WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene vector neurodegeneration

  1. MicroRNAs and deregulated gene expression networks in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Kai-Christian

    2010-06-18

    Neurodegeneration is characterized by the progressive loss of neuronal cell types in the nervous system. Although the main cause of cell dysfunction and death in many neurodegenerative diseases is not known, there is increasing evidence that their demise is a result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors which affect key signaling pathways in cell function. This view is supported by recent observations that disease-compromised cells in late-stage neurodegeneration exhibit profound dysregulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) introduce a novel concept of regulatory control over gene expression and there is increasing evidence that they play a profound role in neuronal cell identity as well as multiple aspects of disease pathogenesis. Here, we review the molecular properties of brain cells derived from patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss how deregulated miRNA/mRNA expression networks could be a mechanism in neurodegeneration. In addition, we emphasize that the dysfunction of these regulatory networks might overlap between different cell systems and suggest that miRNA functions might be common between neurodegeneration and other disease entities.

  2. p53 prevents neurodegeneration by regulating synaptic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Paola; Frost, Bess; Peng, Shouyong; Yang, Yawei J; Park, Peter J; Feany, Mel

    2014-12-16

    DNA damage has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, but the consequences of genotoxic stress to postmitotic neurons are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that p53, a key mediator of the DNA damage response, plays a neuroprotective role in a Drosophila model of tauopathy. Further, through a whole-genome ChIP-chip analysis, we identify genes controlled by p53 in postmitotic neurons. We genetically validate a specific pathway, synaptic function, in p53-mediated neuroprotection. We then demonstrate that the control of synaptic genes by p53 is conserved in mammals. Collectively, our results implicate synaptic function as a central target in p53-dependent protection from neurodegeneration.

  3. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  4. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  5. Homeotic Gene teashirt (tsh has a neuroprotective function in amyloid-beta 42 mediated neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Moran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42 polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We have generated a transgenic Drosophila eye model where high levels of human Aβ42 is misexpressed in the differentiating photoreceptor neurons of the developing eye, which phenocopy Alzheimer's like neuropathology in the neural retina. We have utilized this model for a gain of function screen using members of various signaling pathways involved in the development of the fly eye to identify downstream targets or modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. We have identified the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh as a suppressor of the Aβ42 mediated neurodegenerative phenotype. Targeted misexpression of tsh with Aβ42 in the differentiating retina can significantly rescue neurodegeneration by blocking cell death. We found that Tsh protein is absent/ downregulated in the neural retina at this stage. The structure function analysis revealed that the PLDLS domain of Tsh acts as an inhibitor of the neuroprotective function of tsh in the Drosophila eye model. Lastly, we found that the tsh paralog, tiptop (tio can also rescue Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified tsh and tio as new genetic modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. Our studies demonstrate a novel neuroprotective function of tsh and its paralog tio in Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. The

  6. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  7. Current progress of polymeric gene vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xuan; SUN YunXia; ZHUO RenXi; ZHANG XianZheng

    2011-01-01

    After over 40 years ot progress,gene therapy provides great opportunities for treating diseases from various genetic disorders,infections and cancers.The success of gene therapy largely depends on the availability of suitable gene vectors.As an attractive alternative to virus-based gene therapy,non-viral gene delivery system has been developed and investigated due to their merits including low immunogenecity,convenient operability,and large-scale manufacturability [1].Because polycations can condense with DNA as a result of electrostatic interactions,form nanosize polyplexes,and protect DNA from degradation by DNase,cationic polymer becomes a major type of non-viral gene delivery vectors (Figure 1) [2].A wide range of polymeric vectors have been developed and investigated in the past decade,such as polyethylenimine (PEI)-based vectors,poly(L-lysine) (PLL)-based vectors,dendrimer-based vectors,polypeptide-based vectors,and chitosan-based vectors [3].However,unlike viral vectors that have the ability to infect host cells and overcome cellular barriers through the course of evolution,nonviral gene vectors exhibit Significantly reduced transfection efficiency as they are obstructed by various extra- and intracellular barriers,including serum proteins in blood stream,cell membrane,endosomal compartment and nuclear membrane [4].

  8. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  9. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wasala, Nalinda B.; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic m...

  10. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  11. Viral vectors for gene transfer: current status of gene therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy for the correction of inherited or acquired disease has gained increasing importance in recent years. Successful treatment of children suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was achieved using retrovirus vectors for gene transfer. Encouraging improvements of vision were reported in a genetic eye disorder (LCA) leading to early childhood blindness. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used for gene transfer in these trials. This chapter gives an overview of the design and delivery of viral vectors for the transport of a therapeutic gene into a target cell or tissue. The construction and production of retrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors are covered. The focus is on production methods suitable for biopharmaceutical upscaling and for downstream processing. Quality control measures and biological safety considerations for the use of vectors in clinical trials are discussed.

  12. Retrotransposon vectors for gene delivery in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons are abundant components of plant genomes, and although some plant retrotransposons have been used as insertional mutagens, these mobile genetic elements have not been widely exploited for plant genome manipulation. In vertebrates and yeast, retrotransposons and retroviruses are routinely altered to carry additional genes that are copied into complementary (cDNA through reverse transcription. Integration of cDNA results in gene delivery; recombination of cDNA with homologous chromosomal sequences can create targeted gene modifications. Plant retrotransposon-based vectors, therefore, may provide new opportunities for plant genome engineering. Results A retrotransposon vector system was developed for gene delivery in plants based on the Tnt1 element from Nicotiana tabacum. Mini-Tnt1 transfer vectors were constructed that lack coding sequences yet retain the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs and adjacent cis sequences required for reverse transcription. The internal coding region of Tnt1 was replaced with a neomycin phosphotransferase gene to monitor replication by reverse transcription. Two different mini-Tnt1 s were developed: one with the native 5' LTR and the other with a chimeric 5' LTR that had the first 233 bp replaced by the CaMV 35 S promoter. After transfer into tobacco protoplasts, both vectors undergo retrotransposition using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by endogenous Tnt1 elements. The transposition frequencies of mini-Tnt1 vectors are comparable with native Tnt1 elements, and like the native elements, insertion sites are within or near coding sequences. In this paper, we provide evidence that template switching occurs during mini-Tnt1 reverse transcription, indicating that multiple copies of Tnt1 mRNA are packaged into virus-like particles. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that mini-Tnt1 vectors can replicate efficiently in tobacco cells using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by

  13. Cloning of the neurodegeneration gene drop-dead and characterization of additional phenotypes of its mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Edward M

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila gene drop-dead (drd) result in early adult lethality and neurodegeneration, but the molecular identity of the drd gene and its mechanism of action are not known. This paper describes the characterization of a new X-linked recessive adult-lethal mutation, originally called lot's wife (lwf(1)) but subsequently identified as an allele of drd (drd(lwf)); drd(lwf) mutants die within two weeks of eclosion. Through mapping and complementation, the drd gene has been identified as CG33968, which encodes a putative integral membrane protein of unknown function. The drd(lwf) allele is associated with a nonsense mutation that eliminates nearly 80% of the CG33968 gene product; mutations in the same gene were also found in two previously described drd alleles. Characterization of drd (lwf) flies revealed additional phenotypes of drd, most notably, defects in food processing by the digestive system and in oogenesis. Mutant flies store significantly more food in their crops and defecate less than wild-type flies, suggesting that normal transfer of ingested food from the crop into the midgut is dependent upon the DRD gene product. The defect in oogenesis results in the sterility of homozygous mutant females and is associated with a reduction in the number of vitellogenic egg chambers. The disruption in vitellogenesis is far more severe than that seen in starved flies and so is unlikely to be a secondary consequence of the digestive phenotype. This study demonstrates that mutation of the drd gene CG33968 results in a complex phenotype affecting multiple physiological systems within the fly.

  14. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  15. Therapeutic globin gene delivery using lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivella, Stefano; Sadelain, Michel

    2002-10-01

    The severe hemoglobinopathies, including beta-thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia, are candidate diseases for a genetic treatment based on the transfer of a regulated globin gene in autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Two years ago, May et al reported that an optimized beta-globin transcription unit containing multiple proximal and distal regulatory elements harbored by a recombinant lentiviral vector could efficiently integrate into murine hematopoietic stem cells and express therapeutic levels of the human beta-globin gene. Here, we review the advantages afforded by lentivirus-mediated globin gene transfer and recent studies based on this strategy.

  16. Vectors for gene therapy of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The success of gene therapy mainly depends on the gene vector (GV) responsible for the efficient transport of genetic information. The qualities of a GV have a profound influence on the method of application, the efficiency of gene transfer in the target tissue, the amount and persistence of gene expression and the potential side effects and safety risks. Clinical gene therapy studies over the past 20 years have contributed to the development and testing of different GV systems, some of which also show great potential for the treatment of skin diseases. In this review the structures, methods of application, characteristics, clinical uses and possibilities for optimization of these GV will be discussed with regard to their cutaneous applications.

  17. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Krüger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1 identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2 assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3 connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities.We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses

  18. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  19. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  20. [Developments in gene delivery vectors for ocular gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabou, Hanen; Dalkara, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Its remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in clinical trials for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was mainly due to the favorable characteristics of the retina as a target organ. The eye offers several advantages as it is readily accessible and has some degree of immune privilege making it suitable for application of viral vectors. The viral vectors most frequently used for retinal gene delivery are lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Here we will discuss the use of these viral vectors in retinal gene delivery with a strong focus on favorable properties of AAV. Thanks to its small size, AAV diffuses well in the inter-neural matrix making it suitable for applications in neural retina. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases using AAV as a vector. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent cellular targets for such therapies and the AAV toolkit that has been built to target these cells successfully. We will also discuss some of the challenges that we face in translating AAV-based gene therapies to the clinic. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  1. Recent progress in polymer-based gene delivery vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shiwen; ZHUO Renxi

    2003-01-01

    The gene delivery system is one of the three components of a gene medicine, which is the bottle neck of current gene therapy. Nonviral vectors offer advantages over the viral system of safety, ease of manufacturing, etc. As important nonviral vectors, polymer gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention and have begun to show increasing promising. In this review, the fundamental and recent progress of polymer-based gene delivery vectors is reviewed.

  2. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  3. Vector-mediated cancer gene therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Prem

    2005-05-01

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in developing gene therapy approaches for the treatment of cancer. The two events that have permitted the formulation of concept of cancer gene therapy are the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenesis, and the development of the DNA-delivery vehicles or vectors. Many approaches to cancer gene therapy have been proposed, and several viral and non-viral vectors have been utilized. The purpose of this review article is to describe the various strategies of cancer gene therapy (transfer of tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes-enzyme/pro-drug approach, inhibition of dominant oncogenes, immunomodulation approaches, expression of molecules that affect angiogenesis, tumor invasion and metastasis, chemosensitization and radiosensitization approaches, and chemoprotection of stem cells). The chapter also reviews the commonly used vectors (retroviral vectors, adenoviral vectors, adeno-associated viral vectors, pox viruses, herpes simplex viruses, HIV- vectors, non-viral vectors and targetable vectors) for cancer gene therapy. Some of the important issues in cancer gene therapy, and the potential future directions are also being discussed.

  4. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  5. Large Animal Models for Foamy Virus Vector Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Horn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Foamy virus (FV vectors have shown great promise for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC gene therapy. Their ability to efficiently deliver transgenes to multi-lineage long-term repopulating cells in large animal models suggests they will be effective for several human hematopoietic diseases. Here, we review FV vector studies in large animal models, including the use of FV vectors with the mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMTP140K to increase the number of genetically modified cells after transplantation. In these studies, FV vectors have mediated efficient gene transfer to polyclonal repopulating cells using short ex vivo transduction protocols designed to minimize the negative effects of ex vivo culture on stem cell engraftment. In this regard, FV vectors appear superior to gammaretroviral vectors, which require longer ex vivo culture to effect efficient transduction. FV vectors have also compared favorably with lentiviral vectors when directly compared in the dog model. FV vectors have corrected leukocyte adhesion deficiency and pyruvate kinase deficiency in the dog large animal model. FV vectors also appear safer than gammaretroviral vectors based on a reduced frequency of integrants near promoters and also near proto-oncogenes in canine repopulating cells. Together, these studies suggest that FV vectors should be highly effective for several human hematopoietic diseases, including those that will require relatively high percentages of gene-modified cells to achieve clinical benefit.

  6. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer efficienc

  7. Genetic Screen Reveals Link between the Maternal Effect Sterile Gene mes-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Cao, Xiou; Yan, Dong; Wang, Dayong; Aballay, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that immune responses to microbial infections may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Caenorhabditis elegans causes a number of neural changes that are hallmarks of neurodegeneration. Using an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes involved in the control of P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration, we identified mes-1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein that is required for unequal cell divisions in the early embryonic germ line. We showed that sterile but not fertile mes-1 animals were resistant to neurodegeneration induced by P. aeruginosa infection. Similar results were observed using animals carrying a mutation in the maternal effect gene pgl-1, which is required for postembryonic germ line development, and the germ line-deficient strains glp-1 and glp-4. Additional studies indicated that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required for resistance to P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration in germ line-deficient strains. Thus, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection results in neurodegeneration phenotypes in C. elegans that are controlled by the germ line in a cell-nonautonomous manner.

  8. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinnamon L. Hardee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic

  9. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic. PMID:28208635

  10. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  11. Transient gene expression mediated by integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seung Shin; Dan, Kazuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Chatani, Emi; Mineno, Junichi; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2008-04-18

    Nonintegrating retroviral vectors were produced from a Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vector system by introducing a point mutation into the integrase (IN) gene of the packaging plasmid. The efficacy of IN-defective retroviral vectors was measured through the transient expression of ZsGreen or luciferase in human cell lines. The IN-defective retroviral vectors could transduce target cells efficiently, but their gene expression was transient and lower than that seen with the integrating vectors. IN-defective retroviral vector gene expression decreased to background levels in fewer than 10 days. Southern blot analysis of transduced K562 cells confirmed the loss of a detectable vector sequence by 15 days. The residual integration activity of the IN-defective vector was 1000- to 10,000-fold lower than that of the integrating vector. These results demonstrate that the IN-defective retroviral vectors can provide a useful tool for efficient transient gene expression targeting of primary hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid cells.

  12. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-02

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models.

  13. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration.

  14. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  15. High-throughput Binary Vectors for Plant Gene Function Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong Lei; Ping Zhao; Min-Jie Cao; Rong Cui; Xi Chen; Li-Zhong Xiong; Qi-Fa Zhang; David J. Oliver; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2007-01-01

    A series of high-throughput binary cloning vectors were constructed to facilitate gene function analysis in higher plants. This vector series consists of plasmids designed for plant expression, promoter analysis, gene silencing,and green fluorescent protein fusions for protein localization. These vectors provide for high-throughput and efficient cloning utilizing sites for λ phage integrase/excisionase. In addition, unique restriction sites are incorporated in a multiple cloning site and enable promoter replacement. The entire vector series are available with complete sequence information and detailed annotations and are freely distributed to the scientific community for non-commercial uses.

  16. Preventing and exploiting the oncogenic potential of integrating gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlich, Ute; Baum, Christopher

    2009-04-01

    Gene therapy requires efficient gene delivery to cure or prevent disease by modifying the genome of somatic cells. However, gene vectors, which insert themselves into the host genome in order to achieve persistent protein expression, can trigger oncogenesis by upregulating cellular protooncogenes. This adverse event, known as insertional mutagenesis, has become a major hurdle in the field. Vectors developed on the basis of lentiviruses are considered to be less genotoxic than the hitherto used gamma-retroviral vectors. For their report in this issue of the JCI, Montini et al. utilized a tumor-prone mouse model to identify the genetic determinants of insertional mutagenesis (see the related article beginning on page 964). They report that the lentiviral integration pattern and additional improvements in vector design reduce the genotoxic risk. These findings will inform future vector design with the goal of limiting genotoxicity for gene therapy or increasing genotoxicity for protooncogene discovery.

  17. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Md Zahidul Islam Pranjol; Amin Hajitou

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent dev...

  18. Integrase minus lentiviral vector: A suitable vector for β-thalassemia gene targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Davoud Nouri Inanlou; Bagher Yakhchali; Hossein Khanahmad; Mossa Gardaneh; Hesam Movassagh; Tooraj Farazmandfar; Aida Feiz Barazandeh; Sirous Zeinali

    2009-01-01

    "nβ-Thalassemia is a congenital disorder caused by mutation in β-globin gene. The current therapies to treat β-thalassemia have many complications and limitations necessitating development of new curative methods. Recently, a great attention has been paid to gene therapy of β-thalassemia using lentiviral vectors. Although insertion of transgene into these vectors direct regulated expression of β-globin at therapeutic levels, lentiviruses unfav...

  19. Use of HIV as a gene transfer vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Krzysztof; Kacprzak, Magdalena Marta

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive research efforts over the past 25 years that have focused on HIV, there is still no cure for AIDS. However, tremendous progress in the understanding of the structure and biology of the HIV virus led to the development of safe and potent HIV-based transgene delivery vectors. These genetic vehicles are referred to as lentiviral vectors. They appear to be better suited for particular applications, such as transgene delivery into stem cells, compared to other viral- and non-viral vectors. This is because Lentivirus-based vectors can efficiently infect nondividing and slowly dividing cells. In the present review article, the current state of understanding of HIV-1 is discussed and the main characteristics that had an impact on vector design are outlined. A historical view on the vector concept is presented to facilitate discussion of recent results in vector engineering in a broader context. Subsequently, a state of the art overview concerning vector construction and vector production is given. This review also touches upon the subject of lentiviral vector safety and related topics that can be helpful in addressing this issue are discussed. Finally, examples of Lentivirus-based gene delivery systems and their applications are presented, with emphasis on animal transgenesis and human gene therapy.

  20. Recombinant adenovirus vectors with knobless fibers for targeted gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusechem, VW; van Rijswijk, ALCT; van Es, HHG; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2000-01-01

    Adenoviral vector systems for gene therapy can be much improved by targeting vectors to specific cell types. This requires both the complete ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the introduction of a novel binding affinity in the viral capsid. We reasoned that these requirements could be fulfil

  1. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziaková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Various types of genetic material are used in gene therapy; double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, plasmid DNA and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASON. The success of gene therapy depends on assuring the entrance of the therapeutic gene to targeted cells without any form of biodegradation. Commonly used vectors in gene therapy are: adenoviruses (400 clinical studies; 23.8%, retroviruses (344 clinical studies; 20.5%, unenveloped/plasmid DNA (304 clinical studies, 17.7%, adeno-associated viruses (75 clinical studies; 4.5% and others. In this paper, we have reviewed the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors.

  2. Genetic Association and Gene-gene interaction of HAS2, HABP1 and HYAL3 Implicate Hyaluronan Metabolic Genes in Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA plays a significant role in maintaining aqueous humor outflow in trabecular meshwork, the primary ocular tissue involved in glaucoma. We examined potential association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the HA synthesizing gene – hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1 and HA catabolic gene hyaluronidase 3 (HYAL3 in the primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients in the Indian population. Thirteen tagged SNPs (6 for HAS2, 3 for HABP1 and 4 for HYAL3 were genotyped in 116 high tension (HTG, 321 non-high tension glaucoma (NHTG samples and 96 unrelated, age-matched, glaucoma-negative, control samples. Allelic and genotypic association were analyzed by PLINK v1.04; haplotypes were identified using PHASE v2.1 and gene-gene interaction was analyzed using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR v2.0. An allelic association (rs6651224; p = 0.03; OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25–0.94 was observed at the second intron (C>G of HAS2 both for NHTG and HTG. rs1057308 revealed a genotypic association (p = 0.03 at the 5’ UTR of HAS2 with only HTG. TCT haplotype (rs1805429 – rs2472614 – rs8072363 in HABP1 and TTAG and TTGA (rs2285044 – rs3774753 – rs1310073 – rs1076872 in HYAL3 were found to be significantly high (p < 0.05 both for HTG and NHTG compared to controls. Gene-gene interaction revealed HABP1 predominantly interacts with HAS2 in HTG while it associates with both HYAL3 and HAS2 in NHTG. This is the first genetic evidence, albeit from a smaller study, that the natural polymorphisms in the genes involved in hyaluronan metabolism are potentially involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration.

  3. Global Disruption of Alternative Splicing and Neurodegeneration Is Caused by Mutation of a U2 snRNA Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C.; Ackerman, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2–8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitious, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:22265417

  4. Mutation of a U2 snRNA gene causes global disruption of alternative splicing and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C; Ackerman, Susan L

    2012-01-20

    Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2-8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild-type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitous, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  6. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review ...

  7. A Novel Deletion Mutation of Exon 2 of the C19orf12 Gene in an Omani Family with Mitochondrial Membrane Protein-Associated Neurodegeneration (MPAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Macki, Nabil; Al Rashdi, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the C19orf12 gene are known to cause mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), which is a neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) type 4 disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of MPAN from Oman. A novel homozygous deletion of exon 2 of the C19orf12 gene was confirmed on the proband, a seven-year-old girl, who presented with gait instability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed iron deposition on the basal ganglia. This report highlights the importance of genetic testing of such a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition among a population with a high consanguinity rate. To overcome the diagnostic difficulty, implementation of a cost-effective approach to perform cascade screening of carriers at risk is needed as well as programs to address risky consanguineous marriages. PMID:28042406

  8. Construction of RNAi lentiviral vector targeting mouse Islet-1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-shen ZHI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct and select RNAi lentiviral vectors that can silence mouse Islet-1 gene effectively.Methods Three groups of RNAi-target of mouse Islet-1 gene were designed,and corresponding shRNA oligo(sh1,sh2 and sh3 were synthesized,and then they were respectively inserted to the PLVTHM vector that had been digested by endonuclease.Agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing were used to select and indentify the positive clones.The positive clones were extracted and then mixed with E.coli to amplify positive clones.The amplified clones were then infected into 293T along with the other 3 helper plasmids to produce lentiviral vector.After the construction of the lentiviral vector,plaque formation test was performed to determine the titer of lentiviral vector.The lentiviral vectors were then infected into C3H10T1/2 cells.The transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vectors was determined with flow cytometry with detection of green fluorescent protein(GFP.Q-PCR was employed to detect the RNAi efficiency of the lentiviral vectors.Results Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the clones with right gene at the target size were successfully established;gene sequencing showed that the right DNA fragments had been inserted;plaque formation test showed that the titer of the virus solution was 3.87×108TU/ml;the transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vector infected into C3H10T1/2 cells was 90.36%.All the 3 groups of shRNA targets(sh1,sh2 and sh3 showed an inhibitory effect on Islet-1 gene,and the sh1 showed the highest inhibitory effect(76.8%,as compared with that of normal cells(P < 0.05.Conclusion The RNAi lentiviral vector that can effectively silence the mouse Islet-1 gene has been constructed successfully,which may lay a foundation for further investigation of Islet-1 gene.

  9. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  10. DNA Ministrings: Highly Safe and Effective Gene Delivery Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Nafissi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional plasmid DNA vectors play a significant role in gene therapy, but they also have considerable limitations: they can elicit adverse immune responses because of bacterial sequences they contain for maintenance and amplification in prokaryotes, their bioavailability is compromised because of their large molecular size, and they may be genotoxic. We constructed an in vivo platform to produce ministring DNA—mini linear covalently closed DNA vectors—that are devoid of unwanted bacterial sequences and encode only the gene(s of interest and necessary eukaryotic expression elements. Transfection of rapidly and slowly dividing human cells with ministring DNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein resulted in significantly improved transfection, bioavailability, and cytoplasmic kinetics compared with parental plasmid precursors and isogenic circular covalently closed DNA counterparts. Ministring DNA that integrated into the genome of human cells caused chromosomal disruption and apoptotic death of possibly oncogenic vector integrants; thus, they may be safer than plasmid and circular DNA vectors.

  11. Construction of gene targeting vectors from lambda KOS genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattler, S; Kelly, M; Nehls, M

    1999-06-01

    We describe a highly redundant murine genomic library in a new lambda phage, lambda knockout shuttle (lambda KOS) that facilitates the very rapid construction of replacement-type gene targeting vectors. The library consists of 94 individually amplified subpools, each containing an average of 40,000 independent genomic clones. The subpools are arrayed into a 96-well format that allows a PCR-based efficient recovery of independent genomic clones. The lambda KOS vector backbone permits the CRE-mediated conversion into high-copy number pKOS plasmids, wherein the genomic inserts are automatically flanked by negative-selection cassettes. The lambda KOS vector system exploits the yeast homologous recombination machinery to simplify the construction of replacement-type gene targeting vectors independent of restriction sites within the genomic insert. We outline procedures that allow the generation of simple and more sophisticated conditional gene targeting vectors within 3-4 weeks, beginning with the screening of the lambda KOS genomic library.

  12. Environmental factors as modulators of neurodegeneration: insights from gene-environment interactions in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Christina; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2015-05-01

    Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases with established gene-environment interactions, Huntington's disease (HD) is viewed as a disorder governed by genetics. The cause of the disease is a highly penetrant tandem repeat expansion encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. In the year 2000, a pioneering study showed that the disease could be delayed in transgenic mice by enriched housing conditions. This review describes subsequent human and preclinical studies identifying environmental modulation of motor, cognitive, affective and other symptoms found in HD. Alongside the behavioral observations we also discuss potential mechanisms and the relevance to other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In mouse models of HD, increased sensorimotor and cognitive stimulation can delay or ameliorate various endophenotypes. Potential mechanisms include increased trophic support, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and other forms of experience-dependent cellular plasticity. Subsequent clinical investigations support a role for lifetime activity levels in modulating the onset and progression of HD. Stress can accelerate memory and olfactory deficits and exacerbate cellular dysfunctions in HD mice. In the absence of effective treatments to slow the course of HD, environmental interventions offer feasible approaches to delay the disease, however further preclinical and human studies are needed in order to generate clinical recommendations. Environmental interventions could be combined with future pharmacological therapies and stimulate the identification of enviromimetics, drugs which mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity.

  13. Non viral vectors in gene therapy- an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorth, Murali; Narvekar, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Non-viral vectors are simple in theory but complex in practice. Apart from intra cellular and extracellular barriers, number of other challenges also needs to be overcome in order to increase the effectiveness of non-viral gene transfer. These barriers are categorized as production, formulation and storage. No one-size-fits-all solution to gene delivery, which is why in spite of various developments in liposome, polymer formulation and optimization, new compounds are constantly being proposed and investigated. In this review, we will see in detail about various types of non-viral vectors highlighting promising development and recent advances that had improved the non-viral gene transfer efficiency of translating from "Bench to bedside".

  14. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  15. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  16. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  17. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrij, Jeroen; Willemsen, Ralph A; Lindholm, Leif; Hoeben, Rob C; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; de Ridder, Corrina; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Essand, Magnus; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Jennings, Ian; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nugent, Regina; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schenk-Braat, Ellen; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Slade, Michael; Szyjanowicz, Pio; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, Laura; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Zuber, Guy

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men in Western countries. Whereas the survival rate approaches 100% for patients with localized cancer, the results of treatment in patients with metastasized prostate cancer at diagnosis are much less successful. The patients are usually presented with a variety of treatment options, but therapeutic interventions in prostate cancer are associated with frequent adverse side effects. Gene therapy and oncolytic virus therapy may constitute new strategies. Already a wide variety of preclinical studies has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of such approaches, with oncolytic prostate-specific adenoviruses as the most prominent vector. The state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer are reviewed, with a focus on adenoviral vectors. We summarize advances in adenovirus technology for prostate cancer treatment and highlight areas where further developments are necessary.

  18. Vectores

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Documento que contiene la explicación sobre las temáticas de Sistemas coordenados, Cantidades vectoriales y escalares, Algunas propiedades de los vectores, Componentes de un vector y vectores unitarios

  19. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Kazuko; Yoshitomi, Toru; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP) as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  20. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Toh, Toru Yoshitomi, Yutaka Ikeda and Yukio Nagasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  1. Non-viral vectors for gene-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Kanasty, Rosemary L; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Vegas, Arturo J; Dorkin, J Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-08-01

    Gene-based therapy is the intentional modulation of gene expression in specific cells to treat pathological conditions. This modulation is accomplished by introducing exogenous nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA, small interfering RNA (siRNA), microRNA (miRNA) or antisense oligonucleotides. Given the large size and the negative charge of these macromolecules, their delivery is typically mediated by carriers or vectors. In this Review, we introduce the biological barriers to gene delivery in vivo and discuss recent advances in material sciences, nanotechnology and nucleic acid chemistry that have yielded promising non-viral delivery systems, some of which are currently undergoing testing in clinical trials. The diversity of these systems highlights the recent progress of gene-based therapy using non-viral approaches.

  2. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  3. A multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors for functional gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kristoffer; Bartsch, Udo; Stocking, Carol; Fehse, Boris

    2008-04-01

    Functional gene analysis requires the possibility of overexpression, as well as downregulation of one, or ideally several, potentially interacting genes. Lentiviral vectors are well suited for this purpose as they ensure stable expression of complementary DNAs (cDNAs), as well as short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and can efficiently transduce a wide spectrum of cell targets when packaged within the coat proteins of other viruses. Here we introduce a multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors designed according to the "building blocks" principle. Using a wide spectrum of different fluorescent markers, including drug-selectable enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)- and dTomato-blasticidin-S resistance fusion proteins, LeGO vectors allow simultaneous analysis of multiple genes and shRNAs of interest within single, easily identifiable cells. Furthermore, each functional module is flanked by unique cloning sites, ensuring flexibility and individual optimization. The efficacy of these vectors for analyzing multiple genes in a single cell was demonstrated in several different cell types, including hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem and progenitor cells, as well as hepatocytes. LeGO vectors thus represent a valuable tool for investigating gene networks using conditional ectopic expression and knock-down approaches simultaneously.

  4. The feasibility of incorporating Vpx into lentiviral gene therapy vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A McAllery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While current antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved, challenges still remain in life-long targeting of HIV-1 reservoirs. Lentiviral gene therapy has the potential to deliver protective genes into the HIV-1 reservoir. However, inefficient reverse transcription (RT occurs in HIV-1 reservoirs during lentiviral gene delivery. The viral protein Vpx is capable of increasing lentiviral RT by antagonizing the restriction factor SAMHD1. Incorporating Vpx into lentiviral vectors could substantially increase gene delivery into the HIV-1 reservoir. The feasibility of this Vpx approach was tested in resting cell models utilizing macrophages and dendritic cells. Our results showed Vpx exposure led to increased permissiveness of cells over a period that exceeded 2 weeks. Consequently, significant lower potency of HIV-1 antiretrovirals inhibiting RT and integration was observed. When Vpx was incorporated with anti-HIV-1 genes inhibiting either pre-RT or post-RT stages of the viral life-cycle, transduction levels significantly increased. However, a stronger antiviral effect was only observed with constructs that inhibit pre-RT stages of the viral life cycle. In conclusion this study demonstrates a way to overcome the major delivery obstacle of gene delivery into HIV-1 reservoir cell types. Importantly, incorporating Vpx with pre-RT anti-HIV-1 genes, demonstrated the greatest protection against HIV-1 infection.

  5. Recombinant vectors construction for cellobiohydrolase encoding gene constitutive expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontina GURGU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellobiohydrolases (EC 3.2.1.91 are important exo enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis alongside endoglucanases (EC 3.2.1.4 and β-glucosidases (EC 3.2.1.21. Heterologous cellobiohydrolase gene expression under constitutive promoter control using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host system is of great importance for a successful SSF process. From this point of view, the main objective of the work was to use Yeplac181 expression vector as a recipient for cellobiohdrolase - cbhB encoding gene expression under the control of the actin promoter, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two hybridvectors, YEplac-Actp and YEplac-Actp-CbhB, were generated usingEscherichia coli XLI Blue for the cloning experiments. Constitutive cbhB gene expression was checked by proteine gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE after insertion of these constructs into Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Immune Activities of Polycationic Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Polycationic vectors are used widely in the field of gene delivery, while currently their immune activities in vivo are poorly understood. In this comprehensive review, we aim to present an overview of existing mechanisms of adverse immune responses induced by the polycation/gene complexes, which includes the polycations themselves, the gene sequences and the ROS produced by them. These causes can induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, hypersensitivity as well as the activation of toll-like receptors, and finally the immunostimulation occur. In addition, we introduce some different opinions and research results on the immunogenicity of classical polycations such as polylysine (PLL, polyethyleneimine (PEI, polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM, chitosan and gelatin, most of which have immunogenicity and can induce immunoreactions in vivo. The methods now used to adjust their immunogenicity are shown in the final part of this review. Nowadays, there is still no accurate conclusion on immunogenicity of polycations, which confuses researchers seriously in in vivo test. We conclude that further research is needed in order to skillfully utilize or inhibit the immunogenicity of these polycationic vectors.

  7. Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Application of Retroviral Vectors Mediated Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Chiu Ku; Ming-Fong Tai; K.-H. William Lau; David Baylink; Shin-Tai Chen

    2004-01-01

    @@ Successful gene therapy depends on accurate delivery of therapeutic genes to target sites. In this report, we used magnetic nanopartieles to achieve this goal by developing magnetic Moloney leukemia virus-based (MRV) vectors. The vectors are combined by magnetic nanoparticles with the MRV viral vectors and can be guided to a specific site by an external magnetic filed.

  8. Metals and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Miah, Mahfuzur Rahman; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain-Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Wilson's disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration.

  9. Application of Herpesvirus Saimiri as an Alternative Gene Therapy Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Toptan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus saimiri is the prototype rhadinovirus and is closely related to human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Herpesvirus saimiri strains of subgroup C transduce a broad spectrum of cancer cells and primary cells including human T lymphocytes very efficiently and enable stable transgene expression. Herpesvirus saimiri as a gene therapy vector is favorable because of its large packaging capacity, extensive cell tropism, and long-termed persistence as non-integrating episomes and thus exhibits numerous advantages over commonly used viral vectors. In order to use Herpesvirus saimiri as a secure and versatile gene therapy vehicle, it should be easily manipulated and modified. The recent advances in molecular cloning of large genomic fragments such as virus genomes as bacterial artificial chromosomes facilitated the functional studies and manipulation of herpesviruses using the recombination system of bacteria. Among these, red-recombination based and ldquo;en passant and rdquo; mutagenesis method enables seamless genome modification such as deletion, insertion and point mutation very easily and efficiently. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(1.000: 41-51

  10. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  11. Efficient four fragment cloning for the construction of vectors for targeted gene replacement in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Andersson, Jens A.; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov;

    2008-01-01

    technique that allows single step cloning of the two required homologous recombination sequences into different sites of a recipient vector. The advantages are: A simple experimental design, free choice of target sequence, few procedures and user convenience. The vectors are intented for Agrobacterium...... with an average efficiency of 84% for gene replacement and 80% for targeted overexpression. Conclusion: The new vectors designed for USER Friendly cloning provided a fast reliable method to construct vectors for targeted gene manipulations in fungi....

  12. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  13. Optimization of conditions for transfection with the Sofast gene vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Fan; Qiao, Fang-Fang; Tong, Man-Li; Fu, Zuo-Gen; Dan, Bing; Yang, Tian-Ci; Zhang, Zhong-Ying

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported the synthesis and characterization of a novel cationic polymer gene vector. The present article further explored and optimized the working conditions of the Sofast gene vector both in vitro and in vivo, and improved its performance. The transfection conditions of Sofast, such as cell type, cell density, transfection time, N/P values and analysis time after transfection, were further explored. Moreover, the effects of the fusion peptide diINF-7 on transfection efficiency were examined. Sofast was successfully applied for the transfection of exogenous genes into more than 40 types of cell lines derived from humans, mice, monkeys and other species. When the cells were 50-80% confluent, Sofast possessed a better transfection efficiency. In most cases, Sofast also had a higher transfection efficiency when it was used to transfect cells that were seeded for several hours and had adhered to the substrate. The results from in vitro experiments indicate that the recommended Sofast to DNA mass ratio is 16:1, and the optimum analysis time after transfection is 48 h. The salt concentration in the Sofast working solution markedly affected the transfection efficiency. When conducting in vivo transfection, the working solution should be salt-free, whereas for in vitro transfection, it is more appropriate for the working solution to include certain salt concentrations. Finally, the results confirm that diINF-7 significantly promotes the transfection efficiency of Sofast. In conclusion, the present research not only established the optimal conditions for Sofast in the transfection of commonly used cells, but also built the foundations for in vivo and in vitro applications of Sofast, as well as its use in clinical practice.

  14. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect.

  15. Development of conditionally replicating integrase defective lentiviral vectors for Epstein-Barr virus gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Integrase defective lentiviral vectors show promise for achieving gene expression without integration, preserving some benefits of LVs, whereas reducing the potentially detrimental risk of insertional mutagenesis. Numerous reports supported the ability of these vectors to confer long-term gene expression in slowly dividing cell types for potentially corrective gene expression. These reports also highlighted additional applications of these vectors as delivery platforms for alternate integrati...

  16. Perinatal systemic gene delivery using adeno-associated viral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajvinder eKarda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative monogenic diseases can also affect a broad range of tissues and organs throughout the body. An effective treatment would require a systemic approach. The intravenous administration of novel therapies is ideal but is hampered by the inability of such drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier and precludes efficacy in the central nervous system. A number of these early lethal intractable diseases also present devastating irreversible pathology at birth or soon after. Therefore, any therapy would ideally be administered during the perinatal period to prevent, stop or ameliorate disease progression. The concept of perinatal gene therapy has moved a step further towards being a feasible approach to treating such disorders. This has primarily been driven by the recent discoveries that particular serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV gene delivery vectors have the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier following intravenous administration. Furthermore, this has been safely demonstrated in perinatal mice and non-human primates. This review focuses on the progress made in using AAV to achieve systemic transduction and what this means for developing perinatal gene therapy for early lethal neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM VIRUS IN DESIGNING NONVIRAL GENE VECTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-hong Xu; Mei-hua Sui; Jian-bin Tang; You-qing Shen

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a potential new approach to treat genetic disorders by delivering therapeutic genes to target diseased tissues. However, its clinical use has been impeded by gene delivery systems. The viral vectors are very efficient in delivering and expressing their carried genes, but they have safety issues in clinical use. While nonviral vectors are much safer with very low risks after careful material design, but their gene transcription efficiency is too low to be clinically used. Thus, rational design of nonviral vectors mimicking the viral vectors would be a way to break this bottleneck. This review compares side-by-side how viral/nonviral gene vectors transcend these biological barriers in terms of blood circulation, cellular uptake, endosome escape, nucleus import and gene transcription.

  18. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystian Junqueira Alves

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson’s disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated

  19. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  20. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Horino

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1 is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  1. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  2. Overview of gene delivery into cells using HSV-1-based vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Rachael L

    2012-10-01

    This overview describes the considerations involved in the preparation and use of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon as a vector for gene transfer into neurons. Strategies for gene delivery into neurons, either to study the molecular biology of brain function or for gene therapy, must utilize vectors that persist stably in postmitotic cells and that can be targeted both spatially and temporally in the nervous system in vivo. This unit describes the biology of HSV-1 along with a discussion covering development of amplicon and genomic HSV-1 vectors. Advantages and disadvantages of current HSV-1 vectors are presented, and HSV-1 vectors are compared with other vectors for gene transfer into neurons.

  3. Intragenic vectors for gene transfer without foreign DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conner, A.J.; Barrell, P.J.; Baldwin, S.J.; Lokerse, A.S.; Cooper, P.A.; Erasmuson, A.K.; Nap, J.P.H.; Jacobs, J.M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The intragenic vector system involves identifying functional equivalents of vector components from the genome of a specific crop species (or related species to which it can be hybridised) and using these DNA sequences to assemble vectors for transformation of that plant species. This system offers a

  4. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Julius W.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene

  5. Neurodegeneration in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor

    2010-07-01

    The neurodegenerative aspect of schizophrenia presupposes gene-environmental interactions involving chromosomal abnormalities and obstetric/perinatal complications that culminate in predispositions that impart a particular vulnerability for drastic and unpredictable precipitating factors, such as stress or chemical agents. The notion of a neurodevelopmental progression to the disease state implies that early developmental insults, with neurodegenerative proclivities, evolve into structural brain abnormalities involving specific regional circuits and neurohumoral agents. This neurophysiological orchestration is expressed in the dysfunctionality observed in premorbid signs and symptoms arising in the eventual diagnosis, as well as the neurobehavioral deficits reported from animal models of the disorder. The relative contributions of perinatal insults, neonatal ventral hippocampus lesion, prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate and early traumatic experience, as well as epigenetic contributions, are discussed from a neurodegenerative view of the essential neuropathology. It is implied that these considerations of factors that exert disruptive influences upon brain development, or normal aging, operationalize the central hub of developmental neuropathology around which the disease process may gain momentum. Nonetheless, the status of neurodegeneration in schizophrenia is somewhat tenuous and it is possible that brain imaging studies on animal models of the disorder, which may describe progressive alterations to cortical, limbic and ventricular structures similar to those of schizophrenic patients, are necessary to resolve the issue.

  6. [Adult-onset case of idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation without mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Shinji; Sekine, Takeshi; Ueno, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Takahashi, Junko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Kambe, Yasunori; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with a 15-year history of bipolar disorder treated with anti-depressants, lithium carbonate or neuroleptics was admitted because of marked difficulty in gait and speech. At the age 45, he was unable to walk without bilateral assists and became a wheel-chair state. There was no family history and his mother, father and younger sister were neurologically free. General physical examinations revealed no abnormalities. Neurologically, he was moderately demented (mini mental state examination: 18/30) and showed bilateral horizontal gaze nystagmus, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and moderate spastic paraparesis. No involuntary movements were noted. Wet blood smear showed acanthocytes, while blood chemistries revealed no abnormalities including levels of serum creatine kinase, hepatic enzymes and blood beta-lipoprotein. Kell antigen expressions of the red blood cells were within normal limit. Western blot analysis with anti-chorein antibody detected normal chorein expression levels of the red blood cells. Cranial MRI showed severe symmetric atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes, caudate nuclei, putamen, and brainstem. Also, MRI-gradient echo showed symmetric iron accumulation in the medial portion of the globus pallidus without surrounding high intensity areas, so called "eye-of-the-tiger sign". Genetic analyses revealed no mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Therefore, he was diagnosed as idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). These findings suggest that NBIA is heterogeneous and other additional genes remain to be found.

  7. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holkers, M.; Maggio, I.; Liu, J.; Janssen, J.M.; Miselli, F; Mussolino, C.; Recchia, A; Cathomen, T.; Goncalves, M. A. F. V.

    2012-01-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehi...

  8. Re-engineering adenovirus vector systems to enable high-throughput analyses of gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Richard J; McSharry, Brian P; Armstrong, Melanie; Tomasec, Peter; Wilkinson, Gavin W G

    2008-12-01

    With the enhanced capacity of bioinformatics to interrogate extensive banks of sequence data, more efficient technologies are needed to test gene function predictions. Replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used in expression analysis since they provide for extremely efficient expression of transgenes in a wide range of cell types. To facilitate rapid, high-throughput generation of recombinant viruses, we have re-engineered an adenovirus vector (designated AdZ) to allow single-step, directional gene insertion using recombineering technology. Recombineering allows for direct insertion into the Ad vector of PCR products, synthesized sequences, or oligonucleotides encoding shRNAs without requirement for a transfer vector Vectors were optimized for high-throughput applications by making them "self-excising" through incorporating the I-SceI homing endonuclease into the vector removing the need to linearize vectors prior to transfection into packaging cells. AdZ vectors allow genes to be expressed in their native form or with strep, V5, or GFP tags. Insertion of tetracycline operators downstream of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early (HCMV MIE) promoter permits silencing of transgenes in helper cells expressing the tet repressor thus making the vector compatible with the cloning of toxic gene products. The AdZ vector system is robust, straightforward, and suited to both sporadic and high-throughput applications.

  9. Evolving lessons on nanomaterial-coated viral vectors for local and systemic gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasala, Dayananda; Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2016-07-01

    Viral vectors are promising gene carriers for cancer therapy. However, virus-mediated gene therapies have demonstrated insufficient therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials due to rapid dissemination to nontarget tissues and to the immunogenicity of viral vectors, resulting in poor retention at the disease locus and induction of adverse inflammatory responses in patients. Further, the limited tropism of viral vectors prevents efficient gene delivery to target tissues. In this regard, modification of the viral surface with nanomaterials is a promising strategy to augment vector accumulation at the target tissue, circumvent the host immune response, and avoid nonspecific interactions with the reticuloendothelial system or serum complement. In the present review, we discuss various chemical modification strategies to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of viral vectors delivered either locally or systemically. We conclude by highlighting the salient features of various nanomaterial-coated viral vectors and their prospects and directions for future research.

  10. NANOPARTICLE AS A NEW GENE TRANSFERRING VECTOR IN SPECIFIC EXPRESSION GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管珩; 李拥军; 郑曰宏; 刘昌伟; 杨菁; 宋存先; 王彭延; 赵三妹; 王宗立; 佘铭鹏

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the possibility and efficiency of nanoparticle as a new vector in specific gene transference.Methods. Nanoparticle-DNA complex was prepared with Poly- dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) beating antisense monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (A-MCP-1), a specific expression gene, and the package efficiency, release progress in vitro, and the size of the complex were determined. The possibility of the new vector was evaluated with genomic DNA PCR by transferring gene into cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC), cationic lipids as a control. For study in vivo, jugular vein-to-artery bypass grafting procedures were performed on 20 New Zealand white rabbits, of which 6 grafts were transferred with nanoparticle-A-MCP-1 (200 μg), 6 with A - MCP - 1(200 μ g) by cationic liposome, 4 with LNCX plasmid, and 4 as control. Fourteen days after the grafts were harvested, the expression of A-MCP-1 and its effect on MCP-1 in vein grafts were detected by dot blot, and the morphologic evaluation of grafts was performed.Results. The package efficiency of the nanoparticle-DNA complex was 0. 9%, release progress in vitro lasted 2 weeks, and the size ranged from 150 to 300nm. SMC genomic DNA PCR showed that A-MCP-1 gene could be successfully transfected into cells by nanoparticle. The study in vivo indicated that A-MCP-1 mRNA was expressed in both local gene delivery groups, nanoparticle and liposome, meanwhile, MCP-1 expression in vein grafts was significantly inhibited and neointimal hyperplasia was notably reduced.Conclusion. Nanoparticle can act as a vector to transfect specific gene.

  11. Self-Assembled Fluorodendrimers Combine the Features of Lipid and Polymeric Vectors in Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Yitong; Wang, Yu; Hu, Jingjing; Li, Tianfu; Liu, Hongmei; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2015-09-28

    An ideal vector in gene therapy should exhibit high serum stability, excellent biocompatibility, a desired transfection efficacy and permeability into targeted tissues. Here, we describe a class of low-molecular-weight fluorodendrimers for efficient gene delivery. These materials self-assemble into uniform nanospheres and allow for efficient transfection at low charge ratios and very low DNA doses with minimal cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that these vectors combine the features of synthetic gene vectors such as liposomes and cationic polymers and present promising potential for clinical gene therapy.

  12. A novel binary T-vector with the GFP reporter gene for promoter characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ye Jiang

    Full Text Available Several strategies have been developed to clone PCR fragments into desired vectors. However, most of commercially available T-vectors are not binary vectors and cannot be directly used for Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. In this study, a novel binary T-vector was constructed by integrating two AhdI restriction sites into the backbone vector pCAMBIA 1300. The T-vector also contains a GFP reporter gene and thus, can be used to analyze promoter activity by monitoring the reporter gene. On the other hand, identification and characterization of various promoters not only benefit the functional annotation of their genes but also provide alternative candidates to be used to drive interesting genes for plant genetic improvement by transgenesis. More than 1,000 putative pollen-specific rice genes have been identified in a genome-wide level. Among them, 67 highly expressed genes were further characterized. One of the pollen-specific genes LOC_Os10g35930 was further surveyed in its expression patterns with more details by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Finally, its promoter activity was further investigated by analyzing transgenic rice plants carrying the promoter::GFP cassette, which was constructed from the newly developed T-vector. The reporter GFP gene expression in these transgenic plants showed that the promoter was active only in mature but not in germinated pollens.

  13. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years, aged (60 to 99 years, and AD (74 to 95 years cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Results Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%. In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets, with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc receptors and human

  14. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Ho Park; Hoseong Choi; Semin Kim; Won Kyong Cho; Kook-Hyung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the n...

