new model including environmental factors, genes, trait and temperament markers based on human genetic studies.

  16. Gene-environment interactions and intermediate phenotypes: early trauma and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla eHornung

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on current research developments in the study of Gene x ELS interactions and depression. It serves as a snapshot report of the most recent findings in this dynamic and complex field of research. After several years of investigating and characterizing the specific role of early life stress within the pathogenesis of depression and linking these findings to neurobiological changes of the brain, especially the stress response system, the latest findings highlight the role of genetic factors that increase vulnerability or, likewise, promote resilience to depression after childhood trauma. Considering intermediate phenotypes has further increased our understanding of the complex relationship between early trauma and depression. Recent findings with regard to epigenetic changes resulting from adverse environmental events during childhood promote current aspirations to identify specific target areas for prevention and treatment schemes regarding the long-term impact of early life stress. Taken together, latest findings have underscored the essential role of genotypes and epigenetic processes within the development of depression after childhood trauma, thereby building the basis for future research and clinical interventions.

  17. Degenerative periodontal-diseases and oral osteonecrosis: The role of gene-environment interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, D. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, A. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy); Bonica, P.; Pera, P. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Pulliero, A., E-mail: alessandra.pulliero@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Chronic-degenerative dentistry diseases, including periodontal diseases and oral osteonecrosis, are widespread in human populations and represent a significant problem for public health. These diseases result from pathogenic mechanisms created by the interaction between environmental genotoxic risk-factors and genetic assets conferring individual susceptibility. Osteonecrosis occurs in subjects undergoing exposure to high doses of DNA-damaging agents for chemo- and radiotherapy of neoplastic diseases. In susceptible patients, ionizing radiation and biphosphonate-chemotherapy induce severe, progressive, and irreversible degeneration of facial bones, resulting in avascular necrosis of the jaw. This may also occur in patients receiving biphosphonate for osteoporosis therapy. Periodontal diseases include chronic, aggressive, and necrotizing periodontitis, often resulting in severe alteration of periodontal tissues and tooth loss. Cigarette smoking and chronic inflammation caused by specific bacteria are the main risk factors for periodontitis. Oxidative damage plays a fundamental pathogenic role, as established by detection of mitochondrial DNA damage in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontitis. Endogenous risk factors in dental diseases include polymorphisms for metabolic enzymes such as glutathione transferases M1 and T1, N-acetyl transferase 2, and CYP 1A1. Other genetic polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to dentistry diseases affect genes encoding metalloproteases (involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and degradation), cytokines (involved in inflammation), prothrombin, and DNA repair activities. These findings provide evidence that dentistry diseases are related to risk factors associated with environmental mutagenesis. This issue warrants future investigations aimed at improving oral health and preventing oral degenerative diseases using molecular and experimental approaches currently utilized in mutagenicity studies.

  18. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

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    Antoinesha L. Hollman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases.

  19. I just ran a thousand analyses: benefits of multiple testing in understanding equivocal evidence on gene-environment interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera E Heininga

    Full Text Available In psychiatric genetics research, the volume of ambivalent findings on gene-environment interactions (G x E is growing at an accelerating pace. In response to the surging suspicions of systematic distortion, we challenge the notion of chance capitalization as a possible contributor. Beyond qualifying multiple testing as a mere methodological issue that, if uncorrected, leads to chance capitalization, we advance towards illustrating the potential benefits of multiple tests in understanding equivocal evidence in genetics literature.We focused on the interaction between the serotonin-transporter-linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR and childhood adversities with regard to depression. After testing 2160 interactions with all relevant measures available within the Dutch population study of adolescents TRAILS, we calculated percentages of significant (p < .05 effects for several subsets of regressions. Using chance capitalization (i.e. overall significance rate of 5% alpha and randomly distributed findings as a competing hypothesis, we expected more significant effects in the subsets of regressions involving: 1 interview-based instead of questionnaire-based measures; 2 abuse instead of milder childhood adversities; and 3 early instead of later adversities. Furthermore, we expected equal significance percentages across 4 male and female subsamples, and 5 various genotypic models of 5-HTTLPR.We found differences in the percentages of significant interactions among the subsets of analyses, including those regarding sex-specific subsamples and genetic modeling, but often in unexpected directions. Overall, the percentage of significant interactions was 7.9% which is only slightly above the 5% that might be expected based on chance.Taken together, multiple testing provides a novel approach to better understand equivocal evidence on G x E, showing that methodological differences across studies are a likely reason for heterogeneity in findings - but chance

  20. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area.

  1. Three Approaches to Modeling Gene-Environment Interactions in Longitudinal Family Data: Gene-Smoking Interactions in Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Jacob; Sung, Yun Ju; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Schwander, Karen L; Vazquez, Ana; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) has been shown to be substantially heritable, yet identified genetic variants explain only a small fraction of the heritability. Gene-smoking interactions have detected novel BP loci in cross-sectional family data. Longitudinal family data are available and have additional promise to identify BP loci. However, this type of data presents unique analysis challenges. Although several methods for analyzing longitudinal family data are available, which method is the most appropriate and under what conditions has not been fully studied. Using data from three clinic visits from the Framingham Heart Study, we performed association analysis accounting for gene-smoking interactions in BP at 31,203 markers on chromosome 22. We evaluated three different modeling frameworks: generalized estimating equations (GEE), hierarchical linear modeling, and pedigree-based mixed modeling. The three models performed somewhat comparably, with multiple overlaps in the most strongly associated loci from each model. Loci with the greatest significance were more strongly supported in the longitudinal analyses than in any of the component single-visit analyses. The pedigree-based mixed model was more conservative, with less inflation in the variant main effect and greater deflation in the gene-smoking interactions. The GEE, but not the other two models, resulted in substantial inflation in the tail of the distribution when variants with minor allele frequency familial and longitudinal data. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all.

  3. Genetic gating of human fear learning and extinction: possible implications for gene-environment interaction in anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Weike, Almut I; Nikamo, Pernilla; Schalling, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O; Ohman, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning is a widely used model of the acquisition and extinction of fear. Neural findings suggest that the amygdala is the core structure for fear acquisition, whereas prefrontal cortical areas are given pivotal roles in fear extinction. Forty-eight volunteers participated in a fear-conditioning experiment, which used fear potentiation of the startle reflex as the primary measure to investigate the effect of two genetic polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and COMTval158met) on conditioning and extinction of fear. The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, located in the serotonin transporter gene, is associated with amygdala reactivity and neuroticism, whereas the COMTval158met polymorphism, which is located in the gene coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a dopamine-degrading enzyme, affects prefrontal executive functions. Our results show that only carriers of the 5-HTTLPR s allele exhibited conditioned startle potentiation, whereas carriers of the COMT met/met genotype failed to extinguish conditioned fear. These results may have interesting implications for understanding gene-environment interactions in the development and treatment of anxiety disorders.

  4. Classification and Clustering Methods for Multiple Environmental Factors in Gene-Environment Interaction: Application to the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Allison, Matthew; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2016-11-01

    There has been an increased interest in identifying gene-environment interaction (G × E) in the context of multiple environmental exposures. Most G × E studies analyze one exposure at a time, but we are exposed to multiple exposures in reality. Efficient analysis strategies for complex G × E with multiple environmental factors in a single model are still lacking. Using the data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we illustrate a two-step approach for modeling G × E with multiple environmental factors. First, we utilize common clustering and classification strategies (e.g., k-means, latent class analysis, classification and regression trees, Bayesian clustering using Dirichlet Process) to define subgroups corresponding to distinct environmental exposure profiles. Second, we illustrate the use of an additive main effects and multiplicative interaction model, instead of the conventional saturated interaction model using product terms of factors, to study G × E with the data-driven exposure subgroups defined in the first step. We demonstrate useful analytical approaches to translate multiple environmental exposures into one summary class. These tools not only allow researchers to consider several environmental exposures in G × E analysis but also provide some insight into how genes modify the effect of a comprehensive exposure profile instead of examining effect modification for each exposure in isolation.

  5. Vulnerability or Sensitivity to the Environment? Methodological Issues, Trends, and Recommendations in Gene-Environment Interactions Research in Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Caroline; Botto, Alberto; Silva, Jaime R; Jiménez, Juan Pablo; Luyten, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Research on the potential role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in explaining vulnerability to psychopathology in humans has witnessed a shift from a diathesis-stress perspective to differential susceptibility approaches. This paper critically reviews methodological issues and trends in this body of research. Databases were screened for studies of GxE in the prediction of personality traits, behavior, and mental health disorders in humans published between January 2002 and January 2015. In total, 315 papers were included. Results showed that 34 candidate genes have been included in GxE studies. Independent of the type of environment studied (early or recent life events, positive or negative environments), about 67-83% of studies have reported significant GxE interactions, which is consistent with a social susceptibility model. The percentage of positive results does not seem to differ depending on the gene studied, although publication bias might be involved. However, the number of positive findings differs depending on the population studied (i.e., young adults vs. older adults). Methodological considerations limit the ability to draw strong conclusions, particularly as almost 90% (n = 283/315) of published papers are based on samples from North America and Europe, and about 70% of published studies (219/315) are based on samples that were also used in other reports. At the same time, there are clear indications of methodological improvements over time, as is shown by a significant increase in longitudinal and experimental studies as well as in improved minimum genotyping. Recommendations for future research, such as minimum quality assessment of genes and environmental factors, specifying theoretical models guiding the study, and taking into account of cultural, ethnic, and lifetime perspectives, are formulated.

  6. Gene-environment interaction in progression of AMD: the CFH gene, smoking and exposure to chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Paul N; Robman, Luba D; Richardson, Andrea J; Dimitrov, Peter N; Tikellis, Gabriella; McCarty, Catherine A; Guymer, Robyn H

    2008-05-01

    A number of risk factors including the complement factor H (CFH) gene, smoking and Chlamydia pneumoniae have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanisms underlying how these risk factors might be involved in disease progression and disease aetiology is poorly understood. A cohort series of 233 individuals followed for AMD progression over a mean period of 7 years underwent a full eye examination, blood was taken for DNA and antibody titre and individuals completed a standard medical and general questionnaire. Y402H variants of the CFH gene were assessed with disease progression as well as examination of interaction between Y402H variants and smoking and Y402H variants and the pathogen C. pneumoniae. The CC risk genotype of Y402H was significantly associated with increased AMD progression [odds ratio (OR) 2.43, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.07-5.49] as was smoking (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.26-4.12). However, the risk of progression was greatly increased to almost 12-fold (OR 11.8, 95% CI 2.1-65.8) when, in addition to having the C risk allele, subjects also presented with the upper tertile of antibodies to the bacterial pathogen C. pneumoniae compared with those with the T allele of Y402H and the lowest antibody tertile. This demonstrates for the first time the existence of a gene environment-interaction between pathogenic load of C. pneumoniae and the CFH gene in the aetiology of AMD.

  7. Research Review: Gene-Environment Interaction Research in Youth Depression--A Systematic Review with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erin C.; Uddin, Monica; Subramanian, S. V.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is a major public health problem among youth, currently estimated to affect as many as 9% of US children and adolescents. The recognition that both genes (nature) and environments (nurture) are important for understanding the etiology of depression has led to a rapid growth in research exploring gene-environment interactions…

  8. Research Review: Gene-Environment Interaction Research in Youth Depression--A Systematic Review with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erin C.; Uddin, Monica; Subramanian, S. V.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is a major public health problem among youth, currently estimated to affect as many as 9% of US children and adolescents. The recognition that both genes (nature) and environments (nurture) are important for understanding the etiology of depression has led to a rapid growth in research exploring gene-environment interactions…

  9. Epigenetic Genes and Emotional Reactivity to Daily Life Events : A Multi-Step Gene-Environment Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pishva, Ehsan; Drukker, Marjan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Decoster, Jeroen; Collip, Dina; van Winkel, Ruud; Wichers, Marieke; Jacobs, Nele; Thiery, Evert; Derom, Catherine; Geschwind, Nicole; van den Hove, Daniel; Lataster, Tineke; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Kenis, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    Recent human and animal studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms mediate the impact of environment on development of mental disorders. Therefore, we hypothesized that polymorphisms in epigenetic-regulatory genes impact stress-induced emotional changes. A multi-step, multi-sample gene-environment i

  10. The Interacting Effect of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism and Stressful Life Events on Adolescent Depression Is Not an Artifact of Gene-Environment Correlation: Evidence from a Longitudinal Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Li, Xinying; McGue, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding introduced by gene-environment correlation (rGE) may prevent one from observing a true gene-environment interaction (G × E) effect on psychopathology. The present study investigated the interacting effect of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs) on adolescent depression while controlling for the…

  11. Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnland, Thea; Langaas, Mette; Grill, Valdemar; Mostad, Ingrid Løvold

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trøndelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.

  12. Detection of Epistatic and Gene-Environment Interactions Underlying Three Quality Traits in Rice Using High-Throughput Genome-Wide Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With development of sequencing technology, dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been available, enabling uncovering genetic architecture of complex traits by genome-wide association study (GWAS. However, the current GWAS strategy usually ignores epistatic and gene-environment interactions due to absence of appropriate methodology and heavy computational burden. This study proposed a new GWAS strategy by combining the graphics processing unit- (GPU- based generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR algorithm with mixed linear model approach. The reliability and efficiency of the analytical methods were verified through Monte Carlo simulations, suggesting that a population size of nearly 150 recombinant inbred lines (RILs had a reasonable resolution for the scenarios considered. Further, a GWAS was conducted with the above two-step strategy to investigate the additive, epistatic, and gene-environment associations between 701,867 SNPs and three important quality traits, gelatinization temperature, amylose content, and gel consistency, in a RIL population with 138 individuals derived from super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308 in two environments. Four significant SNPs were identified with additive, epistatic, and gene-environment interaction effects. Our study showed that the mixed linear model approach combining with the GPU-based GMDR algorithm is a feasible strategy for implementing GWAS to uncover genetic architecture of crop complex traits.

  13. Genotype-based association mapping of complex diseases: gene-environment interactions with multiple genetic markers and measurement error in environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong; Carroll, Raymond J

    2010-12-01

    With the advent of dense single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, population-based association studies have become the major tools for identifying human disease genes and for fine gene mapping of complex traits. We develop a genotype-based approach for association analysis of case-control studies of gene-environment interactions in the case when environmental factors are measured with error and genotype data are available on multiple genetic markers. To directly use the observed genotype data, we propose two genotype-based models: genotype effect and additive effect models. Our approach offers several advantages. First, the proposed risk functions can directly incorporate the observed genotype data while modeling the linkage disequilibrium information in the regression coefficients, thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase. Compared with the haplotype-based approach, an estimating procedure based on the proposed methods can be much simpler and significantly faster. In addition, there is no potential risk due to haplotype phase estimation. Further, by fitting the proposed models, it is possible to analyze the risk alleles/variants of complex diseases, including their dominant or additive effects. To model measurement error, we adopt the pseudo-likelihood method by Lobach et al. [2008]. Performance of the proposed method is examined using simulation experiments. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development.

  14. Evidence of gene-environment interaction for two genes on chromosome 4 and environmental tobacco smoke in controlling the risk of nonsyndromic cleft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP is one of the most common human birth defects and both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to its etiology. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS using 550 CP case-parent trios ascertained in an international consortium. Stratified analysis among trios with different ancestries was performed to test for GxE interactions with common maternal exposures using conditional logistic regression models. While no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP achieved genome-wide significance when considered alone, markers in SLC2A9 and the neighboring WDR1 on chromosome 4p16.1 gave suggestive evidence of gene-environment interaction with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS among 259 Asian trios when the models included a term for GxE interaction. Multiple SNPs in these two genes were associated with increased risk of nonsyndromic CP if the mother was exposed to ETS during the peri-conceptual period (3 months prior to conception through the first trimester. When maternal ETS was considered, fifteen of 135 SNPs mapping to SLC2A9 and 9 of 59 SNPs in WDR1 gave P values approaching genome-wide significance (10(-6interaction. SNPs rs3733585 and rs12508991 in SLC2A9 yielded P = 2.26×10(-7 in a test for GxETS interaction. SNPs rs6820756 and rs7699512 in WDR1 also yielded P = 1.79×10(-7 and P = 1.98×10(-7 in a 1 df test for GxE interaction. Although further replication studies are critical to confirming these findings, these results illustrate how genetic associations for nonsyndromic CP can be missed if potential GxE interaction is not taken into account, and this study suggest SLC2A9 and WDR1 should be considered as candidate genes for CP.

  15. Gene environment interaction in periphery and brain converge to modulate behavioral outcomes: Insights from the SP1 transient early in life interference rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asor, Eyal; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that behavior results from an interaction between susceptible genes and environmental stimuli during critical life stages. The present article reviews the main theoretical and practical concepts in the research of gene environment interaction, emphasizing the need for models simulating real life complexity. We review a novel approach to study gene environment interaction in which a brief post-natal interference with the expression of multiple genes, by hindering the activity of the ubiquitous transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) is followed by later-in-life exposure of rats to stress. Finally, this review discusses the role of peripheral processes in behavioral responses, with the Sp1 model as one example demonstrating how specific behavioral patterns are linked to modulations in both peripheral and central physiological processes. We suggest that models, which take into account the tripartite reciprocal interaction between the central nervous system, peripheral systems and environmental stimuli will advance our understanding of the complexity of behavior. PMID:27679768

  16. Multivariate dimensionality reduction approaches to identify gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying multiple complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ming Xu

    Full Text Available The elusive but ubiquitous multifactor interactions represent a stumbling block that urgently needs to be removed in searching for determinants involved in human complex diseases. The dimensionality reduction approaches are a promising tool for this task. Many complex diseases exhibit composite syndromes required to be measured in a cluster of clinical traits with varying correlations and/or are inherently longitudinal in nature (changing over time and measured dynamically at multiple time points. A multivariate approach for detecting interactions is thus greatly needed on the purposes of handling a multifaceted phenotype and longitudinal data, as well as improving statistical power for multiple significance testing via a two-stage testing procedure that involves a multivariate analysis for grouped phenotypes followed by univariate analysis for the phenotypes in the significant group(s. In this article, we propose a multivariate extension of generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR based on multivariate generalized linear, multivariate quasi-likelihood and generalized estimating equations models. Simulations and real data analysis for the cohort from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment are performed to investigate the properties and performance of the proposed method, as compared with the univariate method. The results suggest that the proposed multivariate GMDR substantially boosts statistical power.

  17. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR in relation to state levels of loneliness in adolescence: evidence for micro-level gene-environment interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeske van Roekel

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that the rs53576 variant of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR is associated with trait levels of loneliness, but results are inconsistent. The aim of the present study is to examine micro-level effects of the OXTR rs53576 variant on state levels of loneliness in early adolescents. In addition, gene-environment interactions are examined between this OXTR variant and positive and negative perceptions of company. Data were collected in 278 adolescents (58% girls, by means of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM. Sampling periods consisted of six days with nine assessments per day. A relation was found between the OXTR rs53576 variant and state loneliness, in girls only. Girls carrying an A allele had higher levels of state loneliness than girls carrying the GG genotype. In addition, adolescents with an A allele were more affected by negative perceptions of company than GG carriers, on weekend days only. No significant gene-environment interactions were found with positive company. Adolescents carrying an A allele were more susceptible to negative environments during weekend days than GG carriers. Our findings emphasize the importance of operationalizing the phenotype and the environment accurately.

  18. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) in relation to state levels of loneliness in adolescence: evidence for micro-level gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Verhagen, Maaike; Scholte, Ron H J; Kleinjan, Marloes; Goossens, Luc; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the rs53576 variant of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is associated with trait levels of loneliness, but results are inconsistent. The aim of the present study is to examine micro-level effects of the OXTR rs53576 variant on state levels of loneliness in early adolescents. In addition, gene-environment interactions are examined between this OXTR variant and positive and negative perceptions of company. Data were collected in 278 adolescents (58% girls), by means of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). Sampling periods consisted of six days with nine assessments per day. A relation was found between the OXTR rs53576 variant and state loneliness, in girls only. Girls carrying an A allele had higher levels of state loneliness than girls carrying the GG genotype. In addition, adolescents with an A allele were more affected by negative perceptions of company than GG carriers, on weekend days only. No significant gene-environment interactions were found with positive company. Adolescents carrying an A allele were more susceptible to negative environments during weekend days than GG carriers. Our findings emphasize the importance of operationalizing the phenotype and the environment accurately.

  19. Breast cancer risk, fungicide exposure and CYP1A1*2A gene-environment interactions in a province-wide case control study in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; VanLeeuwen, John; Cribb, Alastair; Andreou, Pantelis; Guernsey, Judith Read

    2012-05-01

    Scientific certainty regarding environmental toxin-related etiologies of breast cancer, particularly among women with genetic polymorphisms in estrogen metabolizing enzymes, is lacking. Fungicides have been recognized for their carcinogenic potential, yet there is a paucity of epidemiological studies examining the health risks of these agents. The association between agricultural fungicide exposure and breast cancer risk was examined in a secondary analysis of a province-wide breast cancer case-control study in Prince Edward Island (PEI) Canada. Specific objectives were: (1) to derive and examine the level of association between estimated fungicide exposures, and breast cancer risk among women in PEI; and (2) to assess the potential for gene-environment interactions between fungicide exposure and a CYP1A1 polymorphism in cases versus controls. After 1:3 matching of 207 cases to 621 controls by age, family history of breast cancer and menopausal status, fungicide exposure was not significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.46-1.17). Moreover, no statistically significant interactions between fungicide exposure and CYP1A1*2A were observed. Gene-environment interactions were identified. Though interpretations of findings are challenged by uncertainty of exposure assignment and small sample sizes, this study does provide grounds for further research.

  20. An update on the rotenone models of Parkinson's disease: their ability to reproduce the features of clinical disease and model gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michaela E; Bobrovskaya, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by two major neuropathological hallmarks: the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and the presence of Lewy bodies in the surviving SN neurons, as well as other regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Animal models have been invaluable tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the pathogenesis of PD and testing new potential symptomatic, neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies. However, the usefulness of these models is dependent on how precisely they replicate the features of clinical PD with some studies now employing combined gene-environment models to replicate more of the affected pathways. The rotenone model of PD has become of great interest following the seminal paper by the Greenamyre group in 2000 (Betarbet et al., 2000). This paper reported for the first time that systemic rotenone was able to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD as well as certain parkinsonian motor deficits. Since 2000, many research groups have actively used the rotenone model worldwide. This paper will review rotenone models, focusing upon their ability to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD, motor deficits, extranigral pathology and non-motor symptoms. We will also summarize the recent advances in neuroprotective therapies, focusing on those that investigated non-motor symptoms and review rotenone models used in combination with PD genetic models to investigate gene-environment interactions.

  1. Cytochrome P450 1B1, a new keystone in gene-environment interactions related to human head and neck cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thier, R. [Dept. Physiology and Pharmacology, Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia); Bruening, T. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Forschungsinstitut fuer Arbeitsmedizin (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Roos, P.H.; Bolt, H.M. [Inst. fuer Arbeitsphysiologie an der Univ. Dortmund (IfADo), Dortmund (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking are major causes of head and neck cancers, and regional differences point to the importance of research into gene-environment interactions. Much interest has been focused on polymorphisms of CYP1A1 and of GSTM1 and GSTT1, but a number of studies have not demonstrated significant effects. This has mostly been ascribed to small sample sizes. In general, the impact of polymorphisms of metabolic enzymes appears inconsistent, with some reports of weak-to-moderate associations, and with other of no elevation of risks. The classical cytochrome P450 isoenzyme considered for metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is CYP1A1. A new member of CYP1 family, CYP1B1, was cloned in 1994, currently representing the only member of the CYP1B subfamily. A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the CYP1B1 gene have been reported. The amino acid substitutions Val432Leu (CYP1B1*3) and Asn453Ser (CYP1B1*4), located in the heme binding domain of CYP1B1, appear as likely candidates to be linked with biological effects. CYP1B1 activates a wide range of PAH, aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Very recently, the CYP1B1 codon 432 polymorphism (CYP1B1*3) has been identified as a susceptibility factor in smoking-related head-and-neck squamous cell cancer. The impact of this polymorphic variant of CYP1B1 on cancer risk was also reflected by an association with the frequency of somatic mutations of the p53 gene. Combined genotype analysis of CYP1B1 and the glutathione transferases GSTM1 or GSTT1 has pointed to interactive effects. This provides new molecular evidence that tobacco smoke-specific compounds relevant to head and neck carcinogenesis are metabolically activated through CYP1B1 and is consistent with a major pathogenetic relevance of PAH as ingredients of tobacco smoke. (orig.)

  2. Multiple analytical approaches reveal distinct gene-environment interactions in smokers and non smokers in lung cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ihsan, Rakhshan; Chauhan, Pradeep Singh; Mishra, Ashwani Kumar; Yadav, Dhirendra Singh; Kaushal, Mishi; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Zomawia, Eric; Verma, Yogesh; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2011-01-01

    ...) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), was applied in 188 lung cancer cases and 290 controls to explore high order interactions among xenobiotic metabolizing genes and environmental risk factors...

  3. Multiple Analytical Approaches Reveal Distinct Gene-Environment Interactions in Smokers and Non Smokers in Lung Cancer: e29431

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rakhshan Ihsan; Pradeep Singh Chauhan; Ashwani Kumar Mishra; Dhirendra Singh Yadav; Mishi Kaushal; Jagannath Dev Sharma; Eric Zomawia; Yogesh Verma; Sujala Kapur; Sunita Saxena

    2011-01-01

    ...) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), was applied in 188 lung cancer cases and 290 controls to explore high order interactions among xenobiotic metabolizing genes and environmental risk factors...

  4. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: Innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env......-H and the antiviral immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease....

  5. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...... immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb...

  6. The STANISLAS Cohort: a 10-year follow-up of supposed healthy families. Gene-environment interactions, reference values and evaluation of biomarkers in prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Siest, Gérard

    2008-01-01

    The description of this familial longitudinal cohort was published in this journal 10 years ago, in 1998. To date, 117 publications on the STANISLAS Cohort (SC) have appeared, corresponding to five main categories of results: familial resemblance and heritability; genetics and gene-environment interactions; mRNA and proteins as gene products; reference values and biological variations of proteins; and finally preventive medicine and prepathological epidemiological data. More than 600 data values on demographic and laboratory data have been collected on each individual taking part out of the 1006 families at the beginning and for all three recruitments. Serum and plasma are stored in liquid nitrogen for all participants for all three recruitments. DNA has been extracted from all participants and mRNA from 357 families. They are stored at -80 degrees C. Owing to the SC study, heritability and many gene-environment interactions have been described. The expression of 166 genes related to cardiovascular diseases was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells RNA. Reference values for proteins and vitamins have been established in addition to reference values for the carotid and femoral intima media thickness in adults and children. The data obtained contribute to a better understanding of the relation between the studied polymorphisms (161 polymorphic sites) and health, and predisposition to obesity, high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, the SC study is internationally the only longitudinal family cohort of subjects who are presumed to be healthy, which enables the study of the chain DNA-RNA-proteins.

  7. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-03-15

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.

  8. A comparison of case-control and case-only designs to investigate gene-environment interactions using breast cancer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Jafar; Moradzadeh, Rahmatollah; Rajaee Fard, Abdolreza; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Golmohammadi, Parvaneh

    2012-06-01

    The traditional methods of studying the gene-environment interactions need a control group. However, the selection of an appropriate control group has been associated with problems. Therefore, new methods, such as case-only design, have been created to study such interactions. The objective of this study was to compare the case-only and case-control designs using data from patients with breast cancer. The interaction of genetic and environmental factor as well as the ratio of control to population odds ratio was calculated for case-only (300 patients with breast cancer) and case-control (300 cases of breast cancer and 300 matched controls) designs. The confidence intervals and -2log likelihood in all variables in case-only design was smaller than those in the matched case-control design. In case-only design, the standard errors of some variables such as age at menarche, the first delivery at the age of 35 yrs and more or no delivery, the history of having live birth, use of oral contraception pills, breastfeeding history were less than those in the matched case-control design. The findings indicate that the case-only design is an efficient method to investigate the interaction of genetic and environmental factors.

  9. A Comparison of Case-Control and Case-Only Designs to Investigate Gene-Environment Interactions Using Breast Cancer Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Hassanzadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The traditional methods of studying the gene-environment interactions need a control group. However, the selection of an appropriate control group has been associated with problems. Therefore, new methods, such as case-only design, have been created to study such interactions. The objective of this study was to compare the case-only and case-control designs using data from patients with breast cancer.Methods: The interaction of genetic and environmental factor as well as the ratio of control to population odds ratio was calculated for case-only (300 patients with breast cancer and case-control (300 cases of breast cancer and 300 matched controls designs. Results: The confidence intervals and -2log likelihood in all variables in case-only design was smaller than those in the matched case-control design. In case-only design, the standard errors of some variables such as age at menarche, the first delivery at the age of 35 yrs and more or no delivery, the history of having live birth, use of oral contraception pills, breastfeeding history were less than those in the matched case-control design. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the case-only design is an efficient method to investigate the interaction of genetic and environmental factors.

  10. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) <1.1×10−3. None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160cm (OR=0.83, p=0.039, pint=1.9×10−4). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  11. Dopamine transporter DAT and receptor DRD2 variants affect risk of lethal cocaine abuse: a gene-gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D; Pinsonneault, J K; Papp, A C; Zhu, H; Lemeshow, S; Mash, D C; Sadee, W

    2013-01-22

    Epistatic gene-gene interactions could contribute to the heritability of complex multigenic disorders, but few examples have been reported. Here, we focus on the role of aberrant dopaminergic signaling, involving the dopamine transporter DAT, a cocaine target, and the dopamine D2 receptor, which physically interacts with DAT. Splicing polymorphism rs2283265 of DRD2, encoding D2 receptors, were shown to confer risk of cocaine overdose/death (odds ratio ∼3) in subjects and controls from the Miami Dade County Brain Bank.(1) Risk of cocaine-related death attributable to the minor allele of rs2283265 was significantly enhanced to OR=7.5 (P=0.0008) in homozygous carriers of the main 6-repeat allele of DAT rs3836790, a regulatory VNTR in intron8 lacking significant effect itself. In contrast, carriers of the minor 5-repeat DAT allele showed no significant risk (OR=1.1, P=0.84). DAT rs3836790 and DRD2 rs2283265 also interacted by modulating DAT protein activity in the ventral putamen of cocaine abusers. In high-linkage disequilibrium with the VNTR, DAT rs6347 in exon9 yielded similar results. Assessing the impact of DAT alone, a rare DAT haplotype formed by the minor alleles of rs3836790 and rs27072, a regulatory DAT variant in the 3'-UTR, occurred in nearly one-third of the cocaine abusers but was absent in African American controls, apparently conferring strong risk. These results demonstrate gene-gene-drug interaction affecting risk of fatal cocaine intoxication.

  12. Neuregulin 1: a prime candidate for research into gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia? Insights from genetic rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKarl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a multi-factorial disease characterized by a high heritability and environmental risk factors. In recent years, an increasing number of researchers worldwide have started investigating the ‘two-hit hypothesis’ of schizophrenia predicting that genetic and environmental risk factors (GxE interactively cause the development of the disorder. This work is starting to produce valuable new animal models and reveal novel insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This mini review will focus on recent advancements in the field made by challenging mutant and transgenic rodent models for the schizophrenia candidate gene neuregulin 1 (NRG1 with particular environmental factors. It will outline results obtained from mouse and rat models for various Nrg1 isoforms/isoform types (e.g. transmembrane domain Nrg1, Type II Nrg1, which have been exposed to different forms of stress (acute versus chronic, restraint versus social and housing conditions (standard laboratory versus minimally enriched housing. These studies suggest Nrg1 as a prime candidate for GxE interactions in schizophrenia rodent models and that the use of rodent models will enable a better understanding of GxE interactions and the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Deng, Wei Q; Varga, Tibor V

    2017-01-01

    variance effects (Pv), G×E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity), and marginal genetic effects (Pm). Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ = 0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ = 0.236 for BMI) compared to all SNPs. When Pv...... (Pbinomial = 8.63×10-9 and 8.52×10-7 for SNP × smoking and SNP × physical activity, respectively). We conclude that some loci with strong marginal effects may be good candidates for G×E, and variance-based prioritization can be used to identify them....

  14. The Influence of Gene-Environment Interactions on Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Use Disorders: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Wolff, Kelly C.; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Prescott, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2005, a rapidly expanding literature has evaluated whether environmental factors such as socio-cultural context and environmental adversity interact with genetic influences on drinking behaviors. This article critically reviews empirical research on alcohol-related genotype-environment interactions (GxE) and provides a contextual framework for understanding how genetic factors combine with (or are shaped by) environmental influences to influence the development of drinking behaviors and alcohol use disorders. Collectively, evidence from twin, adoption, and molecular genetic studies indicates that the degree of importance of genetic influences on risk for drinking outcomes can vary in different populations and under different environmental circumstances. However, methodological limitations and lack of consistent replications in this literature make it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the nature and effect size of alcohol-related GxE. On the basis of this review, we describe several methodological challenges as they relate to current research on GxE in drinking behaviors and provide recommendations to aid future research. PMID:21530476

  15. Influence of 5-HTT variation, childhood trauma and self-efficacy on anxiety traits: a gene-environment-coping interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Miriam A; Ziegler, Christiane; Holitschke, Karoline; Schartner, Christoph; Schmidt, Brigitte; Weber, Heike; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Environmental vulnerability factors such as adverse childhood experiences in interaction with genetic risk variants, e.g., the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), are assumed to play a role in the development of anxiety and affective disorders. However, positive influences such as general self-efficacy (GSE) may exert a compensatory effect on genetic disposition, environmental adversity, and anxiety traits. We, thus, assessed childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, CTQ) and GSE in 678 adults genotyped for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and their interaction on agoraphobic cognitions (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, ACQ), social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T). The relationship between anxiety traits and childhood trauma was moderated by self-efficacy in 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 LALA genotype carriers: LALA probands maltreated as children showed high anxiety scores when self-efficacy was low, but low anxiety scores in the presence of high self-efficacy despite childhood maltreatment. Our results extend previous findings regarding anxiety-related traits showing an interactive relationship between 5-HTT genotype and adverse childhood experiences by suggesting coping-related measures to function as an additional dimension buffering the effects of a gene-environment risk constellation. Given that anxiety disorders manifest already early in childhood, this insight could contribute to the improvement of psychotherapeutic interventions by including measures strengthening self-efficacy and inform early targeted preventive interventions in at-risk populations, particularly within the crucial time window of childhood and adolescence.

