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Sample records for gene underlies hereditary

  1. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  2. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

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    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  4. Genes and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Ataxias

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    Erin Sandford

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  5. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

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    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  6. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Predisposing genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huusko, P. (Pia)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the two major genes predisposing individuals to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, were screened in Finnish and Turkish cancer families. Germline BRCA1 mutations were found in 7% (6/88) and BRCA2 mutations in 6% (5/88) of the Finnish families studied in Oulu. Two distinct BRCA1 (3745delT, 4216nt-2A→G) and three BRCA2 (999delTCAAA, 6503delTT, 9346nt-2A→G) mutations were identified, all of which are recurrently found in Finland....

  8. Recent Advancements in Gene Therapy for Hereditary Retinal Dystrophies

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    Ayşe Öner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary retinal dystrophies (HRDs are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision, and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles, with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family, highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been proposed as potentially efficacious therapies. Because of its favorable anatomical and immunological characteristics, the eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in animal models of HRDs and some of them have been relayed to the clinic. The results from the first clinical trials for a congenital form of blindness have generated great interest and have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of intraocular administrations of viral vectors in humans. This review summarizes the clinical development of retinal gene therapy.

  9. Our genes, our selves: hereditary breast cancer and biological citizenship in Norway.

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    Møller, Pål; Hovig, Eivind

    2017-09-22

    The concept 'hereditary breast cancer' is commonly used to delineate a group of people genetically at risk for breast cancer-all of whom also having risk for other cancers. People carrying pathogenic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are often referred to as those having predisposition for 'hereditary breast cancer'. The two genes, however, are when altered, associated with different risks for and dying from breast cancer. The main risk for dying for carriers of both genes is from ovarian cancer. These biological facts are of philosophical interest, because they are the facts underlying the public debate on BRCA1/2 genetic testing as a model for the discussion of how to implement genetic knowledge and technologies in personalized medicine. A contribution to this public debate describing inherited breast cancer as 'biological citizenship' recently printed in Med Health Care and Philos illustrated how fragmented and detached from the biological and socio-political facts this debate sometimes is. We here briefly summarize some of the biological facts and how they are implemented in today's healthcare based on agreed philosophical, ethical and moral principles. The suggestion of a 'biological citizenship' defined by hereditary breast cancer is incorrect and ill-advised. 'Identity politics' focusing hereditary breast cancer patients as a group based on a bundle of ill-defined negative arguments is well known, but is supported neither by scientific nor philosophical arguments. To those born with the genetic variants described, the philosophical rule of not doing harm is violated by unbalanced negative arguments.

  10. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

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    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  11. Positional cloning of a gene involved in hereditary multiple exostoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuyts, W.; van Hul, W.; Wauters, J.; Nemtsova, M.; Reyniers, E.; van Hul, E. V.; de Boulle, K.; de Vries, B. B.; Hendrickx, J.; Herrygers, I.; Bossuyt, P.; Balemans, W.; Fransen, E.; Vits, L.; Coucke, P.; Nowak, N. J.; Shows, T. B.; Mallet, L.; van den Ouweland, A. M.; McGaughran, J.; Halley, D. J.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostosis (EXT) is an autosomal dominant condition mainly characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses on the long bones. These exostoses are benign cartilaginous tumors (enchondromata). Three different EXT loci on chromosomes 8q (EXT1), 11p (EXT2) and 19p (EXT3) have been

  12. [The progress and prospect of application of genetic testing technology-based gene detection technology in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary cancer].

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    He, J X; Jiang, Y F

    2017-08-06

    Hereditary cancer is caused by specific pathogenic gene mutations. Early detection and early intervention are the most effective ways to prevent and control hereditary cancer. High-throughput sequencing based genetic testing technology (NGS) breaks through the restrictions of pedigree analysis, provide a convenient and efficient method to detect and diagnose hereditary cancer. Here, we introduce the mechanism of hereditary cancer, summarize, discuss and prospect the application of NGS and other genetic tests in the diagnosis of hereditary retinoblastoma, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary colorectal cancer and other complex and rare hereditary tumors.

  13. Diet-gene interactions in sporadic and hereditary colorectal carcinogenesis : epidemiological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is known to develop by accumulation of alterations in regulatory genes. Both familial and environmental factors play a role in the etiology of colorectal cancer and its adenomatous precursor lesions. This thesis examines diet-gene interactions in sporadic and hereditary

  14. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817...

  15. Hereditary angioedema: Assessing the hypothesis for underlying autonomic dysfunction.

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    Maddalena A Wu

    Full Text Available Attacks of Hereditary Angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAEare often triggered by stressful events/hormonal changes.Our study evaluates the relationship between autonomic nervous system (ANS and contact/complement system activation.Twenty-three HAE patients (6 males, mean age 47.5±11.4 years during remission and 24 healthy controls (8 males, mean age 45.3±10.6 years were studied. ECG, beat-by-beat blood pressure, respiratory activity were continuously recorded during rest (10' and 75-degrees-head-up tilt (10'. C1-INH, C4, cleaved high molecular weight kininogen (cHK were assessed; in 16 patients and 11 controls plasma catecholamines were also evaluated. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability allowed extraction of low-(LF and high-(HF frequency components, markers of sympathetic and vagal modulation respectively.HAE patients showed higher mean systolic arterial pressure (SAP than controls during both rest and tilt. Tilt induced a significant increase in SAP and its variability only in controls. Although sympathetic modulation (LFnu increased significantly with tilt in both groups, LF/HF ratio, index of sympathovagal balance, increased significantly only in controls. At rest HAE patients showed higher noradrenaline values (301.4±132.9 pg/ml vs 210.5±89.6pg/ml, p = 0.05. Moreover, in patients tilt was associated with a significant increase in cHK, marker of contact system activation (49.5 ± 7.5% after T vs 47.1 ± 7.8% at R, p = 0.01.Our data are consistent with altered ANS modulation in HAE patients, i.e. increased sympathetic activation at rest and blunted response to orthostatic challenge. Tilt test-induced increased HK cleavage suggests a link between stress and bradykinin production.

  16. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

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    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  17. Development and validation of a 36-gene sequencing assay for hereditary cancer risk assessment

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    Valentina S. Vysotskaia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have brought many important advances in our understanding of the hereditary susceptibility to cancer. Numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that identification of germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes can lead to reductions in morbidity and mortality through targeted risk management options. Additionally, advances in gene sequencing technology now permit the development of multigene hereditary cancer testing panels. Here, we describe the 2016 revision of the Counsyl Inherited Cancer Screen for detecting single-nucleotide variants (SNVs, short insertions and deletions (indels, and copy number variants (CNVs in 36 genes associated with an elevated risk for breast, ovarian, colorectal, gastric, endometrial, pancreatic, thyroid, prostate, melanoma, and neuroendocrine cancers. To determine test accuracy and reproducibility, we performed a rigorous analytical validation across 341 samples, including 118 cell lines and 223 patient samples. The screen achieved 100% test sensitivity across different mutation types, with high specificity and 100% concordance with conventional Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. We also demonstrated the screen’s high intra-run and inter-run reproducibility and robust performance on blood and saliva specimens. Furthermore, we showed that pathogenic Alu element insertions can be accurately detected by our test. Overall, the validation in our clinical laboratory demonstrated the analytical performance required for collecting and reporting genetic information related to risk of developing hereditary cancers.

  18. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio.......8%, P teens. The distribution of MSH2 mutations found in patients with HNPCC-associated SBCs significantly differed from that found in the control group (P

  19. [Mutations of ACVRL1 gene in a pedigree with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie-wei; Chen, Hui; Yang, Liu-qing; Zhu, Ai-lan; Wu, Yan-an; Li, Jian-wei

    2008-06-01

    To identify the activin A receptor type II-like 1 gene (ACVRL1) mutations in a Chinese family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT2). The exons 3, 7 and 8 of ACVRL1 gene of the proband and her five family members were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PCR products were sequenced. The proband had obvious telangiectasis of gastric mucosa, and small arteriovenous fistula in the right kidney. All the patients in the HHT2 family had iterative epistaxis or bleeding in other sites, and had telangiectasis of nasal mucosa, tunica mucosa oris and finger tips. ACVRL1 gene analysis confirmed that there is frameshift mutation caused by deletion of G145 in exon 3 in the 4 patients, but the mutation is absent in 2 members without HHT2. The HHT2 family is caused by a 145delG mutation of ACVRL1 gene, resulting in frameshift and a new stop codon at codon 53.

  20. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

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    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  1. PIEZO1 gene mutation in a Japanese family with hereditary high phosphatidylcholine hemolytic anemia and hemochromatosis-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sugihara, Takashi; Okuno, Yusuke; Wang, Xinan; Yoshida, Kenichi; Kato, Ayako; Kato, Koichi; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Hattori, Ai; Kita, Shinya; Oe, Keishi; Sueyoshi, Atsushi; Usui, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji; Kanno, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary xerocytosis (HX) or dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS) [OMIM 194380], in which PIEZO1 gene mutation has recently been identified, is difficult to diagnose. We report here the discovery of a PIEZO1 gene mutation in a Japanese family (father, daughter, and son) who were previously diagnosed with hereditary high phosphatidylcholine hemolytic anemia (HPCHA). All of the affected family members had non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia associated with severe hemochromatosis-related diabetes mellitus. Although the causative correlation between HPCHA and PIEZO1-gene mutated HX/DHS remains to be clarified, our findings raise an important question as to whether any of the HPCHA cases previously diagnosed in Japan may have in fact been the form of hemolytic anemia known as HX/DHS with PIEZO1 gene mutation.

  2. Multi-gene panel testing improves diagnosis and management of patients with hereditary anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Roberta; Andolfo, Immacolata; Manna, Francesco; Gambale, Antonella; Marra, Roberta; Rosato, Barbara Eleni; Caforio, Paola; Pinto, Valeria; Pignataro, Piero; Radhakrishnan, Kottayam; Unal, Sule; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Forni, Gian Luca; Iolascon, Achille

    2018-02-03

    Mutations in more than 70 genes cause hereditary anemias (HA), a highly heterogeneous group of rare/low frequency disorders in which we included: hyporegenerative anemias, as congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia; hemolytic anemias due to erythrocyte membrane defects, as hereditary spherocytosis and stomatocytosis; hemolytic anemias due to enzymatic defects. The study describes the diagnostic workflow for HA, based on the development of two consecutive versions of a targeted-NGS panel, including 34 and 71 genes, respectively. Seventy-four probands from 62 unrelated families were investigated. Our study includes the most comprehensive gene set for these anemias and the largest cohort of patients described so far. We obtained an overall diagnostic yield of 64.9%. Despite 54.2% of cases showed conclusive diagnosis fitting well to the clinical suspicion, the multi-gene analysis modified the original clinical diagnosis in 45.8% of patients (nonmatched phenotype-genotype). Of note, 81.8% of nonmatched patients were clinically suspected to suffer from CDA. Particularly, 45.5% of the probands originally classified as CDA exhibited a conclusive diagnosis of chronic anemia due to enzymatic defects, mainly due to mutations in PKLR gene. Interestingly, we also identified a syndromic CDA patient with mild anemia and epilepsy, showing a homozygous mutation in CAD gene, recently associated to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-50 and CDA-like anemia. Finally, we described a patient showing marked iron overload due to the coinheritance of PIEZO1 and SEC23B mutations, demonstrating that the multi-gene approach is valuable not only for achieving a correct and definitive diagnosis, but also for guiding treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. DNA mismatch repair gene mutations in 55 kindreds with verified or putative hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NystromLahti, M; Wu, Y; Moisio, AL; Hofstra, RMW; Osinga, J; MEcklin, JP; Jarvinen, HJ; Leisti, J; Buys, CHCM; delaChapelle, A; Peltomaki, P

    The DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 have been shown to account for a major share of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We searched for germline mutations in these genes in 35 HNPCC kindreds fulfilling the Amsterdam diagnostic criteria and in a further 20 kindreds with an

  4. Role of the duplicated CCAAT box region in γ-globin gene regulation and hereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ronchi (Antonella); M. Berry (Meera); S. Raguz (Selina); A.M.A. Imam (Ali); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); S. Ottolenghi (Sergio); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.O. Dillon (Niall)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin (HPFH) is a clinically important condition in which a change in the developmental specificity of the gamma-globin genes results in varying levels of expression of fetal haemoglobin in the adult. The condition is benign and can significantly

  5. Molecular Analysis: Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity of Tumor Suppressor Gene in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC

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    Vesna Hadžiavdić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HNPCC (Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer development is caused by mutation of genes included in system of mismatch repair genes. The mutation exists at 60% of patients in hMSH2 gene, 30% in hMLH1 and 10% both in hPMS1and hPMS2 genes. RER+ exists in about 90% in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and about 15-28% in sporadic cancers.The purpose of the study was to determine highly sensitive microsatellite markers which can be fast and efficient way of microsatellite screening for detection of HNPCC patients. Moreover, we have analysed the loss of heterozygosity of tumour suppressor genes which could have the diagnostic value in detection of HPNCC patients.

  6. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

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    Sun-Mi Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis.

  7. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  8. Prevalence of H63D, S65C, and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene variants in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, Carla; Brehm, António; Spínola, Hélder

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary HFE Hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism that results from mutations in the HFE gene. Almost all patients with hereditary hemochromatosis show a C282Y mutation in homozygosity or in compound heterozygosity with H63D. Also, the mutation S65C has been shown to be associated to a milder iron overload. Since allele and genotype frequencies of these three variants of the HFE gene vary between populations, the determination of their prevalence in Madeira Island will clarify the population susceptibility to hereditary hemochromatosis. One hundred and fifty-four samples from Madeira Island were genotyped for the three most common HFE gene mutations, H63D, C282Y, and S65C, by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results have shown a prevalence of 20.5%, 0.33%, and 1% for H63D, C282Y, and S65C, respectively. Accordingly to our estimates, both genotypes associated to hereditary hemochromatosis, C282Y homozygotes and C282/H63D compound heterozygotes, could be present in Madeira Island population in 1,648 individuals, which represents 0.65% of the total population.

  9. [Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, E

    2014-10-01

    Hereditary amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant fatal multisystem disease caused by extracellular deposition of misfolded proteins and, therefore represents a hereditary protein folding or deposition disease that leads to progressive organ damage and eventually death. In most instances mutations within the transthyretin gene are the underlying cause. The main manifestation is a rapidly progressing axonal sensorimotor and autonomic polyneuropathy (familial amyloid polyneuropathy, FAP). Cardiac involvement is frequent in FAP and additional manifestations include the gastrointestinal tract and the eyes. A second manifestation type is cardiomyopathy with little or no polyneuropathy (familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, FAC). For therapy, orthotopic liver transplantation has been established for 25 years. Recently, the oral agent tafamidis, a transthyretin stabilizer, was licensed for treatment of stage 1 polyneuropathy. Additional treatment options are currently being studied.

  10. Perinatal Gjb2 gene transfer rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takashi; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most widespread sensory disorder, with an incidence of congenital genetic deafness of 1 in 1600 children. For many ethnic populations, the most prevalent form of genetic deafness is caused by recessive mutations in the gene gap junction protein, beta 2, 26 kDa (GJB2), which is also known as connexin 26 (Cx26). Despite this knowledge, existing treatment strategies do not completely recover speech perception. Here we used a gene delivery system to rescue hearing in a mouse model of Gjb2 deletion. Mice lacking Cx26 are characterized by profound deafness from birth and improper development of cochlear cells. Cochlear delivery of Gjb2 using an adeno-associated virus significantly improved the auditory responses and development of the cochlear structure. Using gene replacement to restore hearing in a new mouse model of Gjb2-related deafness may lead to the development of therapies for human hereditary deafness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Two novel FAH gene mutations in a patient with hereditary tyrosinemia type I.

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    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Bang, Hae In; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Shin, Mee-Ran; Lee, Yong-Wha; Lee, Dong Hwan; Park, Hyung-Doo

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT I) is a severe inborn metabolic disorder affecting the tyrosine degradation pathway. Most untreated patients die within the first two years of life. HT I results from fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) deficiency caused by mutations in the FAH gene. The diagnosis of HT I is confirmed by measuring FAH enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts or liver tissue and/or detecting disease-causing mutations in the FAH gene. A female neonate was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of an abnormal newborn screening test that showed elevated tyrosine levels. We analyzed amino acids and organic acids in the patient's blood and urine. To identify the genetic abnormality, all the coding exons and flanking introns of the FAH gene were analyzed via PCR. A repeat newborn screening test and plasma amino acid analysis revealed increased tyrosine levels in the patient. Urine organic acid analysis showed increased urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyphenyllactate, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, and succinylacetone. Sequence analysis of the FAH gene identified two novel variations (c.536A>G (p.Gln179Arg) and c.913+5G>A) that had not been previously reported and that were not found in 170 healthy controls. HT I was confirmed in this patient by molecular genetic analysis of the FAH gene, with highly suggestive biochemical findings. The novel sequence variations detected in the present study should be considered disease-causing mutations by in silico analysis. In the Korean population, this is the first described case of HT I caused by a point mutation in the FAH gene. © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  12. Impact of Panel Gene Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer on Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumish, Heidi S; Steinfeld, Hallie; Koval, Carrie; Russo, Donna; Levinson, Elana; Wynn, Julia; Duong, James; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing have enabled panel gene testing, or simultaneous testing for mutations in multiple genes for a clinical condition. With more extensive and widespread genetic testing, there will be increased detection of genes with moderate penetrance without established clinical guidelines and of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), or genetic variants unknown to either be disease-causing or benign. This study surveyed 232 patients who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer to examine the impact of panel gene testing on psychological outcomes, patient understanding, and utilization of genetic information. The survey used standardized instruments including the Impact of Event Scale (IES), Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA), Satisfaction with Decision Instrument (SWD), Ambiguity Tolerance Scale (AT-20), genetics knowledge, and utilization of genetic test results. Study results suggested that unaffected individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer who received positive results were most significantly impacted by intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress. However, scores were also modestly elevated among unaffected patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who received VUS, highlighting the impact of ambiguous results that are frequent among patients undergoing genetic testing with large panels of genes. Potential risk factors for increased genetic testing-specific distress in this study included younger age, black or African American race, Hispanic origin, lower education level, and lower genetic knowledge and highlight the need for developing strategies to provide effective counseling and education to these communities, particularly when genetic testing utilizes gene panels that more commonly return VUS. More detailed pre-test education and counseling may help patients appreciate the probability of various types of test results and how results

  13. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M.; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W.; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12–/– mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  14. Long-term outcomes of gene therapy for the treatment of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a disease that leads to blindness. Gene therapy has been investigated with some success, and could lead to important advancements in treating LHON. This was a prospective, open-label trial involving 9 LHON patients at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, from August 2011 to December 2015. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of gene therapy for LHON. Nine LHON patients voluntarily received an intravitreal injection of rAAV2-ND4. Systemic examinations and visual function tests were performed during the 36-month follow-up period to determine the safety and efficacy of this gene therapy. Based on successful experiments in an animal model of LHON, 1 subject also received an rAAV2-ND4 injection in the second eye 12 months after gene therapy was administered in the first eye. Recovery of visual acuity was defined as the primary outcome of this study. Changes in the visual field, visual evoked potential (VEP, optical coherence tomography findings, liver and kidney function, and antibodies against AAV2 were defined as secondary endpoints. Eight patients (Patients 2–9 received unilateral gene therapy and visual function improvement was observed in both treated eyes (Patients 4, 6, 7, and 8 and untreated eyes (Patients 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Visual regression fluctuations, defined as changes in visual acuity greater than or equal to 0.3 logMAR, were observed in Patients 2 and 9. Age at disease onset, disease duration, and the amount of remaining optic nerve fibers did not have a significant effect on the visual function improvement. The visual field and pattern reversal VEP also improved. The patient (Patient 1 who received gene therapy in both eyes had improved visual acuity in the injected eye after the first treatment. Unfortunately, visual acuity in this eye decreased 3 months after he received gene therapy in the second eye. Animal experiments suggested that ND4 expression remains

  15. Iranian hereditary hemochromatosis patients: Baseline characteristics, laboratory data and gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Farhad; Bagheri, Zohreh; Bayat, Maryam; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Basi, Ali; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ajdarkosh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common autosomal recessive disorder in white people, characterized by highly abnormal uptake of iron from the gastrointestinal tracts. Recently, mutation studies have focused to detect the genes responsible for HH. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional study, 12 HH patients were recruited, who were referred to Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran. In addition to the clinical assessments, a complete laboratory evaluation, imaging modalities, histopathologic assessment, atomic absorption spectrophotometry and gene mutation study were performed. The genetic study for HFE gene mutation was examined for all of the patients since 2006, while non-HFE mutation was conducted since December 2010 (only for 1 of them). Results Twelve patients were evaluated consisting of 11 men and 1 woman, with the mean age of 39.58±12.68 yr. The average of atomic iron loads was 13.25±4.83-fold higher than normal standards. Four patients had heterozygotic mutation of H63D (33.3%). There was no significant difference in either the iron load of liver (P=0.927) and heart (P=0.164) or serum concentration of ferritin (P=0.907) and TIBC (P=0.937) between the HFE-mutant and without HFE mutation HH cases. Conclusions In contrast to other studies, C282Y mutation was not detected in any of our Iranian HH patients. Heterozygotic mutations of H63D (HFE) and TFR2 (non-HFE) genes were found to be more common in these patients. Similar to previous reports, these mutations were not found to be significantly associated with severity of presentation in HH patients. PMID:23018356

  16. A mutation in the FAM83G gene in dogs with hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Drögemüller

    Full Text Available Hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH represents a palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, which is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in several dog breeds, such as e.g. Kromfohrländer and Irish Terriers. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS in both breeds. In Kromfohrländer we obtained a single strong association signal on chromosome 5 (p(raw = 1.0×10(-13 using 13 HFH cases and 29 controls. The association signal replicated in an independent cohort of Irish Terriers with 10 cases and 21 controls (p(raw = 6.9×10(-10. The analysis of shared haplotypes among the combined Kromfohrländer and Irish Terrier cases defined a critical interval of 611 kb with 13 predicted genes. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected Kromfohrländer at 23.5× coverage. The comparison of the sequence data with 46 genomes of non-affected dogs from other breeds revealed a single private non-synonymous variant in the critical interval with respect to the reference genome assembly. The variant is a missense variant (c.155G>C in the FAM83G gene encoding a protein with largely unknown function. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved arginine into a proline residue (p.R52P. We genotyped this variant in a larger cohort of dogs and found perfect association with the HFH phenotype. We further studied the clinical and histopathological alterations in the epidermis in vivo. Affected dogs show a moderate to severe orthokeratotic hyperplasia of the palmoplantar epidermis. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that FAM83G has an essential role for maintaining the integrity of the palmoplantar epidermis.