  15. Syngeneic AAV Pseudo-particles Potentiate Gene Transduction of AAV Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Pokiniewski, Katie A; Firrman, Jenni; Wu, Zhongren; Chin, Mario P S; Chen, Xiongwen; Liu, LinShu; Xu, Ruian; Diao, Yong; Xiao, Weidong

    2017-03-17

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as a safe and efficient gene therapy platform. One complication is that a significant amount of empty particles have always been generated as impurities during AAV vector production. However, the effects of such particles on AAV vector performance remain unclear. Here we systemically evaluated the biological properties of three types of "empty" AAV particles: syngeneic pseudo-vectors with partial AAV genomes derived from DNA of the corresponding full particles, allogeneic pseudo-vectors with partial genomes different from the corresponding full particles, and null pseudo-vectors with no DNA inside the capsids. The syngeneic particles in excess increased the corresponding full AAV vector transgene expression both in vivo and in vitro. However, such effects were not observed with null or allogeneic particles. The observed differences among these pseudo-AAV particles may be ascribed to the syngeneic pseudo-vector DNA facilitating the complementary DNA synthesis of the corresponding full AAV particles. Our study suggests that the DNA content in the pseudo-vectors plays a key role in dictating their effects on AAV transduction. The effects of residual "empty" particles should be adequately assessed when comparing AAV vector performance. The syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors may be used to enhance the efficacy of gene therapy.

  16. Construction and characterization of calreticulin-HBsAg fusion gene recombinant adenovirus expression vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To generate recombinant adenoviral vector con-taining calreticulin (CRT)-hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) fusion gene for developing a safe, effective and HBsAg-specific therapeutic vaccine.METHODS: CRT and HBsAg gene were fused using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), endonuclease diges-tion and ligation methods. The fusion gene was cloned into pENTR/D-TOPO transfer vector after the base pairs of DNA (CACC) sequence was added to the 5′ end. Adenoviral expression vector containing CRT-HBsAg fusion gen...

  17. Gene Cloning of Murine α-Fetoprotein Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector and Expression in CHO Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易继林; 田耕

    2003-01-01

    To clone the murine α-fetoprotein (AFP) gene, construct the eukaryotic expression vector of AFP and express in CHO cells, total RNA were extracted from Hepa 1-6 cells, and then the murine α-fetoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1. The recombinant of vector was identified by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. A fter transient transfection of CHO cells with the vector, Western blotting was used to detect the expression of AFP. It is concluded that the 1.8kb murine α-fetoprotein gene was successfully cloned and its eukaryotic expression vector was successfully constructed.

  18. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  19. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia D. Suerth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings.

  20. Mouse mutants for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ß2 subunit display changes in cell adhesion and neurodegeneration response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Rubin

    Full Text Available Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2 display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs. Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2-/- mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4, during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1, a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1 and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 21 (Ccl21 mRNAs in Chrnb2-/- mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2-/- mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2-/- mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression.

  1. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dziaková, A.; Valenčáková, A.; Hatalová, E.; J. Kalinová

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including canc...

  2. P and M gene junction is the optimal insertion site in Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for foreign gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been developed as a vector for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. However, the optimal insertion site for foreign gene expression remained to be determined. In the present study, we inserted the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene into five different intergenic ...

  3. Rhodopsin gene expression determines rod outer segment size and rod cell resistance to a dominant-negative neurodegeneration mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandee A Price

    Full Text Available Two outstanding unknowns in the biology of photoreceptors are the molecular determinants of cell size, which is remarkably uniform among mammalian species, and the mechanisms of rod cell death associated with inherited neurodegenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. We have addressed both questions by performing an in vivo titration with rhodopsin gene copies in genetically engineered mice that express only normal rhodopsin or an autosomal dominant allele, encoding rhodopsin with a disease-causing P23H substitution. The results reveal that the volume of the rod outer segment is proportional to rhodopsin gene expression; that P23H-rhodopsin, the most common rhodopsin gene disease allele, causes cell death via a dominant-negative mechanism; and that long term survival of rod cells carrying P23H-rhodopsin can be achieved by increasing the levels of wild type rhodopsin. These results point to promising directions in gene therapy for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by dominant-negative mutations.

  4. rAAV vector-mediated gene therapy for experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao-Jian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safest viral vector system for gene therapy is based on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV up to date in Phase I clinical trials, which has been developed rapidly and applied for ischemic stroke gene therapy in animal experiments since the past seven years. rAAV vector has made great progress in improving gene delivery by modification of the capsid and increasing transgene expression by encapsidation of double-stranded rAAV genome. And in all, nine therapeutic genes in 12 animal studies were successfully delivered using rAAV vector to ischemic brain via different approaches in rat or mice stroke models for gene therapy and the results suggested that rAAV could mediate genes′ expression efficiently; most of them displayed evidently therapeutic efficacy with satisfactory biological safety. Gene therapy involving rAAV vector seems effective in attenuation of ischemic damage in stroke and has greatly promising potential use for patients in the future. In this review, we will focus on the basic biology and development of rAAV vector itself as well as the recent progress in the use of this vector for ischemic stroke gene therapy in animal experiments.

  5. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer in fundamental and applied cardiovascular research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swildens, Jim

    2012-01-01

    To treat various cardiac diseases, modification of gene expression for the purpose of increased or decreased expression of a particular gene, is regarded as a potential therapy. As a vehicle to introduce the gene of choice into the heart cell, virus vectors have given the most promising results. Thi

  6. Transcriptional enhancers induce insertional gene deregulation independently from the vector type and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Porcellini, Simona; Facchini, Giulia; Perna, Serena K; Cattoglio, Claudia; Sartori, Daniela; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Bonini, Chiara; Bovolenta, Chiara; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2009-05-01

    The integration characteristics of retroviral (RV) vectors increase the probability of interfering with the regulation of cellular genes, and account for a tangible risk of insertional mutagenesis in treated patients. To assess the potential genotoxic risk of conventional or self-inactivating (SIN) gamma-RV and lentiviral (LV) vectors independently from the biological consequences of the insertion event, we developed a quantitative assay based on real-time reverse transcriptase--PCR on low-density arrays to evaluate alterations of gene expression in individual primary T-cell clones. We show that the Moloney leukemia virus long terminal repeat (LTR) enhancer has the strongest activity in both a gamma-RV and a LV vector context, while an internal cellular promoter induces deregulation of gene expression less frequently, at a shorter range and to a lower extent in both vector types. Downregulation of gene expression was observed only in the context of LV vectors. This study indicates that insertional gene activation is determined by the characteristics of the transcriptional regulatory elements carried by the vector, and is largely independent from the vector type or design.

  7. Lentiviral vectors in neurodegenrative disorders - Aspects in gene therapy and disease models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2009-01-01

    , which is most often only satisfactory in the initial phase of the disease. Gene therapy is a novel treatment strategy intended to treat or alleviate disease by genetically modifying cells by introducing nucleic acids into the cells. Lentiviral vectors hold great promise as gene transfer vectors...... and are able to transduce post-mitotic cells e.g. terminally differentiated neurons, making them ideal candidates for gene transfer to the brain and as experimental tools. In this study vectors expressing miRNA embedded shRNA from pol II-promoters were constructed for RNA interference (RNAi) in vitro...... and in vivo. Robust gene knock-down was shown using a ubiquitous promoter (CMV) and for the first time neuron specific RNAi was obtained using a neuron specific promoter (NSE). Furthermore, optimization of lentiviral vectors was conducted using an insulator element (cHS4) in order to enhance transgene...

  8. An adeno-associated virus vector-mediated multiple gene transfer for dopamine synthetic enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊东升; 沈扬

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore a multiple gene transfer approach with separate adeno-associated virus vectors. Methods: The genes of dopamine synthetic enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylasc (TH), GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH, an enzyme critical for tetrahydrobioptcrin synthesis), and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), were cotransduced into 293 cells with separate AAV vectors. Expressions of TH, GCH, and AADC were detected by Western blot analysis. L-dopa and dopamine levels in the ceils were assayed by HPLC. Results: TH, GCH, and AADC proteins were effectively cocxpressed in the transduced cells with three separate AAV vectors, AAV-TH, AAV-GCH, and AAV-AADC. Furthermore, the coexpression of these three proteins resulted in an effectively spontaneous dopainc production in the cotransduced cells. Conclusion: The triple transduction of TH, GCH, and AADC genes with separate AAV vectors is effective, which might be important to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  9. Persistent gene expression in mouse nasal epithelia following feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Patrick L; Burnight, Erin R; Hickey, Melissa A; Blissard, Gary W; McCray, Paul B

    2005-10-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 10(6) transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 10(7) to 10(9) TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (approximately 10(9) TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for approximately 1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity.

  10. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  11. Molecular Imaging of Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Cancer Therapy: Beyond Viral Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Nguyen, Vu H. [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, California(United States)

    2010-04-15

    Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonarrival biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.

  12. Engineering cell lines for production of replication defective HSV-1 gene therapy vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kyle G; Krisky, David M; Ataai, Mohammed M; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents an attractive vehicle for a variety of gene therapy applications. To render this virus safe for clinical use, its cytotoxic genes must be removed without losing its ability to express transgenes efficiently. Our vectors are deleted for the essential immediate early genes ICP4 and ICP27. These genes are controlled by unique promoters having enhancer elements responsive to a viral structural protein VP16. The expression of these genes occurs prior to the activation of all other lytic functions and is thus required to initiate and complete the virus replication cycle. For large scale manufacture of clinical grade vectors, efficient cell lines must be generated that express the essential viral gene products in trans during vector propagation. Here we describe methods for engineering HSV-1 production cell lines that improve vector growth by altering the kinetics of complementing gene expression. We examined the ability of Vero cells independently transduced with ICP4 and ICP27 under transcriptional control of their respective promoters to support the growth of a replication defective vector (JDTOZHE), deleted for ICP4, ICP27 and approximately 20 kb of internal elements that are not required for virus growth in Vero cells. Vector yield on this cell line was 3 logs lower than wild-type virus grown on Vero cells. To understand the mechanism underlying poor vector yield, we examined the expression of ICP4 and ICP27 during virus complementation. While ICP27 was expressed immediately on vector infection, the expression of ICP4 was considerably delayed by 8-10 h, suggesting that the ICP4 promoter was not adequately activated by VP16 delivered by the infectious vector particle. Use of the ICP0 promoter to express ICP4 from the cellular genome resulted in higher induction levels and faster kinetics of ICP4 expression and a 10-fold improvement in vector yield. This study suggests that vector complementation is highly dependent on the

  13. NOVEL HYBRID GENE VECTOR STABILIZED BY CROSS-LINKING WITH GOLD NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-xiang Wang; Ying Zhu; Jia-cong Shen

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced stability of polyplexes in physiological condition was an important prerequisite for successful systemic gene delivery. Herein novel method was reported to develop stable gene vector by nanotechnology. Thiolated polyplexes were constructed and then cross-linked with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by gold-thiol interactions. TEM pictures showed that AuNPs were attached to the shell of spherical polyplexes. The hybrid gene vector was stable enough in physiological condition and maintained efficient transfection, which showed great potential in gene delivery research and application.

  14. A Neurodegeneration-Specific Gene-Expression Signature of Acutely Isolated Microglia from an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac M. Chiu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS that are activated by infection, neuronal injury, and inflammation. Here, we utilize flow cytometry and deep RNA sequencing of acutely isolated spinal cord microglia to define their activation in vivo. Analysis of resting microglia identified 29 genes that distinguish microglia from other CNS cells and peripheral macrophages/monocytes. We then analyzed molecular changes in microglia during neurodegenerative disease activation using the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. We found that SOD1G93A microglia are not derived from infiltrating monocytes, and that both potentially neuroprotective and toxic factors, including Alzheimer’s disease genes, are concurrently upregulated. Mutant microglia differed from SOD1WT, lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia, and M1/M2 macrophages, defining an ALS-specific phenotype. Concurrent messenger RNA/fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed posttranscriptional regulation of microglia surface receptors and T cell-associated changes in the transcriptome. These results provide insights into microglia biology and establish a resource for future studies of neuroinflammation.

  15. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and vector mosquito developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing projects have presented the opportunity for analysis of developmental genes in three vector mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles gambiae. A comparative genomic analysis of developmental genes in Drosophila melanogaster and these three important vectors of human disease was performed in this investigation. While the study was comprehensive, special emphasis centered on genes that 1 are components of developmental signaling pathways, 2 regulate fundamental developmental processes, 3 are critical for the development of tissues of vector importance, 4 function in developmental processes known to have diverged within insects, and 5 encode microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate developmental transcripts in Drosophila. While most fruit fly developmental genes are conserved in the three vector mosquito species, several genes known to be critical for Drosophila development were not identified in one or more mosquito genomes. In other cases, mosquito lineage-specific gene gains with respect to D. melanogaster were noted. Sequence analyses also revealed that numerous repetitive sequences are a common structural feature of Drosophila and mosquito developmental genes. Finally, analysis of predicted miRNA binding sites in fruit fly and mosquito developmental genes suggests that the repertoire of developmental genes targeted by miRNAs is species-specific. The results of this study provide insight into the evolution of developmental genes and processes in dipterans and other arthropods, serve as a resource for those pursuing analysis of mosquito development, and will promote the design and refinement of functional analysis experiments.

  17. Suicide Vector Construction of Haemophilus parasuis hhd B Gene Marker-free Deleted

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Shuai; Li Miao; Li Yan; Jiang Zhiyong; Cai Rujian; Yang Dongxia; Li Chunling

    2015-01-01

    To construct the suicide vector of hhd B gene marker-free mutant in Haemophilus parasuis( HPS),two pairs of specific primers were designed and synthesized according to the hhd B gene upstream and downstream sequences of HPS published in Gen Bank. The hhd B gene upstream and downstream sequences were amplified by PCR,which were further ligated( hhd B-up + down) through overlapping PCR method. NotⅠand SalⅠrestriction enzyme sites were introduced on both ends of the ligated sequence. After the corresponding digestion,the hhd B-up + down sequence was directionally cloned to the suicide plasmid vector p EMOC2. Results showed that the suicide vector of hhd B gene marker-free deleted( p EMOC2Δhhd B) with stable inheritance in E. coli β2155 strain was successfully obtained,thereby laying the foundation for construction of HPS-hhd B gene marker-free mutant strain.

  18. Development and use of an efficient DNA-based viral gene silencing vector for soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunquan; Yang, Chunling; Whitham, Steven A; Hill, John H

    2009-02-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is increasingly being used as a reverse genetics tool to study functions of specific plant genes. It is especially useful for plants, such as soybean, that are recalcitrant to transformation. Previously, Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) was shown to be an effective VIGS vector for soybean. However, the reported BPMV vector requires in vitro RNA transcription and inoculation, which is not reliable or amenable to high-throughput applications. To increase the efficiency of the BPMV vector for soybean functional genomics, a DNA-based version was developed. Reported here is the construction of a Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter-driven BPMV vector that is efficient for the study of soybean gene function. The selection of a mild rather than a severe BPMV strain greatly reduced the symptom interference caused by virus infection. The DNA-based BPMV vector was used to silence soybean homologues of genes involved in plant defense, translation, and the cytoskeleton in shoots and in roots. VIGS of the Actin gene resulted in reduced numbers of Soybean mosaic virus infection foci. The results demonstrate the utility of this new vector as an efficient tool for a wide range of applications for soybean functional genomics.

  19. Glycoprotein is enough for sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Juanjuan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the necessity and potential application of structural genes for expressing heterogenous genes from Sindbis virus-derived vector, the DNA-based expression vector pVaXJ was constructed by placing the recombinant genome of sindbis-like virus XJ-160 under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter of the plasmid pVAX1, in which viral structural genes were replaced by a polylinker cassette to allow for insertion of heterologous genes. The defect helper plasmids pVaE or pVaC were developed by cloning the gene of glycoprotein E3E26KE1 or capsid protein of XJ-160 virus into pVAX1, respectively. The report gene cassette pVaXJ-EGFP or pV-Gluc expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP or Gaussia luciferase (G.luc were constructed by cloning EGFP or G.luc gene into pVaXJ. EGFP or G.luc was expressed in the BHK-21 cells co-transfected with report gene cassettes and pVaE at levels that were comparable to those produced by report gene cassettes, pVaC and pVaE and were much higher than the levels produced by report gene cassette and pVaC, suggesting that glycoprotein is enough for Sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes in host cells. The method of gene expression from Sindbis virus-based DNA vector only co-transfected with envelop E gene increase the conveniency and the utility of alphavirus-based vector systems in general.

  20. Glycoprotein is enough for sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuyang; Li, Jiangjiao; Tang, Li; Wang, Huanqin; Li, Jia; Fu, Juanjuan; Liang, Guodong

    2011-07-10

    To investigate the necessity and potential application of structural genes for expressing heterogenous genes from Sindbis virus-derived vector, the DNA-based expression vector pVaXJ was constructed by placing the recombinant genome of sindbis-like virus XJ-160 under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter of the plasmid pVAX1, in which viral structural genes were replaced by a polylinker cassette to allow for insertion of heterologous genes. The defect helper plasmids pVaE or pVaC were developed by cloning the gene of glycoprotein E3E26KE1 or capsid protein of XJ-160 virus into pVAX1, respectively. The report gene cassette pVaXJ-EGFP or pV-Gluc expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) or Gaussia luciferase (G.luc) were constructed by cloning EGFP or G.luc gene into pVaXJ. EGFP or G.luc was expressed in the BHK-21 cells co-transfected with report gene cassettes and pVaE at levels that were comparable to those produced by report gene cassettes, pVaC and pVaE and were much higher than the levels produced by report gene cassette and pVaC, suggesting that glycoprotein is enough for Sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes in host cells. The method of gene expression from Sindbis virus-based DNA vector only co-transfected with envelop E gene increase the conveniency and the utility of alphavirus-based vector systems in general.

  1. Comprehensive set of integrative plasmid vectors for copper-inducible gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; García-Bravo, Elena; García-Hernández, Raquel; Martínez-Cayuela, Marina; Pérez, Juana; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2012-04-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is widely used as a model system for studying gliding motility, multicellular development, and cellular differentiation. Moreover, M. xanthus is a rich source of novel secondary metabolites. The analysis of these processes has been hampered by the limited set of tools for inducible gene expression. Here we report the construction of a set of plasmid vectors to allow copper-inducible gene expression in M. xanthus. Analysis of the effect of copper on strain DK1622 revealed that copper concentrations of up to 500 μM during growth and 60 μM during development do not affect physiological processes such as cell viability, motility, or aggregation into fruiting bodies. Of the copper-responsive promoters in M. xanthus reported so far, the multicopper oxidase cuoA promoter was used to construct expression vectors, because no basal expression is observed in the absence of copper and induction linearly depends on the copper concentration in the culture medium. Four different plasmid vectors have been constructed, with different marker selection genes and sites of integration in the M. xanthus chromosome. The vectors have been tested and gene expression quantified using the lacZ gene. Moreover, we demonstrate the functional complementation of the motility defect caused by lack of PilB by the copper-induced expression of the pilB gene. These versatile vectors are likely to deepen our understanding of the biology of M. xanthus and may also have biotechnological applications.

  2. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Koert FD Kuhlmann; Conny T Bakker; Fibo JW ten Kate; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions.METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices.Tissue slices were cultured ex vivo for 1-6 d in an incubator using 95% O2. Slices were subsequently analyzed for viability and morphology. In addition the slices were incubated with different viral vectors expressing the repor ter genes GFP or DsRed.Expression of these reporter genes was measured at 72 h after infection.RESULTS: With the Krumdieck tissue slicer, uniform slices could be generated from pancreatic tissue but only upon embedding the tissue in 3% low melting agarose. Immunohistological examination showed the presence of all pancreatic cell types. Pancreatic normal and cancer tissue slices could be cultured for up to 6 d, while retaining viability and a moderate to good morphology. Reporter gene expression indicated that the slices could be infected and transduced efficiently by adenoviral vectors and by adeno associated viral vectors, whereas transduction with lentiviral vectors was limited. For the adenoviral vector, the transduction seemed limited to the peripheral layers of the explants.CONCLUSION: The presented sys tem al lows reproducible processing of minimal amounts of pancreatic tissue into slices uniform in size, suitable for pre-clinical evaluation of gene therapy vectors.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  4. [Selection of retroviral vector producing cell lines and gene transfer into hematopoietic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, C; Mannoni, P

    1996-04-01

    Transduction and expression of a transgene in hematopoietic stem cells with retroviral vectors still remain major challenges for gene therapy in blood disorders. Use of an easily detectable gene marker, such as the nlsLacZ, at the laboratory and clinical levels, provides a powerful approach of these two combined problems.

  5. In vivo characteristics of cationic liposomes as delivery vectors for gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audouy, SAL; de Leij, LFMH; Hoekstra, D; Molema, G

    2002-01-01

    After a decade of clinical trials, gene therapy seems to have found its place between excessive ambitions and feasible aims, with encouraging results obtained in recent years. Intracellular delivery of genetic material is the key step in gene therapy. Optimization of delivery vectors is of major imp

  6. Design of retrovirus vectors for transfer and expression of the human. beta. -globin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.D.; Bender, M.A.; Harris, E.A.S.; Kaleko, M.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    Regulated expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene has been demonstrated in cultured murine erythroleukemia cells and in mice after retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. However, the low titer of recombinant viruses described to date results in relatively inefficient gene transfer, which limits their usefulness for animal studies and for potential gene therapy in humans for diseases involving defective ..beta..-globin genes. The authors found regions that interfered with virus production within intron 2 of the ..beta..-globin gene and on both sides of the gene. The flanking regions could be removed, but intron 2 was required for ..beta..-globin expression. Inclusion of ..beta..-globin introns necessitates an antisense orientation of the gene within the retrovirus vector. However, they found no effect of the antisense ..beta..-globin transcription on virus production. A region downstream of the ..beta..-globin gene that stimulates expression of the gene in transgenic mice was included in the viruses without detrimental effects on virus titer. Virus titers of over 10/sup 6/ CFU/ml were obtained with the final vector design, which retained the ability to direct regulated expression of human ..beta..-globin in murine erythroleukemia cells. The vector also allowed transfer and expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene in hematopoietic cells (CFU-S cells) in mice.

  7. Construction and Expression of Eukaryotic Expression Vector of Mature Polypeptide of Duck Interferon Alpha Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Fucheng; LI Jingpeng; LI Lu; ZHANG Jianguang; REN Guiping

    2006-01-01

    To study biological activities of Duck Interferon Alpha (DuIFN-α) and prepare antivirus medicine, the eukaryotic expression vector of mature polypeptide of Duck Interferon Alpha (mDuIFN-α) gene was constructed and expressed in insect cell. By means of PCR technique, the mDuIFN-α gene was cloned from pMD-18-duIFN-αrecombinant. The gene was then inserted to pGEM-T vector and identified by restriction endonuclease analysis and sequencing. The mDuIFN-α gene was ligated with the eukaryotic expression vector pMelBacA, then transfected into Sf9cell line. Recombinant polypeptide was effectively expressed in insect cell and its molecular weight was 34 ku.

  8. Development of a gene silencing DNA vector derived from a broad host range geminivirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancock Leandria C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing is proving to be a powerful tool for genetic, developmental, and physiological analyses. The use of viral induced gene silencing (VIGS offers advantages to transgenic approaches as it can be potentially applied to non-model systems for which transgenic techniques are not readily available. However, many VIGS vectors are derived from Gemini viruses that have limited host ranges. We present a new, unipartite vector that is derived from a curtovirus that has a broad host range and will be amenable to use in many non-model systems. Results The construction of a gene silencing vector derived from the geminivirus Beet curly top virus (BCTV, named pWSRi, is reported. Two versions of the vector have been developed to allow application by biolistic techniques or by agro-infiltration. We demonstrate its ability to silence nuclear genes including ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS, transketolase, the sulfur allele of magnesium chelatase (ChlI, and two homeotic transcription factors in spinach or tomato by generating gene-specific knock-down phenotypes. Onset of phenotypes occurred 3 to 12 weeks post-inoculation, depending on the target gene, in organs that developed after the application. The vector lacks movement genes and we found no evidence for significant spread from the site of inoculation. However, viral amplification in inoculated tissue was detected and is necessary for systemic silencing, suggesting that signals generated from active viral replicons are efficiently transported within the plant. Conclusion The unique properties of the pWSRi vector, the ability to silence genes in meristem tissue, the separation of virus and silencing phenotypes, and the broad natural host range of BCTV, suggest that it will have wide utility.

  9. [Post-translational ligation and function of dual-vector transferred split CFTR gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Ze-Long; Qu, Hui-Ge; Chi, Xiao-Yan

    2010-01-01

    The mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to an autosomal recessive genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF). The gene therapy for CF using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivering CFTR gene is restricted by the contents limitation of AAV vectors. In this study the split CFTR genes severed at its regulatory domain were delivered by a dual-vector system with an intein-mediated protein trans-splicing as a technique to investigate the post-translational ligation of CFTR half proteins and its function as a chloride ion channel. A pair of eukaryotic expression vectors was constructed by breaking the human CFTR cDNA before Ser712 codon and fusing with Ssp DnaB intein coding sequences. After co-transfection into baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells followed by transient expression, patch clamps were carried out to record the chloride current of whole-cell and the activity of a single channel, and the ligation of two halves of CFTR was observed by Western blotting. The results showed that the intein-fused half genes co-transfected cells displayed a high whole cell chloride current and activity of a single channel indicating the functional recovery of chloride channel, and an intact CFTR protein band was figured out by CFTR-specific antibodies indicating that intein can efficiently ligate the separately expressed half CFTR proteins. The data demonstrated that protein splicing strategy could be used as a strategy in delivering CFTR gene by two vectors, encouraging our ongoing research program on dual AAV vector system based gene transfer in gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

  10. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application.

  11. MicroRNAs in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushati, Natascha; Cohen, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in diverse cellular and developmental processes. Many miRNAs are expressed specifically in the central nervous system, where they have roles in differentiation, neuronal survival, and potentially also in plasticity and learning. The absence of miRNAs in a variety of specific postmitotic neurons can lead to progressive loss of these neurons and behavioral defects reminiscent of the phenotypes seen in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review recent studies which provide a link between miRNA function and neurodegeneration. We also discuss evidence which might suggest involvement of miRNAs in the emergence or progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Gene therapy as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: innovative vectors and therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaansen, J; Vervoordeldonk, M J B M; Tak, P P

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to conventional therapy, novel biologicals targeting tumour necrosis factor-alpha have successfully entered the clinic. However, the majority of the patients still has some actively inflamed joints and some patients suffer from side-effects associated with the high systemic dosages needed to achieve therapeutic levels in the joints. In addition, due to of the short half-life of these proteins there is a need for continuous, multiple injections of the recombinant protein. An alternative approach might be the use of gene transfer to deliver therapeutic genes locally at the site of inflammation. Several viral and non-viral vectors are being used in animal models of RA. The first gene therapy trials for RA have already entered the clinic. New vectors inducing long-term and regulated gene expression in specific tissue are under development, resulting in more efficient gene transfer, for example by using distinct serotypes of viral vectors such as adeno-associated virus. This review gives an overview of some promising vectors used in RA research. Furthermore, several therapeutic genes are discussed that could be used for gene therapy in RA patients.

  13. Versatile Cosmid Vectors for the Isolation, Expression, and Rescue of Gene Sequences: Studies with the Human α -globin Gene Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yun-Fai; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a series of cosmids that can be used as vectors for genomic recombinant DNA library preparations, as expression vectors in mammalian cells for both transient and stable transformations, and as shuttle vectors between bacteria and mammalian cells. These cosmids were constructed by inserting one of the SV2-derived selectable gene markers-SV2-gpt, SV2-DHFR, and SV2-neo-in cosmid pJB8. High efficiency of genomic cloning was obtained with these cosmids and the size of the inserts was 30-42 kilobases. We isolated recombinant cosmids containing the human α -globin gene cluster from these genomic libraries. The simian virus 40 DNA in these selectable gene markers provides the origin of replication and enhancer sequences necessary for replication in permissive cells such as COS 7 cells and thereby allows transient expression of α -globin genes in these cells. These cosmids and their recombinants could also be stably transformed into mammalian cells by using the respective selection systems. Both of the adult α -globin genes were more actively expressed than the embryonic zeta -globin genes in these transformed cell lines. Because of the presence of the cohesive ends of the Charon 4A phage in the cosmids, the transforming DNA sequences could readily be rescued from these stably transformed cells into bacteria by in vitro packaging of total cellular DNA. Thus, these cosmid vectors are potentially useful for direct isolation of structural genes.

  14. Increased in vitro and in vivo gene transfer by adenovirus vectors containing chimeric fiber proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, T J; Tzeng, E; Shears, L L; Roelvink, P W; Li, Y; Lee, G M; Brough, D E; Lizonova, A; Kovesdi, I

    1997-11-01

    Alteration of the natural tropism of adenovirus (Ad) will permit gene transfer into specific cell types and thereby greatly broaden the scope of target diseases that can be treated by using Ad. We have constructed two Ad vectors which contain modifications to the Ad fiber coat protein that redirect virus binding to either alpha(v) integrin [AdZ.F(RGD)] or heparan sulfate [AdZ.F(pK7)] cellular receptors. These vectors were constructed by a novel method involving E4 rescue of an E4-deficient Ad with a transfer vector containing both the E4 region and the modified fiber gene. AdZ.F(RGD) increased gene delivery to endothelial and smooth muscle cells expressing alpha(v) integrins. Likewise, AdZ.F(pK7) increased transduction 5- to 500-fold in multiple cell types lacking high levels of Ad fiber receptor, including macrophage, endothelial, smooth muscle, fibroblast, and T cells. In addition, AdZ.F(pK7) significantly increased gene transfer in vivo to vascular smooth muscle cells of the porcine iliac artery following balloon angioplasty. These vectors may therefore be useful in gene therapy for vascular restenosis or for targeting endothelial cells in tumors. Although binding to the fiber receptor still occurs with these vectors, they demonstrate the feasibility of tissue-specific receptor targeting in cells which express low levels of Ad fiber receptor.

  15. Construction of eukaryotic expression vector with brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor trkB gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Tao; JIANG Xiao-dan; XU Zhong; YUAN Jun; DING Lian-shu; ZOU Yu-xi; XU Ru-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct an eukaryotic expression vector carrying rat brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor trkB gene. Methods: Using the total RNA isolated from rat brain as template, the trkB gene was amplified by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with a pair of specific primers which contained the restrictive sites of EcoR I and BamH I. The amplified fragment of trkB gene was digested with EcoR I and BamH I, and then subcloned into cloning vector pMD18-T and expression vector pEGFP-C2 respectively. The recombinant plasmids were identified by restriction endonuclease enzyme analysis and PCR. Results: The amplified DNA fragment was about 1461 bp in length. Enzyme digestion and PCR analysis showed that the gene of trkB had been successfully cloned into vector pMD18-T and pEGFP-C2. Conclusions: The trkB gene of rat has been amplified and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C2.

  16. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP, but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana.

  17. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana.

  18. Common gene therapy viral vectors do not efficiently penetrate sputum from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Hida

    Full Text Available Norwalk virus and human papilloma virus, two viruses that infect humans at mucosal surfaces, have been found capable of rapidly penetrating human mucus secretions. Viral vectors for gene therapy of Cystic Fibrosis (CF must similarly penetrate purulent lung airway mucus (sputum to deliver DNA to airway epithelial cells. However, surprisingly little is known about the rates at which gene delivery vehicles penetrate sputum, including viral vectors used in clinical trials for CF gene therapy. We find that sputum spontaneously expectorated by CF patients efficiently traps two viral vectors commonly used in CF gene therapy trials, adenovirus (d∼80 nm and adeno-associated virus (AAV serotype 5; d∼20 nm, leading to average effective diffusivities that are ∼3,000-fold and 12,000-fold slower than their theoretical speeds in water, respectively. Both viral vectors are slowed by adhesion, as engineered muco-inert nanoparticles with diameters as large as 200 nm penetrate the same sputum samples at rates only ∼40-fold reduced compared to in pure water. A limited fraction of AAV exhibit sufficiently fast mobility to penetrate physiologically thick sputum layers, likely because of the lower viscous drag and smaller surface area for adhesion to sputum constituents. Nevertheless, poor penetration of CF sputum is likely a major contributor to the ineffectiveness of viral vector based gene therapy in the lungs of CF patients observed to date.

  19. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  20. Carbon nanotubes as vectors for gene therapy: past achievements, present challenges and future goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Katie; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Promising therapeutic and prophylactic effects have been achieved following advances in the gene therapy research arena, giving birth to the new generation of disease-modifying therapeutics. The greatest challenge that gene therapy vectors still face is the ability to deliver sufficient genetic payloads in order to enable efficient gene transfer into target cells. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene therapy vectors have been developed and explored over the past 10years, including carbon nanotubes. In this review we will address the application of carbon nanotubes as non-viral vectors in gene therapy with the aim to give a perspective on the past achievements, present challenges and future goals. A series of important topics concerning carbon nanotubes as gene therapy vectors will be addressed, including the benefits that carbon nanotubes offer over other non-viral delivery systems. Furthermore, a perspective is given on what the ideal genetic cargo to deliver using carbon nanotubes is and finally the geno-pharmacological impact of carbon nanotube-mediated gene therapy is discussed.

  1. Expression of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Gene in Cultured Cells by Using Recombinant Plasmid Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Aleem

    1983-01-01

    By using a new host-vector system, expression of the gene coding for hepatitis B surface antigen has been studied. A subgenomic fragment of cloned hepatitis B viral DNA was inserted into the plasmid vector pSV010. Transfection of COS cells with the recombinant plasmid vector containing hepatitis sequences leads to the synthesis of hepatitis B surface antigen, which is released in the culture medium in the form of 22-nm particles similar to those found in the sera of hepatitis carriers.

  2. Construction and expression of SET gene and siRNA recombinant adenovirus vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Bo-qun; Lu Pin-hong; Li Ying; Xue Kai; Li Mei; Ma Xiang; Diao Fei-yan; Cui Yu-gui; Liu Jia-yin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To construct SET gene recombinant adenovirus vector and SET gene small interfering RNA (SiRNA) recombinant adenovirus vector for over-expression or knock-down of SET levels.Methods: The cDNA sequence of SET was cloned by reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the SET gene fragment was subcloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV to construct the shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-SET. The shuttle plasmid pAdtrack-SET was transformed into BJ5183 cells with the adenoviral backbone pAdEasy-1 to obtain the homologous recombinant Ad-CMV-SET and the recombinant Ad-CMV-SET was packaged and amplified in the AD293 cells. The expression of SET in AD293 cells was detected by Western blot. In addition, we constructed SET gene SiRNA recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-H1-SiRNA/SET) and its efficacy of knockdown of SET protein was detected in infected GC-2spd(ts) cells by Western blot. Results: The recombinant adenovirus vectors, both SET gene recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-CMV-SET and SET gene SiRNA recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-H1-SiRNA/SET, were proven to be constructed successfully by the evidence of endonulease digestion and sequencing. AD293 cells infected with either recombinant adenovirus vector of Ad-CMV-SET or Ad-H1-SiRNA/SET were observed to express GFP. The expression of SET protein was up-regulated significantly in AD293 cells infected with SET gene recombinant adenovirus vector. On the contrast, SET protein was significantly down-regulated in the GC-2spd(ts) cells infected with Ad-H1-SiRNA/SET (P<0.05) and the knockdown efficiency was approximately 50%-70%. Conclusion: The recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-CMV-SET and Ad-H1-SiRNA/SET were successfully constructed and effectively expressed in germ cells and somatic cells. It provides an experimental tool for further study of SET gene in the physiological and pathophysiological mechanism of reproduction-related diseases.

  3. Retinal functional change caused by adenoviral vector-mediated transfection of LacZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T; Ueno, H; Goto, Y; Oshima, Y; Yamanaka, I; Ishibashi, T; Inomata, H

    1998-04-10

    We examined the effect of insertion of an exogenous gene on retinal function to assess the rationale of adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer for future gene therapy. An adenoviral vector expressing bacterial LacZ (AdCALacZ) was injected into the eyes of adult rats either intravitreally (group A) or subretinally (group B), and the gene expression and retinal function were thus examined at different time points after gene transfer for 3 weeks. X-Gal histostaining showed that neural retinal cells were transfected in group A and that retinal pigment epithelial cells were transfected in group B. The gene transfer was more efficient in group B (54.4% of the fixed retinal area was stained) than in group A (10.4%). The electroretinogram (ERG) revealed retinal dysfunction in the AdCALacZ-transfected rats even at the stage in which the histological damage was not apparent by electron microscopy and immunohistochemical studies for cytokeratin, S-100 protein, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. The ERG change was correlated with the intensity of inflammation, and retinal function recovered to the original level by 3 weeks, along with a diminution of inflammation. Functional changes were more evident in eyes treated with AdCALacZ than in those infected with adenoviral vector with no exogenous gene; however, no histological difference was observed between these groups, indicating that the insertion of exogenous gene itself affects retinal function. The results showed that different kinds of retinal cells could be gene-transferred by an adenoviral vector, depending on the application method. The retinal dysfunction caused by each adenoviral transfection method was caused by inflammation and the insertion of exogenous gene, and this retinal dysfunction was recoverable. In future gene therapy, special attention should be given to the method of exogenous gene insertion in the retina.

  4. Efficient four fragment cloning for the construction of vectors for targeted gene replacement in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Andersson, Jens A.; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov

    2008-01-01

    Background: The rapid increase in whole genome fungal sequence information allows large scale functional analyses of target genes. Efficient transformation methods to obtain site-directed gene replacement, targeted over-expression by promoter replacement, in-frame epitope tagging or fusion...... of coding sequences with fluorescent markers such as GFP are essential for this process. Construction of vectors for these experiments depends on the directional cloning of two homologous recombination sequences on each side of a selection marker gene. Results: Here, we present a USER Friendly cloning based...... technique that allows single step cloning of the two required homologous recombination sequences into different sites of a recipient vector. The advantages are: A simple experimental design, free choice of target sequence, few procedures and user convenience. The vectors are intented for Agrobacterium...

  5. Avidin-biotin interaction mediated peptide assemblies as efficient gene delivery vectors for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Chen, Wei-Hai; Kuang, Ying; Zeng, Xuan; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhou, Xiang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a bright future for the treatment of cancers. One of the research highlights focuses on smart gene delivery vectors with good biocompatibility and tumor-targeting ability. Here, a novel gene vector self-assembled through avidin-biotin interaction with optimized targeting functionality, biotinylated tumor-targeting peptide/avidin/biotinylated cell-penetrating peptide (TAC), was designed and prepared to mediate the in vitro and in vivo delivery of p53 gene. TAC exhibited efficient DNA-binding ability and low cytotoxicity. In in vitro transfection assay, TAC/p53 complexes showed higher transfection efficiency and expression amount of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells as compared with 293T and HeLa cells, primarily due to the specific recognition between tumor-targeting peptides and receptors on MCF-7 cells. Additionally, by in situ administration of TAC/p53 complexes into tumor-bearing mice, the expression of p53 gene was obviously upregulated in tumor cells, and the tumor growth was significantly suppressed. This study provides an alternative and unique strategy to assemble functionalized peptides, and the novel self-assembled vector TAC developed is a promising gene vector for cancer therapy.

  6. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Melvin Y; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality.

  7. Split vector systems for ultra-targeted gene delivery: a contrivance to achieve ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Tightly controlled spatial localisation of therapeutic gene delivery is essential to maximize the benefits of somatic gene therapy in vivo and to reduce its undesired effects on the 'bystander' cell populations, most importantly germline cells. Indeed, complete ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy can only be achieved with ultra-targeted gene delivery, which excludes the risk of inadvertent germline gene transfer. Thus, it is desired to supplement existing strategies of physical focusing and biological (cell-specific) targeting of gene delivery with an additional principle for the rigid control over spread of gene transfer within the body. In this paper I advance the concept of 'combinatorial' targeting of therapeutic gene transfer in vivo. I hypothesize that it is possible to engineer complex gene delivery vector systems consisting of several components, each one of them capable of independent spread within the human body but incapable of independent facilitation of gene transfer. As the gene delivery augmented by such split vector systems would be reliant on the simultaneous availability of all the vector system components at a predetermined body site, it is envisaged that higher order reaction kinetics required for the assembly of the functional gene transfer configuration would sharpen spatial localisation of gene transfer via curtailing the blurring effect of the vector spread within the body. A particular implementation of such split vector system could be obtained through supplementing a viral therapeutic gene vector with a separate auxiliary vector carrying a non-integrative and non-replicative form of a gene (e.g., mRNA) coding for a cellular receptor of the therapeutic vector component. Gene-transfer-enabling components of the vector system, which would be delivered separately from the vector component loaded with the therapeutic gene cargo, could also be cell-membrane-insertion-proficient receptors, elements of artificial transmembrane channels

  8. Polycistronic strategy for cyanobacterial expression vector construction: Co-transcription of a human gene and a selective marker gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yukun; SHI Dingji; ZHAO Feifei; YU Meimin; RU Binggen

    2005-01-01

    A polycistronic expression vector, pKGA-NTF1, was constructed for the cyanobacterium. Within this vector, the spectinomycin/streptomycin resistance gene (aadA) facilitated the selection of transformants when co-transcribed with favorite genes. A natural glnA gene was selected as the platform to introduce the plasmid into a neutral site of the Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 chromosome. Function of the vector was demonstrated by the insertion of a modified human Trefoil factor 3 gene (NTF1 ) to upstream of the aadA gene and by the analyses of the transformed strains. Antibiotics resistance assays showed that the dicistronic expression cassette conferred high spectinomycin resistance to both the E. coli cells and the Synechococcus cells. PCR analysis and Western-blot analysis were carried out to confirm the integration and expression of the NTF1 gene, respectively. Through simple molecular manipulations, the artificial polycistronic structure described here can be conveniently used to express other favorable genes or operons in cyanobacteria, and to study the cyanobacterial gene expression as well.

  9. Surface immobilization of hexa-histidine-tagged adeno-associated viral vectors for localized gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J-H; Koerber, J T; Gujraty, K; Bethi, S R; Kane, R S; Schaffer, D V

    2010-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, which are undergoing broad exploration in clinical trials, have significant promise for therapeutic gene delivery because of their safety and delivery efficiency. Gene delivery technologies capable of mediating localized gene expression may further enhance the potential of AAV in a variety of therapeutic applications by reducing spread outside a target region, which may thereby reduce off-target side effects. We have genetically engineered an AAV variant capable of binding to surfaces with high affinity through a hexa-histidine metal-binding interaction. This immobilized AAV vector system mediates high-efficiency delivery to cells that contact the surface and thus may have promise for localized gene delivery, which may aid numerous applications of AAV delivery to gene therapy.

  10. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  11. Chimeric adeno-associated virus and bacteriophage: a potential targeted gene therapy vector for malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavarut, Paladd; O'Neill, Kevin; Syed, Nelofer; Hajitou, Amin

    2014-01-01

    The incipient development of gene therapy for cancer has fuelled its progression from bench to bedside in mere decades. Of all malignancies that exist, gliomas are the largest class of brain tumors, and are renowned for their aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. In order for gene therapy to achieve clinical success, a multitude of barriers ranging from glioma tumor physiology to vector biology must be overcome. Many viral gene delivery systems have been subjected to clinical investigation; however, with highly limited success. In this review, the current progress and challenges of gene therapy for malignant glioma are discussed. Moreover, we highlight the hybrid adeno-associated virus and bacteriophage vector as a potential candidate for targeted gene delivery to brain tumors.

  12. Baculoviruses as Vectors for Gene Therapy against Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J. Stanbridge

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Current curative strategies for prostate cancer are restricted to the primary tumour, and the effect of treatments to control metastatic disease is not sustained. Therefore, the application of gene therapy to prostate cancer is an attractive alternative. Baculoviruses are highly restricted insect viruses, which can enter, but not replicate in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses can incorporate large amounts of extra genetic material, and will express transgenes in mammalian cells when under the control of a mammalian or strong viral promoter. Successful gene delivery has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo and into both dividing and nondividing cells, which is important since prostate cancers divide relatively slowly. In addition, the envelope protein gp64 is sufficiently mutable to allow targeted transduction of particular cell types. In this review, the advantages of using baculoviruses for prostate cancer gene therapy are explored, and the mechanisms of viral entry and transgene expression are described.

  13. A Hypoxia-Regulated Adeno-Associated Virus Vector for Cancer-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of hypoxic cells in human brain tumors is an important factor leading to resistance to radiation therapy. However, this physiological difference between normal tissues and tumors also provides the potential for designing cancer-specific gene therapy. We compared the increase of gene expression under anoxia (<0.01% oxygen produced by 3, 6, and 9 copies of hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE from the erythropoietin gene (Epo, which are activated through the transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Under anoxic conditions, nine copies of HIRE (9XHRE yielded 27- to 37-fold of increased gene expression in U-251 MG and U-87 MG human brain tumor cell lines. Under the less hypoxic conditions of 0.3% and 1% oxygen, gene activation by 9XHRE increased expression 11- to 18-fold in these cell lines. To generate a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV in which the transgene can be regulated by hypoxia, we inserted the DNA fragment containing 9XHRE and the LacZ reporter gene into an AAV vector. Under anoxic conditions, this vector produced 79- to 110-fold increase in gene expression. We believe this hypoxia-regulated rAAV vector will provide a useful delivery vehicle for cancer-specific gene therapy.

  14. BMP2 gene delivery to bone mesenchymal stem cell by chitosan-g-PEI nonviral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jianhui; Wu, Jun; Liu, Di; Zhao, Xiaoli; Lu, William W.

    2015-04-01

    Nanotechnology has made a significant impact on the development of nanomedicine. Nonviral vectors have been attracting more attention for the advantage of biosafety in gene delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI)-conjugated chitosan (chitosan-g-PEI) emerged as a promising nonviral vector and has been demonstrated in many tumor cells. However, there is a lack of study focused on the behavior of this vector in stem cells which hold great potential in regenerative medicine. Therefore, in this study, in vitro gene delivering effect of chitosan-g-PEI was investigated in bone marrow stem cells. pIRES2-ZsGreen1-hBMP2 dual expression plasmid containing both the ZsGreen1 GFP reporter gene and the BMP2 functional gene was constructed for monitoring the transgene expression level. Chitosan-g-PEI-mediated gene transfer showed 17.2% of transfection efficiency and more than 80% of cell viability in stem cells. These values were higher than that of PEI. The expression of the delivered BMP2 gene in stem cells enhanced the osteogenic differentiation. These results demonstrated that chitosan-g-PEI is capable of applying in delivering gene to stem cells and providing potential applications in stem cell-based gene therapy.

  15. THE ROLE OF RECOMBINANT Rb GENE ADENOVIRUS VECTOR IN THE GROWTH OF LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian; Jiang Lei; Xia Yongjing; Li Hongxia; Hu Yajun; Hu Shixue; Xu Hongji

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of the most extensively studied tumor suppressor gene, retinoblastoma (Rb) gene,on the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cell line GLC-82 and explore a gene therapy approach for lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: The recombinant Rb gene adenovirus vector was constructed, the control virus which carries LacZ gene was producted by the same method. Infection effects were detected by biochemical staining of β-gal and immunohistochemical analysis of Rb protein. The Rb cDNA of infected cells were determined by PCR. The cell growth rate and cell cycle were observed by cell-counting and flow cytometry. Results: The constructed recombinant adenovirus vector could infect effectively the cells with high level expression of Rb cDNA and Rb protein. The transfection of wild-type Rb gene could suppress GLC-82 cell proliferation and decrease the cellular DNA synthesis. Conclusions: These results showed the possibility of using recombinant Rb gene adenovirus vector in the gene therapy of cancer to inhibit the growth of cancer.

  16. Neuroinflammation Induces Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, D; Thangavel, R; Natteru, PA; Selvakumar, GP; Saeed, D; Zahoor, H; Zaheer, S; Iyer, SS; Zaheer, A

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are characterized by neuronal degeneration and neuronal death in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS). In AD, neurons of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex are the first to degenerate, whereas in PD, dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra degenerate. MS patients show destruction of the myelin sheath. Once the CNS neurons are damaged, they are unable to regenerate unlike any other tissue in the body. Neurodegeneration is mediated by inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, IL-33, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL5, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), glia maturation factor (GMF), substance P, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), mast cells-mediated histamine and proteases, protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), CD40, CD40L, CD88, intracellular Ca+ elevation, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB). Activated microglia, astrocytes, neurons, T-cells and mast cells release these inflammatory mediators and mediate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in a vicious manner. Further, immune and inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators from the periphery cross the defective blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and augment neuroinflammation. Though inflammation is crucial in the onset and the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, anti-inflammatory drugs do not provide significant therapeutic effects in these patients till date, as the disease pathogenesis is not yet clearly understood. In this review, we discuss the possible factors involved in neuroinflammation-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:28127589

  17. Mining susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes from SNP data by combining network topological properties with support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lin; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Hong; Li, Lin; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Zhi-cheng

    2011-11-21

    Genome-wide association study is a powerful approach to identify disease risk loci. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms for most complex diseases are still not well understood. Therefore, further investigating the interplay between genetic factors and biological networks is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Here, we proposed a novel framework to identify susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes by combining network topological properties with support vector regression from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. We assigned risk SNPs to genes using the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database, and then mapped these genes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The gene modules implicated by hub genes were extracted using the PPI networks and the topological property was analyzed for these gene modules. For each gene module, risk feature genes were determined by topological property analysis and support vector regression. As a result, five shared risk feature genes, CD80, EGFR, FN1, GSK3B and TRAF6 were found and proven to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis by previous reports. Our approach showed a good performance in comparison with other approaches and can be used for prioritizing candidate genes associated with complex diseases.