  16. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse

    2015-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estro......A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated...... with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage...

  17. Gene-environment Interactions in Human Health: Case Studies and Strategies for developing new paradigms and research methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah L.C. Jackson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of genes and the environment on health are explored in three case studies: adult lactase persistence, autism spectrum disorders, and the metabolic syndrome, providing examples of the interactive complexities underlying these phenotypes. Since the phenotypes are the initial targets of evolutionary processes, understanding the specific environmental contexts of the genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic changes associated with these phenotypes is essential in predicting their health implications. Robust databases must be developed on the local scale to deconstruct both the population substructure and the unique components of the environment that stimulate geographically-specific changes in gene expression patterns. To produce these databases and make valid predictions, new, locally-focused and information-dense models are needed that incorporate data on evolutionary ecology, environmental complexity, local geographic patterns of gene expression, and population substructure.

  18. Gene-environment interactions in male reproductive health: special reference to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon J S Brokken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, there have been numerous reports of adverse effects on the reproductive health of wildlife and laboratory animals caused by exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. The increasing trends in human male reproductive disorders and the mounting evidence for causative environmental factors have therefore sparked growing interest in the health threat posed to humans by EDCs, which are substances in our food, environment and consumer items that interfere with hormone action, biosynthesis or metabolism, resulting in disrupted tissue homeostasis or reproductive function. The mechanisms of EDCs involve a wide array of actions and pathways. Examples include the estrogenic, androgenic, thyroid and retinoid pathways, in which the EDCs may act directly as agonists or antagonists, or indirectly via other nuclear receptors. Dioxins and dioxin-like EDCs exert their biological and toxicological actions through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon-receptor, which besides inducing transcription of detoxifying enzymes also regulates transcriptional activity of other nuclear receptors. There is increasing evidence that genetic predispositions may modify the susceptibility to adverse effects of toxic chemicals. In this review, potential consequences of hereditary predisposition and EDCs are discussed, with a special focus on the currently available publications on interactions between dioxin and androgen signaling.

  19. Gene-environment interaction during early development in the heterozygous reeler mouse: clues for modelling of major neurobehavioral syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Giovanni; Ognibene, Elisa; Romano, Emilia; Adriani, Walter; Keller, Flavio

    2009-04-01

    Autism and schizophrenia are multifactorial disorders with increasing prevalence in the young population. Among candidate molecules, reelin (RELN) is a protein of the extracellular matrix playing a key role in brain development and synaptic plasticity. The heterozygous (HZ) reeler mouse provides a model for studying the role of reelin deficiency for the onset of these syndromes. We investigated whether early indices of neurobehavioral disorders can be identified in the infant reeler, and whether the consequences of ontogenetic adverse experiences may question or support the suitability of this model. A first study focused on the link between early exposure to Chlorpyryfos and its enduring neurobehavioral consequences. Our data are interesting in view of recently discovered cholinergic abnormalities in autism and schizophrenia, and may suggest new avenues for early pharmacological intervention. In a second study, we analyzed the consequences of repeated maternal separation early in ontogeny. The results provide evidence of how unusual stress early in development are converted into altered behavior in some, but not all, individuals depending on gender and genetic background. A third study aimed to verify the reliability of the model at critical age windows. Data suggest reduced anxiety, increased impulsivity and disinhibition, and altered pain threshold in response to morphine for HZ, supporting a differential organization of brain dopaminergic, serotonergic and opioid systems in this genotype. In conclusion, HZ exhibited a complex behavioral and psycho-pharmacological phenotype, and differential responsivity to ontogenetic adverse conditions. HZ may be used to disentangle interactions between genetic vulnerability and environmental factors. Such an approach could help to model the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental psychiatric diseases.

  20. Cross-cultural gene- environment interactions in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and the cortisol awakening response: FKBP5 polymorphisms and childhood trauma in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Worthman, Carol M; Ressler, Kerry J; Mercer, Kristina B; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Koirala, Suraj; Nepal, Mahendra K; Sharma, Vidya Dev; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased attention to global mental health, psychiatric genetic research has been dominated by studies in high-income countries, especially with populations of European descent. The objective of this study was to assess single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene in a population living in South Asia. Among adults in Nepal, depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), and childhood maltreatment with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). FKBP5 SNPs were genotyped for 682 participants. Cortisol awakening response (CAR) was assessed in a subsample of 118 participants over 3 days. The FKBP5 tag-SNP rs9296158 showed a main effect on depressive symptoms (p = 0.03). Interaction of rs9296158 and childhood maltreatment predicted adult depressive symptoms (p = 0.02) but not PTSD. Childhood maltreatment associated with endocrine response in individuals homozygous for the A allele, demonstrated by a negative CAR and overall hypocortisolaemia in the rs9296158 AA genotype and childhood maltreatment group (p depression but not PTSD. Gene-environment studies should take differences in prevalence and cultural significance of phenotypes and exposures into account when interpreting cross-cultural findings.

  1. Paraoxonase gene variants are associated with autism in North America, but not in Italy: possible regional specificity in gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, M; Ricci, I; Sacco, R; Liu, X; D'Agruma, L; Muscarella, L A; Guarnieri, V; Militerni, R; Bravaccio, C; Elia, M; Schneider, C; Melmed, R; Trillo, S; Pascucci, T; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Reichelt, K-L; Macciardi, F; Holden, J J A; Persico, A M

    2005-11-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are routinely used as pesticides in agriculture and as insecticides within the household. Our prior work on Reelin and APOE delineated a gene-environment interactive model of autism pathogenesis, whereby genetically vulnerable individuals prenatally exposed to OPs during critical periods in neurodevelopment could undergo altered neuronal migration, resulting in an autistic syndrome. Since household use of OPs is far greater in the USA than in Italy, this model was predicted to hold validity in North America, but not in Europe. Here, we indirectly test this hypothesis by assessing linkage/association between autism and variants of the paraoxonase gene (PON1) encoding paraoxonase, the enzyme responsible for OP detoxification. Three functional single nucleotide polymorphisms, PON1 C-108T, L55M, and Q192R, were assessed in 177 Italian and 107 Caucasian-American complete trios with primary autistic probands. As predicted, Caucasian-American and not Italian families display a significant association between autism and PON1 variants less active in vitro on the OP diazinon (R192), according to case-control contrasts (Q192R: chi2=6.33, 1 df, Pautism pathogenesis in a sizable subgroup of North American individuals.

  2. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-01

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.

  3. A genome-wide association and gene-environment interaction study for serum triglycerides levels in a healthy Chinese male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aihua; Sun, Jielin; Xia, Ning; Qin, Xue; Hu, Yanling; Zhang, Shijun; Tao, Sha; Gao, Yong; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haiying; Kim, Seong-Tae; Peng, Tao; Lin, Xiaoling; Li, Li; Mo, Linjian; Liang, Zhengjia; Shi, Deyi; Huang, Zhang; Huang, Xianghua; Liu, Ming; Ding, Qiang; Trent, Jeffrey M; Zheng, S Lilly; Mo, Zengnan; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-04-01

    Triglyceride (TG) is a complex phenotype influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genes or loci affecting lipid levels; however, such studies in Chinese populations are limited. A two-stage GWAS were conducted to identify genetic variants that were associated with TG in a Chinese population of 3495 men. Gene-environment interactions on serum TG levels were further investigated for the seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were studied in both stages. Two previously reported SNPs (rs651821 in APOA5, rs328 in LPL) were replicated in the second stage, and the combined P-values were 9.19 × 10(-26) and 1.41 × 10(-9) for rs651821 and rs328, respectively. More importantly, a significant interaction between aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 and alcohol consumption on serum TG levels were observed (P = 3.34 × 10(-5)). Rs671 was significantly associated with serum TG levels in drinkers (P = 1.90 × 10(-10)), while no association was observed in non-drinkers (P > 0.05). For drinkers, men carrying the AA/AG genotype have significantly lower serum TG levels, compared with men carrying the GG genotype. For men with the GG genotype, the serum TG levels increased with the quantity of alcohol intake (P = 1.28 × 10(-8) for trend test). We identified a novel, significant interaction effect between alcohol consumption and the ALDH2 rs671 polymorphism on TG levels, which suggests that the effect of alcohol intake on TG occurs in a two-faceted manner. Just one drink can increase TG level in susceptible individuals who carry the GG genotype, while individuals carrying AA/AG genotypes may actually benefit from moderate drinking.

  4. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  5. Genetic susceptibility on CagA-interacting molecules and gene-environment interaction with phytoestrogens: a putative risk factor for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Jeong Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether genes that encode CagA-interacting molecules (SRC, PTPN11, CRK, CRKL, CSK, c-MET and GRB2 are associated with gastric cancer risk and whether an interaction between these genes and phytoestrogens modify gastric cancer risk. METHODS: In the discovery phase, 137 candidate SNPs in seven genes were analyzed in 76 incident gastric cancer cases and 322 matched controls from the Korean Multi-Center Cancer Cohort. Five significant SNPs in three genes (SRC, c-MET and CRK were re-evaluated in 386 cases and 348 controls in the extension phase. Odds ratios (ORs for gastric cancer risk were estimated adjusted for age, smoking, H. pylori seropositivity and CagA strain positivity. Summarized ORs in the total study population (462 cases and 670 controls were presented using pooled- and meta-analysis. Plasma concentrations of phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, equol and enterolactone were measured using the time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. RESULTS: SRC rs6122566, rs6124914, c-MET rs41739, and CRK rs7208768 showed significant genetic effects for gastric cancer in both the pooled and meta-analysis without heterogeneity (pooled OR = 3.96 [95% CI 2.05-7.65], 1.24 [95% CI = 1.01-1.53], 1.19 [95% CI = 1.01-1.41], and 1.37 [95% CI = 1.15-1.62], respectively; meta OR = 4.59 [95% CI 2.74-7.70], 1.36 [95% CI = 1.09-1.70], 1.20 [95% CI = 1.00-1.44], and 1.32 [95% CI = 1.10-1.57], respectively. Risk allele of CRK rs7208768 had a significantly increased risk for gastric cancer at low phytoestrogen levels (p interaction<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that SRC, c-MET and CRK play a key role in gastric carcinogenesis by modulating CagA signal transductions and interaction between CRK gene and phytoestrogens modify gastric cancer risk.

  6. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Fan (Qiao); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); R. Wojciechowski (Robert); V.A. Barathi (Veluchamy); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); J. Guggenheim (Jean); R. Höhn (René); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.P. Khawaja (Anthony P.); K. Yamashiro (Kenji); S.M. Hosseini (S Mohsen); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Lu (Yi); T. Haller (Toomas); J. Xie (Jing); C. Delcourt (Cécile); M. Pirastu (Mario); J. Wedenoja (Juho); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); C. Venturini (Cristina); M. Miyake (Masahiro); A.W. Hewit (Alex); X. Guo (Xiaobo); J. Mazur (Johanna); J.E. Huffman (Jenifer E.); K.M. Williams (Katie M.); O. Polasek (Ozren); H. Campbell (Harry); I. Rudan (Igor); Z. Vatavuk (Zoran); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.K. Joshi (Peter); G. Mcmahon (George); B. St Pourcain (Beate); D.M. Evans (David); C.L. Simpson (Claire); T.-H. Schwantes-An (Tae-Hwi); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); A. Cougnard-Grégoire (Audrey); C. Bellenguez (Céline); M. Blettner (Maria); O. Raitakari (Olli); M. Kähönen (Mika); I. Seppälä (Ilkka); T. Zeller (Tanja); T. Meitinger (Thomas); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Gieger (Christian); L. Portas (Laura); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); N. Amin (Najaf); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y. Wang (Ying); X. Wang (Xu); E. Tai-Hui Boh (Eileen); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); C. Sabanayagam (Charumathi); P. Gupta (Preeti); V. Tan (Vincent); L. Zhou (Lei); C.E.H. Ho (Candice E. H.); W. Lim (Wan'E); R.W. Beuerman (Roger W.); R. Siantar (Rosalynn); E.-S. Tai (E-Shyong); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); E. Mihailov (Evelin); C.C. Khor; C. Hayward (Caroline); R.N. Luben (Robert); P.J. Foster (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); R. Klein (Ronald); H.-S. Wong (Hoi-Suen); P. Mitchell (Paul); A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Aung (Tin); T.L. Young (Terri L.); M. He (Mingguang); O. Pärssinen (Olavi); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J. Jin Wang (Jie); C. Williams (Cathy); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); D.A. Mackey (David); K. Oexle (Konrad); N. Yoshimura; A.D. Paterson (Andrew D.); N. Pfeiffer (Norbert); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); P.N. Baird (Paul); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.E.B. Wilson (Joan E. Bailey); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); C.J. Hammond (Christopher J.); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.S. Rahi (Jugnoo); J.-F. Korobelnik (Jean-François); J.P. Kemp (John); N. Timpson (Nicholas); G.D. Smith; J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn P.); R. Fogarty (Rhys); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.Y. Chew (Emily); S. Janmahasatian (Sarayut); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S. MacGregor (Stuart); L. Xu (Liang); M. Schache (Maria); M. Nangia (Monika); S. Panda-Jonas (Songhomitra); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.R. Fondran (Jeremy R.); J.H. Lass (Jonathan H.); S. Feng (Sheng); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); K.T. Khaw; N.J. Wareham (Nick); T. Rantanen (Taina); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); C.P. Pang (Chi Pui); L.J. Chen (Li Jia); P.O. Tam (Pancy O.); V. Jhanji (Vishal); A.L. Young (Alvin L.); A. Döring (Angela); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); M.-F. Cotch (Mary-Frances); X. Li (Xiaohui); S.P. Yip (Shea Ping); M.K.H. Yap (Maurice K.H.); G. Biino; S. Vaccargiu (Simona); M. Fossarello (Maurizio); B. Fleck (Brian); S. Yazar (Seyhan); J.W.L. Tideman (J. Willem L.); M. Tedja (Milly); T. Léveillard (Thierry); M.A. Morrison (Margaux A.); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); X. Zhou (Xiangtian); W. Chen (Wei); N. Mizuki (Nobuhisa); A. Meguro (Akira); K.M. Makela (Kari Matti)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (

  7. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Fan (Qiao); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); R. Wojciechowski (Robert); V.A. Barathi (Veluchamy); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); J. Guggenheim (Jean); R. Höhn (René); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.P. Khawaja (Anthony P.); K. Yamashiro (Kenji); S.M. Hosseini (S Mohsen); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Lu (Yi); T. Haller (Toomas); J. Xie (Jing); C. Delcourt (Cécile); M. Pirastu (Mario); J. Wedenoja (Juho); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); C. Venturini (Cristina); M. Miyake (Masahiro); A.W. Hewit (Alex); X. Guo (Xiaobo); J. Mazur (Johanna); J.E. Huffman (Jenifer E.); K.M. Williams (Katie M.); O. Polasek (Ozren); H. Campbell (Harry); I. Rudan (Igor); Z. Vatavuk (Zoran); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.K. Joshi (Peter); G. Mcmahon (George); B. St Pourcain (Beate); D.M. Evans (David); C.L. Simpson (Claire); T.-H. Schwantes-An (Tae-Hwi); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); A. Cougnard-Grégoire (Audrey); C. Bellenguez (Céline); M. Blettner (Maria); O. Raitakari (Olli); M. Kähönen (Mika); I. Seppälä (Ilkka); T. Zeller (Tanja); T. Meitinger (Thomas); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Gieger (Christian); L. Portas (Laura); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); N. Amin (Najaf); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y. Wang (Ying); X. Wang (Xu); E. Tai-Hui Boh (Eileen); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); C. Sabanayagam (Charumathi); P. Gupta (Preeti); V. Tan (Vincent); L. Zhou (Lei); C.E.H. Ho (Candice E. H.); W. Lim (Wan'E); R.W. Beuerman (Roger W.); R. Siantar (Rosalynn); E.-S. Tai (E-Shyong); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); E. Mihailov (Evelin); C.C. Khor; C. Hayward (Caroline); R.N. Luben (Robert); P.J. Foster (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); R. Klein (Ronald); H.-S. Wong (Hoi-Suen); P. Mitchell (Paul); A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Aung (Tin); T.L. Young (Terri L.); M. He (Mingguang); O. Pärssinen (Olavi); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J. Jin Wang (Jie); C. Williams (Cathy); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); D.A. Mackey (David); K. Oexle (Konrad); N. Yoshimura; A.D. Paterson (Andrew D.); N. Pfeiffer (Norbert); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); P.N. Baird (Paul); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.E.B. Wilson (Joan E. Bailey); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); C.J. Hammond (Christopher J.); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.S. Rahi (Jugnoo); J.-F. Korobelnik (Jean-François); J.P. Kemp (John); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); G.D. Smith; J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn P.); R. Fogarty (Rhys); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.Y. Chew (Emily); S. Janmahasatian (Sarayut); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S. MacGregor (Stuart); L. Xu (Liang); M. Schache (Maria); M. Nangia (Monika); S. Panda-Jonas (Songhomitra); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.R. Fondran (Jeremy R.); J.H. Lass (Jonathan H.); S. Feng (Sheng); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); K.T. Khaw; N.J. Wareham (Nick); T. Rantanen (Taina); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); C.P. Pang (Chi Pui); L.J. Chen (Li Jia); P.O. Tam (Pancy O.); V. Jhanji (Vishal); A.L. Young (Alvin L.); A. Döring (Angela); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); M.-F. Cotch (Mary-Frances); X. Li (Xiaohui); S.P. Yip (Shea Ping); M.K.H. Yap (Maurice K.H.); G. Biino; S. Vaccargiu (Simona); M. Fossarello (Maurizio); B. Fleck (Brian); S. Yazar (Seyhan); J.W.L. Tideman (J. Willem L.); M. Tedja (Milly); T. Léveillard (Thierry); M.A. Morrison (Margaux A.); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); X. Zhou (Xiangtian); W. Chen (Wei); N. Mizuki (Nobuhisa); A. Meguro (Akira); K.M. Makela (Kari Matti)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism

  8. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Q.; Verhoeven, V.J.; Wojciechowski, R.; Barathi, V.A.; Hysi, P.G.; Guggenheim, J.A.; Hohn, R.; Vitart, V.; Khawaja, A.P.; Yamashiro, K.; Hosseini, S.M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lu, Y.; Haller, T.; Xie, J.; Delcourt, C; Pirastu, M.; Wedenoja, J.; Gharahkhani, P.; Venturini, C.; Miyake, M.; Hewitt, A.W.; Guo, X.; Mazur, J.; Huffman, J.E.; Williams, K.M.; Polasek, O.; Campbell, H.; Rudan, I.; Vatavuk, Z.; Wilson, J.F.; Joshi, P.K.; McMahon, G.; St Pourcain, B.; Evans, D.M.; Simpson, C.L.; Schwantes-An, T.H.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Mirshahi, A.; Cougnard-Gregoire, A.; Bellenguez, C.; Blettner, M.; Raitakari, O.; Kahonen, M.; Seppala, I.; Zeller, T.; Meitinger, T.; Ried, J.S.; Gieger, C.; Portas, L.; Leeuwen, E.M. van; Amin, N.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.; Wang, Y.X.; Wang, X.; Boh, E.T.H.; Ikram, M.K.; Sabanayagam, C.; Gupta, P.; Tan, V.; Zhou, L; Ho, C.E.; Lim, W.; Beuerman, R.W.; Siantar, R.; Tai, E.S.; Vithana, E.; Mihailov, E.; Khor, C.C.; Hayward, C.; Luben, R.N.; Foster, P.J.; Klein, B.E.; Klein, R.; Wong, H.S.; Mitchell, P.; Metspalu, A.; Aung, T.; Young, T.L.; He, M.; Parssinen, O.; Duijn, C.M. van; Wang, J.J.; Williams, C.; Jonas, J.B.; Teo, Y.Y.; Mackey, D.A.; Oexle, K.; Yoshimura, N.; Paterson, A.D.; Pfeiffer, N.; Wong, T.Y.; Baird, P.N.; Stambolian, D.; Wilson, J.E.; Cheng, C.Y.; Hammond, C.J.; Klaver, C.C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main

  9. Characterization of the association between 8q24 and colon cancer: gene-environment exploration and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Robert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies and subsequent replication studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the chromosomal region 8q24 are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We examined 11 SNP markers in the 8q24 region between 128.47 and 128.54 Mb, using a total of 1,987 colon cases and 2,339 controls who self-reported as white from two independent, well-characterized study populations. Analysis was performed separately within each study, and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs and to test for effect modification by known colon cancer risk factors. We also performed a meta-analysis combining our results with previous studies. Results We observed evidence of association for four SNPs in low to high linkage disequilibrium (r2 ranging from 0.18 to 0.93 localized in a 16.2 kb region defined by rs10505477 and rs1056368. The combined results for our two studies of colon cancer showed an OR of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.01-1.20, Ptrend = 0.023, and a meta-analysis of our results with previously reported studies of colon and colorectal cancer strongly support the association for this SNP (combined OR for rs6983267 = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.18-1.24, p = 5.5 × 10-44. We did not observe any notable evidence of effect modification by known colon cancer risk factors, and risk did not differ significantly by tumor site or stage. Conclusions Our study confirms the association between polymorphisms on chromosome 8q24 and colon cancer risk and suggests that the susceptibility locus in region 8q24 is not strongly modified by various lifestyle, environmental, and demographic risk factors for colon cancer.

  10. Gene-environment effects on hippocampal neurodevelopment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    Mental disorders like schizophrenia and autism put a heavy load on today’s societies, creating a steady call for revealing underlying disease mechanisms and the development of effective treatments. The etiology of major psychiatric illnesses is complex involving gene by environment susceptibility...... factors. Hence, a deeper understanding is needed of how cortical neurodevelopmental deficiencies can arise from such gene-environment interactions. The convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors is a recent field of research. It is now clear that disease, infection and stress factors may...

  11. [Gene-environment interaction for the HIF1-A 1772C>T polymorphisms and cigarette smoking increase susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Staniszewski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes in the vascular vessels, such as the presence of atherosclerotic plaques or aneurysmal dilatations, are associated with the local conditions of ischemial/hypoxia. Polymorphisms in the HIF1A gene, encoding an oxygen-regulated HIF-1 subunit (HIF-1a), determine inter-individual variability in vascular response to hypoxia. Stimulation of selected pathways, related to this response (i.e. angiogenesis) is impaired by cigarette smoke exposure. In this work, we examined the associations between 1772C>T polymorphism (rs11549465) located in the coding region of HIF1A gene (Pro582-Ser), smoking and the occurrence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Moreover, the relations of these factors with the presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with AAA were studied. The case-control study was designed, in which a group of 1060 Caucasian subjects: 535 AAA patients and 525 controls, was analyzed. Data regarding smoking status were collected using questionnaire. Past and current smokers were analyzed together. In the group of 220 AAA subjects the coexistence of PAD was characterized. HIF-1A genotypes were assessed by PCR-RFLP method. Genetic-environmental interactions were examined by a two-by-four tables. In these analyzes, logistic regression models were used to adjusting for the relevant covariates. The frequency of HIF1A 1772T allele in AAA group (0,067) was similar to that observed in the control group (0,070). In the analyses of genetic-environmental interactions was observed that the co-occurrence of HIF1A 1772CT and TT genotypes and exposure to tobacco smoke has a strong multiplicative effect on the susceptibility to the AAA development. The age and gender adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were: 7,6 for smoking alone (p<0,0001); 0,65 for 1772CT and TT genotypes alone (p=0,3) and 14,4for smoking plus 1772CT and TT genotypes (p<0,0001). The proportion of smokers carrying 1772T allele was higher among patients with advanced form of PAD (femoro

  12. Gene-environment interaction affects substance P and neurokinin A in the entorhinal cortex and periaqueductal grey in a genetic animal model of depression: implications for the pathophysiology of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husum, Henriette; Wörtwein, Gitta; Andersson, Weronika

    2008-01-01

    of the congenitally 'depressed' Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats. It is also known that environmental stress may affect brain levels of tachykinins. In view of these results we decided to superimpose maternal deprivation, an early life environmental stressor......, onto the genetically predisposed 'depressed' FSL rats and the FRL control rats and use this paradigm as a model of gene-environment interaction. The adult animals were sacrificed, adrenal glands and brains dissected out and SP-, NKA- and CRH-LI levels were determined in ten discrete brain regions....... Maternal deprivation led to a marked increase in SP-LI and NKA-LI levels in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and entorhinal cortex of the 'depressed' FSL strain while it had no significant effect in the FRL controls. Furthermore, specific strain differences in peptide-LI content were confirmed. No difference...

  13. Gene-environment and gene-gene interactions of specific MTHFR, MTR and CBS gene variants in relation to homocysteine in black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Ellis, Suria M; Moss, Sarah J; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Towers, G Wayne

    2013-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathione-β-synthase (CBS) and methionine synthase (MTR) genes interact with each other and the environment. These interactions could influence homocysteine (Hcy) and diseases contingent thereon. We determined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes, their relationships and interactions with total Hcy concentrations within black South Africans to address the increased prevalence of diseases associated with Hcy. The MTHFR 677 TT and MTR 2756 AA genotypes were associated with higher Hcy concentrations (16.6 and 10.1 μmol/L; pCBS genotypes did not influence Hcy. We demonstrated interactions between the area of residence and the CBS T833C/844ins68 genotypes (p=0.005) so that when harboring the wildtype allele, rural subjects had significantly higher Hcy than their urban counterparts, but when hosting the variant allele the environment made no difference to Hcy. Between the CBS T833C/844ins68 or G9276A and MTHFR C677T genotypes, there were two-way interactions (p=0.003 and=0.004, respectively), with regard to Hcy. Subjects harboring the MTHFR 677 TT genotype in combination with the CBS 833 TT/homozygous 844 non-insert or the MTHFR 677 TT genotype in combination with the CBS 9276 GA/GG displayed higher Hcy concentrations. Therefore, some of the investigated genotypes affected Hcy; residential area changed the way in which the CBS T833C/844ins68 SNPs influenced Hcy concentrations highlighting the importance of environmental factors; and gene-gene interactions allude to epistatic effects. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Dopamine Receptor D4 7-Repeat Allele and Prenatal Smoking in ADHD-Affected Children and Their Unaffected Siblings: No Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altink, Marieke E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine I. E.; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Anney, Richard; Brookes, Keeley-Joanne; Chen, Wai; Gill, Michael; Mulligan, Aisling; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Thompson, Margaret; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The dopamine receptor D4 ("DRD4") 7-repeat allele and maternal smoking during pregnancy are both considered as risk factors in the aetiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but few studies have been conducted on their interactive effects in causing ADHD. The purpose of this study is to examine the gene by…

  15. HTR1B, ADIPOR1, PPARGC1A, and CYP19A1 and Obesity in a Cohort of Caucasians and African Americans: An Evaluation of Gene-Environment Interactions and Candidate Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Todd L.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Villegas, Raquel; Cohen, Sarah S.; Buchowski, Maciej S.; Fowke, Jay H.; Schlundt, David; Long, Ji Rong; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Hargreaves, Margaret K.; Jeffrey, Smith; Williams, Scott M.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Blot, William J.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that the number of obese and overweight adults has increased to 1.6 billion, with concomitant increases in comorbidity. While genetic factors for obesity have been extensively studied in Caucasians, fewer studies have investigated genetic determinants of body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) in African Americans. A total of 38 genes and 1,086 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in African Americans (n = 1,173) and 897 SNPs in Caucasians (n = 1,165) were examined in the Southern Community Cohort Study (2002–2009) for associations with BMI and gene × environment interactions. A statistically significant association with BMI survived correction for multiple testing at rs4140535 (β = −0.04, 95% confidence interval: −0.06, −0.02; P = 5.76 × 10−5) in African Americans but not in Caucasians. Gene-environment interactions were observed with cigarette smoking and a SNP in ADIPOR1 in African Americans, as well as between a different SNP in ADIPOR1 and physical activity in Caucasians. A SNP in PPARGC1A interacted with alcohol consumption in African Americans, and a different SNP in PPARGC1A was nominally associated in Caucasians. A SNP in CYP19A1 interacted with dietary energy intake in African Americans, and another SNP in CYP191A had an independent association with BMI in Caucasians. PMID:22106445

  16. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bisgaard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites in relation to the development of eczema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379, FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p = 0.005, with a further increase in risk related to cat exposure at birth amongst children with FLG mutation (HR 11.11, 95% CI 3.79-32.60, p < 0.0001; dog exposure was moderately protective (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-1.01, p = 0.05, but not related to FLG genotype. In Manchester (n = 503 an independent and significant association of the development of eczema by age 12 mo with FLG genotype was confirmed (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.13-3.36, p = 0.02. In addition, the risk increased because of the interaction of cat ownership at birth and FLG genotype (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.35-10.81, p = 0.01, with no significant effect of the interaction with dog ownership (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.16-2.20, p = 0.43. Mite-allergen had no effects in either cohort. The observed effects were independent of sensitisation. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a significant interaction between FLG loss-of-function main mutations (501x and 2282del4 and cat ownership at birth on the development of early-life eczema in two independent birth cohorts. Our data suggest that cat but not dog ownership substantially

  17. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Rhodes, Shannon L; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df) = 10(-6), GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10(-7)) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication) = 0.59, P(Replication) = 10(-3); OR(Pooled) = 0.51, P(Pooled) = 7×10(-8). Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10(-3)), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10(-13)). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df)coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify

  18. Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study Identifies Glutamate Receptor Gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's Disease Modifier Gene via Interaction with Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H.; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M.; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I.; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W.; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K.; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P2df = 10−6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10−7) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that “Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers” was confirmed: ORReplication = 0.59, PReplication = 10−3; ORPooled = 0.51, PPooled = 7×10−8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10−3), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10−13). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P2dfcoffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify genes that

  19. The influence of gene-environment interactions on GHR and IGF-1 expression and their association with growth in brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blier Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative reaction norm theory proposes that genotype-by-environment interaction (GxE results from inter-individual differences of expression in adaptive suites of genes in distinct environments. However, environmental norms for actual gene suites are poorly documented. In this study, we investigated the effects of GxE interactions on levels of gene transcription and growth by documenting the impact of rearing environment (freshwater vs. saltwater, sex and genotypic (low vs. high estimated breeding value EBV effects on the transcription level of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and growth hormone receptor (GHR in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis. Results Males grew faster than females (μ♀ = 1.20 ± 0.07 g·d-1, μ♂ = 1.46 ± 0.06 g·d-1 and high-EBV fish faster than low-EBV fish (μLOW = 0.97 ± 0.05 g·d-1, μHIGH = 1.58 ± 0.07 g·d-1; p FW = 1.52 ± 0.07 g·d-1, μSW = 1.15 ± 0.06 g·d-1, yet GHR mRNA transcription level was significantly higher in saltwater than in freshwater (μSW = 0.85 ± 0.05, μFW = 0.61 ± 0.05. The ratio of actual growth to units in assayed mRNA ('individual transcript efficiency', iTE; g·d-1·u-1 also differed among EBV groups (μLOW = 2.0 ± 0.24 g·d-1·u-1; μHIGH = 3.7 ± 0.24 g·d-1·u-1 and environments (μSW = 2.0 ± 0.25 g·d-1·u-1; μFW = 3.7 ± 0.25 g·d-1·u-1 for GHR. Males had a lower iTE for GHR than females (μ♂ = 2.4 ± 0.29 g·d-1·u-1; μ♀ = 3.1 ± 0.23 g·d-1·u-1. There was no difference in IGF-1 transcription level between environments (p > 0.7 or EBV groups (p > 0.15 but the level of IGF-1 was four times higher in males than females (μ♂ = 2.4 ± 0.11, μ♀ = 0.58 ± 0.09; p ♂ = 1.3 ± 0.59 g·d-1·u-1; μ♀ = 3.9 ± 0.47 g·d-1·u-1, salinities (μSW = 2.3 ± 0.52 g·d-1·u-1; μFW = 3.7 ± 0.53 g·d-1·u-1 and EBV-groups (μLOW = 2.4 ± 0.49 g·d-1·u-1; μHIGH = 3.8 ± 0.49 g·d-1·u-1. Interaction between EBV-group and environment was detected for

  20. CYP1A1 genetic polymorphism and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on pulmonary function in the elderly: haplotype-based approach for gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-08-29

    Lung function may be impaired by environmental pollutants not only acting alone, but working with genetic factors as well. Few epidemiologic studies have been conducted to explore the interplay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure and genetic polymorphism on lung function in the elderly. For genetic polymorphism, haplotype is considered a more informative unit than single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Therefore, we examined the role of haplotype based-CYP1A1 polymorphism in the effect of PAHs exposure on lung function in 422 participants from a community-based panel of elderly adults in Seoul, Korea. Linear mixed effect models were fit to evaluate the association of PAH exposure markers (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol) with FVC, FEV₁, FEV₁/FVC, and FEF₂₅₋₇₅, and then the interaction with CYP1A1 haplotype constructed from three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the gene (rs4646421/rs4646422/rs1048943). Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels were inversely associated with FEV₁/FVC (ppolymorphisms on lung functions. Our findings suggest that PAH exposure producing 1-hydroxypyrene as a metabolite compromises lung function in the elderly, and that haplotype-based CYP1A1 polymorphism modifies the risk.