  17. A mutation in the FAM83G gene in dogs with hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögemüller, Michaela; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Becker, Doreen; Drögemüller, Cord; Schelling, Claude; Plassais, Jocelyn; Kaerle, Cécile; Dufaure de Citres, Caroline; Thomas, Anne; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Roosje, Petra; Leeb, Tosso

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH) represents a palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, which is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in several dog breeds, such as e.g. Kromfohrländer and Irish Terriers. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in both breeds. In Kromfohrländer we obtained a single strong association signal on chromosome 5 (p(raw) = 1.0×10(-13)) using 13 HFH cases and 29 controls. The association signal replicated in an independent cohort of Irish Terriers with 10 cases and 21 controls (p(raw) = 6.9×10(-10)). The analysis of shared haplotypes among the combined Kromfohrländer and Irish Terrier cases defined a critical interval of 611 kb with 13 predicted genes. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected Kromfohrländer at 23.5× coverage. The comparison of the sequence data with 46 genomes of non-affected dogs from other breeds revealed a single private non-synonymous variant in the critical interval with respect to the reference genome assembly. The variant is a missense variant (c.155G>C) in the FAM83G gene encoding a protein with largely unknown function. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved arginine into a proline residue (p.R52P). We genotyped this variant in a larger cohort of dogs and found perfect association with the HFH phenotype. We further studied the clinical and histopathological alterations in the epidermis in vivo. Affected dogs show a moderate to severe orthokeratotic hyperplasia of the palmoplantar epidermis. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that FAM83G has an essential role for maintaining the integrity of the palmoplantar epidermis.

  18. Mutations in human CPO gene predict clinical expression of either hepatic hereditary coproporphyria or erythropoietic harderoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Caroline; Gouya, Laurent; Malonova, Eva; Lamoril, Jérôme; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Flamme, Magali; Rose, Christian; Lyoumi, Said; Da Silva, Vasco; Boileau, Catherine; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Puy, Hervé

    2005-10-15

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria, results from mutations in the gene that encodes coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO). HCP (heterozygous or rarely homozygous) patients present with an acute neurovisceral crisis, sometimes associated with skin lesions. Four patients (two families) have been reported with a clinically distinct variant form of HCP. In such patients, the presence of a specific mutation (K404E) on both alleles or associated with a null allele, produces a unifying syndrome in which hematological disorders predominate: 'harderoporphyria'. Here, we report the fifth case (from a third family) with harderoporphyria. In addition, we show that harderoporphyric patients exhibit iron overload secondary to dyserythropoiesis. To investigate the molecular basis of this peculiar phenotype, we first studied the secondary structure of the human CPO by a predictive method, the hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) which allowed us to focus on a region of the enzyme. We then expressed mutant enzymes for each amino acid of the region of interest, as well as all missense mutations reported so far in HCP patients and evaluated the amount of harderoporphyrin in each mutant. Our results strongly suggest that only a few missense mutations, restricted to five amino acids encoded by exon 6, may accumulate significant amounts of harderoporphyrin: D400-K404. Moreover, all other type of mutations or missense mutations mapped elsewhere throughout the CPO gene, lead to coproporphyrin accumulation and subsequently typical HCP. Our findings, reinforced by recent crystallographic results of yeast CPO, shed new light on the genetic predisposition to HCP. It represents a first monogenic metabolic disorder where clinical expression of overt disease is dependent upon the location and type of mutation, resulting either in acute hepatic or in erythropoietic porphyria.

  19. [Double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager with hereditary multiple exostoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Cozar, Mónica; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana; Asteggiano, Carla G; Martínez-Domenech, Gustavo; Bracho, Ana; Sánchez, Yanira; Stock, Frances; Delgado-Luengo, Wilmer; Zara-Chirinos, Carmen; Chacín, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary forms of multiple exostoses, now called EXT1/EXT2-CDG within Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, are the most common benign bone tumors in humans and clinical description consists of the formation of several cartilage-capped bone tumors, usually benign and localized in the juxta-epiphyseal region of long bones, although wide body dissemination in severe cases is not uncommon. Onset of the disease is variable ranging from 2-3 years up to 13-15 years with an estimated incidence ranging from 1/18,000 to 1/50,000 cases in European countries. We present a double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager and her family with hereditary multiple exostoses.

  20. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  1. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  2. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  3. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ...

  4. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  5. [Assessment of hereditary defects and dispositions of the horse under animal welfare aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mählmann, Ch; Steiger, A

    2009-04-01

    Persons involved in equine breeding, namely veterinarians, horse breeders and breeding association judges, often lack of an apropriate consciousness about the relevance of heritability or supposed heritability of common horses diseases, which might play a distinctive role in the aetiology of numerous of these diseases. Executing animal welfare rights in equine breeding, the major concern should focus on an objective evaluation of pain, suffering and damages caused by different hereditary diseases. The basis of assessment for hygienic breeding has to be defi ned according to the actual animal welfare rights throughout guidelines, established by the state and by breeding associations. Hereditary diseases scientifi cally proven as relevant for animal welfare matters or including a potential risk of pain, suffering or damage, should be regarded as essential criterion in horse breeding. In this context following diseases have to be mentioned in particular: Osteochondritis dissecans, deep fl exor tendon contracture in the foal, navicular disease, tarsal osteoarthritis, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, Overo-lethal-white- foal-syndrome.

  6. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  7. Resolving basal ganglia calcification in hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia due to a novel TRMP6 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi M Habeb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH is a rare condi-tion caused by mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 6 (TRMP6 gene. Patients usually present during early infancy with symptomatic hypocalcemia; however, intracranial calcification has not been previously reported in HSH. We report on a three-month-old Saudi girl who presented with hypocalcemic convulsions and was initially treated as nutritional rickets. However, further biochemical analysis of blood and urine were suggestive of HSH. This diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis, which identified a novel homozygous frame shift mutation (ins 2999T of the TRMP6 gene. A computed tomography brain scan, done around the time of diagnosis, identified bilateral basal ganglia calcification (BGC. Her serum calcium and the BGC improved with magnesium replacement. BGC can be added as a new feature of HSH and the case highlights the importance of measuring serum Mg in patients with hypocalcemic convulsions, particularly in children of consanguineous parents.

  8. Development and analytical validation of a 25-gene next generation sequencing panel that includes the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to assess hereditary cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Thaddeus; Leclair, Benoît; Bowles, Karla; Gutin, Natalia; Trost, Jeff; McCulloch, James; Bhatnagar, Satish; Murray, Adam; Craft, Jonathan; Wardell, Bryan; Bastian, Mark; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Chen, Jian; Tran, Thanh; Williams, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer; Jammulapati, Srikanth; Perry, Michael; Morris, Brian; Roa, Benjamin; Timms, Kirsten

    2015-04-02

    Germline DNA mutations that increase the susceptibility of a patient to certain cancers have been identified in various genes, and patients can be screened for mutations in these genes to assess their level of risk for developing cancer. Traditional methods using Sanger sequencing focus on small groups of genes and therefore are unable to screen for numerous genes from several patients simultaneously. The goal of the present study was to validate a 25-gene panel to assess genetic risk for cancer in 8 different tissues using next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. Twenty-five genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were selected for development of a panel to screen for risk of these cancers using NGS. In an initial technical assessment, NGS results for BRCA1 and BRCA2 were compared with Sanger sequencing in 1864 anonymized DNA samples from patients who had undergone previous clinical testing. Next, the entire gene panel was validated using parallel NGS and Sanger sequencing in 100 anonymized DNA samples. Large rearrangement analysis was validated using NGS, microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analyses (MLPA). NGS identified 15,877 sequence variants, while Sanger sequencing identified 15,878 in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 comparison study of the same regions. Based on these results, the NGS process was refined prior to the validation of the full gene panel. In the validation study, NGS and Sanger sequencing were 100% concordant for the 3,923 collective variants across all genes for an analytical sensitivity of the NGS assay of >99.92% (lower limit of 95% confidence interval). NGS, microarray CGH and MLPA correctly identified all expected positive and negative large rearrangement results for the 25-gene panel. This study provides a thorough validation of the 25-gene NGS panel and indicates that this analysis tool can be used to collect clinically significant information related to risk of

  9. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  10. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  11. Combined mutation and rearrangement screening by quantitative PCR high-resolution melting: is it relevant for hereditary recurrent Fever genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pallares-Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent identification of genes implicated in hereditary recurrent fevers has allowed their specific diagnosis. So far however, only punctual mutations have been identified and a significant number of patients remain with no genetic confirmation of their disease after routine molecular approaches such as sequencing. The possible involvement of sequence rearrangements in these patients has only been examined in familial Mediterranean fever and was found to be unlikely. To assess the existence of larger genetic alterations in 3 other concerned genes, MVK (Mevalonate kinase, NLRP3 (Nod like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and TNFRSF1A (TNF receptor superfamily 1A, we adapted the qPCR-HRM method to study possible intragenic deletions and duplications. This single-tube approach, combining both qualitative (mutations and quantitative (rearrangement screening, has proven effective in Lynch syndrome diagnosis. Using this approach, we studied 113 unselected (prospective group and 88 selected (retrospective group patients and identified no intragenic rearrangements in the 3 genes. Only qualitative alterations were found with a sensitivity similar to that obtained using classical molecular techniques for screening punctual mutations. Our results support that deleterious copy number alterations in MVK, NLRP3 and TNFRSF1A are rare or absent from the mutational spectrum of hereditary recurrent fevers, and demonstrate that a routine combined method such as qPCR-HRM provides no further help in genetic diagnosis. However, quantitative approaches such as qPCR or SQF-PCR did prove to be quick and effective and could still be useful after non contributory punctual mutation screening in the presence of clinically evocative signs.

  12. Sequence analysis of the Ras-MAPK pathway genes SOS1, EGFR & GRB2 in silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes): candidate genes for hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Tully, Sara J; Dawn Marshall, H

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis (HHG) is an autosomal recessive disease that presents with progressive gingival proliferation in farmed silver foxes. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is an analogous condition in humans that is genetically heterogeneous with several known autosomal dominant loci. For one locus the causative mutation is in the Son of sevenless homologue 1 (SOS1) gene. For the remaining loci, the molecular mechanisms are unknown but Ras pathway involvement is suspected. Here we compare sequences for the SOS1 gene, and two adjacent genes in the Ras pathway, growth receptor bound protein 2 (GRB2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), between HHG-affected and unaffected foxes. We conclude that the known HGF causative mutation does not cause HHG in foxes, nor do the coding regions or intron-exon boundaries of these three genes contain any candidate mutations for fox gum disease. Patterns of molecular evolution among foxes and other mammals reflect high conservation and strong functional constraints for SOS1 and GRB2 but reveal a lineage-specific pattern of variability in EGFR consistent with mutational rate differences, relaxed functional constraints, and possibly positive selection.

  13. Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Volokha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema — a rare disease caused by a congenital deficiency of C1-inhibitor. Clinical manifestations of the disease — recurrent episodes of angioedema, which manifest in childhood or adolescence, more often localized in the subcutaneous tissue (limbs, face, trunk, genitals or submucosa (intestine, larynx. Swellings of the larynx are potentially harmful to the patient’s life. Early detection enables to carry out timely appropriate treatment and prevention of angioedema. The paper presents a case of hereditary angioedema with manifestation in early childhood. The case study demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

  14. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R C; Berends, M J W; Wu, Y; Sijmons, R H; Hollema, H; Ligtenberg, M J L; de Walle, H E K; de Vries, E G E; Karrenbeld, A; Buys, C H C M; van der Zee, A G J; Hofstra, R M W; Kleibeuker, J H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Aim: To analyse the value of family history,

  15. Expanding the Clinical Spectrum of SPG11 Gene Mutations in Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia with Thin Corpus Callosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alice Abdel; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; Swistun, Dominika; Silhavy, Jennifer; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Zaki, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) represents a large group of neurological disorders characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. One subtype of HSP shows an autosomal recessive form of inheritance with this corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC), and displays genetic heterogeneity with four known loci. We identified a consanguineous Egyptian family with five affected individuals with ARHSP-TCC. We found linkage to the SPG11 locus and identified a novel homozygous p.Q498X stop codon mutation in exon 7 in the SPG11 gene encoding Spatacsin. Cognitive impairment and polyneuropathy, reported as frequent in SPG11, were not evident. This family supports the importance of SPG11 as a frequent cause for ARHSP-TCC, and expands the clinic SPG11 spectrum. PMID:20971220

  16. Hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease; HAE- Hereditary angioedema; Kallikrein inhibitor-HAE: bradykinin receptor antagonist-HAE; C1-inhibitors-HAE; Hives-HAE ... aunt, uncle, or grandparent. Dental procedures, sickness (including colds and the flu), and surgery may trigger HAE ...

  17. Clinical genetics and gene mapping studies on a family in the area of northeast with hereditary cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Xiao Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To map the causal gene of congenital nuclear cataract in a family in the area of northeast.METHODS: We investigated there generations of a Chinese family affected with hereditary cataract. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all of the family members, and genomic DNA was then extracted from the blood samples. Linkage analysis was performed using 62microsatellite markers. Two-point LOD scores(Zwere calculated using the LINKAGE programs(ver. 5.2. Haplotypes were constructed according to the allele information.RESULTS: The affected members in this family showed classic phenotype of autosomal dominant congenital cataract. The maximum two-point LOD score of 2.71 was obtained for marker D22S689(θ = 0. Haplotype analysis traced the disease gene on chromosome 22q11.2-12.1, containing CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, CRYBA4 genes. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of congenital nuclear cataract consistents with the autosomal dominant inherited regular, and the causal gene of congenital nuclear cataract localize at 22q11.2-12.1 in this family.

  18. Psychological impact of multi-gene cancer panel testing in patients with a clinical suspicion of hereditary cancer across Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, I; Vilaró, M; Adrover, E; Angulo, N; Carrasco, E; Gadea, N; Sánchez, A; Ocaña, T; Llort, G; Jover, R; Cubiella, J; Servitja, S; Herráiz, M; Cid, L; Martínez, S; Oruezábal-Moreno, M J; Garau, I; Khorrami, S; Herreros de Tejada, A; Morales, R; Cano, J M; Serrano, R; López-Ceballos, M H; González-Santiago, S; Juan-Fita, M J; Alonso-Cerezo, C; Casas, A; Graña-Suarez, B; Teulé, A; Alba, E; Antón, A; Guillén-Ponce, C; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Alés-Martínez, J E; Brunet, J; Balaguer, F; Balmaña, J

    2018-03-02

    Patients' psychological reactions to multi-gene cancer panel testing might differ compared with the single-gene testing reactions due to the complexity and uncertainty associated with the different possible results. Understanding patients' preferences and psychological impact of multi-gene panel testing is important to adapt the genetic counselling model. One hundred and eighty-seven unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of hereditary cancer undergoing a 25-gene panel test completed questionnaires after pre-test genetic counseling and at one week, three months and twelve months after results to elicit their preferences regarding results disclosure and to measure their cancer worry and testing-specific distress and uncertainty. A pathogenic variant was identified in 38 patients (34 high penetrance and 4 moderate penetrance variants) and 54 patients had at least one VUS. Overall, cancer panel testing was not associated with an increase in cancer worry after results disclosure (p value=0.87). Twelve months after results, carriers of a moderate penetrance variant had higher distress and uncertainty scores compared to carriers of high penetrance variants. Cancer worry prior to genetic testing predicted genetic testing specific distress after results, especially at long-term (p valuetesting, but distress and uncertainty observed in carriers of moderate penetrance cancer variants in this cohort warrants further research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Lin Sung

    Full Text Available An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC or ovarian cancer (OC in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC, cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272, 6.8% (16/236 and 8.2% (13/159, respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272. Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG, were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0% than patients with OC (25.0% or BC (8.6% alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  20. Mutational analysis ofBRCA1andBRCA2genes in Peruvian families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buleje, Jose; Guevara-Fujita, Maria; Acosta, Oscar; Huaman, Francia D P; Danos, Pierina; Murillo, Alexis; Pinto, Joseph A; Araujo, Jhajaira M; Aguilar, Alfredo; Ponce, Jaime; Vigil, Carlos; Castaneda, Carlos; Calderon, Gabriela; Gomez, Henry L; Fujita, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies in the world. In Peru, breast cancer is the second cause of death among women. Five to ten percent of patients present a high genetic predisposition due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations. We performed a comprehensive analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect large rearrangements in patients from 18 families, which met the criteria for hereditary breast cancer. In this series, we found four pathogenic mutations, three previously reported ( BRCA1 : c.302-1G>C and c.815_824dup10; BRCA2 : c.5946delT) and a duplication of adenines in exon 15 in BRCA1 gene (c.4647_4648dupAA, ClinVar SCV000256598.1). We also found two exonic and four intronic variants of unknown significance and 28 polymorphic variants. This is the first report to determine the spectrum of mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in Peruvian families selected by clinical and genetic criteria. The alteration rate in BRCA1/BRCA2 with proven pathogenic mutation was 22.2% (4 out 18) and this finding could be influenced by the reduced sample size or clinical criteria. In addition, we found three known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and a BRCA1 c.4647_4648dupAA as a novel pathogenic mutation.

  1. Hereditary familial vestibular degenerative diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes involved in hereditary vestibular disease is growing at a remarkable pace. Mutant mouse technology can be an important tool for understanding the biological mechanism of human vestibular diseases.

  2. [Biologic treatments for hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Xie, Yangli; Chen, Lin

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary disease, especially monogenic disease is one of the major causes for malformation and disability of children. Most hereditary diseases have no effective therapy besides clinical symptomatic treatment. Biological techniques targeting casual genes or related signaling genes, such as transgenic, RNA interfere, genome editing, have been successfully applied in treating some hereditary diseases. However, most biological, treatments were carried out in animals, further confirmation of the effectiveness and safety of these therapies, and development of more therapeutic approaches based on mechanisms are needed before clinical trials.

  3. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thein, S.L.; Weatherall, D.J. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sampietro, M.; Rohde, K.; Rochette, J.; Lathrop, G.M.; Demenais, F.

    1994-02-01

    [open quotes]Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin[close quotes] (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the [beta]-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. The authors have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with [beta]-thalassemia and/or [alpha]-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. The results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably [beta]-thalassemia and the XmnI-[sup G][gamma] polymorphism, are accounted for in this analysis. Linkage with the [beta]-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. 39 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders

    2017-01-01

    -based approaches detecting both SNVs, indels and CNVs in the same assay. We applied a panel including 19 CRC susceptibility genes to 91 individuals of six phenotypic subgroups. Targeted NGS-based sequencing of the whole gene regions including introns of the 19 genes was used. The individuals had a family history...

  5. Familial Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy with hypoparathyroidism: Normal structural G{sub s}{alpha} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapira, H.; Friedman, E.; Farfel, Z. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a characteristic skeletal phenotype, including short stature, obesity, round face, and brachydactyly. AHO appears in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) who have resistance to PTH and in their eumetabolic family members who have pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). The differential diagnosis of AHO in families without PHP includes brachydactyly E, whose existence as a distinct entity has been questioned. We studied a patient with familial AHO who presented with hypocalcemia. To our surprise, PTH levels were low, and the response to PTH administration was normal. This is the first case of familial AHO with hypoparathyroidism. The proband`s family included 22 affected subjects spanning 3 generations, who had variable degrees of AHO manifestations, with an autosomal dominant inheritance trait. The metacarpophalangeal pattern profile was typical of that of PHP-PPHP. As deficient activity and inactivating mutations of G{sub s}{alpha} were described in PHP as well as in PPHP, we measured the biological activity of G{sub s} in family members, which was normal. To exclude subtle abnormalities in the G{sub s}{alpha} gene, we sequenced the entire coding region of G{alpha} in the propositus, which was normal. We conclude that hypocalcemia should be adequately evaluated even in the presence of familial AHO, and that familial AHO can occur with a normal coding structural Ga gene. Identification of the molecular defect in familial AHO without PHP will shed light on the pathogenesis of AHO in general. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Characterization of a de novo 43-bp deletion of the Gs[alpha] gene (GNAS1) in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttikhuis, M.E.M.O.; Trembath, R.C. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)); Wilson, L.C. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom) Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)); Leonard, J.V. (Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-15

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, mental retardation, subcutaneous calcification, and brachy-metaphalangia. Two distinct forms of AHO exist; pseudohypoparathyroidism type I (PHPI) and pseudopseudohypoparathyrodism (PPHP). The classification is dependent upon the presence or absence, respectively, of resistance to parathyroid and other hormones that bind to Gs-protein-coupled membrane receptors stimulating adenylyl cyclase. Gs is a heterotrimeric protein comprising [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-subunits encoded by separate genes. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral leukocytes from 13 unrelated AHO patients. Exon 4 and flanking intronic sequence of GNAS1 were PCR amplified. A single PCR product corresponding to the expected 159-bp fragment was identified in 12 affected individuals with either PHPIa or PPHP. In patient 10285 an additional smaller fragment was detected but was not present in either of the unaffected parents. These two fragments were isolated from a 2% agarose gel. Direct sequencing of the smaller fragment revealed a 43-bp deletion comprising at least 35 hp of the 3[prime] end of exon 4 and the donor splice site of intron 4 and extending into the following intro. The 43-bp deletion would lead to a premature stop codon, 62 codons downstream of the deletion. The de novo mutation reported here is the largest deletion in the Gs[alpha] gene described so far for AHO patients.