  18. Gene Therapy Vectors with Enhanced Transfection Based on Hydrogels Modified with Affinity Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Wesson, Paul J.; Wang, Christine E.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha J.; Shikanov, Ariella; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative strategies for damaged tissue aim to present biochemical cues that recruit and direct progenitor cell migration and differentiation. Hydrogels capable of localized gene delivery are being developed to provide a support for tissue growth, and as a versatile method to induce the expression of inductive proteins; however, the duration, level, and localization of expression isoften insufficient for regeneration. We thus investigated the modification of hydrogels with affinity peptides to enhance vector retention and increase transfection within the matrix. PEG hydrogels were modified with lysine-based repeats (K4, K8), which retained approximately 25% more vector than control peptides. Transfection increased 5- to 15-fold with K8 and K4 respectively, over the RDG control peptide. K8- and K4-modified hydrogels bound similar quantities of vector, yet the vector dissociation rate was reduced for K8, suggesting excessive binding that limited transfection. These hydrogels were subsequently applied to an in vitro co-culture model to induce NGF expression and promote neurite outgrowth. K4-modified hydrogels promoted maximal neurite outgrowth, likely due to retention of both the vector and the NGF. Thus, hydrogels modified with affinity peptides enhanced vector retention and increased gene delivery, and these hydrogels may provide a versatile scaffold for numerous regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21514659

  19. 3' Noncoding Region Construction of GHR Gene-luciferase Report Vector and Valuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Jing; Men Jing; Wang Chun-mei; Gao Xue-jun; Li Qing-zhang

    2012-01-01

    To analyze miR-139 target sites in 3' UTR of GHR gene in dairy cow mammary gland, a GHR 3' UTR- luciferase reporter vector was constructed and the effect of miRNA on its activity was evaluated in dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells (DCMECs). The miR-139 targeting GHR 3' UTR was predicted by Target Scan 5.1 software, 3' UTR fragment of GHR was amplified by PCR from RNA of DCMECs. PCR products were cloned into Spe Ⅰ/Hind Ⅱ modified pMIR-Report vector. The luciferase reporter vector and miRNA eukaryotic expression vector were transferred into DCMECs using lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. The dualluciferase reporter assay system was used to quantitiate the reporter activity. The results showed that a 107 bp 3' UTR fragment of GHR gene was successfully cloned into the pMIR-Report vector, which authenticated by Spe Ⅰ/Hind Ⅲ digestion and DNA sequencing. The luciferase activity of reporter construction treated with miR-139 decreased 20.87% compared with the control group. It was concluded that the GHR3' UTR-luciferase reporter vector had been successfully constructed. The luciferase activity of the reporter could be suppressed by miR- 139.

  20. Adenovirus as a gene therapy vector for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, F C; Yu, Q; Wickham, T; Kovesdi, I; Andreeff, M

    2000-06-01

    Adenovirus (Adv)-mediated gene transfer has recently gained new attention as a means to deliver genes for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) or progenitor cell gene therapy. In the past, HSCs have been regarded as poor Adv targets, mainly because they lack the specific Adv receptors required for efficient and productive Adv infection. In addition, the nonintegrating nature of Adv has prevented its application to HSC and bone marrow transduction protocols where long-term expression is required. There is even controversy as to whether Adv can infect hematopoietic cells at all. In fact, the ability of Adv to infect epithelium-based targets and its inability to effectively transfect HSCs have been used in the development of eradication schemes that use Adv to preferentially infect and "purge" tumor cell-contaminating HSC grafts. However, there are data supporting the existence of productive Adv infections into HSCs. Such protocols involve the application of cytokine mixtures, high multiplicities of infection, long incubation periods, and more recently, immunological and genetic modifications to Adv itself to enable it to efficiently transfer genes into HSCs. This is a rapidly growing field, both in terms of techniques and applications. This review examines the two sides of the Adv/CD34 controversy as well as the current developments in this field.

  1. A vector library for silencing central carbon metabolism genes with antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Ohno, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the construction of a series of 71 vectors to silence central carbon metabolism genes in Escherichia coli. The vectors inducibly express antisense RNAs called paired-terminus antisense RNAs, which have a higher silencing efficacy than ordinary antisense RNAs. By measuring mRNA amounts, measuring activities of target proteins, or observing specific phenotypes, it was confirmed that all the vectors were able to silence the expression of target genes efficiently. Using this vector set, each of the central carbon metabolism genes was silenced individually, and the accumulation of metabolites was investigated. We were able to obtain accurate information on ways to increase the production of pyruvate, an industrially valuable compound, from the silencing results. Furthermore, the experimental results of pyruvate accumulation were compared to in silico predictions, and both sets of results were consistent. Compared to the gene disruption approach, the silencing approach has an advantage in that any E. coli strain can be used and multiple gene silencing is easily possible in any combination.

  2. Gene therapy for haemophilia...yes, but...with non-viral vectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, A; Olmedillas, S

    2009-05-01

    High-purity plasma-derived and recombinant factors are currently safe and efficient treatment for haemophilia. The mid-term future of haemophilia treatment will involve the use of modified recombinant factors to achieve advantages such as decreased immunogenicity in inhibitor formation and enhanced efficacy as a result of their longer half-life. In the long-term, gene therapy and cell therapy strategies will have to be considered. Achievements in cell therapy to date have been using embryonic stem cells and hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells. Current gene therapy strategies for haemophilia are based on gene transfer using adeno-associated viruses and non-viral vectors. Gene therapy for haemophilia is justified because it is a chronic disease and because a very regular factor infusion is required that may involve fatal risks and because it is very expensive. Haemophilia is a very good candidate for use of gene therapy protocols because it is a monogenic disease, and even low expression is able to achieve reversion from a severe to a moderate phenotype. The current trends in haemophilia using adeno-associated viral vectors are safe but also involve immunogenicity problems. The other alternatives are non-viral vectors. There have been in recent years relevant advances in non-viral transfection that raise hope for considering this possibility. Several research groups are opting for this experimental alternative. An expression over 5%, representing a moderate phenotype, for a few months with a high safety, regarding vector, transfected cells, and implantation procedure, would already be a great success. This may represent an intermediate protocol in which the expression levels and times obtained are lower and shorter respectively as compared to viral vectors, but which provide a potential greater patient safety. This may more readily win acceptance among both patients and haematologists because fatal events in the past due to HIV/HCV infection may constrain the

  3. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17-19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH.

  4. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  5. BglBrick vectors and datasheets: A synthetic biology platform for gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As engineered biological systems become more complex, it is increasingly common to express multiple operons from different plasmids and inducible expression systems within a single host cell. Optimizing such systems often requires screening combinations of origins of replication, expression systems, and antibiotic markers. This procedure is hampered by a lack of quantitative data on how these components behave when more than one origin of replication or expression system are used simultaneously. Additionally, this process can be time consuming as it often requires the creation of new vectors or cloning into existing but disparate vectors. Results Here, we report the development and characterization of a library of expression vectors compatible with the BglBrick standard (BBF RFC 21. We have designed and constructed 96 BglBrick-compatible plasmids with a combination of replication origins, antibiotic resistance genes, and inducible promoters. These plasmids were characterized over a range of inducer concentrations, in the presence of non-cognate inducer molecules, and with several growth media, and their characteristics were documented in a standard format datasheet. A three plasmid system was used to investigate the impact of multiple origins of replication on plasmid copy number. Conclusions The standardized collection of vectors presented here allows the user to rapidly construct and test the expression of genes with various combinations of promoter strength, inducible expression system, copy number, and antibiotic resistance. The quantitative datasheets created for these vectors will increase the predictability of gene expression, especially when multiple plasmids and inducers are utilized.

  6. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients.

  7. Improvement of a Sulfolobus-E. coli shuttle vector for heterologous gene expression in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sungmin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Yoon, Naeun; Cha, Jaeho

    2015-02-01

    A Sulfolobus-E. coli shuttle vector for an efficient expression of the target gene in S. acidocaldarius strain was constructed. The plasmid-based vector pSM21 and its derivative pSM21N were generated based on the pUC18 and Sulfolobus cryptic plasmid pRN1. They carried the S. solfataricus P2 pyrEF gene for the selection marker, a multiple cloning site (MCS) with C-terminal histidine tag, and a constitutive promoter of the S. acidocaldarius gdhA gene for strong expression of the target gene, as well as the pBR322 origin and ampicillin-resistant gene for E. coli propagation. The advantage of pSM21 over other Sulfolobus shuttle vectors is that it contains a MCS and a histidine tag for the simple and easy cloning of a target gene as well as one-step purification by histidine affinity chromatography. For successful expression of the foreign genes, two genes from archaeal origins (PH0193 and Ta0298) were cloned into pSM21N and the functional expression was examined by enzyme activity assay. The recombinant PH0193 was successfully expressed under the control of the gdhA promoter and purified from the cultures by His-tag affinity chromatography. The yield was approximately 1 mg of protein per liter of cultures. The enzyme activity measurements of PH0913 and Ta0298 revealed that both proteins were expressed as an active form in S. acidocaldarius. These results indicate that the pSM21N shuttle vector can be used for the functional expression of foreign archaeal genes that form insoluble aggregates in the E. coli system.

  8. Baculovirus vectors in experimental gene- and vaccine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strokovskaya L. I.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a brief overview of the literature on target design, exploration properties and effectiveness of the application of recombinant baculoviruses in model systems in vivo. The results of experiments with wild and recombinant baculoviruses are analysed in regard to the priority areas of biomedicine such as tissue regeneration, gene therapy of cancer, development of vaccines against infectious diseases and malignancies

  9. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  10. Construction of plant expression vector of Pseudopleuronectes americanus antifreeze protein gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Pseudopleuronectes americanus antifreeze protein gene was synthesized and control sequences were added such as 35S promoter and nos terminator that can facilitate the transcription and fi sequence and Kozak sequence that can improve the expression in translation level, the high expression cassette of antifreeze protein was constructed. This cassette was connected to pBI121.1 and finally got the high expression vector pBRTSAFP introduced into the maize callus. The expression of gus gene that linked to the antifreeze protein gene was detected, and the results was that the gus gene can express strongly and instantaneously.

  11. Phage vectors that allow monitoring of transcription of secondary metabolism genes in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, C J; Guthrie, E P; Chater, K F

    1991-07-01

    We describe a bacteriophage phi C31-based system that permits the transcriptional fusion of the convenient reporter gene xylE to chromosomally located promoters in Streptomyces hosts. Applicability of the system to genes for secondary metabolism is demonstrated in an experiment showing that transcription of genes for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) depends on a transfer RNA gene (bldA) for the rare UUA codon. Two other phi C31::xylE vectors are described that allow detection of promoter activity away from their natural location, either at single copy in a prophage or during lytic infections in plaques.

  12. The development of an efficient multipurpose bean pod mottle virus viral vector set for foreign gene expression and RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunquan; Bradshaw, Jeffrey D; Whitham, Steven A; Hill, John H

    2010-05-01

    Plant viral vectors are valuable tools for heterologous gene expression, and because of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), they also have important applications as reverse genetics tools for gene function studies. Viral vectors are especially useful for plants such as soybean (Glycine max) that are recalcitrant to transformation. Previously, two generations of bean pod mottle virus (BPMV; genus Comovirus) vectors have been developed for overexpressing and silencing genes in soybean. However, the design of the previous vectors imposes constraints that limit their utility. For example, VIGS target sequences must be expressed as fusion proteins in the same reading frame as the viral polyprotein. This requirement limits the design of VIGS target sequences to open reading frames. Furthermore, expression of multiple genes or simultaneous silencing of one gene and expression of another was not possible. To overcome these and other issues, a new BPMV-based vector system was developed to facilitate a variety of applications for gene function studies in soybean as well as in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). These vectors are designed for simultaneous expression of multiple foreign genes, insertion of noncoding/antisense sequences, and simultaneous expression and silencing. The simultaneous expression of green fluorescent protein and silencing of phytoene desaturase shows that marker gene-assisted silencing is feasible. These results demonstrate the utility of this BPMV vector set for a wide range of applications in soybean and common bean, and they have implications for improvement of other plant virus-based vector systems.

  13. Rationale for developing new virus vectors to analyze gene function in grasses through virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanna, Hema; Ding, Xin Shun; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    The exploding availability of genome and EST-based sequences from grasses requires a technology that allows rapid functional analysis of the multitude of genes that these resources provide. There are several techniques available to determine a gene's function. For gene knockdown studies, silencing through RNAi is a powerful tool. Gene silencing can be accomplished through stable transformation or transient expression of a fragment of a target gene sequence. Stable transformation in rice, maize, and a few other species, although routine, remains a relatively low-throughput process. Transformation in other grass species is difficult and labor-intensive. Therefore, transient gene silencing methods including Agrobacterium-mediated and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) have great potential for researchers studying gene function in grasses. VIGS in grasses already has been used to determine the function of genes during pathogen challenge and plant development. It also can be used in moderate-throughput reverse genetics screens to determine gene function. However, the number of viruses modified to serve as silencing vectors in grasses is limited, and the silencing phenotype induced by these vectors is not optimal: the phenotype being transient and with moderate penetration throughout the tissue. Here, we review the most recent information available for VIGS in grasses and summarize the strengths and weaknesses in current virus-grass host systems. We describe ways to improve current virus vectors and the potential of other grass-infecting viruses for VIGS studies. This work is necessary because VIGS for the foreseeable future remains a higher throughput and more rapid system to evaluate gene function than stable transformation.

  14. Construction of a regulable gene therapy vector targeting for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Ying Lu; Yan-Fang Sui; Zeng-Shan Li; Cheng-En Pan; Jing Ye; Wen-Yong Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a gene modified hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific EGFP expression vector regulated by abbreviated cis-acting element of AFP gene.METHODS: The minimal essential DNA segments of AFP gene enhancer and promoter were synthesized through PCR from Genome DNA of HepG2 cells. Gene fragments were then cloned into the multiple cloning site of non-promoter EGFP vector pEGFP-t. Recombinant plasmid was transferred into positive or negative AFP cell lines by means of lipofectamine. The expression of EGFP was tested by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of EGFP was tested in different concentrations.RESULTS: By the methods of restriction digestion and sequence analyses we confirmed that the length, position and orientation of inserted genes of cis-acting element of AFP were all correct. The transcription of EGFP was under the control of AFP cis-acting element. The expressing EGFP can only been detected in AFP producing hepatoma cells.The expression rate of EGFP in G418 screened cell line was 34.9±4.1%. 48 h after adding 1×10-7M retinoic acid, EGFP expression rate was 14.7±3.5%. The activity of AFP gene promoter was significantly suppressed by addition of 1×10-7M retinoic acid (P<0.05, P=0.003, t=6.488).CONCLUSION: This recombinant expression vector can be used as a gene therapy vector for HCC. The expression of tumor killing gene will be confined within the site of tumor and the activity of which can be regulated by retinoic acid.

  15. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  16. Development and Safety Assessment of Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy for SCID-X1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Huston (Marshall W.)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis work focuses on exploring ways to improve hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID-X1) using lentiviral vectors and a mouse model of the disease. This involved 3-part approach: modifying some components

  17. Protection of rat islet viability following heme oxygenase-1 gene transfection via adenoviral vector in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Chen; Yongxiang Li; Weiping Dong; Yang Jiao; Jianming Tan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene transfection on the viability of cultured rat islets, and to explore the potential value of HO-1 gene in islet transplantation. Methods:Recombinant adenovirus vector containing human HO-1 gene(Ad-HO-1 ) or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(Ad-EGFP) was generated by using AdEasy system respectively.The rat islets were transfected with Ad-HO-1, Ad-EGFP or blank vector and then cultured for 7 days. Transfection was confirmed by expression of EGFP and human HO-1 protein detected by fluorescence photographs and western blot, respectively. The insulin release upon different concentration of glucose stimulation was detected using insulin radioimmunoassay kit, and stimulation index (SI) was calculated. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was usedto assess islet viability. Results:Adenovirus vector successfully transferred HO-1 gene to rat islet cells in vitro, and the insulin release upon high level of glucose stimulation and stimulation index(SI) of Ad-HO-1-infected islets were significantly higher than those of Ad-EGFP-infected islets and control islets(P < 0.05).Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated HO-1 gene transfection is a feasible strategy to confer cytoprotection and therefore protect the viability of cultured rat islets.

  18. The potential of adeno-associated viral vectors for gene delivery to muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhong, Li; Nahid, M Abu; Gao, Guangping

    2014-03-01

    Muscle-directed gene therapy is rapidly gaining attention primarily because muscle is an easily accessible target tissue and is also associated with various severe genetic disorders. Localized and systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors of several serotypes results in very efficient transduction of skeletal and cardiac muscles, which has been achieved in both small and large animals, as well as in humans. Muscle is the target tissue in gene therapy for many muscular dystrophy diseases, and may also be exploited as a biofactory to produce secretory factors for systemic disorders. Current limitations of using rAAVs for muscle gene transfer include vector size restriction, potential safety concerns such as off-target toxicity and the immunological barrier composing of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell response against AAV capsid in humans. In this article, we will discuss basic AAV vector biology and its application in muscle-directed gene delivery, as well as potential strategies to overcome the aforementioned limitations of rAAV for further clinical application. Delivering therapeutic genes to large muscle mass in humans is arguably the most urgent unmet demand in treating diseases affecting muscle tissues throughout the whole body. Muscle-directed, rAAV-mediated gene transfer for expressing antibodies is a promising strategy to combat deadly infectious diseases. Developing strategies to circumvent the immune response following rAAV administration in humans will facilitate clinical application.

  19. Protein trans-splicing based dual-vector delivery of the coagulation factor Ⅷ gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A dual-vector system was explored for the delivery of the coagulation factor VIII gene,using intein-mediated protein trans-splicing as a means to produce intact functional factor VIII post-translationally.A pair of eukaryotic expression vectors,expressing Ssp DnaB intein-fused heavy and light chain genes of B-domain deleted factor VIII (BDD-FVIII),was constructed.With transient co-transfection of the two vectors into 293 and COS-7 cells,the culture supernatants contained (137±23) and (109±22) ng mL–1 spliced BDD-FVIII antigen with an activity of (1.05±0.16) and (0.79±0.23) IU mL–1 for 293 and COS-7 cells,respectively.The spliced BDD-FVIII was also detected in supernatants from a mixture of cells transfected with inteinfused heavy and light chain genes.The spliced BDD-FVIII protein bands from cell lysates were visualized by Western blotting.The data demonstrated that intein could be used to transfer the split factor VIII gene and provided valuable information on factor VIII gene delivery by dual-adeno-associated virus in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  20. Construction of lentivirus vectors carrying alphastatin gene and its secretion expression in human umbilical vein endothelia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To construct lentivirus vectors carrying alphastatin gene,test its secretion expression in human umbilical vein endothelia cells(HUVECs)and observe its effects on growth,migration and tube formation of HUVECs.Methods We constructed recombinant lentivirus vectors of NT4-alphastatin fusion gene containing neurotrophin-4 signal peptide,pro-region sequences and alphastatin,then transfected the recombinant lentivirus vectors into HUVECs to obtain secretory protein alphastatin and test its anti-angiogen...

  1. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Iizuka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX. An adenovirus (Ad vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  2. Episomal Nonviral Gene Therapy Vectors Slow Progression of Atherosclerosis in a Model of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G Kerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by elevated levels of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol. Current attempts at gene therapy for FH have been limited by the use of strong heterologous promoters which lack genomic DNA elements essential for regulated expression. Here, we have combined a minigene vector expressing the human LDLR cDNA from a 10 kb native human LDLR locus genomic DNA promoter element, with an efficient miRNA targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylgutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr, to further enhance LDLR expression. We show that the combined vector suppresses endogenous Hmgcr transcripts in vivo, leading to an increase in LDLR transgene expression. In a diet-induced Ldlr-/- mouse model of FH, we show that administration of the combined vector reduces atherogenic plasma lipids by ≃32%. Finally, we demonstrate that our episomal nonviral vectors are able to reduce atherosclerosis by ≃40% after 12 weeks in vivo. Taken together, the vector system we describe exploits the normal cellular regulation of the LDLR to provide prolonged expression of LDLR through targeted knockdown of Hmgcr. This novel gene therapy system could act alone, or in synergy with current therapies that modulate intracellular cholesterol, such as statins, greatly enhancing its therapeutic application for FH.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in alveolar macrophages by adenovirus gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Joshua; Connor, Ruth; Worgall, Stefan; Moore, John P; Leopold, Philip L; Kaner, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2002-08-01

    To assess the hypothesis that infection of alveolar macrophages (AM) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors might prevent subsequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in AM, AM isolated from normal volunteers were infected with increasing doses of first generation (E1(-)) Ad vectors, followed 72 h later by infection with HIV-1(JRFL), an R5/M-tropic strain that preferentially uses the CCR5 coreceptor. As a measure of HIV-1 replication, p24 Ag was quantified by enzyme-linked imunosorbent assay in supernatants on Days 4 to 14 after HIV-1infection. Pretreatment of the AM with an Ad vector resulted in a dose- and time-dependent suppression of subsequent HIV-1 replication. The Ad vector inhibition of HIV-1 replication was independent of the transgene in the Ad vector expression cassette and E4 genes in the Ad backbone. Moreover, it did not appear to be secondary to a soluble factor released by the AM, nor was it overridden by the concomitant transfer of the CCR5 or CXCR4 receptors to the AM before HIV-1 infection. These observations have implications regarding pulmonary host responses associated with HIV-1 infection, as well as possibly uncovering new therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection.

  4. Interleukin-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation following Vaceinia vector gene transfection in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Wang; Xuezhong Wei; Jiangqiu Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of gene therapy is closely related to the efficiency of vector transfection and expression.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to transfect a human brain glioma cell line with recombinant Vaccinia virus expressing the interleukin-2 (rVV-IL-2) gene, and to observe IL-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation potential after transfection. DESIGN: Experimental observation. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, Shenyang Military Area Command of Chinese PLA. MATERIALS: The rVV-IL-2 vectors were obtained through homologous recombination and screening in the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. The human brain glioma cell line and IL-2-dependent cells were produced by the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Human IL-2 was produced by Genzyme Corporation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: IL-2 expression at different time points after transfection of human brain glioma cells with varying MOI of Vaccinia viral vectors; in vitro proliferation capacity of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups. RESULTS: IL-2 expression was detectable 4 hours after Vaccinia viral vector transfection and reached 300 kU/L by 8 hours. There was no significant difference in the proliferating rate of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: Vaccinia viral vectors can transfect human brain glioma cells in vitro and express high levels of IL-2. Vaccinia virus and high IL-2 expression do not influence the proliferation rate of human brain glioma cells in vitro.

  5. Graphene oxide-cationic polymer conjugates: Synthesis and application as gene delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Mohsen; Nia, Azadeh Hashem; Abnous, Khalil; Eshghi, Hossein; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine as the interface between nanotechnology and medical sciences is a new area that has attracted the attention of vast groups of researchers. Carbon nanomaterials are common platform for synthesis of nanoparticles for biomedical applications due to their low cytotoxicity and feasible internalization into mammalian cell lines (Yang et al., 2007; Arora et al., 2014; Oh and Park, 2014). Synthesis of vectors based on various cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), polypropylenimine (PPI) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) and their derivatives were considered as a strategy for transferring plasmid DNA and treatment of genetic diseases. Considering the low cytotoxicity of graphene, chemical modification of its surface has led to fabrication of novel gene delivery systems based on graphene and graphene oxide. Herein we report the synthesis of three groups of vectors based on conjugation of graphene oxide (GO) with alkylated derivatives of three different cationic polymers (polyethylenimine (PEI), polypropylenimine (PPI) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM)) through different linkers including surface carboxyl group, glycine and spermidine. Two main challenges in design of gene delivery vectors is decreasing cytotoxicity while improving the transfection efficiency. All synthesized vectors showed significantly lower cellular toxicity compared to bare polymer. A plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to evaluate the transfection efficiency of nanoparticles both qualitatively using live cell fluorescent imaging and quantitatively using flow cytometry and each vector was compared to its polymer base. Most successful conjugation strategy was observed in the case of PEI conjugates among which most efficient vector was PEI-GO conjugate bearing glycine linker. This vector was 9 fold more effective in terms of the percent of EGFP transfected cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peroxiredoxins and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are a family of novel antioxidant proteins that are found in a variety of species and participate in a number of vital biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, response to oxidative stress and intracellular signaling. It has been proposed that they might participate in these cellular processes by playing a role in eliminating or regulating the intracellular concentration of peroxides produced during metabolism as well as in the signaling cascades of growth factors and cytokines. Mammalian cells express six isoforms of Prx (Prx I to VI, which are classified into three subgroups (typical 2-Cys, atypical 2-Cys and 1-Cys based on the number and position of cysteine (Cys residues that participate in catalysis and on amino acid sequences and the immunological reactivity. Members of the typical 2-Cys subgroup include Prx I through Prx IV and contain an additional conserved cysteine in the carboxyl-terminal region, whereas Prx V and Prx VI, members of the atypical 2-Cys and 1-Cys subgroups, respectively, do not contain this second conserved Cys. On the other hand, Prxs activity can be regulated by phosphorylation and proteolysis processes in addition to overoxidation. Taken together, this study suggest that the generation of the oxidative stress which caused neurodegeneration may couple with produced Prxs and the reverse is true. However, this argument is still unclear on account of the difficulties of the direct observation of the reactive oxygen species due to their biological lifetime is short. Thus, experiments will be required to solve these problems and to comprehend the actual role of Prxs in neurodegeneration.

  7. A CRISPR/Cas9 vector system for tissue-specific gene disruption in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Durand, Ellen M; Yang, Song; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-03-23

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology of genome editing has greatly facilitated the targeted inactivation of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide range of organisms. In zebrafish, it allows the rapid generation of knockout lines by simply injecting a guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 mRNA into one-cell stage embryos. Here, we report a simple and scalable CRISPR-based vector system for tissue-specific gene inactivation in zebrafish. As proof of principle, we used our vector with the gata1 promoter driving Cas9 expression to silence the urod gene, implicated in heme biosynthesis, specifically in the erythrocytic lineage. Urod targeting yielded red fluorescent erythrocytes in zebrafish embryos, recapitulating the phenotype observed in the yquem mutant. While F0 embryos displayed mosaic gene disruption, the phenotype appeared very penetrant in stable F1 fish. This vector system constitutes a unique tool to spatially control gene knockout and greatly broadens the scope of loss-of-function studies in zebrafish.

  8. Construction of Modular Lentiviral Vectors for Effective Gene Expression and Knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyns, Angeline; Geiling, Ben; Dankort, David

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating gene function is heavily reliant on the ability to modulate gene expression in biological model systems. Although transient expression systems can provide useful information about the biological outcome resulting from short-term gene overexpression or silencing, methods providing stable integration of desired expression constructs (cDNA or RNA interference) are often preferred for functional studies. To this end, lentiviral vectors offer the ability to deliver long-term and regulated gene expression to mammalian cells, including the expression of gene targeting small hairpin RNAs (shRNAmirs). Unfortunately, constructing vectors containing the desired combination of cDNAs, markers, and shRNAmirs can be cumbersome and time-consuming if using traditional sequence based restriction enzyme and ligation-dependent methods. Here we describe the use of a recombination based Gateway cloning strategy to rapidly and efficiently produce recombinant lentiviral vectors for the expression of one or more cDNAs with or without simultaneous shRNAmir expression. Additionally, we describe a luciferase-based approach to rapidly triage shRNAs for knockdown efficacy and specificity without the need to create stable shRNAmir expressing cells.

  9. Gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotery, Andrew J; Derksen, Todd A; Russell, Stephen R; Mullins, Robert F; Sauter, Sybille; Affatigato, Louisa M; Stone, Edwin M; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-04-10

    We hypothesize that recombinant feline immunodeficiency viral (rFIV) vectors may be useful for gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina. We performed vitrectomies and subretinal injections in the right eyes of 11 cynomolgus monkeys. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped rFIV that expressed the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene was injected into eight eyes. Sham vehicle or lactose buffer injections were also performed in two of these eight study eyes. rFIV pseudotyped with an amphotropic envelope was used in two eyes, and in one animal injections of lactose buffer only were given. After surgery the animals were clinically evaluated by retinal photography and electroretinography. beta-Galactosidase expression was evaluated, at a final end point, in histological sections. We found photoreceptor and Müller cells to have the greatest transgene expression. Focal inflammatory responses localized to the injection site were seen histologically in all eyes. No difference in transduction efficiency was seen between injections near the macula and more peripheral injections. Visual function as assessed by electroretinography was not significantly affected by vector or vehicle injections. We conclude that rFIV vectors administered beneath the retina can transduce a variety of retinal cells in the nonhuman primate retina. rFIV vectors have therapeutic potential and could be exploited to develop gene therapy for the human eye.

  10. Construction and expression of the bicistronic expression vector with RANTES and SDF-1 genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 白雪帆; 李谨革; 黄长形; 孙永涛; 聂青和; 王九平

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To construct bicistronic expression vector with RANTES and SDF-1 genes,the ligands of HIV 1 principal coreceptors,and identify its expression.Methods:RANTES-KDEL was amplified from plasmid pCMV-R-K by PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pCMV-S/K.Gene transfection into HeLa cells was carried out by lipofectin.Indirect immumofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation were used to confirm the expression of RANTES and SDF-1.Results:The construction of pCMV-R-K-S-K was confirmed by enzymatic digestion and sequencing.RANTES and SDF-1 were shown expressed in HeLa cells by indirect immumofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation.Conclusion:pCMV-R-K-S-K was constructed and expressed in cell line Hela successfully,which will contribute to further study of gene therapy of AIDS by HIV-1 coreceptors knockout.

  11. Targeting an adenoviral gene vector to cytokine-activated vascular endothelium via E-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, O A; Wickham, T J; Stocker, C J; Kovesdi, I; Segal, D M; Huehns, T Y; Sarraf, C; Haskard, D O

    1999-05-01

    We have aimed at selective gene delivery to vascular endothelial cells (EC) at sites of inflammation, by targeting E-selectin, a surface adhesion molecule that is only expressed by activated EC. An anti-E-selectin mAb, 1.2B6, was complexed with the adenovirus vector AdZ.FLAG (expressing the FLAG peptide) by conjugating it to an anti-FLAG mAb. Gene transduction of cultured EC was increased 20-fold compared with AdZ.FLAG complexed with a control bsAb providing EC were activated by cytokines. The anti-E-selectin-complexed vector transduced 29 +/- 9% of intimal EC in segments of pig aorta cultured with cytokines ex vivo, compared with less than 0.1% transduced with the control construct (P < 0.05). This strategy could be developed to target endothelium in inflammation with genes capable of modifying the inflammatory response.

  12. Application of Gaussian moment method to a gene autoregulation model of rational vector field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    We take a lambda expression autoregulation model driven by multiplicative and additive noises as example to extend the Gaussian moment method from nonlinear stochastic systems of polynomial vector field to noisy biochemical systems of rational polynomial vector field. As a direct application of the extended method, we also disclose the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. It is found that the transcription rate can inhibit the stochastic resonant effect, but the degradation rate may enhance the phenomenon. These observations should be helpful in understanding the functional role of noise in gene autoregulation.

  13. The closterovirus-derived gene expression and RNA interference vectors as tools for research and plant biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolja, Valerian V.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Important progress in understanding replication, interactions with host plants, and evolution of closteroviruses enabled engineering of several vectors for gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing. Due to the broad host range of closteroviruses, these vectors expanded vector applicability to include important woody plants such as citrus and grapevine. Furthermore, large closterovirus genomes offer genetic capacity and stability unrivaled by other plant viral vectors. These features provided immense opportunities for using closterovirus vectors for the functional genomics studies and pathogen control in economically valuable crops. This review briefly summarizes advances in closterovirus research during the last decade, explores the relationships between virus biology and vector design, and outlines the most promising directions for future application of closterovirus vectors. PMID:23596441

  14. An efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector for maize functional genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Yang, Xinxin; Wang, Nian; Liu, Xuedong; Nelson, Richard S; Li, Weimin; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a major crop whose rich genetic diversity provides an advanced resource for genetic research. However, a tool for rapid transient gene function analysis in maize that may be utilized in most maize cultivars has been lacking, resulting in reliance on time-consuming stable transformation and mutation studies to obtain answers. We developed an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for maize based on a naturally maize-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain, ZMBJ-CMV. An infectious clone of ZMBJ-CMV was constructed, and a vascular puncture inoculation method utilizing Agrobacterium was optimized to improve its utility for CMV infection of maize. ZMBJ-CMV was then modified to function as a VIGS vector. The ZMBJ-CMV vector induced mild to moderate symptoms in many maize lines, making it useful for gene function studies in critically important maize cultivars, such as the sequenced reference inbred line B73. Using this CMV VIGS system, expression of two endogenous genes, ZmPDS and ZmIspH, was found to be decreased by 75% and 78%, respectively, compared with non-silenced tissue. Inserts with lengths of 100-300 bp produced the most complete transcriptional and visual silencing phenotypes. Moreover, genes related to autophagy, ZmATG3 and ZmATG8a, were also silenced, and it was found that they function in leaf starch degradation. These results indicate that our ZMBJ-CMV VIGS vector provides a tool for rapid and efficient gene function studies in maize. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Construction and Expression of Human PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene Recombinant Adenovirus Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qingyong; WANG Chunyou; CHEN Daoda; CHEN Jianying; JIANG Chunfang; ZHENG Hai

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant defective adenovirus vector carrying human PTEN tumor suppres sor gene was constructed by using AdEasy-1 system and its expression was detected in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468. Human PTEN cDNA was cloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-PTEN, then homologeous recombination was carried out in the E. coli BJ5183 by contransforming linearized shuttle vector with adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1. The newly recombined defective adenovirus vector AdPTEN containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was packaged and propagated in 293 cells. After being purified by cesium chloride gradient centrifugation, the adenovirus was transfected into human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 in vitro. The expression of PTEN mRNA and protein in infected human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The recombinant defective adenovirus vector carrying PTEN gene was constructed successfully. The viral titer of purified adenovirus was 2.5×1010 pfu/mL, and about 70 % breast cancer cells were infected with Ad PTEN when multiplicity of infection (MOI) reached 50. The exogenous PTEN mRNA and protein were expressed in MDA-MB-468 cells infected with Ad-PTEN by RT-PCR and Western blot. The recombinant defective adenovirus vector of PTEN gene was constructed successfully using AdEasy-1 system rapidly, which paved a sound foundation for gene study of breast cancer.

  16. Multicomponent nanoparticles as nonviral vectors for the treatment of Fabry disease by gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz de Garibay AP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aritz Pérez Ruiz de Garibay, Diego Delgado, Ana del Pozo-Rodríguez, María Ángeles Solinís, Alicia Rodríguez GascónPharmacokinetics, Nanotechnology and Gene Therapy Group, Pharmacy Faculty, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, SpainPurpose: Gene-mediated enzyme replacement is a reasonable and highly promising approach for the treatment of Fabry disease (FD. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the potential applications of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN-based nonviral vectors for the treatment of FD.Methods: SLNs containing the pR-M10-αGal A plasmid that encodes the α-Galactosidase A (α-Gal A enzyme were prepared and their in vitro transfection efficacy was studied in Hep G2 cells. We also studied the cellular uptake of the vectors and the intracellular disposition of the plasmid.Results: The enzymatic activity of the cells treated with the vectors increased significantly relative to the untreated cells, regardless of the formulation assayed. When the SLNs were prepared with protamine or dextran and protamine, the activity of the α-Gal A enzyme by the transfected Hep G2 cells increased up to 12-fold compared to that of untreated cells.Conclusion: With this work we have revealed in Hep G2 cells the ability of a multicomponent system based on SLNs to act as efficient nonviral vectors to potentially correct low α-Gal A activity levels in FD with gene therapy.Keywords: solid lipid nanoparticles, Fabry disease, nonviral vectors, gene therapy

  17. Baculovirus as a gene delivery vector for cartilage and bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Luo, Wen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Han; Sung, Li-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Baculovirus is an effective vector for gene delivery into various mammalian cells, including chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and has been employed for diverse applications. By gene delivery and expression of the growth factor, recombinant baculovirus has been shown to modulate the differentiation state of the cells and stimulates the production of extracellular matrix and tissue formation, hence repairing the damaged cartilage and bone in vivo. This article reviews the studies pertaining to the applications of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in cartilage and bone tissue engineering and discusses recent progress, future applications and potential hurdles.

  18. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Mollamohammadi M. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 1-8.AbstractObjectiveNeurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a group of neurodegenerative disorder with deposition of iron in the brain (mainly Basal Ganglia leading to a progressive Parkinsonism, spasticity, dystonia, retinal degeneration, optic atrophy often accompanied by psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline. 8 of the 10 genetically defined NBIA types are inherited as autosomal recessive and the remaining two by autosomal dominant and X-linked dominant manner. Brain MRI findings are almost specific and show abnormal brain iron deposition in basal ganglia some other related anatomicallocations. In some types of NBIA cerebellar atrophy is the major finding in MRI.ReferencesShevel M. Racial hygiene, activeeuthanasia, and Julius Hallervorden. Neurology 1992;42:2214-2219.HayflickSJ. Neurodegeneration with brain Iron accumulation: from genes to pathogenesis.Semin Pediatr Neurol 2006;13:182-185.Zhou B, Westawy SK, Levinson B, et al. A novel pantothenate kinase gene(PANK2 is defective in Hallervorden-Spatzsyndrome. Nat Genet 2001;28:345- 349.www.ncbi.nlm.nihgov/NBK111Y/university of Washington, seattle. Allison Gregory and Susan Hayflick.Paisan-Ruiz C, Li A, Schneider SA, et al. Widesread Levy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Neurobiol Aging 2012;33:814-823.Dick KJ, Eckhardt M, Paison-Ruiz C, et al. Mutation of FA2H underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia(SPG 35. Hum Mutat 31: E1251-E1260.Edvardson S, Hama H, Shaag A, et al. Mutation in the fatty acid 2-Hydroxylase gene are associated with leukodystrophy with spastic paraparesis and dystonia. Am I Hum Genet 2008;83:647-648.Schneider SA, Aggarwal A, Bhatt m, et al. Severe tongue protrusion dystonia: clinical syndromes

  19. Elimination of contaminating cap genes in AAV vector virions reduces immune responses and improves transgene expression in a canine gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Halbert, C L; Lee, D; Butts, T; Tapscott, S J; Storb, R; Miller, A D

    2014-04-01

    Animal and human gene therapy studies utilizing AAV vectors have shown that immune responses to AAV capsid proteins can severely limit transgene expression. The main source of capsid antigen is that associated with the AAV vectors, which can be reduced by stringent vector purification. A second source of AAV capsid proteins is that expressed from cap genes aberrantly packaged into AAV virions during vector production. This antigen source can be eliminated by the use of a cap gene that is too large to be incorporated into an AAV capsid, such as a cap gene containing a large intron (captron gene). Here, we investigated the effects of elimination of cap gene transfer and of vector purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation on AAV vector immunogenicity and expression following intramuscular injection in dogs. We found that both approaches reduced vector immunogenicity and that combining the two produced the lowest immune responses and highest transgene expression. This combined approach enabled the use of a relatively mild immunosuppressive regimen to promote robust micro-dystrophin gene expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected dogs. Our study shows the importance of minimizing AAV cap gene impurities and indicates that this improvement in AAV vector production may benefit human applications.

  20. CONSTRUCTION OF EUKARYOTIC EXPRESSION VECTOR WITH GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To construct the eukaryotic expression vector that express human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene for making highly express in mammalian cells. Methods: Extract totally RNA from the induced human fetal lung (HFL) cell line. HGM-CSF cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and then directionally subcloned into the HindIII and EcoRI site on the pcDNA3.1 plasmid, which was controlled by the CMV promoter, to form the recombinant expressing vector pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF. Results: The PCR amplification was identified and the sequence was analyzed, the results showed that hGM-CSF was properly inserted into the vector and the sequence was correct.

  1. Human artificial chromosome vectors meet stem cells: new prospects for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xianying; Tahimic, Candice Ginn T; Katoh, Motonobu; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Inoue, Toshiaki; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    The recent emergence of stem cell-based tissue engineering has now opened up new venues for gene therapy. The task now is to develop safe and effective vectors that can deliver therapeutic genes into specific stem cell lines and maintain long-term regulated expression of these genes. Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) possess several characteristics that require gene therapy vectors, including a stable episomal maintenance, and the capacity for large gene inserts. HACs can also carry genomic loci with regulatory elements, thus allowing for the expression of transgenes in a genetic environment similar to the chromosome. Currently, HACs are constructed by a two prone approaches. Using a top-down strategy, HACs can be generated from fragmenting endogenous chromosomes. By a bottom-up strategy, HACs can be created de novo from cloned chromosomal components using chromosome engineering. This review describes the current advances in developing HACs, with the main focus on their applications and potential value in gene delivery, such as HAC-mediated gene expression in embryonic, adult stem cells, and transgenic animals.

  2. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  3. Use of PEI-coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Gene Vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦卫中; 徐春芳; 吴华

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (polyMAG-1000) as gene vectors. The surface characteristics of the nanoparticles were observed with scanning electron microscopy. The ability of the nanoparticles to combine with and protect DNA was investigated at different PH values after polyMAG-1000 and DNA were combined in different ratios. The nanoparticles were tested as gene vectors with in vitro transfection models. Under the scanning electron microscope the nanoparticles were about 100 nm in diameter.The nanoparticles could bind and condense DNA under acid, neutral and alkaline conditions, and they could transfer genes into cells and express green fluorescent proteins (GFP). The transfection efficiency was highest (51 %) when the ratio of nanoparticles to DNA was 1:1 (v:w). In that ratio, the difference in transfection efficiency was marked depending on whether a magnetic field was present or not: about 10 % when it was absent but 51 % when it was present. The magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with PEI may potentially be used as gene vectors.

  4. Spontaneous silencing of humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) gene expression from a retroviral vector by DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Nielsen, S D; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a functional murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived retroviral vector transducing two genes encoding the autofluorescent humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (Neo). This was done to determine whether hGFP could function as a marker gene...... in a retroviral vector and to investigate the expression of genes in a retroviral vector. Surprisingly, clonal vector packaging cell lines showed variable levels of hGFP expression, and expression was detected in as few as 49% of the cells in a clonally derived culture. This indicated that hGFP expression...... was shown to increase the hGFP-expressing MT4 cells from either 10.4% to 11.6% or 3.7% to 4.8%, corresponding to an increase in observed transduction efficiencies of 12% and 30%, respectively. These results indicate that silencing of gene expression from a retroviral vector may result from DNA methylation...

  5. Oral microbiome link to neurodegeneration in glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Astafurov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a progressive optic nerve degenerative disease that often leads to blindness. Local inflammatory responses are implicated in the pathology of glaucoma. Although inflammatory episodes outside the CNS, such as those due to acute systemic infections, have been linked to central neurodegeneration, they do not appear to be relevant to glaucoma. Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that chronic subclinical peripheral inflammation contributes to neurodegeneration in glaucoma. METHODS: Mouthwash specimens from patients with glaucoma and control subjects were analyzed for the amount of bacteria. To determine a possible pathogenic mechanism, low-dose subcutaneous lipopolysaccharide (LPS was administered in two separate animal models of glaucoma. Glaucomatous neurodegeneration was assessed in the retina and optic nerve two months later. Changes in gene expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway and complement as well as changes in microglial numbers and morphology were analyzed in the retina and optic nerve. The effect of pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 with naloxone was determined. FINDINGS: Patients with glaucoma had higher bacterial oral counts compared to control subjects (p<0.017. Low-dose LPS administration in glaucoma animal models resulted in enhancement of axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Microglial activation in the optic nerve and retina as well as upregulation of TLR4 signaling and complement system were observed. Pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 partially ameliorated the enhanced damage. CONCLUSIONS: The above findings suggest that the oral microbiome contributes to glaucoma pathophysiology. A plausible mechanism by which increased bacterial loads can lead to neurodegeneration is provided by experiments in animal models of the disease and involves activation of microglia in the retina and optic nerve, mediated through TLR4 signaling and complement upregulation. The finding that commensal

  6. IONP-PLL: a novel non-viral vector for efficient gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Juan-Juan; Tang, Jing-Qun; Zhu, Shi-Guo; Nie, Xin-Min; Lu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Shou-Rong; Li, Xiao-Ling; Tang, Ke; Zhou, Ming; Li, Gui-Yuan

    2003-09-01

    Non-viral methods of gene delivery have been an attractive alternative to virus-based gene therapy. However, the vectors that are currently available have drawbacks limiting their therapeutic application. We have developed a self-assembled non-viral gene carrier, poly-L-lysine modified iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP-PLL), which is formed by modifying poly-L-lysine to the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. The ability of IONP-PLL to bind DNA was determined by ratio-dependent retardation of DNA in the agarose gel and co-sedimentation assay. In vitro cytotoxic effects were quantified by MTT assay. The transfection efficiency in vitro was evaluated by delivering exogenous DNA to different cell lines using IONP-PLL. Intravenous injection of IONP-PLL/DNA complexes into mice was evaluated as a gene delivery system for gene therapy. The PGL2-control gene encoding firefly luciferase and the EGFP-C2 gene encoding green fluorescent protein were used as marker genes. IONP-PLL could bind and protect DNA. In contrast to PLL and cationic liposomes, IONP-PLL described here was less cytotoxic in a broad range of concentrations. In the current study, we have demonstrated that IONP-PLL can deliver exogenous gene to cells in vitro and in vivo. After intravenous injection, IONP-PLL transferred reporter gene EGFP-C2 to lung, brain, spleen and kidney. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that IONP-PLL transferred exogenous DNA across the blood-brain barrier to the glial cells and neuron of brain. IONP-PLL, a low-toxicity vector, appears to have potential for fundamental research and genetic therapy in vitro and in vivo, especially for gene therapy of CNS disease. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Analysis of the role of homology arms in gene-targeting vectors in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Ishii

    Full Text Available Random integration of targeting vectors into the genome is the primary obstacle in human somatic cell gene targeting. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, a major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, is thought to be responsible for most random integration events; however, absence of DNA ligase IV (LIG4, the critical NHEJ ligase, does not significantly reduce random integration frequency of targeting vector in human cells, indicating robust integration events occurring via a LIG4-independent mechanism. To gain insights into the mechanism and robustness of LIG4-independent random integration, we employed various types of targeting vectors to examine their integration frequencies in LIG4-proficient and deficient human cell lines. We find that the integration frequency of targeting vector correlates well with the length of homology arms and with the amount of repetitive DNA sequences, especially SINEs, present in the arms. This correlation was prominent in LIG4-deficient cells, but was also seen in LIG4-proficient cells, thus providing evidence that LIG4-independent random integration occurs frequently even when NHEJ is functionally normal. Our results collectively suggest that random integration frequency of conventional targeting vectors is substantially influenced by homology arms, which typically harbor repetitive DNA sequences that serve to facilitate LIG4-independent random integration in human cells, regardless of the presence or absence of functional NHEJ.

  8. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed. PMID:24145751

  9. Impaired glutathione synthesis in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-10-18

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed.

  10. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Nakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed.

  11. Expression of human nerve growth factor β gene in central nervous system mediated by recombinant adeno-associated viruses type-2 vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高凯; 吴勇杰; 吴小兵; 饶春明; 王军志

    2004-01-01

    Background Neurone atrophy and loss are major causes of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite many pharmacotherapies for neurodegeneration, there are no accepted treatments. We investigated the feasibility of human nerve growth factor β (hNGFβ) gene expression mediated by recombinant adeno-associated viruses type-2 (rAAV-2) vector in the central nervous system (CNS) after blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption.Methods rAAV-2 containing hNGFβ gene was constructed. The ability of hNGFβ gene mediated by rAAV-2 vector (rAAV-2/hNGFβ) to transfect cells in vitro was confirmed by both ELISA and bioassay of hNGFβ in the culture supernatant of BHK-21 cells infected by rAAV-2/hNGFβ. rAAV-2/hNGFβ and rAAV-2/green fluorescence protein (GFP) were administrated separately to rat brains through internal carotid intubation after BBB disruption with hypertonic mannitol. Brain hNGFβ concentration was measured by ELISA and GFP in brain sections was examined by laser scan confocal microscope.Results After 48 hours, hNGFβ content in supernatant was up to (188.0±28.6) pg/ml when BHK-21 cells were infected by rAAV-2/hNGFβ at multiplicity of infection (MOI)1.0×106 vector genome. Neurone fibre outgrowths were obvious in dorsal root ganglion neurone assays by adding serum free culture medium harvested from BHK-21 cells exposed to rAAV-2/hNGFβ. Whole brain hNGFβ content in rAAV-2/hNGFβ transferred group was up to (636.2±140.6) pg/ml. hNGFβ content of BBB disruption in rAAV-2/hNGFβ infused group increased significantly compared to the control group (P<0.05). GFP expression was clearly observed in brain sections of rAAV-2/GFP transferred group.Conclusion rAAV-2/hNGFβ successfully expresses in the CNS after BBB disruption induced by hypertonic mannitol.