  1. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research.

  2. Gene environment interactions in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregelj, Peter

    2011-09-01

    It has been estimated that the heritable component of bipolar disorder ranges between 80 and 90%. However, even genome-wide association studies explain only a fraction of phenotypic variability not resolving the problem of "lost heritability". Although direct evidence for epigenetic dysfunction in bipolar disorder is still limited, methodological technologies in epigenomic profiling have advanced, offering even single cell analysing and resolving the problem of cell heterogeneity in epigenetics research. Gene overlapping with other mental disorders represents another problem in identifying potential susceptibility genes in bipolar disorder. Better understanding of the interplay between multiple environmental and genetic factors involved in the patogenesis of bipolar disorder could provide relevant information for treatment of patients with this complex disorder. Future studies on the role of these factors in psychopathological conditions, subphenotypes and endophenotypes may greatly benefit by using more precise clinical data and a combined approach with multiple research tools incorporated into a single study.

  3. Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual...... of G × E in schizophrenia. While such investigations are now well underway, new challenges emerge for G × E research from late-breaking evidence that genetic variation and environmental exposures are, to a significant degree, shared across a range of psychiatric disorders, with potential overlap...

  4. Gene-Environment Interplay between Number of Friends and Prosocial Leadership Behavior in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivizzigno, Alessandra S.; Brendgen, Mara; Feng, Bei; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Enriched environments may moderate the effect of genetic factors on prosocial leadership (gene-environment interaction, G × E). However, positive environmental experiences may also themselves be influenced by a genetic disposition for prosocial leadership (gene-environment correlation, rGE). Relating these processes to friendships, the present…

  5. Gene-Environment Interplay between Peer Rejection and Depressive Behavior in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Boivin, Michel; Girard, Alain; Bukowski, William M.; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genetic risk for depressive behavior may increase the likelihood of exposure to environmental stressors (gene-environment correlation, rGE). By the same token, exposure to environmental stressors may moderate the effect of genes on depressive behavior (gene-environment interaction, GxE). Relating these processes to a peer-related…

  6. Gene-Environment Interplay between Number of Friends and Prosocial Leadership Behavior in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivizzigno, Alessandra S.; Brendgen, Mara; Feng, Bei; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Enriched environments may moderate the effect of genetic factors on prosocial leadership (gene-environment interaction, G × E). However, positive environmental experiences may also themselves be influenced by a genetic disposition for prosocial leadership (gene-environment correlation, rGE). Relating these processes to friendships, the present…

  7. Gene-Environment Interplay between Peer Rejection and Depressive Behavior in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Boivin, Michel; Girard, Alain; Bukowski, William M.; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genetic risk for depressive behavior may increase the likelihood of exposure to environmental stressors (gene-environment correlation, rGE). By the same token, exposure to environmental stressors may moderate the effect of genes on depressive behavior (gene-environment interaction, GxE). Relating these processes to a peer-related…

  8. Community-Based Participatory Research and Gene-Environment Interaction Methodologies Addressing Environmental Justice among Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Women and Children in Texas: "From Mother to Child Project"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Valero, María A; Herrera, Angelica P; Zahm, Sheila H; Jones, Lovell A

    2007-05-01

    The "From Mother to Child Project" is a molecular epidemiological study that employs a community- based participatory research (CBPR) approach and gene-environment interaction research to address environmental justice in migrant and seasonal farmworker (MSF) women and children of Mexican origin home-based in Baytown and La Joya, Texas. This paper presents the background and rationale for the study and describes the study design and methodology. Preliminary data showed that MSF women and children in Texas have measurable levels of pesticides in their blood and urine, some of which were banned in the United States decades ago and are possible human carcinogens. Polymorphisms in genes involved in chemical detoxification and DNA repair have been associated with susceptibility to genetic damage and cancer development in populations exposed to environmental toxins. The "From Mother to Child Project" is testing three hypotheses: (1) MSF women and children who are occupationally exposed to pesticides are at higher risk for DNA damage than are non-exposed women and children. (2) Both, the extent of pesticide exposure and type of polymorphisms in chemical detoxification and DNA repair genes contribute to the extent of DNA damage observed in study participants. (3) The mutagenic potency levels measured in the organic compounds extracted from the urine and serum of study participants will correlate with the total concentrations of pesticides and with the measured DNA damage in study participants. The study will enroll 800 participants: 200 MSF mother-child pairs; 200 children (one per family) whose parents have never worked in agriculture, matched with the MSF children by ethnicity, age ± 2 years, gender, and city of residence; and these children's mothers. Personal interviews with the mothers are used to gather data for both mothers and children on sociodemographic characteristics; pesticide exposure at work and home; medical and reproductive history; dietary assessment, and

  9. Gene-Environment Interplay in Physical, Psychological, and Cognitive Domains in Mid to Late Adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Chandra A; Gatz, Margaret; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    Despite emerging interest in gene-environment interaction (GxE) effects, there is a dearth of studies evaluating its potential relevance apart from specific hypothesized environments and biometrical variance trends. Using a monozygotic within-pair approach, we evaluated evidence of G×E for body m...

  10. When chocolate seeking becomes compulsion: gene-environment interplay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Patrono

    Full Text Available Eating disorders appear to be caused by a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors, and compulsive eating in response to adverse circumstances characterizes many eating disorders.We compared compulsion-like eating in the form of conditioned suppression of palatable food-seeking in adverse situations in stressed C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, two well-characterized inbred strains, to determine the influence of gene-environment interplay on this behavioral phenotype. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that low accumbal D2 receptor (R availability is a genetic risk factor of food compulsion-like behavior and that environmental conditions that induce compulsive eating alter D2R expression in the striatum. To this end, we measured D1R and D2R expression in the striatum and D1R, D2R and α1R levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, by western blot.Exposure to environmental conditions induces compulsion-like eating behavior, depending on genetic background. This behavioral pattern is linked to decreased availability of accumbal D2R. Moreover, exposure to certain environmental conditions upregulates D2R and downregulates α1R in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, of compulsive animals. These findings confirm the function of gene-environment interplay in the manifestation of compulsive eating and support the hypothesis that low accumbal D2R availability is a "constitutive" genetic risk factor for compulsion-like eating behavior. Finally, D2R upregulation and α1R downregulation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, are potential neuroadaptive responses that parallel the shift from motivated to compulsive eating.

  11. When Chocolate Seeking Becomes Compulsion: Gene-Environment Interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, Loris; Andolina, Diego; Valzania, Alessandro; Latagliata, Emanuele Claudio; Felsani, Armando; Pompili, Assunta; Gasbarri, Antonella; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Background Eating disorders appear to be caused by a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors, and compulsive eating in response to adverse circumstances characterizes many eating disorders. Materials and Methods We compared compulsion-like eating in the form of conditioned suppression of palatable food-seeking in adverse situations in stressed C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, two well-characterized inbred strains, to determine the influence of gene-environment interplay on this behavioral phenotype. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that low accumbal D2 receptor (R) availability is a genetic risk factor of food compulsion-like behavior and that environmental conditions that induce compulsive eating alter D2R expression in the striatum. To this end, we measured D1R and D2R expression in the striatum and D1R, D2R and α1R levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, by western blot. Results Exposure to environmental conditions induces compulsion-like eating behavior, depending on genetic background. This behavioral pattern is linked to decreased availability of accumbal D2R. Moreover, exposure to certain environmental conditions upregulates D2R and downregulates α1R in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, of compulsive animals. These findings confirm the function of gene-environment interplay in the manifestation of compulsive eating and support the hypothesis that low accumbal D2R availability is a “constitutive” genetic risk factor for compulsion-like eating behavior. Finally, D2R upregulation and α1R downregulation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, respectively, are potential neuroadaptive responses that parallel the shift from motivated to compulsive eating. PMID:25781028

  12. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  13. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  14. Gene-Environment Interplay in the Link of Friends' and Nonfriends' Behaviors with Children's Social Reticence in a Competitive Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and…

  15. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  16. Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.

    1989-01-01

    Version 3.12 of INCA provides user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems. System configuration and parameters easily adjusted, enabling INCA user to create compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in convenient manner. Full complement of graphical routines makes output easy to understand. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  17. Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.

    1989-01-01

    Version 3.12 of INCA provides user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems. System configuration and parameters easily adjusted, enabling INCA user to create compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in convenient manner. Full complement of graphical routines makes output easy to understand. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  18. Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA: a method for investigating complex gene-gene interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanock Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of common diseases is likely determined by the complex interplay between environmental and genetic factors, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Traditional methods of data analysis are poorly suited for detecting complex interactions due to sparseness of data in high dimensions, which often occurs when data are available for a large number of SNPs for a relatively small number of samples. Validation of associations observed using multiple methods should be implemented to minimize likelihood of false-positive associations. Moreover, high-throughput genotyping methods allow investigators to genotype thousands of SNPs at one time. Investigating associations for each individual SNP or interactions between SNPs using traditional approaches is inefficient and prone to false positives. Results We developed the Polymorphism Interaction Analysis tool (PIA version 2.0 to include different approaches for ranking and scoring SNP combinations, to account for imbalances between case and control ratios, stratify on particular factors, and examine associations of user-defined pathways (based on SNP or gene with case status. PIA v. 2.0 detected 2-SNP interactions as the highest ranking model 77% of the time, using simulated data sets of genetic models of interaction (minor allele frequency = 0.2; heritability = 0.01; N = 1600 generated previously [Velez DR, White BC, Motsinger AA, Bush WS, Ritchie MD, Williams SM, Moore JH: A balanced accuracy function for epistasis modeling in imbalanced datasets using multifactor dimensionality reduction. Genet Epidemiol 2007, 31:306–315.]. Interacting SNPs were detected in both balanced (20 SNPs and imbalanced data (case:control 1:2 and 1:4, 10 SNPs in the context of non-interacting SNPs. Conclusion PIA v. 2.0 is a useful tool for exploring gene*gene or gene*environment interactions and identifying a small number of putative associations which may be investigated further using other

  19. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L;

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between...... that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...... of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity...

  20. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to conf

  1. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew Anthony; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Korsten, Alex; Leonhardt, Miriam; Dimitriadis, Konstantin; De Coo, Ireneaus F; Klopstock, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick Francis

    2009-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to confirm this to be the case. LHON has no treatment, so identifying environmental triggers is the key to disease prevention, whilst potentially revealing new mechanisms amenable to therapeutic manipulation. To address this issue, we conducted a large, multicentre epidemiological study of 196 affected and 206 unaffected carriers from 125 LHON pedigrees known to harbour one of the three primary pathogenic mtDNA mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. A comprehensive history of exposure to smoking, alcohol and other putative environmental insults was collected using a structured questionnaire. We identified a strong and consistent association between visual loss and smoking, independent of gender and alcohol intake, leading to a clinical penetrance of 93% in men who smoked. There was a trend towards increased visual failure with alcohol, but only with a heavy intake. Based on these findings, asymptomatic carriers of a LHON mtDNA mutation should be strongly advised not to smoke and to moderate their alcohol intake.

  2. Visual Interactive Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchmeier-Andersen, Sabine; Møller Christensen, Jakob; Lihn Jensen, Bente

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the latest version of VIA (version 3.0). The development of the program was initiated by a demand for more systematic training of language analysis in high schools and universities. The system is now web-based, which enables teachers and students to share exercises across th...

  3. Visual Interactive Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchmeier-Andersen, Sabine; Møller Christensen, Jakob; Lihn Jensen, Bente

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the latest version of VIA (version 3.0). The development of the program was initiated by a demand for more systematic training of language analysis in high schools and universities. The system is now web-based, which enables teachers and students to share exercises across...... the globe. A new dictionary feature has been added which contains detailed morphological information used by the system to produce intelligent feed-back on student performance. VIA contains more than 1700 exercises for Danish, German, English, Spanish, Latin, French and Italian. For VIA 3.0, a new module...

  4. The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium (GENEVA): maximizing the knowledge obtained from GWAS by collaboration across studies of multiple conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Agrawal, Arpana; Cole, John W; Hansel, Nadia N; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bennett, Siiri N; Bierut, Laura J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feingold, Eleanor; Fornage, Myriam; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Emily L; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Heit, John A; Hu, Frank B; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cathy C; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A; Marazita, Mary L; Mathias, Rasika A; Mirel, Daniel B; Paschall, Justin; Pasquale, Louis R; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rice, John P; Udren, Jenna; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, Xiaojing; Wiggs, Janey L; Williams, Kayleen; Yu, Kai

    2010-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as powerful means for identifying genetic loci related to complex diseases. However, the role of environment and its potential to interact with key loci has not been adequately addressed in most GWAS. Networks of collaborative studies involving different study populations and multiple phenotypes provide a powerful approach for addressing the challenges in analysis and interpretation shared across studies. The Gene, Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) consortium was initiated to: identify genetic variants related to complex diseases; identify variations in gene-trait associations related to environmental exposures; and ensure rapid sharing of data through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes. GENEVA consists of several academic institutions, including a coordinating center, two genotyping centers and 14 independently designed studies of various phenotypes, as well as several Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health led by the National Human Genome Research Institute. Minimum detectable effect sizes include relative risks ranging from 1.24 to 1.57 and proportions of variance explained ranging from 0.0097 to 0.02. Given the large number of research participants (N>80,000), an important feature of GENEVA is harmonization of common variables, which allow analyses of additional traits. Environmental exposure information available from most studies also enables testing of gene-environment interactions. Facilitated by its sizeable infrastructure for promoting collaboration, GENEVA has established a unified framework for genotyping, data quality control, analysis and interpretation. By maximizing knowledge obtained through collaborative GWAS incorporating environmental exposure information, GENEVA aims to enhance our understanding of disease etiology, potentially identifying opportunities for intervention.

  5. Gene-Environment Interplay, Family Relationships, and Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral genetic research from the past decade that has moved beyond simply studying the independent influences of genes and environments. The studies considered in this review have instead focused on understanding gene-environment interplay, including genotype-environment correlation (rGE) and genotype x environment…

  6. Gene-Environment Interplay, Family Relationships, and Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral genetic research from the past decade that has moved beyond simply studying the independent influences of genes and environments. The studies considered in this review have instead focused on understanding gene-environment interplay, including genotype-environment correlation (rGE) and genotype x environment…

  7. Gene-environment correlations in the stress-depression relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittker, Jason

    2010-09-01

    A critical feature of the social stress model is the apparent relationship between stress and depression. Although many studies have demonstrated a connection between the two, the relationship may be contaminated by genes affecting both stress and depression. Using a sample of identical and fraternal twins, this study explores genetic influences on depression and assorted sources of stress while explicitly estimating, and thereby controlling for, gene-environment correlations. I consider both stress and depression in a fine-grained fashion. For the former, the study explores assorted sources of stress, including health and disability, family, unemployment, discrimination, and perceived neighborhood safety, as gene-environment correlations may be stronger for some forms of stress than others. For the latter, the study explores both depressive symptoms and major depressive disorders, as each may entail a different epidemiological process, especially with respect to genes. The results reveal that most, but not all, measures of stress have moderate heritabilities, suggesting that genes influence exposure to the environment in a broad fashion. Yet, despite this, the relationship between stress and depression is generally robust to gene-environment correlations. There are some notable exceptions. For example, allowing for gene-environment correlations, marital conflict is generally unrelated to depression. Moreover, gene-environment correlations are generally stronger for major depression than for depressive symptoms, encouraging further elaboration of the distinction between the onset of depression and its recurrence, especially in the context of genes. These exceptions do not put limits on environmental influence, but do suggest that genes operate in a complex life-course fashion.

  8. Kernel Approach for Modeling Interaction Effects in Genetic Association Studies of Complex Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadaway, K Alaine; Duncan, Richard; Conneely, Karen N; Almli, Lynn M; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Epstein, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of complex traits likely involves the effects of genetic and environmental factors, along with complicated interaction effects between them. Consequently, there has been interest in applying genetic association tests of complex traits that account for potential modification of the genetic effect in the presence of an environmental factor. One can perform such an analysis using a joint test of gene and gene-environment interaction. An optimal joint test would be one that remains powerful under a variety of models ranging from those of strong gene-environment interaction effect to those of little or no gene-environment interaction effect. To fill this demand, we have extended a kernel machine based approach for association mapping of multiple SNPs to consider joint tests of gene and gene-environment interaction. The kernel-based approach for joint testing is promising, because it incorporates linkage disequilibrium information from multiple SNPs simultaneously in analysis and permits flexible modeling of interaction effects. Using simulated data, we show that our kernel machine approach typically outperforms the traditional joint test under strong gene-environment interaction models and further outperforms the traditional main-effect association test under models of weak or no gene-environment interaction effects. We illustrate our test using genome-wide association data from the Grady Trauma Project, a cohort of highly traumatized, at-risk individuals, which has previously been investigated for interaction effects. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. Child dopamine active transporter 1 genotype and parenting: evidence for evocative gene-environment correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Hanna, Brigitte; Sheikh, Haroon I; Laptook, Rebecca S; Kim, Jiyon; Singh, Shiva M; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-02-01

    The dopamine active transporter 1 (DAT1) gene is implicated in psychopathology risk. Although the processes by which this gene exerts its effects on risk are poorly understood, a small body of research suggests that the DAT1 gene influences early emerging negative emotionality, a marker of children's psychopathology risk. As child negative emotionality evokes negative parenting practices, the DAT1 gene may also play a role in gene-environment correlations. To test this model, children (N = 365) were genotyped for the DAT1 gene and participated in standardized parent-child interaction tasks with their primary caregiver. The DAT1 gene 9-repeat variant was associated with child negative affect expressed toward the parent during parent-child interactions, and parents of children with a 9-repeat allele exhibited more hostility and lower guidance/engagement than parents of children without a 9-repeat allele. These gene-environment associations were partially mediated by child negative affect toward the parent. The findings implicate a specific polymorphism in eliciting negative parenting, suggesting that evocative associations play a role in elevating children's risk for emotional trajectories toward psychopathology risk.

  10. Hamiltonian analysis of interacting fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mitra, Arpan Krishna [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata (India); Ghosh, Subir [Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2015-05-15

    Ideal fluid dynamics is studied as a relativistic field theory with particular stress on its hamiltonian structure. The Schwinger condition, whose integrated version yields the stress tensor conservation, is explicitly verified both in equal-time and light-cone coordinate systems. We also consider the hamiltonian formulation of fluids interacting with an external gauge field. The complementary roles of the canonical (Noether) stress tensor and the symmetric one obtained by metric variation are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Accelerator physics analysis with interactive tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J.A.; Michelotti, L.

    1993-05-01

    Work is in progress on interactive tools for linear and nonlinear accelerator design, analysis, and simulation using X-based graphics. The BEAMLINE and MXYZPTLK class libraries, were used with an X Windows graphics library to build a program for interactively editing lattices and studying their properties.

  12. Gene-Environment Interplay and Psychopathology: Multiple Varieties but Real Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2006-01-01

    Gene-environment interplay is a general term that covers several divergent concepts with different meanings and different implications. In this review, we evaluate research evidence on four varieties of gene-environment interplay. First, we consider epigenetic mechanisms by which environmental influences alter the effects of genes. Second, we…

  13. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  14. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactionsand single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatorycytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiologyof type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in thepro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step inglucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrialinjury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis inT2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin(IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissueplasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins.Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strongenvironmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic modeof inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and antiinflammatorycytokines have been reported as a riskfor T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed byunifying results in different studies and wide variationshave been reported in various ethnic groups. Theinter-ethnic variations can be explained by the factthat gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene,gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. Thisreview highlights the impact of these interactions ondetermining the role of single nucleotide polymorphismof IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesisof T2DM.

  15. Interactive Data Analysis. Development of an Interactive Data Manipulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    8217 .°- .. .’". .. ....... ... . ., . . .’.’_. _ .. _. Aplication L a -iza e S iulIa tinet. 1st programs Ianalys’.s.. steo 2nd Results on r RqAWr step disK storage DAAfor data K...1 and 21; (b) the IDA from SPSS (Interactive Data Analysis from the Software Package for Social Sciences); and (c) the presented system, IDAMAN. 14...are the Bio- MeDical Package (BMDP, 1981), and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences ( SPSS , 1983). 16 BMDP and SPSS are comnlete statistical

  16. Evocative gene-environment correlation in the mother-child relationship: a twin study of interpersonal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Ashlea M; Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Klump, Kelly L; Burt, S Alexandra

    2013-02-01

    The behavior genetic literature suggests that genetically influenced characteristics of the child elicit specific behaviors from the parent. However, little is known about the processes by which genetically influenced child characteristics evoke parental responses. Interpersonal theory provides a useful framework for identifying reciprocal behavioral processes between children and mothers. The theory posits that, at any given moment, interpersonal behavior varies along the orthogonal dimensions of warmth and control and that the interpersonal behavior of one individual tends to elicit corresponding or contrasting behavior from the other (i.e., warmth elicits warmth, whereas control elicits submission). The current study thus examined these dimensions of interpersonal behavior as they relate to the parent-child relationship in 546 twin families. A computer joystick was used to rate videos of mother-child interactions in real time, yielding information on mother and child levels of warmth and control throughout the interaction. Analyses indicated that maternal control, but not maternal warmth, was influenced by evocative gene-environment correlational processes, such that genetic influences on maternal control and child control were largely overlapping. Moreover, these common genetic influences were present both cross-sectionally and over the course of the interaction. Such findings not only confirm the presence of evocative gene-environment correlational processes in the mother-child relationship but also illuminate at least one of the specific interpersonal behaviors that underlie this evocative process.

  17. Expert system interaction with existing analysis codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ransom, V.H.; Fink, R.K.; Bertch, W.J.; Callow, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Coupling expert systems with existing engineering analysis codes is a promising area in the field of artificial intelligence. The added intelligence can provide for easier and less costly use of the code and also reduce the potential for code misuse. This paper will discuss the methods available to allow interaction between an expert system and a large analysis code running on a mainframe. Concluding remarks will identify potential areas of expert system application with specific areas that are being considered in a current research program. The difficulty of interaction between an analysis code and an expert system is due to the incompatibility between the FORTRAN environment used for the analysis code and the AI environment used for the expert system. Three methods, excluding file transfer techniques, are discussed to help overcome this incompatibility. The first method is linking the FORTRAN routines to the LISP environment on the same computer. Various LISP dialects available on mainframes and their interlanguage communication capabilities are discussed. The second method involves network interaction between a LISP machine and a mainframe computer. Comparisons between the linking method and networking are noted. The third method involves the use of an expert system tool that is campatible with a FORTRAN environment. Several available tools are discussed. With the interaction methods identified, several potential application areas are considered. Selection of the specific areas that will be developed for the pilot project and applied to a thermal-hydraulic energy analysis code are noted.

  18. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  19. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  20. Interaction analysis and psychology: a dialogical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossen, Michèle

    2010-03-01

    Interaction analysis is not a prerogative of any discipline in social sciences. It has its own history within each disciplinary field and is related to specific research objects. From the standpoint of psychology, this article first draws upon a distinction between factorial and dialogical conceptions of interaction. It then briefly presents the basis of a dialogical approach in psychology and focuses upon four basic assumptions. Each of them is examined on a theoretical and on a methodological level with a leading question: to what extent is it possible to develop analytical tools that are fully coherent with dialogical assumptions? The conclusion stresses the difficulty of developing methodological tools that are fully consistent with dialogical assumptions and argues that there is an unavoidable tension between accounting for the complexity of an interaction and using methodological tools which necessarily "monologise" this complexity.

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of Interacting Nucleic Acid Strands

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks, Robert M.; Bois, Justin S.; Schaeffer, Joseph M.; Winfree, Erik; Pierce, Niles A.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the analysis of natural and engineered DNA and RNA systems, we present the first algorithm for calculating the partition function of an unpseudoknotted complex of multiple interacting nucleic acid strands. This dynamic program is based on a rigorous extension of secondary structure models to the multistranded case, addressing representation and distinguishability issues that do not arise for single-stranded structures. We then derive the form of the partition function for a fixed...

  2. Proteomic analysis of SETD6 interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ofir; Chen, Ayelet; Feldman, Michal; Levy, Dan

    2016-03-01

    SETD6 (SET-domain-containing protein 6) is a mono-methyltransferase that has been shown to methylate RelA and H2AZ. Using a proteomic approach we recently identified several new SETD6 substrates. To identify novel SETD6 interacting proteins, SETD6 was immunoprecipitated (IP) from Human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia K562 cells. SETD6 binding proteins were subjected to mass-spectrometry analysis resulting in 115 new SETD6 binding candidates. STRING database was used to map the SETD6 interactome network. Network enrichment analysis of biological processes with Gene Ontology (GO) database, identified three major groups; metabolic processes, muscle contraction and protein folding.

  3. Low cost real time interactive analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetina, F.

    1988-01-01

    Efforts continue to develop a low cost real time interactive analysis system for the reception of satellite data. A multi-purpose ingest hardware software frame formatter was demonstrated for GOES and TIROS data and work is proceeding on extending the capability to receive GMS data. A similar system was proposed as an archival and analysis system for use with INSAT data and studies are underway to modify the system to receive the planned SeaWiFS (ocean color) data. This system was proposed as the core of a number of international programs in support of U.S. AID activities. Systems delivered or nearing final testing are listed.

  4. Comparative analysis of methods for detecting interacting loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xiguo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions among genetic loci are believed to play an important role in disease risk. While many methods have been proposed for detecting such interactions, their relative performance remains largely unclear, mainly because different data sources, detection performance criteria, and experimental protocols were used in the papers introducing these methods and in subsequent studies. Moreover, there have been very few studies strictly focused on comparison of existing methods. Given the importance of detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, a rigorous, comprehensive comparison of performance and limitations of available interaction detection methods is warranted. Results We report a comparison of eight representative methods, of which seven were specifically designed to detect interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with the last a popular main-effect testing method used as a baseline for performance evaluation. The selected methods, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, full interaction model (FIM, information gain (IG, Bayesian epistasis association mapping (BEAM, SNP harvester (SH, maximum entropy conditional probability modeling (MECPM, logistic regression with an interaction term (LRIT, and logistic regression (LR were compared on a large number of simulated data sets, each, consistent with complex disease models, embedding multiple sets of interacting SNPs, under different interaction models. The assessment criteria included several relevant detection power measures, family-wise type I error rate, and computational complexity. There are several important results from this study. First, while some SNPs in interactions with strong effects are successfully detected, most of the methods miss many interacting SNPs at an acceptable rate of false positives. In this study, the best-performing method was MECPM. Second, the statistical significance assessment criteria, used by some of the

  5. Interactive analysis of geodata based intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Boris; Eck, Ralf; Unmüessig, Gabriel; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    When a spatiotemporal events happens, multi-source intelligence data is gathered to understand the problem, and strategies for solving the problem are investigated. The difficulties arising from handling spatial and temporal intelligence data represent the main problem. The map might be the bridge to visualize the data and to get the most understand model for all stakeholders. For the analysis of geodata based intelligence data, a software was developed as a working environment that combines geodata with optimized ergonomics. The interaction with the common operational picture (COP) is so essentially facilitated. The composition of the COP is based on geodata services, which are normalized by international standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The basic geodata are combined with intelligence data from images (IMINT) and humans (HUMINT), stored in a NATO Coalition Shared Data Server (CSD). These intelligence data can be combined with further information sources, i.e., live sensors. As a result a COP is generated and an interaction suitable for the specific workspace is added. This allows the users to work interactively with the COP, i.e., searching with an on board CSD client for suitable intelligence data and integrate them into the COP. Furthermore, users can enrich the scenario with findings out of the data of interactive live sensors and add data from other sources. This allows intelligence services to contribute effectively to the process by what military and disaster management are organized.

  6. The shaping of personality: genes, environments, and chance encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Marvin

    2004-02-01

    I started my career as a clinical psychologist with an interest in personality assessment. But a loss of faith in psychoanalytic theory, projective tests, and clinical case studies in general led to a shift in my interests to personality research. Subsequent jobs at research institutes and universities allowed me to indulge in science. I developed the trait-state concept and its application in tests for affect measurement. For 10 years I did experimental research in the field of sensory deprivation. The sensation seeking idea and tests evolved from this work but soon expanded to many other areas. Research in the biological basis of sensation seeking started with genetic and psychophysiological research, but research conducted in other laboratories also pointed to a psychopharmacological basis for the trait. Over the last several decades, I have formulated a psychobiological model for personality. I have used factor analysis and the biosocial model to develop an "alternative-five" factorial trait structure for personality.

  7. Digraph matrix analysis applications to systems interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesso, H.P.; Altenbach, T.; Lappa, D.; Kimura, C.; Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Fromme, D.; Smith, C.F.; Williams, W.

    1984-01-01

    Complex events such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3 and Crystal River-3 have demonstrated that previously unidentified system interdependencies can be important to safety. A major aspect of these events was dependent faults (common cause/mode failures). The term systems interactions has been introduced by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to identify the concepts of spatial and functional coupling of systems which can lead to system interdependencies. Spatial coupling refers to dependencies resulting from a shared environmental condition; functional coupling refers to both dependencies resulting from components shared between safety and/or support systems, and to dependencies involving human actions. The NRC is currently developing guidelines to search for and evaluate adverse systems interactions at light water reactors. One approach utilizes graph theoretical methods and is called digraph matrix analysis (DMA). This methodology has been specifically tuned to the systems interaction problem. The objective of this paper is to present results from two DMA applications and to contrast them with the results from more traditional fault tree approaches.

  8. Estimation and tests of haplotype-environment interaction when linkage phase is ambiguous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lake, SL; Lyon, H; Tantisira, K; Silverman, EK; Weiss, ST; Laird, NM; Schaid, DJ

    2003-01-01

    In the study of complex traits, the utility of linkage analysis and single marker association tests can be limited for researchers attempting to elucidate the complex interplay between a gene and environmental covariates. For these purposes, tests of gene-environment interactions are needed. In addi

  9. Mark 3 interactive data analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. W.; Ma, C.; Schupler, B. P.

    1980-01-01

    The interactive data analysis system, a major subset of the total Mark 3 very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) software system is described. The system consists of two major and a number of small programs. These programs provide for the scientific analysis of the observed values of delay and delay rate generated by the VLBI data reduction programs and product the geophysical and astrometric parameters which are among the ultimate products of VLBI. The two major programs are CALC and SOLVE. CALC generates the theoretical values of VLBI delay rate as well as partial derivatives based on apriori values of the geophysical and astronometric parameters. SOLVE is a least squares parameters estimation program which yields the geophysical and astrometric parameters using the observed values by the data processing system and theoretical values and partial derivatives provided by CALC. SOLVE is a highly interactive program in which the user selects the exact form of the recovered parameters and the data to be accepted into the solution.

  10. Gene-Environment Correlation Underlying the Association between Parental Negativity and Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N.; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M.; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent "and" child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The…

  11. Gene-Environment Correlation Underlying the Association between Parental Negativity and Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N.; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M.; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent "and" child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The present…

  12. Automatic quantitative morphological analysis of interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shamir, Lior; Wallin, John

    2013-01-01

    The large number of galaxies imaged by digital sky surveys reinforces the need for computational methods for analyzing galaxy morphology. While the morphology of most galaxies can be associated with a stage on the Hubble sequence, morphology of galaxy mergers is far more complex due to the combination of two or more galaxies with different morphologies and the interaction between them. Here we propose a computational method based on unsupervised machine learning that can quantitatively analyze morphologies of galaxy mergers and associate galaxies by their morphology. The method works by first generating multiple synthetic galaxy models for each galaxy merger, and then extracting a large set of numerical image content descriptors for each galaxy model. These numbers are weighted using Fisher discriminant scores, and then the similarities between the galaxy mergers are deduced using a variation of Weighted Nearest Neighbor analysis such that the Fisher scores are used as weights. The similarities between the ga...

  13. Hydrophilic interaction chromatographic analysis of anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Chandré M; Stander, Maria A; de Villiers, André

    2013-12-06

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) provides an alternative separation mode for the analysis of phenolic compounds, in which aqueous-organic mobile phases with polar stationary phases are used. This paper reports the evaluation of HILIC for the analysis of the natural pigments anthocyanins, which are of importance because of their chromophoric properties and a range of health benefits associated with their consumption. Several HILIC stationary phases (silica, diol, amine, cyanopropyl and amide) and mobile phase combinations were evaluated, with the latter proving particularly important due to the distinctive chromatographic behaviour of anthocyanins. Diode array detection was used for selective detection of anthocyanins, while high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS) was used for compound identification. The potential of HILIC separation is demonstrated for a range of anthocyanins varying in glycosylation and acylation patterns found in blueberries, grape skins, black beans, red cabbage and red radish. HILIC is shown to be a complementary separation method to reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) due to the alternative retention mechanism.