  7. Germline promoter hypermethylation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is not present in hereditary breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Balada, M; Roig, B; Melé, M; Salvat, M; Martorell, L; Borràs, J; Gumà, J

    2018-02-05

    Germline promoter hypermethylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is an alternative event of gene silencing that has not been widely investigated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. We analyzed germline BRCA promoter hypermethylation in HBOC patients with and without BRCA mutations and control subjects, using a recently developed BRCA methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) assay. Neither the patients tested nor the control subjects showed germline hypermethylation of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 promoter regions analyzed. Despite the results achieved at somatic levels by other researchers, these were not confirmed in our study at the germline level. Our results show the need to establish more predictive CpG sites in the BRCA promoter regions to optimize the MS-MLPA assay for the detection of germline hypermethylation as an effective pre-screening tool for whole-BRCA genetic analysis in HBOC, because we can not rule out the existence of germline promoter hypermethylation in BRCA.

  8. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re......We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims...

  9. Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryline Agler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.

  10. Canine Hereditary Ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters Is Associated with a Defect in the Autophagy Gene Encoding RAB24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agler, Caryline; Nielsen, Dahlia M.; Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Singleton, Andrew; Tonomura, Noriko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Tang, Ruqi; Linder, Keith; Arepalli, Sampath; Hernandez, Dena; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; van de Leemput, Joyce; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; O'Brien, Dennis P.; Bell, Jerold; Harris, Tonya; Steinberg, Steven; Olby, Natasha J.

    2014-01-01

    Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia. PMID:24516392

  11. Hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Francisco A

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal-dominant deficiency of C1 inhibitor--a serpin inhibitor of kallikrein, C1r, C1s, factor XII, and plasmin. Quantitative or qualitative deficiency of C1 inhibitor leads to the generation of vasoactive mediators, most likely bradykinin. The clinical syndrome is repeated bouts of nonpruritic, nonpitting edema of the face, larynx, extermities, and intestinal viscera. Recently, investigators, physicians, and industry have demonstrated a renewed interest in the biology and treatment of hereditary angioedema. Investigators have generated a C1INH-/- mouse model that has demonstrated the importance of the contact activation system for hereditary angioedema-related vascular permeability. An interactive database of mutations is available electronically. Investigators have continued exploration into mRNA/protein levels. The proceedings of a recent workshop have been impressive in the scope and depth. Clinicians have produced consensus documents and expert reviews. The pharmaceutical industry has initiated clinical trails with novel agents. Hereditary angioedema is often misdiagnosed and poorly treated. Diagnosis requires careful medical and family history and the measurement of functional C1 inhibitor and C4 levels. Attenuated androgens, anti-fibrinolytics, and C1 inhibitor concentrates are used for long-term and preprocedure prophylaxis, but have significant drawbacks. C1 inhibitor concentrates and fresh frozen plasma are available for acute intervention. The mainstays of supportive care are airway monitoring, pain relief, hydration, and control of nausea. New agents such as recombinant C1 inhibitor, kallikrein inhibitors, and bradykinin inhibitors may offer safer and more tolerable treatments.

  12. PATCHED and p53 gene alterations in sporadic and hereditary basal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, G.; Ahmadian, A.; Persson, A.; Undén, A. B.; Afink, G.; Williams, C.; Uhlén, M.; Toftgård, R.; Lundeberg, J.; Pontén, F.

    2001-01-01

    It is widely accepted that disruption of the hedgehog-patched pathway is a key event in development of basal cell cancer. In addition to patched gene alterations, p53 gene mutations are also frequent in basal cell cancer. We determined loss of heterozygosity in the patched and p53 loci as well as

  13. Next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Weiss, Maximilian E R; Schneider, Juliane; Köster, Julia; Papachristos, Efstathios B; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zakharkina, Tetyana; Nahavandi, Nahid; Kovacevic, Lejla; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-03-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer mostly relies on laborious molecular tools that use Sanger sequencing to scan for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We explored a more efficient genetic screening strategy based on next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. We first validated this approach in a cohort of 115 samples with previously known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was amplified using the Ion AmpliSeq BRCA1 and BRCA2 panel. The DNA Libraries were pooled, barcoded, and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine sequencer. The combination of different robust bioinformatics tools allowed detection of all previously known pathogenic mutations and polymorphisms in the 115 samples, without detecting spurious pathogenic calls. We then used the same assay in a discovery cohort of 95 uncharacterized hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA1 and BRCA2. In addition, we describe the allelic frequencies across 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients of 74 unique definitely and likely pathogenic and uncertain BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants, some of which have not been previously annotated in the public databases. Targeted next-generation sequencing is ready to substitute classic molecular methods to perform genetic testing on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and provides a greater opportunity for more comprehensive testing of at-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 -resistant rickets in three families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, H.H.; Hughes, M.R.; Thompson, E.T.; Pike, J.W.; O' Malley, B.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Malloy, P.J.; Feldman, D. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Hochberg, Z. (Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel))

    1989-12-01

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C {yields} A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-({sup 3}H)dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets.

  15. Understanding Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergy Library ▸ Understanding Hereditary Angioedema Share | Understanding Hereditary Angioedema This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic condition. People with ...

  16. [The research advances and applications of genome editing in hereditary eye diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, S W; Zhang, Y; Hou, M Z; Liu, Y; Li, X R

    2017-05-11

    Genome editing is a cutting-edge technology that generates DNA double strand breaks at the specific genomic DNA sequence through nuclease recognition and cleavage, and then achieves insertion, replacement, or deletion of the target gene via endogenous DNA repair mechanisms, such as non-homologous end joining, homology directed repair, and homologous recombination. So far, more than 600 human hereditary eye diseases and systemic hereditary diseases with ocular phenotypes have been found. However, most of these diseases are of incompletely elucidated pathogenesis and without effective therapies. Genome editing technology can precisely target and alter the genomes of animals, establish animal models of the hereditary diseases, and elucidate the relationship between the target gene and the disease phenotype, thereby providing a powerful approach to studying the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the hereditary eye diseases. In addition, correction of gene mutations by the genome editing brings a new hope to gene therapy for the hereditary eye diseases. This review introduces the molecular characteristics of 4 major enzymes used in the genome editing, including homing endonucleases, zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/ CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), and summarizes the current applications of this technology in investigating the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the hereditary eye diseases. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 386-371 ) .

  17. Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Karim, Omar; Dizdarevic, Adis; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    of life. Most studies have been conducted in adults. We report a 13-year-old boy who quickly learned self-administration, which resulted in reduced frequency and severity of attacks. The aim of this report is to emphasize that children should be considered for self-administration training......Hereditary angioedema is an inherited disease that causes periodic swelling attacks, which can be life threatening and have a major effect on a patient's life. Studies have shown that home therapy for angioedema reduces disease severity, leads to faster relief of symptoms, and improves quality...

  18. BRCA1 gene-related hereditary susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihomirova, Laima; Vaivade, Iveta; Fokina, Oksana; Peculis, Raitis; Mandrika, Ilona; Sinicka, Olga; Stengrevics, Aivars; Krilova, Anna; Keire, Guntars; Petrevics, Janis; Eglitis, Janis; Timofejevs, Mihails; Leja, Marcis

    2014-03-01

    In this report, we summarise data on BRCA1 gene analysis in Latvia to characterise criteria of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. Analysis by SSCP/HD, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry or DNA sequencing was used for mutation detection. Mutations identified were confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Out of 1068 breast and 231 ovarian cancer patients from different families: 58 carried the c.5266dupC and 43 carried the c.4035delA mutations. Every 4th patient in our study did not report cancer in the family. The breast cancer was diagnosed earlier in carriers of the c.5266dupC than in carriers of the c.4035delA (p=0.003). The incidence of breast or ovarian cancer does not differ among the 2 mutation carriers in our patient group. The nature of the c.5266dupC mutation might be more deleterious. We recommend the screening of 4 founder BRCA1 mutations in all breast and ovarian cancer patients in Latvia at diagnosis of disease regardless of family history or age. The BRCA1 screening can be carried out efficiently using the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry mutation detection method developed in the Biomedical Research and Study Centre (Riga, Latvia). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  19. THE POLYMORPHISM OF Α2B-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR GENE — A NEW GENETIC MARKER OF THE HEREDITARY SICK SINUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iu. Nikulina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the association of the hereditary sick sinus syndrome (SSS with gene α2B-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2B polymorphism.Material and methods. 29 families with hereditary primary SSS from the database of the Chair of Therapy № 1 of Krasnoyarsk State Medical University named after prof. V.F. Voyno-Yasenetsky were included in the study. Group 1 included probands (20 women and 9 men, 58±0.15 y.o., group 2 – proband relatives of I, II and III degree (65 males and 68 females, 39±0.13 y.o., group 3 (control — 89 healthy volunteers. Clinical examination (physical examination, ECG, bicycle ergometry, ECG monitoring, atropine test, electrophysiological study, echocardiography was performed in all probands and their relatives. The diagnosis of SSS was confirmed by transesophageal left atrium stimulation in 75 individuals. Genotypic examination of gene ADRA2B I/D polymorphism was performed in 213 individuals: 75 SSS-patients, 49 their healthy relatives, 89 healthy volunteers.Results. 3 types of ADRA2B genotypes (II — homozygous wild, ID — heterozygous, DD — homozygous mutant were founded by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Significant prevalence of the homozygous genotype of more rare alleles DD in SSS-patients (28±5.2% compared to the control group (8.99±3.0% was found.Conclusion. Study of the genetic marker can be used to identify predisposition to hereditary SSS in the population and individual-family level. SSS due to mutations in genes that regulate cell function of sinus node and the sinoatrial conduct occurs, apparently, extremely rarely.

  20. Endoglin, a TGF-β binding protein of endothelial cells, is the gene for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. McAllister (K.); K.M. Grogg (K.); D.W. Johnson (D.); C.J. Gallione (C.); P.J. Baldwin (Peter); C.E. Jackson (C.); E.A. Helmbold (E.); D.S. Markel (D.); W. McKinnon; J.R. Murrell (Jill); J.A. McCormick (James); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); T. Haitjema (T.); C.J.J. Westerman (C. J J); M.E. Porteous (Mary); A.E. Guttmacher (A.); M. Letarte (M.); D.A. Marchuk (D.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractHereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multisystemic vascular dysplasia and recurrent haemorrhage. Linkage for some families has been established to chromosome 9q33−q34. In the present study, endoglin, a transforming growth factor

  1. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Pylkäs

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211. Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  2. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  3. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...

  4. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian canc...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer.......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  5. QUOTE-gene(ca): development of a counselee-centered instrument to measure needs and preferences in genetic counseling for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Arwen; van Dulmen, Sandra; Ausems, Margreet; Schoemaker, Angela; Beemer, Frits; Bensing, Jozien

    2005-05-01

    Counselees' motives for seeking genetic counseling for hereditary cancer have already been investigated, however not using instruments based on counselees' perspective. In addition, expectations regarding the process of counseling have scarcely been assessed. This article describes the construction and psychometric properties of the QUOTE-gene(ca), a counselee-centered instrument intended to measure needs and preferences in genetic counseling for hereditary cancer. Formulation of the items involved input from counselees and the instrument was derived from a conceptual framework for measuring patient satisfaction. Two-hundred new counselees completed a questionnaire containing the instrument and measures of coping style (TMSI), generalized anxiety (STAI) and cancer-related stress reactions (IES), prior to their first consultation. Results showed that the instrument captures relevant issues of concern with high internal consistency, and was associated, as expected, with validated measures of coping style and distress. Responses showed that major concerns prior to counseling relate to: receiving information about risk and preventive strategies; the procedure of counseling; and preferences on how the interaction with the counselor proceeds. Receiving emotional support and discussing emotional aspects were considered relatively less important. Increasing insight into individual needs may help counselors in better addressing these concerns, potentially increasing the likelihood of successful counseling. Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Oral manifestations, dental management, and a rare homozygous mutation of the PRDM12 gene in a boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Finke, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Bartzela, Theodosia

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder. Chen et al. recently identified the causative gene and characterized biallelic mutations in the PR domain-containing protein 12 gene, which plays a role in the development of pain-sensing nerve cells. Our patient's family was included in Chen and colleagues' study. We performed a literature review of the PubMed library (January 1985 to December 2016) on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I to VIII genetic disorders and their orofacial manifestations. This case report is the first to describe the oral manifestations, and their treatment, of the recently discovered hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII in the medical and dental literature. We report on the oral manifestations and dental management of an 8-month-old white boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-VIII over a period of 16 years. Our patient was homozygous for a mutation of PR domain-containing protein 12 gene and was characterized by insensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli, self-mutilation behavior, reduced sweat and tear production, absence of corneal reflexes, and multiple skin and bone infections. Oral manifestations included premature loss of teeth, associated with dental traumata and self-mutilation, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and submucosal abscesses, hypomineralization of primary teeth, and mandibular osteomyelitis. The lack of scientific knowledge on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to the rarity of the disease often results in a delay in diagnosis, which is of substantial importance for the prevention of many complications and symptoms. Interdisciplinary work of specialized medical and dental teams and development of a standardized treatment protocols are essential for the management of the disease. There are many knowledge gaps concerning the management of patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

  7. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  8. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  9. A novel A792D mutation in the CSF1R gene causes hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids characterized by slow progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiho Ueda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS is an autosomal dominant white matter disease that causes adult-onset cognitive impairment. The clinical manifestations are a variable combination of personality and behavioral changes, cognitive decline, parkinsonism, spasticity, and epilepsy. In 2012, mutations in the gene encoding colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R were identified as the cause of HDLS. As the numbers of reported mutations are limited, the understanding of whole pathogenesis needs accumulation of disease-causing mutations with detailed clinical descriptions. We describe a Japanese family with autosomal dominant adult-onset cognitive impairment and characteristic white matter lesions. Genetic testing revealed a novel p.A792D mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of CSF1R in two affected family members. The symptom profile of the present cases mostly matched the previously reported cases, with the notable exceptions of late-onset and long disease duration.

  10. Identification of a novel gene (HSN2) causing hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II through the Study of Canadian Genetic Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Ronald G; MacDonald, Marcia L E; Dube, Marie-Pierre; MacFarlane, Julie; O'Driscoll, Mary; Brais, Bernard; Meilleur, Sebastien; Brinkman, Ryan R; Dadivas, Owen; Pape, Terry; Platon, Christele; Radomski, Chris; Risler, Jenni; Thompson, Jay; Guerra-Escobio, Ana-Maria; Davar, Gudarz; Breakefield, Xandra O; Pimstone, Simon N; Green, Roger; Pryse-Phillips, William; Goldberg, Y Paul; Younghusband, H Banfield; Hayden, Michael R; Sherrington, Robin; Rouleau, Guy A; Samuels, Mark E

    2004-05-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impairment of pain, temperature, and touch sensation owing to reduction or absence of peripheral sensory neurons. We identified two large pedigrees segregating the disorder in an isolated population living in Newfoundland and performed a 5-cM genome scan. Linkage analysis identified a locus mapping to 12p13.33 with a maximum LOD score of 8.4. Haplotype sharing defined a candidate interval of 1.06 Mb containing all or part of seven annotated genes, sequencing of which failed to detect causative mutations. Comparative genomics revealed a conserved ORF corresponding to a novel gene in which we found three different truncating mutations among five families including patients from rural Quebec and Nova Scotia. This gene, termed "HSN2," consists of a single exon located within intron 8 of the PRKWNK1 gene and is transcribed from the same strand. The HSN2 protein may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of peripheral sensory neurons or their supporting Schwann cells.

  11. Demonstration by transfection studies that mutations in the adrenocorticotropin receptor gene are one cause of the hereditary syndrome of glucocorticoid deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naville, D.; Barjhoux, L.; Jaillard, C. [Hopital Debrousse, Tours (France)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The hereditary syndrome of unresponsiveness to ACTH is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by low levels of serum cortisol and high levels of plasma ACTH. There is no cortisol response to exogenous ACTH. Recent cloning of the human ACTH receptor gene has enabled us to study this gene in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency. By using the PCR to amplify the coding sequence of the ACTH receptor gene, we identified three mutations in two unrelated patients. One mutation present in homozygous form converted the negatively charged Asp{sup 107}, located in the third transmembrane domain, to an uncharged Asn residue. The second patient was a compound heterozygote: the paternal allele contained a one-nucleotide insertion leading to a stop codon within the third extracellular loop, and the maternal allele contained a point mutation converting Cys{sup 235} to Phe, also in the third extracellular loop. Normal and mutant ACTH receptor genes were expressed in the M3 cell line, and intracellular cAMP production in response to ACTH was measured. For the mutant receptors, no response to physiological ACTH concentrations was detected, suggesting an impaired binding of ACTH to the receptors and/or an altered coupling to the adenylate cyclase effector. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy APP CST3 ITM2B Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation ... a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about ... APP-related Genetic Testing Registry: Dementia familial British Genetic ...

  13. Genetics of human isolated hereditary nail disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Basit, S; Habib, R; Kamal, A; Muhammad, N; Ahmad, W

    2015-10-01

    Human hereditary nail disorders constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of ectodermal dysplasias. They occur as isolated and/or syndromic ectodermal conditions where other ectodermal appendages are also involved, and can occur associated with skeletal dysplasia. 'Nail disorder, nonsyndromic congenital' (OMIM; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is subclassified into 10 different types. The underlying genes identified thus far are expressed in the nail bed and play important roles in nail development and morphogenesis. Here, we review the current literature on nail disorders and present a coherent review on the genetics of nail disorders. This review will pave the way to identifying putative genes and pathways involved in nail development and morphogenesis. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  15. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  16. Genes Underlying Positive Influence Of Prenatal Environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to investigate and find out key genes underlying the positive-negative effects derived from prenatal interventions. Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats were randomized into EE group (EEG), earthquake simulation group (ESG), herbal group (HG) received herbal supplements in feed after earthquake simulation, ...

  17. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  18. Automated detection of hereditary syndromes using data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S; Lemon, S J; Deters, C A; Fusaro, R M; Lynch, H T

    1997-10-01

    Computer-based data mining methodology applied to family history clinical data can algorithmically create highly accurate, clinically oriented hereditary disease pattern recognizers. For the example of hereditary colon cancer, the data mining's selection of relevant factors to assess for hereditary colon cancer was statistically significant (P recognizer-formulated patterns of hereditary colon cancer were independently confirmed by a clinical expert. Applied to previously analyzed family histories, the recognizer identified the definitive hereditary histories, correctly responded negatively to the putative hereditary histories, and correctly responded negatively to empirically elevated colon cancer risk situations. This capability facilitates patient selection for DNA studies in search of gene mutations. When genetic mutations are included as parameters in a patient database for a genetic disease, the process yields an expert system which characterizes variations in clinical disease presentations in terms of genetic mutations. Such information can greatly improve the efficiency of gene testing.

  19. Genes and (common pathways underlying drug addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a serious worldwide problem with strong genetic and environmental influences. Different technologies have revealed a variety of genes and pathways underlying addiction; however, each individual technology can be biased and incomplete. We integrated 2,343 items of evidence from peer-reviewed publications between 1976 and 2006 linking genes and chromosome regions to addiction by single-gene strategies, microrray, proteomics, or genetic studies. We identified 1,500 human addiction-related genes and developed KARG (http://karg.cbi.pku.edu.cn, the first molecular database for addiction-related genes with extensive annotations and a friendly Web interface. We then performed a meta-analysis of 396 genes that were supported by two or more independent items of evidence to identify 18 molecular pathways that were statistically significantly enriched, covering both upstream signaling events and downstream effects. Five molecular pathways significantly enriched for all four different types of addictive drugs were identified as common pathways which may underlie shared rewarding and addictive actions, including two new ones, GnRH signaling pathway and gap junction. We connected the common pathways into a hypothetical common molecular network for addiction. We observed that fast and slow positive feedback loops were interlinked through CAMKII, which may provide clues to explain some of the irreversible features of addiction.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary angioedema Hereditary angioedema Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary angioedema is a disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of ...

  1. A novel homozygous p.R1105X mutation of the AP4E1 gene in twins with hereditary spastic paraplegia and mycobacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Kong

    Full Text Available We report identical twins with intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia and short stature, born to a consanguineous family. Intriguingly, both children presented with lymphadenitis caused by the live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Two syndromes - hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP and mycobacterial disease - thus occurred simultaneously. Whole-exome sequencing (WES revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R1105X of the AP4E1 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The p.R1105X mutation has no effect on AP4E1 mRNA levels, but results in lower levels of AP-4ε protein and of the other components of the AP-4 complex, as shown by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Thus, the C-terminal part of the AP-4ε subunit plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the AP-4 complex. No abnormalities of the IL-12/IFN-γ axis or oxidative burst pathways were identified. In conclusion, we identified twins with autosomal recessive AP-4 deficiency associated with HSP and mycobacterial disease, suggesting that AP-4 may play important role in the neurological and immunological systems.

  2. Synergistic effect of two β globin gene cluster mutations leading to the hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Priya; Sawant, Madhavi; Gorivale, Manju; Manchanda, Ruma; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, K; Nadkarni, Anita

    2017-10-01

    Co-inheritance of gamma and beta globin gene mutations in a compound heterozygous state is rare but of clinical interest as it provides an important data on understanding the HbF expression. Hematological analysis was carried out (Sysmex KX-21). F-cells were enumerated using flow cytometry. Beta globin gene was analysed by CRDB technique and by DNA sequencing. Gamma globin promoter region was sequenced and expression studies were carried out using real time Taqman assay. We report a family, where two inherited defects of the β globin gene cluster segregate. The proband and her sibling were compound heterozygotes for a novel G γ promoter mutation and the 619 bp deletion a common Indian β thalassemia mutation. Molecular characterization revealed that the father (HbA 2 5.1%, HbF 5.4%), proband (HbA 2 3.6%, HbF 31.7%) and her brother (HbA 2 3.9%, HbF 23.6%) were heterozygous for the 619 bp deletion. The mother (HbA 2 2.1%, HbF 3.4%) had a normal β globin gene. As both the children showed high HbF levels, the γ globin gene work up was carried out. The G γ-globin gene promoter analysis revealed that the mother and the two children were heterozygous for a 5 bp deletion -ATAAG (-533 to -529) that resides in the GATA binding site. These findings suggest that the 5 bp deletion in the G γ globin promoter has a functional role in silencing the γ-globin gene expression in adults by disrupting GATA-1 binding and the associated repressor complex and results in the up-regulation of gamma globin gene expression. When co-inherited with β -thalassemia trait it leads to a phenotype of HPFH.