  12. Construction and application of a promoter-trapping vector with methyl parathion hydrolase gene mpd as the reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Zhong-Hui; Li, Shun-Peng

    2004-07-01

    A facilitative and efficient promoter-trapping vector, pUC-mpd, was constructed with the promoterless methyl parathion hydrolase gene as the reporter. This reporter gene is easily used to clone promoters with different promoting strength on selective plates. Promoter regions of the ytkA and ywoF genes with strong promoting and signal peptide functions were cloned from the Bacillus subtilis 168 genomic promoter library with this vector.

  13. Efficient gene targeting mediated by a lentiviral vector-associated meganuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmiryan, Araksya; Basmaciogullari, Stéphane; Henry, Adrien; Paques, Frédéric; Danos, Olivier

    2011-09-01

    Gene targeting can be achieved with lentiviral vectors delivering donor sequences along with a nuclease that creates a locus-specific double-strand break (DSB). Therapeutic applications of this system would require an appropriate control of the amount of endonuclease delivered to the target cells, and potentially toxic sustained expression must be avoided. Here, we show that the nuclease can be transferred into cells as a protein associated with a lentiviral vector particle. I-SceI, a prototypic meganuclease from yeast, was incorporated into the virions as a fusion with Vpr, an HIV accessory protein. Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors containing the donor sequences and the I-SceI fusion protein were tested in reporter cells in which targeting events were scored by the repair of a puromycin resistance gene. Molecular analysis of the targeted locus indicated a 2-fold higher frequency of the expected recombination event when the nuclease was delivered as a protein rather than encoded by a separate vector. In both systems, a proportion of clones displayed multiple integrated copies of the donor sequences, either as tandems at the targeted locus or at unrelated loci. These integration patterns were dependent upon the mode of meganuclease delivery, suggesting distinct recombination processes.

  14. Synthetic vectors for gene delivery: An overview of their evolution depending on routes of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmadi, Nawal; Midoux, Patrick; Loyer, Pascal; Passirani, Catherine; Pichon, Chantal; Le Gall, Tony; Jaffres, Paul-Alain; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid delivery constitutes an emerging therapeutic strategy to cure various human pathologies. This therapy consists of introducing genetic material into the whole body or isolated cells to correct a cellular abnormality or disfunction. As with any drug, the main objective of nucleic acid delivery is to establish optimal balance between efficacy and tolerance. The methods of administration and the vectors used are selected depending on whether the goal of treatment is the production of an active protein; the replacement of a missing or inactive gene; or the combat of acquired diseases, such as cancer or AIDS. In that sense, synthetic vectors represent a valuable solution because they are well characterized, their structure can be fine tuned, and their potential toxicity can be reduced, since toxicity depends on the composition of the formulations. Here we review various synthetic vectors for gene delivery and address the question of their biodistribution as a function of the route of administration. We highlight the modifications to vectors structure and formulations necessary to overcome the major hurdles limiting the effectiveness of nucleic acid therapies.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Gene therapy vectors: the prospects and potentials of the cut-and-paste transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys Bouuaert, Corentin; Chalmers, Ronald M

    2010-05-01

    Gene therapy applications require efficient tools for the stable delivery of genetic information into eukaryotic genomes. Most current gene delivery strategies are based on viral vectors. However, a number of drawbacks, such as the limited cargo capacity, host immune response and mutational risks, highlight the need for alternative gene delivery tools. A comprehensive gene therapy tool kit should contain a range of vectors and techniques that can be adapted to different targets and purposes. Transposons provide a potentially powerful approach. However, transposons encompass a large number of different molecular mechanisms, some of which are better suited to gene delivery applications than others. Here, we consider the range and potentials of the various mechanisms, focusing on the cut-and-paste transposons as one of the more promising avenues towards gene therapy applications. Several cut-and-paste transposition systems are currently under development. We will first consider the mechanisms of piggyBac and the hAT family elements Tol1 and Tol2, before focusing on the mariner family elements including Mos1, Himar1 and Hsmar1.

  17. Deep brain stimulation as treatment for dystonic storm in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration syndrome: case report of a patient with homozygous C.628 2 T > G mutation of the PANK2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrıkulu, Bahattin; Özen, Ali; Günal, Dilek Ince; Türkdoğan, Dilşad; Bayraklı, Fatih; Bayri, Yaşar; Dağçınar, Adnan; Şeker, Aşkın

    2015-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) syndrome is an autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive generalized dystonia. Currently, the disorder remains pharmacologically intractable. Herein we report the first case in which deep brain stimulation helped to relieve dystonic storm in a patient with PKAN syndrome who had homozygous c.628 2 T > G mutation of the PANK2 gene. A 10-year-old boy with PKAN disease presented with dystonic storm and was admitted to the emergency department. Examination revealed generalized dystonia and impaired breathing due to involvement of the respiratory muscles. The patient underwent surgery for bilateral globus pallidus internus deep brain stimulation. The patient showed marked response to treatment.

  18. Gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of murine bispecific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMonte, L B; Nistico, P; Tecce, R; Dellabona, P; Momo, M; Anichini, A; Mariani, M; Natali, P G; Malavasi, F

    1990-01-01

    The present study reports on the use of gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of hybrid hybridomas secreting bispecific monoclonal antibodies. neo- and dhfr- genes were infected into distinct murine hybridomas, thus conferring a dominant resistance trait to geneticin (G418) and to methotrexate. The vectors employed were replication-deficient and dependent on complementation by a helper virus provided by the irradiated packaging lines. After cocultivation with the relevant packaging cell lines, stable hybridoma lines expressing the selectable markers were easily obtained and were then suitable for conventional somatic fusion. This high-efficiency method was used to generate two bispecific monoclonal antibodies simultaneously targeting molecules expressed on cytotoxic cells (i.e., T lymphocytes and natural killer cells) against a human melanoma-associated antigen. Images PMID:2326256

  19. High-throughput genomic mapping of vector integration sites in gene therapy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Brian C; Adair, Jennifer E; Trobridge, Grant D; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has enormous potential to treat a variety of infectious and genetic diseases. To date hundreds of patients worldwide have received hematopoietic cell products that have been gene-modified with retrovirus vectors carrying therapeutic transgenes, and many patients have been cured or demonstrated disease stabilization as a result (Adair et al., Sci Transl Med 4:133ra57, 2012; Biffi et al., Science 341:1233158, 2013; Aiuti et al., Science 341:1233151, 2013; Fischer et al., Gene 525:170-173, 2013). Unfortunately, for some patients the provirus integration dysregulated the expression of nearby genes leading to clonal outgrowth and, in some cases, cancer. Thus, the unwanted side effect of insertional mutagenesis has become a major concern for retrovirus gene therapy. The careful study of retrovirus integration sites (RIS) and the contribution of individual gene-modified clones to hematopoietic repopulating cells is of crucial importance for all gene therapy studies. Supporting this, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has mandated the careful monitoring of RIS in all clinical trials of gene therapy. An invaluable method was developed: linear amplification mediated-polymerase chain reaction (LAM-PCR) capable of analyzing in vitro and complex in vivo samples, capturing valuable genomic information directly flanking the site of provirus integration. Linking this method and similar methods to high-throughput sequencing has now made possible an unprecedented understanding of the integration profile of various retrovirus vectors, and allows for sensitive monitoring of their safety. It also allows for a detailed comparison of improved safety-enhanced gene therapy vectors. An important readout of safety is the relative contribution of individual gene-modified repopulating clones. One limitation of LAM-PCR is that the ability to capture the relative contribution of individual clones is compromised because of the initial linear PCR common to all current methods

  20. Gene transfer to chicks using lentiviral vectors administered via the embryonic chorioallantoic membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Hen

    Full Text Available The lack of affordable techniques for gene transfer in birds has inhibited the advancement of molecular studies in avian species. Here we demonstrate a new approach for introducing genes into chicken somatic tissues by administration of a lentiviral vector, derived from the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, into the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM of chick embryos on embryonic day 11. The FIV-derived vectors carried yellow fluorescent protein (YFP or recombinant alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH genes, driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. Transgene expression, detected in chicks 2 days after hatch by quantitative real-time PCR, was mostly observed in the liver and spleen. Lower expression levels were also detected in the brain, kidney, heart and breast muscle. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses confirmed transgene expression in chick tissues at the protein level, demonstrating a transduction efficiency of ∼0.46% of liver cells. Integration of the viral vector into the chicken genome was demonstrated using genomic repetitive (CR1-PCR amplification. Viability and stability of the transduced cells was confirmed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay, immunostaining with anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (anti-PCNA, and detection of transgene expression 51 days post transduction. Our approach led to only 9% drop in hatching efficiency compared to non-injected embryos, and all of the hatched chicks expressed the transgenes. We suggest that the transduction efficiency of FIV vectors combined with the accessibility of the CAM vasculature as a delivery route comprise a new powerful and practical approach for gene delivery into somatic tissues of chickens. Most relevant is the efficient transduction of the liver, which specializes in the production and secretion of proteins, thereby providing an optimal target for prolonged study of secreted hormones and peptides.

  1. Expression of the glycoprotein gene from a fish rhabdovirus by using baculovirus vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koener, J.F.; Leong, J.A.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA fragment containing the gene encoding the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was inserted into Autographa californica baculovirus vectors under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A 66-kilodalton protein, identical in size to the glycosylated glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was expressed at high levels in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the recombinant viruses. The expressed protein reacted with antiserum to the glycoprotein on Western blots.

  2. pHUSH: a single vector system for conditional gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Eby Mike; Murray Lesley J; Gogineni Alvin; Gu Zhenyu; Peng Li; Hoeflich Klaus P; Gray Daniel C; Kljavin Noelyn; Seshagiri Somasekar; Cole Mary J; Davis David P

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Conditional expression vectors have become a valuable research tool to avoid artefacts that may result from traditional gene expression studies. However, most systems require multiple plasmids that must be independently engineered into the target system, resulting in experimental delay and an increased potential for selection of a cell subpopulation that differs significantly from the parental line. We have therefore developed pHUSH, an inducible expression system that all...

  3. Genome-wide patterns of gene expression during aging in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available The primary means of reducing malaria transmission is through reduction in longevity in days of the adult female stage of the Anopheles vector. However, assessing chronological age is limited to crude physiologic methods which categorize the females binomially as either very young (nulliparous or not very young (parous. Yet the epidemiologically relevant reduction in life span falls within the latter category. Age-grading methods that delineate chronological age, using accurate molecular surrogates based upon gene expression profiles, will allow quantification of the longevity-reducing effects of vector control tools aimed at the adult, female mosquito. In this study, microarray analyses of gene expression profiles in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae were conducted during natural senescence of females in laboratory conditions. Results showed that detoxification-related and stress-responsive genes were up-regulated as mosquitoes aged. A total of 276 transcripts had age-dependent expression, independently of blood feeding and egg laying events. Expression of 112 (40.6% of these transcripts increased or decreased monotonically with increasing chronologic age. Seven candidate genes for practical age assessment were tested by quantitative gene amplification in the An. gambiae G3 strain in a laboratory experiment and the Mbita strain in field enclosures set up in western Kenya under conditions closely resembling natural ones. Results were similar between experiments, indicating that senescence is marked by changes in gene expression and that chronological age can be gauged accurately and repeatedly with this method. These results indicate that the method may be suitable for accurate gauging of the age in days of field-caught, female An. gambiae.

  4. pHUSH: a single vector system for conditional gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eby Mike

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conditional expression vectors have become a valuable research tool to avoid artefacts that may result from traditional gene expression studies. However, most systems require multiple plasmids that must be independently engineered into the target system, resulting in experimental delay and an increased potential for selection of a cell subpopulation that differs significantly from the parental line. We have therefore developed pHUSH, an inducible expression system that allows regulated expression of shRNA, miRNA or cDNA cassettes on a single viral vector. Results Both Pol II and Pol III promoters have been successfully combined with a second expression cassette containing a codon-optimized tetracycline repressor and selectable marker. We provide examples of how pHUSH has been successfully employed to study the function of target genes in a number of cell types within in vitro and in vivo assays, including conditional gene knockdown in a murine model of brain cancer. Conclusion We have successfully developed and employed a single vector system that enables Doxycycline regulated RNAi or transgene expression in a variety of in vitro and in vivo model systems. These studies demonstrate the broad application potential of pHUSH for conditional genetic engineering in mammalian cells.

  5. Magnetofection Enhances Adenoviral Vector-based Gene Delivery in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Andrea Soledad; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Lockhart, Eugenia Falomir; Taylor, Jackson Richard; Delbono, Osvaldo; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Plank, Christian; Hereñu, Claudia Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The goal of magnetic field-assisted gene transfer is to enhance internalization of exogenous nucleic acids by association with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This technique named magnetofection is particularly useful in difficult-to-transfect cells. It is well known that human, mouse, and rat skeletal muscle cells suffer a maturation-dependent loss of susceptibility to Recombinant Adenoviral vector (RAd) uptake. In postnatal, fully differentiated myofibers, the expression of the primary Coxsackie and Adenoviral membrane receptor (CAR) is severely downregulated representing a main hurdle for the use of these vectors in gene transfer/therapy. Here we demonstrate that assembling of Recombinant Adenoviral vectors with suitable iron oxide MNPs into magneto-adenovectors (RAd-MNP) and further exposure to a gradient magnetic field enables to efficiently overcome transduction resistance in skeletal muscle cells. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 was significantly enhanced after magnetofection with RAd-MNPs complexes in C2C12 myotubes in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle in vivo when compared to transduction with naked virus. These results provide evidence that magnetofection, mainly due to its membrane-receptor independent mechanism, constitutes a simple and effective alternative to current methods for gene transfer into traditionally hard-to-transfect biological models. PMID:27274908

  6. Construction of expression vector for NT4-ADNF-9 fusion gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-xi Zheng; Kang Zhu; Yang Jing; Jun-rong Wei; Hong-liang Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To construct the prokaryotic expression vector bearing fusion gene NT4-ADNF-9 and lay foundation for further study on genetic therapy of neuraseusory deafness. Methods By means of asymmetrical prince/ template, double stranded eDNA of activity dependent neurotrophic factor-9 (ADNF-9) was obtained, which included restriction enzymes sites on the two extremities. ADNF-9 eDNA was ligated to the signal and leader peptides of nenrotrophin 4 (NT4), and the fusion gene was named NT4-ADNF-9. Then it was suheluned into prokaryotic expression vector pBV220, and called pBV220/ NT4-ADNF-9. Results Evidences of DNA sequence analysis and restrtction enzymes digestion showed that we recombined ADNF-9 eDNA to the 3'terminal of the signal and leader peptides of NT4, and the fusion gene was subcluned into pBV220 successfully. Bioactivity of the products was proved that it could support the cell survival and neurite growth in the primary cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of embryonic day-8 cbicken neurons as compared to the control. Conclusion Prokaryotic expression vector pBV220/NT4-ADNF-9 can be constructed successfully and the bioactivtty is satisfactory.

  7. [Construction and identification of small interfering RNA expression vector targeting ATF-2 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei-wei; Xiong, Peng; Han, Feng; Hu, Zhi-jian

    2012-09-01

    To construct an eukaryotic expression vector for RNA interference targeting activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) gene, and explore its effect on proliferation and apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Two complementary oligonucleotides were synthesized based on ATF-2 mRNA sequence. The annealed fragment was inserted into the vector PBA-siU6. The recombinant plasmid PBA-siATF-2 was confirmed by DNA sequencing and transfected into HepG2 cells mediated by liposome. After transfection, ATF-2 protein was detected by Western blotting. The cellular growth activity and apoptosis rate were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Recombinant plasmid expressing siRNA targeting ATF-2 gene was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Plasmid transfection down-regulated the level of ATF-2 protein in HepG2 cells, which blocked cellular growth and induced cell apoptosis. The eukaryotic expression vector for RNA interference targeting ATF-2 gene was constructed successfully, which inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis.

  8. Highly efficient virus-induced gene silencing in apple and soybean by apple latent spherical virus vector and biolistic inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective tool for the analysis of the gene function in plants within a short time. However, in woody fruit tree like apple, some of Solanum crops, and soybean, it is generally difficult to inoculate virus vector by conventional inoculation methods. Here, we show efficient VIGS in apple and soybean by Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vector and biolistic inoculation. The plants inoculated with ALSV vectors by particle bombardment showed uniform silenced phenotypes of target genes within 2-3 weeks post inoculation.

  9. Construction of expression vector for NT4-ADNF-9 fusion gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To construct the prokaryotic expression vector bearing fusion gene NT4-ADNF-9 and lay foundation for further study on genetic therapy of neurosensory deafness. Methods By means of asymmetrical primer/ template,double stranded cDNA of activity dependent neurotrophic factor-9 (ADNF-9) was obtained,which included restriction enzymes sites on the two extremities. ADNF-9 cDNA was ligated to the signal and leader peptides of neurotrophin 4 (NT4),and the fusion gene was named NT4-ADNF-9. Then it was subc...

  10. Baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of NIS gene into colon tumor cells for radionuclide therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the feasibility of radionuclide therapy of colon tumor cells by baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of the sodium/iodide symporter(NIS) gene.METHODS:A recombinant baculovirus plasmid carrying the NIS gene was constructed,and the viruses(BacNIS) were prepared using the Bac-to-Bac system.The infection efficiency in the colon cancer cell line SW1116 of a green fluorescent protein(GFP) expressing baculovirus(Bac-GFP) at different multiplicities of infection(MOI) with various concentrations o...

  11. Polydnaviruses of Parasitic Wasps: Domestication of Viruses To Act as Gene Delivery Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Strand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a common phenomenon in which associated organisms can cooperate in ways that increase their ability to survive, reproduce, or utilize hostile environments. Here, we discuss polydnavirus symbionts of parasitic wasps. These viruses are novel in two ways: (1 they have become non-autonomous domesticated entities that cannot replicate outside of wasps; and (2 they function as a delivery vector of genes that ensure successful parasitism of host insects that wasps parasitize. In this review we discuss how these novelties may have arisen, which genes are potentially involved, and what the consequences have been for genome evolution.

  12. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle.

  13. A novel nonviral nanoparticle gene vector: Poly-L-lysine-silica nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    DNA delivery is a core technology for gene structure and function research as well as clinical settings. The ability to safely and efficiently targeted transfer foreign DNA into cells is a fundamental goal in biotechnology. With the development of nanobiotechnology, nanoparticle gene vectors brought about new hope to reach the goal. In our research, silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were synthesized first in a microemulsion system polyoxyethylene nonylphenyl ether (OP-10)/cyclohexane/ammonium hydroxide, at the same time the effects of SiNP size and its distribution were elucidated by orthogonal analysis; then poly-L-lysine (PLL) was linked on the surface of SiNP by nanoparticle surface energy and electrostatically binding; lastly a novel complex nanomaterial-- poly-L-lysine-silica nanoparticles (PLL-SiNP) was prepared. The analysis of plasmid DNA binding and DNaseⅠ enzymatic degradation discovered that PLL-SiNP could bind DNA, and protect it against enzymatic degradation. Cell transfection showed that PLL-SiNP could efficiently transfer PEGFPC-2 plasmid DNA into HNE1 cell line. These results indicated that PLL-SiNP was a novel nonviral nanoparticle gene vector, and would probably play an important role in gene structure and function research as well as gene therapy.

  14. Construction and identification of lentiviral RNA interference vector of rat leptin receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengjuan LIU; Jie BIAN; Yuchuan WANG; Yongli ZHAO; Dong YAN; Xiaoxia WANG

    2009-01-01

    Leptin resistance is a main mechanism of acquired childhood obesity, and the suppression of long form of leptin receptor (OBRb) gene expression in diet-induced obese rats indicates that the down-regulation of OBRb gene expression plays a pivotal role in the mechanism of leptin resistance. The aim of the present study was to construct the lentiviral RNA interference (RNAi) vector of rat OBRb gene and evaluate the effects of siRNA on silencing OBRb gene expression. The target sequence of siRNA-OBRb was designed, and the com-plementary DNA containing both sense and antisense oligonucleotides was synthesized. After phosphorylation and annealing, these double-stranded DNA was cloned to pRNA-lentivector-VGFP to construct pRNA-Lenti-OBRb-VGFP recombinants with U6-containing promoter, target sequence and Poly Ⅲ terminator. Then, the products were confirmed by electrophoresis and sequencing analy-sis, and the effects of RNAi on reducing gene expression were further confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in transfected rat glioma cells expressing OBRb. The target sequence of siRNA-OBRb was successfully cloned to pRNA-lentivector-VGFE and the RNAi protocol specifically reduced the expression of OBRb mRNA by approximately 80% compared with controls in transfected rat glioma cells. The successful construction of rat lentivirus vectors expressing OBRb-specific shRNA may be useful for further investigation in vivo.

  15. Construction of Prokaryotic Expression Vector of Mouse Nanog Gene and Its Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; L(U) Chang-rong; DOU Lin; DOU Zhong-ying

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to construct a prokaryotic expression vector of mouse Nanog gene andto express it in E. Coli. A pair of primers was designed according to digestion sites in plasmid pGEX-KG and the Nanog gene sequence published by GenBank. The DNA fragment of 918 bp was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the pNA992 recombinant plasmid with Nanog gene, then cloned into pGEX-KG and transformed into the host E. Coli strain TG I. The sequence of the fragment was matched with the original sequence of pNA992. It indicated that fusion expression vector, pGEX-KGNanog, was constructed successfully. The pGEX-KG-Nanog plasmid was extracted from E. Coli strain TG I and was transformed into BL21(DE3) for expression. After induction by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) at 37℃, the expression product of Nanog gene was identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the expression condition was optimized. Nanog fusion protein was successfully expressed in the form of inclusion bodies. The molecular weight of the inclusion body was 63 kDa. Meanwhile, the optimum condition for the expression of Nanog fusion protein was induced with 0.8 mmol L-1 IPTG for 5 h. The mouse Nanog gene was successfully expressed in E. Coli, which laid a foundation for the purification of Nanog protein and for the preparation of polyclonal antibody.

  16. Construction of the Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein Expression Vector Carrying IFN-γ Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqing Lan; Jian Ge; Yehong Zhuo; Jinlin Wang; Huiyi Chen; Haiquan Liu

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To construct the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) vector carryinginterferon-y gene (ifn-γ) in order to provide an ideal reporter in the expression of ifn-γand location of protein in vitro and in vivo.Method: According to the nucleotide sequence of ifn-y gene, a pair of oligonucleotideswas designed as primer whose two end contained nucleotide sequence of EcoR V and NotⅠ restriction endonuclease respectively. The gene encoding for inf-y was amplified usingPCR technique. After the PCR product was retrieved and purified, it was digested withEcoR V and Not Ⅰ restriction endonuclease, and then cloned into the plasmidpIRES-EYFP. The recombinant plasmid plRES-EYFPIFN-γwas identified by restrictionendonuclease enzyme analysis and DNA sequence analysis.Results: The ifn-γ was successfully amplified and verified by partial DNA sequenceanalysis. The recombinant plasmid was correctly screened.Conclusion: The EYFP expression vector carrying ifn-γgene was successfully established.This research work has formed a base for monitoring the ifn-y gene expression andprotein position in living cells.

  17. Range of retinal diseases potentially treatable by AAV-vectored gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, William W; Li, Quihong; Raisler, Brian; Timmers, Adrian M; Berns, Kenneth I; Flannery, John G; LaVail, Matthew M; Lewin, Alfred S

    2004-01-01

    Viable strategies for retinal gene therapy must be designed to cope with the genetic nature of the disease and/or the primary pathologic process responsible for retinal malfunction. For dominant gene defects the aim must be to destroy the presumably toxic gene product, for recessive gene defects the direct approach aims to provide a wild-type copy of the gene to the affected retinal cell type, and for diseases of either complex or unknown genetic origin, more general cell survival strategies that deal with preserving affected retinal cells are often the best and only option. Hence examples of each type of therapy will be briefly discussed in several animal models, including ribozyme therapy for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in the transgenic P23H opsin rat, beta-PDE gene augmentation therapy for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the rd mouse, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy for autosomal dominant RP in the transgenic S334ter opsin rat and pigment epithelial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (PEDF) gene therapy for neovascular retinal disease in rodents. Each employs a recombinant AAV vectored passenger gene controlled by one of several promoters supporting either photoreceptor-specific expression or more general retinal cell expression depending on the therapeutic requirements.

  18. "Bronchial Artery Delivery of Viral Vectors for Gene delivery in Cystic Fibrosis; Superior to Airway Delivery?"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutelle Charles C

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attempts at gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis have relied mainly on airway delivery. However the efficiency of gene transfer and expression in the airway epithelia has not reached therapeutic levels. Access to epithelial cells is not homogenous for a number of reasons and the submucosal glands cannot be reached via the airways. Presentation We propose to inject gene delivery vectors directly into bronchial arteries combined with pre-delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor to increase vascular endothelial permeability and post-delivery flow reduction by balloon occlusion. Thus it may be possible to reach mucous secreting cells of the bronchial luminal epithelium and the submucosal glands in an increased and homogenous fashion. Testing This combination of techniques to the best of our knowledge has not previously been investigated, and may enable us to overcome some of the current limitations to gene therapy for Cystic Fibrosis.

  19. Sola dosis facit venenum. Leukemia in gene therapy trials: a question of vectors, inserts and dosage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, F J T; Pike-Overzet, K; Ng, Y Y; van Dongen, J J M

    2008-10-01

    In clinical gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, the development of leukemia has come up as a severe adverse effect. In all five cases, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred as a direct consequence of insertional mutagenesis by the retrovirus used to deliver the therapeutic gene. Here, we review the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis, the function of the Il2RG gene and the future developments in the field. New lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors can significantly improve the safety profile of the tools used but still carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis, as shown in this issue of Leukemia. Finally, the unfortunate side effects of gene therapy have given more insight into the development of human T-ALL.

  20. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Axelle; Mougel, Florence; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (re)colonize houses—a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes. Methodology/Principal Finding In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 3 odorant receptors (ORs), 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs), 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs), 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary) and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE) contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system. Conclusion/Significance Chemosensory genes could be good

  1. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelle Marchant

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (recolonize houses-a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes.In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs, 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 3 odorant receptors (ORs, 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs, 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs, 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system.Chemosensory genes could be good candidates for genes that contribute to adaptation or

  2. Reversal of MDR1 gene-dependent multidrug resistance using short hairpin RNA expression vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Hui-zhu; ZHENG De-ming; ZHANG Gui-zhen; ZHAO Ji-sheng; ZHANG Feng-chun; BU Li-sha; YANG Shao-juan; PIAO Song-lan; DU Zhen-wu; GAO Shen

    2005-01-01

    Background RNA interference using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) can mediate sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression in mammalian cells. A vector-based approach for synthesizing shRNA has been developed recently. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the MDR1 gene product, confers multidrug resistance (MDR) to cancer cells. In this study, we reversed MDR using shRNA expression vectors in a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/AdrR). Methods The two shRNA expression vectors were constructed and introduced into MCF-7/AdrR cells. Expression of MDR1 mRNA was assessed by RT-PCR, and P-gp expression was determined by Western Blot and immunocytochemistry. Apoptosis and sensitization of the breast cancer cells to doxorubicin were quantified by flow cytometry and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays, respectively. Cellular daunorubicin accumulation was assayed by laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). Statistical significance of differences in mean values was evaluated by Student's t tests. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results In MCF-7/AdrA cells transfected with MDR1-A and MDR1-B shRNA expression vectors, RT-PCR showed that MDR1 mRNA expression was reduced by 40.9% (P<0.05), 30.1% (P<0.01) (transient transfection) and 37.6 % (P<0.05), 28.0% (P<0.01) (stable transfection), respectively. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry showed that P-gp expression was significantly and specifically inhibited. Resistance against doxorubicin was decreased from 162-fold to 109-fold (P<0.05), 54-fold (P<0.01) (transient transfection) and to 108-fold (P<0.05), 50-fold (P<0.01) (stable transfection). Furthermore, shRNA vectors significantly enhanced the cellular daunorubicin accumulation. The combination of shRNA vectors and doxorubicin significantly induced apoptosis in MCF-7/AdrR cells. Conclusions shRNA expression vectors effectively reduce MDR expression in a sustained fashion and can restore the sensitivity of drug-resistant cancer

  3. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  4. A Single Vector Platform for High-Level Gene Transduction of Central Neurons: Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Equipped with the Tet-Off System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jaerin; Takahashi, Megumu; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Ishida, Yoko; Furuta, Takahiro; Hioki, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Visualization of neurons is indispensable for the investigation of neuronal circuits in the central nervous system. Virus vectors have been widely used for labeling particular subsets of neurons, and the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has gained popularity as a tool for gene transfer. Here, we developed a single AAV vector Tet-Off platform, AAV-SynTetOff, to improve the gene-transduction efficiency, specifically in neurons. The platform is composed of regulator and response elements in a single AAV genome. After infection of Neuro-2a cells with the AAV-SynTetOff vector, the transduction efficiency of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was increased by approximately 2- and 15-fold relative to the conventional AAV vector with the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human synapsin I (SYN) promoter, respectively. We then injected the AAV vectors into the mouse neostriatum. GFP expression in the neostriatal neurons infected with the AAV-SynTetOff vector was approximately 40-times higher than that with the CMV or SYN promoter. By adding a membrane-targeting signal to GFP, the axon fibers of neostriatal neurons were clearly visualized. In contrast, by attaching somatodendritic membrane-targeting signals to GFP, axon fiber labeling was mostly suppressed. Furthermore, we prepared the AAV-SynTetOff vector, which simultaneously expressed somatodendritic membrane-targeted GFP and membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein (RFP). After injection of the vector into the neostriatum, the cell bodies and dendrites of neostriatal neurons were labeled with both GFP and RFP, whereas the axons in the projection sites were labeled only with RFP. Finally, we applied this vector to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive (VIP+) neocortical neurons, one of the subclasses of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, in layer 2/3 of the mouse primary somatosensory cortex. The results revealed the differential distribution of the somatodendritic and axonal structures at the population level. The

  5. Role of Cell Membrane-Vector Interactions in Successful Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2016-08-16

    Cationic polymers have been investigated as nonviral vectors for gene delivery due to their favorable safety profile when compared to viral vectors. However, nonviral vectors are limited by poor efficacy in inducing gene expression. The physicochemical properties of cationic polymers enabling successful gene expression have been investigated in order to improve expression efficiency and safety. Studies over the past several years have focused on five possible rate-limiting processes to explain the differences in gene expression: (1) endosomal release, (2) transport within specific intracellular pathways, (3) protection of DNA from nucleases, (4) transport into the nucleus, and (5) DNA release from vectors. However, determining the relative importance of these processes and the vector properties necessary for optimization remain a challenge to the field. In this Account, we describe over a decade of studies focused on understanding the interaction of cationic polymer and cationic polymer/oligonucleotide (polyplex) interactions with model lipid membranes, cell membranes, and cells in culture. In particular, we have been interested in how the interaction between cationic polymers and the membrane influences the intracellular transport of intact DNA to the nucleus. Recent advances in microfluidic patch clamp techniques enabled us to quantify polyplex cell membrane interactions at the cellular level with precise control over material concentrations and exposure times. In attempting to relate these findings to subsequent intracellular transport of DNA and expression of protein, we needed to develop an approach that could distinguish DNA that was intact and potentially functional for gene expression from the much larger pool of degraded, nonfunctional DNA within the cell. We addressed this need by developing a FRET oligonucleotide molecular beacon (OMB) to monitor intact DNA transport. The research highlighted in this Account builds to the conclusion that polyplex

  6. Effects of insertion sites in a Newcastle disease virus vector on foreign gene expression through an internal ribosomal entry site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian paramyxovirus type 1, has been developed as a vector to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign genes are usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit (ITU), which potentially a...

  7. Development of a Newcastle disease virus vector expressing a foreign gene through an internal ribosomal entry site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been developed as a vector to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign genes are usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit (ITU). Based on the well-accepted “stop-start” transcr...

  8. Nuclear localisation sequence templated nonviral gene delivery vectors: investigation of intracellular trafficking events of LMD and LD vector systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michael; Harbottle, Richard P; Perouzel, Eric; Colin, Morvane; Shah, Imran; Rahim, Ahad; Vaysse, Laurence; Bergau, Anna; Moritz, Sylviane; Brahimi-Horn, Christiane; Coutelle, Charles; Miller, Andrew D

    2003-04-04

    The impact of a peptide that contains a nuclear localisation sequence (NLS) on intracellular DNA trafficking was studied. We used the adenoviral core peptide mu and an SV40 NLS peptide to condense plasmid DNA (pDNA) prior to formulation with 3beta-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)carbamoyl]cholesterol/dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DC-Chol/DOPE) liposomes to give LMD and LND vectors, respectively. Fluorescent-labelled lipid and peptides plus dye-labelled pDNA components were used to investigate gene delivery in dividing and S-phase growth-arrested cells. Confocal microscopic analyses reveal little difference in intracellular trafficking events. Strikingly, mu peptide associates with nuclei and nucleoli of cells within less than 15 mins incubation of LMD with cells, which suggests that mu peptide has an NLS function. These NLS properties were confirmed by cloning of a mu-beta-galactosidase fusion protein that localises in the nuclei of cells after cytosolic translation. In dividing cells both LMD and LND deliver pDNA(Cy3) to nuclei within 30-45 min incubation with cells. By contrast, pDNA is detected only in the cytoplasm in growth-arrested cells over the period of time investigated, and not in the nuclei. LD systems prepared from DC-Chol/DOPE cationic liposomes and pDNA(Cy3) behave similarly to LMD systems, which suggests that mu peptide is unable to influence trafficking events in this current LMD formulation, in spite of its strong NLS capacity. We further describe the effect of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) on cellular uptake. "Stealth" systems obtained by post-coating LMD particles with fluorescent-labelled PEG molecules (0.5, 5 and 10 mol % fluorescein-PEG(5000)-N-hydroxysuccinimide) were prepared and shown to be internalised rapidly (mins) by cells, without detectable transgene expression. This result indicates that PEG blocks intracellular trafficking of pDNA.

  9. [Preparation of a novel AAV-ITR gene expression mini vector in Sf9 insect cells via baculovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taiming; Pan, Junjie; Qi, Jing; Zhang, Chun

    2015-08-01

    AAV-ITR gene expression mini vector is a double-strand or single-strand DNA that only contains inverted terminal repeats of adeno-associated virus, cis-elements and gene of interest and does not contain any other foreign DNA sequences. We prepared Bac-ITR-EGFP and Bac-inrep. Spodoptera frugiperda cells were infected with Bac-ITR-EGFP (P3) and Bac-inrep (P3). Up to 100 μg of AAV-ITR-EGFP gene expression mini vectors were extracted from 2 x 10(7) cells of Sf9 72 h after infection. The gel electrophoresis analysis shows that most forms of AAV-ITR-EGFP gene expression mini vector were monomer and dimer. The mini vector expression efficacy was examined in vitro with HEK 293T cells. The EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection, and the positive ratio reached 65% at 48 h after transfection.

  10. Elimination of marker genes from transgenic plants using MAT vector systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Sugita, Koichi; Endo, Saori; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Yamada, Keiko

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system (Multi-Auto-Transformation [MAT] vectors) for the removal of marker genes and to increase the regeneration frequency of transgenic crops without using antibiotic selection, reducing their possible environmental impact. The MAT vector system is designed to use the oncogenes (ipt, iaaM/H, rol) of Agrobacterium, which control the endogenous levels of plant hormones and the cell responses to plant growth regulators, to differentiate transgenic cells, and to select marker-free transgenic plants. The oncogenes are combined with the site-specific recombination system (R/RS). At transformation, the oncogenes regenerate transgenic plants and then are removed by the R/RS system to generate marker-free transgenic plants. The choice of a promoter for the oncogenes and the recombinase (R) gene, the state of plant materials and the tissue culture conditions greatly affect efficiency of both the regeneration of transgenic plants and the generation of marker-free plants. We have evaluated these conditions in several plant species to increase their generation efficiency. This chapter describes our transformation protocols using MAT vectors.

  11. Effect of adenovirus gene transfer vectors on the immunologic functions of mouse dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korst, Robert J; Mahtabifard, Ali; Yamada, Reiko; Crystal, Ronald G

    2002-03-01

    To address the effect of adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vector transduction on the diverse functions of dendritic cells, we used an Ad vector encoding no transgene (AdNull) to transduce mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Initial experiments using an Ad vector encoding a marker gene (AdGFP, jellyfish green fluorescent protein) showed that the optimal ratio of infectious Ad particles to each cell was 100, when both transgene expression and resultant BMDC viability were taken into account. Exposure to AdNull resulted in upregulation of both surface activation markers (CD40, MHC class II, B7.1, B7.2, ICAM-1) and IL-12 expression by BMDC. AdNull activation of BMDC was observed in multiple strains of mice. Despite this, AdNull-transduced BMDC displayed only modestly impaired antigen uptake ability, as demonstrated in macropinocytosis and phagocytosis assays, in vitro. However, Ad-modified BMDC migrated to regional lymph nodes five times more efficiently than sham-transduced BMDC in vivo. In addition, Ad transduction significantly enhanced the ability of BMDC to present a model peptide antigen to T-lymphocyte hybridoma cells at low BMDC:T cell ratios. We conclude that Ad modification, in and of itself, induces a state of activation in mouse BMDC. This activation, albeit mild compared with that induced by other stimuli, produces measurable effects of the specific immunological functions of these antigen-presenting cells.

  12. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-10-24

    Here we describe "Supernova" series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain.

  13. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe “Supernova” series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain. PMID:27775045

  14. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Vassetzky Yegor S; Dmitriev Petr V

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS) carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418) and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo) contains either...

  15. Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

    2006-11-01

    Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing

  16. Immunogenic comparison of chimeric adenovirus 5/35 vector carrying optimized human immunodeficiency virus clade C genes and various promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Masaki; Yoshizaki, Shinji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Kenji; Shimada, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus vector-based vaccine is a promising approach to protect HIV infection. However, a recent phase IIb clinical trial using the vector did not show its protective efficacy against HIV infection. To improve the vaccine, we explored the transgene protein expression and its immunogenicity using optimized codon usage, promoters and adaptors. We compared protein expression and immunogenicity of adenovirus vector vaccines carrying native or codon usage-optimized HIV-1 clade C gag and env genes expression cassettes driven by different promoters (CMV, CMVi, and CA promoters) and adapters (IRES and F2A). The adenovirus vector vaccine containing optimized gag gene produced higher Gag protein expression and induced higher immune responses than the vector containing native gag gene in mice. Furthermore, CA promoter generated higher transgene expression and elicited higher immune responses than other two popularly used promoters (CMV and CMVi). The second gene expression using F2A adaptor resulted in higher protein expression and immunity than that of using IRES and direct fusion protein. Taken together, the adenovirus vector containing the expression cassette with CA promoter, optimized HIV-1 clade C gene and an F2A adaptor produced the best protein expression and elicited the highest transgene-specific immune responses. This finding would be promising for vaccine design and gene therapy.

  17. Elements of lentiviral vector design toward gene therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I is a lysosomal disease caused by α-l-iduronidase (IDUA deficiency and accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG. Lentiviral vector encoding correct IDUA cDNA could be used for treating MPS I. To optimize the lentiviral vector design, 9 constructs were designed by combinations of various promoters, enhancers, and codon optimization. After in vitro transfection into 293FT cells, 5 constructs achieved the highest IDUA activities (5613 to 7358 nmol/h/mg protein. These 5 candidate vectors were then tested by injection (1 × 107 TU/g into neonatal MPS I mice. After 30 days, one vector, CCEoIDW, achieved the highest IDUA levels: 2.6% of wildtype levels in the brain, 9.9% in the heart, 200% in the liver and 257% in the spleen. CCEoIDW achieved the most significant GAG reduction: down 49% in the brain, 98% in the heart, 100% in the liver and 95% in the spleen. Further, CCEoIDW had the lowest transgene frequency, especially in the gonads (0.03 ± 0.01 copies/100 cells, reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis and germ-line transmission. Therefore, CCEoIDW is selected as the optimal lentiviral vector for treating MPS I disease and will be applied in large animal preclinical studies. Further, taken both in vitro and in vivo comparisons together, codon optimization, use of EF-1α promoter and woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional response element (WPRE could enhance transgene expression. These results provided a better understanding of factors contributing efficient transgene expression in lentiviral gene therapies.

  18. Subcloning plus insertion (SPI)--a novel recombineering method for the rapid construction of gene targeting vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-08

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a 'targeting' vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4 kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors.

  19. Re-engineering an alphoid(tetO)-HAC-based vector to enable high-throughput analyses of gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, Artem V; Lee, Nicholas C O; Earnshaw, William C; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2013-05-01

    Human artificial chromosome (HAC)-based vectors represent an alternative technology for gene delivery and expression with a potential to overcome the problems caused by the use of viral-based vectors. The recently developed alphoid(tetO)-HAC has an advantage over other HAC vectors because it can be easily eliminated from cells by inactivation of the HAC kinetochore via binding of tTS chromatin modifiers to its centromeric tetO sequences. This provides unique control for phenotypes induced by genes loaded into the alphoid(tetO)-HAC. However, inactivation of the HAC kinetochore requires transfection of cells by a retrovirus vector, a step that is potentially mutagenic. Here, we describe an approach to re-engineering the alphoid(tetO)-HAC that allows verification of phenotypic changes attributed to expression of genes from the HAC without a transfection step. In the new HAC vector, a tTS-EYFP cassette is inserted into a gene-loading site along with a gene of interest. Expression of the tTS generates a self-regulating fluctuating heterochromatin on the alphoid(tetO)-HAC that induces fast silencing of the genes on the HAC without significant effects on HAC segregation. This silencing of the HAC-encoded genes can be readily recovered by adding doxycycline. The newly modified alphoid(tetO)-HAC-based system has multiple applications in gene function studies.

  20. Construction and Identification of Human Tissue Kallikrein Gene Eukaryotic Expressing Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yong; PENG Wujian; LI Tiyuan; DU Hong; SUN Wenxue; CHEN Deheng; XU Zhuojia

    2007-01-01

    To clone and sequence the human tissue kallikrein gene of Chinese, and to construct eukaryotic expression recombinant of KK, total RNA was extracted from human pancreas and human tissue kallikrein gene cDNA was amplified by PCR after reverse-transcription by using Oligo(dT)primer. The original kallikrein cDNA was recovered and filled with Klenow enzyme and inserted into KS plasmid. After restriction endonuclease digestion, KK cDNA was sequenced by ABI 377 analyzer.Then the KKgene was amplified from pBluescript KSKK and inserted into pcDNA3. A sequence comparison showed that the cloned kallikrein gene was only one nucleotide different from that reported in the Genbank. The coding amino acid was Asp in the Genbank gene, while the coding amino acid of Chinese kallikrein gene was Asn. The KK cDNA fragment was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3. The cloned kallikrein gene and the pcDNA3KK can be used for further study in gene therapy...

  1. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  2. Improved Retroviral Vector Design Results in Sustained Expression after Adult Gene Therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis I Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Ma, Xiucui; Tittiger, Mindy; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kovacs, Attila; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Gene therapy can reduce most clinical manifestations, but mice that receive transfer as adults lose expression unless they receive immunosuppression. Increasing liver specificity of transgene expression has reduced immune responses to other genes. Methods A gamma retroviral vector was generated with a liver-specific human α1-antitrypsin promoter and the canine IDUA cDNA inverted relative to the retroviral long-terminal repeat. Adult MPS I mice received the vector intravenously at 6 weeks of age and were assessed for expression via serial serum IDUA assays. Functional testing and organ analysis were performed at 8 months. Results This vector resulted in high specificity of expression in liver, and serum IDUA activity was stable in 90% of animals. Although the average serum IDUA activity was relatively low at 12.6 ± 8.1 units/mL in mice with stable expression, a relatively high percentage of enzyme contained the mannose 6-phosphorylation necessary for uptake by other cells. At 6.5 months after transduction, most organs had high IDUA activity and normalized GAG levels. There was complete correction of hearing and vision abnormalities and significant improvements in bone, although the aorta was refractory to treatment. Conclusions Stable expression of IDUA in adult MPS I mice can be achieved without immunosuppression by modifying the vector to reduce expression in the spleen. This approach may be effective in patients with MPS I or other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:18613275

  3. Targeted gene disruption by use of a group Ⅱ intron (tarqetron)vector in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Shao; Shiyuan Hu; Yi Yang; Yang Gu; Jun Chen; Yunliu Yang; Weihong Jiang; Sheng Yang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor: Clostridium acetobutylicum,a gram-positive,anaerobic,spore-forming bacterium,is capable of using a wide variety of carbon sources to produce acetone,butanol and ethanol.To improve solvent productivity of C.acetobutylicum.metabolic engineering is considered as a useful tool in developing strains with industrially desirable characteristics.However,to date,there are few useful methods for genetic manipulation of C.acetobutylicum,especially for gene disruption.To our knowledge,two types of vectors,including non-replicative and replicative integrative plasmids,have been developed for gene-inactivation in C.acetobutylicum.By using non-replicative integrative plasmids,buk and solR genes of C. acetobutylicum were inactivated[1,2].

  4. An improved cloning vector for construction of gene replacements in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojie; Kathariou, S

    2003-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium implicated in severe food-borne illness (listeriosis) in humans. The construction of well-defined gene replacements in the genome of L. monocytogenes has been instrumental to several genetic studies of the virulence and other attributes of the organism. Construction of such mutations by currently available procedures, however, tends to be labor intensive, and gene replacement mutants are sometimes difficult to recover due to lack of direct selection for the construct. In this study we describe the construction and use of plasmid vector pGF-EM, which can be conjugatively transferred from Escherichia coli S17-1 to L. monocytogenes and which provides the genetic means for direct selection of gene replacements.

  5. Safety and Effects of the Vector for the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J.; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W.; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3

  6. Safety and effects of the vector for the Leber hereditary optic neuropathy gene therapy clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes transfect rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells based on cationic polymer vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zunsheng Zhang; Kun Zan; Yonghai Liu; Xia Shen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene therapy is an effective expression of genes within target cells after transferring exogenous target genes. Both vector selection and transfection method are important factors for gene transfection. An ideal gene vector is required for a high transfusion of target gene and an exact introduction of target gene into specific target cells so as to express gene products. OBJECTIVE: To study the expression of mRNA and protein after transfecting rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes based on cationic polymer vector. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled in vitro study using gene engineering, performed at the Neurobiology Laboratory, Xuzhou Medical College between October 2007 and April 2008. MATERIALS: PcDNA3.1 BDNF was obtained from Youbiai Biotechnological Company, Beijing and cationic polymer vector used was the SofastTM gene transfection reagent that was made by Taiyangma Biotechnological Co., Ltd., Xiamen. METHODS: BMSCs extracted from six Sprague Dawley (SD) rats aged 1 month were isolated and cultured in vitro. Third passage BMSCs were inoculated on a 6-well culture plate at the density of 1×106 cells/L. At about 80% confluence, BMSCs were transfected with PcDNA3.1-BDNF (2 μg) combined with SofastTM gene transfection reagent (6 μg) (BDNF group) or with PcDNA3.1 (2 μg) combined with SofastTM gene transfection reagent (6 μg) (blank vector group). Cells that were not transfected with any reagents but still cultured under primary culture conditions were used as a non-transfection group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure time efficiency of BMSC-secreted BDNF protein. Twenty-four hours after gene transfection, RT-PCR was used to detect expression of BDNF mRNA in the BMSCs. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine expression of BDNF protein in the BMSCs.RESULTS: BDNF protein expression was detected at day 1 after gene transfection

  8. Neurodegeneration med jernakkumulation i hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Maria; Hansen, Lars Kjærsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of syndromes. Whereas NBIA1 (panto-thenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration) has been known since 1922, some of the other diseases in the NBIA group have just been known for a few years. We present the case of a 16-......-year-old man who recently was diagnosed with NBIA4. He had had neurodegenerative symptoms since he was eight years old. The typical MRI findings in the basal ganglia were important in diagnosing NBIA. Furthermore gait analysis and specific genetic testing were performed....