  14. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    taking any oral contraceptives and then resumed, ask questions D1- D2 again) D2 . Name of the oral contraceptive D3 . Age of first use D4. Duration...June 2007). “The multipotent influence of Vitamin D on breast cancer risk”. D.R. Marshall (PI), primary submitter with Dr. Alecia Malin-Fair (PI), co...Portion Size 170. Pepper 1 2 3 4 5 171. Chili/Hot 1 2 3 4 5 172. Salt 1 2 3 4 5 173. Vitamins and Supplements 1 2 3 4 5 174. Others 1 2 3 4 5

  15. Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia : Contemporary Challenges for Integrated, Large-scale Investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M.; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Kempton, Matthew J.; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A.; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F. Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J. Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Koksal; Ucok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbasoglu, E. Cem; Guloksuz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burin; Karadag, Hasan; Soygur, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga; Ayer, Ahmet; Noyan, Handan; Karadayi, Gulsah; Akturan, Elin; Ulas, Halis; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara; Bernardo, Miguel; Sanjuan, Julio; Bobes, Julio; Arrojo, Manuel; Luis Santos, Jose; Cuadrado, Pedro; Rodriguez Solano, Jose Juan; Carracedo, Angel; Garcia Bernardo, Enrique; Roldan, Laura; Lopez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, Bibiana; Cruz, Sabrina; Diaz Mesa, Eva Ma; Pouso, Maria; Jimenez, Estela; Sanchez, Teresa; Rapado, Marta; Gonzalez, Emiliano; Martinez, Covadonga; Sanchez, Emilio; Soledad Olmeda, Ma; de Haan, Lieuwe; Velthorst, Eva; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; van Dam, Daniella; van der Ven, Elsje; van der Meer, Floor; Messchaert, Elles; Kraan, Tamar; Burger, Nadine; Leboyer, Marion; Szoke, Andrei; Schurhoff, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Jamain, Stephane; Tortelli, Andrea; Frijda, Flora; Vilain, Jeanne; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Baudin, Gregoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Bulzacka, Ewa; Charpeaud, Thomas; Tronche, Anne-Marie; De Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud; Decoster, Jeroen; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Stefanis, Nikos C.; Sachs, Gabriele; Aschauer, Harald; Lasser, Iris; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Schlogelhofer, Monika; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Smieskova, Renata; Rapp, Charlotte; Ittig, Sarah; Soguel-Dit-Piquard, Fabienne; Studerus, Erich; Klosterkotter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Paruch, Julia; Julkowski, Dominika; Hilboll, Desiree; Sham, Pak C.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Campbell, Desmond D.; Li, Miaoxin; Maria Romeo-Casabona, Carlos; Emaldi Cirion, Aitziber; Urruela Mora, Asier; Jones, Peter; Kirkbride, James; Cannon, Mary; Rujescu, Dan; Tarricone, Ilaria; Berardi, Domenico; Bonora, Elena; Seri, Marco; Marcacci, Thomas; Chiri, Luigi; Chierzi, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Braca, Mauro; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Donegani, Ivonne; Fioritti, Angelo; La Barbera, Daniele; La Cascia, Caterina Erika; Mule, Alice; Sideli, Lucia; Sartorio, Rachele; Ferraro, Laura; Tripoli, Giada; Seminerio, Fabio; Marinaro, Anna Maria; McGorry, Patrick; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G. Paul; Pantelis, Christos; Menezes, Paulo R.; Del-Ben, Cristina M.; Tenan, Silvia H. Gallo; Shuhama, Rosana; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Ira, Elisa; Nordentoft, Merete; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Cristobal, Paula; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Gadelha, Ary; Maric, Nadja P.; Andric, Sanja; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mirjanic, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular

  16. Gene-environment interactions and the impact on obesity and lipid profile phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequencing the human genome provided the data, human intellectual capital and technology, particularly in terms of infrastructure and methodologies, to begin discovering genes involved in a wide range of human diseases and afflictions. This has led to a resurgence in genetics with the advent of geno...

  17. Gene-Environment Interaction and Breast Cancer on Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    multiethnic pregnancy cohort. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jun 15;165(12):1397-404. Sagiv SK, Gaudet MM, Eng SM, Abrahamson PE, Shantakumar S, Teitelbaum SL...Gammon MD. Preeclampsia, pregnancy -related hypertension, and breast cancer risk. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1007-14. • Invited Presentation...potential hormonal activity, can have beneficial health effects including lowering the risk of breast cancer and osteoporosis (Branca and Lorenzetti, 2005

  18. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in prostate, breast and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Nellemann, Christine; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Tjønneland, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cancer incidensen i Vesten er steget stødt de sidste 50 år. For tre af de mest prævalente cancer typer i Danmark, prostata-, bryst- og kolorektal cancer, er kun en lille del (1-15%) af incidensen forårsaget af højpenetrans enkelt-genmutationer pga. deres lave frekvens i populationen. Generelt set bidrager nedarvede faktorer til årsagsforhold for bryst cancer kun med 27%, hvorimod genetik bidrager med 35% og 42% for henholdsvis kolorektal- og prostata cancer. Derudover indikerer immigrationsst...

  19. Childhood problem behavior and parental divorce: evidence for gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.C. Robbers (Sylvana); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); A.C. Huizink (Anja); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt (Toos); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Bartels (Meike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The importance of genetic and environmental influences on children's behavioral and emotional problems may vary as a function of environmental exposure. We previously reported that 12-year-olds with divorced parents showed more internalizing and externalizing problems than

  20. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Aurora Szentágotai-Tătar; Adina Chiș; Romana Vulturar; Anca Dobrean; Diana Mirela Cândea; Andrei C Miu

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people's preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neu...

  1. Gene-environment interactions and obesity: recent developments and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Tao; Hu, Frank B

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, a major public health concern, is a multifactorial disease caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Although recent genome-wide association studies have identified many loci related to obesity or body mass index, the identified variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of obesity. Better understanding of the interplay between genetic and environmental factors is the basis for developing effective personalized obesity prevention and management strategies. T...

  2. Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia : Contemporary Challenges for Integrated, Large-scale Investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Jim; Rutten, Bart P.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; van Zelst, Catherine; Bruggeman, Richard; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Morgan, Craig; Murray, Robin M.; Di Forti, Marta; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Kempton, Matthew J.; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Hubbard, Kathryn; Beards, Stephanie; Stilo, Simona A.; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Bourque, Francois; Modinos, Gemma; Tognin, Stefania; Calem, Maria; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Holmans, Peter; Williams, Nigel; Craddock, Nicholas; Richards, Alexander; Humphreys, Isla; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Leweke, F. Markus; Tost, Heike; Akdeniz, Ceren; Rohleder, Cathrin; Bumb, J. Malte; Schwarz, Emanuel; Alptekin, Koksal; Ucok, Alp; Saka, Meram Can; Atbasoglu, E. Cem; Guloksuz, Sinan; Gumus-Akay, Guvem; Cihan, Burin; Karadag, Hasan; Soygur, Haldan; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Ulusoy, Semra; Akdede, Berna; Binbay, Tolga; Ayer, Ahmet; Noyan, Handan; Karadayi, Gulsah; Akturan, Elin; Ulas, Halis; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara; Bernardo, Miguel; Sanjuan, Julio; Bobes, Julio; Arrojo, Manuel; Luis Santos, Jose; Cuadrado, Pedro; Rodriguez Solano, Jose Juan; Carracedo, Angel; Garcia Bernardo, Enrique; Roldan, Laura; Lopez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, Bibiana; Cruz, Sabrina; Diaz Mesa, Eva Ma; Pouso, Maria; Jimenez, Estela; Sanchez, Teresa; Rapado, Marta; Gonzalez, Emiliano; Martinez, Covadonga; Sanchez, Emilio; Soledad Olmeda, Ma; de Haan, Lieuwe; Velthorst, Eva; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; van Dam, Daniella; van der Ven, Elsje; van der Meer, Floor; Messchaert, Elles; Kraan, Tamar; Burger, Nadine; Leboyer, Marion; Szoke, Andrei; Schurhoff, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Jamain, Stephane; Tortelli, Andrea; Frijda, Flora; Vilain, Jeanne; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Baudin, Gregoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Bulzacka, Ewa; Charpeaud, Thomas; Tronche, Anne-Marie; De Hert, Marc; van Winkel, Ruud; Decoster, Jeroen; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Stefanis, Nikos C.; Sachs, Gabriele; Aschauer, Harald; Lasser, Iris; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Schlogelhofer, Monika; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Anna; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Smieskova, Renata; Rapp, Charlotte; Ittig, Sarah; Soguel-Dit-Piquard, Fabienne; Studerus, Erich; Klosterkotter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Paruch, Julia; Julkowski, Dominika; Hilboll, Desiree; Sham, Pak C.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Campbell, Desmond D.; Li, Miaoxin; Maria Romeo-Casabona, Carlos; Emaldi Cirion, Aitziber; Urruela Mora, Asier; Jones, Peter; Kirkbride, James; Cannon, Mary; Rujescu, Dan; Tarricone, Ilaria; Berardi, Domenico; Bonora, Elena; Seri, Marco; Marcacci, Thomas; Chiri, Luigi; Chierzi, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Braca, Mauro; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Donegani, Ivonne; Fioritti, Angelo; La Barbera, Daniele; La Cascia, Caterina Erika; Mule, Alice; Sideli, Lucia; Sartorio, Rachele; Ferraro, Laura; Tripoli, Giada; Seminerio, Fabio; Marinaro, Anna Maria; McGorry, Patrick; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G. Paul; Pantelis, Christos; Menezes, Paulo R.; Del-Ben, Cristina M.; Tenan, Silvia H. Gallo; Shuhama, Rosana; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Ira, Elisa; Nordentoft, Merete; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Cristobal, Paula; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Gadelha, Ary; Maric, Nadja P.; Andric, Sanja; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mirjanic, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in epidemiological and molecular genetic research into environmental and genetic factors in schizophrenia, but methodological uncertainties remain with regard to validating environmental exposures, and the population risk conferred by individual molecular

  3. Gene Environment Interactions in Women With Breast and Secondary Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Komorowski,J., Bell,A.K., Downie ,I., Mooney,J., Verbeke,C., Bellamy,C., and Keith,W.N. (2005) Markers of adenocarcinoma characteristic of the site of...sensitivity. Am.J.Clin.Pathol., 123, 9-12. 107. Esteller,M., Corn ,P.G., Baylin,S.B., and Herman,J.G. (2001) A gene hypermethylation profile of human

  4. Coronary heart disease risk : family history and gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes research into lifestyle, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie the increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with a family history of this disorder. The second part of this thesis describes whether levels of plasma lipids and l

  5. Respiratory effects of endotoxin exposure : Individual susceptibility and gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470882

    2008-01-01

    Endotoxins are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that occur commonly on plants and plant products and as gut commensals. A large variability in airborne endotoxin exposure levels has been measured in a range of agricultural and other occupational environments. Inhalation of endotoxins m

  6. Respiratory effects of endotoxin exposure : Individual susceptibility and gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Endotoxins are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that occur commonly on plants and plant products and as gut commensals. A large variability in airborne endotoxin exposure levels has been measured in a range of agricultural and other occupational environments. Inhalation of endotoxins m

  7. Childhood problem behavior and parental divorce: evidence for gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.C. Robbers (Sylvana); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); A.C. Huizink (Anja); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt (Toos); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Bartels (Meike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The importance of genetic and environmental influences on children's behavioral and emotional problems may vary as a function of environmental exposure. We previously reported that 12-year-olds with divorced parents showed more internalizing and externalizing problems than chi

  8. Gene-environment interplay in the link of friends' and nonfriends' behaviors with children's social reticence in a competitive situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E; Boivin, Michel

    2014-03-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and nonfriends' behaviors and (b) children's social reticence were examined. The sample comprised 466 twin children (i.e., the target children), each of whom was assessed in kindergarten together with a same-sex friend and two nonfriend classmates of either sex. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that children with a genetic disposition for social reticence showed more reticent behavior in the competitive situation and were more likely to affiliate with reticent friends (i.e., rGE). Moreover, a higher level of children's reticent behavior was predicted by their friends' higher social reticence (particularly for girls) and their friends' higher social dominance, independently of children's genetic disposition. Children's social reticence was also predicted by their nonfriends' behaviors. Specifically, children were less reticent when male nonfriends showed high levels of social reticence in the competitive situation, and this was particularly true for children with a genetic disposition for social reticence (i.e., GxE). Moreover, children genetically vulnerable for social reticence seemed to foster dominant behavior in their female nonfriend peers (i.e., rGE). In turn, male nonfriends seemed to be more dominant as soon as the target children were reticent, even if the target children did not have a stable genetic disposition for this behavior.

  9. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  10. Phenomenological analysis of the interacting boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R. L.; Levit, S.

    1982-01-01

    The classical Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model is defined and expressed in terms of the conventional quadrupole variables. This is used in the analyses of the dynamics in the various limits of the model. The purpose is to determine the range and the features of the collective phenomena which the interacting boson model is capable of describing. In the commonly used version of the interacting boson model with one type of the s and d bosons and quartic interactions, this capability has certain limitations and the model should be used with care. A more sophisticated version of the interacting boson model with neutron and proton bosons is not discussed. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Interacting bosons, classical IBM Hamiltonian in quadrupole variables, phenomenological content of the IBM and its limitations.

  11. A review of gene-environment correlations and their implications for autism: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Shantel E; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Jahromi, Laudan B; Valiente, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    A conceptual model is proposed that explains how gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect function in the context of social development in individuals with autism. The review discusses the current state of autism genetic research, including its challenges, such as the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder, and its limitations, such as the lack of interdisciplinary work between geneticists and social scientists. We discuss literature on gene-environment correlations in the context of social development and draw implications for individuals with autism. The review expands upon genes, behaviors, types of environmental exposure, and exogenous variables relevant to social development in individuals on the autism spectrum, and explains these factors in the context of the conceptual model to provide a more in-depth understanding of how the effects of certain genetic variants can be multiplied by the environment to cause largely phenotypic individual differences. Using the knowledge gathered from gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect, we outline novel intervention directions and implications.

  12. Interaction Pattern Analysis in cMOOCs Based on the Connectivist Interaction and Engagement Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Anderson, Terry; Chen, Li; Barbera, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Connectivist learning is interaction-centered learning. A framework describing interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning was constructed using logical reasoning techniques. The framework and analysis was designed to help researchers and learning designers understand and adapt the characteristics and principles of interaction in…

  13. Dynamic Stall Analysis Utilizing Interactive Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Blade-Vortex Interaction (BV[) studies. solkes the two-dimen i,)nal, unsteady, compressible Euler and Napier -Stokes equations in strong conservation...requirements, interactive computer graphics workstations have been evolved to complement the super -computer. Workstation capabilities, in terms of

  14. A typology of affordances: untangling sociomaterial interactions through video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, W.; Mendelson, O.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we untangle the sociomaterial interactions between developers, users, and artifacts by analyzing what types of affordances occur in the interactions between actors and artifacts in the context of group generativity. Hereto, we conducted an in-depth ethnographic and interaction analysis

  15. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...... interactions between proteins and lipids. First, interactions of soluble proteins with membranes and specific lipids were studied, using two proteins: Annexin V and Tma1. The protein was first subjected to a lipid/protein overlay assay to identify candidate interaction partners in a fast and efficient way...

  16. Analysis of Human-Spacesuit Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts sustain injuries of various natures such as finger delamination, joint pain, and redness due to their interaction with the space suit. The role of the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility is to understand the biomechanics, environmental variables, and ergonomics of the suit. This knowledge is then used to make suggestions for improvement in future iterations of the space suit assembly to prevent injuries while allowing astronauts maneuverability, comfort, and tactility. The projects I was involved in were the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit stiffness study and the glove feasibility study. The EMU project looked at the forces exerted on the shoulder, arm, and wrist when subjects performed kinematic tasks with and without a pressurized suit. The glove study consisted of testing three conditions - the Series 4000 glove, the Phase VI glove, and the no glove condition. With more than forty channels of sensor data total, it was critical to develop programs that could analyze data with basic descriptive statistics and generate relevant graphs to help understand what happens within the space suit and glove. In my project I created a Graphical User Interface (GUI) in MATLAB that would help me visualize what each sensor was doing within a task. The GUI is capable of displaying overlain plots and can be synchronized with video. This was helpful during the stiffness testing to visualize how the forces on the arm acted while the subject performed tasks such as shoulder adduction/abduction and bicep curls. The main project of focus, however, was the glove comparison study. I wrote MATLAB programs which generated movies of the strain vectors during specific tasks. I also generated graphs that summarized the differences between each glove for the strain, shear and FSR sensors. Preliminary results indicate that the Phase VI glove places less strain and shear on the hand. Future work includes continued data analysis of surveys and sensor data. In the end

  17. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuesen; Dong, Hua; Luo, Li; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Gang; Reveille, John D; Xiong, Momiao

    2010-09-23

    Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked). The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDRanalysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  18. Information Retrieval Interaction: an Analysis of Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sadoughi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Information searching process is an interactive process; thus users has control on searching process, and they can manage the results of the search process. In this process, user's question became more mature, according to retrieved results. In addition, on the side of the information retrieval system, there are some processes that could not be realized, unless by user. Practically, this issue, is egregious in “Interaction” -i.e. process of user connection to other system elements- and in “Relevance judgment”. This paper had a glance to existence of “Interaction” in information retrieval, in first. Then the tradition model of information retrieval and its strenght and weak points were reviewed. Finally, the current models of interactive information retrieval includes: Belkin episodic model, Ingwersen cognitive model, Sarasevic stratified model, and Spinks interactive feedback model were elucidated.

  19. Analysis of Interaction Factors Between Two Piles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming; CHEN Long-zhu

    2008-01-01

    A rigorous analytical method is presented for calculating the interaction factor between two identical piles subjected to vertical loads. Following the technique proposed by Muki and Sternberg, the problem is decomposed into an extended soil mass and two fictitious piles characterized respectively by Young's modulus of the soil and that of the difference between the pile and soil. The unknown axial forces along fictitious piles are determined by solving a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind, which imposes the compatibility condition that the axial strains of the fictitious piles are equal to those corresponding to the centroidal axes of the extended soil. The real pile forces and displacements can subequally be calculated based on the determined fictitious pile forces, and finally, the desired pile interaction factors may be obtained. Results confirm the validity of the proposed approach and portray the influence of the governing parameters on the pile interaction.

  20. Combinatorial analysis of interacting RNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    Recently several minimum free energy (MFE) folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Their folding targets are interaction structures, that can be represented as diagrams with two backbones drawn horizontally on top of each other such that (1) intramolecular and intermolecular bonds are noncrossing and (2) there is no "zig-zag" configuration. This paper studies joint structures with arc-length at least four in which both, interior and exterior stack-lengths are at least two (no isolated arcs). The key idea in this paper is to consider a new type of shape, based on which joint structures can be derived via symbolic enumeration. Our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures with surprisingly small exponential growth rates. They are of interest in the context of designing prediction algorithms for RNA-RNA interactions.

  1. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesen Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked. The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDR<0.001 and 0.001interacting pairs of SNPs in genes LST1/NCR3, CXCR5/BCL9L, and GLS2, some of which were located in the target sites of miR-324-3p, miR-433, and miR-382, as well as 15 pairs of interacting SNPs that had nonsynonymous substitutions. Our results demonstrated that genome-wide interaction analysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  2. Quantitative timed analysis of interactive Markov chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guck, Dennis; Han, Tingting; Katoen, Joost-Pieter; Neuhausser, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new algorithms and accompanying tool support for analyzing interactive Markov chains (IMCs), a stochastic timed 1 1/2-player game in which delays are exponentially distributed. IMCs are compositional and act as semantic model for engineering formalisms such as AADL and dynamic fa

  3. Interactive Graphics Analysis for Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Program uses higher-order far field drag minimization. Computer program WDES WDEM preliminary aerodynamic design tool for one or two interacting, subsonic lifting surfaces. Subcritical wing design code employs higher-order far-field drag minimization technique. Linearized aerodynamic theory used. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  4. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  5. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  6. Realtime Interaction Analysis of Social Interplay in a Multimodal Musical-Sonic Interaction Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the analysis of social interplay among users in a multimodal interaction and musical performance situation. The approach consists of a combined method of realtime sensor data analysis for the description and interpretation of player gestures and video micro......-analysis methods used to describe the interaction situation and the context in which the social interplay takes place. This combined method is used in an iterative process, where the design of interactive games with musical-sonic feedback is improved according to newly discovered understandings and interpretations...

  7. Transcriptome analysis of monocyte-HIV interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Huyen

    2010-06-01

    /macrophage dysfunction is involved may only now be emerging or remain yet to be discovered, in particular in view of the limited number of studies focussing on the monocyte response to ART 32. In order to generate novel hypotheses rather than test pre-existing ones in the context of monocyte-HIV interactions, we performed a transcriptome analysis on monocyte samples from patients in different stages of HIV infection and/or combination ART treatment, using a parallel approach of genome-wide microarray analysis and focused gene expression profiling to identify broad areas of monocyte dysfunction and to pinpoint genes which are potentially involved in one or several of these dysfunctions. In particular the factors which are exploited by the monocyte/macrophage to communicate with and/or modulate other immune cells were of interest, as they represent a particularly relevant population 3334 which is a primary target for intervention.

  8. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions....... Discovered interactions were then probed on the level of the membrane using liposome-based assays. In the second part, a transmembrane protein was investigated. Assays to probe activity of the plasma membrane ATPase (Arabidopsis thaliana H+ -ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2)) in single liposomes using both giant...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...

  9. Facilitating Discourse Analysis with Interactive Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Chevalier, F; Collins, C; Balakrishnan, R

    2012-12-01

    A discourse parser is a natural language processing system which can represent the organization of a document based on a rhetorical structure tree-one of the key data structures enabling applications such as text summarization, question answering and dialogue generation. Computational linguistics researchers currently rely on manually exploring and comparing the discourse structures to get intuitions for improving parsing algorithms. In this paper, we present DAViewer, an interactive visualization system for assisting computational linguistics researchers to explore, compare, evaluate and annotate the results of discourse parsers. An iterative user-centered design process with domain experts was conducted in the development of DAViewer. We report the results of an informal formative study of the system to better understand how the proposed visualization and interaction techniques are used in the real research environment.

  10. Interactive visualization and analysis of transitional flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gregory P; Calo, Victor M; Gaither, Kelly P

    2008-01-01

    A stand-alone visualization application has been developed by a multi-disciplinary, collaborative team with the sole purpose of creating an interactive exploration environment allowing turbulent flow researchers to experiment and validate hypotheses using visualization. This system has specific optimizations made in data management, caching computations, and visualization allowing for the interactive exploration of datasets on the order of 1TB in size. Using this application, the user (co-author Calo) is able to interactively visualize and analyze all regions of a transitional flow volume, including the laminar, transitional and fully turbulent regions. The underlying goal of the visualizations produced from these transitional flow simulations is to localize turbulent spots in the laminar region of the boundary layer, determine under which conditions they form, and follow their evolution. The initiation of turbulent spots, which ultimately lead to full turbulence, was located via a proposed feature detection condition and verified by experimental results. The conditions under which these turbulent spots form and coalesce are validated and presented.

  11. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  12. Gene-Environment Interplay in Physical, Psychological, and Cognitive Domains in Mid to Late Adulthood: Is APOE a Variability Gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Chandra A; Gatz, Margaret; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene; Dahl Aslan, Anna K; Kaprio, Jaakko; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kremen, William S; Krueger, Robert; McGue, Matt; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2016-01-01

    Despite emerging interest in gene-environment interaction (GxE) effects, there is a dearth of studies evaluating its potential relevance apart from specific hypothesized environments and biometrical variance trends. Using a monozygotic within-pair approach, we evaluated evidence of G×E for body mass index (BMI), depressive symptoms, and cognition (verbal, spatial, attention, working memory, perceptual speed) in twin studies from four countries. We also evaluated whether APOE is a 'variability gene' across these measures and whether it partly represents the 'G' in G×E effects. In all three domains, G×E effects were pervasive across country and gender, with small-to-moderate effects. Age-cohort trends were generally stable for BMI and depressive symptoms; however, they were variable-with both increasing and decreasing age-cohort trends-for different cognitive measures. Results also suggested that APOE may represent a 'variability gene' for depressive symptoms and spatial reasoning, but not for BMI or other cognitive measures. Hence, additional genes are salient beyond APOE.

  13. PIC. Profile of Interaction in the Classroom. A Quick Feedback of Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ellen

    The Profile of Interaction in the Classroom (PIC) is a short-cut method of interaction analysis that can provide the quick feedback essential to effective supervision of instruction. And because the PIC contains a record of all the behaviors that occurred in the classroom, as well as the sequence, the data may be used to build a traditional…

  14. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis for Interaction Design Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Social media analytics is an emerging skill for organizations. Currently, developers are exploring ways to create tools for simplifying social media analysis. These tools tend to focus on gathering data, and using systems to make it meaningful. However, we contend that making social media data...... meaningful is by nature a human-computer interaction problem. We examine this problem around the emerging field of sentiment analysis, exploring criteria for designing sentiment analysis systems based in Human Computer interaction, HCI. We contend that effective sentiment analysis affects audience analysis...

  15. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis for Interaction Design Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Social media analytics is an emerging skill for organizations. Currently, developers are exploring ways to create tools for simplifying social media analysis. These tools tend to focus on gathering data, and using systems to make it meaningful. However, we contend that making social media data...... meaningful is by nature a human-computer interaction problem. We examine this problem around the emerging field of sentiment analysis, exploring criteria for designing sentiment analysis systems based in Human Computer interaction, HCI. We contend that effective sentiment analysis affects audience analysis......, and can serve as a basis for communication design choices that support strategic relationship goals for organizations....

  16. Plasma diagnostics surface analysis and interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auciello, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Plasmas and their interaction with materials have become subjects of major interest because of their importance in modern forefront technologies such as microelectronics, fusion energy, and space. Plasmas are used in microelectronics to process semiconductors (etching of patterns for microcircuits, plasma-induced deposition of thin films, etc.); plasmas produce deleterious erosion effects on surfaces of materials used for fusion devices and spaceships exposed to the low earth environment.Diagnostics of plasmas and materials exposed to them are fundamental to the understanding of the physical a

  17. Linguistic feature analysis for protein interaction extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Chris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of the amount of publicly available reports on biomedical experimental results has recently caused a boost of text mining approaches for protein interaction extraction. Most approaches rely implicitly or explicitly on linguistic, i.e., lexical and syntactic, data extracted from text. However, only few attempts have been made to evaluate the contribution of the different feature types. In this work, we contribute to this evaluation by studying the relative importance of deep syntactic features, i.e., grammatical relations, shallow syntactic features (part-of-speech information and lexical features. For this purpose, we use a recently proposed approach that uses support vector machines with structured kernels. Results Our results reveal that the contribution of the different feature types varies for the different data sets on which the experiments were conducted. The smaller the training corpus compared to the test data, the more important the role of grammatical relations becomes. Moreover, deep syntactic information based classifiers prove to be more robust on heterogeneous texts where no or only limited common vocabulary is shared. Conclusion Our findings suggest that grammatical relations play an important role in the interaction extraction task. Moreover, the net advantage of adding lexical and shallow syntactic features is small related to the number of added features. This implies that efficient classifiers can be built by using only a small fraction of the features that are typically being used in recent approaches.

  18. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  19. Interpersonal Communication Skills: The Marriage of Interaction Analysis and Microcounseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Curtis H.

    1976-01-01

    Describes microcounseling and interaction analysis, provides a reationale for the "marriage" of these two successful innovations, and demonstrates how the combination can provide an objective and systematic technology for the development of effective interpersonal communication skills.

  20. Estimating risks and relative risks in case-base studies under the assumptions of gene-environment independence and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tina Tsz-Ting; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Many diseases result from the interactions between genes and the environment. An efficient method has been proposed for a case-control study to estimate the genetic and environmental main effects and their interactions, which exploits the assumptions of gene-environment independence and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. To estimate the absolute and relative risks, one needs to resort to an alternative design: the case-base study. In this paper, the authors show how to analyze a case-base study under the above dual assumptions. This approach is based on a conditional logistic regression of case-counterfactual controls matched data. It can be easily fitted with readily available statistical packages. When the dual assumptions are met, the method is approximately unbiased and has adequate coverage probabilities for confidence intervals. It also results in smaller variances and shorter confidence intervals as compared with a previous method for a case-base study which imposes neither assumption.

  1. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha R. Hathwar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  2. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  3. Toward Interactive Scenario Analysis and Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle, Thomas R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Interactive Systems, Simulations, and Analysis; Summers, Kenneth Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Interactive Systems, Simulations, and Analysis; Jungels, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Interactive Systems, Simulations, and Analysis; Oppel III, Fred J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Interactive Systems, Simulations, and Analysis

    2015-01-01

    As Modeling and Simulation (M&S) tools have matured, their applicability and importance have increased across many national security challenges. In particular, they provide a way to test how something may behave without the need to do real world testing. However, current and future changes across several factors including capabilities, policy, and funding are driving a need for rapid response or evaluation in ways that many M&S tools cannot address. Issues around large data, computational requirements, delivery mechanisms, and analyst involvement already exist and pose significant challenges. Furthermore, rising expectations, rising input complexity, and increasing depth of analysis will only increase the difficulty of these challenges. In this study we examine whether innovations in M&S software coupled with advances in ''cloud'' computing and ''big-data'' methodologies can overcome many of these challenges. In particular, we propose a simple, horizontally-scalable distributed computing environment that could provide the foundation (i.e. ''cloud'') for next-generation M&S-based applications based on the notion of ''parallel multi-simulation''. In our context, the goal of parallel multi- simulation is to consider as many simultaneous paths of execution as possible. Therefore, with sufficient resources, the complexity is dominated by the cost of single scenario runs as opposed to the number of runs required. We show the feasibility of this architecture through a stable prototype implementation coupled with the Umbra Simulation Framework [6]. Finally, we highlight the utility through multiple novel analysis tools and by showing the performance improvement compared to existing tools.

  4. Adding Graphical Interactive FITS Image Interaction to Data Analysis in IPython Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, E.

    2014-05-01

    IPython notebooks are becoming a popular and viable approach for documenting data analysis procedures and helping produce open, reproducible science. Recent developments in the IPython project allow notebooks to be published and viewed on the web, providing a nearly seamless transition from data analysis to publication. In this talk we will review and demonstrate the ipython notebook as a data analysis tool, and show how graphical FITS image interaction can be integrated in the workflow to simplify some cumbersome tasks.

  5. The neutrino interaction analysis chain in OPERA

    CERN Document Server

    Rescigno, Regina

    Th e aim of the OPERA experiment i s to provide a “smoking - gun” proof of neutrino oscillation s, through the detecti on of the appearance signal of ν τ ’s in an initially pure ν μ beam. The beam is produced at CERN, 732 Km fa r from the detector , which is located underground in t he Gran Sasso laboratory. The evidence of the appearance signal will be provided by the detection of the daughter particles produced in the decay of the τ lepton. A micro - metric spatial resolution is needed in order to measure a nd study the topology of the ν τ - induced events. With this goal, n uclear emulsions, the highest resolution tracking detector , were chosen to be the core of the OPERA apparatus. The analysis of the large amount of nuclear emulsions used in the OPERA experime n t has required the development of a new generation of fast automatic mi croscopes , featuring a scanning speed more than one order of magnitude hi g h er than in p...

  6. The nature and limits of interactive communication: A philosophical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvor Nordby

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In many modern study programs, teachers and students communicate via internet and other interactive communicative channels. What is the essential nature of this communication? How does interactive communication differ from ordinary face-to-face communication in the most fundamental sense? The article uses conceptual analysis as a philosophical method to explore the intrinsic nature of the concept interactive communication. The aim of this method is to develop a concept definition that matches shared linguistic beliefs about informative examples from internet based communication and information exchange that is central in electronic teaching courses. The article examines several concept definitions and argues in favor of a philosophical information processing analysis of interactive communication. The significance of this analysis has two dimensions. First, it can give teachers and others who are involved in interactive communication a better understanding of the essential differences between interactive and face-toface communication. Second, the analysis can stimulate pedagogical and critical reflection on the nature and limits of internet based communication and electronic teaching tools.

  7. Analysis of Pumphouse RCC Frame Structure for Soil Structure Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr A.S. Thombare

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When structure is built on ground some elements of structure are direct contact with soil. When loads are applied on structure internal forces are developed in both the structure as well as in soil. It results in deformation of both the components which are independent to each other. This are called soil structure interaction. The analysis is done by using (Bentley STAAD.Pro V8i Version 2007 software. The analysis carried out been pump house structure R.C.C. frame structure find out shear force Z direction fixed support and fixed but support for different soil. It concluded that soil structure interaction more affected on fixed base. So overcome the effects of the soil structure interaction on the soft soil, it is important to design the structure to standard loading condition and interaction forces. Thus here concluded that pump house building should be design resist the maximum shear force in fixed base

  8. Analysis and Verification of Service Interaction Protocols - A Brief Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Salaün, Gwen

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and analysis of interactions among services is a crucial issue in Service-Oriented Computing. Composing Web services is a complicated task which requires techniques and tools to verify that the new system will behave correctly. In this paper, we first overview some formal models proposed in the literature to describe services. Second, we give a brief survey of verification techniques that can be used to analyse services and their interaction. Last, we focus on the realizability and conformance of choreographies.

  9. Phase space analysis of some interacting Chaplygin gas models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshudyan, M. [Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Institute for Physical Research, Ashtarak (Armenia); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Laboratory for Theoretical Cosmology, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Myrzakulov, R. [Eurasian National University, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we discuss a phase space analysis of various interacting Chaplygin gas models in general relativity. Linear and nonlinear sign changeable interactions are considered. For each case appropriate late time attractors of field equations are found. The Chaplygin gas is one of the dark fluids actively considered in modern cosmology due to the fact that it is a joint model of dark energy and dark matter. (orig.)