  3. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mutation in the RPE65 gene causing hereditary retinal dystrophy in the Briard dogs: application of a new detection method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bechyňová, Renata; Dostál, Jaromír; Stratil, Antonín; Jílek, F.; Horák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2008), s. 176-179 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500450578; GA ČR GD523/03/H076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : RPE65 gene * CSNB * dog Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.735, year: 2008

  5. Intracellular processing and maturation of mutant gene products in hereditary beta-galactosidase deficiency (beta-galactosidosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A; Yoshida, K; Itoh, K; Kase, R; Sakuraba, H; Suzuki, Y

    1994-02-01

    Heterogeneous patterns of biosynthesis, posttranslational processing, and degradation were demonstrated for mutant enzymes in three clinical forms of beta-galactosidase deficiency (beta-galactosidosis): juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis, adult GM1-gangliosidosis, and Morquio B disease. The precursor of the mutant enzyme in adult GM1-gangliosidosis was not phosphorylated, and only a small portion of the gene product reached the lysosomes. The enzyme in Morquio B disease was normally processed and transported to lysosomes, but its catalytic activity was low. A common gene mutation in juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis (R201C) produced an enzyme protein that did not aggregate with protective protein in the lysosome, and was rapidly degraded by thiol proteases. This abnormal turnover was similar to that for the normal but dissociated beta-galactosidase in galactosialidosis. Protease inhibitors restored the enzyme activity in fibroblasts of this clinical form. A possible therapeutic approach is discussed for this specific type of enzyme deficiency.

  6. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  7. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  8. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  9. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in the gene TTC7A in French-Canadian cases with hereditary multiple intestinal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Mark E; Majewski, Jacek; Alirezaie, Najmeh; Fernandez, Isabel; Casals, Ferran; Patey, Natalie; Decaluwe, Hélène; Gosselin, Isabelle; Haddad, Elie; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Marchand, Valerie; Michaud, Jacques L; Rodrigue, Marc-André; Desjardins, Sylvie; Dubois, Stéphane; Le Deist, Francoise; Awadalla, Philip; Raymond, Vincent; Maranda, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Congenital multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a severe, fatal neonatal disorder, involving the occurrence of obstructions in the small and large intestines ultimately leading to organ failure. Surgical interventions are palliative but do not provide long-term survival. Severe immunodeficiency may be associated with the phenotype. A genetic basis for MIA is likely. We had previously ascertained a cohort of patients of French-Canadian origin, most of whom were deceased as infants or in utero. The goal of the study was to identify the molecular basis for the disease in the patients of this cohort. We performed whole exome sequencing on samples from five patients of four families. Validation of mutations and familial segregation was performed using standard Sanger sequencing in these and three additional families with deceased cases. Exon skipping was assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Five patients from four different families were each homozygous for a four base intronic deletion in the gene TTC7A, immediately adjacent to a consensus GT splice donor site. The deletion was demonstrated to have deleterious effects on splicing causing the skipping of the attendant upstream coding exon, thereby leading to a predicted severe protein truncation. Parents were heterozygous carriers of the deletion in these families and in two additional families segregating affected cases. In a seventh family, an affected case was compound heterozygous for the same 4bp deletion and a second missense mutation p.L823P, also predicted as pathogenic. No other sequenced genes possessed deleterious variants explanatory for all patients in the cohort. Neither mutation was seen in a large set of control chromosomes. Based on our genetic results, TTC7A is the likely causal gene for MIA.

  10. A non-stop S-antigen gene mutation is associated with late onset hereditary retinal degeneration in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Orly; Jordan, Julie Ann; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    To identify the causative mutation of canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregating as an adult onset autosomal recessive disorder in the Basenji breed of dog. Basenji dogs were ascertained for the PRA phenotype by clinical ophthalmoscopic examination. Blood samples from six affected cases and three nonaffected controls were collected, and DNA extraction was used for a genome-wide association study using the canine HD Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and PLINK. Positional candidate genes identified within the peak association signal region were evaluated. The highest -Log10(P) value of 4.65 was obtained for 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on three chromosomes. Homozygosity and linkage disequilibrium analyses favored one chromosome, CFA25, and screening of the S-antigen (SAG) gene identified a non-stop mutation (c.1216T>C), which would result in the addition of 25 amino acids (p.*405Rext*25). Identification of this non-stop SAG mutation in dogs affected with retinal degeneration establishes this canine disease as orthologous to Oguchi disease and SAG-associated retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and offers opportunities for genetic therapeutic intervention.

  11. New treatments addressing the pathophysiology of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Alvin E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a deficiency of C1-inhibitor. The condition is the result of a defect in the gene controlling the synthesis of C1-inhibitor, which regulates the activity of a number of plasma cascade systems. Although the prevalence of hereditary angioedema is low – between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 – the condition can result in considerable pain, debilitation, reduced quality of life, and even death in those afflicted. Hereditary angioedema presents clinically as cutaneous swelling of the extremities, face, genitals, and trunk, or painful swelling of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Angioedema of the upper airways is extremely serious and has resulted in death by asphyxiation. Subnormal levels of C1-inhibitor are associated with the inappropriate activation of a number of pathways – including, in particular, the complement and contact systems, and to some extent, the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems. Current findings indicate bradykinin, a product of contact system activation, as the primary mediator of angioedema in patients with C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, other systems may play a role in bradykinin's rapid and excessive generation by depleting available levels of C1-inhibitor. There are currently no effective therapies in the United States to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, and currently available agents used to treat hereditary angioedema prophylactically are suboptimal. Five new agents are, however, in Phase III development. Three of these agents replace C1-inhibitor, directly addressing the underlying cause of hereditary angioedema and re-establishing regulatory control of all pathways and proteases involved in its pathogenesis. These agents include a nano-filtered C1-inhibitor replacement therapy, a pasteurized C1-inhibitor, and a recombinant C1-inhibitor isolated from the milk of transgenic rabbits. All C1-inhibitors are being investigated for acute angioedema

  12. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and

  13. A missense mutation (Q279R) in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene, responsible for hereditary tyrosinemia, acts as a splicing mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, N; Poudrier, J A; Bergeron, A; Levy, H L; Baklouti, F; Tanguay, R M

    2001-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type I, the most severe disease of the tyrosine catabolic pathway is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). A patient showing few of the symptoms associated with the disease, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a splice mutation, IVS6-1g->t, and a putative missense mutation, Q279R. Analysis of FAH expression in liver sections obtained after resection for hepatocellular carcinoma revealed a mosaic pattern of expression. No FAH was found in tumor regions while a healthy region contained enzyme-expressing nodules. Analysis of DNA from a FAH expressing region showed that the expression of the protein was due to correction of the Q279R mutation. RT-PCR was used to assess if Q279R RNA was produced in the liver cells and in fibroblasts from the patient. Normal mRNA was found in the liver region where the mutation had reverted while splicing intermediates were found in non-expressing regions suggesting that the Q279R mutation acted as a splicing mutation in vivo. Sequence of transcripts showed skipping of exon 8 alone or together with exon 9. Using minigenes in transfection assays, the Q279R mutation was shown to induce skipping of exon 9 when placed in a constitutive splicing environment. These data suggest that the putative missense mutation Q279R in the FAH gene acts as a splicing mutation in vivo. Moreover FAH expression can be partially restored in certain liver cells as a result of a reversion of the Q279R mutation and expansion of the corrected cells.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Canada Muscular Dystrophy UK Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Muscular Dystrophy / Atrophy GeneReviews (1 link) Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure (HMERF) Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed ...

  15. [Molecular mechanism of hereditary spherocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusławska, Dzamila M; Heger, Elzbieta; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a common inherited anaemia in northern Europe characterized by the presence of spherocytic red cells and by heterogeneous clinical presentation, and heterogeneous molecular basis and inheritance. The primary molecular defects reside in the red blood cell membrane, particularly in proteins involved in the vertical interactions between the membrane skeleton and the lipid bilayer. Defects in these interactions lead to the loss of red cell surface area and to the spheroidal shape of the erythrocyte in particular loss of the membrane elasticity and mechanical stability. Severe HS is often associated with a substantial reduction of, and (or) dysfunction of, the affected membrane protein(s). Hereditary spherocytosis stems from mutations in one of the genes encoding ankyrin-1 (ANKI), alpha spectrin (SPTA1) and beta spectrin (SPTB), the anion exchanger 1 (SLC4A 1), and protein 4.2 (EPB42). Inheritance of HS is usually (75%) autosomal, dominant. Recessive and nondominant cases are mostly found in HS associated with ANK1, SPTA1 and SPTB genes.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Aug;105(8):1876- ... Hammel P, Ruszniewski P, Lévy P. The natural history of hereditary pancreatitis: a national series. Gut. 2009 ...

  17. Digital microscopy as a screening tool for the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisjes, R; van Solinge, W W; Levin, M D; van Wijk, R; Riedl, J A

    2018-04-01

    Evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) morphology is an important first step in the differential diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia. It is, however, labor intensive, expensive, and prone to subjectivity. To improve and standardize the analysis of RBC morphology as a screening tool in the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia, we studied its automated analysis by digital microscopy (DM). Blood from 90 patients with hereditary hemolytic anemia and 32 normal control subjects was analyzed by the CellaVision DM96 Digital Microscope. All hemolytic RBC abnormalities could be distinguished by the presence of at least one aberrant red cell type. In particular, the percentage of microcytes was highly sensitive and specific (AUC ROC  = 0.97) for RBC membrane disorders, and a cut-off of 5.7% microcytes was calculated to be optimal to distinguish patients from healthy controls. Subgroup analysis of patients with RBC membrane disorders revealed additional distinct differences according to the underlying gene defect. A number of cell types were significantly elevated in sickle cell anemia patients, such as polychromatic cells, macrocytes, and poikilocytes. The increase in helmet cells (AUC ROC  = 0.96) and hypochromic cells (AUC ROC  = 0.91) was specific for β-thalassemia, whereas patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency showed a significant increased polychromatic cells, macrocytes, and ovalocytes. Patients with hereditary xerocytosis showed significantly higher numbers of polychromatic cells, macrocytes, and target cells. DM holds a promise as a useful screening tool in the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia by detecting and quantifying distinct morphological changes in RBCs in patients with various forms of hereditary hemolytic anemia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P A

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, with overall mortality exceeding 40% even with treatment. Effective efforts for screening and prevention are most likely to succeed in patient groups identified as high risk for colorectal cancer, most notably the hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes. In these syndromes, benign polyps develop throughout the intestinal tract prior to the development of colorectal cancer, marking the patient and associated family for precancer diagnosis followed by either close surveillance or preventive treatment. This review article was undertaken to discuss the most recent developments in the knowledge of hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes, emphasizing the clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment relative to preventing the development of cancer. The most common of the hereditary polyposis syndromes is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which is characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon followed at an early age by colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer can be prevented in this autosomal dominant condition by prophylactic colectomy, though a risk for other tumors, including periampullary cancers, remains throughout life. Variant of FAP associated with fewer and smaller polyps (hereditary flat adenoma syndrome), or even CNS tumors (Turcot's syndrome) also carry this high risk of colorectal cancer. Hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes such as juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (also autosomal dominant) are characterized by less frequent polyps. Though these are generally benign polyps, they are also associated with a significant risk of colorectal and other cancers. Other polyposis syndromes, including neurofibromatosis and Cowden's disease, do not carry this increased risk of colorectal cancer, and therefore affect different treatment strategies. Analysis of genetic factors responsible for these and other hereditary syndromes with

  19. Lymphocyte gene expression signatures from patients and mouse models of hereditary hemochromatosis reveal a function of HFE as a negative regulator of CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation and differentiation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Costa

    Full Text Available Abnormally low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers is characteristic of some patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH, a MHC-linked disorder of iron overload. Both environmental and genetic components are known to influence CD8+ T-lymphocyte homeostasis but the role of the HH associated protein HFE is still insufficiently understood. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed in peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients selected according to CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and from Hfe-/- mice maintained either under normal or high iron diet conditions. In addition, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry in HH patients. HH patients with low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers show a differential expression of genes related to lymphocyte differentiation and maturation namely CCR7, LEF1, ACTN1, NAA50, P2RY8 and FOSL2, whose expression correlates with the relative proportions of naïve, central and effector memory subsets. In addition, expression levels of LEF1 and P2RY8 in memory cells as well as the proportions of CD8+ T cells in G2/M cell cycle phase are significantly different in HH patients compared to controls. Hfe-/- mice do not show alterations in CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers but differential gene response patterns. We found an increased expression of S100a8 and S100a9 that is most pronounced in high iron diet conditions. Similarly, CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients display higher S100a9 expression both at the mRNA and protein level. Altogether, our results support a role for HFE as a negative regulator of CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation. While the activation markers S100a8 and S100a9 are strongly increased in CD8+ T cells from both, Hfe-/- mice and HH patients, a differential profile of genes related to differentiation/maturation of CD8+ T memory cells is evident in HH patients only. This supports the notion that HFE contributes, at least in part, to the generation of low peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes

  20. Investigação genética da surdez hereditária: mutação do gene da Conexina 26 Genetic investigation of hereditary deafness: connexin 26 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Michele da Silva Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos houve grande progresso na localização de genes associados à deficiência auditiva hereditária, possibilitando diagnósticos cada vez mais precisos e precoces. Mutações no gene da Conexina 26 (GJB2 - Cx26 causam deficiência auditiva. Pela facilidade e benefício do rastreamento de mutações no gene GJB2, o teste genético está se tornando um importante recurso na saúde pública. O objetivo foi realizar pesquisa bibliográfica sobre a mutação do gene da Conexina 26 e sua influência na audição. Foi realizado um levantamento bibliográfico por meio de busca eletrônica utilizando os descritores: perda auditiva, genética, triagem genética, Conexina 26, nas bases de dados MEDLINE, SciELO e LILACS, desde a década de 90 até os dias atuais. Concluiu-se que a mutação 35delG da Conexina 26 está potencialmente vinculada a alguns casos de perda auditiva não esclarecida. A pesquisa desta mutação poderia ser incluída na bateria de exames de investigação etiológica da surdez indeterminada, uma vez que esclarece a etiologia de alguns casos e a sua identificação possibilita o aconselhamento genético.In the last few years, great progress has been made in the search for genes associated to hereditary hearing impairment, allowing more precise and earlier diagnosis. Connexin 26 gene mutations (GJB2 - Cx26 cause hearing impairment. Due to the easiness and benefits of the screening of mutations on the gene GJB2, genetic testing is becoming an important resource in public health. The aim of the present study was to conduct a literature research about the mutation of the Connexin 26 gene and its influence in hearing. It was carried out a literature review through electronic search using the keywords: hearing loss, genetics, genetic screening, and Connexin 26, at the databases MEDLINE, SciELO and LILACS, from the 90s to the present days. The results indicate that the 35delG mutation of Connexin 26 is potentially associated

  1. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  2. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history...

  3. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  4. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  5. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    In the past, hereditary ovarian carcinoma was attributed almost entirely to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a much smaller contribution from mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Recently, three new ovarian cancer susceptibility genes have been identified: RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1. In addition, germline mutations in women with ovarian carcinoma have been recently identified in many of the previously identified breast cancer genes in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway. While mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 are each individually rare, together they make up a significant proportion of cases. With at least 16 genes implicated in hereditary ovarian cancer to date, comprehensive testing for ovarian cancer risk will require assessment of many genes. As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the practice of evaluating cancer susceptibility one gene at a time is rapidly becoming obsolete. New advances in genomic technologies will likely accelerate the discovery of additional cancer susceptibility genes and increase the feasibility of comprehensive evaluation of multiple genes simultaneously at low cost. Improved recognition of inherited risk will identify individuals who are candidates for targeted prevention. In addition, identifying inherited mutations in a variety of FA-BRCA pathway genes may aid in identifying individuals who will selectively benefit from PARP inhibitors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, D.W.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Bergmans, J.; Marx, J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for

  7. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  8. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  10. Genes under positives selection in deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sghaier, Haithem; Barkallah, Insaf; Ghedira, Kais; Benkahla, Alia

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionising radiation (IR) and desiccation. Deinococcus radiodurans is the current gold-medallist of ionising -radiation resistance and desiccation tolerance among organisms with a completely sequenced genome, can amend more than 100 DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) per chromosome, induced by 10 kGy, without loss of viability, and can survive for six years in a desiccator with 10% viability. To further unravel molecular targets involved in ionizing radiation resistance and desiccation tolerance in D. radiodurans, we identified based on pertinent ortho logy relationships and positive selection analyses less than 700 s tellar genes . the present work leads to further reduction of the set of factors implicated as major contributors to the resistance phenotype in D. radiodurans, and outlines a computational approach that may be broadly applicable for studying ionizing radiation resistance, desiccation tolerance and strain-specific adaptation in other prokaryotes

  11. Gene panel testing of 5589 BRCA1/2-negative index patients with breast cancer in a routine diagnostic setting: results of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauke, Jan; Horvath, Judit; Groß, Eva; Gehrig, Andrea; Honisch, Ellen; Hackmann, Karl; Schmidt, Gunnar; Arnold, Norbert; Faust, Ulrike; Sutter, Christian; Hentschel, Julia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Smogavec, Mateja; Weber, Bernhard H F; Weber-Lassalle, Nana; Weber-Lassalle, Konstantin; Borde, Julika; Ernst, Corinna; Altmüller, Janine; Volk, Alexander E; Thiele, Holger; Hübbel, Verena; Nürnberg, Peter; Keupp, Katharina; Versmold, Beatrix; Pohl, Esther; Kubisch, Christian; Grill, Sabine; Paul, Victoria; Herold, Natalie; Lichey, Nadine; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Ruckert, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Auber, Bernd; Rump, Andreas; Niederacher, Dieter; Haaf, Thomas; Ramser, Juliane; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hahnen, Eric

    2018-03-09

    The prevalence of germ line mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes associated with hereditary breast cancer (BC) is low, and the role of some of these genes in BC predisposition and pathogenesis is conflicting. In this study, 5589 consecutive BC index patients negative for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations and 2189 female controls were screened for germ line mutations in eight cancer predisposition genes (ATM, CDH1, CHEK2, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, RAD51D, and TP53). All patients met the inclusion criteria of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer for germ line testing. The highest mutation prevalence was observed in the CHEK2 gene (2.5%), followed by ATM (1.5%) and PALB2 (1.2%). The mutation prevalence in each of the remaining genes was 0.3% or lower. Using Exome Aggregation Consortium control data, we confirm significant associations of heterozygous germ line mutations with BC for ATM (OR: 3.63, 95%CI: 2.67-4.94), CDH1 (OR: 17.04, 95%CI: 3.54-82), CHEK2 (OR: 2.93, 95%CI: 2.29-3.75), PALB2 (OR: 9.53, 95%CI: 6.25-14.51), and TP53 (OR: 7.30, 95%CI: 1.22-43.68). NBN germ line mutations were not significantly associated with BC risk (OR:1.39, 95%CI: 0.73-2.64). Due to their low mutation prevalence, the RAD51C and RAD51D genes require further investigation. Compared with control datasets, predicted damaging rare missense variants were significantly more prevalent in CHEK2 and TP53 in BC index patients. Compared with the overall sample, only TP53 mutation carriers show a significantly younger age at first BC diagnosis. We demonstrate a significant association of deleterious variants in the CHEK2, PALB2, and TP53 genes with bilateral BC. Both, ATM and CHEK2, were negatively associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumor phenotypes. A particularly high CHEK2 mutation prevalence (5.2%) was observed in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumors. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine

  12. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Josefine; Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  13. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Blume

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  15. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  16. Rare hereditary cause of chronic pancreatitis in a young male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary chronic pancreatitis associated with a mutation in the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal Type-1 (SPINK-1 gene) is extremely rare. The SPINK1 mutation results in trypsinogen activation which predisposes to chronic pancreatitis predominately when combined with CFTR gene mutations. It presents as either chronic ...

  17. New forms of -compactness with respect to hereditary classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo Mohammed Qahis

    2019-01-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary class on a set X is a nonempty collection of subsets closed under heredity. The aim of this paper is to introduce and study strong forms of u-compactness in generalized topological spaces with respect to a hereditary class, called  SuH-compactness and S- SuH-compactness. Also several of their properties are presented. Finally some eects of various kinds of functions on them are studied.

  18. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  19. COL5A1: Genetic mapping and exclusion as candidate gene in families with nail-patella syndrome, tuberous sclerosis 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, D.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Northrup, H.; Au, K.S. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, has been considered a candidate gene for certain diseases based on chromosomal location and/or disease phenotype. We have employed 3{prime}-untranslated region RFLPs to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis 1, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type H, and nail-patella syndrome. In addition, we describe a polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) within a COL5A1 intron. This SSR is used to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease) and to add COL5A1 to the existing map of {open_quotes}index{close_quotes} markers of chromosome 9 by evaluation of the COL5A1 locus on the CEPH 40-family reference pedigree set. This genetic mapping places COL5A1 between markers D9S66 and D9S67. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. A complex case of renal amyloidosis with a rare co-occurrence of 2 mutations in separate hereditary periodic fever syndrome-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigni, Alessandro; Ledda, Franca; Satta, Andrea E

    2006-01-01

    A 41 year-old male was admitted because of nephrotic syndrome associated with renal impairment and arterial hypertension. Renal biopsy showed a complete subverting of renal architecture with eosinophilic, amorphous deposits which stained positive for Congo red and were positive for antibodies against AA-amyloid. Abdominal fat pad aspirate confirmed the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. Despite high values of serum amyloid A (SAA), surprisingly medical history, physical examination and all tests failed to identify any underlying inflammatory disease, even asymptomatic, at presentation and during the whole follow-up period. The patient carried a mutation (Glu148Gln) in the MEFV gene, and a mutation (Arg92Gln) in the TNFRSF1A gene, both in heterozygosity. The patient has never complained of the typical features of the Familial Mediterranean fever or of the TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome. The patient's father carried the same mutations. His father's medical history was unremarkable; renal tests, acute-phase reactants and SAA were normal. During a trial with colchicine (while the patient was also taking atorvastatin) SAA decreased, renal function continued to deteriorate and proteinuria remained high; no cardiac involvement was detected. Six months later our patient developed rhabdomyolysis, thus accelerating the decline of renal function and requiring the start of dialysis.