  9. Neurodegeneration in the diabetic eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Bandello, F;

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates in the develop......Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates...

  10. [Construction of a recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene and research on it's target gene TLR4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Xu, Guang-xian; Jia, Wei; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Yi-lin; Zhao, Zhi-jun; Wei, Jun

    2012-02-01

    To construct the recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene, which can express mature miR-21 efficiently, and to study the interaction of miR- 21 with its target gene TLR4. Using healthy mouse's gDNA as template, the primary miR-21 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into a shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV. Constructed plasmid was sequenced and linearized for homologous recombination with pAdEasy-1 vector in BJ5183 bacteria. The recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene was used to challenge HeLa cell. The candidate target gene of miR-21 was determined by miRNA analysis databases. The expression level of TLR4 protein was detected by western blotting. Through the PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, DNA sequencing and expression of GFP, recombinant adenoviral vector pri-miR-21 gene was constructed successfully. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a few possible binding sites between miR-21 and TLR4. Results showed that miR-21 down-regulated TLR4 at protein levels. The recombinant adenoviral vector containing pri- miR-21 was successfully constructed. miR-21 gene interfered with the expression of TLR4 target gene.

  11. Spatial mapping of gene expression in the salivary glands of the dengue vector mosquito, aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolucci Pimenta Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the main vectors of dengue viruses to humans. Understanding their biology and interactions with the pathogen are prerequisites for development of dengue transmission control strategies. Mosquito salivary glands are organs involved directly in pathogen transmission to vertebrate hosts. Information on the spatial distribution of gene expression in these organs is expected to assist in the development of novel disease control strategies, including those that entail the release of transgenic mosquitoes with impaired vector competence. Results We report here the hybridization in situ patterns of 30 transcripts expressed in the salivary glands of adult Ae. aegypti females. Distinct spatial accumulation patterns were identified. The products of twelve genes are localized exclusively in the proximal-lateral lobes. Among these, three accumulate preferentially in the most anterior portion of the proximal-lateral lobe. This pattern revealed a salivary gland cell type previously undescribed in Ae. aegypti, which was validated by transmission electron microscopy. Five distinct gene products accumulate in the distal-lateral lobes and another five localize in the medial lobe. Seven transcripts are found in the distal-lateral and medial lobes. The transcriptional product of one gene accumulates in proximal- and distal-lateral lobes. Seven genes analyzed by quantitative PCR are expressed constitutively. The most abundant salivary gland transcripts are those localized within the proximal-lateral lobes, while previous work has shown that the distal-lateral lobes are the most active in protein synthesis. This incongruity suggests a role for translational regulation in mosquito saliva production. Conclusions Transgenic mosquitoes with reduced vector competence have been proposed as tools for the control of dengue virus transmission. Expression of anti-dengue effector molecules in the distal-lateral lobes of Ae

  12. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  13. A top-down approach for construction of hybrid polymer-virus gene delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Vu, Halong N; Pack, Daniel W

    2010-05-21

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids remains the primary hurdle for human gene therapy. While many researchers have attempted to re-engineer viruses to be suited for gene delivery, others have sought to develop non-viral alternatives. We have developed a complementary approach in which viral and synthetic components are combined to form hybrid nanoparticulate vectors. In particular, we complexed non-infectious retrovirus-like particles lacking a viral envelope protein, from Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-VLP) or human immunodeficiency virus (H-VLP), with poly-L-lysine (PLL) or polyethylenimine (PEI) over a range of polymer/VLP ratios. At appropriate stoichiometry (75-250 microg polymer/10(6) VLP), the polymers replace the function of the viral envelope protein and interact with the target cell membrane, initiate cellular uptake and facilitate escape from endocytic vesicles. The viral particle, once in the cytosol, efficiently completes its normal infection process including integration of viral genes with the host genome as demonstrated by long-term (at least 5 weeks) transgene expression. In addition, hybrid vectors comprising H-VLP were shown to be capable of infecting non-dividing cells.

  14. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan;

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et et, 2014a), we showed the use of integrase......% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded 'all-in-one' IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell based gene therapies.......-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZEN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology...

  15. Evaluating baculovirus as a vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Swift

    Full Text Available Gene therapy represents an attractive strategy for the non-invasive treatment of prostate cancer, where current clinical interventions show limited efficacy. Here, we evaluate the use of the insect virus, baculovirus (BV, as a novel vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy. Since prostate tumours represent a heterogeneous environment, a therapeutic approach that achieves long-term regression must be capable of targeting multiple transformed cell populations. Furthermore, discrimination in the targeting of malignant compared to non-malignant cells would have value in minimising side effects. We employed a number of prostate cancer models to analyse the potential for BV to achieve these goals. In vitro, both traditional prostate cell lines as well as primary epithelial or stromal cells derived from patient prostate biopsies, in two- or three-dimensional cultures, were used. We also evaluated BV in vivo in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. BV was capable of preferentially transducing invasive malignant prostate cancer cell lines compared to early stage cancers and non-malignant samples, a restriction that was not a function of nuclear import. Of more clinical relevance, primary patient-derived prostate cancer cells were also efficiently transduced by BV, with robust rates observed in epithelial cells of basal phenotype, which expressed BV-encoded transgenes faster than epithelial cells of a more differentiated, luminal phenotype. Maximum transduction capacity was observed in stromal cells. BV was able to penetrate through three-dimensional structures, including in vitro spheroids and in vivo orthotopic xenografts. BV vectors containing a nitroreductase transgene in a gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy approach were capable of efficiently killing malignant prostate targets following administration of the pro-drug, CB1954. Thus, BV is capable of transducing a large proportion of prostate cell types within a heterogeneous 3-D prostate

  16. [Construction of plant expression vectors harboring a peptide antibiotic-apidaecin gene and resistance analysis of the transgenic tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Sun, C; Peng, X X

    2001-07-01

    Two plant expression vectors(pBinPRHbI and pBinPRSIHbI) were constructed: Firstly, apidaecin gene were fused to the signal peptide coding sequencing of a PR-protein, and cloned into a binary vector pBin438 to form pBinPRHbI. Then, the cassette consisting of 35S promoter, PR signal peptide coding sequencing and apidaecin gene was cut off from pBinPRHbI and inserted into another plant expression vector pBinPRSI to produce a bivalent plant expression vector pBinPRSIHbI. pBinPRSI was constructed previously in our lab and contained PR signal peptide and Shiva-I fusion gene under control of 35S promoter. The three plant expression vectors were introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The positive rate of PCR was 95% in all putative transgenic plants. Results from Southern blot indicated that foreign genes were integrated into tobacco genome and RT-PCR analysis proved that the foreign gene was transcribed in transgenic tobacco. The transgenic tobacco showed higher resistance to P. syringae pv tabaci, the causal agent of tobacco wild fire disease, than their original cultivars. From the disease index, the transgenic plants carrying apidaecin and Shiva-I genes had highest resistance among three kinds of transgenic plants, and the plants carrying Shiva-I gene alone had lowest resistance.

  17. Knowledge-based analysis of microarray gene expression data by using support vector machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Grundy; Manuel Ares, Jr.; David Haussler

    2001-06-18

    The authors introduce a method of functionally classifying genes by using gene expression data from DNA microarray hybridization experiments. The method is based on the theory of support vector machines (SVMs). SVMs are considered a supervised computer learning method because they exploit prior knowledge of gene function to identify unknown genes of similar function from expression data. SVMs avoid several problems associated with unsupervised clustering methods, such as hierarchical clustering and self-organizing maps. SVMs have many mathematical features that make them attractive for gene expression analysis, including their flexibility in choosing a similarity function, sparseness of solution when dealing with large data sets, the ability to handle large feature spaces, and the ability to identify outliers. They test several SVMs that use different similarity metrics, as well as some other supervised learning methods, and find that the SVMs best identify sets of genes with a common function using expression data. Finally, they use SVMs to predict functional roles for uncharacterized yeast ORFs based on their expression data.

  18. Assessing recovery from neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia 1: Comparison of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy with motor testing, gene expression and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; Kittelson, Emily; Demirgöz, Döne; Rainwater, Orion; Eberly, Lynn E; Orr, Harry T; Clark, H Brent

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of transgene expression in a conditional transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1) reverses the Purkinje cell pathology and motor dysfunction that are hallmarks of SCA1. We previously showed that cerebellar neurochemical levels measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) correlate with progression of pathology and clinical status of patients and that abnormal neurochemical levels normalize upon suppression of transgene expression, indicating their potential as robust surrogate markers of treatment effects. Here we investigated the relative sensitivities of MRS, histology, transgene expression and motor behavioral testing to disease reversal in conditional SCA1 mice. Transgene expression was suppressed by doxycycline administration and treated and untreated mice were assessed by MRS at 9.4tesla before and after treatment and with an accelerating Rotarod, histology and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for ataxin-1 transgene expression following doxycycline treatment. The MRS-measured N-acetylaspartate-to-myo-inositol ratio (NAA/Ins) correlated significantly with the molecular layer (ML) thickness and transgene expression. NAA/Ins, ML thickness and transgene expression were highly significantly different between the treated vs. untreated groups (p<0.0001), while the Rotarod assessment showed a trend for treatment effect. MRS, qPCR and histology had high sensitivity/specificity to distinguish treated from untreated mice, all with areas under the curve (AUC)=0.97-0.98 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, while Rotarod had significantly lower sensitivity and specificity (AUC=0.72). Therefore, MRS accurately reflects the extent of recovery from neurodegeneration with sensitivity similar to invasive measures, further validating its potential as a surrogate marker in pre-clinical and clinical treatment trials.

  19. Chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery vectors targeting osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huading; Dai, Yuhu; Lv, Lulu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP)/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS) with a low molecular weight (Mw) PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa). Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w). The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes.

  20. Gene discovery for the bark beetle-vectored fungal tree pathogen Grosmannia clavigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grosmannia clavigera is a bark beetle-vectored fungal pathogen of pines that causes wood discoloration and may kill trees by disrupting nutrient and water transport. Trees respond to attacks from beetles and associated fungi by releasing terpenoid and phenolic defense compounds. It is unclear which genes are important for G. clavigera's ability to overcome antifungal pine terpenoids and phenolics. Results We constructed seven cDNA libraries from eight G. clavigera isolates grown under various culture conditions, and Sanger sequenced the 5' and 3' ends of 25,000 cDNA clones, resulting in 44,288 high quality ESTs. The assembled dataset of unique transcripts (unigenes consists of 6,265 contigs and 2,459 singletons that mapped to 6,467 locations on the G. clavigera reference genome, representing ~70% of the predicted G. clavigera genes. Although only 54% of the unigenes matched characterized proteins at the NCBI database, this dataset extensively covers major metabolic pathways, cellular processes, and genes necessary for response to environmental stimuli and genetic information processing. Furthermore, we identified genes expressed in spores prior to germination, and genes involved in response to treatment with lodgepole pine phloem extract (LPPE. Conclusions We provide a comprehensively annotated EST dataset for G. clavigera that represents a rich resource for gene characterization in this and other ophiostomatoid fungi. Genes expressed in response to LPPE treatment are indicative of fungal oxidative stress response. We identified two clusters of potentially functionally related genes responsive to LPPE treatment. Furthermore, we report a simple method for identifying contig misassemblies in de novo assembled EST collections caused by gene overlap on the genome.

  1. Development of a novel plasmid as a shuttle vector for heterologous gene expression in Mycoplasma yeatsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Bethany N; Foecking, Mark F; Calcutt, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    A circular plasmid, pMyBK1, was detected in Mycoplasma yeatsii strain GIH(T). Analysis of the sequence of the 3432-bp replicon identified two predicted open reading frames (ORFs), one with sequence similarity to multiple plasmid mobilization proteins and one that matches only to hypothetical ORFs encoded by integrated chromosomal elements in the sequenced genomes of two Mycoplasma species. Shuttle vectors were constructed in Escherichia coli which could be introduced into M. yeatsii at high efficiency (10(4)-10(5) per μg DNA) by electroporation. Independent deletion analysis of the two ORFs disclosed that whereas mob was dispensable, orf2 was necessary for plasmid replication or maintenance. The absence of plasmid-encoded database matches for ORF2 indicates that pMyBK1 represents a novel plasmid family. One shuttle vector was used to demonstrate heterologous expression of the Mycoplasma fermentans malp gene and was stable during multiple passages. The host-plasmid system described has potential application for genetic manipulation in a genus for which few replicative vectors are available.

  2. Gene transfer to hepatocellular carcinoma: transduction efficacy and transgene expression kinetics by using retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolami, R; Uch, R; Jordier, F; Chapel, S; Bagnis, C; Bréchot, C; Mannoni, P

    2000-09-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive therapy for hepatocarcinoma, and several approaches have been studied using murine leukemia virus-derived retroviruses. We compared gene transfer efficacy and transgene expression kinetics after transduction of hepatocarcinoma cell lines using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vectors and HIV-derived lentiviral vectors. First, we showed that both retroviral and lentiviral vectors efficiently transduce cycling hepatocarcinoma cell lines in vitro. However, after cell cycle arrest, transduction efficacy remained the same for lentiviral vectors but it decreased by 80% for retroviral vectors. Second, we studied EGFP expression kinetics using lentiviral vectors expressing EGFP under the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerolkinase (PGK) promoter. We show that the CMV promoter allows a stronger EGFP expression than the PGK promoter. However, in contrast to PGK-driven EGFP expression, which persists up to 2 months after transduction, CMV-driven EGFP expression rapidly decreased with time. This phenomenon is due to promoter silencing, and EGFP expression can be restored in transduced cells by using transcription activators such as interleukin-6 or phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin and, to a lesser extent, the demethylating agent 5'-azacytidine. Altogether, our results suggest that lentiviral vectors, which allow efficient transduction of hepatocarcinoma cell lines with a strong and a sustained expression according to the promoter used, are promising tools for gene therapy of hepatocarcinomas.

  3. An Adenovirus Vector Containing the Suicide Gene Thymidine Kinase for a Broad Application in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães GS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancer using gene therapy is based on adding a property to the cell leading to its elimination. One possibility is the use of suicide genes that code for enzymes that transform a pro-drug into a cytotoxic product. The most extensively used is the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK gene, followed by administration of the antiviral drug ganciclovir (GCV. The choice of the promoter to drive the transcription of a transgene is one of the determinants of a given transfer vector usefulness, as different promoters show different efficiencies depending on the target cell type. In the experiments presented here, we report the construction of a recombinant adenovirus carrying TK gene (Ad-TK driven by three strong promoters (P CMV IE, SV40 and EN1 and its effectiveness in two cell types. Human HeLa and mouse CCR2 tumor cells were transduced with Ad-TK and efficiently killed after addition of GCV. We could detect two sizes of transcripts of TK gene, one derived from the close together P CMV IE/SV40 promoters and the other from the 1.5 Kb downstream EN1 promoter. The relative amounts of these transcripts were different in each cell type thus indicating a higher flexibility of this system.

  4. A translatable, closed recirculation system for AAV6 vector-mediated myocardial gene delivery in the large animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, JaBaris D; Katz, Michael G; White, Jennifer D; Thesier, Danielle M; Henderson, Armen; Stedman, Hansell H; Bridges, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Current strategies for managing congestive heart failure are limited, validating the search for an alternative treatment modality. Gene therapy holds tremendous promise as both a practical and translatable technology platform. Its effectiveness is evidenced by the improvements in cardiac function observed in vector-mediated therapeutic transgene delivery to the murine myocardium. A large animal model validating these results is the likely segue into clinical application. However, controversy still exists regarding a suitable method of vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery that provides for efficient, global gene transfer to the large animal myocardium that is also clinically translatable and practical. Intramyocardial injection and catheter-based coronary delivery techniques are attractive alternatives with respect to their clinical applicability; yet, they are fraught with numerous challenges, including concerns regarding collateral gene expression in other organs, low efficiency of vector delivery to the myocardium, inhomogeneous expression, and untoward immune response secondary to gene delivery. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) delivery with dual systemic and isolated cardiac circuitry precludes these drawbacks and has the added advantage of allowing for control of the pharmacological milieu, multiple pass recirculation through the coronary circulation, the selective addition of endothelial permeabilizing agents, and an increase in vector residence time. Collectively, these mechanics significantly improve the efficiency of global, vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery to the large animal myocardium, highlighting a potential therapeutic strategy to be extended to some heart failure patients.

  5. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu

    Combination drug and gene therapy shows promise in cancer treatment. However, the success of such strategy requires careful selection of the therapeutic agents, as well as development of efficient delivery vectors. BENSpm (N 1, N11-bisethylnorspermine), a polyamine analogue targeting the intracellular polyamine pathway, draws our special attention because of the following reasons: (1) polyamine pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancer; (2) BENSpm exhibits multiple functions to interfere with the polyamine pathway, such as to up-regulate polyamine metabolism enzymes and down-regulate polyamine biosynthesis enzymes. Therefore BENSpm depletes all natural polyamines and leads to apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in a wide range of cancers; (3) preclinical studies proved that BENSpm can act synergistically with various chemotherapy agents, making it a promising candidate in combination therapy; (4) multiple positive charges in BENSpm enable it as a suitable building block for cationic polymers, which can be further applied to gene delivery. In this dissertation, our goal was to design dual-function delivery vector based on BENSpm that can function as a gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as an active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We first demonstrated strong synergism between BENSpm and a potential therapeutic gene product TRAIL. Strong synergism was obtained in both estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant dose reduction of TRAIL in combination with BENSpm in MDA-MB-231 cells, together with the fact that BENSpm rendered MCF-7 cells more sensitive to TRAIL treatment verified our rationale of designing BENSpm-based delivery platform. This was expected to be beneficial for overcoming drug resistance in chemotherapy, as well as boosting the therapeutic effect of therapeutic genes. We first designed a lipid-based BENSpm dual vector (Lipo

  6. The emerging role of viral vectors as vehicles for DMD gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Ignazio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-05-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The DMD gene, spanning over 2.4 megabases along the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21.2), is the largest genetic locus known in the human genome. The size of DMD, combined with the complexity of the DMD phenotype and the extent of the affected tissues, begs for the development of novel, ideally complementary, therapeutic approaches. Genome editing based on the delivery of sequence-specific programmable nucleases into dystrophin-defective cells has recently enriched the portfolio of potential therapies under investigation. Experiments involving different programmable nuclease platforms and target cell types have established that the application of genome-editing principles to the targeted manipulation of defective DMD loci can result in the rescue of dystrophin protein synthesis in gene-edited cells. Looking towards translation into the clinic, these proof-of-principle experiments have been swiftly followed by the conversion of well-established viral vector systems into delivery agents for DMD editing. These gene-editing tools consist of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered homing endoculeases (HEs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) based on clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 systems. Here, we succinctly review these fast-paced developments and technologies, highlighting their relative merits and potential bottlenecks, when used as part of in vivo and ex vivo gene-editing strategies.

  7. Introduction of Foreign Genes into Silkworm Eggs by Electroporation and Its Application in Transgenic Vector Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Yang GUO; Liang DONG; Sheng-Peng WANG; Ting-Qing GUO; Jian-Yang WANG; Chang-De LU

    2004-01-01

    Electroporation as a methodology to introduce foreign genes into silkworm eggs was systematically analyzed. The foreign gene in both the newly hatched and 3rd instar larva DNA can be detected by PCR. The amount of foreign gene in 3rd instar larva DNA was about 1/1000 of that in newly hatched larva DNA. The ratio of foreign gene entering into silkworm eggs was voltage dependent and showed significant difference between the tested silkworm strains. When the piggyBac transposon system was applied, the effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide and the in vitro transcribed transposase mRNA on the transposition rate has been measured. Results showed that the in vitro transcribed transposase mRNA facilitated trans-position to take place earlier and NLS could result in higher transposition probability and earlier transposition as well. When linearized vectors containing varied length of flanking homologous sequences around a reporter gene were introduced into silkworm eggs by electroporation, the one with 2.6 kb total arm length gave higher G1 positive ratio than that with total arm length of 1.5 kb and 800 bp.

  8. New vectors in fission yeast: application for cloning the his2 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weilguny, D; Praetorius, M; Carr, Alan;

    1991-01-01

    We describe a new Escherichia coli vector (pON5) that allows positive selection for recombinant clones. In this plasmid, the bla gene from pBR322 is permanently active, whereas the neo gene from transposon Tn5 is repressed by the cI-encoded lambda repressor. When DNA is inserted into the Bc...... of transforming Sc. pombe ura4 strains, as well as ura 3 strains of the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used pON163 for the construction of two fission yeast genomic libraries. From these gene banks clones were isolated that were able to complement fission yeast his2 mutants....../I or HindIII restriction sites situated within the cI gene, the neo gene becomes transcribed from the lambda pR promoter. We have also made a Schizosaccharomyces pombe derivative of pON5 (= pON163) by introducing the fission yeast ars1 and ura4+ sequences. We show that this plasmid is capable...

  9. Construction of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in human neurenergen-3 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangli Wang; Haili Wang; Baojie Mi

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research of transgene brings hope for gene therapy of various diseases; in addition, some projects have been tested in clinic. Recently, the focus has been to find an ideal vehicle and a suitable therapeutic gene.OBJECTIVE: To explore an effective way to construct recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expression in human neurnnergen-3 gene. DESIGN: Gene directed cloning.SETTING: Central Laboratory of Northern China Coal Medical College.MATERIALS: DH5a competent bacillus coli strain was provided by Capital Medical University; pCDNA3-NT-3 by professor Chen from Bengbu Medical College; pAAV-Laze, pAAV-Helper, pAAV-RC and pAAV-MCS plasmids by Capital Medical University; HEK293 cells by Cell Center of Basic Medical College of Tongji Medical University.METHODS: NT-3 genes which were selected from pCDNA3-NT-3 plasmids were cloned in pAAV-MCS to form a recombinant adeno-associated viral plasmid (pAAV-NT-3). pAAV-NT-3, pAAV-RC, pAAV-LacZ and pHelper plasmids were extracted, purified and subjected to enzyme-shearing evaluation. In addition, pAAV-NT-3 and pAAV-LacZ were cotransfected with pHelper and pAAV-RC, respectively into AVV-293 cells with DNA mediated by calcium superphosphate transfection gene; and then, AVV-293 cells were packed into recombinant adeno-associated viral rAAV-NT-3 and rAAV-LacZ. After collection of viral particles, rAAV-LacZ viral stock solution was diluted based on ratio of 10:1 and the mixture was used to infect HT1080 cells. X-gal stain was used to measure virus liter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size of targeted gene fragments, validity of vehicle construction and virus liter.RESULTS: Targeted gene NT-3 was successfully inserted into the relative vehicle pAAV and pAAV-NT-3 was correctly recongnized by enzyme-shearing evaluation. Enzyme-shearing electrophoresis demonstrated that pAAV-NT-3, pAAV-RC, pAAV-LacZ and pHelper plasmids were successfully extracted and purified.β-galactoside staining in situ indicated that LacZ genes were

  10. Optimization of vesicular stomatitis virus-G pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus vector for minimized cytotoxicity with efficient gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Jin; Lee, Boyoung; Chang, Jin Woo; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Lee, Heuiran

    2003-05-01

    FIV-based lentiviral vector has shown a unique opportunity as an efficient gene delivery vehicle, especially to nondividing human cells. Here, we genetically reconstructed the FIV-based vector by serially deleting residual virus genes of gag and vif, leading to minimized cytotoxicity together with efficient virus production and gene transfer. The modified FIV- based vector was generated by transiently transfecting 293T cells with three plasmids of the gene transfer vector with minimal gag region, the packaging plasmid without vif and the VSV-G-expressing plasmid. The vector was routinely generated as many as 1 x 10(7) transducing particles per ml and easily concentrated by simple centrifugation. The cytotoxic effect significantly decreased in sensitive cells to FIV infection even at high multiplicity of infection (MOI), such as 500. Moreover, the transduction efficiency was consistently retained after cell cycle was arrested in a variety of human cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the modified VSV-G pseudotyped FIV-based vector efficiently transduce dividing and nondividing human cells with minimal cytotoxicity.

  11. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  12. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  13. A SINGLE TETRACYCLINE-REGULATED VECTOR DEVISED FOR CONTROLLED INSULIN GENE EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-yang Zhang; Ben-li Su; Hong Li; Ran Bai; Zhao-hui Xu; Chang-chen Li

    2004-01-01

    Objective To construct a single plasmid vector mediating doxycycline-inducible recombined human insulin gene expression in myotube cell line.Methods An expression cassette of rtTAnls driven by promoter of human cytomegalovirus and a furin-cuttable recom bined human insulin expression cassette driven by a reverse poly-tetO DNA motif were cloned into a single plasmid vector (prTR-tetO-mINS). The prTR-tetO-mINS and pLNCX were co-transfected into a myotube cell line (C2C12) and pLNCX vector were used as a control. After selection with G418, the transfected cells were induced with doxycycline at concentrations of 0, 2, and 10 μg/mL. RT-PCR was used to determine expression levels of recombinant insulin mRNA at the 5th day.Insulin production in cell cultures medium (at different incubation time) and cell extracts (at the 7th day) were analyzed with human pro/insulin RIA kits.Results Immune reactive insulin (IRI) level in cell medium was found increased at 24 hours of doxycycline incubation,and still increased at the 5th day. After withdrawn of doxycycline, IRI decreased sharply and was at baseline three days later. IRI and human insulin mRNA levels were positively related to different levels of doxycycline. A 25-fold increase in IRI was found against background expression at the 7th day.Conclusion Human insulin expression can be successfully regulated by doxycycline and the background was very low.This single ret-on insulin expression system may provide a new approach to a controlled insulin gene therapy in skeletal muscle.

  14. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Baker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX, which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon, pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX, or alternatively, through the use of polymer

  15. The population genetics of using homing endonuclease genes in vector and pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredec, Anne; Burt, Austin; Godfray, H C J

    2008-08-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) encode proteins that in the heterozygous state cause double-strand breaks in the homologous chromosome at the precise position opposite the HEG. If the double-strand break is repaired using the homologous chromosome, the HEG becomes homozygous, and this represents a powerful genetic drive mechanism that might be used as a tool in managing vector or pest populations. HEGs may be used to decrease population fitness to drive down population densities (possibly causing local extinction) or, in disease vectors, to knock out a gene required for pathogen transmission. The relative advantages of HEGs that target viability or fecundity, that are active in one sex or both, and whose target is expressed before or after homing are explored. The conditions under which escape mutants arise are also analyzed. A different strategy is to place HEGs on the Y chromosome that cause one or more breaks on the X chromosome and so disrupt sex ratio. This strategy can cause severe sex-ratio biases with efficiencies that depend on the details of sperm competition and zygote mortality. This strategy is probably less susceptible to escape mutants, especially when multiple X shredders are used.

  16. [Aspirin-PEI-beta-CyD as a novel non-viral vector for gene transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Ren; Chen, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2009-01-01

    To develop a novel non-viral gene delivery vector based on PEI-beta-CyD as backbone modified with aspirin, and to identify its physicochemical characters. 1, 1-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) was used to bind aspirin onto PEI-beta-CyD to form PEI-beta-CyD-ASP. (1)H-NMR, FT-IR, UV and XRD were used to confirm the polymer structure. The ability of condensation was demonstrated by gel retardation assay. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability in B16, Hela and A293 cell lines. Transfection efficiency of the polymer was tested in B16 cells. The structure of PEI-beta-CyD-ASP was confirmed by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR, UV and XRD, which efficiently condensed plasmid DNA at the N/P ratio of 4. The copolymer showed low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in B16 cells. The synthesized aspirin-PEI-beta-CyD might be a potential gene delivery vector.

  17. TALEN-based gene disruption in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Aryan

    Full Text Available In addition to its role as the primary vector for dengue viruses, Aedes aegypti has a long history as a genetic model organism for other bloodfeeding mosquitoes, due to its ease of colonization, maintenance and reproductive productivity. Though its genome has been sequenced, functional characterization of many Ae. aegypti genes, pathways and behaviors has been slow. TALE nucleases (TALENs have been used with great success in a number of organisms to generate site-specific DNA lesions. We evaluated the ability of a TALEN pair to target the Ae. aegypti kmo gene, whose protein product is essential in the production of eye pigmentation. Following injection into pre-blastoderm embryos, 20-40% of fertile survivors produced kmo alleles that failed to complement an existing kh(w mutation. Most of these individuals produced more than 20% white-eyed progeny, with some producing up to 75%. Mutant alleles were associated with lesions of 1-7 bp specifically at the selected target site. White-eyed individuals could also be recovered following a blind intercross of G1 progeny, yielding several new white-eyed strains in the genetic background of the sequenced Liverpool strain. We conclude that TALENs are highly active in the Ae. aegypti germline, and have the potential to transform how reverse genetic experiments are performed in this important disease vector.

  18. TALEN-based gene disruption in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Azadeh; Anderson, Michelle A E; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as the primary vector for dengue viruses, Aedes aegypti has a long history as a genetic model organism for other bloodfeeding mosquitoes, due to its ease of colonization, maintenance and reproductive productivity. Though its genome has been sequenced, functional characterization of many Ae. aegypti genes, pathways and behaviors has been slow. TALE nucleases (TALENs) have been used with great success in a number of organisms to generate site-specific DNA lesions. We evaluated the ability of a TALEN pair to target the Ae. aegypti kmo gene, whose protein product is essential in the production of eye pigmentation. Following injection into pre-blastoderm embryos, 20-40% of fertile survivors produced kmo alleles that failed to complement an existing kh(w) mutation. Most of these individuals produced more than 20% white-eyed progeny, with some producing up to 75%. Mutant alleles were associated with lesions of 1-7 bp specifically at the selected target site. White-eyed individuals could also be recovered following a blind intercross of G1 progeny, yielding several new white-eyed strains in the genetic background of the sequenced Liverpool strain. We conclude that TALENs are highly active in the Ae. aegypti germline, and have the potential to transform how reverse genetic experiments are performed in this important disease vector.

  19. Modification of a viral satellite DNA-based gene silencing vector and its application to leaf or flower color change in Petunia hybrida

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Xiaorong; QIAN Yajuan; ZHOU Xueping

    2006-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing offers a powerful reverse-genetic tool for the study of gene function in plants. We have previously reported effective gene silencing of plant genes using a viral satellite DNA associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). In this study, we further modified the viral satellite DNA-based vector. The modified vector can induce sulfu (Su) gene silencing as effective as the original vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, but the new system simplifies procedures for construction of vector derivative. Furthermore, a fragment of petunia Su or chalcone synthase (CHS) endogenous gene was inserted into the modified vector. When petunia plants were agro- inoculated with the modified vector carrying a Su or CHS gene, the Su silenced plants started to appear yellowing in veins of systemically infected upper leaves two weeks after agroinoculation, while the CHS silenced plants started to show flower color change one month after agroinoculation and later single-color flowers became mosaic.

  20. Efficiency for Gene Silencing Induction in Nicotiana Species by a Viral Satellite DNA Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Ping Xu; Lu-Ping Zheng; Qiu-Fang Xu; Chang-Chun Wang; Xue-Ping Zhou; Zu-Jian Wu; Xin-Zhong Cai

    2007-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a useful technique for rapid plant gene function analysis.We recently reported a new VIGS vector modified from Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) DNAβ (DNAm β).In this study we compared In detail DNAmβ-induced gene silencing in four Nicotiana species including N.benthamiana, N.glutinosa, N.tabacum and N.paniculata.We found that DNAmβ-induced gene silencing in the four species was distinct in developing dynamics, tissue specificity, efficiency, and constancy in the plant life span.It was most efficient in N.benthamiana, where development of VIGS was most rapid, without tissue specificity and nearly 100% efficient.DNAmβ-induced gene silencing in N.Glutinosa was also efficient despite being slightly less than in N.benthamiana.It initially occurred in veins, later was scattered to mesophyll, finally led to complete silencing in whole leaves.In both species, VIGS constantly expressed until the plants died.However, DNAmβ-mediated VIGS in the other two Nicotiana species, N.tabacum and N.paniculata, was significantly less efficient.It was strictly limited within the veins of the silenced leaves, and constantly occurred only over 3-4 weeks.The upper leaves that emerged later stopped showing the silencing phenotype, DNAm β-induced gene silencing in N.benthamiana and N.glutinosa was not significantly influenced by the growth stage when the plants were agro-inoculated,and was not sensitive to high growth temperature up to 32℃, Our results indicate that this system has great potential as a versatile VIGS system for routine functional analysis of genes in some Nicotiana species.

  1. A RGD-Containing Oligopeptide (K)16GRGDSPC: A Novel Vector for Integrin-Mediated Targeted Gene Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Haitao; ZHENG Qixin; GUO Xiaodong; LIU Yong; LI Changwen; SONG Yulin

    2006-01-01

    A 23 amino acid, bifunctional integrin-targeted synthetic oligopeptide was evaluated for ex vivo gene delivery to rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Synthesis of the peptide (K)16GRGDSPC was performed on a solid-phase batch peptide synthesizer. BMSCs were transfected with plasmid DNA coding for luciferase by (K)16GRGDSPC and the transfection efficiency was assayed. The influences of chloroquine and polyethyleneimine on the transfection efficiency were also examined. The target specificity of (K)16GRGDSPC to mediate exogenous gene into BMSCs was analyzed using cell attachment test and gene delivery inhibition test. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of the oligopeptide vector was lower than that of Lipofectamine. But in the presence of endosomal buffer chloroquine or endosomal disrupting agent polyethyleneimine, the transfection efficiency of the vector was greatly enhanced. In addition, RGD-containing peptides inhibited BMSCs' attachment to the 96-well plates pretreated with fibronectin or vitronectin and significantly decreased the transfection efficiency of the oligopeptide vector. These studies demonstrated that oligopeptide (K)16GRGDSPC was an ideal novel targeted non-viral gene delivery vector, which was easy to be synthesized, high efficient and low cytotoxicity. The vector could effectively deliver exogenous gene into rat BMSCs.

  2. Part I: Minicircle vector technology limits DNA size restrictions on ex vivo gene delivery using nanoparticle vectors: Overcoming a translational barrier in neural stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplant populations offer key benefits in regenerative neurology, for release of therapeutic biomolecules in ex vivo gene therapy. NSCs are 'hard-to-transfect' but amenable to 'magnetofection'. Despite the high clinical potential of this approach, the low and transient transfection associated with the large size of therapeutic DNA constructs is a critical barrier to translation. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA minicircles (small DNA vectors encoding essential gene expression components but devoid of a bacterial backbone, thereby reducing construct size versus conventional plasmids) deployed with magnetofection achieve the highest, safe non-viral DNA transfection levels (up to 54%) reported so far for primary NSCs. Minicircle-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated gene delivery also resulted in sustained gene expression for up to four weeks. All daughter cell types of engineered NSCs (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were transfected (in contrast to conventional plasmids which usually yield transfected astrocytes only), offering advantages for targeted cell engineering. In addition to enhancing MNP functionality as gene delivery vectors, minicircle technology provides key benefits from safety/scale up perspectives. Therefore, we consider the proof-of-concept of fusion of technologies used here offers high potential as a clinically translatable genetic modification strategy for cell therapy.

  3. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF ADENOASSOCIATED VIRUS- BASED PLASMID EXPRESSING VECTORS CONTAINING hIL- 2 GENE OR mIFN-γ GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景迎; 梁宏立; 陈诗书

    2000-01-01

    Objective To improve the plasmid vectors in gene therapy, adeno - associated virus (AA V) based plasmid expressing vectors containing hIL-2 gene or mIFN-γ gene were constructed and its expression in transfected cells was studied. Methods By means of step to step cloning, promoter CMVp was placed at the downstream of 5' inverted terminal repeat from AA V (AA V- ITR) of pAP, hIL- 2 gene or mIFN- γ gene inserted into pAC between CMVp and poly A. Then intron A was inserted into pAC- hIL - 2 or pAC- mIFN- γ between CMVp and IL - 2 gene or IFNγ gene to construct pAI- hIL - 2 or pAI- mIFN - γ. Liposome -plasmid complexes were formed by mixing Dosper with these AAV-based plasmids containing hIL-2 gene or mIFN-γgene. Results High biological activities of IL - 2 or IFN- γ could be detected in the supernatants of NIH3T3 and MM45T. Li cells after transfection. Insertion of intron A into pAC-hIL-2 or pAC-mIFN-γ improved the expression of IL- 2 or IFN- γ. Conclusion These data demonstrated that the constructed AA V- based plasmid expressing vectors could efficiently express therapeutic genes in cultured cells and could be used as a nonviral gene transfer system in human gene therapy.

  4. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar Murlidharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9, which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137 in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities.

  5. Parameters selection in gene selection using Gaussian kernel support vector machines by genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In microarray-based cancer classification, gene selection is an important issue owing to the large number of variables and small number of samples as well as its non-linearity. It is difficult to get satisfying results by using conventional linear statistical methods. Recursive feature elimination based on support vector machine (SVM RFE) is an effective algorithm for gene selection and cancer classification, which are integrated into a consistent framework. In this paper, we propose a new method to select parameters of the aforementioned algorithm implemented with Gaussian kernel SVMs as better alternatives to the common practice of selecting the apparently best parameters by using a genetic algorithm to search for a couple of optimal parameter. Fast implementation issues for this method are also discussed for pragmatic reasons. The proposed method was tested on two representative hereditary breast cancer and acute leukaemia datasets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method performs well in selecting genes and achieves high classification accuracies with these genes.

  6. Intracranial gene delivery of LV-NAGLU vector corrects neuropathology in murine MPS IIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Carmela; Villani, Guglielmo R D; Di Napoli, Daniele; Nusco, Edoardo; Calì, Gaetano; Nitsch, Lucio; Di Natale, Paola

    2009-06-01

    Mucopolysacccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological involvement with high mortality. Although several therapeutic approaches have been applied to the murine model of the disease, no effective therapy is available for patients. In this study, we used the lentiviral-NAGLU vector to deliver the functional human NAGLU gene into the brain of young adult MPS IIIB mice. We report the restoration of active enzyme with a sustained expression throughout a large portion of the brain, and a significantly improved behavioral performance of treated animals. Moreover, we analyzed the effect of therapy on the expression profile of some genes related to neurotrophic signaling molecules and inflammatory cytokines previously found altered in MPS IIIB mice. At 1 month from treatment, the level of cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) was decreased while the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) expression was increased, both reaching normal values. At 6 months from treatment a significant reduction in the expression of all the inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes was observed, as well as the maintenance of the correction of the Bdnf gene expression. These results indicate that NAGLU delivery from intracerebral sources has the capacity to alleviate most disease manifestations in MPS IIIB mice; furthermore, Bdnf might be a response-to-therapy biomarker for MPS IIIB.

  7. Photoluminescent hyperbranched poly(amido amine) containing β-cyclodextrin as a nonviral gene delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhou, Linzhu; Pang, Yan; Huang, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Jiang, Xulin; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Chen, Qun

    2011-06-15

    Hyperbranched poly(amido amine)s (HPAAs) containing different amounts of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) (HPAA-CDs) were synthesized in one-pot by Michael addition copolymerization of N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide, 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, and mono-6-deoxy-6-ethylenediamino-β-CD. In comparison to pure HPAA, the fluorescence intensity of HPAA-CDs was enhanced significantly while the cytotoxicity became lower. Ascribed to plenty of amino groups and strong photoluminescence, HPAA-CDs could be used as nonviral gene delivery vectors, and the corresponding gene transfection was evaluated. The experimental results indicated that HPAA-CDs condensed the plasmid DNA very well. By utilizing the fluorescent properties of HPAA-CDs, the cellular uptake and gene transfection processes were tracked by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy without any fluorescent labeling. The transfection efficiencies of HPAA-CDs were similar to that of pure HPAA. In addition, the inner cavities of β-CDs in HPAA-CDs could be used to encapsulate drugs through host--guest interaction. Therefore, the HPAA-CDs may have potential application in the combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy.

  8. Escherichia coli gpt gene provides dominant selection for vaccinia virus open reading frame expression vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, F G; Moss, B

    1988-06-01

    Mycophenolic acid, an inhibitor of purine metabolism, was shown to block the replication of vaccinia virus in normal cell lines. This observation led to the development of a dominant one-step plaque selection system, based on expression of the Escherichia coli gpt gene, for the isolation of recombinant vaccinia viruses. Synthesis of xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enabled only the recombinant viruses to form large plaques in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid, xanthine, and hypoxanthine. To utilize the selection system efficiently, we constructed a series of plasmids that contain the E. coli gpt gene and allow insertion of foreign genes into multiple unique restriction endonuclease sites in all three reading frames between the translation initiation codon of a strong late promoter and synthetic translation termination sequences. The selection-expression cassette is flanked by vaccinia virus DNA that directs homologous recombination into the virus genome. The new vectors allow high-level expression of complete or partial open reading frames and rapid construction of recombinant viruses by facilitating the cloning steps and by simplifying their isolation. The system was tested by cloning the E. coli beta-galactosidase gene; in 24 h, this enzyme accounted for approximately 3.5% of the total infected-cell protein.

  9. The innate immune response transcription factor relish is necessary for neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew J; Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Wassarman, David A

    2013-05-01

    Neurodegeneration is a hallmark of the human disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is caused by mutation of the A-T mutated (ATM) gene. We have analyzed Drosophila melanogaster ATM mutants to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in A-T. Previously, we found that ATM mutants upregulate the expression of innate immune response (IIR) genes and undergo neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we present evidence that activation of the IIR is a cause of neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Three lines of evidence indicate that ATM mutations cause neurodegeneration by activating the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor Relish, a key regulator of the Immune deficiency (Imd) IIR signaling pathway. First, the level of upregulation of IIR genes, including Relish target genes, was directly correlated with the level of neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Second, Relish mutations inhibited upregulation of IIR genes and neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Third, overexpression of constitutively active Relish in glial cells activated the IIR and caused neurodegeneration. In contrast, we found that Imd and Dif mutations did not affect neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Imd encodes an activator of Relish in the response to gram-negative bacteria, and Dif encodes an immune responsive NF-κB transcription factor in the Toll signaling pathway. These data indicate that the signal that causes neurodegeneration in ATM mutants activates a specific NF-κB protein and does so through an unknown activator. In summary, these findings suggest that neurodegeneration in human A-T is caused by activation of a specific NF-κB protein in glial cells.

  10. Development of SyneBrick Vectors As a Synthetic Biology Platform for Gene Expression in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wook Jin; Lee, Sun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that are able to assimilate CO2 using solar energy and water. Metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria has suggested the possibility of direct CO2 conversion to value-added chemicals. However, engineering of cyanobacteria has been limited due to the lack of various genetic tools for expression and control of multiple genes to reconstruct metabolic pathways for biochemicals from CO2. Thus, we developed SyneBrick vectors as a synthetic biology platform for gene expression in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as a model cyanobacterium. The SyneBrick chromosomal integration vectors provide three inducible expression systems to control gene expression and three neutral sites for chromosomal integrations. Using a SyneBrick vector, LacI-regulated gene expression led to 24-fold induction of the eYFP reporter gene with 1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) inducer in S. elongatus PCC 7942 under 5% (v/v) CO2. TetR-regulated gene expression led to 19-fold induction of the GFP gene when 100 nM anhydrotetracycline (aTc) inducer was used. Gene expression decreased after 48 h due to degradation of aTc under light. T7 RNA polymerase-based gene expression resulted in efficient expression with a lower IPTG concentration than a previously developed pTrc promoter. A library of T7 promoters can be used for tunable gene expression. In summary, SyneBrick vectors were developed as a synthetic biology platform for gene expression in S. elongatus PCC 7942. These results will accelerate metabolic engineering of biosolar cell factories through expressing and controlling multiple genes of interest.

  11. Remission of invasive, cancer stem-like glioblastoma xenografts using lentiviral vector-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Huszthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. The translation of therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma from the experimental phase into the clinic has been limited by insufficient animal models, which lack important features of human tumors. Lentiviral gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic option for human glioblastoma, which we validated in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rodent xenograft model that recapitulates the invasive and angiogenic features of human glioblastoma to analyze the transduction pattern and therapeutic efficacy of lentiviral pseudotyped vectors. Both, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV-GP and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors very efficiently transduced human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, pseudotyped gammaretroviral vectors, similar to those evaluated for clinical therapy of glioblastoma, showed inefficient gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. Both pseudotyped lentiviral vectors transduced cancer stem-like cells characterized by their CD133-, nestin- and SOX2-expression, the ability to form spheroids in neural stem cell medium and to express astrocytic and neuronal differentiation markers under serum conditions. In a therapeutic approach using the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk fused to eGFP, both lentiviral vectors mediated a complete remission of solid tumors as seen on MRI resulting in a highly significant survival benefit (p<0.001 compared to control groups. In all recurrent tumors, surviving eGFP-positive tumor cells were found, advocating prodrug application for several cycles to even enhance and prolong the therapeutic effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, lentiviral pseudotyped vectors are promising candidates for gene therapy of glioma in patients. The inefficient gene delivery

  12. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing vectors based on Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV are used extensively in cereals to study gene function, but nearly all studies have been limited to genes expressed in leaves of barley and wheat. However since many important aspects of plant biology are based on root-expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species have created a need for tools to study gene function in these species. Results Here we demonstrate the successful BSMV-mediated virus induced gene silencing (VIGS of three different genes in barley roots, i.e. the barley homologues of the IPS1, PHR1, and PHO2 genes known to participate in Pi uptake and reallocation in Arabidopsis. Attempts to silence two other genes, the Pi transporter gene HvPht1;1 and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene HvCel1, in barley roots were unsuccessful, probably due to instability of the plant gene inserts in the viral vector. In B. distachyon leaves, significant silencing of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (BdPDS gene was obtained as shown by photobleaching as well as quantitative RT-PCR analysis. On the other hand, only very limited silencing of the oat AsPDS gene was observed in both hexaploid (A. sativa and diploid (A. strigosa oat. Finally, two modifications of the BSMV vector are presented, allowing ligation-free cloning of DNA fragments into the BSMV-γ component. Conclusions Our results show that BSMV can be used as a vector for gene silencing in barley roots and in B. distachyon leaves and possibly roots, opening up possibilities for using VIGS to study cereal root biology and to exploit the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too

  13. EasyClone 2.0: expanded toolkit of integrative vectors for stable gene expression in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borja, Gheorghe M; Forster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the key cell factories for production of chemicals and active pharmaceuticals. For large-scale fermentations, particularly in biorefinery applications, it is desirable to use stress-tolerant industrial strains. However, such strains are less amenable for metabolic engineering than the standard laboratory strains. To enable easy delivery and overexpression of genes in a wide range of industrial S. cerevisiae strains, we constructed a set of integrative vectors with long homology arms and dominant selection markers. The vectors integrate into previously validated chromosomal locations via double cross-over and result in homogenous stable expression of the integrated genes, as shown for several unrelated industrial strains. Cre-mediated marker rescue is possible for removing markers positioned on different chromosomes. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented vector set for metabolic engineering of industrial yeast, we constructed xylose-utilizing strains overexpressing xylose isomerase, xylose transporter and five genes of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  14. Bovine leukemia virus structural gene vectors are immunogenic and lack pathogenicity in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerova, L; Altanerova, V; Altaner, C; Boris-Lawrie, K

    1999-10-01

    Infection with a replication-competent bovine leukemia virus structural gene vector (BLV SGV) is an innovative vaccination approach to prevent disease by complex retroviruses. Previously we developed BLV SGV that constitutively expresses BLV gag, pol, and env and related cis-acting sequences but lacks tax, rex, RIII, and GIV and most of the BLV long terminal repeat sequences, including the cis-acting Tax and Rex response elements. The novel SGV virus is replication competent and replicates a selectable vector to a titer similar to that of the parental BLV in cell culture. The overall goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that infection with BLV SGV is nonpathogenic in rabbits. BLV infection of rabbits by inoculation of cell-free BLV or cell-associated BLV typically causes an immunodeficiency-like syndrome and death by 1 year postinfection. We sought to evaluate whether in vivo transfection of BLV provirus recapitulates pathogenic BLV infection and to compare BLV and BLV SGV with respect to infection, immunogenicity, and clinical outcome. Three groups of rabbits were subjected to in vivo transfection with BLV, BLV SGV, or negative control DNA. The results of our 20-month study indicate that in vivo transfection of rabbits with BLV recapitulates the fatal BLV infection produced by cell-free or cell-associated BLV. The BLV-infected rabbits exhibited sudden onset of clinical decline and immunodeficiency-like symptoms that culminated in death. BLV and BLV SGV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced similar levels of seroconversion to BLV structural proteins. However, BLV SGV exhibited a reduced proviral load and did not trigger the immunodeficiency-like syndrome. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BLV SGV is infectious and immunogenic and lacks BLV pathogenicity in rabbits, and they support the use of this modified proviral vector delivery system for vaccines against complex retroviruses like BLV.