  10. Why does parental language input style predict child language development? A twin study of gene-environment correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Philip S; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E; Plomin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    There are well-established correlations between parental input style and child language development, which have typically been interpreted as evidence that the input style causes, or influences the rate of, changes in child language. We present evidence from a large twin study (TEDS; 8395 pairs for this report) that there are also likely to be both child-to-parent effects and shared genetic effects on parent and child. Self-reported parental language style at child age 3 and age 4 was aggregated into an 'informal language stimulation' factor and a 'corrective feedback' factor at each age; the former was positively correlated with child language concurrently and longitudinally at 3, 4, and 4.5 years, whereas the latter was weakly and negatively correlated. Both parental input factors were moderately heritable, as was child language. Longitudinal bivariate analysis showed that the correlation between the language stimulation factor and child language was significantly and moderately due to shared genes. There is some suggestive evidence from longitudinal phenotypic analysis that the prediction from parental language stimulation to child language includes both evocative and passive gene-environment correlation, with the latter playing a larger role. The reader will understand why correlations between parental language and rate of child language are by themselves ambiguous, and how twin studies can clarify the relationship. The reader will also understand that, based on the present study, at least two aspects of parental language style - informal language stimulation and corrective feedback - have substantial genetic influence, and that for informal language stimulation, a substantial portion of the prediction to child language represents the effect of shared genes on both parent and child. It will also be appreciated that these basic research findings do not imply that parental language input style is unimportant or that interventions cannot be effective. Copyright

  11. Distributed and interactive visual analysis of omics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Yehia; Berven, Frode S; Jonassen, Inge; Petersen, Kjell; Barsnes, Harald

    2015-11-01

    The amount of publicly shared proteomics data has grown exponentially over the last decade as the solutions for sharing and storing the data have improved. However, the use of the data is often limited by the manner of which it is made available. There are two main approaches: download and inspect the proteomics data locally, or interact with the data via one or more web pages. The first is limited by having to download the data and thus requires local computational skills and resources, while the latter most often is limited in terms of interactivity and the analysis options available. A solution is to develop web-based systems supporting distributed and fully interactive visual analysis of proteomics data. The use of a distributed architecture makes it possible to perform the computational analysis at the server, while the results of the analysis can be displayed via a web browser without the need to download the whole dataset. Here the challenges related to developing such systems for omics data will be discussed. Especially how this allows for multiple connected interactive visual displays of omics dataset in a web-based setting, and the benefits this provide for computational analysis of proteomics data.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics.

  12. Recent applications of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Feng-Qing; Ge, Liya; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Xia, Zhi-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, an alternative liquid chromatography mode, is of particular interest in separating hydrophilic and polar ionic compounds. Compared with traditional liquid chromatography techniques, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography offers specific advantages mainly including: (1) relatively green and water-soluble mobile phase composition, which enhances the solubility of hydrophilic and polar ionic compounds; (2) no need for ion-pairing reagents and high content of organic solvent, which benefits mass spectrometry detection; (3) high orthogonality to reverse-phase liquid chromatography, well adapted to two-dimensional liquid chromatography for complicated samples. Therefore, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography has been rapidly developed in many areas over the past decades. This review summarizes the recent progress (from 2012 to July 2016) of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis, with the focus on detecting chemical drugs in various matrices, charactering active compounds of natural products and assessing biotherapeutics through typical structure unit. Moreover, the retention mechanism and behavior of analytes in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography as well as some novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography columns used for pharmaceutical analysis are also described.

  13. Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interactions between ketoprofen and paracetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hai-Xia; Liu, Jin; Kong, Hui; Liu, Yan; Mei, Xing-Guo

    2007-02-28

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antinociceptive interaction between paracetamol and ketoprofen. The antinociceptive effect of oral administration of the drugs alone or in combination was evaluated using the mouse abdominal constriction test. The data were interpreted by isobolographic analysis to establish the nature of the interaction. The effective dose that produced 50% antinociception (ED(50,mix)) was calculated from the log dose-response curve of fixed-ratio combinations of paracetamol with ketoprofen. This ED(50,mix) was compared to the theoretical additive ED(50,add) by isobolographic analysis. The experimental ED(50,mix) was found to be significantly smaller than the theoretically calculated ED(50,add), indicating a synergistic antinociceptive interaction between ketoprofen and paracetamol. Pharmacokinetic studies were carried out with mice treated with combined ketoprofen (12 mg/kg) and paracetamol (36 mg/kg). Plasma levels of ketoprofen were not changed by concurrent paracetamol treatment, and similarly no statistically significant difference was observed between paracetamol alone and the combination with ketoprofen. The pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the combination of ketoprofen with paracetamol exerted a synergistic (supra-additive) interaction that was not associated with a pharmacokinetic interaction. The results of this study demonstrate significant synergism between ketoprofen and paracetamol.

  14. An Analysis of Interaction Patterns in the Focus Group Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavora Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the analysis of a focus group interview of a moderator and a group of undergraduate students on the topic of self-regulation of learning. The purpose of the investigation was to identify interaction patterns that appeared in the talk of participants and the moderator. In the stream of communication two rudimentary interaction patterns were recognized. The first pattern was named the Catalogue. It consists of a sequence of turns of participants who respond to a request of the moderator and who provide their answers, one by one, without reacting on the content of the previous partner(s talk. The other interaction pattern was called the Domino. In this pattern participants respond to each other. The Catalogue pattern prevailed in the interview. Alongside with identification of patterns of interaction the study demonstrated the functions of the common ground and its accomplishment in the talk of the moderator and participants.

  15. Morphological Analysis and Interaction of Chlorophyll and BSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe D. S. Gorza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and drugs, which can lead to formation of stable drug-protein complexes, have important implications on several processes related to human health. These interactions can affect, for instance, free concentration, biological activity, and metabolism of the drugs in the blood stream. Here, we report on the UV-Visible spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA with chlorophyll (Chl in aqueous solution under physiological conditions. Binding constants at different temperatures—obtained by using the Benesi-Hildebrand equation—were found to be of the same order of magnitude (~104 M−1 indicating low affinity of Chl with BSA. We have found a hyperchromism, which suggested an interaction between BSA and Chl occurring through conformational changes of BSA caused by exposition of tryptophan to solvent. Films from BSA and Chl obtained at different Chl concentrations showed fractal structures, which were characterized by fractal dimension calculated from microscopic image analysis.

  16. Weighted protein interaction network analysis of frontotemporal dementia\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Lovering, Ruth C.; Hardy, John; Lewis, Patrick A.; Manzoni, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The genetic analysis of complex disorders has undoubtedly led to the identification of a wealth of associations between genes and specific traits. However, moving from genetics to biochemistry one gene at a time has, to date, rather proved inefficient and under-powered to comprehensively explain the molecular basis of phenotypes. Here we present a novel approach, weighted protein−protein\\ud interaction network analysis (W-PPI-NA), to highlight key functional players within relevant biological...

  17. Links between Friends' Physical Aggression and Adolescents' Physical Aggression: What Happens If Gene-Environment Correlations are Controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to deviant friends has been found to be a powerful source of influence on children's and adolescents' aggressive behavior. However, the contribution of deviant friends may have been overestimated because of a possible non-accounted gene-environment correlation (rGE). In this study, we used a cross-lagged design to test whether friends'…

  18. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  19. Interaction Analysis in Foreign Language Teaching: A Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Maria Antonieta Medina

    A system for observing and coding verbal interchanges between the teacher and his pupils, at all instructional levels, is described in this study. The system, widely known as the Flanders System of Interaction Analysis, is reviewed in terms of its effect on the classroom behavior of teachers and on student attitudes. The application of the…

  20. Interactive exploratory data analysis tool in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Furcila

    2015-04-01

    Thus, MorExAn provide us the possibility to relate histopathological data with neuropsychological and clinical variables. The aid of this interactive visualization tool brings us the possibility to find unexpected conclusions beyond the insight provided by simple statistics analysis, as well as to improve neuroscientists’ productivity.

  1. Pomeron-Odderon Interactions: A Functional RG Flow Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vacca, Gian Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for an effective field theory which could help to understand some non perturbative feature of the QCD in the Regge limit, we consider a Reggeon Field Theory (RFT) for both Pomeron and Odderon interactions and perform an analysys of the critical theory using functional renormalization group techniques, unveiling a novel symmetry structure.

  2. Stochastic Process Analysis of Interactive Discourse in Early Counseling Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Phillips, Susan D.

    1984-01-01

    Examined patterns of interactive discourse to suggest how client and counselor establish a working alliance in their early interviews. Based on classification of 312 conversational turns from 14 dyads, a stochastic analysis was conducted. Results showed the sequences of talk were highly stable and predictable. (JAC)

  3. I PASS: an interactive policy analysis simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug Olson; Con Schallau; Wilbur Maki

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive policy analysis simulation system(IPASS) that can be used to analyze the long-term economic and demographic effects of alternative forest resource management policies. The IPASS model is a dynamic analytical tool that forecasts growth and development of an economy. It allows the user to introduce changes in selected parameters based...

  4. Moving shape analysis and control applications to fluid structure interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Moubachir, Marwan

    2006-01-01

    Problems involving the evolution of two- and three-dimensional domains arise in many areas of science and engineering. Emphasizing an Eulerian approach, Moving Shape Analysis and Control: Applications to Fluid Structure Interactions presents valuable tools for the mathematical analysis of evolving domains. The book illustrates the efficiency of the tools presented through different examples connected to the analysis of noncylindrical partial differential equations (PDEs), such as Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids in moving domains. The authors first provide all of the details of existence and uniqueness of the flow in both strong and weak cases. After establishing several important principles and methods, they devote several chapters to demonstrating Eulerian evolution and derivation tools for the control of systems involving fluids and solids. The book concludes with the boundary control of fluid-structure interaction systems, followed by helpful appendices that review some of the advanced m...

  5. Circular Dichroism for the Analysis of Protein-DNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Garry; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kneale, Geoffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide information on the practical aspects of circular dichroism (CD) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) in protein-nucleic acids interaction solution studies. The chapter will describe the guidelines appropriate to designing experiments and conducting correct data interpretation, the use of both benchtop and synchrotron CD approaches is discussed and the advantages of SRCD outlined. Further information and a good general review of the field a can be found in Gray (Circular Dichroism of protein-nucleic acid interactions. In: Fasman GD (ed) Circular dichroism and the conformational analysis of biomolecules. Plenum Press, New York. pp 469-500, 1996).

  6. Biospecific protein immobilization for rapid analysis of weak protein interactions using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengali, Aditya N; Tessier, Peter M

    2009-10-01

    "Reversible" protein interactions govern diverse biological behavior ranging from intracellular transport and toxic protein aggregation to protein crystallization and inactivation of protein therapeutics. Much less is known about weak protein interactions than their stronger counterparts since they are difficult to characterize, especially in a parallel format (in contrast to a sequential format) necessary for high-throughput screening. We have recently introduced a highly efficient approach of characterizing protein self-association, namely self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS; Tessier et al., 2008; J Am Chem Soc 130:3106-3112). This approach exploits the separation-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles to detect weak self-interactions between proteins immobilized on nanoparticles. A limitation of our previous work is that differences in the sequence and structure of proteins can lead to significant differences in their affinity to adsorb to nanoparticle surfaces, which complicates analysis of the corresponding protein self-association behavior. In this work we demonstrate a highly specific approach for coating nanoparticles with proteins using biotin-avidin interactions to generate protein-nanoparticle conjugates that report protein self-interactions through changes in their optical properties. Using lysozyme as a model protein that is refractory to characterization by conventional SINS, we demonstrate that surface Plasmon wavelengths for gold-avidin-lysozyme conjugates over a range of solution conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength) are well correlated with lysozyme osmotic second virial coefficient measurements. Since SINS requires orders of magnitude less protein and time than conventional methods (e.g., static light scattering), we envision this approach will find application in large screens of protein self-association aimed at either preventing (e.g., protein aggregation) or promoting (e.g., protein crystallization) these

  7. Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  8. Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Raducanu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  9. Analysis on liquid metal corrosion-oxidation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinsuo [International and Nuclear System Engineering, MS K-575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: jszhang@lanl.gov; Li Ning [International and Nuclear System Engineering, MS K-575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    The interaction between growing surface oxides and flowing liquid metals is of importance in many high temperature applications such as coolant systems using liquid lead or lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) in advanced nuclear energy systems. The impact of flow can manifest through particle erosion, mass transfer corrosion, stress scrape, etc. In the present study, we consider the continuous flow-induced corrosion by dissolution of steel components or dissociation of surface oxides. In oxygen controlled liquid lead or LBE systems, steels exposed to the liquid metals are subject to both oxidation and flow-induced corrosion. It is necessary and important to understand the corrosion-oxidation interactions for selecting structural materials and optimizing operating conditions. A comprehensive theoretical analysis of the key corrosion-oxidation interactions is presented here. Possible corrosion-oxidation mechanisms are considered and the corrosion-oxidation interactions are classified into different regimes. In each regime, a theoretical model is given. Based on the analysis, corrosion-oxidation maps are developed for selecting and optimizing the operation conditions for liquid lead-alloy systems.

  10. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  11. Interaction Analysis of a Two-Component System Using Nanodiscs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hörnschemeyer

    Full Text Available Two-component systems are the major means by which bacteria couple adaptation to environmental changes. All utilize a phosphorylation cascade from a histidine kinase to a response regulator, and some also employ an accessory protein. The system-wide signaling fidelity of two-component systems is based on preferential binding between the signaling proteins. However, information on the interaction kinetics between membrane embedded histidine kinase and its partner proteins is lacking. Here, we report the first analysis of the interactions between the full-length membrane-bound histidine kinase CpxA, which was reconstituted in nanodiscs, and its cognate response regulator CpxR and accessory protein CpxP. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with interaction map analysis, the affinity of membrane-embedded CpxA for CpxR was quantified, and found to increase by tenfold in the presence of ATP, suggesting that a considerable portion of phosphorylated CpxR might be stably associated with CpxA in vivo. Using microscale thermophoresis, the affinity between CpxA in nanodiscs and CpxP was determined to be substantially lower than that between CpxA and CpxR. Taken together, the quantitative interaction data extend our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism used by two-component systems.

  12. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  13. Visual exploration and analysis of human-robot interaction rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Boyles, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel interaction paradigm for the visual exploration, manipulation and analysis of human-robot interaction (HRI) rules; our development is implemented using a visual programming interface and exploits key techniques drawn from both information visualization and visual data mining to facilitate the interaction design and knowledge discovery process. HRI is often concerned with manipulations of multi-modal signals, events, and commands that form various kinds of interaction rules. Depicting, manipulating and sharing such design-level information is a compelling challenge. Furthermore, the closed loop between HRI programming and knowledge discovery from empirical data is a relatively long cycle. This, in turn, makes design-level verification nearly impossible to perform in an earlier phase. In our work, we exploit a drag-and-drop user interface and visual languages to support depicting responsive behaviors from social participants when they interact with their partners. For our principal test case of gaze-contingent HRI interfaces, this permits us to program and debug the robots' responsive behaviors through a graphical data-flow chart editor. We exploit additional program manipulation interfaces to provide still further improvement to our programming experience: by simulating the interaction dynamics between a human and a robot behavior model, we allow the researchers to generate, trace and study the perception-action dynamics with a social interaction simulation to verify and refine their designs. Finally, we extend our visual manipulation environment with a visual data-mining tool that allows the user to investigate interesting phenomena such as joint attention and sequential behavioral patterns from multiple multi-modal data streams. We have created instances of HRI interfaces to evaluate and refine our development paradigm. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first program manipulation paradigm that integrates visual programming

  14. Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model: Dynamical System Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Golchin, Hanif; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    We study the impacts of interaction between dark matter and dark energy in the context of ghost dark energy model. Using the dynamical system analysis, we obtain the fixed points of the system for different types of interactions while the universe is filled with radiation, matter (including dark matter and luminous matter) and dark energy components. We consider the stability of the fixed points in details for different cases. In all cases there is an unstable matter dominated epoch and a stable late time dark energy dominated phase. However, we find that adding the linear interaction, the evolution of ghost dark energy model does not contain the radiation dominated epoch in the early times which is a necessary point in any cosmic model. This failure resolved when we add the non-linear interaction to the model. We also find an upper bound for the value of the coupling constant of the interaction between dark matter and dark energy as b < 0.57 . This bound is necessary to have a decelerating and unstable ma...

  15. Nexus analysis and interaction in healthcare educational practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon’s notions...... on 'navigate' and 'engage' in the field provided a frame to combine both discourse (Edley, 2014) document (Prior, 2003) and interaction analysis (Jordan & Henderson, 1995; Sacks, 1992) in order to grasp the crucial social actors (nurses, students, patients, relatives) and their daily routinized practice....... The paper shows how a combination of (video) observations, written interviews and workshops can be a way to obtain knowledge about the practice that consists of members generalizations, neutral observations, individual experiences and interaction with members (Scollon & Scollon 2004, p. 158)...

  16. Analysis of linear and nonlinear genotype × environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Cai eYang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The usual analysis of genotype × environment interaction (GxE is based on the linear regression of genotypic performance on environmental changes (e.g., classic stability analysis. This linear model may often lead to lumping together of the nonlinear responses to the whole range of environmental changes from suboptimal and superoptimal conditions, thereby lowering the power of detecting GxE variation. On the other hand, the GxE is present when the magnitude of the genetic effect differs across the range of environmental conditions regardless of whether the response to environmental changes is linear or nonlinear. The objectives of this study are: (i explore the use of four commonly used nonlinear functions (logistic, parabola, normal and Cauchy functions for modeling nonlinear genotypic responses to environmental changes and (ii to investigate the difference in the magnitude of estimated genetic effects under different environmental conditions. The use of nonlinear functions was illustrated through the analysis of one data set taken from barley cultivar trials in Alberta, Canada (Data A and the examination of change in effect sizes is through the analysis another data set taken from the North America Barley Genome Mapping Project (Data B. The analysis of Data A showed that the Cauchy function captured an average of >40% of total GxE variation whereas the logistic function captured less GxE variation than the linear function. The analysis of Data B showed that genotypic responses were largely linear and that strong QTL × environment interaction existed as the positions, sizes and directions of QTL detected differed in poor vs. good environments. We conclude that (i the nonlinear functions should be considered when analyzing multi-environmental trials with a wide range of environmental variation and (ii QTL × environment interaction can arise from the difference in effect sizes across environments.

  17. Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a Bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate Bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more natu...

  18. Deformed Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble Analysis of the Interacting Boson Model

    CERN Document Server

    Pato, M P; Lima, C L; Hussein, M S; Alhassid, Y

    1994-01-01

    A Deformed Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (DGOE) which interpolates between the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble and a Poissonian Ensemble is constructed. This new ensemble is then applied to the analysis of the chaotic properties of the low lying collective states of nuclei described by the Interacting Boson Model (IBM). This model undergoes a transition order-chaos-order from the $SU(3)$ limit to the $O(6)$ limit. Our analysis shows that the quantum fluctuations of the IBM Hamiltonian, both of the spectrum and the eigenvectors, follow the expected behaviour predicted by the DGOE when one goes from one limit to the other.

  19. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  20. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  1. Data Analysis through a Generalized Interactive Computer Animation Method (DATICAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, J.N.; Schweider, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    DATICAM is an interactive computer animation method designed to aid in the analysis of nuclear research data. DATICAM was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG and G Idaho, Inc. INEL analysts use DATICAM to produce computer codes that are better able to predict the behavior of nuclear power reactors. In addition to increased code accuracy, DATICAM has saved manpower and computer costs. DATICAM has been generalized to assist in the data analysis of virtually any data-producing dynamic process.

  2. Data analysis through interactive computer animation method (DATICAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, J.N.; Schwieder, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    DATICAM is an interactive computer animation method designed to aid in the analysis of nuclear research data. DATICAM was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG and G Idaho, Inc. INEL analysts use DATICAM to produce computer codes that are better able to predict the behavior of nuclear power reactors. In addition to increased code accuracy, DATICAM has saved manpower and computer costs. DATICAM has been generalized to assist in the data analysis of virtually any data-producing dynamic process.

  3. Interactive Safety Analysis Framework of Autonomous Intelligent Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui You Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 100,000 people were killed and around 2.6 million injured in road accidents in the People’s Republic of China (PRC, that is four to eight times that of developed countries, equivalent to 6.2 mortality per 10 thousand vehicles—the highest rate in the world. There are more than 1,700 fatalities and 840,000 injuries yearly due to vehicle crashes off public highways. In this paper, we proposed a interactive safety situation and threat analysis framework based on driver behaviour and vehicle dynamics risk analysis based on ISO26262…

  4. Analysis of the interaction of participants freight forwarding system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo Popovych

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Main goal of this work is the analysis of the interaction of participants of freight forwarding activities. Research methods included analysis of scientific literature, theory of systems and systems analysis, methods of induction and deduction. As sources of information used and applied work of fundamental importance known foreign and local scientists and regulatory and legislative documents of Ukraine for the state transport policy. In the article the basic interactions of participants of freight forwarding activities. Classified components freight forwarding services. Assign the concept freight forwarding system and its aim. Established element and forms of cooperation in the freight forwarding system. The main task of forwarding companies are organizing, coordinating and ensuring the delivery from shipper to consignee. Freight forwarding company responsible for the timely delivery of the goods on the condition of preservation of the quantity and quality specified time conditions. Currently used methods are uneffective decision-making, leading to losses. These circumstances require improvement methodology management of freight forwarding companies. This is possible only using modern mathematical methods and information technologies that will improve the operation of freight forwarding companies. The article presents a theoretical exposition of the basic processes of interaction between participants in freight forwarding system. The article may be of interest to specialists of freight forwarding companies.

  5. Probability and sensitivity analysis of machine foundation and soil interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Králik J., jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the possibility of the sensitivity and probabilistic analysis of the reliability of the machine foundation depending on variability of the soil stiffness, structure geometry and compressor operation. The requirements to design of the foundation under rotating machines increased due to development of calculation method and computer tools. During the structural design process, an engineer has to consider problems of the soil-foundation and foundation-machine interaction from the safety, reliability and durability of structure point of view. The advantages and disadvantages of the deterministic and probabilistic analysis of the machine foundation resistance are discussed. The sensitivity of the machine foundation to the uncertainties of the soil properties due to longtime rotating movement of machine is not negligible for design engineers. On the example of compressor foundation and turbine fy. SIEMENS AG the affectivity of the probabilistic design methodology was presented. The Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS simulation method for the analysis of the compressor foundation reliability was used on program ANSYS. The 200 simulations for five load cases were calculated in the real time on PC. The probabilistic analysis gives us more complex information about the soil-foundation-machine interaction as the deterministic analysis.

  6. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Xie, Jing; Lipford, Heather Richter; Chu, Bill

    2014-07-01

    Many security incidents are caused by software developers' failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases.

  7. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many security incidents are caused by software developers’ failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases.

  8. DOSCHEDA: a web application for interactive chemoproteomics data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Contrino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Mass Spectrometry (MS based chemoproteomics has recently become a main tool to identify and quantify cellular target protein interactions with ligands/drugs in drug discovery. The complexity associated with these new types of data requires scientists with a limited computational background to perform systematic data quality controls as well as to visualize the results derived from the analysis to enable rapid decision making. To date, there are no readily accessible platforms specifically designed for chemoproteomics data analysis. Results We developed a Shiny-based web application named DOSCHEDA (Down Stream Chemoproteomics Data Analysis to assess the quality of chemoproteomics experiments, to filter peptide intensities based on linear correlations between replicates, and to perform statistical analysis based on the experimental design. In order to increase its accessibility, DOSCHEDA is designed to be used with minimal user input and it does not require programming knowledge. Typical inputs can be protein fold changes or peptide intensities obtained from Proteome Discover, MaxQuant or other similar software. DOSCHEDA aggregates results from bioinformatics analyses performed on the input dataset into a dynamic interface, it encompasses interactive graphics and enables customized output reports. Conclusions DOSCHEDA is implemented entirely in R language. It can be launched by any system with R installed, including Windows, Mac OS and Linux distributions. DOSCHEDA is hosted on a shiny-server at https://doscheda.shinyapps.io/doscheda and is also available as a Bioconductor package (http://www.bioconductor.org/.

  9. Automatic Feature Interaction Analysis in PacoSuite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Vanderperren

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we build upon previous work that aims at recuperating aspect oriented ideas into component based software development. In that research, a composition adapter was proposed in order to capture crosscutting concerns in the PacoSuite component based methodology. A composition adapter is visually applied onto a given component composition and the changes it describes are automatically applied. Stacking multiple composition adapters onto the same component composition can however lead to unpredictable and undesired side-effects. In this paper, we propose a solution for this issue, widely known as the feature interaction problem. We present a classification of different interaction levels among composition adapters and the algorithms required to verify them. The proposed algorithms are however of exponential nature and depend on both the composition adapters and the component composition as a whole. In order to enhance the performance of our feature interaction analysis, we present a set of theorems that define the interaction levels solely in terms of the properties of the composition adapters themselves.

  10. Analysis of human emotion in human-robot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blar, Noraidah; Jafar, Fairul Azni; Abdullah, Nurhidayu; Muhammad, Mohd Nazrin; Kassim, Anuar Muhamed

    2015-05-01

    There is vast application of robots in human's works such as in industry, hospital, etc. Therefore, it is believed that human and robot can have a good collaboration to achieve an optimum result of work. The objectives of this project is to analyze human-robot collaboration and to understand humans feeling (kansei factors) when dealing with robot that robot should adapt to understand the humans' feeling. Researches currently are exploring in the area of human-robot interaction with the intention to reduce problems that subsist in today's civilization. Study had found that to make a good interaction between human and robot, first it is need to understand the abilities of each. Kansei Engineering in robotic was used to undergo the project. The project experiments were held by distributing questionnaire to students and technician. After that, the questionnaire results were analyzed by using SPSS analysis. Results from the analysis shown that there are five feelings which significant to the human in the human-robot interaction; anxious, fatigue, relaxed, peaceful, and impressed.

  11. Improved statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Masao; Cordell, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Wu and colleagues [1] proposed two novel statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis using case/control or case-only data. In computer simulations, their proposed case/control statistic outperformed competing approaches, including the fast-epistasis option in PLINK and logistic regression analysis under the correct model; however, reasons for its superior performance were not fully explored. Here we investigate the theoretical properties and performance of Wu et al.'s proposed statistics and explain why, in some circumstances, they outperform competing approaches. Unfortunately, we find minor errors in the formulae for their statistics, resulting in tests that have higher than nominal type 1 error. We also find minor errors in PLINK's fast-epistasis and case-only statistics, although theory and simulations suggest that these errors have only negligible effect on type 1 error. We propose adjusted versions of all four statistics that, both theoretically and in computer simulations, maintain correct type 1 error rates under the null hypothesis. We also investigate statistics based on correlation coefficients that maintain similar control of type 1 error. Although designed to test specifically for interaction, we show that some of these previously-proposed statistics can, in fact, be sensitive to main effects at one or both loci, particularly in the presence of linkage disequilibrium. We propose two new "joint effects" statistics that, provided the disease is rare, are sensitive only to genuine interaction effects. In computer simulations we find, in most situations considered, that highest power is achieved by analysis under the correct genetic model. Such an analysis is unachievable in practice, as we do not know this model. However, generally high power over a wide range of scenarios is exhibited by our joint effects and adjusted Wu statistics. We recommend use of these alternative or adjusted statistics and urge caution when using Wu et al

  12. Global Interactions Analysis of Epileptic ECoG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Guillermo J.; Sola, Rafael G.; Pastor, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    Localization of the epileptogenic zone is an important issue in epileptology, even though there is not a unique definition of the epileptic focus. The objective of the present study is to test ultrametric analysis to uncover cortical interactions in human epileptic data. Correlation analysis has been carried out over intraoperative Electro-Corticography (ECoG) data in 2 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recordings were obtained using a grid of 20 electrodes (5×4) covering the lateral temporal lobe and a strip of either 4 or 8 electrodes at the mesial temporal lobe. Ultrametric analysis was performed in the averaged final correlation matrices. By using the matrix of linear correlation coefficients and the appropriate metric distance between pairs of electrodes time series, we were able to construct Minimum Spanning Trees (MST). The topological connectivity displayed by these trees gives useful and valuable information regarding physiological and pathological information in the temporal lobe of epileptic patients.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF...... rotational speed (3P effects). The effect of dynamic soil-structure interaction on the rotation of the foundation has also been investigated.......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...

  14. Analysis of crease-wrinkle interaction for thin sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Kyeong Sik [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jenkins, Christopher H. [Montana State University, Bozeman (United States)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, geometrically non-linear post-buckling analyses were performed to study the effect of sheet thickness, deployment angle, and load ratio on the crease-wrinkle interaction. A square sheet configuration with a single transverse crease was modeled using thin shell elements. The analysis proceeded by initially providing a realistic deployed state of a creased membrane sheet. Then an uneven corner loading was applied to introduce wrinkling. The effects of the induced anisotropy from the crease on the fine-scale detail of the wrinkle evolution, as a function of sheet thickness, loading, and crease deployment angle were systematically investigated. Significant differences were found in sheet compliance and crease-wrinkle interaction as these parameters were varied.

  15. Computing and Visualizing Log-linear Analysis Interactively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Valero-Mora

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe a simple program for computing log-linear analysis based on a direct manipulation interface that emphasizes the use of plots for guiding the analysis and evaluating the results obtained. The program described here works as a plugin for ViSta (Young 1997 and receives the name of LoginViSta (for Log-linear analysis in ViSTa. ViSta is a statistical package based on Lisp-Stat. Lisp-Stat is a statistical programming environment developed by Luke Tierney (1990 that features an object-oriented approach for statistical computing and one that allows for The purpose of this paper is to describe a simple program for computing log-linear analysis based on a direct manipulation interface that emphasizes the use of plots for guiding the analysis and evaluating the results obtained. The program described here works as a plugin for ViSta (Young 1997 and receives the name of LoginViSta (for Log-linear analysis in ViSTa. ViSta is a statistical package based on Lisp-Stat. Lisp-Stat is a statistical programming environment developed by Luke Tierney (1990 that features an object-oriented approach for statistical computing and one that allows for Computing and Visualizing Pedro Valero-Mora and Forrest W. Young interactive and dynamic graphs.

  16. Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene-Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many recent studies of serotonin transporter gene by environment effects predicting depression have used stress assessments with undefined or poor psychometric methods, possibly contributing to wide variation in findings. The present study attempted to distinguish between effects of acute and chronic stress to predict depressive…

  17. Neuronal connectivity as a convergent target of gene-environment interactions that confer risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Stamou, Marianna; Streifel, Karin M.; Goines, Paula E; Pamela J Lein

    2012-01-01

    Evidence implicates environmental factors in the pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). However, the identity of specific environmental chemicals that influence ASD risk, severity or treatment outcome remains elusive. The impact of any given environmental exposure likely varies across a population according to individual genetic substrates, and this increases the difficulty of identifying clear associations between exposure and ASD diagnoses. Heritable genetic vulnerabilities may am...

  18. Linkages between Children's and Their Friends' Social and Physical Aggression: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendgen, Mara; Boivin, Michel; Vitaro, Frank; Bukowski, William M.; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Based on a sample of 406 seven-year-old twins, this study examined whether exposure to friends' social or physical aggression, respectively, moderates the effect of heritability on children's own social and physical aggression. Univariate analyses showed that children's own social and physical aggression were significantly explained by genetic…

  19. Gene/Environment Interaction in Atherosclerosis: An Example of Clinical Medicine as Seen from the Evolutionary Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Mertens

    2010-01-01

    The chronic multifactorial disease of atherosclerosis clearly illustrates the Darwinian paradigm. Recent research, combining the effects of genes and environment, has provided surprising clues to the pathogenesis of this major public health problem. This example makes a strong case for recognizing evolution biology as a basic science for medicine.

  20. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  1. Exploration of gene-environment interactions, maternal effects and parent of origin effects in the etiology of hypospadias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, L.F.M. van der; Galesloot, T.E.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Brouwers, M.M.; Shi, M.; Knoers, N.V.; Franke, B.; Roeleveld, N.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypospadias is a common congenital malformation of the male external genitalia. Association studies for single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding steroid 5alpha-reductase, estrogen receptors 1 and 2, and activating transcription factor 3 have been equivocal. We examined whether nonr

  2. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  3. Linkages between Children's and Their Friends' Social and Physical Aggression: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendgen, Mara; Boivin, Michel; Vitaro, Frank; Bukowski, William M.; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Based on a sample of 406 seven-year-old twins, this study examined whether exposure to friends' social or physical aggression, respectively, moderates the effect of heritability on children's own social and physical aggression. Univariate analyses showed that children's own social and physical aggression were significantly explained by genetic…

  4. Physical activity, diet and gene-environment interactions in relation to body mass index and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnehed, Nina; Tynelius, Per; Heitmann, Berit L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between genetic susceptibility to obesity, physical activity (PA), dietary fibre, sugar and fat intakes and 4-year changes in body mass index (BMI) and attained waist circumference (WC) in a cohort of 287 monozygotic and 189...

  5. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Anja; Roger L Milne; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC.

  6. Underlying Mechanisms of Gene-Environment Interactions in Externalizing Behavior: A Systematic Review and Search for Theoretical Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeland, J.; Overbeek, G.; Orobio de Castro, B.; Matthys, W.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, several candidate genes (i.e., MAOA, DRD4, DRD2, DAT1, 5-HTTLPR, and COMT) have been extensively studied as potential moderators of the detrimental effects of postnatal family adversity on child externalizing behaviors, such as aggression and conduct disorder. Many studies on s

  7. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Alison M Dunning; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC.