  1. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  2. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  3. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - A long-term study on 114 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDTN; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Taal, BG; Kleibeuker, JH; Vasen, HF

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  4. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  5. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezsarlak, O.; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible

  6. Cytoplasmic nonsense-mediated mRNA decay for a nonsense (W262X) transcript of the gene responsible for hereditary tyrosinemia, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Natacha; Maresca, Antonella; Khandjian, Edward W; Baklouti, Faouzi; Tanguay, Robert M

    2004-11-05

    Messenger RNAs containing premature stop codons are generally targeted for degradation through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. The subcellular localization of the NMD process in higher eukaryotes remains controversial. While many mRNAs are subjected to NMD prior to their release from the nucleus, a few display cytoplasmic NMD. To understand the possible impact of NMD on the pathogenesis of hereditary tyrosinemia type I, a severe metabolic disease caused by fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) deficiency, we examined the metabolism of FAH mRNA harboring a nonsense mutation, W262X, in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients and their parents. W262X-FAH transcripts show a approximately 20-fold reduction in abundance in mutant cells, which is translation-dependent. Cellular fractionation shows that this down-regulation of the W262X transcript occurs in the cytoplasm. Thus, the W262X FAH is another example of nonsense mRNAs subjected to the NMD pathway in the cytoplasm.

  7. Hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia and severe glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency in an Indian patient homozygous for the L487F mutation in the human GPI gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warang, Prashant; Kedar, Prabhakar; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Colah, Roshan B

    2012-08-01

    Homozygous glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is one of the most important erythroenzymopathies causing hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). We report an Indian patient with HNSHA showing 85 % reduction in GPI activity resulting from a homozygous missense replacement g.1459C > T in exon 16, leading to a substitution of the protein residue L487F mutation. This mutation has been detected previously in a compound heterozygous state along with another mutation in a GPI deficient patient elsewhere. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HNSHA associated with GPI deficiency with the homozygous L487F mutation, as well as the first report from India of GPI deficiency. Molecular modeling using the human crystal structure of GPI as a model was performed to determine how this mutation could affect enzyme structure and function. The enzyme is present in a dimeric form necessary for normal activity; the L487F mutation causes a loss of the ability of GPI to dimerize, which decreases the thermostability of the enzyme and results in significant changes in erythrocyte metabolism.

  8. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Raposo Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1, ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027, and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1. In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1 and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193 were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production.

  9. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  10. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  11. Novel mutations c.[5121_5122insAG]+[6859C>T] of the SPG11 gene associated with cerebellum hypometabolism in a Chinese case of hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Xiong, Likuan; Chang, Yu; Jing, Xiangyi; Huang, Weijun; Hu, Bin; Shi, Xinchong; Xu, Weiping; Wang, Yiming; Li, Xunhua

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a very heterogeneous disease, both genetically and clinically. To date, approximately 52 loci and 31 genes have been reported to be involved in the causality of HSP. The pattern of inheritance of the disease can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked recessive. Autosomal recessive HSP with thin corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is one form of this disease, and a recessive gene, SPG11, is responsible for 41-77% of all ARHSP-TCC cases. SPG11 encodes the protein SPATACSIN, which is most prominently expressed in the cerebellum. However, little is known about its function. Despite diverse clinical presentations, diffuse hypometabolism in the cerebellum has not been reported previously. We have identified an HSP-TCC patient that presented with prominent intellectual disability rather than spasticity. (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)FDG-PET/CT) examination showed diffuse hypometabolism in both cerebella. Mutation screening of the SPG11 gene using Sanger sequencing identified the novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[5121_5122insAG]+[6859C>T] (p.[I1708RfsX2]+[Q2287X]) in the patient. The mother bears the c.5121_5122insAG mutation, which results in a frameshift and is predicted to truncate the 735 amino acids from the C-terminus, and the father carries the c.6859C>T mutation, which terminates the 157 amino acids from the C-terminus. Therefore, these mutations may result in the loss of function of wild-type SPATACSIN. Our results suggest that SPATACSIN may be involved in cerebella metabolism, and the novel mutations provide more data for the mutational spectrum of this gene, which will aid in the development of quick and accurate genetic diagnostic tools for this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rubisco activity and gene expression of tropical tree species under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Light intensity is associated with the photosynthetic rate and genetic response to moderate ... light intensity. Thus, this study reviews the relationship between the physiological and Rubisco activity changes and gene expression under different light ... being the most dominant family and Rubiaceae and.

  13. A polymorphism in mir-34b/c as a potential biomarker for early onset of hereditary retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ivna N S R; Reis, Adriana H O; Dos Santos, Anna C E; Vargas, Fernando R

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a malignant pediatric tumor and, mainly because of late diagnosis, most patients undergo enucleation. The tumor almost always initiates by two inactivation events at the RB1 gene. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in p53 pathway have been found to represent genetic modifiers of RB. To investigate whether a SNP (rs4938723T > C) in mir-34b/c gene, a key effector of p53, could influence RB risk and patients' age of onset. mir-34b/c rs4938723T > C was sequenced in 130 RB patients and in 105 control individuals. Statistical analysis consisted of χ 2 tests or Fisher's exact, odds ratios (ORs) and Mann-Whitney test. The presence of the C allele did not change the risk for retinoblastoma. However, in hereditary RB patients, the mean age at diagnosis is much lower (1.4 ± 1.4 months) among CC carriers than when it is compared to TT genotype (13.8 ± 6.4, p = 0.001). Besides, hereditary RB patients with CC genotype are around 4 times more likely to present retinoblastoma under the age of 3 months (OR = 4.44; IC: 2.50-7.90; p = 0.002). The C allele together with a germ-line RB1 gene mutation may speed retinoblastoma onset which suggests that mir-34b/c rs4938723T > C may represent a candidate biomarker for hereditary RB.

  14. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic ...

  15. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  16. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  17. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.INTRODUÇÃO: CHEK2 codifica uma proteína quinase envolvida em um ponto de checagem do ciclo celular que desempenha um papel importante na via de reparação do DNA, danos ativados principalmente por ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutado em resposta a danos na dupla hélice do DNA. A mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2 tem sido descrita como um alelo de baixa penetrância em um número significativo de famílias com câncer de mama e cólon em certos países e também está associada com risco

  18. Transcriptional regulatory networks underlying gene expression changes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Seth A; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Bragg, Robert M; Skene, Peter J; Coffey, Sydney R; Bergey, Dani E; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Baliga, Nitin S; Rosinski, Jim; Hood, Leroy E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Price, Nathan D

    2018-03-26

    Transcriptional changes occur presymptomatically and throughout Huntington's disease (HD), motivating the study of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in HD We reconstructed a genome-scale model for the target genes of 718 transcription factors (TFs) in the mouse striatum by integrating a model of genomic binding sites with transcriptome profiling of striatal tissue from HD mouse models. We identified 48 differentially expressed TF-target gene modules associated with age- and CAG repeat length-dependent gene expression changes in Htt CAG knock-in mouse striatum and replicated many of these associations in independent transcriptomic and proteomic datasets. Thirteen of 48 of these predicted TF-target gene modules were also differentially expressed in striatal tissue from human disease. We experimentally validated a specific model prediction that SMAD3 regulates HD-related gene expression changes using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) of mouse striatum. We found CAG repeat length-dependent changes in the genomic occupancy of SMAD3 and confirmed our model's prediction that many SMAD3 target genes are downregulated early in HD. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xu-Lin; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Cai, Shan-Rong; Huang, Yan-Qin; Jiang, Qiang; Zheng, Shu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families and to screen the germline mutations of human mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 in the probands.

  20. Approach to genetic analysis in the diagnosis of hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Vesely, R.; Myrdal, U.; Yoshimura, K.; Duys, P.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. Seven subtypes have been described, caused by mutations in four different genes. Apart from a common phenotype of lifelong recurrent inflammatory attacks, all subtypes have distinct

  1. Prospective identification of malaria parasite genes under balancing selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K A Tetteh

    Full Text Available Endemic human pathogens are subject to strong immune selection, and interrogation of pathogen genome variation for signatures of balancing selection can identify important target antigens. Several major antigen genes in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown such signatures in polymorphism-versus-divergence indices (comparing with the chimpanzee parasite P. reichenowi, and in allele frequency based indices.To compare methods for prospective identification of genes under balancing selection, 26 additional genes known or predicted to encode surface-exposed proteins of the invasive blood stage merozoite were first sequenced from a panel of 14 independent P. falciparum cultured lines and P. reichenowi. Six genes at the positive extremes of one or both of the Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade (HKA and McDonald-Kreitman (MK indices were identified. Allele frequency based analysis was then performed on a Gambian P. falciparum population sample for these six genes and three others as controls. Tajima's D (TjD index was most highly positive for the msp3/6-like PF10_0348 (TjD = 1.96 as well as the positive control ama1 antigen gene (TjD = 1.22. Across the genes there was a strong correlation between population TjD values and the relative HKA indices (whether derived from the population or the panel of cultured laboratory isolates, but no correlation with the MK indices.Although few individual parasite genes show significant evidence of balancing selection, analysis of population genomic and comparative sequence data with the HKA and TjD indices should discriminate those that do, and thereby identify likely targets of immunity.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... link) PubMed OMIM (2 links) NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VA NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VB Sources ...

  3. Adrenomyeloneuropathy due to mutation in the ABCD1 gene as underlying factor in spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikallio, Emil; Rahikkala, Elisa; Keski-Filppula, Riikka; Auranen, Mari; Tyynismaa, Henna

    We present a Finnish family in which adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) caused by the mutation in the ABCD1 gene was revealed as the cause of spastic paraparesis. . Two patients had hypoadrenalism, which is in some cases some associated with the disease . AMN is a hereditary disease manifested both in men and women. but owing to the location of the gene in the X chromosome the symptoms are usually more severe in male patients. . Diagnoses was trucked down with gene-panel sequencing and confirmed through detection of an elevated level of very long-chain fatty acids in the serum of the patients. Specific molecular genetic diagnosis is beneficial, because it enables precise genetic counseling as well as recognition and treatment of associated symptoms, such as severe cortisol deficiency.

  4. Inferring the gene network underlying the branching of tomato inflorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Astola

    Full Text Available The architecture of tomato inflorescence strongly affects flower production and subsequent crop yield. To understand the genetic activities involved, insight into the underlying network of genes that initiate and control the sympodial growth in the tomato is essential. In this paper, we show how the structure of this network can be derived from available data of the expressions of the involved genes. Our approach starts from employing biological expert knowledge to select the most probable gene candidates behind branching behavior. To find how these genes interact, we develop a stepwise procedure for computational inference of the network structure. Our data consists of expression levels from primary shoot meristems, measured at different developmental stages on three different genotypes of tomato. With the network inferred by our algorithm, we can explain the dynamics corresponding to all three genotypes simultaneously, despite their apparent dissimilarities. We also correctly predict the chronological order of expression peaks for the main hubs in the network. Based on the inferred network, using optimal experimental design criteria, we are able to suggest an informative set of experiments for further investigation of the mechanisms underlying branching behavior.

  5. Chromosome damage in G0 X-irradiated lymphocytes from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morten, J.E.; Harnden, D.G.; Taylor, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes following 400 rads G0 X-irradiation in 10 of 11 hereditary retinoblastoma patients was shown to be intermediate between that in normals and damage in trisomy 21 patients. The difference between normals and hereditary retinoblastoma patients was small, it varied between hereditary retinoblastoma patients, and no difference was detected following 200 rads G0 X-irradiation. No difference was found in levels of spontaneous chromosome damage in hereditary retinoblastoma patients, trisomy 21 patients, and normals. These results suggest that, although sensitivity to ionizing radiation may be associated with hereditary retinoblastoma, the observed difference is so small that it is probably not the major effect of the gene predisposing to retinoblastoma

  6. Expression profiles of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) genes under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    protein homologue, xyloglucanendo-1,4-β-D-gucanase precursor, PR10, and the putative non-specific lipid transfer protein StnsLTP. [Hwang E-W, Kim K-A, Park S-C, Jeong M-J, Byun M-O and Kwon H-B 2005 Expression profiles of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) genes under cold stress conditions; J. Biosci. 30 657–667].

  7. Prevalence of C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations in hereditary HFE-hemochromatosis gene in Lithuanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinskas, Laimutis; Juzenas, Simonas; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Cedaviciute, Ruta; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Kalibatas, Vytenis; Kondrackiene, Jurate; Kupcinskas, Limas

    2012-04-01

    HFE-hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive disease caused by HFE gene mutations and characterized as iron overload and failure of different organs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of C282Y (c.845 G>A), H63D (c.187 C>G), and S65C (c.193A>T) alleles of HFE gene in the Lithuanian population. One thousand and eleven healthy blood donors of Lithuanian nationality were examined in four different ethnic Lithuanian regions to determine HFE gene alleles and genotype frequencies. The samples of DNA were analyzed for the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphism and validated by DNA sequencing. Among 1,011 blood donors tested, the frequency of C282Y, H63D, and S65C alleles were 2.6%, 15.9%, and 1.9%, respectively. One third of the tested subjects (n = 336) had at least one of the C282Y or H63D HFE gene mutations. The screening of Lithuanian blood donors has detected 13 (1.3%) subjects with a genotype C282Y/C282Y or C282Y/H63D responsible for the development of HFE-hemochromatosis. The prevalence of C282Y mutation was significantly higher among the inhabitants of Zemaitija (Somogitia) at the Baltic Sea area (5.9%) in comparison to the regions of continental part of Lithuania (2.4% in Dzukija, 2.3% in Aukstaitija, and 2% in Suvalkija, p Vikings along the Baltic Sea coast. The first epidemiological investigation of HFE gene mutations in ethnic Lithuanians showed that the frequencies of H63D, C282Y, and S65C of HFE gene alleles are similar to the other North-Eastern Europeans, especially in the Baltic region (Estonia, Latvia), Poland, and part of Russia (Moscow region).

  8. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement......, an operation important for the top-down design of concurrent systems. We show that-unlike hp-bisimilarity-checking hhp-bisimilarity for finite labelled asynchronous transition systems is not decidable, by a reduction from the halting problem of 2-counter machines. To make the proof more transparent we...

  9. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

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    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  10. Repeated adaptive introgression at a gene under multiallelic balancing selection.

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    Vincent Castric

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently diverged species typically have incomplete reproductive barriers, allowing introgression of genetic material from one species into the genomic background of the other. The role of natural selection in preventing or promoting introgression remains contentious. Because of genomic co-adaptation, some chromosomal fragments are expected to be selected against in the new background and resist introgression. In contrast, natural selection should favor introgression for alleles at genes evolving under multi-allelic balancing selection, such as the MHC in vertebrates, disease resistance, or self-incompatibility genes in plants. Here, we test the prediction that negative, frequency-dependent selection on alleles at the multi-allelic gene controlling pistil self-incompatibility specificity in two closely related species, Arabidopsis halleri and A. lyrata, caused introgression at this locus at a higher rate than the genomic background. Polymorphism at this gene is largely shared, and we have identified 18 pairs of S-alleles that are only slightly divergent between the two species. For these pairs of S-alleles, divergence at four-fold degenerate sites (K = 0.0193 is about four times lower than the genomic background (K = 0.0743. We demonstrate that this difference cannot be explained by differences in effective population size between the two types of loci. Rather, our data are most consistent with a five-fold increase of introgression rates for S-alleles as compared to the genomic background, making this study the first documented example of adaptive introgression facilitated by balancing selection. We suggest that this process plays an important role in the maintenance of high allelic diversity and divergence at the S-locus in flowering plant families. Because genes under balancing selection are expected to be among the last to stop introgressing, their comparison in closely related species provides a lower-bound estimate of the time since the

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Girod S, Bailly S, Plauchu H. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: from molecular biology to patient care. J Thromb Haemost. 2010 Jul; ... Bayrak-Toydemir P. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: genetics and molecular diagnostics in a new era. Front Genet. 2015 Jan 26;6:1. doi: ... JA. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: ...

  12. Effect of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Gene H63D and C282Y Mutations on Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease Patients

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    Yunus Kasım Terzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease that is one of the most important reasons for iron overload. Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that occurs as a result of a homozygous mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Erythrocyte transfusion is frequently used in the treatment of this disease. Iron overload as a result of transfusion is important in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell anemia patients as well as in other hemoglobinopathies. In this study, the effect of hemochromatosis gene (HFE p.H63D and p.C282Y mutations on transfusion-related cardiac and liver iron overload in sickle cell disease patients who carry homozygous hemoglobin S mutation has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single-center crosssectional study in patients with homozygous hemoglobin S mutation between the years 2008 and 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (group A, n=31 was receiving chelation therapy and the second group (group B, n=13 was not. Direct and indirect iron loads were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging and biochemically, respectively. HFE gene mutations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analyses were performed by independent samples t-test. Results: p.H63D mutation was detected in 10 (32.3% patients in group A and in only 1 patient (7.7% in group B. When the 2 groups were compared for iron overload, iron deposition in the liver was significantly higher in group B (p=0.046. In addition, in group A, iron deposition was significantly higher in HFE mutation carriers compared to patients without the mutation (p=0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that HFE gene mutations are important in iron deposition in the liver in patients with sickle cell disease.

  13. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

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    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  14. Gene Profiling of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells under Elevated Pressure Conditions: Modulation of Inflammatory Gene Networks

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    James N. Warnock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify mechanosensitive pathways and gene networks that are stimulated by elevated cyclic pressure in aortic valve interstitial cells (VICs and lead to detrimental tissue remodeling and/or pathogenesis. Porcine aortic valve leaflets were exposed to cyclic pressures of 80 or 120 mmHg, corresponding to diastolic transvalvular pressure in normal and hypertensive conditions, respectively. Linear, two-cycle amplification of total RNA, followed by microarray was performed for transcriptome analysis (with qRT-PCR validation. A combination of systems biology modeling and pathway analysis identified novel genes and molecular mechanisms underlying the biological response of VICs to elevated pressure. 56 gene transcripts related to inflammatory response mechanisms were differentially expressed. TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β were key cytokines identified from the gene network model. Also of interest was the discovery that pentraxin 3 (PTX3 was significantly upregulated under elevated pressure conditions (41-fold change. In conclusion, a gene network model showing differentially expressed inflammatory genes and their interactions in VICs exposed to elevated pressure has been developed. This system overview has detected key molecules that could be targeted for pharmacotherapy of aortic stenosis in hypertensive patients.

  15. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  17. Reliable reference gene selection for Cordyceps militaris gene expression studies under different developmental stages and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Liu, Guijun; Sun, Junde; Dong, Caihong

    2014-07-01

    Cordyceps militaris is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species, which are highly prized in traditional Chinese medicine. Gene expression analysis has become more popular and important in studies of this fungus. Reference gene validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. In this study, eight candidate reference genes, actin, cox5, gpd, rpb1, tef1, try, tub, and ubi, were selected and their expression stability was evaluated in C. militaris samples using four algorithms, genorm, normfinder, bestkeeper, and the comparative ∆Ct method. Three sets of samples, five different developmental stages cultured in wheat medium and pupae, and all the samples pool were included. The results showed that rpb1 was the best reference gene during all developmental stages examined, while the most common reference genes, actin and tub, were not suitable internal controls. Cox5 also performed poorly and was less stable in our analysis. The ranks of ubi and gpd were inconsistent in different sample sets by different methods. Our results provide guidelines for reference gene selection at different developmental stages and also represent a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in C. militaris gene expression analysis. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of PALB2 gene in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative Spanish hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families with pancreatic cancer cases.

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    Ana Blanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PALB2 gene, also known as FANCN, forms a bond and co-localizes with BRCA2 in DNA repair. Germline mutations in PALB2 have been identified in approximately 1% of familial breast cancer and 3-4% of familial pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of PALB2 mutations in a population of BRCA1/BRCA2 negative breast cancer patients selected from either a personal or family history of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: 132 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families with at least one pancreatic cancer case were included in the study. PALB2 mutational analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all coding exons and intron/exon boundaries, as well as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Two PALB2 truncating mutations, the c.1653T>A (p.Tyr551Stop previously reported, and c.3362del (p.Gly1121ValfsX3 which is a novel frameshift mutation, were identified. Moreover, several PALB2 variants were detected; some of them were predicted as pathological by bioinformatic analysis. Considering truncating mutations, the prevalence rate of our population of BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer patients with pancreatic cancer is 1.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rate of PALB2 mutations in non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families, selected from either a personal or family pancreatic cancer history, is similar to that previously described for unselected breast/ovarian cancer families. Future research directed towards identifying other gene(s involved in the development of breast/pancreatic cancer families is required.

  19. Graph limits and hereditary properties

    OpenAIRE

    Janson, Svante

    2011-01-01

    We collect some general results on graph limits associated to hereditary classes of graphs. As examples, we consider some classes defined by forbidden subgraphs and some classes of intersection graphs, including triangle-free graphs, chordal graphs, cographs, interval graphs, unit interval graphs, threshold graphs, and line graphs.