  15. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassetzky Yegor S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418 and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo contains either a chloramphenicol or a kanamycin resistance gene and is unable to replicate in most E. coli strains as it contains a conditional R6Kγ replication origin. Introduction of the antibiotic resistance genes into the vector of interest is achieved by Cre-mediated recombination between the replication-incompetent pINS and a replication-competent target vector. The recombination mix is then transformed into E. coli and selected by the resistance marker (kanamycin or chloramphenicol present in pINS, which allows to recover the recombinant plasmids with 100% efficiency. Conclusion Here we propose a simple strategy that allows to introduce various antibiotic-resistance genes into any plasmid containing a replication origin, an ampicillin resistance gene and a loxP site.

  16. Cloning of HBsAg-encoded genes in different vectors and their expression in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Qin; Hong Tang; Lian-San Zhao; Fang He; Yong Lin; Li Liu; Xiao-Mei He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficiency of different plasmids as DNA vectors by cloning three HBsAg-encoded genes into two eukaryotic expression vectors, pRc/CMV and pSG5UTPL/Flag, and to express HBsAg S, MS, and LS proteins in SP2/0 cells, and to establish monoclone SP2/0 cell strains that are capable of expressing S or S2S proteins stably.METHODS: Segments of S, preS2-S, preS1-preS2-S genes of Hepatitis B virus were amplified by routine PCR and preS1S fragment was amplified by Over-Lap Extension PCR. The amplified segments were cleaved with restricted endonuclease Hind Ⅲ/Not Ⅰ followed by ligation with pRc/CMV, or BamHI/EcoR Ⅰ followed by ligation with pSG5UTPL/Flag. After the plasmid vectors were cleaved with the correspond enzymes, the amplified segments were inserted into pRc/CMV or pSGSUTPL/Flag plasmid vectors with T4DNA ligase. KOZAK sequence was added before the initial ATG code of each fragment using specific primer. The inserted segments in the recombinant plasmids were sequenced after subcloning. BALB/c mice myeloma cells (SP2/0 cell line) were transfected with the recombinant plasmids. The expressions of the different recombinants were compared by Western-blot, using a monoclonal anti-HBs antibody as the primary antibody and peroxidase-labeled multi-linker as the secondary. Stable SP2/0-pRc/CMV-S or SP2/0- pRc/CMV-MS clones were established through clone screening with G418.RESULTS: Fragments with anticipated size were harvested after PCR. After recombination and screening, the sequences of the inserted segments in the recombinants were confirmed to be S, preS2S, preSl-preS2S and preSlS encoding genes,determined by sequencing. The results of Western-blot hybridization were positive for the anticipated proteins.Among them, pRc/CMV-S or pRc/CMV-MS demonstrated the highest expressing their respective antigen.CONCLUSION: Eight recombinant plasmids expressing S,M, L or preSlS proteins are obtained. For hepatitis surface antigen expression in eukaryotic cells

  17. Novel recombinant binary vectors harbouring Basta (bar) gene as a plant selectable marker for genetic transformation of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Reham M

    2016-04-01

    Genetic transformation is one of the most widely used technique in crop improvement. However, most of the binary vectors used in this technique, especially cloning based, contain antibiotic genes as selection marker that raise serious consumer and environmental concerns; moreover, they could be transferred to non-target hosts with deleterious effects. Therefore, the goal of this study was reconstruction of the widely used pBI121 binary vector by substituting the harmful antibiotic selection marker gene with a less-harmful selection marker, Basta (herbicide resistance gene). The generated vectors were designated as pBI121NB and pBI121CB, in which Basta gene was expressed under the control of Nos or CaMV 35S promoter, respectively. The successful integration of the new inserts into both the vectors was confirmed by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. Both these vectors were used in transforming Arabidopsis, Egyptian wheat and barley varieties using LBA4404 and GV3101 Agrobacterium strains. The surfactant Tween-20 resulted in an efficient transformation and the number of Arabidopsis transformants was about 6-9 %. Soaked seeds of wheat and barley were transformed with Agrobacterium to introduce the bacteria to the growing shoot apices. The percentage of transgenic lines was around 16-17 and 14-15 % for wheat and barley, respectively. The quantitative studies presented in this work showed that both LBA4404 and GV3101 strains were suitable for transforming Egyptian wheat and barley.

  18. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  19. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  20. Gene therapy for allergic rhinitis with recombinant adenovirus vector containing CTLA4Ig in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱瑾; 吴军; 陈希炜; 易绍萱; 罗高兴; 贺伟峰

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To examine the role of recombinant adenovirus vector containing CTLA4Ig gene(Ad-CTLA4Ig) in the treatment of induced allergic rhinitis in mice.Methods: Allergic rhinitis was induced by sensitizing and challenging with ovalbumin(OVA).Ad-CTLA4Ig was intraperitoneally injected 30 min before OVA challenge.Adenovirus vector without inserted CTLA4Ig cDNA served as the control.The symptoms and morphological changes of nasal mucosa of each group were observed, and the serum levels of IgE against OVA were detected with ELISA.Results: There were no obvious symptoms and pathological changes in Ad-CTLA4Ig treated group, in which the serum OVA-specific IgE levels were significantly lower than that in control groups(P< 0.05).Conclusion: Ad-CTLA4Ig prevents and treats allergic rhinitis of mice,implying the possibility of the usage of Ad-CTLA4Ig against allergic rhinitis in clinic in future.

  1. Analysis of the expression and polymorphism of APOE, HSP, BDNF, and GRIN2B genes associated with the neurodegeneration process in the pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Alicja; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Przybyłowska-Sygut, Karolina; Pytel, Dariusz; Szymanek, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by optic neuropathy of the RGC or retinal nerve fiber. The aim of this study was to evaluate a relationship between the neurodegenerative genes' polymorphisms of the APOE (rs449647), BDNF (rs2030324), GRIN2B (rs3764028), and HSP70-1 (rs1043618) and the occurrence risk of POAG and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. Analysis of the genes' polymorphisms was performed using PCR-RFLP. The level of mRNA expression was determined by QRT-PCR. We showed a statistically significant association of BDNF and APOE genes' polymorphisms with a risk of POAG occurrence. There was a statistically significant association of the rs2030324 polymorphism with progression of POAG based on cup disc ratio value and rs1043618 polymorphism based on nerve fiber index and rim area. Furthermore, we found that mean HSP70-1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the case of individuals with the G/G genotype than in the case of minor allele carriers, that is, G/C and C/C. We also found that BDNF and HSP70-1 expression level are associated with the progression of POAG based on rim area value. In conclusion, our results suggest that BDNF, APOE, and HSP70-1 genes might be associated with a risk of POAG occurrence in the Polish population.

  2. Effects of medium composition on the production of plasmid DNA vector potentially for human gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-nan; SHEN Wen-he; CHEN Hao; CEN Pei-lin

    2005-01-01

    Plasmid vector is increasingly applied to gene therapy or gene vaccine. The production of plasmid pCMV-AP3 for cancer gene therapy was conducted in a modified MBL medium using a recombinant E. coli BL21 system. The effects of different MMBL components on plasmid yield, cell mass and specific plasmid DNA productivity were evaluated on shake-flask scale. The results showed that glucose was the optimal carbon source. High plasmid yield (58.3 mg/L) was obtained when 5.0 g/L glucose was added to MMBL. Glycerol could be chosen as a complementary carbon source because of the highest specific plasmid productivity (37.9 mg DNA/g DCW). After tests of different levels of nitrogen source and inorganic phosphate, a modified MMBL medium was formulated for optimal plasmid production. Further study showed that the initial acetate addition (less than 4.0 g/L) in MMBL improved plasmid production significantly, although it inhibited cell growth. The results will be useful for large-scale plasmid production using recombinant E. coli system.

  3. Enzyme-synthesized Poly(amine-co-esters) as Non-viral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Zhou, Jiangbing; Zhang, Shengmin; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2010-01-01

    A family of biodegradable poly(amine-co-esters) was synthesized in one step via enzymatic copolymerization of diesters with amino-substituted diols. Diesters of length C4–C12 (i.e., from succinate to dodecanedioate) were successfully copolymerized with diethanolamines with either an alkyl (methyl, ethyl, n-butyl, t-butyl) or an aryl (phenyl) substituent on the nitrogen. Upon protonation at slightly acidic conditions, these poly(amine-co-esters) readily turned to cationic polyelectrolytes, which were capable of condensing with polyanionic DNA to form nanometer-sized polyplexes. In vitro screening with pLucDNA revealed that two of the copolymers, poly(N-methyldiethyleneamine sebacate) (PMSC) and poly(N-ethyldiethyleneamine sebacate) (PESC), possessed comparable or higher transfection efficiencies compared to Lipofectamine 2000. PMSC/pLucDNA and PESC/pLucDNA nanoparticles had desirable particle sizes (40–70 nm) for cellular uptake and were capable of functioning as proton sponges to facilitate endosomal escape after cellular uptake. These polyplex nanoparticles exhibited extremely low cytotoxicity. Furthermore, in vivo gene transfection experiments revealed that PMSC is a substantially more effective gene carrier than PEI in delivering pLucDNAto cells in tumors in mice. All these properties suggest that poly(amine-co-esters) are promising non-viral vectors for safe and efficient DNA delivery in gene therapy. PMID:21171165

  4. A Versatile Vector for Gene and Oligonucleotide Transfer into Cells in Culture and in vivo: Polyethylenimine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussif, Otmane; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Zanta, Maria Antonietta; Djavaheri Mergny, Mojgan; Scherman, Daniel; Demeneix, Barbara; Behr, Jean-Paul

    1995-08-01

    Several polycations possessing substantial buffering capacity below physiological pH, such as lipopolyamines and polyamidoamine polymers, are efficient transfection agents per se-i.e., without the addition of cell targeting or membrane-disruption agents. This observation led us to test the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) for its genedelivery potential. Indeed, every third atom of PEI is a protonable amino nitrogen atom, which makes the polymeric network an effective "proton sponge" at virtually any pH. Luciferase reporter gene transfer with this polycation into a variety of cell lines and primary cells gave results comparable to, or even better than, lipopolyamines. Cytotoxicity was low and seen only at concentrations well above those required for optimal transfection. Delivery of oligonucleotides into embryonic neurons was followed by using a fluorescent probe. Virtually all neurons showed nuclear labeling, with no toxic effects. The optimal PEI cation/anion balance for in vitro transfection is only slightly on the cationic side, which is advantageous for in vivo delivery. Indeed, intracerebral luciferase gene transfer into newborn mice gave results comparable (for a given amount of DNA) to the in vitro transfection of primary rat brain endothelial cells or chicken embryonic neurons. Together, these properties make PEI a promising vector for gene therapy and an outstanding core for the design of more sophisticated devices. Our hypothesis is that its efficiency relies on extensive lysosome buffering that protects DNA from nuclease degradation, and consequent lysosomal swelling and rupture that provide an escape mechanism for the PEI/DNA particles.

  5. RNAi-based conditional gene knockdown in mice using a U6 promoter driven vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Shukla, Xavier Coumoul, Chu-Xia Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a powerful tool widely used for studying gene function in a number of species. We have previously developed an approach that allows conditional expression of a polymerase III promoter based small hairpin RNA (shRNA in mice using the Cre-LoxP system. This approach uses a U6 promoter, which is inactive due to the presence of a ploxPneo cassette in the promoter; this promoter can be activated after excision of the neo gene in transgenic mice that express a Cre recombinase transgene. As a proof of principle, we have previously knocked down over 95% of Fgfr2 transcripts in mouse germlines, leading to embryonic lethality, while restricting the knockdown to the progress zone of the limb results in live animals with malformation of digits of both the forelimbs and hindlimbs. We now provide a detailed protocol, including a simplified single-step cloning procedure for vector construction. This method provides a fast yet efficient way to decipher gene functions in vivo in a tissue specific manner.

  6. Zn(II)-dipicolylamine-based metallo-lipids as novel non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a series of Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) based cationic lipids bearing different hydrophobic tails (long chains, α-tocopherol, cholesterol or diosgenin) were synthesized. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these lipids was studied in detail by investigating the effects of several structural aspects including the type of hydrophobic tails, the chain length and saturation degree. In addition, several assays were used to study their interactions with plasmid DNA, and results reveal that these lipids could condense DNA into nanosized particles with appropriate size and zeta-potentials. MTT-based cell viability assays showed that lipoplexes 5 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed the hydrophobic tails clearly affected the TE, and hexadecanol-containing lipid 5b gives the best TE, which was 2.2 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum. The results not only demonstrate that these lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, but also afford us clues for further optimization of lipidic gene delivery materials.

  7. Efficiency of adenoviral vector mediated CTLA4Ig gene delivery into mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓宇斌; 郭小荑; 原清涛; 李树浓

    2003-01-01

    Objective To prevent Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in rat model, we evaluated the feasibility of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a gene transfer target and studied the efficiency of recombinant adenovirus mediated gene therapy. Methods We constructed the recombinant adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene. Rat MSCs of passages 3-5 were infected by the adenovirus, and the transfection efficiency was monitored by GFP markers. We performed flow cytometric analysis, immunohistochemical and Western blotting analysis to identify the CTLA4Ig expression. The gene transferred MSCs were tested for their ability to inhibit the allogeneic lymphocyte response in vitro and to prevent GVHD in a rat model. Results Recombinant adenovirus pAd-CTLA4Ig was correctly constructed and confirmed. After MSCs were infected by the adenovirus, the CTLA4Ig protein was detected not only in transgenic MSCs, but also in the culture medium. In a mixed lymphocytes response (MLR) test, the transgenic MSCs could significantly inhibit the allogeneic lymphocyte response compared with the control groups (P<0.05). A model of GVHD was developed by transplanting bone marrow cells and spleen lymphocytes of F344 rats to lethally irradiated SD rats. The onset of GVHD could be ameliorated or prevented by co-administration of transgenic MSCs. All the rats in the control groups suffered severe acute GVHD. CTLA4Ig expression was observed in the liver, intestine, kidney and spleen 30 days post- transplantation. Conclusions Our results indicate that adenoviral vectors could efficiently transfer CTLA4Ig gene into MSCs and sustain long-term stable expression in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes.

  9. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  10. Assessing the tobacco-rattle-virus-based vectors system as an efficient gene silencing technique in Datura stramonium (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhariyan Ghamsari, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Farah; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Hosseini Tafreshi, Seyed Ali; Salami, Seyed Alireza

    2014-12-01

    Datura stramonium is a well-known medicinal plant, which is important for its alkaloids. There are intrinsic limitations for the natural production of alkaloids in plants; metabolic engineering methods can be effectively used to conquer these limitations. In order for this the genes involved in corresponding pathways need to be studied. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing is known as a functional genomics technique to knock-down expression of endogenous genes. In this study, we silenced phytoene desaturase as a marker gene in D. stramonium in a heterologous and homologous manner by tobacco-rattle-virus-based VIGS vectors. Recombinant TRV vector containing pds gene from D. stramonium (pTRV2-Dspds) was constructed and injected into seedlings. The plants injected with pTRV2-Dspds showed photobleaching 2 weeks after infiltration. Spectrophotometric analysis demonstrated that the amount of chlorophylls and carotenoids in leaves of the bleached plants decreased considerably compared to that of the control plants. Semi-Quantitative RT-PCR results also confirmed that the expression of pds gene in the silenced plants was significantly reduced in comparison with the control plants. The results showed that the viral vector was able to influence the levels of total alkaloid content in D. stramonium. Our results illustrated that TRV-based VIGS vectors are able to induce effective and reliable functional gene silencing in D. stramonium as an alternative tool for studying the genes of interest in this plant, such as the targeted genes in tropane alkaloid biosynthetic pathway. The present work is the first report of establishing VIGS as an efficient method for transient silencing of any gene of interest in D. stramonium.

  11. A concept of eliminating nonhomologous recombination for scalable and safe AAV vector generation for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biao; Moore, Andrea R; Dai, Jihong; Roberts, Sean; Chu, Kirk; Kapranov, Philipp; Moss, Bernard; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    Scalable and efficient production of high-quality recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for gene therapy remains a challenge despite recent clinical successes. We developed a new strategy for scalable and efficient rAAV production by sequestering the AAV helper genes and the rAAV vector DNA in two different subcellular compartments, made possible by using cytoplasmic vaccinia virus as a carrier for the AAV helper genes. For the first time, the contamination of replication-competent AAV particles (rcAAV) can be completely eliminated in theory by avoiding ubiquitous nonhomologous recombination. Vector DNA can be integrated into the host genomes or delivered by a nuclear targeting vector such as adenovirus. In suspension HeLa cells, the achieved vector yield per cell is similar to that from traditional triple-plasmid transfection method. The rcAAV contamination was undetectable at the limit of our assay. Furthermore, this new concept can be used not only for production of rAAV, but also for other DNA vectors.

  12. Construction of Retroviral Vectors Containing Rat Fas Ligand Gene and FasL Expression Mediated by the Vectors in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective In order to study the biological function of Fas and Fas ligand system, discuss the feasibility of treating tumor with transfecting FasL gene. Methods the rat Fas ligand complementary DNA was subcloned to retroviral vector pLXSN, acquired pLXSN/FasL+ recombinant with direct inserting and single copy,then packaged with PA317 amphotropic packaging cells,anti-G418 clones were acquired,and it was named PA317/ pLXSN-FasL+ cells.Results The titer of virus was 4.7×107 CFU/ml,there was FasL gene integration in PA317/pLXSN-FasL+ cells detected by polymerase chain reaction. When we used the supernatant of the PA317/pLXSN-FasL+ cells to infect hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG-2,SMMC-7721,CBRH-7919 and RH-35 ,the FasL expression was found at all the surface of the four cell lines through FCM,and the apoptosis in HepG-2 and CBRH-7919 cells which had high levels Fas expression was found too.Conclusion the results show that it is an effective way to introduce FasL gene to retroviral vectors, which can be used to induce apoptosis in the cells with high levels Fas expression.

  13. Acute toxicity study of a simian immunodeficiency virus-based lentiviral vector for retinal gene transfer in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Miyazaki, Masanori; Kohno, Ri-ichiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Murata, Toshinori; Goto, Yoshinobu; Tabata, Toshiaki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ono, Fumiko; Suzuki, Toshimichi; Ageyama, Naohide; Terao, Keiji; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Sueishi, Katsuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-09-01

    A phase 1 clinical trial evaluating the safety of gene therapy for patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or retinoblastoma has been completed without problems. The efficacy of gene therapy for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) was reported by three groups. Gene therapy may thus hold promise as a therapeutic method for the treatment of intractable ocular diseases. However, it will first be important to precisely evaluate the efficiency and safety of alternative gene transfer vectors in a preclinical study using large animals. In the present study, we evaluated the acute local (ophthalmic) and systemic toxicity of our simian immunodeficiency virus from African green monkeys (SIVagm)-based lentiviral vectors carrying human pigment epithelium-derived factor (SIV-hPEDF) for transferring genes into nonhuman primate retinas. Transient inflammation and elevation of intraocular pressure were observed in some animals, but these effects were not dose dependent. Electroretinograms (ERGs), including multifocal ERGs, revealed no remarkable change in retinal function. Histopathologically, SIV-hPEDF administration resulted in a certain degree of inflammatory reaction and no apparent structural destruction in retinal tissue. Regarding systemic toxicity, none of the animals died, and none showed any serious side effects during the experimental course. No vector leakage was detected in serum or urine samples. We thus propose that SIVagm-mediated stable gene transfer might be useful and safe for ocular gene transfer in a clinical setting.

  14. miRNA genes of an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Gu

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus, a vector of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, is a robust invasive species in both tropical and temperate environments. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection. While a number of miRNAs have been discovered in some mosquitoes, no comprehensive effort has been made to characterize them from different developmental stages from a single species. Systematic analysis of miRNAs in Ae. albopictus will improve our understanding of its basic biology and inform novel strategies to prevent virus transmission. Between 10-14 million Illumina sequencing reads per sample were obtained from embryos, larvae, pupae, adult males, sugar-fed and blood-fed adult females. A total of 119 miRNA genes represented by 215 miRNA or miRNA star (miRNA* sequences were identified, 15 of which are novel. Eleven, two, and two of the newly-discovered miRNA genes appear specific to Aedes, Culicinae, and Culicidae, respectively. A number of miRNAs accumulate predominantly in one or two developmental stages and the large number that showed differences in abundance following a blood meal likely are important in blood-induced mosquito biology. Gene Ontology (GO analysis of the targets of all Ae. albopictus miRNAs provides a useful starting point for the study of their functions in mosquitoes. This study is the first systematic analysis of miRNAs based on deep-sequencing of small RNA samples of all developmental stages of a mosquito species. A number of miRNAs are related to specific physiological states, most notably, pre- and post-blood feeding. The distribution of lineage-specific miRNAs is consistent with mosquito phylogeny and the presence of a number of Aedes-specific miRNAs likely reflects the divergence between the Aedes and Culex genera.

  15. miRNA genes of an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinbao; Hu, Wanqi; Wu, Jinya; Zheng, Peiming; Chen, Maoshan; James, Anthony A; Chen, Xiaoguang; Tu, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a vector of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, is a robust invasive species in both tropical and temperate environments. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection. While a number of miRNAs have been discovered in some mosquitoes, no comprehensive effort has been made to characterize them from different developmental stages from a single species. Systematic analysis of miRNAs in Ae. albopictus will improve our understanding of its basic biology and inform novel strategies to prevent virus transmission. Between 10-14 million Illumina sequencing reads per sample were obtained from embryos, larvae, pupae, adult males, sugar-fed and blood-fed adult females. A total of 119 miRNA genes represented by 215 miRNA or miRNA star (miRNA*) sequences were identified, 15 of which are novel. Eleven, two, and two of the newly-discovered miRNA genes appear specific to Aedes, Culicinae, and Culicidae, respectively. A number of miRNAs accumulate predominantly in one or two developmental stages and the large number that showed differences in abundance following a blood meal likely are important in blood-induced mosquito biology. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the targets of all Ae. albopictus miRNAs provides a useful starting point for the study of their functions in mosquitoes. This study is the first systematic analysis of miRNAs based on deep-sequencing of small RNA samples of all developmental stages of a mosquito species. A number of miRNAs are related to specific physiological states, most notably, pre- and post-blood feeding. The distribution of lineage-specific miRNAs is consistent with mosquito phylogeny and the presence of a number of Aedes-specific miRNAs likely reflects the divergence between the Aedes and Culex genera.

  16. Bioresorbable microporous stents deliver recombinant adenovirus gene transfer vectors to the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y W; Landau, C; Willard, J E; Rajasubramanian, G; Moskowitz, A; Aziz, S; Meidell, R S; Eberhart, R C

    1998-01-01

    The use of intravascular stents as an adjunct for percutaneous transluminal revascularization is limited by two principal factors, acute thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, resulting in restenosis. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the potential of microporous bioresorbable polymer stents formed from poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) blends to function both to provide mechanical support and as reservoirs for local delivery of therapeutic molecules and particles to the vessel wall. Tubular PLLA/PCL stents were fabricated by the flotation-precipitation method, and helical stents were produced by a casting/winding technique. Hybrid structures in which a tubular sheath is deposited on a helical skeleton were also generated. Using a two-stage solvent swelling technique, polyethylene oxide has been incorporated into these stents to improve hydrophilicity and water uptake, and to facilitate the ability of these devices to function as drug carriers. Stents modified in this manner retain axial and radial mechanical strength sufficient to stabilize the vessel wall against elastic recoil caused by vasoconstrictive and mechanical forces. Because of the potential of direct gene transfer into the vessel wall to ameliorate thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, we have investigated the capacity of these polymer stents to function in the delivery of recombinant adenovirus vectors to the vessel wall. In vitro, virus stock was observed to readily absorb into, and elute from these devices in an infectious form, with suitable kinetics. Successful gene transfer and expression has been demonstrated following implantation of polymer stents impregnated with a recombinant adenovirus carrying a nuclear-localizing betaGal reporter gene into rabbit carotid arteries. These studies suggest that surface-modified polymer stents may ultimately be useful adjunctive devices for both mechanical support and gene transfer during percutaneous

  17. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Z Salem

    Full Text Available The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS. In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV, the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt, and gp37. In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications.

  18. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Tamer Z; Seaborn, Craig P; Turney, Colin M; Xue, Jianli; Shang, Hui; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA) has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS). In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter) transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt), and gp37). In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications).

  19. Multicistronic lentiviral vectors containing the FMDV 2A cleavage factor demonstrate robust expression of encoded genes at limiting MOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margison Geoffrey P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of gene therapy applications would benefit from vectors capable of expressing multiple genes. In this study we explored the feasibility and efficiency of expressing two or three transgenes in HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. Bicistronic and tricistronic self-inactivating lentiviral vectors were constructed employing the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and/or foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV cleavage factor 2A. We employed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT, and homeobox transcription factor HOXB4 as model genes and their expression was detected by appropriate methods including fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, biochemical assay, and western blotting. Results All the multigene vectors produced high titer virus and were able to simultaneously express two or three transgenes in transduced cells. However, the level of expression of individual transgenes varied depending on: the transgene itself; its position within the construct; the total number of transgenes expressed; the strategy used for multigene expression and the average copy number of pro-viral insertions. Notably, at limiting MOI, the expression of eGFP in a bicistronic vector based on 2A was ~4 times greater than that of an IRES based vector. Conclusion The small and efficient 2A sequence can be used alone or in combination with an IRES for the construction of multicistronic lentiviral vectors which can express encoded transgenes at functionally relevant levels in cells containing an average of one pro-viral insert.

  20. Retroviral Vector-mediated Gene Therapy to Mucopolysaccharidosis I Mice Improves Sensorimotor Impairments and Other Behavior Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Guilherme; Wozniak, David F.; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Zhang, Yanming; Giugliani, Roberto; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Systemic gene therapy to MPS I mice can reduce lysosomal storage in the brain, but few data are available regarding the effect upon behavioral function. Here, we investigated the effect of gene therapy with a long-terminal repeat (LTR)-intact retroviral vector or a self-inactivating (SIN) vector on behavioral function in MPS I mice. The LTR vector was injected intravenously to 6 week-old MPS I mice, while the SIN vector was given to neonatal or 6 week-old mice. Adult-LTR, Neonatal-SIN, and Adult-SIN-treated mice achieved serum IDUA activity that was 235±20 (84-fold normal), 127±10, and 71±7 units/ml, respectively. All groups had reduction in histochemical evidence of lysosomal storage in the brain, with the Adult-LTR group showing the best response, while Adult-LTR mice had reductions in lysosomal storage in the cristae of the vestibular system. Behavioral evaluation was performed at 8 months. Untreated MPS I mice had a markedly reduced ability to hold onto an inverted screen or climb down a pole. LTR vector-treated mice had marked improvements on both of these tests, while Neonatal-SIN mice had improvements in the pole test. We conclude that both vectors can reduce brain disease in MPS I mice, with the LTR vector achieving higher serum IDUA levels and better correction. Vestibular abnormalities may contribute to mobility problems in patients with MPS I, and gene therapy may reduce symptoms. PMID:22983812

  1. Lentiviral gene ontology (LeGO) vectors equipped with novel drug-selectable fluorescent proteins: new building blocks for cell marking and multi-gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K; Mock, U; Petrowitz, B; Bartsch, U; Fehse, B

    2010-04-01

    Vector-encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs) facilitate unambiguous identification or sorting of gene-modified cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Exploiting this feature, we have recently developed lentiviral gene ontology (LeGO) vectors (www.LentiGO-Vectors.de) for multi-gene analysis in different target cells. In this study, we extend the LeGO principle by introducing 10 different drug-selectable FPs created by fusing one of the five selection marker (protecting against blasticidin, hygromycin, neomycin, puromycin and zeocin) and one of the five FP genes (Cerulean, eGFP, Venus, dTomato and mCherry). All tested fusion proteins allowed both fluorescence-mediated detection and drug-mediated selection of LeGO-transduced cells. Newly generated codon-optimized hygromycin- and neomycin-resistance genes showed improved expression as compared with their ancestors. New LeGO constructs were produced at titers >10(6) per ml (for non-concentrated supernatants). We show efficient combinatorial marking and selection of various cells, including mesenchymal stem cells, simultaneously transduced with different LeGO constructs. Inclusion of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken beta-actin promoter into LeGO vectors facilitated robust transgene expression in and selection of neural stem cells and their differentiated progeny. We suppose that the new drug-selectable markers combining advantages of FACS and drug selection are well suited for numerous applications and vector systems. Their inclusion into LeGO vectors opens new possibilities for (stem) cell tracking and functional multi-gene analysis.

  2. Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Serotype 8 for Cell-Specific Delivery of Therapeutic Genes in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, Diego; Sucunza, Diego; Vanrell, Lucia; Lopez-Franco, Esperanza; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G.; Vales, Africa; Hommel, Mirja; Rico, Alberto J.; Lanciego, Jose L.; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have become highly promising tools for research and clinical applications in the central nervous system (CNS). However, specific delivery of genes to the cell type of interest is essential for the success of gene therapy and therefore a correct selection of the promoter plays a very important role. Here, AAV8 vectors carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) as reporter gene under the transcriptional control of different CNS-specific promoters were used and compared with a strong ubiquitous promoter. Since one of the main limitations of AAV-mediated gene delivery lies in its restricted cloning capacity, we focused our work on small-sized promoters. We tested the transduction efficacy and specificity of each vector after stereotactic injection into the mouse striatum. Three glia-specific AAV vectors were generated using two truncated forms of the human promoter for glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) as well as a truncated form of the murine GFAP promoter. All three vectors resulted in predominantly glial expression; however we also observed eGFP expression in other cell-types such as oligodendrocytes, but never in neurons. In addition, robust and neuron-specific eGFP expression was observed using the minimal promoters for the neural protein BM88 and the neuronal nicotinic receptor β2 (CHRNB2). In summary, we developed a set of AAV vectors designed for specific expression in cells of the CNS using minimal promoters to drive gene expression when the size of the therapeutic gene matters. PMID:28239341

  3. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  4. Design of a regulated lentiviral vector for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ungari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD is a demyelinating lysosomal storage disease due to the deficiency of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC enzyme. The favorable outcome of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC-based approaches in GLD and other similar diseases suggests HSPC gene therapy as a promising therapeutic option for patients. The path to clinical development of this strategy was hampered by a selective toxicity of the overexpressed GALC in the HSPC compartment. Here, we presented the optimization of a lentiviral vector (LV in which miR-126 regulation was coupled to codon optimization of the human GALC cDNA to obtain a selective and enhanced enzymatic activity only upon transduced HSPCs differentiation. The safety of human GALC overexpression driven by this LV was extensively demonstrated in vitro and in vivo on human HSPCs from healthy donors. No perturbation in the content of proapoptotic sphingolipids, gene expression profile, and capability of engraftment and mutlilineage differentiation in chimeric mice was observed. The therapeutic potential of this LV was then assessed in a severe GLD murine model that benefited from transplantation of corrected HSPCs with longer survival and ameliorated phenotype as compared to untreated siblings. This construct has thus been selected as a candidate for clinical translation.

  5. Advances in Viral Vector-Based TRAIL Gene Therapy for Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norian, Lyse A. [Department of Urology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); James, Britnie R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Griffith, Thomas S., E-mail: thomas-griffith@uiowa.edu [Department of Urology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Numerous biologic approaches are being investigated as anti-cancer therapies in an attempt to induce tumor regression while circumventing the toxic side effects associated with standard chemo- or radiotherapies. Among these, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown particular promise in pre-clinical and early clinical trials, due to its preferential ability to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells and its minimal toxicity. One limitation of TRAIL use is the fact that many tumor types display an inherent resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To circumvent this problem, researchers have explored a number of strategies to optimize TRAIL delivery and to improve its efficacy via co-administration with other anti-cancer agents. In this review, we will focus on TRAIL-based gene therapy approaches for the treatment of malignancies. We will discuss the main viral vectors that are being used for TRAIL gene therapy and the strategies that are currently being attempted to improve the efficacy of TRAIL as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

  6. Gene flow in a Yersinia pestis vector, Oropsylla hirsuta, during a plague epizootic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Jones , Leigh R. Washburn & Hugh B. Britten

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Appreciating how Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, spreads amongblack-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus colonies (BTPD, is vital to wildlife conservation programsin North American grasslands. A little-studied aspect of the system is the role of Y. pestis vectors, i.e. fleas,play in the spreading of plague in natural settings. We investigated the genetic structure and variability of acommon prairie dog flea (Oropsylla hirsuta in BTPD colonies in order to examine dispersal patterns. Giventhat this research took place during a widespread plague epizootic, there was the added advantage of gaininginformation on the dynamics of sylvatic plague.Methods & Results: Oropsylla hirsuta were collected from BTPD burrows in nine colonies from May 2005 toJuly 2005, and eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to generate genotypic data from them.Gene flow estimates revealed low genetic differentiation among fleas sampled from different colonies. NestedPCR plague assays confirmed the presence of Y. pestis with the average Y. pestis prevalence across all ninecolonies at 12%. No significant correlations were found between the genetic variability and gene flow of O.hirsuta and Y. pestis prevalence on a per-colony basis.Conclusion: Oropsylla hirsuta dispersal among BTPD colonies was high, potentially explaining the rapidspread of Y. pestis in our study area in 2005 and 2006.

  7. Polyethylenimine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangbo; Tang, Zhaomin; Shi, Chunli; Shi, Shuai; Qian, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2012-11-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery. The nanoparticles could provide the magnetic-targeting, and the cationic polymer PEI could condense DNA and avoid in vitro barriers. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic light scattering measurements, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and atomic force microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to asses DNA binding and perform a DNase I protection assay. The Alamar blue assay was used to evaluate negative effects on the metabolic activity of cells incubated with PEI modified magnetic nanoparticles and their complexes with DNA both in the presence or absence of an external magnetic field. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were also performed to investigate the transfection efficiency of the DNA-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in A549 and B16-F10 tumor cells with (+M) or without (-M) the magnetic field. The in vitro transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles was improved obviously in a permanent magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles show considerable potential as nanocarriers for gene delivery.

  8. Gene flow in a Yersinia pestis vector, Oropsylla hirsuta, during a plague epizootic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip H; Washburn, Leigh R; Britten, Hugh B

    2011-09-01

    Appreciating how Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, spreads among black - tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies (BTPD), is vital to wildlife conservation programs in North American grasslands. A little - studied aspect of the system is the role of Y. pestis vectors, i.e. fleas, play in the spreading of plague in natural settings. We investigated the genetic structure and variability of a common prairie dog flea (Oropsylla hirsuta) in BTPD colonies in order to examine dispersal patterns. Given that this research took place during a widespread plague epizootic, there was the added advantage of gaining information on the dynamics of sylvatic plague. Oropsylla hirsuta were collected from BTPD burrows in nine colonies from May 2005 to July 2005, and eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to generate genotypic data from them. Gene flow estimates revealed low genetic differentiation among fleas sampled from different colonies. NestedPCR plague assays confirmed the presence of Y. pestis with the average Y. pestis prevalence across all nine colonies at 12%. No significant correlations were found between the genetic variability and gene flow of O. hirsuta and Y. pestis prevalence on a per -colony basis. Oropsylla hirsuta dispersal among BTPD colonies was high, potentially explaining the rapid spread of Y. pestis in our study area in 2005 and 2006.

  9. Modeling horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the gut of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durvasula Ravi V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paratransgenesis is an approach to reducing arthropod vector competence using genetically modified symbionts. When applied to control of Chagas disease, the symbiont bacterium Rhodococcus rhodnii, resident in the gut lumen of the triatomine vector Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae, is transformed to export cecropin A, an insect immune peptide. Cecropin A is active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While proof of concept has been achieved in laboratory studies, a rigorous and comprehensive risk assessment is required prior to consideration of field release. An important part of this assessment involves estimating probability of transgene horizontal transfer to environmental organisms (HGT. This article presents a two-part risk assessment methodology: a theoretical model predicting HGT in the gut of R. prolixus from the genetically transformed symbiont R. rhodnii to a closely related non-target bacterium, Gordona rubropertinctus, in the absence of selection pressure, and a series of laboratory trials designed to test the model. Results The model predicted an HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations at the 99% certainty level. The model was iterated twenty times, with the mean of the ten highest outputs evaluated at the 99% certainty level. Laboratory trials indicated no horizontal gene transfer, supporting the conclusions of the model. Conclusions The model treats HGT as a composite event, the probability of which is determined by the joint probability of three independent events: gene transfer through the modalities of transformation, transduction, and conjugation. Genes are represented in matrices and Monte Carlo method and Markov chain analysis are used to simulate and evaluate environmental conditions. The model is intended as a risk assessment instrument and predicts HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations. With laboratory studies that

  10. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  11. A Kunjin replicon vector encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor for intra-tumoral gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang-Le, D.; Smeenk, L.; Anraku, I.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wang, X.J.; Vrij, de J.; Liu, W.J.; Le, T.T.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently developed a non-cytopathic RNA replicon-based viral vector system based on the flavivirus Kunjin. Here, we illustrate the utility of the Kunjin replicon system for gene therapy. Intra-tumoral injections of Kunjin replicon virus-like particles encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating

  12. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata Cells with an Antibiotic Resistance Gene Using a Ti-Plasmid-Derived Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1986-01-01

    A chimaeric antibiotic resistance gene was transferred to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a member of the legume family. This transfer was established by inoculating cowpea leaf discs with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a Ti-plasmid-derived vector that contained two copies of a chimaeric

  13. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata Cells with an Antibiotic Resistance Gene Using a Ti-Plasmid-Derived Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1986-01-01

    A chimaeric antibiotic resistance gene was transferred to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a member of the legume family. This transfer was established by inoculating cowpea leaf discs with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a Ti-plasmid-derived vector that contained two copies of a chimaeric

  14. Developing a potentially immunologically inert tetracycline-regulatable viral vector for gene therapy in the peripheral nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyng, S A; Gnavi, S; de Winter, F; Eggers, R; Ozawa, T; Zaldumbide, A; Hoeben, R C; Malessy, M J A; Verhaagen, J

    2014-01-01

    Viral vector-mediated gene transfer of neurotrophic factors is an emerging and promising strategy to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Unfortunately, the chronic exposure to neurotrophic factors results in local trapping of regenerating axons or other unwanted side effects. Ther

  15. Use of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria as a vector to express the cry3A gene from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcao Salles, Joana; Gitahy, P.M.; Skot, L.; Baldani, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria as a vector to express a cry gene from Bacillus thuringiensis, envisaging the control of pests that attack sugarcane plants. The endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus strain BR1128

  16. Gene Therapy of Liver Disease with Lentiviral Vectors Preclinical Studies in Models of Crigler-Najjar Disease and Hepatitis C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. van der Wegen (Pascal)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe main theme of this thesis is the application of lentiviral vectors for the treatment of congenital and acquired liver disease. Gene therapy represents a relatively new and promising therapeutic tool with possible applications in a broad spectrum of medical disciplines. The underlying

  17. Development of new USER-based cloning vectors for multiple genes expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Maury, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    auxotrophic and dominant markers for convenience of use. Our vector set also contains both integrating and multicopy vectors for stability of protein expression and high expression level. We will make the new vector system available to the yeast community and provide a comprehensive protocol for cloning...

  18. Construction Of An Optimized Lentiviral Vector Containing Pdx-1 Gene For Transduction Of Stem Cells Towards Gene Therapy Diabetes Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahmati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Nowadays, most of gene therapy protocols are performed by lentiviral vectors. One of the most important factors which is involved in pancreas development and transcription of insulin gene is pancreatic & duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1 transcription factor. The goal of this study was to optimize a lentiviral construct, containing pdx-1 gene, to transfect stem cells towards gene therapy of type-1 diabetes. Methods: In this experimental study, first, the pdx-1 gene was multiplied by PCR from pcDNA3.1-pdx-1 and cloned into pTG19-T vector. Then, pdx-1 was subcloned on upstream of IRES-EGFP gene into IRES2-EGFP vector. At the next step, the cloned parts of IRES-EGFP and pdx-1 were isolated and cloned into the lentiviral expression vector pSINTREM in upstream of TRE-CMV gene. After sequencing, final construct was transfected into HEK 293 cells and gene expression of pdx-1 was evaluated using flow cytometry analysis and reverse fluorescent microscopy. Results: Flow cytometry results and inverted fluorescent microscopy observing showed that pdx-1 and GFP genes are expressed in cells transfected with final recombinant construct. Conclusion: Regarding the design of this construct, to ensure long time expression with higher in vivo and in vitro expression efficiency for stem cells and also use of Tet on induced optimized system, it seems that the current construct can be among the best ones to transfect stem cells. Key words: Gene therapy, Diabetes, Stem cells

  19. Separating lentiviral vector injection and induction of gene expression in time, does not prevent an immune response to rtTA in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markusic, D.M.; de Waart, D.R.; Seppen, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lentiviral gene transfer can provide long-term expression of therapeutic genes such as erythropoietin. Because overexpression of erythropoietin can be toxic, regulated expression is needed. Doxycycline inducible vectors can regulate expression of therapeutic transgenes efficiently. Howev

  20. Analysis of the Expression and Polymorphism of APOE, HSP, BDNF, and GRIN2B Genes Associated with the Neurodegeneration Process in the Pathogenesis of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Nowak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is characterized by optic neuropathy of the RGC or retinal nerve fiber. The aim of this study was to evaluate a relationship between the neurodegenerative genes’ polymorphisms of the APOE (rs449647, BDNF (rs2030324, GRIN2B (rs3764028, and HSP70-1 (rs1043618 and the occurrence risk of POAG and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. Analysis of the genes’ polymorphisms was performed using PCR-RFLP. The level of mRNA expression was determined by QRT-PCR. We showed a statistically significant association of BDNF and APOE genes’ polymorphisms with a risk of POAG occurrence. There was a statistically significant association of the rs2030324 polymorphism with progression of POAG based on cup disc ratio value and rs1043618 polymorphism based on nerve fiber index and rim area. Furthermore, we found that mean HSP70-1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the case of individuals with the G/G genotype than in the case of minor allele carriers, that is, G/C and C/C. We also found that BDNF and HSP70-1 expression level are associated with the progression of POAG based on rim area value. In conclusion, our results suggest that BDNF, APOE, and HSP70-1 genes might be associated with a risk of POAG occurrence in the Polish population.

  1. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Albert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson′s disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson′s disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson′s disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson′s disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP, which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in

  2. Ageing, neurodegeneration and brain rejuvenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Although systemic diseases take the biggest toll on human health and well-being, increasingly, a failing brain is the arbiter of a death preceded by a gradual loss of the essence of being. Ageing, which is fundamental to neurodegeneration and dementia, affects every organ in the body and seems to be encoded partly in a blood-based signature. Indeed, factors in the circulation have been shown to modulate ageing and to rejuvenate numerous organs, including the brain. The discovery of such factors, the identification of their origins and a deeper understanding of their functions is ushering in a new era in ageing and dementia research. PMID:27830812

  3. pSiM24 is a novel versatile gene expression vector for transient assays as well as stable expression of foreign genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed a small and highly efficient binary Ti vector pSiM24 for plant transformation with maximum efficacy. In the pSiM24 vector, the size of the backbone of the early binary vector pKYLXM24 (GenBank Accession No. HM036220; a derivative of pKYLX71) was reduced from 12.8 kb to 7.1 kb. The binary vector pSiM24 is composed of the following genetic elements: left and right T-DNA borders, a modified full-length transcript promoter (M24) of Mirabilis mosaic virus with duplicated enhancer domains, three multiple cloning sites, a 3'rbcsE9 terminator, replication functions for Escherichia coli (ColE1) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pRK2-OriV) and the replicase trfA gene, selectable marker genes for kanamycin resistance (nptII) and ampicillin resistance (bla). The pSiM24 plasmid offers a wide selection of cloning sites, high copy numbers in E. coli and a high cloning capacity for easily manipulating different genetic elements. It has been fully tested in transferring transgenes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) both transiently (agro-infiltration, protoplast electroporation and biolistic) and stably in plant systems (Arabidopsis and tobacco) using both agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistic procedures. Not only reporter genes, several other introduced genes were also effectively expressed using pSiM24 expression vector. Hence, the pSiM24 vector would be useful for various plant biotechnological applications. In addition, the pSiM24 plasmid can act as a platform for other applications, such as gene expression studies and different promoter expressional analyses.

  4. pSiM24 is a novel versatile gene expression vector for transient assays as well as stable expression of foreign genes in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Kumar Sahoo

    Full Text Available We have constructed a small and highly efficient binary Ti vector pSiM24 for plant transformation with maximum efficacy. In the pSiM24 vector, the size of the backbone of the early binary vector pKYLXM24 (GenBank Accession No. HM036220; a derivative of pKYLX71 was reduced from 12.8 kb to 7.1 kb. The binary vector pSiM24 is composed of the following genetic elements: left and right T-DNA borders, a modified full-length transcript promoter (M24 of Mirabilis mosaic virus with duplicated enhancer domains, three multiple cloning sites, a 3'rbcsE9 terminator, replication functions for Escherichia coli (ColE1 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pRK2-OriV and the replicase trfA gene, selectable marker genes for kanamycin resistance (nptII and ampicillin resistance (bla. The pSiM24 plasmid offers a wide selection of cloning sites, high copy numbers in E. coli and a high cloning capacity for easily manipulating different genetic elements. It has been fully tested in transferring transgenes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP and β-glucuronidase (GUS both transiently (agro-infiltration, protoplast electroporation and biolistic and stably in plant systems (Arabidopsis and tobacco using both agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistic procedures. Not only reporter genes, several other introduced genes were also effectively expressed using pSiM24 expression vector. Hence, the pSiM24 vector would be useful for various plant biotechnological applications. In addition, the pSiM24 plasmid can act as a platform for other applications, such as gene expression studies and different promoter expressional analyses.

  5. Kunjin virus replicons: an RNA-based, non-cytopathic viral vector system for protein production, vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Suhrbier, A.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The application of viral vectors for gene expression and delivery is rapidly evolving, with several entering clinical trials. However, a number of issues, including safety, gene expression levels, cell selectivity and antivector immunity, are driving the search for new vector systems. A number of re

  6. Efficient and selective gene transfer into primary human brain tumors by using single-chain antibody-targeted adenoviral vectors with native tropism abolished

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusechem, VW; Grill, J; Mastenbroek, DCJ; Wickham, TJ; Roelvink, PW; Haisma, HJ; Lamfers, MLM; Dirven, CMF; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2002-01-01

    The application of adenoviral vectors in cancer gene therapy is hampered by low receptor expression on tumor cells and high receptor expression on normal epithelial cells. Targeting adenoviral vectors toward tumor cells may improve cancer gene therapy procedures by providing augmented tumor transduc

  7. Development of new transformation-competent artificial chromosome vectors and rice genomic libraries for efficient gene cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Guang; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Letian; Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Qunyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Chunyi; Su, Jing; Wang, Zhonghua; Tian, Dongsheng; Mei, Mantong

    2002-01-09

    The transformation-competent artificial chromosome vector (TAC) system has been shown to be very useful for efficient gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1998) 6535). To adapt the vector system for gene isolation in crops, two new TAC vectors and rice genomic libraries were developed. The new vectors pYLTAC17 and pYLTAC27 use the Bar gene and Hpt gene driven by the rice Act1 promoter as the plant selectable markers, respectively, and are suitable for transformation of rice and other grasses. Two representative genomic libraries (I and II) of an Indica rice variety Minghui63, a fertility restorer line for hybrid rice, were constructed with pYLTAC17 using different size classes of partially digested DNA fragments. Library I and library II consisted of 34,560 and 1.2 x 10(5) clones, with average insert sizes of approximately 77 and 39 kb, respectively. The genome coverage of the libraries I and II was estimated to be about 5 and 11 haploid genome equivalents, respectively. Clones of the library I were stored individually in ninety 384-well plates, and those of the library II were collected as bulked pools each containing 30-50 clones and stored in eight 384-well plates. A number of probes were used to hybridize high-density colony filters of the library I prepared by an improved replicating method and each detected 2-9 positive clones. A method for rapid screening of the library II by pooled colony hybridization was developed. A TAC clone having an 80 kb rice DNA insert was successfully transferred into rice genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The new vectors and the genomic libraries should be useful for gene cloning and genetic engineering in rice and other crops.