  8. Fixed point sensitivity analysis of interacting structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, György; Meszéna, Géza; Ostling, Annette

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis of structured populations is a useful tool in population ecology. Historically, methodological development of sensitivity analysis has focused on the sensitivity of eigenvalues in linear matrix models, and on single populations. More recently there have been extensions to the sensitivity of nonlinear models, and to communities of interacting populations. Here we derive a fully general mathematical expression for the sensitivity of equilibrium abundances in communities of interacting structured populations. Our method yields the response of an arbitrary function of the stage class abundances to perturbations of any model parameters. As a demonstration, we apply this sensitivity analysis to a two-species model of ontogenetic niche shift where each species has two stage classes, juveniles and adults. In the context of this model, we demonstrate that our theory is quite robust to violating two of its technical assumptions: the assumption that the community is at a point equilibrium and the assumption of infinitesimally small parameter perturbations. Our results on the sensitivity of a community are also interpreted in a niche theoretical context: we determine how the niche of a structured population is composed of the niches of the individual states, and how the sensitivity of the community depends on niche segregation.

  9. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease.

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE KQML MODEL IN MULTI-AGENT INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海龙; 吴铁军

    2001-01-01

    Our analysis of the KQML(Knowledge Query and Manipulation Language) model yielded some conclusions on the knowledge level of communication in agent-oriented program. First, the agent state and transition model were given for analyzing the necessary conditions for interaction with the synchronal and asynchronous KQML model respectively. Second, we analyzed the deadlock and starvation problems in the KQML communication, and gave the solution. At last, the advantages and disadvantages of the synchronal and asynchronous KQML model were listed respectively, and the choosing principle was given.

  11. Interactive facades analysis and synthesis of semi-regular facades

    KAUST Repository

    AlHalawani, Sawsan

    2013-05-01

    Urban facades regularly contain interesting variations due to allowed deformations of repeated elements (e.g., windows in different open or close positions) posing challenges to state-of-the-art facade analysis algorithms. We propose a semi-automatic framework to recover both repetition patterns of the elements and their individual deformation parameters to produce a factored facade representation. Such a representation enables a range of applications including interactive facade images, improved multi-view stereo reconstruction, facade-level change detection, and novel image editing possibilities. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Distributed Parallel Interactive Data Analysis Using the Proof System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ReneBrun; FonsRademakers

    2001-01-01

    The only way Terabytes of data can be processed and analyzed in a reasonable time is by using parallel processing architectures.The Paralle ROOT Facility,PROOF,is s system for the parallel interactive analysis of such datasets on clusters of heterogeneous computers.Early prototypes have confirmed the validity of the basic PROOF architecture However,some important work still has to be done before PROOF can be used as a production facility.The basic architecture and the planned developments are described in this paper.

  13. Isobolographic analysis of interactions: an update on applications and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, P K

    1995-12-28

    Isobolographic analysis provides a fundamental basis for assessing whether biological responses induced by mixtures of agents are greater, equal or smaller than would have been expected on the basis of the individual activities of the component agents and the concept of dose additivity. Limited in its direct application to binary mixtures, isobolographic analysis provides a conceptual framework and an unambiguous terminology, as well as an algebraic paradigm for the analysis of the interaction of ternary and higher order mixtures. A library of examples generously illustrated graphically is provided to facilitate the understanding of the methodology and serve as a guide for investigators who are unfamiliar with the approach. Also discussed are the theoretical derivation of the isobologram, the representation of various dosage combinations, the derivation of the principle of dose additivity, supra-additivity, infra-additivity, antagonism, the methods for probit analysis of mixture potency, effect addition and the consequences of peak effect coincidence in time or lack thereof, and the role of isobolographic analysis in the various aspects of dose-response surface methodology.

  14. Graph theory and stability analysis of protein complex interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hung; Chen, Teng-Hung; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes play an essential role in many biological processes. Complexes can interact with other complexes to form protein complex interaction network (PCIN) that involves in important cellular processes. There are relatively few studies on examining the interaction topology among protein complexes; and little is known about the stability of PCIN under perturbations. We employed graph theoretical approach to reveal hidden properties and features of four species PCINs. Two main issues are addressed, (i) the global and local network topological properties, and (ii) the stability of the networks under 12 types of perturbations. According to the topological parameter classification, we identified some critical protein complexes and validated that the topological analysis approach could provide meaningful biological interpretations of the protein complex systems. Through the Kolmogorov-Smimov test, we showed that local topological parameters are good indicators to characterise the structure of PCINs. We further demonstrated the effectiveness of the current approach by performing the scalability and data normalization tests. To measure the robustness of PCINs, we proposed to consider eight topological-based perturbations, which are specifically applicable in scenarios of targeted, sustained attacks. We found that the degree-based, betweenness-based and brokering-coefficient-based perturbations have the largest effect on network stability.

  15. Microarray analysis of human epithelial cell responses to bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Jeffrey J; Lamont, Richard J; Handfield, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are inherently complex and dynamic. The recent use of human microarrays has been invaluable to monitor the effects of various bacterial and viral pathogens upon host cell gene expression programs. This methodology has allowed the host response transcriptome of several cell lines to be studied on a global scale. To this point, the great majority of reports have focused on the response of immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells. These studies revealed that the immune response to microbial pathogens is tailored to different microbial challenges. Conversely, the paradigm for epithelial cells has--until recently--held that the epithelium mostly served as a relatively passive physical barrier to infection. It is now generally accepted that the epithelial barrier contributes more actively to signaling events in the immune response. In light of this shift, this review will compare transcriptional profiling data from studies that involved host-pathogen interactions occurring with epithelial cells. Experiments that defined both a common core response, as well as pathogen-specific host responses will be discussed. This review will also summarize the contributions that transcriptional profiling analysis has made to our understanding of bacterial physio-pathogensis of infection. This will include a discussion of how host transcriptional responses can be used to infer the function of virulence determinants from bacterial pathogens interacting with epithelial mucosa. In particular, we will expand upon the lessons that have been learned from gastro-intestinal and oral pathogens, as well as from members of the commensal flora.

  16. SWAN: a Service for Interactive Analysis in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Piparo, Danilo; Mato, Pere; Mascetti, Luca; Moscicki, Jakub; Lamanna, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    SWAN (Service for Web based ANalysis) is a platform to perform interactive data analysis in the cloud. SWAN allows users to write and run their data analyses with only a web browser, leveraging on the widely-adopted Jupyter notebook interface. The user code, executions and data live entirely in the cloud. SWAN makes it easier to produce and share results and scientific code, access scientific software, produce tutorials and demonstrations as well as preserve analyses. Furthermore, it is also a powerful tool for non-scientific data analytics. This paper describes how a pilot of the SWAN service was implemented and deployed at CERN. Its backend combines state-of-the-art software technologies with a set of existing IT services such as user authentication, virtual computing infrastructure, mass storage, file synchronisation and sharing, specialised clusters and batch systems. The added value of this combination of services is discussed, with special focus on the opportunities offered by the CERNBox service and it...

  17. Interactive Building Design Space Exploration Using Regionalized Sensitivity Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Maagaard, Steffen; Østergård, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations combined with regionalized sensitivity analysis provide the means to explore a vast, multivariate design space in building design. Typically, sensitivity analysis shows how the variability of model output relates to the uncertainties in models inputs. This reveals which...... in combination with the interactive parallel coordinate plot (PCP). The latter is an effective tool to explore stochastic simulations and to find high-performing building designs. The proposed methods help decision makers to focus their attention to the most important design parameters when exploring...... a multivariate design space. As case study, we consider building performance simulations of a 15.000 m² educational centre with respect to energy demand, thermal comfort, and daylight....

  18. A novel comparative molecule/pseudo receptor interaction analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Peng; TONG Jianbo; TIAN Feifei; LI Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Comparative molecule/pseudo receptor interaction analysis (CoMPIA) is developed as a novel 3D-QSAR method by adding postulated pseudo receptor and GA-optimized probe into comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). CoMPIA is used to find the pseudo receptor mode by optimizing probe distributions and to establish the optimal model of high qualities and good interpretations. Correlative coefficient R2, cross-validated correlative coefficient Q2 and root mean square error RMSEP of the resulting model are 0.940, 0.868 and 0.502, respectively by applying CoMPIA to quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of 31 classical steroids.

  19. Interactive Correspondence Analysis in a Dynamic Object-Oriented Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bond

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available A highly interactive, user-friendly object-oriented software package written in LispStat is introduced that performs simple and multiple correspondence analysis, and profile analysis. These three techniques are integrated into a single environment driven by a user-friendly graphical interface that takes advantage of Lisp-Stat's advanced graphical capabilities. Techniques that assess the stability of the solution are also introduced. Some of the features of the package include colored graphics, incremental graph zooming capabilities, manual point separation to determine identities of overlapping points, and stability and fit measures. The features of the package are used to show some interesting trends in a large educational dataset.

  20. Ferrocene Orientation Determined Intramolecular Interactions Using Energy Decomposition Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two very different quantum mechanically based energy decomposition analyses (EDA schemes are employed to study the dominant energy differences between the eclipsed and staggered ferrocene conformers. One is the extended transition state (ETS based on the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF package and the other is natural EDA (NEDA based in the General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS package. It reveals that in addition to the model (theory and basis set, the fragmentation channels more significantly affect the interaction energy terms (ΔE between the conformers. It is discovered that such an interaction energy can be absorbed into the pre-partitioned fragment channels so that to affect the interaction energies in a particular conformer of Fc. To avoid this, the present study employs a complete fragment channel—the fragments of ferrocene are individual neutral atoms. It therefore discovers that the major difference between the ferrocene conformers is due to the quantum mechanical Pauli repulsive energy and orbital attractive energy, leading to the eclipsed ferrocene the energy preferred structure. The NEDA scheme further indicates that the sum of attractive (negative polarization (POL and charge transfer (CL energies prefers the eclipsed ferrocene. The repulsive (positive deformation (DEF energy, which is dominated by the cyclopentadienyle (Cp rings, prefers the staggered ferrocene. Again, the cancellation results in a small energy residue in favour of the eclipsed ferrocene, in agreement with the ETS scheme. Further Natural Bond Orbital (NBO analysis indicates that all NBO energies, total Lewis (no Fe and lone pair (LP deletion all prefer the eclipsed Fc conformer. The most significant energy preferring the eclipsed ferrocene without cancellation is the interactions between the donor lone pairs (LP of the Fe atom and the acceptor antibond (BD* NBOs of all C–C and C–H bonds in the ligand, LP(Fe-BD*(C–C & C

  1. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0226 TITLE: Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs PRINCIPAL...insight into gene environment interactions. It leverages the simplified genetics and detailed records of the military working dog population. There are...regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping. PLoS Genet . 7(10):e1002316. PubMed PMID: 22022279). In the

  2. Bispectral pairwise interacting source analysis for identifying systems of cross-frequency interacting brain sources from electroencephalographic or magnetoencephalographic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chella, Federico; Pizzella, Vittorio; Zappasodi, Filippo; Nolte, Guido; Marzetti, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Brain cognitive functions arise through the coordinated activity of several brain regions, which actually form complex dynamical systems operating at multiple frequencies. These systems often consist of interacting subsystems, whose characterization is of importance for a complete understanding of the brain interaction processes. To address this issue, we present a technique, namely the bispectral pairwise interacting source analysis (biPISA), for analyzing systems of cross-frequency interacting brain sources when multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) or magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data are available. Specifically, the biPISA makes it possible to identify one or many subsystems of cross-frequency interacting sources by decomposing the antisymmetric components of the cross-bispectra between EEG or MEG signals, based on the assumption that interactions are pairwise. Thanks to the properties of the antisymmetric components of the cross-bispectra, biPISA is also robust to spurious interactions arising from mixing artifacts, i.e., volume conduction or field spread, which always affect EEG or MEG functional connectivity estimates. This method is an extension of the pairwise interacting source analysis (PISA), which was originally introduced for investigating interactions at the same frequency, to the study of cross-frequency interactions. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in simulations for up to three interacting source pairs and for real MEG recordings of spontaneous brain activity. Simulations show that the performances of biPISA in estimating the phase difference between the interacting sources are affected by the increasing level of noise rather than by the number of the interacting subsystems. The analysis of real MEG data reveals an interaction between two pairs of sources of central mu and beta rhythms, localizing in the proximity of the left and right central sulci.

  3. Prediction of drug-drug interactions from chemogenomic and gene-gene interactions and analysis of drug-drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between multiple drugs administered to an organism concurrently, whether in the form of synergy or antagonism, are of clinical relevance. Moreover, un-derstanding the mechanisms and nature of drug-drug interactions is of great practical and theoretical interest. Work has previously been done on gene-gene and gene-drug interactions, but the prediction and rationalization of drug-drug interactions from this data is not straightforward. We present a strategy for attacking this p...

  4. Case-only study of interactions between metabolic enzymes and smoking in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuangshuang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involved in the metabolism of carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer. Our objective was to measure the interactions between common polymorphisms of P450 (CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, GSTM1 and T1, SULT1A1 and cigarette smoking in colorectal cancer (CRC. Methods A case-only design was conducted in a Chinese population including 207 patients with sporadic CRC. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking. Results The interaction odds ratio (COR for the gene-gene interaction between CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1 638A allele was 2.68 (95% CI: 1.16–6.26. The results of the gene-environment analyses revealed that an interaction existed between cigarette smoking and the CYP1B1 1294G allele for CRC (COR = 2.62, 95%CI: 1.01–6.72, the COR for the interaction of CYP1B1 1294G and smoking history > 35 pack-years was 3.47 (95%CI: 1.12–10.80. No other significant gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were observed. Conclusion Our results showed that the interaction between polymorphisms in CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1*2 may play a significant role on CRC in the Chinese population. Also, it is suggested that the association between cigarette smoking and CRC could be differentiated by the CYP1B1 1294G allele.

  5. Interactive flutter analysis and parametric study for conceptual wing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1995-01-01

    An interactive computer program was developed for wing flutter analysis in the conceptual design stage. The objective was to estimate the flutter instability boundary of a flexible cantilever wing, when well defined structural and aerodynamic data are not available, and then study the effect of change in Mach number, dynamic pressure, torsional frequency, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, taper ratio, center of gravity, and pitch inertia, to guide the development of the concept. The software was developed on MathCad (trademark) platform for Macintosh, with integrated documentation, graphics, database and symbolic mathematics. The analysis method was based on nondimensional parametric plots of two primary flutter parameters, namely Regier number and Flutter number, with normalization factors based on torsional stiffness, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, center of gravity location and pitch inertia radius of gyration. The plots were compiled in a Vaught Corporation report from a vast database of past experiments and wind tunnel tests. The computer program was utilized for flutter analysis of the outer wing of a Blended Wing Body concept, proposed by McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Using a set of assumed data, preliminary flutter boundary and flutter dynamic pressure variation with altitude, Mach number and torsional stiffness were determined.

  6. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  7. An interactive system for analysis of global cloud imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodberry, Karen; Tanaka, Ken; Hendon, Harry; Salby, Murry

    1991-01-01

    Synoptic images of the global cloud pattern composited from six contemporaneous satellites provide an unprecedented view of the global cloud field. Having horizontal resolution of about 0.5 deg and temporal resolution of 3 h, the global cloud imagery (GCI) resolves most of the variability of organized convection, including several harmonics of the diurnal cycle. Although the GCI has these attractive features, the dense and 3D nature of that data make it a formidable volume of information to treat in a practical and efficient manner. An interactive image-analysis system (IAS) has been developed to investigate the space-time variability of global cloud behavior. In the IAS, data, hardware, and software are integrated into a single system providing a variety of space-time covariance analyses in a menu-driven format. Owing to its customized architecture and certain homogeneous properties of the GCI, the IAS calculates such quantities effectively. Many covariance statistics are derived from 3D data with interactive speed, allowing the user to interrogate the archive iteratively in a single session. The 3D nature of those analyses and the speed with which they are performed distinguish the IAS from conventional image processing of 2D data.

  8. Isobolographic analysis of the analgesic interactions between ketamine and tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chan, Sui Y; Ho, Paul C

    2002-05-01

    Owing to different mechanisms of analgesia, we hypothesized that the combination of ketamine and tramadol could produce synergistic or additive antinociceptive effects. Swiss albino mice were administered intraperitoneally with ketamine, tramadol, a combination of ketamine and tramadol, or saline, and the resulting antinociceptive effects were tested in the mouse tail-flick and formalin tests. The potencies of the two drugs alone or in combination were obtained by fitting data to the Sigmoid Emax equation. Isobolographic analysis was performed to evaluate the interaction. CNS depression was also monitored. Results showed that tramadol exhibited apparent dose-dependent effects in the tail-flick test, and in phase 1 and phase 2 of the formalin test. Ketamine dose-dependently inhibited the phase 2 responses, but failed to modify the phase 1 and tail-flick responses. Combination of tramadol and ketamine produced significant synergistic interactions only in phase 2 of the formalin test (P < 0.05). The synergistic combinations also displayed less CNS depression than when an equianalgesic dose of ketamine was administered alone. We conclude that in the acute thermal or chemical pain model, ketamine is not effective and the net effect of ketamine and tramadol in combination was simply additive after systemic administration. However, the coadministration produced synergistic antinociception in the chemical-induced persistent pain model.

  9. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  10. Multi-scale analysis for random quantum systems with interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The study of quantum disorder has generated considerable research activity in mathematics and physics over past 40 years. While single-particle models have been extensively studied at a rigorous mathematical level, little was known about systems of several interacting particles, let alone systems with positive spatial particle density. Creating a consistent theory of disorder in multi-particle quantum systems is an important and challenging problem that largely remains open. Multi-scale Analysis for Random Quantum Systems with Interaction  presents the progress that had been recently achieved in this area.   The main focus of the book is on a rigorous derivation of the multi-particle localization in a strong random external potential field. To make the presentation accessible to a wider audience, the authors restrict attention to a relatively simple tight-binding Anderson model on a cubic lattice Zd.   This book includes the following cutting-edge features: * an introduction to the state-of-the-art single-...

  11. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL; Maness, Christopher S [ORNL; Senter, James K [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  12. Evidence of Reactive Gene-Environment Correlation in Preschoolers' Prosocial Play with Unfamiliar Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Bersted, Kyle; John, Sufna Gheyara

    2015-01-01

    The development of prosocial behaviors during the preschool years is essential for children's positive interactions with peers in school and other social situations. Although there is some evidence of genetic influences on prosocial behaviors, very little is known about how genes and environment, independently and in concert, affect prosocial…

  13. Recent insights into plant-virus interactions through proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2012-10-05

    Plant viruses represent a major threat for a wide range of host species causing severe losses in agricultural practices. The full comprehension of mechanisms underlying events of virus-host plant interaction is crucial to devise novel plant resistance strategies. Until now, functional genomics studies in plant-virus interaction have been limited mainly on transcriptomic analysis. Only recently are proteomic approaches starting to provide important contributions to this area of research. Classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is still the most widely used platform in plant proteome analysis, although in the last years the application of quantitative "second generation" proteomic techniques (such as differential in gel electrophoresis, DIGE, and gel-free protein separation methods) are emerging as more powerful analytical approaches. Apparently simple, plant-virus interactions reveal a really complex pathophysiological context, in which resistance, defense and susceptibility, and direct virus-induced reactions interplay to trigger expression responses of hundreds of genes. Given that, this review is specifically focused on comparative proteome-based studies on pathogenesis of several viral genera, including some of the most important and widespread plant viruses of the genus Tobamovirus, Sobemovirus, Cucumovirus and Potyvirus. In all, this overview reveals a widespread repression of proteins associated with the photosynthetic apparatus, while energy metabolism/protein synthesis and turnover are typically up-regulated, indicating a major redirection of cell metabolism. Other common features include the modulation of metabolisms concerning sugars, cell wall, and reactive oxigen species as well as pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The fine-tuning between plant development and antiviral defense mechanisms determines new patterns of regulation of common metabolic pathways. By offering a 360-degree view of protein modulation

  14. Proteomic analysis of HIV-T cell interaction: an update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave eSpeijer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review summarizes techniques applied in, and results obtained with, proteomic studies of HIV-1 T cell interaction. Our group previously reported on the use of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled to MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprint analysis, to study T cell responses upon HIV-1 infection. Only one in three differentially expressed proteins could be identified using this experimental setup. Here we report on our latest efforts to test models generated by this data set and extend its analysis by using novel bioinformatic algorithms. The 2D-DIGE results are compared with other studies including a pilot study using one-dimensional peptide separation coupled to MSE, a novel mass spectrometric approach. It can be concluded that although the latter method detects fewer proteins, it is much faster and less labor intensive. Last but not least, recent developments and remaining challenges in the field of proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection and proteomics in general are discussed.

  15. Analysis of interactions among barriers in project risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandage, Rahul V.; Mantha, Shankar S.; Rane, Santosh B.; Bhoola, Vanita

    2017-06-01

    In the context of the scope, time, cost, and quality constraints, failure is not uncommon in project management. While small projects have 70% chances of success, large projects virtually have no chance of meeting the quadruple constraints. While there is no dearth of research on project risk management, the manifestation of barriers to project risk management is a less dwelt topic. The success of project management is oftentimes based on the understanding of barriers to effective risk management, application of appropriate risk management methodology, proactive leadership to avoid barriers, workers' attitude, adequate resources, organizational culture, and involvement of top management. This paper represents various risk categories and barriers to risk management in domestic and international projects through literature survey and feedback from project professionals. After analysing the various modelling methods used in project risk management literature, interpretive structural modelling (ISM) and MICMAC analysis have been used to analyse interactions among the barriers and prioritize them. The analysis indicates that lack of top management support, lack of formal training, and lack of addressing cultural differences are the high priority barriers, among many others.

  16. Analysis of Metabolites in Stem Parasitic Plant Interactions: Interaction of Cuscuta–Momordica versus Cassytha–Ipomoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Furuhashi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cuscuta and Cassytha are two well-known stem parasitic plant genera with reduced leaves and roots, inducing haustoria in their stems. Their similar appearance in the field has been recognized, but few comparative studies on their respective plant interactions are available. To compare their interactions, we conducted a metabolite analysis of both the Cassytha–Ipomoea and the Cuscuta–Momordica interaction. We investigated the energy charge of the metabolites by UFLC (ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, and conducted GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for polar metabolites (e.g., saccharides, polyols and steroids. The energy charge after parasitization changed considerably in Cassytha but not in Cusucta. Cuscuta changed its steroid pattern during the plant interaction, whereas Cassytha did not. In the polar metabolite analysis, the laminaribiose increase after parasitization was conspicuous in Cuscuta, but not in Cassytha. This metabolite profile difference points to different lifestyles and parasitic strategies.

  17. Analysis of Metabolites in Stem Parasitic Plant Interactions: Interaction of Cuscuta–Momordica versus Cassytha–Ipomoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Iwase, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Cuscuta and Cassytha are two well-known stem parasitic plant genera with reduced leaves and roots, inducing haustoria in their stems. Their similar appearance in the field has been recognized, but few comparative studies on their respective plant interactions are available. To compare their interactions, we conducted a metabolite analysis of both the Cassytha–Ipomoea and the Cuscuta–Momordica interaction. We investigated the energy charge of the metabolites by UFLC (ultra-high performance liquid chromatography), and conducted GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) analysis for polar metabolites (e.g., saccharides, polyols) and steroids. The energy charge after parasitization changed considerably in Cassytha but not in Cusucta. Cuscuta changed its steroid pattern during the plant interaction, whereas Cassytha did not. In the polar metabolite analysis, the laminaribiose increase after parasitization was conspicuous in Cuscuta, but not in Cassytha. This metabolite profile difference points to different lifestyles and parasitic strategies. PMID:27941603

  18. Social Network Analysis to Examine Interaction Patterns in Knowledge Building Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Donald N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes use of social network analysis to examine student interaction patterns in a Grade 5/6 Knowledge Building class. The analysis included face-to-face interactions and interactions in the Knowledge Forum[R] Knowledge Building environment. It is argued that sociogram data are useful to reveal group processes; in sociological terms,…

  19. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thematic Apperception Test: an original proposal for interaction analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doriana Dipaola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The TAT as projective technique gives the opportunity to explore the inner world and the intra-psychic functioning, as well as the objectual representations and the prevailing thinking processes. Our hypothesis is that the TAT could also be deployed as a valid tool in the analysis of inter-personal functioning, specifically within the couple. From this assumption originates our proposal for an original methodology of TAT deployment and reading, which integrates the classical individual TAT methodology with the Common Rorschach method suggested by Willi. The goal is to experiment a parallel utilisation of the test that could contribute to the understanding of personalities and of how these intertwine in couple interaction. “In the relationship with the partner, the personality takes new shapes, given personality and character traits are strengthened, while others lose importance”, (Theodore Lidz, in Willi, 1990. The couple TAT presupposes a sequence of pictures proposed following procedures identical to the Common Rorschach ones to the single individuals at first and then to the couple. From the initial individual task follows the one of building a commonly shared history starting from the stimulus. The suggested methodology shall be exemplified through the presentation of clinical cases belonging to the research sample. The comprehension of the inter-personal dynamic, in a common task, could allow to explore the ways in which conflict expresses itself, the roles and prospects for collaboration, the “generativity” of the couple and the management of affects and anxieties in the interaction and could be successfully deployed as a tool in the context of couple counselling.

  1. Control system design and analysis using the INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly efficient environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. Moreover, the results of the analytic tools imbedded in INCA have been flight proven with at least three currently orbiting spacecraft. This paper describes the INCA program and illustrates, using a flight proven example, how the package can perform complex design analyses with relative ease.

  2. Control system design and analysis using the INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly efficient environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. Moreover, the results of the analytic tools imbedded in INCA have been flight proven with at least three currently orbiting spacecraft. This paper describes the INCA program and illustrates, using a flight proven example, how the package can perform complex design analyses with relative ease.

  3. Jatropha Developments in Mozambique: Analysis of Structural Conditions Influencing Niche-Regime Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, M.A.; Schut, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the transition dynamics related to Jatropha developments in Mozambique. The analysis focuses on how structural conditions (infrastructure, institutions, interaction and collaboration and capabilities and resources) enable or constrain interactions between niche-level Jatrop

  4. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  5. Genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinying; Zhu, Yun; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-03-01

    The critical barrier in interaction analysis for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data is that the traditional pairwise interaction analysis that is suitable for common variants is difficult to apply to rare variants because of their prohibitive computational time, large number of tests and low power. The great challenges for successful detection of interactions with NGS data are (1) the demands in the paradigm of changes in interaction analysis; (2) severe multiple testing; and (3) heavy computations. To meet these challenges, we shift the paradigm of interaction analysis between two SNPs to interaction analysis between two genomic regions. In other words, we take a gene as a unit of analysis and use functional data analysis techniques as dimensional reduction tools to develop a novel statistic to collectively test interaction between all possible pairs of SNPs within two genome regions. By intensive simulations, we demonstrate that the functional logistic regression for interaction analysis has the correct type 1 error rates and higher power to detect interaction than the currently used methods. The proposed method was applied to a coronary artery disease dataset from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) study and the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) dataset, and the early-onset myocardial infarction (EOMI) exome sequence datasets with European origin from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. We discovered that 6 of 27 pairs of significantly interacted genes in the FHS were replicated in the independent WTCCC study and 24 pairs of significantly interacted genes after applying Bonferroni correction in the EOMI study.

  6. Analysis of Multi-Stakeholder Requirements Using Requirement Interaction Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohayanti Hassan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Software requirements engineering is an imperative phase in the software development life cycle in every project regardless of the project size. In a project, different people are involved in the requirements engineering process, including requirement engineers, stakeholders, end users, and system designers. Amongst them, stakeholders play an essential role. Differences in goals and priorities of multiple stakeholders would make requirements management complex and difficult, which is a huge challenge for requirement engineers. From time to time, new requirements emerge and existing requirements need changes to fulfil stakeholders’ goals. Thus, such situation leads to high requirements volatility and low stability which causes overlapping and conflicting of requirements. The correctness and validity of requirements are of paramount importance as they are the key factors toward a successful system. A deep understanding of requirement management technique that conforms to users’ needs is crucial. Such technique of the concept is applied to the Labour Management System. In this study, we have discussed the implementation of analysis of multi-stakeholder requirements using requirement interaction matrix in the f. The study used real requirements to yield a solid and dependable result. We have documented the requirements using a template and assessed their respective volatility level. An algorithm is constructed to   show   that   the   technique has managed to minimize   the time   used   when   checking requirements.

  7. Continuous maximum flow segmentation method for nanoparticle interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marak, L; Tankyevych, O; Talbot, H

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, tomographic three-dimensional reconstruction approaches using electrons rather than X-rays have become popular. Such images produced with a transmission electron microscope make it possible to image nanometre-scale materials in three-dimensional. However, they are also noisy, limited in contrast and most often have a very poor resolution along the axis of the electron beam. The analysis of images stemming from such modalities, whether fully or semiautomated, is therefore more complicated. In particular, segmentation of objects is difficult. In this paper, we propose to use the continuous maximum flow segmentation method based on a globally optimal minimal surface model. The use of this fully automated segmentation and filtering procedure is illustrated on two different nanoparticle samples and provide comparisons with other classical segmentation methods. The main objectives are the measurement of the attraction rate of polystyrene beads to silica nanoparticle (for the first sample) and interaction of silica nanoparticles with large unilamellar liposomes (for the second sample). We also illustrate how precise measurements such as contact angles can be performed.

  8. High school students presenting science: An interactional sociolinguistic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Robert

    Presenting science is an authentic activity of practicing scientists. Thus, effective communication of science is an important skill to nurture in high school students who are learning science. This study examines strategies employed by high school students as they make science presentations; it assesses students' conceptual understandings of particular science topics through their presentations and investigates gender differences. Data are derived from science presentation given by eight high school students, three females and five males who attended a summer science program. Data sources included videotaped presentations, ethnographic fieldnotes, interviews with presenters and members of the audience, and presenter notes and overheads. Presentations were transcribed and submitted to discourse analysis from an interactional sociolinguistic perspective. This article focuses on the methodology employed and how it helps inform the above research questions. The author argues that use of this methodology leads to findings that inform important social-communicative issues in the learning of science. Practical advice for teaching students to present science, implications for use of presentations to assess conceptual learning, and indications of some possible gender differences are discussed.Received: 14 April 1993; Revised: 15 February 1994;

  9. Chromatographic analysis of olopatadine in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksić, Jelena; Jovanović, Marko; Rakić, Tijana; Popović, Igor; Ivanović, Darko; Jančić-Stojanović, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, chromatographic analysis of active substance olopatadine hydrochloride, which is used in eye drops as antihistaminic agent, and its impurity E isomer by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and application of design of experiments (DoE) methodology are presented. In addition, benzalkonium chloride is very often used as a preservative in eye drops. Therefore, the evaluation of its chromatographic behavior in HILIC was carried out as well. In order to estimate chromatographic behavior and set optimal chromatographic conditions, DoE methodology was applied. After the selection of important chromatographic factors, Box-Behnken design was utilized, and on the basis of the obtained models factor effects were examined. Then, multi-objective robust optimization is performed aiming to obtain chromatographic conditions that comply with several quality criteria simultaneously: adequate and robust separation of critical peak pair and maximum retention of the first eluting peak. The optimal conditions are identified by using grid point search methodology. The experimental verification confirmed the adequacy of the defined optimal conditions. Finally, under optimal chromatographic conditions, the method was validated and applicability of the proposed method was confirmed.

  10. PINK1-Interacting Proteins: Proteomic Analysis of Overexpressed PINK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Rakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications suggest that the Parkinson's disease- (PD- related PINK1/Parkin pathway promotes elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. We used tandem affinity purification (TAP, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry as a first step towards identification of possible substrates for PINK1. The cellular abundance of selected identified interactors was investigated by Western blotting. Furthermore, one candidate gene was sequenced in 46 patients with atypical PD. In addition to two known binding partners (HSP90, CDC37, 12 proteins were identified using the TAP assay; four of which are mitochondrially localized (GRP75, HSP60, LRPPRC, and TUFM. Western blot analysis showed no differences in cellular abundance of these proteins comparing PINK1 mutant and control fibroblasts. When sequencing LRPPRC, four exonic synonymous changes and 20 polymorphisms in noncoding regions were detected. Our study provides a list of putative PINK1 binding partners, confirming previously described interactions, but also introducing novel mitochondrial proteins as potential components of the PINK1/Parkin mitophagy pathway.

  11. VisIt: Interactive Parallel Visualization and Graphical Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department Of Energy (DOE) Advanced Simulation; Computing Initiative (ASCI)

    2011-03-01

    VisIt is a free interactive parallel visualization and graphical analysis tool for viewing scientific data on Unix and PC platforms. Users can quickly generate visualizations from their data, animate them through time, manipulate them, and save the resulting images for presentations. VisIt contains a rich set of visualization features so that you can view your data in a variety of ways. It can be used to visualize scalar and vector fields defined on two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) structured and unstructured meshes. VisIt was designed to handle very large data set sizes in the terascale range and yet can also handle small data sets in the kilobyte range. See the table below for more details about the tool’s features. VisIt was developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Simulation and Computing Initiative (ASCI) to visualize and analyze the results of terascale simulations. It was developed as a framework for adding custom capabilities and rapidly deploying new visualization technologies. Although the primary driving force behind the development of VisIt was for visualizing terascale data, it is also well suited for visualizing data from typical simulations on desktop systems.