  20. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  1. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  2. Genetic and Preventive Services for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foretova Lenka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers can be accounted for by germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Genetic counselling and testing in high-risk patients in the Czech Republic began in 1997 in two centres (Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute in Brno, MMCI, and the General University Hospital plus the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, 1FMUK. Health insurance covers testing in MMCI, whereas testing at 1FMUK is covered by research grants. The spectrum of mutations in the BRCA1 gene is similar in the Bohemian (western and Moravian (eastern regions of the country but the mutation spectrum observed in the BRCA2 gene is completely different. There are three BRCA1 gene mutations that are responsible for 69% and 70.4% of all BRCA1 mutations identified in women reporting to the Brno and Prague centres, respectively. The two most frequent mutations in the BRCA2 gene, which comprises 41.5% of all detected BRCA2 mutations in Brno, were not found in women tested in the Prague centre. The testing of BRCA1/BRCA2 or other possible predisposition genes for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer is determined by medical geneticists after genetic counselling. Predictive testing is offered to persons older than 18 years of age. Genetic counselling centres are easily accessible to all inhabitants in the country. Specialized preventive care is mostly organized by MMCI and the General University Hospital in Prague; however, some patients and their family members are under the care of other oncology departments and clinics. The quality of preventive care in different hospitals is currently being investigated.

  3. Hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy 1 maps to chromosome 20q13.2-13.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA or hereditary motor neuronopathies result from the continuous degeneration and death of spinal cord lower motor neurons, leading to progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. We describe a large Brazilian family exhibiting an extremely rare, late-onset, dominant, proximal, and progressive SMA accompanied by very unusual manifestations, such as an abnormal sweating pattern, and gastrointestinal and sexual dysfunctions, suggesting concomitant involvement of the autonomic nervous system. We propose a new disease category for this disorder, `hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy', and attribute the term, `survival of motor and autonomic neurons 1' (SMAN1 to the respective locus that was mapped to a 14.5 cM region on chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 by genetic linkage analysis and haplotype studies using microsatellite polymorphic markers. This locus lies between markers D20S120 and D20S173 showing a maximum LOD score of 4.6 at D20S171, defining a region with 33 known genes, including several potential candidates. Identifying the SMAN1 gene should not only improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lower motor neuron diseases but also help to clarify the relationship between motor and autonomic neurons.

  4. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses.

  5. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses

  6. Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajmardanova, B. Kh.; Gorbach, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Territory of the Pavlodar region directly adjoining to the Semipalatinsk test site is unique object for study of many year tests consequences on population health. Health worsening caused by small doses of radiation on artificial pollution background is defined. Purpose of the work is Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases (Downs syndrome, crack of upper lip and/or palate, hemophilia) under study of frequency dynamic of statistical data within period from 1980 by 1995. It is defined: a) tendency to growth Downs syndrome frequency has been distinctly observed beginning of the 1982; b) it is noted Downs syndrome frequency growth stabilization within period from 1988 by 1991; c) among children with Downs syndrome is distinguished low viability; d) there is rather higher correlation rate of Downs syndrome and congenial heart threshold against average statistical index; e) character of frequencies changes of crack of upper lip and/or palate has tendency to growth; f) it is defined that boys predominate among children with this disease; g) congenial crack of soft palate have being revealed as solitary thresholds of development; h) genealogy analysis of hemophilia sick reveals, that it has only hereditary character. 8 refs

  7. Hereditary protein S deficiency presenting with cerebral sinus thrombosis in an adolescent girl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelman, J. H.; Bakker, C. M.; Plandsoen, W. C.; Peeters, F. L.; Barth, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl, on oral contraceptives for 3 months, presented with cerebral sinus thrombosis. Investigation revealed underlying hereditary protein S deficiency. This uncommon cause of cerebral sinus thrombosis and the possible association with oral contraceptives are discussed

  8. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF HEREDITARY OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Kotiv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most established risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the study was to analyze BRCA1/2 testing in ovarian cancer patients. Materials and methods. We analyzed 222 patients with ovarian cancer (OC who underwent genetic testing. Results. Recurrent Slavic mutations in these genes were detected in 60/222 (27% patients.104 patients lacked any clinical signs of hereditary form of the disease, however BRCA1/2 genetic defects were identified among 11 (11% of these women. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas were characterized by more advanced stage at diagnosis and predominance of high-grade serous histological tumor subtype. Conclusion. These results emphasize the need for BRCA1/2 testing for all patients with OC. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas have clinical and pathological cgaracteristics, which should be considered while planning therapy. 

  9. Management of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The Asian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are the most common high penetrant genes associated with an increased lifetime risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. Although genetic testing is standard of care in Western developed countries, there are still variations in availability of genetic testing and risk assessment for HBOC in Asia. Depending on the countries, there are variations in the clinical strategies and cancer management. The Asian BRCA Consortium has grouped together 14 Asian countries and reviewed genetic counselling/testing uptake rates and clinical management options in these countries. Moreover economic factors, healthcare and legal frameworks, and cultural issues affecting the genetic service availability in Asia were discussed. Mutation spectrum, and VUS rates and the increase use of NGS gene panel testing poses more decisional issues in the clinical management of Hereditary Breast cancer in Asia. These will be discussed. Keywords: BRCA1/BRCA2, germline, HBOC, Asia BRCA Consortium, NGS

  10. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.

  11. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  12. Deletion of a region that is a candidate for the difference between the deletion forms of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and deltabeta-thalassemia affects beta- but not gamma-globin gene expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Calzolari (Roberta); T. McMorrow (Tara); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); A. Langeveld (An); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe analysis of a number of cases of beta-globin thalassemia and hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) due to large deletions in the beta-globin locus has led to the identification of several DNA elements that have been implicated in the switch

  13. On the Hereditary Properties of Modular Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bashkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary graph properties are those that can be inherited from the graph to all its subgraphs (such as planarity. Modular nets of active resources is a (Petri nets- powerful formalism with simple modular syntax. Boundedness and liveness are fundamental semantic properties for Petri net models. It is shown that boundedness and liveness, being not hereditary in general, are downward-hereditary (net-to-subnet and upward-hereditary (subnet-to-net for the particular types of AR-subnets. It is also shown that boundedness is downward-hereditary and unboundedness is upward-hereditary for arbitrary subnets after a specific module interface transformation (so-called R-normalization.

  14. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  15. Evaluation and validation of housekeeping genes as reference for gene expression studies in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) under drought stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pallavi; Singh, Vikas K; Suryanarayana, V; Krishnamurthy, L; Saxena, Rachit K; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a very sensitive technique and its sensitivity depends on the stable performance of reference gene(s) used in the study. A number of housekeeping genes have been used in various expression studies in many crops however, their expression were found to be inconsistent under different stress conditions. As a result, species specific housekeeping genes have been recommended for different expression studies in several crop species. However, such specific housekeeping genes have not been reported in the case of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) despite the fact that genome sequence has become available for the crop. To identify the stable housekeeping genes in pigeonpea for expression analysis under drought stress conditions, the relative expression variations of 10 commonly used housekeeping genes (EF1α, UBQ10, GAPDH, 18SrRNA, 25SrRNA, TUB6, ACT1, IF4α, UBC and HSP90) were studied on root, stem and leaves tissues of Asha (ICPL 87119). Three statistical algorithms geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were used to define the stability of candidate genes. geNorm analysis identified IF4α and TUB6 as the most stable housekeeping genes however, NormFinder analysis determined IF4α and HSP90 as the most stable housekeeping genes under drought stress conditions. Subsequently validation of the identified candidate genes was undertaken in qRT-PCR based gene expression analysis of uspA gene which plays an important role for drought stress conditions in pigeonpea. The relative quantification of the uspA gene varied according to the internal controls (stable and least stable genes), thus highlighting the importance of the choice of as well as validation of internal controls in such experiments. The identified stable and validated housekeeping genes will facilitate gene expression studies in pigeonpea especially under drought stress conditions.

  16. Colorectal intussusception: an unusual gastrointestinal complication of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschi, A; Krähenbühl, L; Frei, E; Saltzman, J; Späth, P J; Müller, U R

    1996-09-01

    A 21-year-old man with a history of hereditary angioedema presented with protracted abdominal pain which failed to respond to infusion of C1 inhibitor concentrate. Evaluation by CT scan revealed extensive colorectal intussusception requiring surgical intervention. Under replacement therapy with C1 inhibitor concentrate, both the operation under general anesthesia and the postoperative phase were uneventful. The intraoperative examination suggested initiation of intussusception by local mucosal edema in the transverse colon.

  17. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  18. Hereditary Kidney Cancer Syndromes and Surgical Management of the Small Renal Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Shuch, Brian

    2017-05-01

    The management of patients with hereditary kidney cancers presents unique challenges to clinicians. In addition to an earlier age of onset compared with patients with sporadic kidney cancer, those with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes often present with bilateral and/or multifocal renal tumors and are at risk for multiple de novo lesions. This population of patients may also present with extrarenal manifestations, which adds an additional layer of complexity. Physicians who manage these patients should be familiar with the underlying clinical characteristics of each hereditary kidney cancer syndrome and the suggested surgical approaches and recommendations of genetic testing for at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  20. Advocate's Viewpoint on Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolling-Dandrieu Francisca

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper discusses the presentation I held at the symposium on genetics during the 4th European Breast Cancer Conference held in Hamburg in March 2004. Primarily, the goals and working methods of the advocacy group specialised in Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer of the Dutch Breast Cancer Patient Organisation known as BorstkankerVereniging Nederland (BVN are explained. Furthermore, some specific individual problems that mutation carriers might encounter before and after BRCA1/2 susceptibility testing are discussed. These include: dilemmas in choosing preventive interventions, dealing with the psychological impact of knowing you are a mutation carrier, dealing with the social implications of being genetically at risk, an example of insurance discrimination. In addition, some controversial social and ethical issues that are currently under debate are highlighted, such as the issue of the European patenting of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Since this topic could also become relevant for other gene-related diseases, society as a whole has to consider the ethical and social implications related to the patenting of human genes in general. Another ethical area of debate is the controversial issue of prenatal BRCA testing and the choice of pregnancy termination. Finally, the Working Party pleads for the international co-operation and exchange of data and experience among professionals as well as patients. It appears that professionals in different European countries tend to advise on different risk management strategies and treatments and as such, the Working Party strongly advocates the international standardisation of risk management and treatment of mutation carriers. In this respect, specific attention should be given to a group that has had a non-informative or negative BRCA test result, because this group is still considered to be at high risk to develop the disease.

  1. Reproductive factors in hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernström, H C; Johannsson, O T; Loman, N; Borg, A; Olsson, H

    1999-12-01

    An early age at menarche, a short menstrual cycle length, and a high age at first full term pregnancy or nulliparity are known risk factors for breast cancer. These risk factors have previously been reported to differ between breast cancer patients with and without a family history of breast cancer and also between breast cancer patients and controls. Self-administered questionnaires were filled out by 95 women belonging to 24 families with known BRCA1 mutations, 16 women belonging to nine families with known BRCA2 mutations, and 95 women belonging to 65 families with hereditary breast cancer where no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations could be detected. Thirty-nine women were BRCA1 mutation carriers and 56 women were BRCA1 negative, 11 women were BRCA2 carriers and five BRCA2 negative. All women were born between 1905 and 1979. Age at menarche, physiological menstrual cycle length at age 30 or at current age in younger women (when not using oral contraceptives), age at first full term pregnancy, and nulliparity did not significantly differ between BRCA1 mutation carriers and BRCA1 negative women. Too few women were BRCA2 negative to serve as a control group. BRCA2 mutation carriers were therefore compared with BRCA1 negative and BRCA2 negative women. None of the above reproductive factors did significantly differ between BRCA2 mutation carriers and from BRCA1 and BRCA2 families. Women from non-BRCA1/BRCA2 hereditary breast cancer families had a higher age at menarche, but this was no longer significant after adjustment for other factors in a multivariate model. Our results suggest that reproductive risk factors of breast cancer are not related to BRCA1 or BRCA2 carrier status. There was also no indication that these factors differ in carriers of unknown susceptibility genes compared with non-carriers from BRCA1 and BRCA2 families.

  2. Genetic testing and counseling for hereditary forms of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G M; Brensinger, J D; Johnson, K A; Giardiello, F M

    1999-12-01

    The discovery of genes responsible for inherited forms of colorectal cancer have the potential to improve cancer risk assessment and counseling. Germline mutations (nonsense, frameshift) of APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis, an autosomal dominant syndrome, clinically characterized by young onset, hundreds of adenomatous polyps in the colon, and increased risk for extracolonic tumors. Mutations in APC are also associated with forms of attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis. Germline mutations in five mismatch repair related genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6, hPMS1, and hPMS2) cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and are associated with increased risk of somatic genetic alterations and high DNA microsatellite instability. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by young onset colorectal cancer, proximal colon location, and increased risk of extracolonic cancers. A missense mutation in APC (I1307K) is associated with some familial colorectal cancer in Ashkenazic Jews. For persons at risk for hereditary forms of colorectal cancer, testing algorithms and gene test interpretations depend on identification of the pedigree germline gene mutation. Careful evaluation of the kindred for characteristic aggregation of tumor types among affected individuals and the availability of affected persons for testing are important issues in implementing genetic testing and follow-up management. Case reports illustrate the importance of genetic counseling as a component of cancer genetic risk assessment. The genetic counseling process includes exploration of patient risk perception, sources of anxiety related to cancer risk, patient education (specific cancer-related issues, prevention/intervention options), discussion of possible gene test options, test limitations, and consequences of various gene test outcomes.

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  4. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  5. Genome-wide expression analysis of hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) using canine microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Booman, Marije; Hudson, Robert C; Marshall, H Dawn

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis (HHG) is an autosomal recessive condition found predominantly in farmed silver foxes, first documented in Europe in the 1940s. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is an analogous condition occurring in humans. HGF has a heterogeneous aetiology with emphasis placed on the autosomal dominant forms of inheritance for which there are three known loci: HGF1, HGF2, and HGF3. Among these, only one causative mutation has been determined, in the Son of sevenless homolog 1 (SOS1) gene. The goal of this study was to explore potential molecular or cellular mechanisms underlying HHG by analysis of global gene expression patterns from Affymetrix Canine 2.0 microarrays cross-referenced against candidate genes within the human loci. We conclude that the SOS1 gene involved in HGF1 is not significantly up-regulated in HHG. However, the structurally and functionally similar SOS2 gene is up-regulated in affected foxes, and we propose this as a candidate gene for HHG. At HGF2 we identify RASA1 (rat sarcoma viral p21 protein activator 1) as a candidate gene for HHG, as it is up-regulated in affected foxes and is involved in MAPK signalling. From comparison to the genes within the HGF3 locus, we find evidence for a role of androgens in HHG phenotype severity by differential up-regulation of SRD5A2 in HHG-affected foxes. We hypothesize that the putative mutation occurs upstream of RAS in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase component of MAPK signalling.

  6. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  8. Finding candidate genes under positive selection in Non-model species: examples of genes involved in host specialization in pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, G; Lengelle, J; Marthey, S; Chiapello, H; Rodolphe, F; Gendrault, A; Yockteng, R; Vercken, E; Devier, B; Fontaine, M C; Wincker, P; Dossat, C; Cruaud, C; Couloux, A; Giraud, T

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genes in diverse organisms have been shown to be under positive selection, especially genes involved in reproduction, adaptation to contrasting environments, hybrid inviability, and host-pathogen interactions. Looking for genes under positive selection in pathogens has been a priority in efforts to investigate coevolution dynamics and to develop vaccines or drugs. To elucidate the functions involved in host specialization, here we aimed at identifying candidate sequences that could have evolved under positive selection among closely related pathogens specialized on different hosts. For this goal, we sequenced c. 17,000-32,000 ESTs from each of four Microbotryum species, which are fungal pathogens responsible for anther smut disease on host plants in the Caryophyllaceae. Forty-two of the 372 predicted orthologous genes showed significant signal of positive selection, which represents a good number of candidate genes for further investigation. Sequencing 16 of these genes in 9 additional Microbotryum species confirmed that they have indeed been rapidly evolving in the pathogen species specialized on different hosts. The genes showing significant signals of positive selection were putatively involved in nutrient uptake from the host, secondary metabolite synthesis and secretion, respiration under stressful conditions and stress response, hyphal growth and differentiation, and regulation of expression by other genes. Many of these genes had transmembrane domains and may therefore also be involved in pathogen recognition by the host. Our approach thus revealed fruitful and should be feasible for many non-model organisms for which candidate genes for diversifying selection are needed.

  9. Pinpointing genes underlying annual/perennial transitions with comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidel, Andrew J; Kiefer, Christiane; Coupland, George; Rose, Laura E

    2016-11-15

    Transitions between perennial and an annual life history occur often in plant lineages, but the genes that control whether a plant is an annual or perennial are largely unknown. To identify genes that confer differences between annuals and perennials we compared the gene content of four pairs of sister lineages (Arabidopsis thaliana/Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabis montbretiana/Arabis alpina, Arabis verna/Aubrieta parviflora and Draba nemorosa/Draba hispanica) in the Brassicaceae in which each pair contains one annual and one perennial, plus one extra annual species (Capsella rubella). After sorting all genes in all nine species into gene families, we identified five families in which well-annotated genes are present in the perennials A. lyrata and A. alpina, but are not present in any of the annual species. For the eleven genes in perennials in these families, an orthologous pseudogene or otherwise highly diverged gene was found in the syntenic region of the annual species in six cases. The five candidate families identified encode: a kinase, an oxidoreductase, a lactoylglutathione lyase, a F-box protein and a zinc finger protein. By comparing the active gene in the perennial to the pseudogene or heavily altered gene in the annual, dN and dS were calculated. The low dN/dS values in one kinase suggest that it became pseudogenized more recently, while the other kinase, F-box, oxidoreductase and zinc-finger became pseudogenized closer to the divergence between the annual-perennial pair. We identified five gene families that may be involved in the life history switch from perennial to annual. Considering the dN and dS data and whether syntenic pseudogenes were found and the potential functions of the genes, the F-box family is considered the most promising candidate for future functional studies to determine if it affects life history.

  10. Gender specific issues in hereditary ocular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iragavarapu, Saradha; Gorin, Michael B

    2015-02-01

    This review is intended to summarize the current knowledge from basic science and clinical medical literature cited within PubMed that pertain to gender-related factors and affect those individuals with hereditary ocular disorders. We consider gender-related biological factors that (a) affect disease onset and progression, (b) gender differences for major X-linked ocular disorders, (c) gender-specific conditions, (d) medications that may influence genetic eye disorders, and finally, (e) gender-related issues that influence the management and quality of life of these patients. Several studies have demonstrated the manner in which sex-related hormones in animal models are capable of influencing cell pathway and survival that are likely to affect hereditary eye disorders. There are very few clinical studies that provide compelling evidence for gender differences in human ocular conditions, other than for a number of X-linked disorders. Disease expression for X-linked disorders may be impacted by genetic mechanisms such as lyonization or uniparental disomy. Clinical evidence regarding the impact of gender-related medical conditions and therapies on eye conditions is extremely limited and primarily based on anecdotal evidence. Gender-specific factors may play a major role in the underlying biological pathways that influence the onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings associated with ocular genetic conditions. Clinicians need to be aware of the variable phenotypes observed in female carriers of X-linked disorders of gender specific issues, many of which are inadequately addressed in the current literature. Clinicians need to be sensitive to gender differences in social, cultural, and religious systems and they should also be aware of how their own gender biases may influence how they counsel patients. Finally, it is clear that the lack of effective clinical studies in this area creates an opportunity for future research that will have real benefits for these

  11. GMDR: Versatile Software for Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environ- ment Interactions Underlying Complex Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Ming; Xu, Li-Feng; Hou, Ting-Ting; Luo, Lin-Feng; Chen, Guo-Bo; Sun, Xi-Wei; Lou, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Identification of multifactor gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions underlying complex traits poses one of the great challenges to today’s genetic study. Development of the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method provides a practicable solution to problems in detection of interactions. To exploit the opportunities brought by the availability of diverse data, it is in high demand to develop the corresponding GMDR software that can handle a breadth of phenotypes, such as continuous, count, dichotomous, polytomous nominal, ordinal, survival and multivariate, and various kinds of study designs, such as unrelated case-control, family-based and pooled unrelated and family samples, and also allows adjustment for covariates. We developed a versatile GMDR package to implement this serial of GMDR analyses for various scenarios (e.g., unified analysis of unrelated and family samples) and large-scale (e.g., genome-wide) data. This package includes other desirable features such as data management and preprocessing. Permutation testing strategies are also built in to evaluate the threshold or empirical p values. In addition, its performance is scalable to the computational resources. The software is available at http://www.soph.uab.edu/ssg/software or http://ibi.zju.edu.cn/software. PMID:28479868

  12. High speed single nucleotide polymorphism typing of a hereditary haemochromatosis mutation with capillary array electrophoresis microplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medintz, I; Wong, W W; Sensabaugh, G; Mathies, R A

    2000-07-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing assay is developed and evaluated on a microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis system. Using fluorescently labeled allele-specific primers, the S65C (193A-->T) substitution associated with hereditary haemochromatosis in the HFE gene is genotyped. The covalently labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products are separated on a microfabricated radial capillary array electrophoresis microplate using nondenaturing gel media in under two minutes. Detection is accomplished with a laser-excited rotary confocal scanner. The Rox-labeled A-allele specific amplicon (211 bp) is differentiated from the R110-labeled T-allele specific amplicon (201 bp) by both size and color. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using allele-specific PCR with covalently labeled primers for high speed fluorescent SNP typing on microfabricated radial capillary array electrophoresis microplates.