  8. GENIS: gene expression of sodium iodide symporter for noninvasive imaging of gene therapy vectors and quantification of gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kenneth N; Tyson, Donald; Stricker, Hans; Lew, Young S; Heisey, Gregory; Koul, Sweaty; de la Zerda, Alberto; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Hui; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Randall, Kelly Ann; Jin, Guk Kim; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Jhiang, Sissy; Ho Kim, Jae; Freytag, Svend O; Brown, Stephen L

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of optimizing adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer, we have developed a method based on the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) that allows for noninvasive monitoring of adenoviral vectors and quantification of gene expression magnitude and volume within the prostate. A replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS) coexpressing a therapeutic yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD)/mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mutTK(SR39)) fusion gene and the hNIS gene was developed. Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS and a replication-defective hNIS adenovirus (rAd-CMV-FLhNIS) were injected into contralateral lobes of the dog prostate and hNIS activity was monitored in live animals following administration of Na(99m)TcO(4) using gamma camera scintigraphy. Despite the close proximity of the urinary bladder, (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake was readily detected in the prostate using viral dose levels (10(10) to 10(12) viral particles) that have been safely administered to humans. Due to its rapid clearance and short physical half-life (6 h), it was possible to obtain daily measurements of (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake in vivo, allowing for dynamic monitoring of reporter gene expression within the prostate as well as biodistribution throughout the body. High-resolution autoradiography of prostate sections coupled with 3D reconstruction of gene expression demonstrated that the magnitude and volume of gene expression could be quantified with submillimeter resolution. Implementation of the GENIS (gene expression of Na/I symporter) technology in the clinic will facilitate optimization of future human gene therapy trials.

  9. Gene therapy for pathological scar with hepatocyte growth factor mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    哈小琴; 苑宾; 李元敏; 劳妙芬; 吴祖泽

    2003-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding human hepatocyte growth factor wasintroduced into a replication-defective type 5 adenovirus (lacking E1, E3 domains) vector by homologous recombination of intracellular plasmid DNA, thus a recombinant vector containing HGF (Ad-HGF) was obtained. Ad-HGF and Ad-GFP (adenovirus vector carrying green fluorescence protein gene) were expanded in 293 cells and purified by cesium chloride gradient centrifugation for large-scale preparation, then were infected to the primarily cultured scar fibroblast of rabbit ear to observe the transfer efficiency and expression level of HGF in vitro. To evaluate the effect of Ad-HGF on established scar Ad-HGF solution was injected into excessively formed scar, which bears some clinical and histologic similarities tohuman hypertrophic scars. The results showed that: (i) the transfer efficiency was 36.8%±14.1% on day 3 in primarily cultured scar fibroblasts treated with Ad-GFP and lasted more than 20 d; (ii) high-level expression of HGF protein was detected by means of ELISA in supernatant of scar fibroblasts treated with Ad-HGF,the amount of expression was 76 ng/4.0×105 cells on day 3; (iii) on day 32 after a single intradermal injection of Ad-HGF at different doses (8.6×109 pfu, 8.6×108 pfu, 8.6×107 pfu, 8.6×106 pfu) per scar, most of the scars in the former two dose groups were dramatically flattened, some were even similar to that ofthe normal skin. The value of HI (hypertrophic index) showed that there was a therapeutic effect of Ad-HGF on scars at the dose of 109 pfu and 108 pfu. Whereasno therapeutic effects were seen at lower dose (107 pfu and 106 pfu of Ad-HGF) groups. In addition, clusters of hair were observed to different extent on healed wound treated with Ad-HGF. Histopathologic examination revealed that in most healed wounds of Ad-HGF treated group, the dermal layer was thinner, the amount of fibrous tissue was much fewer, and hair follicles growth and sebaceous glands were observed

  10. Construction of an Artificial MicroRNA Expression Vector for Simultaneous Inhibition of Multiple Genes in Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyin Guo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, artificial microRNA (amiRNA has become a promising RNA interference (RNAi technology. Here, we describe a flexible and reliable method for constructing both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors. Two universal primers, together with two specific primers carrying the encoding sequence of amiRNA were designed and utilized to synthesize the functional amiRNA cassette through a one-step PCR. With appropriate restriction sites, the synthesized amiRNA cassettes can be cloned into any site of different destination vectors. Using the method, we constructed both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors to target three reporter genes, which code firefly luciferase (Fluc, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and β-galactosidase (LacZ, respectively. The expressions of three genes were all specifically inhibited by either the corresponding single- or the multi-amiRNA expression vector in 293T cells. And the RNAi efficiency of each amiRNA produced by both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors was comparable.

  11. Protamine/DNA/Niosome Ternary Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery to the Retina: The Role of Protamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puras, G; Martínez-Navarrete, G; Mashal, M; Zárate, J; Agirre, M; Ojeda, E; Grijalvo, S; Eritja, R; Diaz-Tahoces, A; Avilés-Trigueros, M; Fernández, E; Pedraz, J L

    2015-10-05

    The present study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of protamine into niosome/DNA vectors to analyze the potential application of this novel ternary formulation to deliver the pCMS-EGFP plasmid into the rat retina. Binary vectors based on niosome/DNA and ternary vectors based on protamine/DNA/niosomes were prepared and physicochemically characterized. In vitro experiments were performed in ARPE-19 cells. At 1:1:5 protamine/DNA/niosome mass ratio, the resulted ternary vectors had 150 nm size, positive charge, spherical morphology, and condensed, released, and protected the DNA against enzymatic digestion. The presence of protamine in the ternary vectors improved transfection efficiency, cell viability, and DNA condensation. After ocular administration, the EGFP expression was detected in different cell layers of the retina depending on the administration route without any sign of toxicity associated with the formulations. While subretinal administration transfected mainly photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells at the site of injection, intravitreal administration produced a more uniform distribution of the protein expression through the inner layers of the retina. The protein expression in the retina persisted for at least one month after both administrations. Our study highlights the flattering properties of protamine/DNA/niosome ternary vectors for efficient and safe gene delivery to the rat retina.

  12. Early limited nitrosamine exposures exacerbate high fat diet-mediated type 2 diabetes and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longato Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and several types of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's, are linked to insulin-resistance, and chronic high dietary fat intake causes T2DM with mild neurodegeneration. Intra-cerebral Streptozotocin, a nitrosamine-related compound, causes neurodegeneration, whereas peripheral treatment causes DM. Hypothesis Limited early exposures to nitrosamines that are widely present in the environment, enhance the deleterious effects of high fat intake in promoting T2DM and neurodegeneration. Methods Long Evans rat pups were treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA by i.p. injection, and upon weaning, they were fed with high fat (60%; HFD or low fat (5%; LFD chow for 8 weeks. Cerebella were harvested to assess gene expression, and insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF deficiency and resistance in the context of neurodegeneration. Results HFD ± NDEA caused T2DM, neurodegeneration with impairments in brain insulin, insulin receptor, IGF-2 receptor, or insulin receptor substrate gene expression, and reduced expression of tau and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, which are regulated by insulin and IGF-1. In addition, increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine were measured in cerebella of HFD ± NDEA treated rats, and overall, NDEA+HFD treatment reduced brain levels of Tau, phospho-GSK-3β (reflecting increased GSK-3β activity, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and ChAT to greater degrees than either treatment alone. Finally, pro-ceramide genes, examined because ceramides cause insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, were significantly up-regulated by HFD and/or NDEA exposure, but the highest levels were generally present in brains of HFD+NDEA treated rats. Conclusions Early limited exposure to nitrosamines exacerbates the adverse effects of later chronic high dietary fat intake in promoting T2DM and neurodegeneration. The mechanism involves increased generation of

  13. Construction and Identification of a Vector Expressing RNA Interference Aimed at the Human CyclinD1 Gene and its Expression in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To construct a eukaryotic expression vector for RNA interference of the human cyclinD1 gene, and to detect its interference effect in human ovarian cancer cells (HO-8910).METHODS Four target gene segments were synthesized and cloned into the pSUPER vector respectively to construct four recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors, pSUPER-C1~4. The four recombinant vectors were identified by enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. Then HO-8910 cells were transfected with the pSUPER-C1~4 vectors and subjected to G418 selection. In G418-resistant cells, the interference effect was detected by RT-PCR.RESULTS Enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the target segments were cloned into the pSUPER vector. The four recombinant vectors inhibited transcription of the cyclinD1 gene. The pSUPER-C2 vector had a better interference effect.CONCLUSION The sequence-specific siRNA effectively interfered with expression of the cyclinD1 gene that was selected. The transcription and expression of the cyclinD1 gene were inhibited effectively by the constructed RNAi eukaryotic expression vectors in the ovarian cancer cells. These results indicate that it is possible to search for a new tumor gene therapy method.

  14. Construction of the recombinant vector carrying herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and cytokine genes expressed in cell line Tca8113

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Guang-hui; ZOU Jing-zhi; QU Le; YUE Ying; KUAI Jian-ke

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct expression vector containing fusion genes of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase(Hsv-tk), Interleukin-2(IL-2) with internal ribosome entry sites(IRES), and to assess their expression in cell lineTca8113. Methods: IL-2 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription. Hsv-tk, IL-2 and IRES genes were amplified by PCR. The purified amplification products were inserted into pGEM-T-Easy, and transformed into E. coli JM109. The purified recombinant plasmids were identified by restriction endonucleases. The recombinant plasmids were digested and pEGFPN3 were linearized, DNA fragments of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 were ligated into linearized pEGFP-N3, and then transferred into E. coli JM109. The recombinant tk-IL-2 genes were cloned separately and introduced into the expression vector pEGFPN3 containing GFP. The recombinant vectors were identified by their restriction sites through PCR. The plasmids pEGFP-TI was also transfected into Tca8113 cells by calcium phosphate method for the expression of fusion proteins. Fusion genes expressing vector PL(TI)SN was generated by the fusion of HSV-tk, IRES and IL-2 with the use of DNA recombination technology. The recombinant retroviruses were transferred into Tca8113 cells by lipofectamine. The positive clones were obtained after G418 selection and named Tca/TI respectively. Results: The pEGFP-TI pasmid was identified respectively by restriction endonucleases, and their fragment sizes were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI pasmid as templates were amplified respectively by PCR, and their PCR products were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI vectors were used to transfect Tca8113 cell, and the cells with fluorescence accounted for 60 % of the total amount. Conclusion: pFGFP- tk- IRES- IL-2 expressing vector is easy to assess the expression of tk-IRES-IL-2-GFP fusion protein localization in transfected cells. The successful construction of expressing vector containing fusion genes of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 may be

  15. Constructionof the recombinant adenovirus vectors of CALB2 gene and small interfering RNA, and application in testicular Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jian; Wang Jing; Liu Shan; Sun Xue-ping; Gao Chao; Gao Li; Yang Xiao-yu; Liu Jia-yin; Cui Yu-gui

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To construct the recombinant adenovirus vectors of calretinin (CALB2) gene and small interfering RNA (siRNA),for over-expression or knock-down of CALB2,as the basis of functional investigation of CALB2 in testicular Leydig cells.Methods:The cDNA sequence of CALB2 was cloned by the reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).A CALB2 gene fragment was sub-cloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV to construct the shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CALB2.Then it was transformed into BJ5183 cells with the adenoviral backbone pAdEasy-1 to obtain the homologous recombinant AdCMV-CALB2.The recombinant AdCMV-CALB2 was further packaged and amplificated in AD293 cells.The expression of CALB2 protein in AD293 cells was detected by Western blotting.CALB2 protein was over-expressed in mouse Leydig cell line (MLTC-1 cells) by the constructed AdCMVCALB2.CALB2 gene siRNA recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-H1-siRNA/CALB2 was also constructed simultaneously.Its efficacy was detected in AD293 cells by Western blotting.Results:The CALB2 gene recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMV-CALB2 and the CALB2 gene siRNA recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-H1-siRNA/CALB2 were constructed successfully by endonulease digestion and sequencing.AD293 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 or Ad-H1-SiRNA/CALB2 significantly expressed GFP protein.The expression of CALB2 protein was significantly up-regulated in AD293 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 plasmids,while the expression of CALB2 protein was down-regulated by 60% in the CALB2 cells infected with Ad-H1SiRNA/CALB2.MLTC-1 cells did not markedly express CALLB2 protein,while MLTC-1 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 expressed CALB2 protein at a high level.Conclusions:The recombinant adenovirus vectors of AdCMV-CALB2 and Ad-H1-SiRNA/CALB2 were successfully constructed.Both vectors effectively expressed in AD293.CALB2 protein was over-expressed in the cultured MLTC-1 cells by AdCMV-CALB2.These vectors of CALB2 gene and Leydig cell line are

  16. Interleukin-1 and inflammatory neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simi, A; Tsakiri, N; Wang, P; Rothwell, N J

    2007-11-01

    Inflammation occurs rapidly in response to acute brain insults such as stroke, haemorrhage or trauma, and can be sustained for long periods of time, for example in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases and multiple sclerosis. Experimental evidence indicates that inflammation plays a major role in neurodegeneration under these conditions, and that the cytokine IL-1 (interleukin-1) is a pivotal mediator. IL-1 is expressed rapidly in response to neuronal injury, predominantly by microglia, and elevated levels of endogenous or exogenous IL-1 markedly exacerbate injury. The naturally occurring IL-1RA (IL-1 receptor antagonist) markedly inhibits ischaemic, excitotoxic and traumatic brain injury in rodents, and has shown promise in a Phase II clinical trial in stroke patients. The mechanisms of IL-1 expression, release and action in neurodegeneration are not fully elucidated and appear multiple. Systemic IL-1 markedly enhances ischaemic brain injury via release of neutrophils into circulation, neutrophil adhesion to injured cerebrovasculature and CNS (central nervous system) invasion, and cell death via activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9. IL-1 also influences the release of toxins from glial and endothelial cells. Neuronal responses to excitotoxins and physiological factors may have an impact on neuronal survival. IL-1RA, delivered peripherally, can enter the CNS in animals and humans and has no adverse effects in stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage patients, but shows potential benefit in acute stroke patients.

  17. Functional study of dextran-graft-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) gene delivery vector for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Bin; Yuan, Wei; Xu, Fu-Jian; Zhao, Chen; Ma, Jie; Zhan, Qi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The obstacle of gene therapy is the shortage of efficient delivery system. The development of the gene delivery system with high transfection efficiency and low toxicity appears to be crucial. Recently, we reported that the dextran-graft-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) (DPD) can be potentially used as efficient gene vector. Herein, DPD was systematically studied for its potential in tumor gene therapy. DPD was synthesized and characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, particle size and zeta potential. The particle size and zeta potential of the DPD/enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) plasmid complexes at various N/P ratios were 130-150 nm and about 40 mV, respectively. The results showed that DPD exhibit a higher transfection effect compared with Lipofectamine 2K (Lipo 2K), a commercialized vector. The possibility of DPD in gene therapy was evaluated using p53, a gene that has been wildly applied in the research of cancer gene therapy. DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex was found to be able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, the tumor growth was found to be restrained when DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex was used in a xenograft MCF7 tumor model in vivo. These observations indicated that DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex may be considered to be an efficient delivery system for tumor gene therapy.

  18. Advances in research on non-viral vectors for gene delivery%非病毒基因递送载体的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡星

    2012-01-01

    目前,基因药物的递送成为药学研究的热点,基因递送载体主要包括病毒载体和非病毒载体.非病毒基因载体的毒性低,生物相容性好,转染效率高,具有潜在的临床应用价值.本文就靶向递送基因载体、多功能基因载体、同时载基因与化疗药物的载体、智能基因载体和脂质体等非病毒基因递送载体的研究进展做一综述.%Currently,the delivery of gene drugs has become the hot point of pharmaceutical research. Viral and non-viral vectors are the two major vehicles for gene delivery. Non-viral vectors have the advantages of low toxicity,good biocompatibility and high efficiency of transfection, showing great potential for clinical use. Advances in research on non-viral vectors, such as targeting gene vectors, multifunctional gene vectors, intelligent gene vectors, gene vectors which simultaneously carry chemo-therapeutic drugs, and liposome gene vectors are reviewed in this paper.

  19. Degradable polyethylenimine derivate coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 as a new gene-delivery vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kehai Liu1,2,*, Xiaoyu Wang1,*, Wei Fan1, Qing Zhu2, Jingya Yang2, Jing Gao3, Shen Gao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Shanghai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 2Department of Biopharmaceutics, School of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*The first two authors contributed equally to this workBackground: To solve the efficiency versus cytotoxicity and tumor-targeting problems of polyethylenimine (PEI used as a nonviral gene delivery vector, a degradable PEI derivate coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 was developed.Methods: First, we synthesized a degradable PEI derivate by crosslinking low-molecular-weight PEI with pluronic P123, then used tumor-targeting peptide arginine-glycine-aspartate-cysteine (RGDC, in conjunction with the cell-penetrating peptide Tat (49–57, to yield a bifunctional peptide RGDC-Tat (49–57 named R13, which can improve cell selection and increase cellular uptake, and, lastly, adopted R13 to modify the PEI derivates so as to prepare a new polymeric gene vector (P123-PEI-R13. The new gene vector was characterized in terms of its chemical structure and biophysical parameters. We also investigated the specificity, cytotoxicity, and gene transfection efficiency of this vector in avß3-positive human cervical carcinoma Hela cells and murine melanoma B16 cells in vitro.Results: The vector showed controlled degradation, strong targeting specificity to avß3 receptor, and noncytotoxicity in Hela cells and B16 cells at higher doses, in contrast to PEI 25 KDa. The particle size of P123-PEI-R13/DNA complexes was around 100–250 nm, with proper zeta potential. The nanoparticles can protect plasmid DNA from being digested by DNase I at a concentration of 6 U DNase I/µg DNA. The nanoparticles were resistant to dissociation induced by 50% fetal bovine serum and 600 µg/mL sodium

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  1. Peptide-Mediated Tumor Targeting by a Degradable Nano Gene Delivery Vector Based on Pluronic-Modified Polyethylenimine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaoyong; Zhan, Shuyu; Fan, Wei; Ding, Xueying; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Yinghua; Huang, Yueyan; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Rubing; Li, Mingjuan; Xu, Ningyin; Zheng, Yongxia; Ding, Baoyue

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered to be a promising non-viral gene delivery vector. To solve the toxicity versus efficacy and tumor-targeting challenges of PEI used as gene delivery vector, we constructed a novel non-viral vector DR5-TAT-modified Pluronic-PEI (Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT), which was based on the attachment of low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) to the amphiphilic polymer Pluronic to prepare Pluronic-modified LMW-PEI (Pluronic-PEI). This was then conjugated to a multifunctional peptide containing a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT) and a synthetic peptide that would bind to DR5—a receptor that is overexpressed in cancer cells. The vector showed controlled degradation, favorable DNA condensation and protection performance. The Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes at an N/P ratio of 15:1 were spherical nanoparticles of 122 ± 11.6 nm and a zeta potential of about 22 ± 2.8 mV. In vitro biological characterization results indicated that Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes had a higher specificity for the DR5 receptor and were taken up more efficiently by tumor cells than normal cells, compared to complexes formed with PEI 25 kDa or Pluronic-PEI. Thus, the novel complexes showed much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells and higher gene transfection efficiency in tumor cells than that exhibited by PEI 25 kDa and Pluronic-PEI. In summary, our novel, degradable non-viral tumor-targeting vector is a promising candidate for use in gene therapy.

  2. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacak, Andrzej; Geisler, Katrin; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2010-01-01

    -expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species) have created...... the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too weak to be of practical use. The new BSMV vectors modified for ligation-free cloning will allow rapid insertion of plant gene fragments for future experiments....

  3. Construction of a new plant expression vector containing two insect resistant genes and its expression in transgenic tobacco plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new plant expression vector (pBS29K-BA) containing two insect resistant genes, a synthetic chimeric gene BtS29K encoding the activated insecticidal protein Cry1Ac and a gene API-BA encoding the arrowhead (Sagittaria sagittifolia L.) proteinase inhibitor (API) A and B, is constructed. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these two genes are obtained through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco leaf discs. The average expression levels of Cry1Ac and API-BA proteins in transgenic plants are of 3.2 μg and 4.9 μg per gram fresh leaf respectively. The results of insecticidal assay of transgenic plants indicate that the pBS29K-BA transformed plants are more resistant to insect damage than the plants expressing the Cry1Ac gene or API-BA gene alone.

  4. An efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector based on hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang X

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xuan Liang,1,* Xianyue Ren,2,* Zhenzhen Liu,1 Yingliang Liu,1 Jue Wang,2 Jingnan Wang,2 Li-Ming Zhang,1 David YB Deng,2 Daping Quan,1 Liqun Yang1 1Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material, Key Laboratory for Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Research Center of Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *Both these authors contributed equally to this work Background: The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives as an efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector. Methods: A series of hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with 3-(dimethylamino-1-propylamine (DMAPA-Glyp and 1-(2-aminoethyl piperazine (AEPZ-Glyp residues were synthesized and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Their buffer capacity was assessed by acid–base titration in aqueous NaCl solution. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (pDNA condensation ability and protection against DNase I degradation of the glycogen derivatives were assessed using agarose gel electrophoresis. The zeta potentials and particle sizes of the glycogen derivative/pDNA complexes were measured, and the images of the complexes were observed using atomic force microscopy. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity were evaluated by hemolysis assay and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, respectively. pDNA transfection efficiency mediated by the cationic glycogen derivatives was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy in the 293T (human embryonic kidney and the CNE2 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. In vivo delivery of pDNA in model animals (Sprague Dawley

  5. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  6. Transduction of brain dopamine neurons by adenoviral vectors is modulated by CAR expression: rationale for tropism modified vectors in PD gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5-based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR. Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA neurons in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN in wild type (wt and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the

  7. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance and Classic Gene Mutations to Japanese Encephalitis Vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Dong, Yan-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Widespread resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been widely reported in China and there is consequently an urgent need to adjust pest management strategies appropriately. This requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of resistance to 5 insecticides among 12 strains of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, a major vector of Japanese encephalitis in China. Resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur were measured using larval bioassays. The allelic frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mutations were determined in all strains. Larval bioassay results indicated that the field strains collected from different sites were resistant to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur, with resistance ratio values ranging from 1.70- to 71.98-fold, 7.83- to 43.07-fold, 3.54- to 40.03-fold, 291.85- to 530.89-fold, and 51.32- to 108.83-fold, respectively. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles method for individual was developed to detect genotypes of the AChE gene mutation F455W in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The frequency of the AChE gene mutation F455W was 100.00% in all strains, making this mutation of no value as a marker of resistance to organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus in China. The kdr allele was present in all strains at frequencies of 10.00-29.55%. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between kdr allele frequencies and levels of resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin. These results highlight the need to monitor and map insecticide resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and to adjust pesticide use to minimize the development of resistance in these mosquitoes.

  8. Effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated human interleukin-24 gene transfection on pancreatic carcinoma growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xin-ting; ZHU Qing-yun; LI De-chun; YANG Ji-cheng; ZHANG Zi-xiang; ZHU Xing-guo; ZHAO Hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant tumor affecting an ever increasing number of patients with a mean 5-year survival rate below 4%. Therefore, gene therapy for cancer has become a potential novel therapeutic modality. In this study we sought to determine the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated human interleukin-24 (AdhlL-24) on pancreatic cancer.Methods Human interleukin-24 gene was cloned into replication-defective adenovirus specific for patu8988 tumor cells by virus recombination technology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis were used to determine the expression of human interleukin-24 mRNA in patu8988 cells in vitro. Induction of apoptosis by overexpression of human interleukin-24 in patu8988 cells was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo efficacy of adenoviral delivery of human interleukin-24 was assessed in nude mice (n=10 for each group) bearing patu8988 pancreatic cancer cell lines by determining inhibition of tumor growth, endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression, and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD).Results The recombinant adenovirus vector AdVGFP/IL-24 was constructed with a packaged recombinant retrovirus titer of 1.0x1010 pfu/ml and successfully expressed of both mRNA and protein in patu8988 cells. The AdVGFP/IL-24 induced apoptosis of patu8988 tumor cells in vitro and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo (P <0.05). The intratumoral MVD decreased significantly in the treated tumors (P <0.05).Conclusion The recombinant adenovirus AdGFP/IL-24 can effectively express biologically active human interleukin-24, which results in inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth.

  9. Broad-Host Range Vector-Particle: Gene Transfer Particles From Thermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiura, H. X.; Nakamura, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Nakata, D.; Tomaru, A.; Okita, N.; Hoaki, T.

    2002-12-01

    Viruses or virus-like particles (VLPs) are common in aquatic ecosystems, however, VLP-host interactions and its commitments to gene transfer in the environment is yet unclear. We have proposed that at least some of the widely distributed VLPs could be general gene transfer agents among a wide range of microbial host cells, and might function as a universal vector (1-4). To elucidate such a broad host range gene transfer mediated by "VLP", the sampling site was extended to the hyper hydrothermal vent, and boring cores. VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml water samples from drilling holes of Suiyo seamount were: APSK04 (28°34.303'N, 140°38.618'E, 1385 m deep, 21°C, b = 8.26 *E^{6}, v = 6.03 x 10^{6}); APSK07 (28°34.299'N, 140°38.690'E, 1386 m deep, 250.5°C, b = 5.33 \\times 104, v = 2.52 \\times 104); a natural vent near APSK05 (28°34.322'N, 140°38.594'E, 1382 m deep, 304.7°C, b = 3.23 x 10^{4}, v = 1.85 x 10^{4}). A boring core sample was obtained from APSK06 (28°34.313'N, 140°38.617', 1386 m deep), from which a hyper thermophilic Archaean, Thermococcus kodakaraensis was successfully cultivated in sulphur supplemented medium between 70 and 90°C. VLP production was observed from T. kodakaraensis, whose VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml at 480 h culture at 70°C were: b = 3.61 *E^{9}, v = 3.46 *E^{9}. Transduction experiment at multiplicity of infection of ca 0.2 using particles from APSK07 and T. kodakaraensis showed a plate efficiency on recipient Escherichia coli AB1157 by ca 72 % and ca 89 % regardless of UV treatment of the particle. Gene transfer frequency of APSK07 particle was (x 10^{-5} cfu/particle) between 2.4 and 0.92, and that of T. kodakaraensis particle was between x 10^{-4} and x 10^{-5}$ cfu/particle. These findings suggest the non-specific gene transfer by such particles may be a ubiquitous event in the natural environment. Such gene transfer particles may have mediated gene flux among phylogenetically diverse microbial

  10. Expression profile of genes during resistance reversal in a temephos selected strain of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Strode

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes aegypti is one of the most important disease vectors because it transmits two major arboviruses, dengue and yellow fever, which cause significant global morbidity and mortality. Chemical insecticides form the cornerstone of vector control. The organophosphate temephos a larvicide recommended by WHO for controlling Ae. aegypti, however, resistance to this compound has been reported in many countries, including Brazil. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of this study was to identify genes implicated in metabolic resistance in an Ae. aegypti temephos resistant strain, named RecR, through microarray analysis. We utilized a custom 'Ae. aegypti detox chip' and validated microarray data through RT-PCR comparing susceptible and resistant individuals. In addition, we analyzed gene expression in 4(th instar larvae from a reversed susceptible strain (RecRev, exposed and unexposed to temephos. The results obtained revealed a set of 13 and 6 genes significantly over expressed in resistant adult mosquitoes and larvae, respectively. One of these genes, the cytochrome P450 CYP6N12, was up-regulated in both stages. RT-PCR confirmed the microarray results and, additionally, showed no difference in gene expression between temephos exposed and unexposed RecRev mosquitoes. This suggested that the differences in the transcript profiles among the strains are heritable due to a selection process and are not caused by immediate insecticide exposure. Reversal of temephos resistance was demonstrated and, importantly, there was a positive correlation between a decrease in the resistance ratio and an accompanying decrease in the expression levels of previously over expressed genes. Some of the genes identified here have also been implicated in metabolic resistance in other mosquito species and insecticide resistant populations of Ae. aegypti. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of gene expression signatures associated to

  11. Enhancement of heterologous gene expression in Flammulina velutipes using polycistronic vectors containing a viral 2A cleavage sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Lin

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation for edible mushrooms has been previously established. However, the enhancement of heterologous protein production and the expression of multi-target genes remains a challenge. In this study, heterologous protein expression in the enoki mushroom Flammulina velutipes was notably enhanced using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage to co-express multiple copies of single gene. The polycistronic expression vectors were constructed by connecting multi copies of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp gene using 2A peptides derived from porcine teschovirus-1. The P2A peptides properly self-cleaved as shown by the formation of the transformants with antibiotic resistant capacity and exciting green fluorescence levels after introducing the vectors into F. velutipes mycelia. The results of western blot analysis, epifluorescent microscopy and EGFP production showed that heterologous protein expression in F. velutipes using the polycistronic strategy increased proportionally as the gene copy number increased from one to three copies. In contrast, much lower EGFP levels were detected in the F. velutipes transformants harboring four copies of the egfp gene due to mRNA instability. The polycistronic strategy using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage developed in this study can not only be used to express single gene in multiple copies, but also to express multiple genes in a single reading frame. It is a promising strategy for the application of mushroom molecular pharming.

  12. Enhancement of heterologous gene expression in Flammulina velutipes using polycistronic vectors containing a viral 2A cleavage sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Huang, Li-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation for edible mushrooms has been previously established. However, the enhancement of heterologous protein production and the expression of multi-target genes remains a challenge. In this study, heterologous protein expression in the enoki mushroom Flammulina velutipes was notably enhanced using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage to co-express multiple copies of single gene. The polycistronic expression vectors were constructed by connecting multi copies of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) gene using 2A peptides derived from porcine teschovirus-1. The P2A peptides properly self-cleaved as shown by the formation of the transformants with antibiotic resistant capacity and exciting green fluorescence levels after introducing the vectors into F. velutipes mycelia. The results of western blot analysis, epifluorescent microscopy and EGFP production showed that heterologous protein expression in F. velutipes using the polycistronic strategy increased proportionally as the gene copy number increased from one to three copies. In contrast, much lower EGFP levels were detected in the F. velutipes transformants harboring four copies of the egfp gene due to mRNA instability. The polycistronic strategy using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage developed in this study can not only be used to express single gene in multiple copies, but also to express multiple genes in a single reading frame. It is a promising strategy for the application of mushroom molecular pharming.

  13. Clonal Dominance With Retroviral Vector Insertions Near the ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 Genes in a Human Xenotransplant Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Haemmerle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertional leukemogenesis represents the major risk factor of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC based gene therapy utilizing integrating viral vectors. To develop a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of vector-related genotoxicity directly in the relevant human target cells, cord blood CD34+ HSCs were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD.SCID.IL2rg−/− (NSG mice after transduction with an LTR-driven gammaretroviral vector (GV. Furthermore, we specifically investigated the effect of prolonged in vitro culture in the presence of cytokines recently described to promote HSC expansion or maintenance. Clonality of human hematopoiesis in NSG mice was assessed by high throughput insertion site analyses and validated by insertion site-specific PCR depicting a GV typical integration profile with insertion sites resembling to 25% those of clinical studies. No overrepresentation of integrations in the vicinity of cancer-related genes was observed, however, several dominant clones were identified including two clones harboring integrations in the ANGPT1 and near the ANGPT2 genes associated with deregulated ANGPT1- and ANGPT2-mRNA levels. While these data underscore the potential value of the NSG model, our studies also identified short-comings such as overall low numbers of engrafted HSCs, limited in vivo observation time, and the challenges of in-depth insertion site analyses by low contribution of gene modified hematopoiesis.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-generated p47phox-deficient cell line for Chronic Granulomatous Disease gene therapy vector development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Dominik; Siler, Ulrich; Reichenbach, Janine

    2017-01-01

    Development of gene therapy vectors requires cellular models reflecting the genetic background of a disease thus allowing for robust preclinical vector testing. For human p47phox-deficient chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) vector testing we generated a cellular model using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 to introduce a GT-dinucleotide deletion (ΔGT) mutation in p47phox encoding NCF1 gene in the human acute myeloid leukemia PLB-985 cell line. CGD is a group of hereditary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired respiratory burst activity in phagocytes due to a defective phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. In Western countries autosomal-recessive p47phox-subunit deficiency represents the second largest CGD patient cohort with unique genetics, as the vast majority of p47phox CGD patients carries ΔGT deletion in exon two of the NCF1 gene. The established PLB-985 NCF1 ΔGT cell line reflects the most frequent form of p47phox-deficient CGD genetically and functionally. It can be differentiated to granulocytes efficiently, what creates an attractive alternative to currently used iPSC models for rapid testing of novel gene therapy approaches. PMID:28287132

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-generated p47(phox)-deficient cell line for Chronic Granulomatous Disease gene therapy vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Dominik; Siler, Ulrich; Reichenbach, Janine

    2017-03-13

    Development of gene therapy vectors requires cellular models reflecting the genetic background of a disease thus allowing for robust preclinical vector testing. For human p47(phox)-deficient chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) vector testing we generated a cellular model using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 to introduce a GT-dinucleotide deletion (ΔGT) mutation in p47(phox) encoding NCF1 gene in the human acute myeloid leukemia PLB-985 cell line. CGD is a group of hereditary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired respiratory burst activity in phagocytes due to a defective phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. In Western countries autosomal-recessive p47(phox)-subunit deficiency represents the second largest CGD patient cohort with unique genetics, as the vast majority of p47(phox) CGD patients carries ΔGT deletion in exon two of the NCF1 gene. The established PLB-985 NCF1 ΔGT cell line reflects the most frequent form of p47(phox)-deficient CGD genetically and functionally. It can be differentiated to granulocytes efficiently, what creates an attractive alternative to currently used iPSC models for rapid testing of novel gene therapy approaches.

  16. Vector integration is nonrandom and clustered and influences the fate of lymphopoiesis in SCID-X1 gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Annette; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Schmidt, Manfred; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Brugman, Martijn H; Hu, Jingqiong; Glimm, Hanno; Gyapay, Gabor; Prum, Bernard; Fraser, Christopher C; Fischer, Nicolas; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Siegler, Maria-Luise; de Ridder, Dick; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Howe, Steven J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Wagemaker, Gerard; Abel, Ulrich; Staal, Frank J T; Delabesse, Eric; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Aronow, Bruce; Hue, Christophe; Prinz, Claudia; Wissler, Manuela; Klanke, Chuck; Weissenbach, Jean; Alexander, Ian; Fischer, Alain; von Kalle, Christof; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2007-08-01

    Recent reports have challenged the notion that retroviruses and retroviral vectors integrate randomly into the host genome. These reports pointed to a strong bias toward integration in and near gene coding regions and, for gammaretroviral vectors, around transcription start sites. Here, we report the results obtained from a large-scale mapping of 572 retroviral integration sites (RISs) isolated from cells of 9 patients with X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) treated with a retrovirus-based gene therapy protocol. Our data showed that two-thirds of insertions occurred in or very near to genes, of which more than half were highly expressed in CD34(+) progenitor cells. Strikingly, one-fourth of all integrations were clustered as common integration sites (CISs). The highly significant incidence of CISs in circulating T cells and the nature of their locations indicate that insertion in many gene loci has an influence on cell engraftment, survival, and proliferation. Beyond the observed cases of insertional mutagenesis in 3 patients, these data help to elucidate the relationship between vector insertion and long-term in vivo selection of transduced cells in human patients with SCID-X1.

  17. Construction of Smac gene-containing and human prostate specific antigen promoter-regulated vector and its expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wu; Fuqing Zeng; Liang Wang; Yanbo Wang; Guiyi Liao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct an eukaryotic expression vector containing Smac gene and study the expression efficiency and specificity of prostate specific antigen(PSA) enhancer/promoter in a possible targeted gene therapy scheme for prostate cancer. Methods: PSA enhancer (PSAE) and promoter (PSAP) sequences were amplified using PCR method. CMV and T7 promoters were deleted from pcDNA3.1-Smac and replaced by the two specific fragments to generate pPSAE-PSAP-Smac. After transfection into different cell lines, the status of cells was observed. And then, we determined the relative concentration of Smac mRNA in RT-PCR. Results: The recombinant plasmid of pPSAE-PSAP-Smac was successfully constructed. And only the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 was suppressed after transfection with pPSAE-PSAP-Smac. However, other nonprostate lines were not. Moreover,the concentration of Smac mRNA regulated by PSA promoter and enhancer was higher in comparison to the CMV promoter-driven control vectors. Conclusion: An expression vector containing the Smac gene (based on elements of the PSA gene regulatory sequences) has been developed and shown to function in prostate cancer cell lines which provides a solid platform for launching clinical studies.

  18. Vaccination with lentiviral vector expressing the nfa1 gene confers a protective immune response to mice infected with Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2013-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection.

  19. Mutational Analysis of the Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Capsid Gene and Construction of AAV2 Vectors with Altered Tropism

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Pei; Xiao, Wu; Conlon, Thomas; Hughes, Jeffrey; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; FERKOL, THOMAS; Flotte, Terence; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) has proven to be a valuable vector for gene therapy. Characterization of the functional domains of the AAV capsid proteins can facilitate our understanding of viral tissue tropism, immunoreactivity, viral entry, and DNA packaging, all of which are important issues for generating improved vectors. To obtain a comprehensive genetic map of the AAV capsid gene, we have constructed 93 mutants at 59 different positions in the AAV capsid gene by site-directed mut...

  20. Development of next generation adeno-associated viral vectors capable of selective tropism and efficient gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanling; Yao, Tianzhuo; Zheng, Yongxiang; Li, Zhongjun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2016-02-01

    Virus-based nanoparticles have shown promise as vehicles for delivering therapeutic genes. However, the rational design of viral vectors that enable selective tropism towards particular types of cells and tissues remains challenging. Here, we explored structural-functional relationships of the adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector by expanding its genetic code during production. As a proof-of-principle, an azide moiety was strategically displayed on the vector capsid as a bioorthogonal chemical reporter. Upon bioorthogonal conjugation of AAV2 with fluorophores and cyclic arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid ligands at certain modifiable sites, we characterized in vitro and in vivo AAV2 movement and enhanced tropism selectivity towards integrin-expressing tumor cells. Targeting AAV2 vectors resulted in selective killing of U87 glioblastoma cells and derived xenografts via the herpes simplex virus suicide gene thymidine kinase, with the potency of ganciclovir being increased by 25-fold. Our results demonstrated successful rational modification of AAV2 as a targeting delivery vehicle, establishing a facile platform for precision engineering of virus-based nanoparticles in basic research and therapeutic applications.

  1. Clinical-scale lentiviral vector transduction of PBL for TCR gene therapy and potential for expression in less differentiated cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shicheng; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In human gene therapy applications, lentiviral vectors may have advantages over gamma-retroviral vectors because of their ability to transduce non-dividing cells, their resistance to gene silencing, and a lack of integration site preference. In this study, we utilized VSV-G pseudotype third generation lentiviral vectors harboring specific anti-tumor T-cell receptor (TCR) to establish clinical-scale lentiviral transduction of PBL. Spinoculation (1000 × g, 32°C for 2 h) in the presence of protamine sulfate represents the most efficient and economical approach to transduce a large number of PBLs compared to RetroNectin-based methods. Up to 20 million cells per well of a 6-well plate were efficiently transduced and underwent an average 50-fold expansion in two weeks. TCR transduced PBL mediated specific anti-tumor activities including IFN-γ release and cell lysis. Compared to gamma-retroviral vectors, the TCR transgene could be preferentially expressed on a less-differentiated cell population. PMID:18833004

  2. Development of a plant viral-vector-based gene expression assay for the screening of yeast cytochrome p450 monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kathleen; Nguyen, Long V; Khan, Faizah; Pogue, Gregory P; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; Panda, Sanjay; Pinot, Franck; Oriedo, Vincent B; Rasochova, Lada; Subramanian, Mani; Miller, Barbara; White, Earl L

    2003-02-01

    Development of a gene discovery tool for heterologously expressed cytochrome P450 monooxygenases has been inherently difficult. The activity assays are labor-intensive and not amenable to parallel screening. Additionally, biochemical confirmation requires coexpression of a homologous P450 reductase or complementary heterologous activity. Plant virus gene expression systems have been utilized for a diverse group of organisms. In this study we describe a method using an RNA vector expression system to phenotypically screen for cytochrome P450-dependent fatty acid omega-hydroxylase activity. Yarrowia lipolytica CYP52 gene family members involved in n-alkane assimilation were amplified from genomic DNA, cloned into a plant virus gene expression vector, and used as a model system for determining heterologous expression. Plants infected with virus vectors expressing the yeast CYP52 genes (YlALK1-YlALK7) showed a distinct necrotic lesion phenotype on inoculated plant leaves. No phenotype was detected on negative control constructs. YlALK3-, YlALK5-, and YlALK7-inoculated plants all catalyzed the terminal hydroxylation of lauric acid as confirmed using thin-layer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. The plant-based cytochrome P450 phenotypic screen was tested on an n-alkane-induced Yarrowia lipolytica plant virus expression library. A subset of 1,025 random library clones, including YlALK1-YlALK7 constructs, were tested on plants. All YlALK gene constructs scored positive in the randomized screen. Following nucleotide sequencing of the clones that scored positive using a phenotypic screen, approximately 5% were deemed appropriate for further biochemical analysis. This report illustrates the utility of a plant-based system for expression of heterologous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and for the assignment of gene function.

  3. Suppression of gastric cancer growth by baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of normal epithelial cell specific-1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Xiang-Long Tian; Yun-Lin Wu; Jie Zhong; Li-Fen Yu; Sheng-Ping Hu; Biao Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated normal epithelial celt specific-1 (NES1) gene therapy on gastric cancer (GC) in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: We first constructed recombinant baculovirus vectors and then transfected them into gastric cancer cells (SGC-7901). Efficiency of the baculovirus for gene transfer into SGC-7901 cells and cell growth curves were detected by fluorescence microscopy, Western blot and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in vitro, respectively. The therapeutic effect of this gene therapy on GC was confirmed in xenografted nude mice. Tumor growth was determined by tumor volume, and expression of NES1 in tumor was analyzed by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Baculovirus vectors were successfully transfected into SGC-7901 cells. SGC-7901 cells transfected with the NES1 gene inhibited cell growth. In the Bac-NES1 treated group, tumor growth was significantly reduced with a high level of NES1 expression CONCLUSION: Baculovirus-mediated NES1 gene can be used in gene therapy for GC.

  4. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  5. Cloning of strawberry FaEtr2 gene and its plant expression vector construction for antisense RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunli SONG; Junlian MA; Xia TANG; Zide ZHANG; Pingping ZHOU; Zhixia HOU

    2009-01-01

    An ethylene receptor FaEtr2 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from ripening strawberry fruit. A 1049-bp PCR product (All Star-Etr2) was cloned. Sequence analysis showed that the All Star-Etr2 nucleotide sequence had 100% identity with Chandler-Etr2 from the GenBank. A pair of primers containing restriction enzyme sites were designed and used to amplify the sequenced plasmid. The PCR product was digested by the corresponding restricted enzymes and inserted between the CaMV 35S promoter and NOS terminator of expression vector pBI121 directionally. The constructed expression vector was transformed into Agrobacterium fumefeciens LBA4404 in the follow-up research to silence a ripening-related ethylene receptor FaEtr2 gene in strawberry fruits.

  6. High-level expression of a chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma using a prokaryotic expression vector.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma has been cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector under the regulation of a synthetic constitutive transcriptional-translational control unit that contains a strong bacteriophage T5 early promoter and a strong ribosome-binding site. Cells harboring the recombinant plasmid express high levels (4 X 10(9) units per liter of culture) of antiviral activity specific for interferon-gamma. Analysis of total cell lysates on NaDodSO4/polyacryl...

  7. Clonado de genes de trypanosoma cruzi en vectores de expresión y purificación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Anzola de M.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genes del Trypanosoma cruzi, parásito causante de la enfermedad de Chagas, fueron clonados en vectores pGEX. La expresión se hizo en Escherichia coli, induciendo las proteínas de fusión con IPTG y purificándolas por cromatografía de afinidad con glutation agarosa. Estas proteínas fueron analizadas por electroforesis y cuantificadas por el micrométodo de Bradford

  8. The use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging and biofluorescence for in vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, N.; Macnab, SA; Marston, G; Scott, N.; Carr, IM; Markham, AF; Whitehouse, A; Coletta, PL

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive imaging of the biodistribution of novel therapeutics including gene therapy vectors in animal models is essential. Methods: This study assessed the utility of high-frequency ultrasound (HF-US) combined with biofluoresence imaging (BFI) to determine the longitudinal impact of a Herpesvirus saimiri amplicon on human colorectal cancer xenograft growth. Results: HF-US imaging of xenografts resulted in an accurate and informative xenograft volume in a longitudinal study. T...

  9. Cloning of NHE-1 gene fragment from human lung cancer cells and construction of its antisense expression vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-ming; HUANG Gui-jun; QIAN Gui-sheng

    2001-01-01

    To clone the partial sequence of Na+/H+ exchanger-1 (NHE-1) gene of human lung cancer cells and insert it reversely into the multiclone site of pLXSN in order to construct an antisense expression vector for tumor gene therapy in vivo. Methods: With use of the upstream and downstream primers containing Bam H I and EcoR I in their 5' ends respectively, a partial sequence of the first exon of NHE-1 gene was cloned in a length of 454 bp from genomic DNA of human lung cancer cell A549 with PCR method. The product was then directionally and reversely insert into the multiclone site of pLXSN. Finally, the constructed recombinant was identified with agarose gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. Results: The cloned fragment was 461 bp in length and successfully ligated to pLXSN with the identification by agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA sequencing confirmed that the fragment cloned and inserted into the vector was identical with the targeted one. Conclusion: The targeted fragment is successfully cloned and reversely inserted into pLXSN in our experiment. The antisense expression vector ofNHE-1, pNHE- 1, was constructed successfully.

  10. [Construction of an integration vector carrying hygromycin B resistance gene and its genetic transformation in Rhizopus oryzae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Juan; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xingjiang; Pan, Lijun; Luo, Shuizhong

    2015-08-01

    To construct a system of genetic transformation suitable for Rhizopus oryzae, we constructed a single-exchange vector pBS-hygro carrying hygromycin B resistance gene (hph) as its selective marker using gene splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE PCR) technique. We introduced this recombinant vector into Rhizopus oryzae AS 3.819 by PEG/CaCl2-mediated transformation of protoplast, electroporation of protoplast and germinated spores; and we studied the effects of hydrolysis time, field strength and spore germination time on transformation frequency. We conducted quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to determine the gene copy number of ldhA integrated in the genome of R. oryzae transformants and its effect on the stability of transformants. We successfully achieved R. oryzae transformants integrated with pBS-hygro-ldhA vector. The optimal hydrolysis time for protoplast production was 140 min, and the optimal field strength of electroporation pulse for protoplast was 13 kV/cm. The optimal germination time of spores for electroporation was 2.5 h, and the optimal field strength of electroporation pulse was 14 kV/cm. The transformation frequency of method based on germinated spores was generally higher than the methods based on protoplast. The qPCR test results suggested that transformants with high copy number of integration in a certain range were relatively stable. Our results provided basis and support for metabolic regulation and genetic engineering breeding of R. oryzae.

  11. Highly efficient Cas9-mediated gene drive for population modification of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Valentino M; Jasinskiene, Nijole; Tatarenkova, Olga; Fazekas, Aniko; Macias, Vanessa M; Bier, Ethan; James, Anthony A

    2015-12-08

    Genetic engineering technologies can be used both to create transgenic mosquitoes carrying antipathogen effector genes targeting human malaria parasites and to generate gene-drive systems capable of introgressing the genes throughout wild vector populations. We developed a highly effective autonomous Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated gene-drive system in the Asian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi, adapted from the mutagenic chain reaction (MCR). This specific system results in progeny of males and females derived from transgenic males exhibiting a high frequency of germ-line gene conversion consistent with homology-directed repair (HDR). This system copies an ∼ 17-kb construct from its site of insertion to its homologous chromosome in a faithful, site-specific manner. Dual anti-Plasmodium falciparum effector genes, a marker gene, and the autonomous gene-drive components are introgressed into ∼ 99.5% of the progeny following outcrosses of transgenic lines to wild-type mosquitoes. The effector genes remain transcriptionally inducible upon blood feeding. In contrast to the efficient conversion in individuals expressing Cas9 only in the germ line, males and females derived from transgenic females, which are expected to have drive component molecules in the egg, produce progeny with a high frequency of mutations in the targeted genome sequence, resulting in near-Mendelian inheritance ratios of the transgene. Such mutant alleles result presumably from nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) events before the segregation of somatic and germ-line lineages early in development. These data support the design of this system to be active strictly within the germ line. Strains based on this technology could sustain control and elimination as part of the malaria eradication agenda.

  12. piggyBac as a high-capacity transgenesis and gene-therapy vector in human cells and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongbo Li

    2013-05-01

    The stable genomic integration and expression of a large transgene is a major hurdle in gene therapy. We show that the modified piggyBac (PB transposon system can be used to introduce a 207 kb genomic DNA fragment containing the RORγ/γt locus into human cells and mice. PB-mediated transgenesis results in a single copy of a stably inherited and expressed transgene. These results indicate that PB could serve as an effective high-capacity vector for functional analysis of the mammalian genome and for gene therapy in human cells.