  12. Physical punishment and childhood aggression: the role of gender and gene-environment interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutwell, Brian B; Franklin, Cortney A; Barnes, J C; Beaver, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research has linked spanking with a range of adverse outcomes in children, including aggression, psychopathology, and criminal involvement. Despite evidence concerning the association of spanking with antisocial behavior, not all children who are spanked develop antisocial traits. Given the heterogeneous effects of spanking on behavior, it is possible that a third variable may condition the influence of corporal punishment on child development. We test this possibility using data drawn from a nationally representative dataset of twin siblings. Our findings suggest that genetic risk factors condition the effects of spanking on antisocial behavior. Moreover, our results provide evidence that the interaction between genetic risk factors and corporal punishment may be particularly salient for males.

  13. Using Interactive Graphics to Teach Multivariate Data Analysis to Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Mora, Pedro M.; Ledesma, Ruben D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of interactive graphics to teach multivariate data analysis to Psychology students. Three techniques are explored through separate activities: parallel coordinates/boxplots; principal components/exploratory factor analysis; and cluster analysis. With interactive graphics, students may perform important parts of the…

  14. Using Interactive Graphics to Teach Multivariate Data Analysis to Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Mora, Pedro M.; Ledesma, Ruben D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of interactive graphics to teach multivariate data analysis to Psychology students. Three techniques are explored through separate activities: parallel coordinates/boxplots; principal components/exploratory factor analysis; and cluster analysis. With interactive graphics, students may perform important parts of the…

  15. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    A color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer are used to develop a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. These interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner; (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements; and (3) analyze data from non-imaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  16. Analysis of the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and airborne particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Shi, Shanshan; Weschler, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    A proper quantitative understanding of the dynamic interaction between gas-phase semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and airborne particles is important for human exposure assessment and risk evaluation. Questions regarding how to properly address gas/particle interactions have introduced...... uncertainty when predicting SVOC concentrations and assessing exposures to these compounds. In this study, we have developed a dimensionless description for the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and organic particles. A better criterion to judge whether the internal resistance (diffusion in and out...

  17. Microfluidic large scale integration of viral-host interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Glick, Yair; Kipper, Sarit; Schwartz, Nika; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron

    2013-06-21

    Viral-host interactions represent potential drug targets for novel antiviral strategies (Flisiak et al., Hepatology, 2008, 47, 817-26). Hence, it is important to establish an adequate platform for identifying and analyzing such interactions. In this review, we discuss bottlenecks in conventional protein-protein interaction methodologies and present the contribution of innovative microfluidic-based technologies towards a solution to these problems with respect to viral-host proteomics.

  18. Interactive graphics for data analysis principles and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Theus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction PRINCIPLESInteractivity Queries Selection and Linked Highlighting Linking AnalysesInteracting with Graphics Examining a Single Variable Categorical DataContinuous DataTransforming Data Weighted Plots Interactions between Two VariablesTwo Categorical VariablesOne Categorical Variable and One Continuous VariableTwo Continuous VariablesMultidimensional Plots Mosaic PlotsParallel Coordinate Plots Trellis Displays Plot Ensembles and Statistical ModelsResponse ModelsANOVALoglinear ModelsGeographical DataMore Interactivity Sorting and Ordering Zooming Multiple ViewsInteractive Graphics ?

  19. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  20. The Autism Birth Cohort: a paradigm for gene-environment-timing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenberg, C; Schjølberg, S; Bresnahan, M; Hornig, M; Hirtz, D; Dahl, C; Lie, K K; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Schreuder, P; Alsaker, E; Øyen, A-S; Magnus, P; Surén, P; Susser, E; Lipkin, W I

    2010-07-01

    The reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has increased by 5- to 10-fold over the past 20 years. Whether ASDs are truly more frequent is controversial; nonetheless, the burden is profound in human and economic terms. Although autism is among the most heritable of mental disorders, its pathogenesis remains obscure. Environmental factors are proposed; however, none is implicated. Furthermore, there are no biomarkers to screen for ASD or risk of ASD. The Autism Birth Cohort (ABC) was initiated to analyze gene x environment x timing interactions and enable early diagnosis. It uses a large, unselected birth cohort in which cases are prospectively ascertained through population screening. Samples collected serially through pregnancy and childhood include parental blood, maternal urine, cord blood, milk teeth and rectal swabs. More than 107,000 children are continuously screened through questionnaires, referral, and a national registry. Cases are compared with a control group from the same cohort in a 'nested case-control' design. Early screening and diagnostic assessments and re-assessments are designed to provide a rich view of longitudinal trajectory. Genetic, proteomic, immunologic, metagenomic and microbiological tools will be used to exploit unique biological samples. The ABC is a paradigm for analyzing the role of genetic and environmental factors in complex disorders.

  1. Research on Gene-Environment Interplay in the Era of "Big Data".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Andrew C; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Lian, Min; Miller, Ruth; Duncan, Alexis E; Madden, Pamela A F

    2016-09-01

    Successful identification of genetic risk factors in genomewide association studies typically has depended on meta-analyses combining data from large numbers of studies involving tens or hundreds of thousands of participants. This poses a challenge for research on Gene × Environment interaction (G × E) effects, where characterization of environmental exposures is quite limited in most studies and often varies idiosyncratically between studies. Yet the importance of environmental exposures in the etiology of many disorders-and especially alcohol, tobacco, and drug use disorders-is undeniable. We discuss the potential for "big-data" approaches (e.g., aggregating data from state databases) to generate consistent measures of neighborhood environment across multiple studies, requiring only information about residential address (or ideally residential history) to make progress in G × E analyses. Big-data approaches may also help address limits to the generalizability of existing research literature, such as those that arise because of the limited numbers of severely alcohol-dependent mothers represented in prospective research studies.

  2. Explaining Interaction Effects within and across Levels of Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulf; Cuervo-Cazurra, Alvaro; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Many manuscripts submitted to the Journal of International Business Studies propose an interaction effect in their models in an effort to explain the complexity and contingency of relationships across borders. In this article, we provide guidance on how best to explain the interaction effects...

  3. SEPAC data analysis in support of the environmental interaction program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1991-01-01

    Data analyses of the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) data and computer modeling were conducted to investigate spacecraft environmental effects associated with injection of electron beams, plasma clouds, and neutral gas clouds from the Shuttle orbiter. The data analysis indicates that Extremely Low Frequency oscillations from 150 to 200 Hz were seen in the Langmuir probe current when the beam was fired in a continuous mode. The strongest oscillations occurred when the ambient pressure was augmented by neutral gas releases from the SEPAC plasma accelerator magnetoplasma-dynamic (MPD) arcjet. To understand the dependence of spacecraft charging potential on beam density and other plasma parameters, a two-dimensional electrostatic particle code was used to simulate the injection of electron beams from an infinite conductor into a plasma. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential depends critically on the reflection coefficient of the conductor surface, which is defined as the percentage of incident particles reflected by the conductor. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging were examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. The simulations also indicate that the beam radius is generally proportional to the beam electron gyroradius when the conductor is charged to a large potential. It appears that the charge buildup at the beam stagnation point causes the beam radial expansion. A survey of the simulation results suggests that the ratio of the beam radius to the beam electron gyroradius increases with the square root of beam density and decreases inversely with beam injection velocity. These results are useful for explaining the spacecraft charging phenomena observed during SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  4. Effective field theory analysis of the self-interacting chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanctuary, Hillary; Sturani, Riccardo

    2010-08-01

    We analyse the phenomenology of a self-interacting scalar field in the context of the chameleon scenario originally proposed by Khoury and Weltman. In the absence of self-interactions, this type of scalar field can mediate long range interactions and simultaneously evade constraints from violation of the weak equivalence principle. By applying to such a scalar field the effective field theory method proposed for Einstein gravity by Goldberger and Rothstein, we give a thorough perturbative evaluation of the importance of non-derivative self-interactions in determining the strength of the chameleon mediated force in the case of orbital motion. The self-interactions are potentially dangerous as they can change the long range behaviour of the field. Nevertheless, we show that they do not lead to any dramatic phenomenological consequence with respect to the linear case and solar system constraints are fulfilled.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of random two-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Calvin W

    2010-01-01

    The input to the configuration-interaction shell model includes many dozens or hundreds of independent two-body matrix elements. Previous studies have shown that when fitting to experimental low-lying spectra, the greatest sensitivity is to only a few linear combinations of matrix elements. Here we consider interactions drawn from the two-body random ensemble, or TBRE, and find that the low-lying spectra are also most sensitive to only a few linear combinations of two-body matrix elements, in a fashion nearly indistinguishable from an interaction empirically fit to data. We find in particular the spectra for both the random and empirical interactions are sensitive to similar matrix elements, which we analyze using monopole and contact interactions.

  6. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-12-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  7. Analysis of User Requirements in Interactive 3D Video Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyue Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of three dimensional (3D display technologies has resulted in a proliferation of 3D video production and broadcasting, attracting a lot of research into capture, compression and delivery of stereoscopic content. However, the predominant design practice of interactions with 3D video content has failed to address its differences and possibilities in comparison to the existing 2D video interactions. This paper presents a study of user requirements related to interaction with the stereoscopic 3D video. The study suggests that the change of view, zoom in/out, dynamic video browsing, and textual information are the most relevant interactions with stereoscopic 3D video. In addition, we identified a strong demand for object selection that resulted in a follow-up study of user preferences in 3D selection using virtual-hand and ray-casting metaphors. These results indicate that interaction modality affects users’ decision of object selection in terms of chosen location in 3D, while user attitudes do not have significant impact. Furthermore, the ray-casting-based interaction modality using Wiimote can outperform the volume-based interaction modality using mouse and keyboard for object positioning accuracy.

  8. Organochlorine Pesticides Exposure and Bladder Cancer: Evaluation from a Gene-Environment Perspective in a Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in the Canary Islands (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, L D; Henríquez-Hernández, L A; Zumbado, M; Almeida-González, M; Álvarez-León, E E; Navarro, P; Luzardo, O P

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer has increased significantly since the 1950s. Pesticide exposure has been linked with increasing bladder cancer incidence, although the evidence is inconclusive. However, most epidemiological studies did not evaluate the potential role played by the organochlorine pesticides, the most widely used pesticides in Western countries from the 1940s to the 1970s. Organochlorine pesticides were banned in the late 1970s because of their persistence in the environment and their carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. Organochlorine pesticides were employed in huge amounts in the Spanish archipelago of the Canary Islands; the authors, therefore, evaluated the role played by organochlorine pesticides exposure on bladder cancer. Serum levels of the most prevalent organochlorine pesticides used in the agriculture of these Islands (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [p,p'-DDT], and its metabolites dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene [p,p'-DDE] and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane [p,p'-DDD], hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor, cis-chlordane, trans-chlordane, α- and β-endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, methoxychlor, and mirex) were measured in 140 bladder cancer cases and 206 controls. GST-M1 and GST-T1 gene polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. These results showed that serum levels of organochlorine pesticides did not increase bladder cancer risk. On the contrary, total burden of hexachlorocyclohexanes was found to be negatively associated to bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.929, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.865-0.997; P = .041). This effect disappeared when the distribution of the gluthathione S-transferase polymorphisms was introduced in the statistical model. These results indicate that organochlorine pesticides are not a risk factor for bladder cancer. However, these findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for organochlorine

  9. Proteomic tools for the analysis of transient interactions between metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Rubio, Silvia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel Á

    2011-05-01

    Metalloproteins play major roles in cell metabolism and signalling pathways. In many cases, they show moonlighting behaviour, acting in different processes, depending on the physiological state of the cell. To understand these multitasking proteins, we need to discover the partners with which they carry out such novel functions. Although many technological and methodological tools have recently been reported for the detection of protein interactions, specific approaches to studying the interactions involving metalloproteins are not yet well developed. The task is even more challenging for metalloproteins, because they often form short-lived complexes that are difficult to detect. In this review, we gather the different proteomic techniques and biointeractomic tools reported in the literature. All of them have shown their applicability to the study of transient and weak protein-protein interactions, and are therefore suitable for metalloprotein interactions.

  10. Micromechanical analysis of interaction energy for SMA reinforced composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The energy of the interaction between the matrix and the inclusions in shape memory alloy (SMA) re- inforced composite is one of the most important and complicated parts in thermodynamic constitutive theory. In this paper, the interaction energy is derived based on the classical theory of micromechanics and the thermodynamic theory. The SMA composite is treated as three phases, namely the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase. The interaction among the three phases is analyzed in a way close to the fact. The present expression is used to calculate the interaction energy of a typical SMA composite with attentions paid to understand of the effects of the matrix material, the fiber ge- ometry, and the fiber/matrix volume ratio. It is shown that the method developed in this paper is credible compared with the references. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  11. Micromechanical analysis of interaction enersy for SMA reinforced composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU YuPing; DUI GuanSuo; DUO Liu

    2009-01-01

    The energy of the interaction between the matrix and the inclusions in shape memory alloy (SMA) re-inforced composite is one of the most important and complicated parts in thermodynamic constitutive theory. In this paper, the interaction energy is derived based on the classical theory of micromechanics and the thermodynamic theory. The SMA composite is treated as three phases, namely the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase. The interaction among the three phases is analyzed in a way close to the fact. The present expression is used to calculate the interaction energy of a typical SMA composite with attentions paid to understand of the effects of the matrix material, the fiber ge-ometry, and the fiber/matrix volume ratio. It is shown that the method developed in this paper is credi-ble compared with the references. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  12. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2017-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team micro-processes affect the likelihood of positivity occurring within dynamic team interactions. In doing so, we build on and expand previous work on individual positivity and integrate theory on temp...

  13. Theoretical analysis of noncanonical base pairing interactions in RNA molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhananjay Bhattacharyya; Siv Chand Koripella; Abhijit Mitra; Vijay Babu Rajendran; Bhabdyuti Sinha

    2007-08-01

    Noncanonical base pairs in RNA have strong structural and functional implications but are currently not considered for secondary structure predictions. We present results of comparative ab initio studies of stabilities and interaction energies for the three standard and 24 selected unusual RNA base pairs reported in the literature. Hydrogen added models of isolated base pairs, with heavy atoms frozen in their ‘away from equilibrium’ geometries, built from coordinates extracted from NDB, were geometry optimized using HF/6-31G** basis set, both before and after unfreezing the heavy atoms. Interaction energies, including BSSE and deformation energy corrections, were calculated, compared with respective single point MP2 energies, and correlated with occurrence frequencies and with types and geometries of hydrogen bonding interactions. Systems having two or more N-H…O/N hydrogen bonds had reasonable interaction energies which correlated well with respective occurrence frequencies and highlighted the possibility of some of them playing important roles in improved secondary structure prediction methods. Several of the remaining base pairs with one N-H…O/N and/or one C-H…O/N interactions respectively, had poor interaction energies and negligible occurrences. High geometry variations on optimization of some of these were suggestive of their conformational switch like characteristics.

  14. Quantitative analysis of genomic element interactions by molecular colony technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Alexey A; Chetverina, Helena V; Chermnykh, Elina S; Razin, Sergey V; Chetverin, Alexander B

    2014-03-01

    Distant genomic elements were found to interact within the folded eukaryotic genome. However, the used experimental approach (chromosome conformation capture, 3C) enables neither determination of the percentage of cells in which the interactions occur nor demonstration of simultaneous interaction of >2 genomic elements. Each of the above can be done using in-gel replication of interacting DNA segments, the technique reported here. Chromatin fragments released from formaldehyde-cross-linked cells by sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction and sonication are distributed in a polyacrylamide gel layer followed by amplification of selected test regions directly in the gel by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The fragments that have been cross-linked and separate fragments give rise to multi- and monocomponent molecular colonies, respectively, which can be distinguished and counted. Using in-gel replication of interacting DNA segments, we demonstrate that in the material from mouse erythroid cells, the majority of fragments containing the promoters of active β-globin genes and their remote enhancers do not form complexes stable enough to survive sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction and sonication. This indicates that either these elements do not interact directly in the majority of cells at a given time moment, or the formed DNA-protein complex cannot be stabilized by formaldehyde cross-linking.

  15. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  16. From traditional to interactive playspaces: automatic analysis of player behavior in the interactive tag playground

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Célleri, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Play is an essential activity for the development of children. However, with the emergence of digital games, the way in which games are played has changed significantly. Many digital games promote sedentary gaming habits, or make it difficult for meaningful social interactions to occur. Nevertheless

  17. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  18. An interaction stress analysis of nanoscale elastic asperity contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat, Meysam; Ghiasi, Hossein; Hubert, Pascal

    2012-01-07

    A new contact mechanics model is presented and experimentally examined at the nanoscale. The current work addresses the well-established field of contact mechanics, but at the nanoscale where interaction stresses seem to be effective. The new model combines the classic Hertz theory with the new interaction stress concept to provide the stress field in contact bodies with adhesion. Hence, it benefits from the simplicity of non-adhesive models, while offering the same applicability as more complicated models. In order to examine the model, a set of atomic force microscopy experiments were performed on substrates made from single-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper. The stress field in the substrate was obtained by superposition of the Hertzian stress field and the interaction stress field, and then compared to other contact models. Finally, the effect of indentation depth on the stress field was studied for the interaction model as well as for the Hertz, Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov, and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts models. Thus, the amount of error introduced by using the Hertz theory to model contacts with adhesion was found for different indentation depths. It was observed that in the absence of interaction stress data, the Hertz theory predictions led to smaller errors compared to other contact-with-adhesion models.

  19. Transboundary water justice: a combined reading of literature on critical transboundary water interaction and "justice", for analysis and diplomacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, M.; Warner, J.F.; Mirumachi, N.; Matthews, N.; McLaughlin, K.

    2014-01-01

    By reviewing and blending two main bodies of research (critical transboundary water interaction analysis and centuries of thought on social justice) this paper seeks to improve international transboundary water interaction analysis and diplomacy. Various implications for transboundary analysis and d

  20. Externalizing behaviors in preadolescents: familial risk to externalizing behaviors, prenatal and perinatal risks, and their interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschgens, C.J.M.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Aken, M.A. van; Ormel, J.; Verhulst, F.C.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence indicates that there is a rich and varied interplay between persons and their environments, which strongly suggests that this involves gene-environment correlations and interactions. We investigated whether familial risk (FR) to externalizing behaviors and prenatal

  1. Combining microsimulation and spatial interaction models for retail location analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Tomoki; Fotheringham, A. Stewart; Hanaoka, Kazumasa; Clarke, Graham; Ballas, Dimitris; Yano, Keiji

    2007-12-01

    Although the disaggregation of consumers is crucial in understanding the fragmented markets that are dominant in many developed countries, it is not always straightforward to carry out such disaggregation within conventional retail modelling frameworks due to the limitations of data. In particular, consumer grouping based on sampled data is not assured to link with the other statistics that are vital in estimating sampling biases and missing variables in the sampling survey. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a useful combination of spatial interaction modelling and microsimulation approaches for the reliable estimation of retail interactions based on a sample survey of consumer behaviour being linked with other areal statistics. We demonstrate this approach by building an operational retail interaction model to estimate expenditure flows from households to retail stores in a local city in Japan, Kusatsu City.

  2. Fluid-structure interactions models, analysis and finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This book starts by introducing the fundamental concepts of mathematical continuum mechanics for fluids and solids and their coupling. Special attention is given to the derivation of variational formulations for the subproblems describing fluid- and solid-mechanics as well as the coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two monolithic formulations for fluid-structure interactions are described in detail: the well-established ALE formulation and the modern Fully Eulerian formulation, which can effectively deal with problems featuring large deformation and contact. Further, the book provides details on state-of-the-art discretization schemes for fluid- and solid-mechanics and considers the special needs of coupled problems with interface-tracking and interface-capturing techniques. Lastly, advanced topics like goal-oriented error estimation, multigrid solution and gradient-based optimization schemes are discussed in the context of fluid-structure interaction problems.

  3. Kinetic analysis of interaction between lipopolysaccharide and biomolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan YANG; Xiurong YANG

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major compo-nent of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria. It interacts with some biomolecules and triggers a toxic reaction. In this paper, we studied the interaction between LPS from Salmonella Minnesota and some biomolecules using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Biomolecules were immobilized on a CM5 sensor chip using the amino coupling method and LPS was injected over the immobilized surfaces. The affinity constant KA of LPS with serum albumin, hemoglobin, chitosan and lysozyme was 2.36 × 107, 2.03 × 108,7.58×106, 2.82 × 104 L·mol-1, respectively. However, LPS could not interact with ferritin.

  4. Affinity Electrophoresis for Analysis of Catalytic Module-Carbohydrate Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis has long been used to study the interaction between proteins and large soluble ligands. The technique has been found to have great utility for the examination of polysaccharide binding by proteins, particularly carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). In recent years, carbohy......Affinity electrophoresis has long been used to study the interaction between proteins and large soluble ligands. The technique has been found to have great utility for the examination of polysaccharide binding by proteins, particularly carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). In recent years......, carbohydrate surface binding sites of proteins mostly enzymes have also been investigated by this method. Here, we describe a protocol for identifying binding interactions between enzyme catalytic modules and a variety of carbohydrate ligands....

  5. Mathematical Analysis of a Coarsening Model with Local Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmers, Michael; Niethammer, Barbara; Velázquez, Juan J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We consider particles on a one-dimensional lattice whose evolution is governed by nearest-neighbor interactions where particles that have reached size zero are removed from the system. Concentrating on configurations with infinitely many particles, we prove existence of solutions under a reasonable density assumption on the initial data and show that the vanishing of particles and the localized interactions can lead to non-uniqueness. Moreover, we provide a rigorous upper coarsening estimate and discuss generic statistical properties as well as some non-generic behavior of the evolution by means of heuristic arguments and numerical observations.

  6. Impedance Interaction Modeling and Analysis for Bidirectional Cascaded Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Yanjun; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe;

    2015-01-01

    more uncertainty to the system stability. An investigation is performed here for showing that the forward and reverse interactions are prominently different in terms of dynamics and stability even though the cascaded converter control remains unchanged. An important guideline has been drawn...

  7. Identification and analysis of interactions between sea use functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.T.; Quirijns, F.J.; Leopold, M.F.; Slijkerman, D.M.E.; Jongbloed, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    This report focuses on the interactions both positive and negative between offshore wind energy and the non-wind sea use functions.Some sea use functions can co-exist without substantial negative effects. Other combinations are problematic or even impossible and should be avoided. Therefore the inte

  8. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team mi

  9. Sensitivity analysis of fluid-structure interaction problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etienne, S.; Pelletier, D. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: stephane.etienne@polymtl.ca

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between solids and fluids (FSI) have been a topic of interest for engineers for many years. The behavior of vessels subject to wave loads, of planes in flight condition as well as submarine or transmission lines are but a few examples. In an attempt to address these problems, the present paper presents a formulation which allows to treat interactions between an incompressible flow and a structure undergoing large displacements. We assume existence and unicity of the solution. The interested reader is referred, for a mathematical discussion of existence and unicity. The approach to coupling can be addressed in two ways: weakly-coupled methods for which algorithms for structure and fluid are segregated, as is commonly done for simplicity and often because engineers have access to existing structural and fluid codes; and tightly-coupled or monolithic methods, for which the formulation guarantees satisfaction of equilibrium of the interface between the fluid and the solid. The latter has been chosen as it allows for quadratic convergence of Newton's method. The paper begins with the description of the steady state governing equations for laminar incompressible fluids, hyperelastic solid behaviour, pseudo-solid mapping and fluid-structure interfaces. The weak forms of the equations are then presented. We proceed with the description of the continuous sensitivity equations for fluid-structure interactions problems. The following sections detail the adaptive finite element procedure for the fluid-structure interaction and sensitivity problems. Results are presented and the paper ends with conclusions and discussions. (author)

  10. Interaction in Distance Education Environments: A Trend Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Serçin; Yilmaz, Ayse Bagriacik; Dikmen, Cemal Hakan; Ermis, Ugur Ferhat; Gürbüz, Onur

    The aim of this study is to determine the trend concerning interaction in distance education between the years 2011 and 2015. According to this aim, 544 articles in the databases of EBSCO, Scopus, and Web of Science were examined. The examination has been conducted on the basis of various variables including year, country, number of authors,…

  11. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2017-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team mi

  12. Analysis of moniliformin in maize plants using hydrophilic interaction chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Thrane, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    A novel HPLC method was developed for detection of the Fusarium mycotoxin, moniliformin in whole maize plants. The method is based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) on a ZIC zwitterion column combined with diode array detection and negative electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI...

  13. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  14. Muscle Quality and Myosteatosis: Novel Associations With Mortality Risk: The Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Ilse; Murphy, Rachel A; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Visser, Marjolein; Launer, Lenore; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lang, Thomas F; Harris, Tamara B

    2016-01-01

    Muscle composition may affect mortality risk, but prior studies have been limited to specific samples or less precise determination of muscle composition. We evaluated associations of thigh muscle composition, determined using computed tomography imaging, and knee extension strength with mortality risk among 4,824 participants aged 76.4 (standard deviation (SD), 5.5) years from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios. After 8.8 years of follow-up, there were 1,942 deaths. For men, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 11% and 22%. Each SD-increment increase in intermuscular adipose tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with higher mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.22) and HR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30), respectively). For women, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 12% and 19%. Greater intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with an 8% higher mortality risk (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16). This study shows that muscle composition is associated with mortality risk. These results also show the importance of improving muscle strength and area and lowering muscle adipose tissue infiltration.

  15. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    The role of “genes” on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one’s job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated. PMID:24860199

  16. Analysis of protein interactions at native chloroplast membranes by ellipsometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Kriechbaumer

    Full Text Available Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE. We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins.

  17. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, J. B.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, Y. S. and others [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The objectives of this study are to review the methods of soil- structure interaction system analysis, particularly the direct method, and to carry out the blind prediction analysis of the Forced Vibration Test(FVT) before backfill in the course of Hualien LSST project. The scope and contents of this study are as follows : theoretical review on soil-structure interaction analysis methods, free-field response analysis methods, modelling methods of unbounded exterior region, hualien LSST FVT blind prediction analysis before backfill. The analysis results are found to be very well compared with the field test results.

  18. Interaction Analysis in Performing Arts: A Case Study in Multimodal Choreography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Maria; Luciani, Annie

    The growing overture towards interacting virtual words and the variety of uses, have brought great changes in the performing arts, that worth a profound analysis in order to understand the emerging issues. We examine the performance conception for its embodiment capacity with a methodology based on interaction analysis. Finally, we propose a new situation of multimodal choreography that respects the aforementioned analysis, and we evaluate the results on a simulation exercise.

  19. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited...... for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions...... determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide...

  20. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of the elements interaction in liquid copper melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoylova, O V; Mikhaylov, G G [South Urals State University, 76 Lenin avenue, Chelyabinsk, 454080 (Russian Federation); Trofimov, E A [Zlatoust Branch, South Urals State University, 16 Turgenev street, Zlatoust, 456209 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: tea7510@rambler.ru

    2008-02-15

    Interaction between impurity elements (in particular, Si, Ni and O) dissolved in copper melt has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The X-rays microanalysis has been used to investigate reactions products in the melt. Experimental results have allowed to determine conditions of various complex compounds formation. In particular, interaction between Si and Ni in copper melt leading to formation of double compounds (silicides) has been discovered. Phase diagram of Cu{sub 2}O-NiO system has been calculated. Calculation results are in good agreement with literary data. Activities a{sub Cu2O} and a{sub NiO} have been calculated. The deviation of activity from Raoult law is negative for Cu{sub 2}O and positive for NiO.

  2. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  3. Analysis and application of opinion model with multiple topic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Ximeng

    2017-08-01

    To reveal heterogeneous behaviors of opinion evolution in different scenarios, we propose an opinion model with topic interactions. Individual opinions and topic features are represented by a multidimensional vector. We measure an agent's action towards a specific topic by the product of opinion and topic feature. When pairs of agents interact for a topic, their actions are introduced to opinion updates with bounded confidence. Simulation results show that a transition from a disordered state to a consensus state occurs at a critical point of the tolerance threshold, which depends on the opinion dimension. The critical point increases as the dimension of opinions increases. Multiple topics promote opinion interactions and lead to the formation of macroscopic opinion clusters. In addition, more topics accelerate the evolutionary process and weaken the effect of network topology. We use two sets of large-scale real data to evaluate the model, and the results prove its effectiveness in characterizing a real evolutionary process. Our model achieves high performance in individual action prediction and even outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Meanwhile, our model has much smaller computational complexity. This paper provides a demonstration for possible practical applications of theoretical opinion dynamics.

  4. Development of soil-structure interaction analysis method (II) - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Park, H. K. and others [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    This project includes following six items : free field analysis for the determination of site input motions, impedance analysis which simplifies the effects of soil-structure interaction by using lumped parameters, soil-structure interaction analysis including the material nonlinearity of soil depending on the level of strains, strong geometric nonlinearity due to the uplifting of the base, seismic analysis of underground structure such as varied pipes, seismic analysis of liquid storage tanks. Each item contains following contents respectively : state-of-the-art review on each item and data base construction on the past researches, theoretical review on the technology of soil-structure interaction analysis, proposing preferable technology and estimating the domestic applicability, proposing guidelines for evaluation of safety and analysis scheme.

  5. Assessing Group Interaction with Social Language Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholand, Andrew J.; Tausczik, Yla R.; Pennebaker, James W.

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  6. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  7. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Jun; Xie, Jing; Lipford, Heather Richter; Chu, Bill

    2014-01-01

    .... Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic...

  8. Liminality in language use: some thoughts on interactional analysis from a dialogical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kyoko

    2010-03-01

    This essay traces my engagement with Michèle Grossen's ideas of a dialogical perspective on interaction analysis (Grossen Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 1-22, 2009) and highlights a process account of self in interaction. Firstly I draw on Turner's concept of liminality with respect to the transformative, temporal significance in interaction. Secondly I explored further the conversation analytic concepts such as formulation and reformulation as a viable analytical tool for a dialogical perspective. Lastly, I addressed the issue of interaction in institutional settings, in particular with interactional asymmetries of interaction, whilst relativising the I-position dialogical perspective. I explore insights from social anthropology as well as revisiting conversation analysis and discursive psychology, concluding that a promising direction would be sought through a cross-fertilisation between dialogism and other sibling perspectives concerning language use, communication, social action and discourse- and narrative-based analyses.

  9. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  10. [Fluid solid interaction analysis of bioprosthetic heart valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuejie; Du, Yawei; Zhang, Linan; Hou, Zengtao; Ye, Xin

    2014-09-01

    This paper constructs numerical models of bioprosthetic heart valve and blood. The fluid solid interaction is carried out using penalty function method. The mechanical property of the bioprosthetic heart valve during cardiac cycle is simulated with ANSYS software. Results show that the Von Mises stress concentrates at the junction of attachment edge and coaptation edge. The open time of bioprosthetic heart valve is consistent with that of actural measurement. The peak velocity of blood is in the range of physiology. This model provides more realistic mechanical property of bioprosthetic heart valve during cardiac cycle compared to pure solid model, and facilitates design and optimization of bioprosthetic heart valve.

  11. Fourier Analysis of an Expanded Gravity Model for Spatio-Temporal Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    Fourier analysis and cross-correlation function are successfully applied to improving the conventional gravity model of interaction between cities by introducing a time variable to the attraction measures (e.g., city sizes). The traditional model assumes spatial interaction as instantaneous, while the new model considers the interaction as a temporal process and measures it as an aggregation over a period of time. By doing so, the new model not only is more theoretically sound, but also enables us to integrate the analysis of temporal process into spatial interaction modeling. Based on cross-correlation function, the developed model is calibrated by Fourier analysis techniques, and the computation process is demonstrated in four steps. The paper uses a simple case study to illustrate the approach to modeling the interurban interaction, and highlight the relationship between the new model and the conventional gravity model.

  12. Molecular Analysis of AFP and HSA Interactions with PTEN Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyue; Lin, Bo; Zhou, Peng; Li, Mengsen

    2015-01-01

    Human cytoplasmic alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been classified as a member of the albuminoid gene family. The protein sequence of AFP has significant homology to that of human serum albumin (HSA), but its biological characteristics are vastly different from HSA. The AFP functions as a regulator in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway, but HSA plays a key role as a transport protein. To probe their molecular mechanisms, we have applied colocalization, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), and molecular docking approaches to analyze the differences between AFP and HSA. The data from colocalization and co-IP displayed a strong interaction between AFP and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog), demonstrating that AFP did bind to PTEN, but HSA did not. The molecular docking study further showed that the AFP domains I and III could contact with PTEN. In silicon substitutions of AFP binding site residues at position 490M/K and 105L/R corresponding to residues K490 and R105 in HSA resulted in steric clashes with PTEN residues R150 and K46, respectively. These steric clashes may explain the reason why HSA cannot bind to PTEN. Ultimately, the experimental results and the molecular modeling data from the interactions of AFP and HSA with PTEN will help us to identify targets for designing drugs and vaccines against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Asymmetrical peer interaction and formal operational development: Dialogue dimensions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanović-Ilić Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study is to define dialogue dimensions in order to describe the interaction within peer dyads and potentially connect them with formal operations development in the less competent participants. Its significance is related to rare investigations of this subject in the context of formal operations development and to practical implications regarding peer involvement in education process. The sample included 316 students aged 12 and 14. The research had an experimental design: pre-test, intervention and post-test. In the pre-test and the post-test phases students solved the formal operations test BLOT. According to the pre-test results, 47 dyads were formed where less and more competent students jointly solved tasks from BLOT. Their dialogues were coded by 14 dimensions operationalized for this purpose. Correlations between the dialogue dimensions indicate clearly distinguished positive and negative interaction patterns. There are no connections between dialogue dimensions and progress of less competent adolescents on BLOT in the entire sample, but several are found in the subsamples. Arguments exchange seems to be the most encouraging dialogue feature regarding formal operations development, particularly in older students. This confirms relevant research data and the expectations about peers’ constructive role in fostering cognitive development. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018: Identification, measurement and development of cognitive and emotional competences important for a society oriented towards European integrations

  14. Halogen Bonding: An AIM Analysis of the Weak Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU, Jian-Wei; LU, Yun-Xiang; YU, Qing-Sen; ZHANG, Hua-Xin; JIANG, Yong-Jun

    2006-01-01

    A series of complexes formed between halogen-containing molecules and ammonia have been investigated by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) approach to gain a deeper insight into halogen bonding. The existence of the halogen bond critical points (XBCP) and the values of the electron density (ρb) and Laplacian of electron density (▽2pb) at the XBCP reveal the closed-shell interactions in these complexes. Integrated atomic properties such as charge, energy, polarization moment, volume of the halogen bond donor atoms, and the corresponding changes (△) upon complexation have been calculated. The present calculations have demonstrated that the halogen bond represents different AIM properties as compared to the well-documented hydrogen bond. Both the electron density and the Laplacian of electron density at the XBCP have been shown to correlate well with the interaction energy, which indicates that the topological parameters at the XBCP can be treated as a good measure of the halogen bond strength.In addition, an excellent linear relationship between the interatomic distance d(X…N) and the logarithm of ρb has been established.