  13. IDENTIFICATION AND VERIFICATION OF HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS BY MEANS OF LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Prokhorova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is the most commonly encountered erythrocyte membranopathy. Frequency of occurrence of the disease makes one case per 2000−5000 newborns. Hereditary spherocytosis often causes a complex of clinical signs, including hemolytic crises in patients. At the same time many patients have asymptomatic HS. Differential diagnosis of HS is quite complex and in modern workload conditions the clinical doctors need a simpler diagnostics procedure. Patients and methods. Participants included 13 adults with verified hereditary spheroсytosis and 42 children with identified hereditary spherocytosis, 311 adults without hematological disorders, 42 children without hematological disorders. Verification of hereditary spherocytosis diagnosis was carried out using flow cytometry test (eosine-5 maleimid-binding, Deich`s method of determination of erythrocyte osmotic resistance and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Poly Acrylamide Gel Electrophoresis. In this study we have assessed diagnostic value of hematological parameters provided by the hematological analyzer Beckman Coulter Cellular Analysis System DxH800 for identifying the degree of erythropoiesis disorder in patients with hereditary spherocytosis at the stage of reticulocytes maturation. According to our data, the ratio RET/IRF and calculated parameter MCV-MSCV can be used as the screening tests for hereditary spherocytosis. Results. Evaluation of the erythrocytes and reticulocytes parameters at the hematological analyzer identified the significant difference in estimate index MCV-MSCV (p < 0,0001, sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%, area under the ROC-curve 1,0 and RET/IRF (p < 0,0001, sensitivity 96,3%, specificity 94,1, area under the ROC-curve 0,97 between group of patients with HS and control group. We also evaluated the usability of eosine-5 maleimide binding in flow cytometry for verification of this membranopathy. For unify the test results we offer to use estimate indicator S

  14. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    and found pathogenic. In silico and mini-gene assay were used to predict the functional consequence in one of them. Mutation carriers were offered endoscopy and total gastrectomy. The gastric specimens were completely sectioned and examined histologically. Seven asymptomatic mutation carriers were operated......Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified...

  15. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  16. Hereditary syndromes with enhanced radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity to ionizing radiation is modified by heritable genetic factors. This is exemplified by heritable disorders that are characterized by predisposition to the development of neoplasms. Cells derived from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiektasia-like disorder show a markedly changed reaction to exposure to ionizing radiation. Correspondingly, at least in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an enhanced radiosensitivity that is of clinical importance has been observed. In addition to these recessive disorders, some autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are associated with increased radiosensitivity. As cells from these patients still have a normal allele (that is dominant over the mutant allele), the cellular phenotype is most often normal. Specifically, there is no overtly altered reaction in response to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, two dominant cancer predisposition syndromes, namely hereditary retinoblastoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, are associated with a enhanced radiosensitivity as indicated by increased development of tumors following radiation therapy. (orig.) [de

  17. RiceGeneThresher: a web-based application for mining genes underlying QTL in rice genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongjuea, Supat; Ruanjaichon, Vinitchan; Bruskiewich, Richard; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2009-01-01

    RiceGeneThresher is a public online resource for mining genes underlying genome regions of interest or quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice genome. It is a compendium of rice genomic resources consisting of genetic markers, genome annotation, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), protein domains, gene ontology, plant stress-responsive genes, metabolic pathways and prediction of protein-protein interactions. RiceGeneThresher system integrates these diverse data sources and provides powerful web-based applications, and flexible tools for delivering customized set of biological data on rice. Its system supports whole-genome gene mining for QTL by querying using DNA marker intervals or genomic loci. RiceGeneThresher provides biologically supported evidences that are essential for targeting groups or networks of genes involved in controlling traits underlying QTL. Users can use it to discover and to assign the most promising candidate genes in preparation for the further gene function validation analysis. The web-based application is freely available at http://rice.kps.ku.ac.th.

  18. Probabilistic estimation of microarray data reliability and underlying gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigvardsson Mikael

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of high throughput methods for measurement of mRNA concentrations makes the reliability of conclusions drawn from the data and global quality control of samples and hybridization important issues. We address these issues by an information theoretic approach, applied to discretized expression values in replicated gene expression data. Results Our approach yields a quantitative measure of two important parameter classes: First, the probability P(σ|S that a gene is in the biological state σ in a certain variety, given its observed expression S in the samples of that variety. Second, sample specific error probabilities which serve as consistency indicators of the measured samples of each variety. The method and its limitations are tested on gene expression data for developing murine B-cells and a t-test is used as reference. On a set of known genes it performs better than the t-test despite the crude discretization into only two expression levels. The consistency indicators, i.e. the error probabilities, correlate well with variations in the biological material and thus prove efficient. Conclusions The proposed method is effective in determining differential gene expression and sample reliability in replicated microarray data. Already at two discrete expression levels in each sample, it gives a good explanation of the data and is comparable to standard techniques.

  19. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1 gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation. Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes.

  20. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  1. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  2. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  3. Kindler syndrome - a rare type of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kindler syndrome is one of the types of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa with its onset related to mutations of the KIND1 gene. The authors describe a case of a family with three members suffering from this rare disease. All of these patients have typical clinical manifestations of the Kindler syndrome such as the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes right after the birth, scarring with the formation of contractures, pseudosyndactyly, microstomia and ankyloglossia, progressive poikiloderma, photosensibility, affections of the gastrointestinal tract - dysphagia, esophagostenosis, stool disorders, dental pathology, phimosis vaginalis in women.

  4. BAGE genes generated by juxtacentromeric reshuffling in the Hominidae lineage are under selective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruault, Myriam; Ventura, Mario; Galtier, Nicolas; Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Roizès, Gérard; De Sario, Albertina

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we show that the BAGE (B melanoma antigen) gene family was generated by chromosome rearrangements that occurred during the evolution of hominoids. An 84-kb DNA fragment derived from the phylogenetic 7q36 region was duplicated in the juxtacentromeric region of either chromosome 13 or chromosome 21. The duplicated region contained a fragment of the MLL3 gene, which, after juxtacentromeric reshuffling, generated the ancestral BAGE gene. Then, this ancestral gene gave rise to several independent genes through successive rounds of inter- and intrachromosome duplications. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations in putative coding regions shows that BAGE genes, but not the BAGE gene fragments, are under selective pressure. Our data strongly suggest that BAGE proteins have a function and that juxtacentromeric regions, whose plasticity is now largely proved, are not a simple junkyard of gene fragments, but may be the birth site of novel genes.

  5. Evaluation of new reference genes in papaya for accurate transcript normalization under different experimental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Zhu

    Full Text Available Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR requires accurate normalization though the use of reference genes. As no single reference gene is universally suitable for all experiments, thus reference gene(s validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. To date, only a few studies on reference genes have been done in other plants but none in papaya. In the present work, we selected 21 candidate reference genes, and evaluated their expression stability in 246 papaya fruit samples using three algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder. The samples consisted of 13 sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, different storage temperatures, different cultivars, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, modified atmosphere packaging, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP treatment, hot water treatment, biotic stress and hormone treatment. Our results demonstrated that expression stability varied greatly between reference genes and that different suitable reference gene(s or combination of reference genes for normalization should be validated according to the experimental conditions. In general, the internal reference genes EIF (Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A, TBP1 (TATA binding protein 1 and TBP2 (TATA binding protein 2 genes had a good performance under most experimental conditions, whereas the most widely present used reference genes, ACTIN (Actin 2, 18S rRNA (18S ribosomal RNA and GAPDH (Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were not suitable in many experimental conditions. In addition, two commonly used programs, geNorm and Normfinder, were proved sufficient for the validation. This work provides the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in papaya under different experimental

  6. Transcriptional profiling of protein expression related genes of Pichia pastoris under simulated microgravity.

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    Feng Qi

    Full Text Available The physiological responses and transcription profiling of Pichia pastoris GS115 to simulated microgravity (SMG were substantially changed compared with normal gravity (NG control. We previously reported that the recombinant P. pastoris grew faster under SMG than NG during methanol induction phase and the efficiencies of recombinant enzyme production and secretion were enhanced under SMG, which was considered as the consequence of changed transcriptional levels of some key genes. In this work, transcriptiome profiling of P. pastoris cultured under SMG and NG conditions at exponential and stationary phases were determined using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. Four categories of 141 genes function as methanol utilization, protein chaperone, RNA polymerase and protein transportation or secretion classified according to Gene Ontology (GO were chosen to be analyzed on the basis of NGS results. And 80 significantly changed genes were weighted and estimated by Cluster 3.0. It was found that most genes of methanol metabolism (85% of 20 genes and protein transportation or secretion (82.2% of 45 genes were significantly up-regulated under SMG. Furthermore the quantity and fold change of up-regulated genes in exponential phase of each category were higher than those of stationary phase. The results indicate that the up-regulated genes of methanol metabolism and protein transportation or secretion mainly contribute to enhanced production and secretion of the recombinant protein under SMG.

  7. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  8. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Kristin H; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Krabbe, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) linked to the spastic gait gene 4 (SPG4) is controversial, as the "pure" form traditionally has been considered confined to the long axons of the spinal cord. However, recent immunolabeling experiments have demonstrated extensive Spastin expression in the corte...

  9. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype...

  10. Epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular characteristics of hereditary prostate cancer in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, Andris; Vjaters, Egils; Irmejs, Arvīds; Trofimovičs, Genadijs; Miklaševičs, Edvīns; Gardovskis, Jānis

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancy affecting men in Latvia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological features and molecular basis of hereditary prostate cancer in Latvia. A total of 1217 newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients were recruited in our study. Data were analyzed according to clinical diagnostic criteria for hereditary prostate cancer. Molecular testing for the founder mutation 657del5 of the NBS1 gene was performed for the first 280 prostate cancer patients and 173 control cases, and for the founder mutations 300T/G, 4153delA, and 5382insC of the BRCA1 gene for 112 prostate cancer patients with a history of breast or ovarian cancer in their families. Of the 1217 families, 14 (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.7%-1.9%) matched clinical diagnostic criteria for definitive hereditary prostate cancer, and of the 1217 families, 196 (16.1%; 95% CI, 14.1%-18.3%) for suspected hereditary prostate cancer. The founder mutation of the NBS1 gene was detected in 1 (0.4%, 95% CI, 0.1%-2.0%) of the 280 cases in the prostate cancer group and in 1 (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-3.2%) of the 173 cases in the control group. The mutation 5382insC of the BRCA1 gene was detected in 2 (1.8%; 95% CI, 0.5%-6.3%) of the 112 cases analyzed in the prostate cancer group. No other BRCA1 founder mutations were detected. Our study did not reveal predisposition genes for hereditary prostate cancer as the founder mutations of the BRCA1 and NBS1 genes are rarely detected in Latvia, but showed the importance of evaluation risk individually as a positive family history of cancer was associated with the earlier onset of prostate cancer.

  11. A systematic molecular circuit design method for gene networks under biochemical time delays and molecular noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yu-Te

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene networks in nanoscale are of nonlinear stochastic process. Time delays are common and substantial in these biochemical processes due to gene transcription, translation, posttranslation protein modification and diffusion. Molecular noises in gene networks come from intrinsic fluctuations, transmitted noise from upstream genes, and the global noise affecting all genes. Knowledge of molecular noise filtering and biochemical process delay compensation in gene networks is crucial to understand the signal processing in gene networks and the design of noise-tolerant and delay-robust gene circuits for synthetic biology. Results A nonlinear stochastic dynamic model with multiple time delays is proposed for describing a gene network under process delays, intrinsic molecular fluctuations, and extrinsic molecular noises. Then, the stochastic biochemical processing scheme of gene regulatory networks for attenuating these molecular noises and compensating process delays is investigated from the nonlinear signal processing perspective. In order to improve the robust stability for delay toleration and noise filtering, a robust gene circuit for nonlinear stochastic time-delay gene networks is engineered based on the nonlinear robust H∞ stochastic filtering scheme. Further, in order to avoid solving these complicated noise-tolerant and delay-robust design problems, based on Takagi-Sugeno (T-S fuzzy time-delay model and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs technique, a systematic gene circuit design method is proposed to simplify the design procedure. Conclusion The proposed gene circuit design method has much potential for application to systems biology, synthetic biology and drug design when a gene regulatory network has to be designed for improving its robust stability and filtering ability of disease-perturbed gene network or when a synthetic gene network needs to perform robustly under process delays and molecular noises.

  12. Movement disorders in hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Mayo, David; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-10-15

    Movement disorders are well known features of some dominant hereditary ataxias (HA), specially SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease and dentatorubropallidolusyan atrophy. However, little is known about the existence and classification of movement disorders in other dominant and recessive ataxias. We prospectively studied the presence of movement disorders in patients referred for HA over the last 3 years. Only those patients with a confirmed family history of ataxia were included. We studied 84 cases of HA, including 46 cases of recessive and 38 cases of dominant HA. Thirty out of 46 cases of recessive HA could be classified as: Friedreich ataxia (FA), 29 cases; vitamin E deficiency, 1 case. Twenty-three out of 38 cases of dominant HA could be classified as: SCA 2, 4 cases; SCA 3, 8 cases; SCA 6, 4 cases; SCA 7, 6 cases and SCA 8, 1 case. We observed movement disorders in 20/38 (52%) patients with dominant HA and 25/46 (54%) cases with recessive HA, including 16 patients (16/29) with FA. In general, postural tremor was the most frequent observed movement disorder (27 cases), followed by dystonia (22 cases). Five patients had akinetic rigid syndrome, and in 13 cases, several movement disorders coexisted. Movement disorders are frequent findings in HA, not only in dominant HA but also in recessive HA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated......Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  14. Hereditary angioedema type III (estrogen-dependent) report of three cases and literature review*

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Amanda Rodrigues; de Ue, Ana Paula Fusel; Sabbag, Dominique Vilarinho; Furlani, Wellington de Jesus; de Souza, Patr?cia Karla; Rotta, Osmar

    2013-01-01

    In this article, three cases of hereditary angioedema (HAE) type III (estrogen-dependent or with normal C1 inhibitor) are reported. The HAE was initially described in women of the same family in association with high-leveled estrogenic conditions such as the use of oral contraceptives and pregnancy. There is no change in the C1 inhibitor as happens in other types of hereditary angioedema, and mutations are observed in the encoding gene of the XII factor of coagulation in several patients. The...

  15. Reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in citrus genotypes under different experimental conditions.

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    Valéria Mafra

    Full Text Available Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR has emerged as an accurate and widely used technique for expression profiling of selected genes. However, obtaining reliable measurements depends on the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression normalization. The aim of this work was to assess the expression stability of 15 candidate genes to determine which set of reference genes is best suited for transcript normalization in citrus in different tissues and organs and leaves challenged with five pathogens (Alternaria alternata, Phytophthora parasitica, Xylella fastidiosa and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. We tested traditional genes used for transcript normalization in citrus and orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes described as superior reference genes based on transcriptome data. geNorm and NormFinder algorithms were used to find the best reference genes to normalize all samples and conditions tested. Additionally, each biotic stress was individually analyzed by geNorm. In general, FBOX (encoding a member of the F-box family and GAPC2 (GAPDH was the most stable candidate gene set assessed under the different conditions and subsets tested, while CYP (cyclophilin, TUB (tubulin and CtP (cathepsin were the least stably expressed genes found. Validation of the best suitable reference genes for normalizing the expression level of the WRKY70 transcription factor in leaves infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus showed that arbitrary use of reference genes without previous testing could lead to misinterpretation of data. Our results revealed FBOX, SAND (a SAND family protein, GAPC2 and UPL7 (ubiquitin protein ligase 7 to be superior reference genes, and we recommend their use in studies of gene expression in citrus species and relatives. This work constitutes the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for transcript normalization in different citrus organs and under biotic stress.

  16. Differential Gene Expression of Longan Under Simulated Acid Rain Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shan; Pan, Tengfei; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2017-05-01

    Differential gene expression profile was studied in Dimocarpus longan Lour. in response to treatments of simulated acid rain with pH 2.5, 3.5, and a control (pH 5.6) using differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR). Results showed that mRNA differential display conditions were optimized to find an expressed sequence tag (EST) related with acid rain stress. The potential encoding products had 80% similarity with a transcription initiation factor IIF of Gossypium raimondii and 81% similarity with a protein product of Theobroma cacao. This fragment is the transcription factor activated by second messenger substances in longan leaves after signal perception of acid rain.

  17. Effects of inhaled (S)-linalool on hypothalamic gene expression in rats under restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Saito-Iizumi, Kana; Kamei, Asuka; Shinozaki, Fumika; Watanabe, Yuki; Abe, Keiko; Nakamura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Linalool has two enantiomers, (R)-linalool and (S)-linalool. Both are known to possess several biological activities in stressed animals. Our previous work revealed that inhalation of (R)-linalool altered hypothalamic gene expression in rats under stress. In the present study, we monitored hypothalamic gene expression in restrained rats with and without (S)-linalool inhalation by DNA microarray. The entire gene expression profile showed that inhalation of (S)-linalool significantly changed the expression levels of 316 hypothalamic genes in the restrained rats. The differentially expressed genes (e.g., App, Avp, Igf2, Igfbp2, Sst and Syt5) were found to relate to cell-to-cell signaling and nervous system development. These results indicate that (S)-linalool influences hypothalamic gene expression in restrained rats, and that inhalation of (S)-linalool under the stressed condition has some effects on stress-related biological responses.

  18. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  19. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease.

  20. miRNA expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE hereditary breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljana Tanić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer constitutes only 5–10% of all breast cancer cases and is characterized by strong family history of breast and/or other associated cancer types. Only ~25% of hereditary breast cancer cases carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, while mutations in other rare high and moderate-risk genes and common low penetrance variants may account for additional 20% of the cases. Thus the majority of cases are still unaccounted for and designated as BRCAX tumors. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles as regulators of gene expression and are deregulated in cancer. To characterize hereditary breast tumors based on their miRNA expression profiles we performed global microarray miRNA expression profiling on a retrospective cohort of 80 FFPE breast tissues, including 66 hereditary breast tumors (13 BRCA1, 10 BRCA2 and 43 BRCAX, 10 sporadic breast carcinomas and 4 normal breast tissues, using Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array v.11.0. Here we describe in detail the miRNA microarray expression data and tumor samples used for the study of BRCAX tumor heterogeneity (Tanic et al., 2013 and biomarkers associated with positive BRCA1/2 mutation status (Tanic et al., 2014. Additionally, we provide the R code for data preprocessing and quality control.

  1. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, D.; Andrea, D' M.M.; Ramiro Garcia, J.; Leimena, M.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Zhang, J.; Öztürk, B.; Nylund, L.; Sipkema, D.; Schaik, van W.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Smidt, H.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing

  2. Identification of a core set of genes that signifies pathways underlying cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strom, C.C.; Kruhoffer, M.; Knudsen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Although the molecular signals underlying cardiac hypertrophy have been the subject of intense investigation, the extent of common and distinct gene regulation between different forms of cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We hypothesized that a general and comparative analysis of hypertrophic...... gene expression, using microarray technology in multiple models of cardiac hypertrophy, including aortic banding, myocardial infarction, an arteriovenous shunt and pharmacologically induced hypertrophy, would uncover networks of conserved hypertrophy-specific genes and identify novel genes involved...... in hypertrophic signalling. From gene expression analyses (8740 probe sets, n = 46) of rat ventricular RNA, we identified a core set of 139 genes with consistent differential expression in all hypertrophy models as compared to their controls, including 78 genes not previously associated with hypertrophy and 61...

  3. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKie Iain

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI and dentine dysplasia (DD, comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a

  4. [Quality control of DNA testing in hereditary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Scheffer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratories performing diagnostic studies regarding hereditary diseases and the specialists providing hereditary counselling are housed in clinical genetic centres. The laboratories are subject to the Special Medical Performances Act and have had licenses from the Ministry. The DNA diagnostic

  5. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A. R. R.; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1971-01-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. PMID:5289293

  6. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  8. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  9. Hand muscles corticomotor excitability in hereditary spastic paraparesis type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Carluccio, Maria A; Mignarri, Andrea; Tessa, Alessandra; Santorelli, Filippo M; Rossi, Alessandro; Federico, Antonio; Dotti, Maria T

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies on the pathways to the upper limbs have revealed inconsistent results in patients harboring mutations in SPAST/SPG4 gene, responsible for the commonest form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). This paper is addressed to study the corticomotor excitability of the pathways to the upper limbs in SPG4 subjects. We assessed the corticomotor excitability of hand muscles in 12 subjects belonging to 7 unrelated SPG4 families and in 12 control subjects by stimulus-response curve [input-output (I-O) curve]. All the parameters of the recruitment curve (threshold, V50, slope and plateau) did not differ significantly from those of the controls. Presence of upper limb hyper-reflexia did not influence the results of I-O curve. Considering the multiplicity of possible genes/loci accounting for pure HSPs, performing TMS analyses could be helpful in differential diagnosis of pure HSPs in the absence of other clinical or neuroimaging tools.