  13. Early, sustained efficacy of adeno-associated virus vector-mediated gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, D D; Sun, B D; Damodaran, T V; Brown, T; Millington, D S; Benjamin, D K; Bird, A; Schneider, A; Hillman, S; Jackson, M; Beaty, R M; Chen, Y T

    2006-09-01

    The deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia). An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding G6Pase was pseudotyped as AAV8 and administered to 2-week-old GSD-Ia mice (n = 9). Median survival was prolonged to 7 months following vector administration, in contrast to untreated GSD-Ia mice that survived for only 2 weeks. Although GSD-Ia mice were initially growth-retarded, treated mice increased fourfold in weight to normal size. Blood glucose was partially corrected by 2 weeks following treatment, whereas blood cholesterol normalized. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was partially corrected to 25% of the normal level at 7 months of age in treated mice, and blood glucose during fasting remained lower in treated, affected mice than in normal mice. Glycogen storage was partially corrected in the liver by 2 weeks following treatment, but reaccumulated to pre-treatment levels by 7 months old (m.o.). Vector genome DNA decreased between 3 days and 3 weeks in the liver following vector administration, mainly through the loss of single-stranded genomes; however, double-stranded vector genomes were more stable. Although CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrates were present in the liver, partial biochemical correction was sustained at 7 m.o. The development of efficacious AAV vector-mediated gene therapy could significantly reduce the impact of long-term complications in GSD-Ia, including hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia and growth failure.

  14. Use of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria as a vector to express the cry3A gene from Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salles Joana Falcão

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria as a vector to express a cry gene from Bacillus thuringiensis, envisaging the control of pests that attack sugarcane plants. The endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus strain BR11281 and Herbaspirillum seropedicae strain BR11335 were used as models. The cry3A gene was transferred by conjugation using a suicide plasmid and the recombinant strains were selected by their ability to fix nitrogen in semi-solid N-free medium. The presence of the cry gene was detected by Southern-blot using an internal fragment of 1.0 kb as a probe. The production of delta-endotoxin by the recombinant H. seropedicae strain was detected by dot blot while for G. diazotrophicus the Western-blot technique was used. In both cases, a specific antibody raised against the B. thuringiensis toxin was applied. The delta-endotoxin production showed by the G. diazotrophicus recombinant strain was dependent on the nitrogen fixing conditions since the cry3A gene was fused to a nif promoter. In the case of H. seropedicae the delta-endotoxin expression was not affected by the promoter (rhi used. These results suggest that endophytic diazotrophic bacteria can be used as vectors to express entomopathogenic genes envisaging control of sugarcane pests.

  15. Application of PEI-Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles as Gene Transfer Vector for the Genetic Modification of Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector for breeding transgenic animals, we investigated a new approach to deliver green fluorescent protein (GFP gene to porcine kidney 15 (PK-15 and porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF cells using PEI-modified magnetic nanoparticles as gene vector. The morphology of the nanoparticles and nanoparticle/DNA complexes was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the surface of the particles becomes coarse and rough with increased average diameter, which implied the effective conjugating between nanoparticles with DNA. The zeta potential of nanoparticle/DNA complexes drops down from +29.4 mV to +23.1 mV comparing with pure nanoparticles. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiments show that DNA plasmids can be protected effectively against degradation of exonuclease and endonuclease. The efficiency of gene delivery was affected by the mass ratio of nanoparticle/DNA and the amount of nanoparticle/DNA complexes. We confirm that the most optimal mass ratio of nanoparticle/DNA is 1  :  1 by conducting a series of experiments. This work provides important experimental basis for the application of the magnetic nanoparticles on gene delivery to porcine somatic cells, which is significant for the achieving of breeding new transgenic cloned pigs by using somatic cell nuclear transfer technique.

  16. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  17. A modular lentiviral and retroviral construction system to rapidly generate vectors for gene expression and gene knockdown in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiling, Benjamin; Vandal, Guillaume; Posner, Ada R; de Bruyns, Angeline; Dutchak, Kendall L; Garnett, Samantha; Dankort, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to express exogenous cDNAs while suppressing endogenous genes via RNAi represents an extremely powerful research tool with the most efficient non-transient approach being accomplished through stable viral vector integration. Unfortunately, since traditional restriction enzyme based methods for constructing such vectors are sequence dependent, their construction is often difficult and not amenable to mass production. Here we describe a non-sequence dependent Gateway recombination cloning system for the rapid production of novel lentiviral (pLEG) and retroviral (pREG) vectors. Using this system to recombine 3 or 4 modular plasmid components it is possible to generate viral vectors expressing cDNAs with or without inhibitory RNAs (shRNAmirs). In addition, we demonstrate a method to rapidly produce and triage novel shRNAmirs for use with this system. Once strong candidate shRNAmirs have been identified they may be linked together in tandem to knockdown expression of multiple targets simultaneously or to improve the knockdown of a single target. Here we demonstrate that these recombinant vectors are able to express cDNA and effectively knockdown protein expression using both cell culture and animal model systems.

  18. Advancements in Researches on Vectors of the Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A%血友病A基因治疗载体研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晴; 颜景斌; 曾溢滔

    2011-01-01

    血友病A是X染色体隐性遗传出血性疾病.其发病原因是患者血液中先天缺乏凝血因子F Ⅷ.用于血友病A基因治疗研究的载体有病毒载体和非病毒载体,目前研究较多的是病毒载体,主要有逆转录病毒载体和慢病毒载体,腺病毒载体及腺相关病毒载体等.非病毒载体主要有质粒、脂质体、转座子等.文章拟对血友病A基因治疗各载体的特点和研究进展作一综述.%Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a congenital deficiency of clotting factor VDI in patients' blood. The vectors applied in researches on the gene therapy for hemophilia A include viral vectors and nonviral vectors. Recently, more researches have been done in the development of viral vectors system, such as retrovirus vectors, lentivirus vectors, adenovirus vectors, and adeno-associated vectors. Nonviral vectors mainly include plasmids, lipofectamine, transposon, etc. This article will review the progress in researches on the vectors of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

  19. Molecular pathways underpinning ethanol-induced neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eGoldowitz*

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetics impacts the type and severity of damage following developmental ethanol exposure, little is currently known about the molecular pathways that mediate these effects. Traditionally, research in this area has used a candidate gene approach and evaluated effects on a gene-by-gene basis. Recent studies, however, have begun to use unbiased approaches and genetic reference populations to evaluate the roles of genotype and epigenetic modifications in phenotypic changes following developmental ethanol exposure, similar to studies that evaluated numerous alcohol-related phenotypes in adults. Here, we present work assessing the role of genetics and chromatin-based alterations in mediating ethanol-induced apoptosis in the developing nervous system. Utilizing the expanded family of BXD recombinant inbred mice, animals were exposed to ethanol at postnatal day 7 via subcutaneous injection (5.0 g/kg in 2 doses. Tissue was collected 7 hours after the initial ethanol treatment and analyzed by activated caspase-3 immunostaining to visualize dying cells in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In parallel, the levels of two histone modifications relevant to apoptosis, γH2AX and H3K14 acetylation, were examined in the cerebral cortex using protein blot analysis. Activated caspase-3 staining identified marked differences in cell death across brain regions between different mouse strains. Genetic analysis of ethanol susceptibility in the hippocampus led to the identification of a quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, which mediates, at least in part, strain-specific differential vulnerability to ethanol-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of chromatin modifications in the cerebral cortex revealed a global increase in γH2AX levels following ethanol exposure, but did not show any change in H3K14 acetylation levels. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and genetic contributions underlying ethanol

  20. Characterization of a Brome mosaic virus strain and its use as a vector for gene silencing in monocotyledonous hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin Shun; Schneider, William L; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa Rao; Mian, M A Rouf; Nelson, Richard S

    2006-11-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is used to analyze gene function in dicotyledonous plants but less so in monocotyledonous plants (particularly rice and corn), partially due to the limited number of virus expression vectors available. Here, we report the cloning and modification for VIGS of a virus from Festuca arundinacea Schreb. (tall fescue) that caused systemic mosaic symptoms on barley, rice, and a specific cultivar of maize (Va35) under greenhouse conditions. Through sequencing, the virus was determined to be a strain of Brome mosaic virus (BMV). The virus was named F-BMV (F for Festuca), and genetic determinants that controlled the systemic infection of rice were mapped to RNAs 1 and 2 of the tripartite genome. cDNA from RNA 3 of the Russian strain of BMV (R-BMV) was modified to accept inserts from foreign genes. Coinoculation of RNAs 1 and 2 from F-BMV and RNA 3 from R-BMV expressing a portion of a plant gene to leaves of barley, rice, and maize plants resulted in visual silencing-like phenotypes. The visual phenotypes were correlated with decreased target host transcript levels in the corresponding leaves. The VIGS visual phenotype varied from maintained during silencing of actin 1 transcript expression to transient with incomplete penetration through affected tissue during silencing of phytoene desaturase expression. F-BMV RNA 3 was modified to allow greater accumulation of virus while minimizing virus pathogenicity. The modified vector C-BMV(A/G) (C for chimeric) was shown to be useful for VIGS. These BMV vectors will be useful for analysis of gene function in rice and maize for which no VIGS system is reported.

  1. Construction and Characterization of Lentiviral shRNA Expression Vector Targeting Rat CD40 Gene in Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Mei; LI Jin-dong; JIANG Rui; JIN Cheng-yan; GAO Nan; LUO Shu-li; WANG Chun-guang; WANG Bin; WANG Rong-you; ZHANG Xing-yi

    2009-01-01

    To construct a lentiviral shRNA vector targeting rat CD40 gene and detect its effectiveness of gene silencing in dendritic cells(DCs), specific siRNA targets with short hairpin frame were designed and synthesized according to the mRNA sequence of rat CD40 gene. DNA oligo was cloned into lentiviral expression vector, and then PCR and sequencing analyses were conducted to verify the constructs. The verified plasmids were transfected into 293T cells that over-express recombinant CD40 in order to select the most effective siRNA targets. shRNA lentivi-ruses from the selected constructs were propagated and harvested with a virus packaging system, and the virus titers were determined. Western blot and Real-time PCR were performed to determine CD40 expression level in the virus-infected dendritic cells. PCR and sequencing analyses reveal that shRNA plasmids of four targets were successfully constructed. The optimal interfering target was selected, and the virus with a titer of 5×10~7 TU/mL was successfully packaged. CD40 expression in rat DCs was knockdown at both mRNA and protein levels by virus infection. In comparison to that of control groups, CD40 mRNA expression and protein expression were decreased by 60.9% and 61.2%, respectively. We have successfully constructed recombinant lentiviral shRNA expression vector targeting rat CD40 gene that can effectively down-regulate CD40 gene expression at mRNA and protein levels in rat DC.

  2. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  3. CRTC1 Function During Memory Encoding Is Disrupted in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Chen, Meng; Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Ortega, Laura; Acosta, Sara; Perna, Judith Camats; Fullana, M Neus; Aguilera, José; Rodríguez-Alvarez, José; Saura, Carlos A

    2017-01-15

    Associative memory impairment is an early clinical feature of dementia patients, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these deficits are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the functional regulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by associative learning in physiological and neurodegenerative conditions. We evaluated the activation of CRTC1 in the hippocampus of control mice and mice lacking the Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin genes (presenilin conditional double knockout [PS cDKO]) after one-trial contextual fear conditioning by using biochemical, immunohistochemical, and gene expression analyses. PS cDKO mice display classical features of neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease including age-dependent cortical atrophy, neuron loss, dendritic degeneration, and memory deficits. Context-associative learning, but not single context or unconditioned stimuli, induces rapid dephosphorylation (Ser151) and translocation of CRTC1 from the cytosol/dendrites to the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in the mouse brain. Accordingly, context-associative learning induces differential CRTC1-dependent transcription of c-fos and the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (Nr4a) genes Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus through a mechanism that involves CRTC1 recruitment to CRE promoters. Deregulation of CRTC1 dephosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and transcriptional function are associated with long-term contextual memory deficits in PS cDKO mice. Importantly, CRTC1 gene therapy in the hippocampus ameliorates context memory and transcriptional deficits and dendritic degeneration despite ongoing cortical degeneration in this neurodegeneration mouse model. These findings reveal a critical role of CRTC1 in the hippocampus during associative memory, and provide evidence that CRTC1 deregulation underlies memory deficits during neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016

  4. NEURODEGENERATION WITH IRON ACCUMULATION TYPE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikhande D Y

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1 is a rare degenerative disorder presenting with dementia and progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction. A 10 yrs old girl reported with complaints of difficulty in speech and involuntary movements. MRI Brain showed ‘eye of tiger appearance’ which is suggestive of neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1. Treatment is symptomatic and chelating agents have no effect. The disease is progressivelyfatal

  5. 2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran methyl methacrylate copolymer nonviral vector: still a long way toward the safety of aerosol gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, P; Hohenforst-Schmidt, W; Darwiche, K; Krauss, L; Sparopoulou, D; Sakkas, L; Gschwendtner, A; Huang, H; Turner, F J; Freitag, L; Zarogoulidis, K

    2013-10-01

    Revealing the lung tumor genome has directed the current treatment strategies toward targeted therapy. First line treatments targeting the genome of lung tumor cells have been approved and are on the market. However, they are limited by the small number of patients with the current investigated genetic mutations. Novel treatment administration modalities have been also investigated in an effort to increase the local drug deposition and disease control. In the current study, we investigated the safety of the new nonviral vector 2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran methyl methacrylate copolymer (DDMC; Ryujyu Science), which belongs to the 2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran family by aerosol administration. Thirty male BALBC mice, 2 month old, were included and divided into three groups. However, pathological findings indicated severe emphysema within three aerosol sessions. In addition, the CytoViva technique was applied for the first time to display the nonviral particles within the pulmonary tissue and emphysema lesions, and a spectral library of the nonviral vector was also established. Although our results in BALBC mice prevented us from further investigation of the DDMC nonviral vector as a vehicle for gene therapy, further investigation in animals with larger airways is warranted to properly evaluate the safety of the vector.

  6. A MultiSite GatewayTM vector set for the functional analysis of genes in the model Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagels Durand Astrid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinatorial cloning using the GatewayTM technology has been the method of choice for high-throughput omics projects, resulting in the availability of entire ORFeomes in GatewayTM compatible vectors. The MultiSite GatewayTM system allows combining multiple genetic fragments such as promoter, ORF and epitope tag in one single reaction. To date, this technology has not been accessible in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most widely used experimental systems in molecular biology, due to the lack of appropriate destination vectors. Results Here, we present a set of three-fragment MultiSite GatewayTM destination vectors that have been developed for gene expression in S. cerevisiae and that allow the assembly of any promoter, open reading frame, epitope tag arrangement in combination with any of four auxotrophic markers and three distinct replication mechanisms. As an example of its applicability, we used yeast three-hybrid to provide evidence for the assembly of a ternary complex of plant proteins involved in jasmonate signalling and consisting of the JAZ, NINJA and TOPLESS proteins. Conclusion Our vectors make MultiSite GatewayTM cloning accessible in S. cerevisiae and implement a fast and versatile cloning method for the high-throughput functional analysis of (heterologous proteins in one of the most widely used model organisms for molecular biology research.

  7. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA) and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mualif, Siti Aisyah; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Chew, Yik Wei; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Ali, Syed A

    2015-01-01

    Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW) rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef), HIV-1 p24 (ca), and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3) E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  8. Development of a Newcastle disease virus vector expressing a foreign gene through an internal ribosomal entry site provides direct proof for a sequential transcription mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the Paramxoviridae family, has been developed as a vector to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign genes are usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit (ITU...

  9. Development of a Newcastle disease virus vector expressing a foreign gene through an internal ribosomal entry site provides direct proof for a sequential transcription mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been developed as a vector to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign genes are usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit (ITU). Based on the well-accepted “stop-start” transcr...

  10. A CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system targeting female reproduction in the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Andrew; Galizi, Roberto; Kyrou, Kyros; Simoni, Alekos; Siniscalchi, Carla; Katsanos, Dimitris; Gribble, Matthew; Baker, Dean; Marois, Eric; Russell, Steven; Burt, Austin; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Gene drive systems that enable super-Mendelian inheritance of a transgene have the potential to modify insect populations over a timeframe of a few years. We describe CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease constructs that function as gene drive systems in Anopheles gambiae, the main vector for malaria. We identified three genes (AGAP005958, AGAP011377 and AGAP007280) that confer a recessive female-sterility phenotype upon disruption, and inserted into each locus CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive constructs designed to target and edit each gene. For each targeted locus we observed a strong gene drive at the molecular level, with transmission rates to progeny of 91.4 to 99.6%. Population modeling and cage experiments indicate that a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting one of these loci, AGAP007280, meets the minimum requirement for a gene drive targeting female reproduction in an insect population. These findings could expedite the development of gene drives to suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support malaria transmission.

  11. Curative effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells transfected with recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任瑞芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the curative effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) transfected with recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) gene on intracerebral

  12. Efficacy and safety of myocardial gene transfer of adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors in the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merentie, M; Lottonen-Raikaslehto, L; Parviainen, V; Huusko, J; Pikkarainen, S; Mendel, M; Laham-Karam, N; Kärjä, V; Rissanen, R; Hedman, M; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new treatment option for cardiac diseases. For finding the most suitable and safe vector for cardiac gene transfer, we delivered adenovirus (AdV), adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus (LeV) vectors into the mouse heart with sophisticated closed-chest echocardiography-guided intramyocardial injection method for comparing them with regards to transduction efficiency, myocardial damage, effects on the left ventricular function and electrocardiography (ECG). AdV had the highest transduction efficiency in cardiomyocytes followed by AAV2 and AAV9, and the lowest efficiency was seen with LeV. The local myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in the left ventricle (LV) was proportional to transduction efficiency. AdV caused LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction. Neither of the locally injected AAV serotypes impaired the LV systolic function, but AAV9 caused diastolic dysfunction to some extent. LeV did not affect the cardiac function. We also studied systemic delivery of AAV9, which led to transduction of cardiomyocytes throughout the myocardium. However, also diffuse fibrosis was present leading to significantly impaired LV systolic and diastolic function and pathological ECG changes. Compared with widely used AdV vector, AAV2, AAV9 and LeV were less effective in transducing cardiomyocytes but also less harmful. Local administration of AAV9 was safer and more efficient compared with systemic administration.

  13. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  14. Exosome-associated AAV2 vector mediates robust gene delivery into the murine retina upon intravitreal injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmer, Sarah J.; Carvalho, Livia S.; György, Bence; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Maguire, Casey A.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread gene transfer to the retina is challenging as it requires vector systems to overcome physical and biochemical barriers to enter and diffuse throughout retinal tissue. We investigated whether exosome-associated adeno-associated virus, (exo-AAV) enabled broad retinal targeting following intravitreal (IVT) injection, as exosomes have been shown to traverse biological barriers and mediate widespread distribution upon systemic injection. We packaged an AAV genome encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into conventional AAV2 and exo-AAV2 vectors. Vectors were IVT injected into the eyes of adult mice. GFP expression was noninvasively monitored by fundus imaging and retinal expression was analyzed 4 weeks post-injection by qRT-PCR and histology. Exo-AAV2 outperformed conventional AAV2 in GFP expression based on fundus image analysis and qRT-PCR. Exo-AAV2 demonstrated deeper penetration in the retina, efficiently reaching the inner nuclear and outer plexiform, and to a lesser extent the outer nuclear layer. Cell targets were ganglion cells, bipolar cells, Müller cells, and photoreceptors. Exo-AAV2 serves as a robust gene delivery tool for murine retina, and the simplicity of production and isolation should make it widely applicable to basic research of the eye. PMID:28361998

  15. Self-assembled cationic micelles based on PEG-PLL-PLLeu hybrid polypeptides as highly effective gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jizhe; Gao, Ningning; Wang, Yanan; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2012-11-12

    Developing safe and effective nonviral gene vector is highly crucial for successful gene therapy. In the present study, we designed a series of biodegradable micelles based on hybrid polypeptide copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-leucine) (PEG-PLL-PLLeu) for efficient gene delivery. A group of amphiphilic PEG-PLL-PLLeu hybrid polypeptide copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride, and the chemical structure of each copolymer was characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy measurement. The PEG-PLL-PLLeu micelles were positively charged with tunable sizes ranging from 40 to 90 nm depending on the length of PLL and PLLeu segment. Compared with PEG-PLL copolymers, PEG-PLL-PLLeu micelles demonstrated significantly higher transfection efficiency and less cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the transfection efficiency and biocompatibility of the micelles can be simultaneously improved by tuning the length of PLL and PLLeu segments. The transfection efficiency of PEG-PLL-PLLeu micelles in vivo was two to three times higher than that of PEI(25k), which was attributable to their capability of promoting DNA condensation and cell internalization as well as successful lysosome escape. Hence well-defined PEG-PLL-PLLeu micelles would serve as highly effective nonviral vectors for in vivo gene delivery.

  16. Stable EGFP Gene Expression in C6 Glioma Cell Line after Transduction with HIV-1-based Lentiviral Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Gui-shan; LIU Fu-sheng; CHAI Qi; WANG Jian-jao; LI Jun-hua

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To establish a stable C6/EGFP glioma cell line for studies on glioma. Methods:The C6 glioma cell line was transfected with the human immunodeficiency virus type Ⅰ(HIV-1)based lentivirus vector containing two enhancer-promoters CMV and EF1α.Enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP)-positive C6 cells were sorted out by fluorescence-activated cell sort.Expression of EGFP was observed by fluorescent microscopy.EGFP gene in C6 genome was assessed by Polymerase chain reaction(PCR)and DNA sequencing.Original and transfected cells were compared biologically and cytomorphologically. Results:Lentivirus vector transfection produced up to 40% EGFP-positive cells.After fluorescence-activated cell sort selection,a pure cell line C6/EGFP was established.PCR and DNA sequencing revealed integration of EGFP gene in C6 cell genome.Analysis of cell characteristics revealed no difference between transfected and original cells. Conclusion:A C6/EGFP cell line expressing EGFP as a marker is established,in which the EGFP gene is integrated into the genome.This cell line can be served as a promising tool for further basic research and gene therapy studies.

  17. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for gene therapy: a "ménage à trois" among nucleic acids, materials, and the biological environment. Stimuli-responsive gene delivery vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele

    2013-03-01

    Gene delivery is the science of transferring genetic material into cells by means of a vector to alter cellular function or structure at a molecular level. In this context, a number of nucleic acid-based drugs have been proposed and experimented so far and, as they act on distinct steps along the gene transcription-translation pathway, specific delivery strategies are required to elicit the desired outcome. Cationic lipids and polymers, collectively known as non-viral delivery systems, have thus made their breakthrough in basic and medical research. Albeit they are promising alternatives to viral vectors, their therapeutic application is still rather limited as high transfection efficiencies are normally associated to adverse cytotoxic side effects. In this scenario, drawing inspiration from processes naturally occurring in vivo, major strides forward have been made in the development of more effective materials for gene delivery applications. Specifically, smart vectors sensitive to a variety of physiological stimuli such as cell enzymes, redox status, and pH are substantially changing the landscape of gene delivery by helping to overcome some of the systemic and intracellular barriers that viral vectors naturally evade. Herein, after summarizing the state-of-the-art information regarding the use of nucleic acids as drugs, we review the main bottlenecks still limiting the overall effectiveness of non-viral gene delivery systems. Finally, we provide a critical outline of emerging stimuli-responsive strategies and discuss challenges still existing on the road toward conceiving more efficient and safer multifunctional vectors.

  18. A sensitive and rapid assay for homologous recombination in mosquito cells: impact of vector topology and implications for gene targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yuguang

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in insect transgenesis has been dramatic but existing transposon-based approaches are constrained by position effects and potential instability. Gene targeting would bring a number of benefits, however progress requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved. Much can be learned in vitro since extrachromosomal recombination occurs at high frequency, facilitating the study of multiple events and the impact of structural changes among the recombining molecules. We have investigated homologous recombination in mosquito cells through restoration of luciferase activity from deleted substrates. The implications of this work for the construction of insect gene targeting vectors are discussed. Results We show that linear targeting vectors are significantly more efficient than circular ones and that recombination is stimulated by introducing double-strand breaks into, or near, the region of homology. Single-strand annealing represents a very efficient pathway but may not be feasible for targeting unbroken chromosomes. Using circular plasmids to mimic chromosomal targets, one-sided invasion appears to be the predominant pathway for homologous recombination. Non-homologous end joining reactions also occur and may be utilised in gene targeting if double-strand breaks are first introduced into the target site. Conclusions We describe a rapid, sensitive assay for extrachromosomal homologous recombination in mosquito cells. Variations in substrate topology suggest that single-strand annealing and one-sided invasion represent the predominant pathways, although non-homologous end joining reactions also occur. One-sided invasion of circular chromosomal mimics by linear vectors might therefore be used in vitro to investigate the design and efficiency of gene targeting strategies.

  19. Cloning of Human Uroplakin Ⅱ Gene from Chinese Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To clone Uroplakin Ⅱ gene from Chinese transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of bladder and construct its eukaryotic expression vector, the molecular cloning method was used to extract total RNA from a GⅢ/ T3N0M0 tissue sample of the bladder TCC patients. The primers were designed by Primer 5.0 software. Full length cDNA of Uroplakin Ⅱ gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), assayed by nucleic acid sequencing and then inserted between Xba Ⅰ and HindⅢ restrictive sites of eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.0. The recombinant was assayed by restricted enzyme digestion. Under the induction of Lipofectamine 2000, the recombinant was transfected into Uroplakin Ⅱ negative bladder cancer cell line EJ. Cellular expression levels of Uroplakin Ⅱ were detected by RT-PCR. The nucleic acid sequencing results indicated that Chinese Uroplakin Ⅱ cDNA (555 bp) was successfully cloned. The BLAST analysis demonstrated that the cloned sequence is 100 % homologous with sequences reported overseas. The GenBank accession number AY455312 was also registered. The results of restricted enzyme digestion indicated that eukaryotic vector pcDNA-UP Ⅱ for Uroplakin Ⅱ was successfully constructed.After being transferred with pcDNA-UPⅡ for 72 h, cellular Uroplakin Ⅱ mRNA levels were significantly improved (P<0.01). It is concluded that human Uroplakin Ⅱ gene was successfully cloned from Chinese TCC tissues, which provided a basis for further exploration of the roles of Uroplakin Ⅱ gene in TCC biological behaviors and potential strategies for targeted biological therapy of TCC.

  20. Use of adenovirus vector expressing the mouse full estrogen receptor alpha gene to infect mouse primary neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao HU; Lei Lou; Jun Yuan; Xing Wan; Jianyi Wang; Xinyue Qin

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen plays important regulatory and protective roles in the central nervous system through estrogen receptor a mediation.Previous studies applied eukaryotic expression and lentiviral vectors carrying estrogen receptor a to clarify the undedying mechanisms,in the present study,an adenovirus vector expressing the mouse full estrogen receptor a gene was constructed to identify biological characteristics of estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus infecting nerve cells.Primary cultured mouse nerve cells were first infected with estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus at various multiplicities of infection,followed by 100 multiplicity of infection.Results showed overexpression of estrogen receptor a mRNA and protein in the infected nerve cells.Estrogen receptor a recombinant adenovirus at 100 multiplicity of infection successfully infected neurons and upregulated estrogen receptor a mRNA and protein expression.

  1. A versatile shuttle cosmid vector for the efficient construction of genomic libraries and for the cloning of fungal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiewacz, H D

    1994-07-01

    A shuttle cosmid vector, pANsCos1, has been constructed for Escherichia coli and filamentous fungi. This vector contains two cos sequences separated by a single XbaI restriction site. pANsCos1 allows the efficient construction of representative genomic libraries from as little as 15-20 micrograms of genomic DNA. Due to the presence of a functional hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene (hph) transformation of fungal protoplasts with pAN-sCos1, or derivatives of it, results in the formation of hygromycin B-resistant transformants. The T7 and T3 RNA polymerase promoter sequences flanking the cloning site, in combination with two adjacent NotI sites facilitate genomic walking and the rapid construction of restriction maps of cloned inserts.

  2. A novel gateway-compatible binary vector series (PC-GW) for flexible cloning of multiple genes for genetic transformation of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Jyoti; Yalamanchili, Roopa; La Hovary, Christophe; Ji, Mikyoung; Rodriguez-Welsh, Maria; Aslett, Denise; Ganapathy, Sowmya; Grunden, Amy; Sederoff, Heike; Qu, Rongda

    2015-09-01

    The rapidly advancing field of plant synthetic biology requires transforming plants with multiple genes. This has sparked a growing interest in flexible plant transformation vectors, which can be used for multi-gene transformations. We have developed a novel binary vector series, named the PC-GW series (GenBank: KP826769-KP826773), for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. The PC-GW vectors use the pCAMBIA vector backbone, and contain NPTII, hpt, bar, mCherry or egfp genes as selectable markers for plant transformation. In a modified multiple cloning site (MCS) of the T-DNA region, we have placed the attR1, attR2 and ccdB sequences for rapid cloning of one to four genes by Gateway™-assisted recombination. In addition, we have introduced four meganuclease sites, and other restriction sites for multi-gene vector construction. Finally, we have placed a CaMV 35S promoter and a 35S terminator on the 5' and 3' ends of the MCS. The CaMV 35S promoter is flanked by PstI restriction sites that can be used to replace it with another promoter sequence if needed. The PC-GW vectors provide choices for selectable markers, cloning methods, and can accommodate up to eight gene constructs in a single T-DNA, thereby significantly reducing the number of transformations or crosses needed to generate multi-transgene expressing plants.

  3. Cationic lipid-nanoceria hybrids, a novel nonviral vector-mediated gene delivery into mammalian cells: investigation of the cellular uptake mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joydeep; Han, Jae Woong; Choi, Yun-Jung; Song, Hyuk; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Seo, Han Geuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-07-06

    Gene therapy is a promising technique for the treatment of various diseases. The development of minimally toxic and highly efficient non-viral gene delivery vectors is the most challenging undertaking in the field of gene therapy. Here, we developed dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DODAB)-nanoceria (CeO2) hybrids as a new class of non-viral gene delivery vectors. These DODAB-modified CeO2 nanoparticles (CeO2/DODAB) could effectively compact the pDNA, allowing for highly efficient gene transfection into the selected cell lines. The CeO2/DODAB nanovectors were also found to be non-toxic and did not induce ROS formation as well as any stress responsive and pro-survival signaling pathways. The overall vector performance of CeO2/DODAB nanohybrids was comparable with lipofectamine and DOTAP, and higher than calcium phosphate and DEAE-dextran for transfecting small plasmids. The increased cellular uptake of the nanovector/DNA complexes through clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis and subsequent release from the endosomes further support the increased gene transfection efficiency of the CeO2/DODAB vectors. Besides, CeO2/DODAB nanovectors could transfect genes in vivo without any sign of toxicity. Taken together, this new nano-vector has the potential to be used for gene delivery in biomedical applications.

  4. The use of an adeno-associated viral vector for efficient bicistronic expression of two genes in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Thomas Haynes; Kathe, Claudia; Menezes, Sean Christopher; Rooney, Marie-Claire; Bueler, Hansruedi; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are one of the most promising therapeutic delivery systems for gene therapy to the central nervous system (CNS). Preclinical testing of novel gene therapies requires the careful design and production of AAV vectors and their successful application in a model of CNS injury. One major limitation of AAV vectors is their limited packaging capacity (genes (e.g., from two promoters) difficult. An internal ribosomal entry site has been used to express two genes: However, the second transgene is often expressed at lower levels than the first. In addition to this, achieving high levels of transduction in the CNS can be challenging. In this chapter we describe the cloning of a bicistronic AAV vector that uses the foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A sequence to efficiently express two genes from a single promoter. Bicistronic expression of a therapeutic gene and a reporter gene is desirable so that the axons from transduced neurons can be tracked and, after CNS injury, the amount of axonal sprouting or regeneration quantified. We go on to describe how to perform a pyramidotomy model of CNS injury and the injection of AAV vectors into the sensorimotor cortex to provide efficient transduction and bicistronic gene expression in cortical neurons such that transduced axons are detectable in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord.

  5. Effects of recombinant adenoviral vector containing IRE1α gene on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-zhu LI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant adenoviral vector containing human IRE1α (type I transmembrane protein kinase/endoribonucleasegene, and investigate its effects on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells. Methods  By using pAdEasyTM adenovirus vector system, the recombinant shuttle vectors of IRE1α full-length gene(pAdTrack-IRE1αand RNase+Kinasedomain(pAdTrack-R+Kwere constructed, and then transferred with pAdEasy-1 to generate recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAd-IRE1α and pAd-R+K by electroporation method. Subsequently, the plasmids were transfected into HEK-293 cells to pack and amplify the recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K. The expression of recombinant adenovirus was detected by PCR. The ATDC5 cells wereinfected in vitro by recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, the infection efficiency of green fluorescent protein(GFPwas observed, and the influence of Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K on the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress(ERS or non-ERS was detected by flow cytometry(FCM. Results Restriction endonuclease digestion analysis and PCR indicated that the recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-IRE1α andAd-R+K was successfully constructed. FCM detection showed that under ERS conditions, the G1 phasedcreased and S phase increased in ATDC5 cells after transfected by Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, meanwhile the apoptosis rate increased significantly(P<0.05. Conclusion Infection of recombinant adenovirus containing IRE1α gene may promote the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5cells.

  6. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  7. ArrayXPath: mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data with integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hee-Joon; Kim, Mingoo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Ju Han

    2004-07-01

    Biological pathways can provide key information on the organization of biological systems. ArrayXPath (http://www.snubi.org/software/ArrayXPath/) is a web-based service for mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data for integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). By integrating major bio-databases and searching pathway resources, ArrayXPath automatically maps different types of identifiers from microarray probes and pathway elements. When one inputs gene-expression clusters, ArrayXPath produces a list of the best matching pathways for each cluster. We applied Fisher's exact test and the false discovery rate (FDR) to evaluate the statistical significance of the association between a cluster and a pathway while correcting the multiple-comparison problem. ArrayXPath produces Javascript-enabled SVGs for web-enabled interactive visualization of pathways integrated with gene-expression profiles.

  8. Effects of recombinant retroviral vector mediated human insulin like growth factor-1 gene transfection on skeletal muscle growth in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Shu-Ling; LU Yong-Xin; LIAO Yu-Hua; WANG Xiao-Lin; GUO He-Ping; CHANG Chao; GAO Yan-Zhang; MI Shao-Hua; Wan Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Background This study transferred a recombinant gene encoding human insulin like growth factor-1 (hIGF-1)into modified primary skeletal myoblasts with a retroviral vector (pLgXSN) and determined whether the hIGF-1 promoted growth of skeletal muscle in rat.Methods hIGF-lcDNA was amplified in vitro from normal human liver cells by using RT-PCR and cloned into plasmid vector pLgXSN. The recombinant vector pLghIGF-1SN and control vector pLgGFPSN were transfected into packaging cell PT67 and G418 was used to select positive colony. Myoblasts were infected with a high titre viral supernatant and transduction efficiency was evaluated as GFP expression. The expression of hIGF-1 mRNA in myoblasts was investigated by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR. MTT assays detected the growth of myoblasts in vitro. Myoblasts transduced with pLghIGF-1SN were injected into hind limb muscles of 10-12 week male SD rats. Formed tissues were harvested 4 weeks later. Myocyte diameter, mean weight of hind limb and body were measured to evaluate the skeletal muscle growth.Results Recombinant retroviral plasmid vector pLghIGF-1SN was constructed successfully. The titre of the packaged recombinant retrovirus was 1 × 106 cfu/ml. The transfection rate of PT67 cells reached 100% after G418 screening. hIGF-1 expression was positive in myoblast-IGF-1. The proliferation rate of myoblast-IGF-1 in vitro was higher than GFP-myoblast or myoblast (P< 0.05). The mean weights of hind limb and body of rats injected myoblast-IGF-1 were higher than those of the rats injected with myoblast-GFP or myoblast (P< 0.05). Myocyte diameter had a significant increase in IGF-1 group compared to GFP group and myoblast group (P< 0.05).Conclusions The transfection of the human IGF- 1 gene mediated by a retroviral vector can promote the growth of skeletal muscle in rats. Genetically modified primary skeletal myoblasts provide a possibly effective approach to treat some skeletal muscle diseases.

  9. AAV vectors as gene delivery vehicles in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, M.L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant gene delivery vehicles based on the replication-defective AAV have gained a preeminent position in the field of gene delivery to the brain. Efficient global gene delivery to the CNS is beneficial for the study of gene products is the entire CNS as well as for introducing and expressing g

  10. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of th...

  11. Low Molecular Weight PEI-Based Vectors via Acid-Labile Ortho Ester Linkage for Improved Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Min; Wang, Jun; Tang, Rupei; Yan, Guoqing; Yao, Weijing; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    A series of novel pH-sensitive gene delivery vectors (POEI 1, 2, and 3) are synthesized through Michael addition from low molecular weight PEI (LMW PEI) via acid-labile ortho ester linkage with terminal acrylates (OEAc) by various feed molar ratios. The obtained POEI 1 and POEI 2 can efficiently condense plasmid DNA into nanoparticles with size range of 200-300 nm and zeta-potentials of about +15 mV while protecting DNA from enzymatic digestion compared with POEI 3. Significantly, ortho ester groups of POEI main-chains can make an instantaneous degradation-response to acidic endosomal pH (≈5.0), resulting in accelerated disruption of polyplexes and intracellular DNA release. MTT assay reveals that all POEIs exhibit much lower cytotoxicity in different cells than branched PEI (25 KDa). As expected, POEI 1 and POEI 2 perform improved gene transfection in vitro, suggesting that such polycations might be promising gene vectors based on overcoming toxicity-efficiency contradiction.

  12. Simple and efficient vectors for retrofitting BACs and PACs with mammalian neoR and EGFP marker genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaname, T; Huxley, C

    2001-03-21

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and P1 artificial chromosomes (PACs) are widely used to investigate the functions of genes and genomes in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a series of vectors which can simply and efficiently be retrofitted onto BACs or PACs. These vectors carry a neoR gene for selection in cells in tissue culture, including ES cells, and also an EGFP gene driven by the strong CAG promoter for quick detection of the DNA in cells. All the plasmids are retrofitted using the loxP site and Cre recombinase and some carry the gamma origin of plasmid R6K which does not function in commonly used bacteria such as DH10B. Retrofitting of PACs and BACs carrying alphoid DNA was very efficient with almost no rearrangement of the highly repetitive alphoid DNA. Following transfer into HT1080 cells and mouse oocytes in tissue culture the DNA could easily be monitored by the EGFP fluorescence.

  13. Unmarked gene deletion and host-vector system for the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Zhu, Haojun; Chen, Zhengjun

    2009-01-01

    , and unmarked lacS mutants were obtained by each method. A new alternative recombination mechanism, i.e., marker circularization and integration, was shown to operate in the latter method, which did not yield the designed deletion mutation. Subsequently, Sulfolobus-E. coli plasmid shuttle vectors were...

  14. CRISPR-Mediated Integration of Large Gene Cassettes Using AAV Donor Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus O. Bak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been shown to facilitate high levels of precise genome editing using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors to serve as donor template DNA during homologous recombination (HR. However, the maximum AAV packaging capacity of ∼4.5 kb limits the donor size. Here, we overcome this constraint by showing that two co-transduced AAV vectors can serve as donors during consecutive HR events for the integration of large transgenes. Importantly, the method involves a single-step procedure applicable to primary cells with relevance to therapeutic genome editing. We use the methodology in primary human T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to site-specifically integrate an expression cassette that, as a single donor vector, would otherwise amount to a total of 6.5 kb. This approach now provides an efficient way to integrate large transgene cassettes into the genomes of primary human cells using HR-mediated genome editing with AAV vectors.

  15. Development of a novel thermostable Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for expression of a heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to control Newcastle disease (ND) for village flocks, due to their independence of cold chains for delivery and storage. To explore the potential use of the thermostable NDV as a vaccine vector, an infectious clone of the...

  16. Characterization of a Pantoea stewartii TTSS gene required for persistence in its flea beetle vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart's bacterial wilt of maize is caused by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), a bacterium that is transmitted by the flea beetle, Chaetocnema pulicaria. Few studies have focused on the molecular basis of the interactions of Pnss with its vector. Genome analyses indicated that Pnss carri...

  17. Rapid and sensitive lentivirus vector-based conditional gene expression assay to monitor and quantify cell fusion activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A F V Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell fusion is involved in multiple fundamental biological processes. Prominent examples include osteoclast and giant cell formation, fertilization and skeletal myogenesis which involve macrophage, sperm-egg and myoblast fusion, respectively. Indeed, the importance of cell fusion is underscored by the wide range of homeostatic as well as pathologic processes in which it plays a key role. Therefore, rapid and sensitive systems to trace and measure cell fusion events in various experimental systems are in demand. Here, we introduce a bipartite cell fusion monitoring system based on a genetic switch responsive to the site-specific recombinase FLP. To allow flexible deployment in both dividing as well as non-dividing cell populations, inducer and reporter modules were incorporated in lentivirus vector particles. Moreover, the recombinase-inducible transcription units were designed in such a way as to minimize basal activity and chromosomal position effects in the "off" and "on" states, respectively. The lentivirus vector-based conditional gene expression assay was validated in primary human mesenchymal stem cells and in a differentiation model based on muscle progenitor cells from a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient using reporter genes compatible with live- and single-cell imaging and with whole population measurements. Using the skeletal muscle cell differentiation model, we showed that the new assay displays low background activity, a 2-log dynamic range, high sensitivity and is amenable to the investigation of cell fusion kinetics. The utility of the bipartite cell fusion monitoring system was underscored by a study on the impact of drug- and RNAi-mediated p38 MAPK inhibition on human myocyte differentiation. Finally, building on the capacity of lentivirus vectors to readily generate transgenic animals the present FLP-inducible system should be adaptable, alone or together with Cre/loxP-based assays, to cell lineage tracing and

  18. Development of a new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Nam, Moon; Kim, Kil Hyun; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-02-01

    A new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) was constructed for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans. The in vitro transcript with a 5' cap analog m7GpppG from an SYCMV full-length infectious vector driven by a T7 promoter infected soybeans (pSYCMVT7-full). The symptoms observed in the soybeans infected with either the sap from SYCMV-infected leaves or pSYCMVT7-full were indistinguishable, suggesting that the vector exhibits equivalent biological activity as the virus itself. To utilize the vector further, a DNA-based vector driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter was constructed. The complete sequence of the SYCMV genome was inserted into a binary vector flanked by a CaMV 35S promoter at the 5' terminus of the SYCMV genome and a cis-cleaving ribozyme sequence followed by a nopaline synthase terminator at the 3' terminus of the SYCMV genome (pSYCMV-full). The SYCMV-derived vector was tested for use as a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for the functional analysis of soybean genes. VIGS constructs containing either a fragment of the Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene (pSYCMV-PDS1) or a fragment of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) gene (pSYCMV-RbcS2) were constructed. Plants infiltrated with each vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation method exhibited distinct symptoms, such as photo-bleaching in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-PDS1 and yellow or pale green coloring in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-RbcS2. In addition, down-regulation of the transcripts of the two target genes was confirmed via northern blot analysis. Particle bombardment and direct plasmid DNA rubbing were also confirmed as alternative inoculation methods. To determine if the SYCMV vector can be used for the expression of heterologous proteins in soybean plants, the vector encoding amino acids 135-160 of VP1 of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O1 Campos (O1C

  19. Matrix attachment regions included in a bicistronic vector enhances and stabilizes follistatin gene expressions in both transgenic cells and transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming HU,Jing GUO,Chunling BAI,Zhuying WEI,Li GAO,Tingmao HU,Shorgan BOU,Guangpeng LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, follistatin (FST gene expression vectors with either a bicistronic gene transfer cassette alone, or a bicistron gene cassette carrying a matrix attachment region (MAR were constructed and transfected to bovine fetal fibroblasts. Evaluations of both the integration and expression of exogenous FST indicated that the pMAR-CAG-FST-IRES-AcGFP1-polyA-MAR (pMAR-FST vector had higher capacity to form monoclonal transgenic cells than the vector without MAR, though transient transfection and integration efficiency were similar with either construct. Remarkably, protein expression in transgenic cells with the pMAR-FST vector was significantly higher than that from the bicistronic vector. Exogenous FST was expressed in all of the pMAR-FST transgenic mice at F0, F1 and F2. Total muscle growth in F0 mice was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, with larger muscles in fore and hind limbs of transgenic mice. pMAR-FST transgenic mice were also found with more evenly distributed muscle bundles and thinner spaces between sarcolemma, which suggests a correlation between transgene expression-associated muscle development and the trend of muscle growth. In conclusion, a pMAR-FST vector, which excluded the resistant genes and frame structure, enhances and stabilizes FST gene expressions in both transfected cells and transgenic mice.

  20. piggyBac as a high-capacity transgenesis and gene-therapy vector in human cells and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rongbo Li; Yuan Zhuang; Min Han; Tian Xu; Xiaohui Wu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The stable genomic integration and expression of a large transgene is a major hurdle in gene therapy. We show that the modified piggyBac (PB) transposon system can be used to introduce a 207 kb genomic DNA fragment containing the RORγ/γt locus into human cells and mice. PB-mediated transgenesis results in a single copy of a stably inherited and expressed transgene. These results indicate that PB could serve as an effective high-capacity vector for functional analysis of the mammalian ...

  1. Construction of plant expression vectors carrying glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase and regeneration of transgenic rice plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏金; 张雪琴; 颜秋生; 陈章良; 尤崇杓

    1995-01-01

    The glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase (GS) was amplified from Azospirillum brasilenseSp7 with PCR technique.The amplified 1.4-kb DNA fragment flanked with a BamH Ⅰ site at each end wascloned into EcoR V site of Bluescript-SK vector.A recombinant plasmid pGSJ1 containing this 1.4-kb DNA frag-ment was selected by restriction digestion analysis.The sequencing data also confirmed that the amplified 1.4-kbDNA fragment was undoubtedly the glnA gene of A.brasilense Sp7.Then the 1.4-kb BamH Ⅰ fragment was ex-cised from pGSJ1.A glnA plant expression vector pAGNB92 with rice actin 1 (Act1) promoter was constructedby using colony in situ hybridization to screen positive clones,and 3 rounds of ligation and transformation wereperformed.Protoplasts isolated from rice (Oryza sativa,L.Japonica) cell suspension line (cv.T986) weretransformed with the glnA plant expression vector pAGNB92 carrying neomycin phosphotransferase Ⅱ (NPT Ⅱ)gene by PEG fusion or electroporation.G418~ calli were used to detect NPT Ⅱ enzyme activity.The resultsshow that G418~ calli possess high positive hybridization signal with the frequency of 37%.The regeneratedG418~NPTII~+ rice plants were used for PCR amplification of glnA gene,and a 1.4-kb DNA fragment was ampli-fied from glnA-transgenic rice plants (R0 generation).The results of Southern blot hybridization prove that the1.4-kb DNA fragment amplified from the total DNA of glnA transgenic rice plants is indeed the glnA gene of A.brasilense Sp7.Northern blot hybridization was carried out using the same glnA gene as probe.The glnAgene was expressed in the transgenic rice plants.Bioassays also confirmed that the glnA transgenic rice plantsgrew much better than that of the control plants under a condition with nitrogen poor source (0.75 mmol/L).

  2. A preliminary step of a novel strategy in suicide gene therapy with lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan Afrooz Ghanbari

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this step of our strategy, we demonstrated that modification of orientation and location of promoter may overcome some issues in lentiviral suicide gene therapy, especially when toxin or apoptosis-inducing genes are used.

  3. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  4. Behavioural determinants of gene flow in malaria vector populations: Anopheles gambiae males select large females as mates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan G

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium-refractory mosquitoes are being rapidly developed for malaria control but will only succeed if they can successfully compete for mates when released into the wild. Pre-copulatory behavioural traits maintain genetic population structure in wild mosquito populations and mating barriers have foiled previous attempts to control malaria vectors through sterile male release. Methods Varying numbers of virgin male and female Anopheles gambiae Giles, from two strains of different innate sizes, were allowed to mate under standardized conditions in laboratory cages, following which, the insemination status, oviposition success and egg batch size of each female was assessed. The influence of male and female numbers, strain combination and female size were determined using logistic regression, correlation analysis and a simple mechanistic model of male competition for females. Results Male An. gambiae select females on the basis of size because of much greater fecundity among large females. Even under conditions where large numbers of males must compete for a smaller number of females, the largest females are more likely to become inseminated, to successfully oviposit and to produce large egg batches. Conclusions Sexual selection, on the basis of size, could either promote or limit the spread of malaria-refractory genes into wild populations and needs to be considered in the continue