  15. Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to help teaching interactional competence in English to adult second language learners from lower to intermediate levels. To set the context, this article gives a brief overview on the use of CA in second language research as well as considering the construct of interactional competence…

  16. Parent-Child Interaction in Nigerian Families: Conversation Analysis, Context and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Annabel; Radford, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a conversation analysis (CA) approach to explore parent-child interaction (PCI) within Nigerian families. We illustrate how speech and language therapists (SLTs), by using CA, can tailor recommendations according to the interactional style of each individual family that are consonant with the family's cultural beliefs. Three…

  17. Ghosts, Stars, and Learning Online: Analysis of Interaction Patterns in Student Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Peretz, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Discussions are commonly used in online teaching and have been shown to foster student learning and collaboration. This case study uses content analysis to explore the interaction patterns of student online discussions during a semester-long teacher preparation course using concepts from sociometry. Findings suggest that interaction patterns were…

  18. Isobolographic analysis of pharmacodynamic interactions between antifungal agents and ciprofloxacin against Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulou, Theodouli; Meletiadis, Joseph; Sein, Tin; Papaioannidou, Paraskevi; Tsiouris, Ioannis; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J

    2008-06-01

    Patients suffering from invasive mycoses often receive concomitant antifungal therapy and antibacterial agents. Assessment of pharmacodynamic interactions between antifungal and antibacterial agents is complicated by the absence of a common antifungal end point for both agents. Ciprofloxacin has no intrinsic antifungal activity but may interact with antifungal agents, since it inhibits DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II), which is abundant in fungi. We therefore employed isobolographic analysis adapted to incorporate a nonactive agent in order to analyze the potential in vitro interaction between the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin and several representative antifungal agents against Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus strains by using a microdilution checkerboard technique. In agreement with earlier in vitro studies, conventional fractional inhibitory concentration index analysis was unable to detect interactions between ciprofloxacin and antifungal agents. However, isobolographic analysis revealed significant pharmacodynamic interactions between antifungal agents and ciprofloxacin against C. albicans and A. fumigatus strains. Amphotericin B demonstrated concentration-dependent interactions for both species, with synergy (interaction indices, 0.14 to 0.81) observed at ciprofloxacin concentrations of Isobolographic analysis may help to elucidate the pharmacodynamic interactions between antifungal and non-antifungal agents and to develop better management strategies against invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis.

  19. Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to help teaching interactional competence in English to adult second language learners from lower to intermediate levels. To set the context, this article gives a brief overview on the use of CA in second language research as well as considering the construct of interactional competence…

  20. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  1. Residential Satisfaction and Friendship Formation in High- and Low-Rise Student Housing: An Interactional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Charles J.; Wilcox, Brian L.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the interaction between social competence and type of environment showed that residents of low-rise dormitories were significantly more satisfied and established more dormitory-based friendships than residents of a high-rise mega-dorm setting. A number of interactions were found between social competence, type of environment, and…

  2. Data Analysis Tools and Methods for Improving the Interaction Design in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Paul Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this digital era, learning from data gathered from different software systems may have a great impact on the quality of the interaction experience. There are two main directions that come to enhance this emerging research domain, Intelligent Data Analysis (IDA) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI). HCI specific research methodologies can be…

  3. Interactive Construction Digital Tools With Real Time Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Jens; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2007-01-01

    . An example of a prototype for a digital conceptual design tool with integrated real time structural analysis is presented and compared with a more common Building Information Modelling (BIM) approach. It is concluded that a digital conceptual design tool with embedded real time structural analysis could......The recent developments in computational design tools have evolved into a sometimes purely digital process which opens up for new perspectives and problems in the sketching process. One of the interesting possibilities lay within the hybrid practitioner- or architect-engineer approach, where...... an architect-engineer or hybrid practitioner works simultaneously with both aesthetic and technical design requirements. In this paper the problem of a vague or not existing link between digital design tools, used by architects and designers, and the analysis tools developed by and for engineers is considered...

  4. [Analysis of carbapenems by hydrophilic interaction chromatography and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinfang; Ji, Shunli; Li, Shaohui; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-09-01

    A hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) method has been developed for the determination of the four carbapenems in human urine and tap water. The parameters including acetonitrile amount, buffer concentration and pH on the retention behavior of the four carbapenem antibiotics on an XAmide column were explored and the possible HILIC retention mechanism was proposed. Good linearities were obtained over the mass concentration ranges of 0.1-250 mg/L for biapenem, doripenem and ertapenem with correlation coefficients (R2) = 0.999 9 and while it was 0.5-250 mg/L with R2 = 0.999 8 for meropenem. The limits of quantification (LOQs) of all carbapenems were 0.1-0.5 mg/L. The spiked recoveries were within 100.4%-111.9% (RSD carbapenems in human urine samples and tap water samples.

  5. Bifurcation analysis of a photoreceptor interaction model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Erika T.; Radulescu, Anca; Wirkus, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the term used to describe a diverse set of degenerative eye diseases affecting the photoreceptors (rods and cones) in the retina. This work builds on an existing mathematical model of RP that focused on the interaction of the rods and cones. We non-dimensionalize the model and examine the stability of the equilibria. We then numerically investigate other stable modes that are present in the system for various parameter values and relate these modes to the original problem. Our results show that stable modes exist for a wider range of parameter values than the stability of the equilibrium solutions alone, suggesting that additional approaches to preventing cone death may exist.

  6. Determining protein function and interaction from genome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Yeates, Todd O.

    2004-08-03

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  7. Interactive state-space analysis of concurrent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.T.; Razouk, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The introduction of concurrency into programs has added to the complexity of the software design process. This is most evident in the design of communications protocols where concurrency is inherent to the behavior of the system. The complexity exhibited by such software systems makes more evident the need for computer-aided tools for automatically analyzing behavior. The Distributed Systems project at UCI has been developing techniques and tools, based on Petri nets, which support the design and evaluation of concurrent software systems. Techniques based on constructing reachability graphs that represent projections and selections of complete state-spaces have been developed. This paper focuses attention on the computer-aided analysis of these graphs for the purpose of proving correctness of the modeled system. The application of the analysis technique to evaluating simulation results for correctness is discussed. The tool which supports this analysis (the reachability graph analyzer, RGA) is also described. This tool provides mechanisms for proving general system properties (e.g., deadlock-freeness) as well as system-specific properties. The tool is sufficiently general to allow a user to apply complex user-defined analysis algorithms to reachability graphs. The alternating-bit protocol, with a bounded channel, is used to demonstrate the power of the tool and to point to future extensions.

  8. Hidden Crises and Communication : An Interactional Analysis of Hidden Crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Annette

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I describe the ways in which the communication discipline can make a hidden crisis transparent. For this purpose I examine the concept of crisis entrepreneurship from a communication point of view. Using discourse analysis, I analyse the discursive practices of crisis entrepreneurs in

  9. Interactive human behavior analysis in open or public spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hung, H.; Odobez, J.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the past years, efforts in surveillance and open space analysis have focused on traditional computer vision problems like scene modeling or object detection and tracking. Research on human behavior recognition have tended to work on predefined simple activities such as running, jumping or left lu

  10. Stability analysis of interacting queues in the ALOHA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ramesh

    The author considers the finite-user, infinite-buffer slotted ALOHA system and analytically extends the known bounds for its stability region. The technique used consists of expressing the stability region in terms of certain status probabilities and then solving for the status probabilities by using results from the analysis of dependent queues and that of Markov chains.

  11. Impeller-diffuser interaction: analysis of the unsteady flow structures based on their direction of propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Bulot; I. Trébinjac

    2007-01-01

    The present study is focused on the analysis of the deterministic fluctuations arising from the rotor-stator interaction within a transonic centrifugal compressor stage. A spectral analysis applied to the unsteady flow field leads to the values of the rotation speed of most energetic modes. From these values, the various structures are classified according to their direction of propagation which leads to a comprehensive description of the underlying mechanisms involved in the interaction.

  12. Advanced Seismic Fragility Modeling using Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandu [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talaat, Mohamed [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States); Hashimoto, Philip [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this effort is to compare the seismic fragilities of a nuclear power plant system obtained by a traditional seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) and an advanced SPRA that utilizes Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction (NLSSI) analysis. Soil-structure interaction (SSI) response analysis for a traditional SPRA involves the linear analysis, which ignores geometric nonlinearities (i.e., soil and structure are glued together and the soil material undergoes tension when the structure uplifts). The NLSSI analysis will consider geometric nonlinearities.

  13. Individuals' stress assessment using human-smartphone interaction analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciman, Matteo; Wac, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The increasing presence of stress in people’ lives has motivated much research efforts focusing on continuous stress assessment methods of individuals, leveraging smartphones and wearable devices. These methods have several drawbacks, i.e., they use invasive external devices, thus increasing entry...... costs and reducing user acceptance, or they use some of privacy-related information. This paper presents an approach for stress assessment that leverages data extracted from smartphone sensors, and that is not invasive concerning privacy. Two different approaches are presented. One, based on smartphone...... gestures analysis, e.g., ‘tap’, ‘scroll’, ‘swipe’ and ‘text writing’, and evaluated in laboratory settings with 13 participants (F-measure 79-85% within-subject model, 70-80% global model); the second one based on smartphone usage analysis and tested in-the-wild with 25 participants (F-measure 77...

  14. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  15. Employing Power Graph Analysis to Facilitate Modeling Molecular Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momchil Nenov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling is used to explore and understand complex systems ranging from weather patterns to social networks to gene-expression regulatory mechanisms. There is an upper limit to the amount of details that can be reflected in a model imposed by finite computational resources. Thus, there are methods to reduce the complexity of the modeled system to its most significant parameters. We discuss the suitability of clustering techniques, in particular Power Graph Analysis as an intermediate step of modeling.

  16. A Data Analysis Center for Electromagnetic and Hadronic Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, William John [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Workman, Ronald L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies

    2015-05-31

    The GW Data Analysis Center (DAC) has made significant progress in its program to enhance and expand the partial-wave and multipole analyses of fundamental reactions, while maintaining and expanding each associated database. These efforts provide guidance to national and international experimental and theoretical efforts, and are an important link between theory and experiment. Our principal goals are focused on baryon and meson physics programs and related topics.

  17. Towards Interactive Timing Analysis for Designing Reactive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    check timing overruns due to hardware failures. Mendler et al. [31] propose an algebraic approach for the WCRT analysis for Esterel programs running on...WAGA99: Second Workshop on Attribute Grammars and their Applications. (1999) 173–184 15. Kirner, R., Lang , R., Freiberger, G., Puschner, P.: Fully... Algebra and Interfaces for Esterel-Style Synchronous Processing. In: Proceedings of the Design, Automation and Test in Europe Conference (DATE’09

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of turbulence/mobile-bed interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil-Baudard, Thibaud; Chauchat, Julien; Hurther, David; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Highly resoluted and co-located velocity and concentration measurements have been obtained by using an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) in an intense sediment transport laboratory experiment. This dataset is used to investigate the complex coupling between the turbulent fluid motion and the sediment bed. It has been shown that the bed interface position is highly intermittent because of the impact of the large-scale coherent structures. The important contribution of the streamwise turbulent fluxes observed close to the sediment bed might be related to the bed-intermittency. In return, the mobile bed affects the turbulent fluid flow. It is shown that the turbulent kinetic energy is enhanced by the bed-mobility compared with a similar clear-water flow. However the streamwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations are observed to be less correlated in the suspension region, resulting in a reduced efficiency of turbulence for momentum mixing. In the suspension region, the turbulent particle diffusivity is shown to be twice greater than the momentum diffusivity. Two possible mechanisms might provide an explanation for this feature. First, the increased contribution of the so-called interaction turbulent events tend to increase the velocity gradients, consistently with a drop of momentum mixing. These interactions events are also efficient to increase particle dispersion and hence to increase concentration mixing. Second, the turbulent particle diffusivity is directly proportional to the particle settling velocity which is classically taken as the one measured or computed in still-water conditions. However, different mechanisms highlighted in the literatures imply a turbulence-induced modification of the settling velocity. This modification could partly explain why the turbulent concentration mixing appears to be more efficient than the momentum one in sediment-laden flows. These experimental results are utilized to improve the sub-grid dissipation and

  19. Isobolographic analysis of interactions among losigamone analog AO-620 and two conventional antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Jaszczyk, Bozena; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated pharmacodynamic interactions among AO-620, a losigamone analog, and two conventional antiepileptic drugs, valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB). Experiments were conducted in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Isobolographic analysis of the obtained data revealed pure additive interactions between AO-620 and PB applied at three dose ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 3:1. Antagonism was observed when AO-620 was co-administered with VPAat the ratio of 3:1, while additive interactions were seen in two remaining proportions (1:3 and 1:1). Surprisingly, the interaction pattern of AO-620 appeared quite different from that of losigamone.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of the interaction between chromium (III) and apoovotransferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingqi [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Liu Bin [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Yang Binsheng, E-mail: yangbs@sxu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Ovotransferrin (OTf) is a main member of the transferrin family that functions both as an iron transporter and an antibacterial agent. In this study, the thermodynamic property of the interaction between chromium (III) and ovotransferrin was investigated. The conditional binding constants for Cr{sup 3+} binding to the protein were determined by difference UV spectroscopy and were found to be log K{sub C}=13.08{+-}0.24 and log K{sub N}=5.65{+-}0.12. It was found that Cr{sup 3+} preferentially binds to the C-terminal site over the N-terminal site under these experimental conditions. The conformational changes in apoovotransferrin (apoOTf) during Cr{sup 3+} binding were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) as the fluorescence probe and by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results show that a large conformational change in apoOTf can be attributed to binding of Cr{sup 3+} to the N-terminal site, instead of the C-terminal site. In addition, the binding of Cr{sup 3+} to apoOTf stabilizes the structure of OTf as determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies. These findings help advance our understanding of the biological effects of Cr{sup 3+}.

  1. Predicting drug-target interactions through integrative analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Marja A; Aittokallio, Tero

    2013-04-05

    Chemical-genomic and genetic interaction profiling approaches are widely used to study mechanisms of drug action and resistance. However, there exist a number of scoring algorithms customized to different experimental assays, the relative performance of which remains poorly understood, especially with respect to different types of chemogenetic assays. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a test bed, we carried out a systematic evaluation among the main drug target analysis approaches in terms of predicting global drug-target interaction networks. We found drastic differences in their performance across different chemical-genomic assay types, such as those based on heterozygous and homozygous diploid or haploid deletion mutant libraries. Moreover, a relatively small overlap in the predicted targets was observed between those approaches that use either chemical-genomic screening alone or combined with genetic interaction profiling. A rank-based integration of the complementary scoring approaches led to improved overall performance, demonstrating that genetic interaction profiling provides added information on drug target prediction. Optimal performance was achieved when focusing specifically on the negative tail of the genetic interactions, suggesting that combining synthetic lethal interactions with chemical-genetic interactions provides highest information on drug-target interactions. A network view of rapamycin-interacting genes, pathways and complexes was used as an example to demonstrate the benefits of such integrated and optimized analysis of chemogenetic assays in yeast.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Interaction between Rural Residents’ Consumption and Income

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    In recent years,the income and consumption level of farmers is lower than that of urban residents,and in the context of current grave international economic environment,it is very unfavorable to expanding domestic demand and stimulating economic growth. Based on the empirical analysis of rural residents’ income and consumption,this paper explores the reasons for lagging consumption of rural residents in China,and finally puts forth the recommendations for increasing farmers’ income,promoting farmers’ consumption and expanding the rural market.

  3. Analysis and application of large-scale protein-protein interaction data sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jingchun; XU Jinlin; LI Yixue; SHI Tieliu

    2005-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in cells. Lots of experimental approaches and in silico methods have been developed to identify and predict large-scale protein-protein interactions. However, compared with the traditionally experimental results, the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data often contain the false positives in high probability. In order to fully utilize the large-scale data, it is necessary to develop bioinformatic methods for systematically evaluating those data in order to further improve the data reliability and mine biological information. This review summarizes the methodologies of analysis and application of high-throughput protein-protein interaction data, including the evaluation methods, the relationship between protein-protein interaction data and other protein biological information, and their applications in biological study. In addition, this paper also suggests some interesting topics on mining high-throughput protein-protein interaction data.

  4. Reconstructability analysis as a tool for identifying gene-gene interactions in studies of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, Stephen; Kramer, Patricia L; Westaway, Shawn K; Cox, Nancy J; Zwick, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of common human diseases for which the genetic component may include an epistatic interaction of multiple genes. Detecting these interactions with standard statistical tools is difficult because there may be an interaction effect, but minimal or no main effect. Reconstructability analysis (RA) uses Shannon's information theory to detect relationships between variables in categorical datasets. We applied RA to simulated data for five different models of gene-gene interaction, and find that even with heritability levels as low as 0.008, and with the inclusion of 50 non-associated genes in the dataset, we can identify the interacting gene pairs with an accuracy of > or =80%. We applied RA to a real dataset of type 2 non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) cases and controls, and closely approximated the results of more conventional single SNP disease association studies. In addition, we replicated prior evidence for epistatic interactions between SNPs on chromosomes 2 and 15.

  5. Analysis of particle-wall interactions during particle free fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Reiyu; Liao, Wenyuan

    2005-08-01

    In this study, the vertical motion of a particle in a quiescent fluid falling toward a horizontal plane wall is analyzed, based on simplified models. Using the distance between the particle and wall as a parameter, the effects of various forces acting on the particle and the particle motion are examined. Without the colloidal and Brownian forces being included, the velocity of small particles is found to be approximately equal to the inverse of the drag force correction function used in this study as the particle approaches the near-wall region. Colloidal force is added to the particle equation of motion as the particle moves a distance comparable to its size. It is found that the particle might become suspended above or deposited onto the wall, depending on the Hamaker constant, the surface potentials of the particle and wall, and the thickness of the electrical double layer (EDL). For strong EDL repulsive force and weaker van der Waals (VDW) attractive force, the particle will become suspended above the wall at a distance at which the particle velocity is zero. This location is referred to as the equilibrium distance. The equilibrium distance is found to increase with increased in EDL thickness when a repulsive force barrier appears in the colloidal force interaction. For the weak EDL repulsive force and strong VDW attractive force case, the particle can become deposited onto the wall without the Brownian motion effect. The Brownian jump length was found to be very small. Many Brownian jumps would be required in a direction toward the wall for a suspended particle to become deposited.

  6. Interactive Correlation Analysis and Visualization of Climate Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between our ability to analyze and extract insights from visualization of climate model output and the capability of the available resources to make those visualizations has reached a crisis point. The large volume of data currently produced by climate models is overwhelming the current, decades-old visualization workflow. The traditional methods for visualizing climate output also have not kept pace with changes in the types of grids used, the number of variables involved, and the number of different simulations performed with a climate model or the feature-richness of high-resolution simulations. This project has developed new and faster methods for visualization in order to get the most knowledge out of the new generation of high-resolution climate models. While traditional climate images will continue to be useful, there is need for new approaches to visualization and analysis of climate data if we are to gain all the insights available in ultra-large data sets produced by high-resolution model output and ensemble integrations of climate models such as those produced for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Towards that end, we have developed new visualization techniques for performing correlation analysis. We have also introduced highly scalable, parallel rendering methods for visualizing large-scale 3D data. This project was done jointly with climate scientists and visualization researchers at Argonne National Laboratory and NCAR.

  7. Rice–arsenate interactions in hydroponics: whole genome transcriptional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J.; Lou-Hing, Daniel E.; Meharg, Andrew A.; Price, Adam H.

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) varieties that are arsenate-tolerant (Bala) and -sensitive (Azucena) were used to conduct a transcriptome analysis of the response of rice seedlings to sodium arsenate (AsV) in hydroponic solution. RNA extracted from the roots of three replicate experiments of plants grown for 1 week in phosphate-free nutrient with or without 13.3 μM AsV was used to challenge the Affymetrix (52K) GeneChip Rice Genome array. A total of 576 probe sets were significantly up-regulated at least 2-fold in both varieties, whereas 622 were down-regulated. Ontological classification is presented. As expected, a large number of transcription factors, stress proteins, and transporters demonstrated differential expression. Striking is the lack of response of classic oxidative stress-responsive genes or phytochelatin synthases/synthatases. However, the large number of responses from genes involved in glutathione synthesis, metabolism, and transport suggests that glutathione conjugation and arsenate methylation may be important biochemical responses to arsenate challenge. In this report, no attempt is made to dissect differences in the response of the tolerant and sensitive variety, but analysis in a companion article will link gene expression to the known tolerance loci available in the Bala×Azucena mapping population. PMID:18453530

  8. Rice-arsenate interactions in hydroponics: whole genome transcriptional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J; Lou-Hing, Daniel E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) varieties that are arsenate-tolerant (Bala) and -sensitive (Azucena) were used to conduct a transcriptome analysis of the response of rice seedlings to sodium arsenate (AsV) in hydroponic solution. RNA extracted from the roots of three replicate experiments of plants grown for 1 week in phosphate-free nutrient with or without 13.3 muM AsV was used to challenge the Affymetrix (52K) GeneChip Rice Genome array. A total of 576 probe sets were significantly up-regulated at least 2-fold in both varieties, whereas 622 were down-regulated. Ontological classification is presented. As expected, a large number of transcription factors, stress proteins, and transporters demonstrated differential expression. Striking is the lack of response of classic oxidative stress-responsive genes or phytochelatin synthases/synthatases. However, the large number of responses from genes involved in glutathione synthesis, metabolism, and transport suggests that glutathione conjugation and arsenate methylation may be important biochemical responses to arsenate challenge. In this report, no attempt is made to dissect differences in the response of the tolerant and sensitive variety, but analysis in a companion article will link gene expression to the known tolerance loci available in the BalaxAzucena mapping population.

  9. Guide to IDAP, Version 2: an interactive decision analysis procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jusko, M.J.; Whitfield, R.G.

    1980-11-01

    This document is intended to serve as both a programmer's and user's guide to the current version of the IDAP; and to prompt interested individuals into making suggestions for the future development of IDAP. The majority of the sections pertain to the main IDA program rather than to the IDAIN procedure. A brief discussion is presented of the theory of decision analysis. The aspects of decision analysis that are relevant to the IDAP are discussed. A complete list and description of the commands used in the IDAP program is provided and, including three complete examples. This section may be considered a user's guide to the IDAP. The programmer's guide to the IDAP discusses the various technical aspects of the programs, and may be skipped by users not involved with programming the IDAP. A list of the error messages generated by the IDAP is presented. As the program is developed, error handling and messages will improve.

  10. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  11. Network analysis of named entity interactions in written texts

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R

    2015-01-01

    The use of methods borrowed from statistics and physics has allowed for the discovery of unprecedent patterns of human behavior and cognition by establishing links between models features and language structure. While current models have been useful to identify patterns via analysis of syntactical and semantical networks, only a few works have probed the relevance of investigating the structure arising from the relationship between relevant entities such as characters, locations and organizations. In this study, we introduce a model that links entities appearing in the same context in order to capture the complexity of entities organization through a networked representation. Computational simulations in books revealed that the proposed model displays interesting topological features, such as short typical shortest path length, high values of clustering coefficient and modular organization. The effectiveness of the our model was verified in a practical pattern recognition task in real networks. When compared ...

  12. Dynamic analysis methods for detecting anomalies in asynchronously interacting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Akshat; Solis, John Hector; Matschke, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Detecting modifications to digital system designs, whether malicious or benign, is problematic due to the complexity of the systems being analyzed. Moreover, static analysis techniques and tools can only be used during the initial design and implementation phases to verify safety and liveness properties. It is computationally intractable to guarantee that any previously verified properties still hold after a system, or even a single component, has been produced by a third-party manufacturer. In this paper we explore new approaches for creating a robust system design by investigating highly-structured computational models that simplify verification and analysis. Our approach avoids the need to fully reconstruct the implemented system by incorporating a small verification component that dynamically detects for deviations from the design specification at run-time. The first approach encodes information extracted from the original system design algebraically into a verification component. During run-time this component randomly queries the implementation for trace information and verifies that no design-level properties have been violated. If any deviation is detected then a pre-specified fail-safe or notification behavior is triggered. Our second approach utilizes a partitioning methodology to view liveness and safety properties as a distributed decision task and the implementation as a proposed protocol that solves this task. Thus the problem of verifying safety and liveness properties is translated to that of verifying that the implementation solves the associated decision task. We develop upon results from distributed systems and algebraic topology to construct a learning mechanism for verifying safety and liveness properties from samples of run-time executions.

  13. Interaction and learning: An analysis of two freshman physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dexter

    2005-08-01

    The influence of digital technology has gradually increased through the years to the point where it impacts almost every part of our experience in some way. Educators are expected increasingly to supplement or even replace lecture and chalkboard practices with alternative strategies. Beyond integrating new technologies into the learning environments are the new forms of learning that some believe are implied by the nature of digitally mediated instruction itself. The use of multimedia technologies for learning in many cases is thought to facilitate a move away from teacher-centered practices of instruction toward learner-centered strategies of both delivery and assessment. This study was an investigation of effects that may be encountered when alternative forms of classroom delivery are introduced. It was a mixed-mode investigation of classroom culture and student performance in two sections of a physics course for undergraduate engineering students. The content for these two classes was identical as were the learning resources available to students. Both classes employed multiple methods of presentation combining face-to-face methods with classroom and online digital learning tools. The most distinctive differences between them were found in the classroom practice itself. One class received what may be called a traditional teacher-centered presentation focusing on solving math problems in physics. The other employed dense student to instructor and student-to-student interaction in the classroom with a learning approach characterized by inquiry methods of content delivery. The investigation asked three questions. First it sought to identify what expectations students brought to the classroom about what they would experience and how they would be taught. Second it examined how the tools and practices used to facilitate learning actually affected the classroom culture. Finally the study explored what affect if any the pedagogical practices students experienced had on

  14. An environmental analysis of genes associated with schizophrenia: hypoxia and vascular factors as interacting elements in the neurodevelopmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; van Os, J; Esquivel, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F

    2012-12-01

    Investigating and understanding gene-environment interaction (G × E) in a neurodevelopmentally and biologically plausible manner is a major challenge for schizophrenia research. Hypoxia during neurodevelopment is one of several environmental factors related to the risk of schizophrenia, and links between schizophrenia candidate genes and hypoxia regulation or vascular expression have been proposed. Given the availability of a wealth of complex genetic information on schizophrenia in the literature without knowledge on the connections to environmental factors, we now systematically collected genes from candidate studies (using SzGene), genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses, and then applied four criteria to test for a (theoretical) link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. In all, 55% of the schizophrenia candidate genes (n=42 genes) met the criteria for a link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. Genes associated with schizophrenia showed a significant, threefold enrichment among genes that were derived from microarray studies of the ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) in the brain. Thus, the finding of a considerable match between genes associated with the risk of schizophrenia and IHR and/or vascular factors is reproducible. An additional survey of genes identified by GWAS and CNV analyses suggested novel genes that match the criteria. Findings for interactions between specific variants of genes proposed to be IHR and/or vascular factors with obstetric complications in patients with schizophrenia have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the extended gene set defined here may form a reasonable and evidence-based starting point for hypothesis-based testing of G × E interactions in clinical genetic and translational neuroscience studies.

  15. Correcting Students' Misconceptions about Automobile Braking Distances and Video Analysis Using Interactive Program Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockicko, Peter; Trpišová, Beáta; Ondruš, Ján

    2014-01-01

    The present paper informs about an analysis of students' conceptions about car braking distances and also presents one of the novel methods of learning: an interactive computer program Tracker that we used to analyse the process of braking of a car. The analysis of the students' conceptions about car braking distances consisted in…

  16. Does interactive animation control improve exploratory data analysis of animated trend visualization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukhodair, Felwa A.; Riecke, Bernhard E.; Erhan, Halil I.; Shaw, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Effectively analyzing trends of temporal data becomes a critical task when the amount of data is large. Motion techniques (animation) for scatterplots make it possible to represent lots of data in a single view and make it easy to identify trends and highlight changes. These techniques have recently become very popular and to an extent successful in describing data in presentations. However, compared to static methods of visualization, scatterplot animations may be hard to perceive when the motions are complex. METHODS: This paper studies the effectiveness of interactive scatterplot animation as a visualization technique for data analysis of large data. We compared interactive animations with non-interactive (passive) animations where participants had no control over the animation. Both conditions were evaluated for specific as well as general comprehension of the data. RESULTS: While interactive animation was more effective for specific information analysis, it led to many misunderstandings in the overall comprehension due to the fragmentation of the animation. In general, participants felt that interactivity gave them more confidence and found it more enjoyable and exciting for data exploration. CONCLUSION: Interactive animation of trend visualizations proved to be an effective technique for exploratory data analysis and significantly more accurate than animation alone. With these findings we aim at supporting the use of interactivity to effectively enhance data exploration in animated visualizations.

  17. Analysis of Presenilin 1 and 2 interacting proteins in mouse cerebral cortex during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    In our previous report, we showed that Presenilin (PS)1 and 2 have differential expression profile from early embryonic stages till adulthood in mouse cerebral cortex, suggesting that both of these proteins are crucial for brain development. Genetic manipulation studies have also shown the involvement of PS1 in brain development, but PS2 remains largely unexplored. In order to understand how PS1 and 2 mediate developmental functions, we have investigated the interaction of PS1 and 2 with proteins of mouse cerebral cortex during development. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) combined with MALDI-MS/MS analysis revealed 12 interacting partners of PS1 and 11 partners of PS2. The interacting proteins were different for PS1 and 2, and involved in cell division, glycolysis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. Densitometric analysis of protein bands visualized after SDS-PAGE separation of Co-IP proteins revealed variation in their amount and degree of interaction during different developmental stages of mice. Further, immunoblot based validation of PS1 interacting protein Notch-1 showed maximum interaction at embryonic day (E) 12.5, decline at E18.5, upregulation from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P20 and thereafter reduction at P45 and 20 weeks. In-silico analysis of PS and its interacting proteins indicated conformation based interaction through common type of secondary structures having alpha helical, extended beta strand and random coil, and CK2, PKC phosphorylation and myristoylation motifs. Taken together, our study showed that PS1 and PS2 interact to varying extent with different proteins of mouse cerebral cortex and suggests their interaction based on specific conformation and involvement in diverse functions essential for the brain development.

  18. School violence: An analysis from different interaction contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Varela Garay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to analyze the differences between adolescents scoring high and low on school violence in the following areas: individual (self-esteem, loneliness, satisfaction with life, and empathy; family (family climate, communication with father and mother; academic (classroom climate, attitudes toward authority, and sociometric status; and community (community involvement, community participation, social support from formal systems, and social support from informal systems. Differences in these relationships between boys and girls scoring high on school violence were also examined. Participants in the study were 1723 adolescents, aged 12 to 18 years old, in four secondary schools. Multivariate and univariate analysis of variance were performed. Results showed that adolescents with high levels of school violence scored higher on loneliness, depressive symptomatology, offensive and avoidance communication with father and mother, family conflict, and attitude towards transgression, as compared to adolescents with low levels of school violence. Furthermore, girls scoring high on school violence reported higher scores on academic self-esteem, empathy, and sociometric status, and lower scores on open communication with father and community participation, as compared to boys scoring high in school violence. Finally, these results and their practical implications are discussed.

  19. Interactive transcriptome analysis of malaria patients and infecting Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Junya; Natori, Anna; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Mongan, Arthur E; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Katayama, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Eshita, Yuki; Tuda, Josef; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of parasitism in vivo, it is essential to elucidate how the transcriptomes of the human hosts and the infecting parasites affect one another. Here we report the RNA-seq analysis of 116 Indonesian patients infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). We extracted RNAs from their peripheral blood as a mixture of host and parasite transcripts and mapped the RNA-seq tags to the human and Pf reference genomes to separate the respective tags. We were thus able to simultaneously analyze expression patterns in both humans and parasites. We identified human and parasite genes and pathways that correlated with various clinical data, which may serve as primary targets for drug developments. Of particular importance, we revealed characteristic expression changes in the human innate immune response pathway genes including TLR2 and TICAM2 that correlated with the severity of the malaria infection. We also found a group of transcription regulatory factors, JUND, for example, and signaling molecules, TNFAIP3, for example, that were strongly correlated in the expression patterns of humans and parasites. We also identified several genetic variations in important anti-malaria drug resistance-related genes. Furthermore, we identified the genetic variations which are potentially associated with severe malaria symptoms both in humans and parasites. The newly generated data should collectively lay a unique foundation for understanding variable behaviors of the field malaria parasites, which are far more complex than those observed under laboratory conditions.

  20. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.