  10. Commentary: When does understanding phenotypic evolution require identification of the underlying genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausher, Mark D; Delph, Lynda F

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive evolution is fundamentally a genetic process. Over the past three decades, characterizing the genes underlying adaptive phenotypic change has revealed many important aspects of evolutionary change. At the same time, natural selection is often fundamentally an ecological process that can often be studied without identifying the genes underlying the variation on which it acts. This duality has given rise to disagreement about whether, and under what circumstances, it is necessary to identify specific genes associated with phenotypic change. This issue is of practical concern, especially for researchers who study nonmodel organisms, because of the often enormous cost and labor required to "go for the genes." We here consider a number of situations and questions commonly addressed by researchers. Our conclusion is that although gene identification can be crucial for answering some questions, there are others for which definitive answers can be obtained without finding underlying genes. It should thus not be assumed that considerations of "empirical completeness" dictate that gene identification is always desirable. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Identification and expression analysis of WRKY family genes under biotic and abiotic stresses in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayum, Md Abdul; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Saha, Gopal; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-02-01

    WRKY proteins constitute one of the largest transcription factor families in higher plants, and they are involved in multiple biological processes such as plant development, metabolism, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Genes of this family have been well documented in response to many abiotic and biotic stresses in many plant species, but not yet against Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans in any of the plants. Moreover, potentiality of a specific gene may vary depending on stress conditions and genotypes. To identify stress resistance-related potential WRKY genes of Brassica rapa, we analyzed their expressions against above-mentioned pathogens and cold, salt, and drought stresses in B. rapa. Stress resistance-related functions of all Brassica rapa WRKY (BrWRKY) genes were firstly analyzed through homology study with existing biotic and abiotic stress resistance-related WRKY genes of other plant species and found a high degree of homology. We then identified all BrWRKY genes in a Br135K microarray dataset, which was created by applying low-temperature stresses to two contrasting Chinese cabbage doubled haploid (DH) lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, and selected 41 BrWRKY genes with high and differential transcript abundance levels. These selected genes were further investigated under cold, salt, and drought stresses as well as after infection with P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and F. oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans in B. rapa. The selected genes showed an organ-specific expression, and 22 BrWRKY genes were differentially expressed in Chiifu compared to Kenshin under cold and drought stresses. Six BrWRKY genes were more responsive in Kenshin compared to Chiffu under salt stress. In addition, eight BrWRKY genes showed differential expression after P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum infection and five genes after F. oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans infection in B. rapa. Thus, the differentially expressed Br

  12. [Hereditary diseases of the eye and their relative significance among the causes of blindness and diminished vision in the pupils of boarding schools for blind and amblyopic children in Uzbekistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ina, T G; Pisarevskiĭ, S L

    1989-01-01

    At the present time about 2000 hereditary diseases are known, 246 pathologic genes leading to eye pathology are described. Diagnostics of these diseases is important for correct treatment, prognosis and rehabilitation. Results of examinations, conducted by the authors, of 1843 pupils of boarding-schools for blind and poor-sighted children in Uzbekistan were identified with 87 nosologic forms of hereditary eye diseases which can develop among the contingents of pupils of these schools. Hereditary diseases were diagnosed in 1005 (54%) examined children. The hereditary character of this pathology is confirmed by results of genealogical examination, combination of eye pathologies, associated diseases of internal organs and systems in the examined children.

  13. Two Cases of Elderly-Onset Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Manifesting Bilateral Peroneal Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Kawaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP is characterized by recurrent focal neuropathies, which usually become symptomatic in the second or third decade of life. However, clinical phenotypic heterogeneity among patients with HNPP has recently been reported. Certain patients show polyneuropathy-type diffuse nerve injuries, whereas others remain asymptomatic at older ages. We present two cases of elderly-onset bilateral peroneal nerve palsies with diffuse muscle weakness in the lower limbs and glove-and-stocking type sensory disturbance. Both patients were diagnosed with HNPP by genetic analyses that detected deletions of chromosome 17p11.2 in peripheral myelin protein 22 genes. Their clinical courses suggested that the Japanese sitting style termed ‘seiza’, a way of sitting on the floor with the lower legs crossed under the thighs, was a precipitating factor for the bilateral peroneal nerve palsies.

  14. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  15. Identifying gene coexpression networks underlying the dynamic regulation of wood-forming tissues in Populus under diverse environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkgraf, Matthew; Liu, Lijun; Groover, Andrew; Filkov, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Trees modify wood formation through integration of environmental and developmental signals in complex but poorly defined transcriptional networks, allowing trees to produce woody tissues appropriate to diverse environmental conditions. In order to identify relationships among genes expressed during wood formation, we integrated data from new and publically available datasets in Populus. These datasets were generated from woody tissue and include transcriptome profiling, transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility and genome-wide association mapping experiments. Coexpression modules were calculated, each of which contains genes showing similar expression patterns across experimental conditions, genotypes and treatments. Conserved gene coexpression modules (four modules totaling 8398 genes) were identified that were highly preserved across diverse environmental conditions and genetic backgrounds. Functional annotations as well as correlations with specific experimental treatments associated individual conserved modules with distinct biological processes underlying wood formation, such as cell-wall biosynthesis, meristem development and epigenetic pathways. Module genes were also enriched for DNase I hypersensitivity footprints and binding from four transcription factors associated with wood formation. The conserved modules are excellent candidates for modeling core developmental pathways common to wood formation in diverse environments and genotypes, and serve as testbeds for hypothesis generation and testing for future studies. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Paraoxonase-1 status in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Nicola; García-Heredia, Anabel; Roca, Helena; Aranda, Núria; Arija, Victoria; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Michael; Busti, Fabiana; Aragonès, Gerard; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Pedica, Federica; Cataldo, Ivana; Marsillach, Judit; Joven, Jorge; Girelli, Domenico; Camps, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by accumulation of iron, oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrogenesis in liver tissue. In this setting, research on the protection afforded by intracellular antioxidants is of clinical relevance. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an enzyme that degrades lipid peroxides. This study investigates the alterations in serum PON1 status, PON1 gene polymorphisms, and PON1 hepatic expression in patients with HH. We performed a case-control study in 77 patients with HH (80.5% men, 22–70 years of age) and 408 healthy individuals (43.1% men, 26–74 years of age). Serum PON1 activities against different substrates and PON1192 and PON155 polymorphisms were analyzed. PON1 protein expression was investigated in 20 liver biopsies. HH patients had significantly lower serum PON1 activity, which was inversely correlated with ferritin (marker of iron stores) and serum 8-isoprostane concentrations (index of oxidative stress). PON1 protein expression in liver tissue was higher in patients and showed stronger staining in hepatocytes surrounding the areas of inflammation. Our study provides preliminary evidence that PON1 may play a role in protecting against iron-induced oxidative stress in hereditary hemochromatosis. PMID:23471031

  17. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  18. Burden of Illness in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Beusterien, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe was to assess the real-world experience of HAE from the patient perspective. Based on open-ended qualitative interviews with 30 patients from Spain, Germany and Denmark, 5 key themes emerged characterizing the impact...

  19. Major and minor form of hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Vergouwe, MN; van Dijk, JG; Rees, M; Frants, RR; Brown, P

    Hyperekplexia is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses. Within the disorder two clinical forms can be distinguished. The major form is characterized by continuous generalized stiffness in the first year of life and an exaggerated startle reflex, accompanied

  20. Revisited diagnostics of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa is a big group of hereditary diseases with the main manifestations in the form of blisters on the skin and mucous coat after slight mechanical injuries. It is not always possible to diagnose this disease based on the clinical picture. The article discusses current laboratory diagnostics methods for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa including immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and genetic analysis (molecular or DNA diagnostics as well as their advantages and disadvantages. TEM determines the micro splitting level and nature of ultrafine changes in the area of the dermoepidermal junction; at the same time, such tests need special expensive equipment. Substantial experience is also needed to analyze the resulting submicroscopic images. IFM determines whether expression of the affected protein related to the disease development is reduced or absent; however, invalid (false positive or false negative results can be obtained in patients with the reduced expression of the affected protein. Genetic analysis plays a key role for prenatal diagnostics. Therefore, to make an exact diagnosis of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, it is expedient to apply IFM, TEM and genetic analysis. The need to set an exact diagnosis of the disease is related to the fact that the promising treatment methods being currently developed are aimed at treating patients with certain forms of the disease.

  1. Hereditary spherocytosis. | Hassan | Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. Although a positive family history of spherocytosis increases the risk for this disorder, it may be sporadic in some cases. In severe cases the ...

  2. Presumed hereditary retinal degenerations: Ibadan experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary retinal degenerative condition with no known treatment. Associated ocular conditions, such as cataract and glaucoma, when present further worsen vision, but these conditions are often treatable. There are, however, no known reports of cataract or glaucoma surgery in ...

  3. Hereditary spectrin deficiency in Golden Retriever dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slappendel, Robbert J.; van Zwieten, Rob; van Leeuwen, Martin; Schneijdenberg, Chris T. W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Spectrin deficiency with increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF) is a hallmark of hereditary spherocytosis, which is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia in humans of northern European ancestry. A radioimmunoassay revealed that erythrocyte spectrin concentration was 50-65% of normal in 5

  4. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  5. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  6. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia clinical and molecular genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, T.G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by vascular malformations in multiple organ systems. HHT has an age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The clinical symptoms are caused by direct

  7. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  8. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition ...

  9. Increased levels and pulsatility of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone in mothers of hereditary dizygotic twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambalk, C.B.; Boomsma, D.I.; Boer, L.; de Koning, C.H.; Schoute, E.; Popp-Snyders, C.; Schoemaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    According to the endocrine model of hereditary dizygotic twinning, high FSH is responsible for multiple ovulation and pregnancy. Our study explored the underlying neuroendocrine causes. In a prospective clinical study, we compared the third day of menses parameters of episodic secretion of LH and

  10. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for approximately five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, USA and the first kidney cancer-associated gene, VHL, was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided the basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at the germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of the causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms of how an alteration of each kidney cancer-associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression analysis under abiotic stresses in the desert biomass willow, Salix psammophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Salix psammophila is a desert shrub willow that has extraordinary adaptation to abiotic stresses and plays an important role in maintaining local ecosystems. Moreover, S. psammophila is regarded as a promising biomass feedstock because of its high biomass yields and short rotation coppice cycle. However, few suitable reference genes (RGs for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR constrain the study on normalization of gene expression in S. psammophila until now. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of 14 candidate RGs across tissue types and under four abiotic stress treatments, including heat, cold, salt and drought treatments. After calculation of PCR efficiencies, three different software, NormFinder, geNorm, and BestKeeper were employed to analyze systematically the qRT-PCR data, and the outputs were merged by RankAggreg software. The optimal reference genes selected for gene expression analysis were EF1□□ (Elongation factor-1 alpha and OTU (OTU-like cysteine protease family protein for different tissue types, UBC (Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 and LTA4H (Leukotriene A-4 hydrolase homologue for heat treatment, HIS (Histone superfamily protein H3 and ARF2 (ADP-ribosylation factor 2 for cold treatment, OTU and ACT7 (Actin 7 for salt treatment, UBC and LTA4H for drought treatment. The expression of UBC, ARF2 and VHAC (V-type proton ATPase subunit C varied the least across tissue types and under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the relative genes expression profiles of one tissue-specific gene WOX1a (WUSCHEL-related homeobox 1a, and four stress-inducible genes, including Hsf-A2 (Heat shock transcription factors A2, CBF3 (C-repeat binding factor 3, HKT1 (High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1 and GST (Glutathione S-transferase, were conducted to confirm the validity of the reference genes in this study. These results provided an important RGs application guideline for gene expression characterization in S. psammophila.

  12. Species-specific genes under selection characterize the co-evolution of slavemaker and host lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, B; Elsner, D; Alleman, A; Foitzik, S

    2017-12-04

    The transition to a parasitic lifestyle entails comprehensive changes to the selective regime. In parasites, genes encoding for traits that facilitate host detection, exploitation and transmission should be under selection. Slavemaking ants are social parasites that exploit the altruistic behaviour of their hosts by stealing heterospecific host brood during raids, which afterwards serve as slaves in slavemaker nests. Here we search for evidence of selection in the transcriptomes of three slavemaker species and three closely related hosts. We expected selection on genes underlying recognition and raiding or defense behaviour. Analyses of selective forces in species with a slavemaker or host lifestyle allowed investigation into whether or not repeated instances of slavemaker evolution share the same genetic basis. To investigate the genetic basis of host-slavemaker co-evolution, we created orthologous clusters from transcriptome sequences of six Temnothorax ant species - three slavemakers and three hosts - to identify genes with signatures of selection. We further tested for functional enrichment in selected genes from slavemakers and hosts respectively and investigated which pathways the according genes belong to. Our phylogenetic analysis, based on more than 5000 ortholog sequences, revealed sister species status for two slavemakers as well as two hosts, contradicting a previous phylogeny based on mtDNA. We identified 309 genes with signs of positive selection on branches leading to slavemakers and 161 leading to hosts. Among these were genes potentially involved in cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis, thus species recognition, and circadian clock functionality possibly explaining the different activity patterns of slavemakers and hosts. There was little overlap of genes with signatures of positive selection among species, which are involved in numerous different functions and different pathways. We identified different genes, functions and pathways under positive

  13. GSTF1 Gene Expression Analysis in Cultivated Wheat Plants under Salinity and ABA Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Niazi; Amin Ramezani; Ali Dinari

    2014-01-01

    Most plants encounter stress such as drought and salinity that adversely affect growth, development and crop productivity. The expression of the gene glutathione-s-transferases (GST) extends throughout various protective mechanisms in plants and allows them to adapt to unfavorable environmental conditions. GSTF1 (the first phi GSTFs class) gene expression patterns in the wheat cultivars Mahuti and Alamut were studied under salt and ABA treatments using a qRT-PCR technique. Results showed that...

  14. Clinical features of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features and diagnostic methods of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Methods Patients diagnosed with pure HSP from October 2006 to February 2013 admitted to Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University were included. The patients were assessed by the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale and the clinical features were reviewed. Results Thirty-three HSP patients (21 men and 12 women were included in the study. Thirteen patients (39.39% had family history of HSP and the most common genetic mode of the familial cases were autosomal dominant inheritance (11/13. The mean age of onset were (20.35 ± 15.55 years and the mean disease duration were (12.77 ± 9.83 years. All of the included patients presented with signs of impairment of the pyramidal tract such as increased muscular tone, tendon hyperreflexia and positive Babinski's sign of the lower limbs. Impairment of the pyramidal tract also presented in the upper limbs in some patients. Scissors gait appeared in 29 patients and feet deformity in 5 patients. Atrophy of thoracic cord on MRI were presented in 5 patients while 2 patients complicated with peripheral nerve damage. Four patients had a novel exon 10-17 deletion in SPG4 gene. There were no differences in onset age, disease duration and mean score of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale between male and female patients as well as between patients with and without family history (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion The onset age of pure HSP is variational and males are more common than females. The most common inheritance mode is autosomal dominant and most of the cases are characterized by impairment of the pyramidal tract of the lower limbs and occasionally bladder dysfunction and peripheral nerve damage. Gender and family history do not affect the clinical features. Clinical features, family history and spinal cord MRI will assist the correct diagnosis, and making a definite

  15. Codominant grasses differ in gene expression under experimental climate extremes in native tallgrass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Meghan L.; Knapp, Alan K.; Smith, Melinda D.

    2018-01-01

    Extremes in climate, such as heat waves and drought, are expected to become more frequent and intense with forecasted climate change. Plant species will almost certainly differ in their responses to these stressors. We experimentally imposed a heat wave and drought in the tallgrass prairie ecosystem near Manhattan, Kansas, USA to assess transcriptional responses of two ecologically important C4 grass species, Andropogon gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans. Based on previous research, we expected that S. nutans would regulate more genes, particularly those related to stress response, under high heat and drought. Across all treatments, S. nutans showed greater expression of negative regulatory and catabolism genes while A. gerardii upregulated cellular and protein metabolism. As predicted, S. nutans showed greater sensitivity to water stress, particularly with downregulation of non-coding RNAs and upregulation of water stress and catabolism genes. A. gerardii was less sensitive to drought, although A. gerardii tended to respond with upregulation in response to drought versus S. nutans which downregulated more genes under drier conditions. Surprisingly, A. gerardii only showed minimal gene expression response to increased temperature, while S. nutans showed no response. Gene functional annotation suggested that these two species may respond to stress via different mechanisms. Specifically, A. gerardii tends to maintain molecular function while S. nutans prioritizes avoidance. Sorghastrum nutans may strategize abscisic acid response and catabolism to respond rapidly to stress. These results have important implications for success of these two important grass species under a more variable and extreme climate forecast for the future. PMID:29473008

  16. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). PMID:29084901

  17. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreti, Elena; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2018-02-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  19. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  20. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, or SMAD4. Around 90% of HHT patients present with a heterozygous pathogenic genetic variation. Almost all cases of HHT have a family history. Very few cases are de...... novo or mosaicism. We describe a case with mutational mosaicism that would not be observed in the clinical routine when using Sanger sequencing or a NGS read coverage below app. 100. METHODS: DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and buccal swabs. The coding region, exon-intron boundaries......, and the flanking sequences of the genes were sequenced by NGS. RESULTS: The proband had clinical HHT fulfilling the Curaçao criteria and genetic testing identified a frameshift mutation in ENG. The mother of the proband, also with clinical HHT, was found negative when analyzing DNA from blood for the familial...

  1. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. In Search of 'Birth Month Genes': Using Existing Data Repositories to Locate Genes Underlying Birth Month-Disease Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Mary Regina; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal exposures vary seasonally (e.g., sunlight, allergens) and many diseases are linked with variance in exposure. Epidemiologists often measure these changes using birth month as a proxy for seasonal variance. Likewise, Genome-Wide Association Studies have associated or implicated these same diseases with many genes. Both disparate data types (epidemiological and genetic) can provide key insights into the underlying disease biology. We developed an algorithm that links 1) epidemiological data from birth month studies with 2) genetic data from published gene-disease association studies. Our framework uses existing data repositories - PubMed, DisGeNET and Gene Ontology - to produce a bipartite network that connects enriched seasonally varying biofactorss with birth month dependent diseases (BMDDs) through their overlapping developmental gene sets. As a proof-of-concept, we investigate 7 known BMDDs and highlight three important biological networks revealed by our algorithm and explore some interesting genetic mechanisms potentially responsible for the seasonal contribution to BMDDs.

  3. [Progress on nitrogen regulation gene expression of plant pathogenic fungi under nitrogen starvation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Yao, Chun-Xin; Ding, Yu-Mei; Tao, Nan; Sun, Mao-Lin; Zhang, Shao-Song

    2012-07-01

    It has been confirmed that the occurrence of plant disease is caused by the effector molecules secreted by plant pathogens. The regulation effector gene expression is an important aspect in understanding of the infection process. The nutritional status of cells has been postulated to be a vital role for effector gene expression. Studies have indicated that the induction of the same effecter genes during growth in vitro as those during growth in planta under nitrogen-starved conditions. This showed that the nitrogen poor environment existed in the early time of plant evolution. This paper describes the system in the pathogenesis of several fungal pathogens and nitrogen in the process of gene expression effects from the results of several species by comparing and contrasting the function of nitrogen regulatory genes, as well as by studying plants in vivo and in vitro gene under nitrogen limitation inductive effect in order to reveal the effectiveness of nitrogen in the development process of host plant disease is an important factor.

  4. Gene expression analysis of Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum habrochaites under drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upama Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the limiting environmental factors that affect crop production worldwide. Understanding the molecular mechanism of drought stress is the key to developing drought tolerant crop. In this experiment we performed expression profiling of tomato plants under water deficit conditions using microarray technology. The data set we generated (available in the NCBI/GEO database under GSE22304 has been analyzed to identify genes that are involved in the regulation of tomato's responses to drought.

  5. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills......-sensitive phenotype for some patients. CONCLUSION: The course of angioedema in women with C1 inhibitor deficiency is affected by physiologic hormonal changes; consequently, physicians should take these into account when advising on management....

  6. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Osta, Rabih; Grandpre, Nicolas; Monnin, Nicolas; Hubert, Jacques; Koscinski, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic disease that progresses silently. This disease is often diagnosed late when complications appear. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is one of the classical complications of hemochromatosis. Its frequency is declining probably because of earlier diagnosis and better informed physicians. Certain symptoms linked to HH can have an impact on a patient's sexuality, such as decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and impairment of ejaculation, as well as on his reproductive capacities. This review is based on an online search in English, French and German language publications found in PubMed/Medline, up to 23 September 2016 using the following key word: Male infertility, Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism, Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Thirty-four papers met these inclusion criteria. This review describes the impact of iron overload on male fertility, resulting in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and proposes treatment modalities.

  7. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by sudden attacks of peripheral swelling. Patients also commonly have episodic swelling of the wall of hollow viscera, including the bowel. We present a 33-year-old previously healthy male with a complaint of acute-onset intense abdominal pain localized in the epigastrium. Pain irradiated to the right lower quadrant and was associated with five episodes of vomiting. Computed tomography showed thickening of the duodenal wall with liquid in the subphrenic space. Complementary laboratory tests showed low C4 complement levels (5.5 mg/dl) and 30% complement C1 inhibitor activity. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) in complement C1 inhibitor. Abdominal associated with angioedema may manifest as severe acute-onset abdominal pain or as moderately severe chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Two medications are currently FDA-approved for the treatment of these patients.

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  9. [Hereditary ataxia and sensory-motor neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Hodzić, Samiha; Zjuzin, Nadezda; Lokmic, Eldan

    2003-01-01

    The authors presented this case because of the determined characteristics in the clinical picture and electrophysiologic finding which refer to spinocerebral degeneration and neuropathia of the hereditary type, and give the possibility of the classification into two nosologic entities. One is Roussey Levy's syndrome, what is the advisable diagnosis of our patient, and another Freidreich's ataxia. Regardless to the impossibility of the establishing of diagnosis by means the specific enzimatic and genetic tests, the authors on the basis of the clinical picture, electromioncurographic findings and data from the literature of the diagnostic ally decided for Freidreich's ataxya. The neuropathy have classified into the hereditary motor sensor neuropathy--HMSN type II and presented its characteristics.

  10. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  11. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  12. Multimodality imaging features of hereditary multiple exostoses

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, H K; Fitzgerald, L; Campbell, N; Lyburn, I D; Munk, P L; Buckley, O; Torreggiani, W C

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) or diaphyseal aclasis is an inherited disorder characterised by the formation of multiple osteochondromas, which are cartilage-capped osseous outgrowths, and the development of associated osseous deformities. Individuals with HME may be asymptomatic or develop clinical symptoms, which prompt imaging studies. Different modalities ranging from plain radiographs to cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging studies can be helpful in the diagnosis and detecti...

  13. Subtle neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive changes in hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis)

    OpenAIRE

    Kantanen, Mari; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Salonen, Oili; Kaipainen, Markku; Hokkanen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is an autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis caused by a c.640G>A or c.640G>T mutation in the gene coding for gelsolin. Principal clinical manifestations include corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy and cutis laxa with vascular fragility. Signs of minor CNS involvement have also been observed, possibly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). To investigate further if AGel amyloidosis carries a risk for a specific neuro...

  14. EXPRESSION OF CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE (CDPK GENES IN VITIS AMURENSIS UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrovina A.S.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses, such as extreme temperatures, soil salinity, or water deficit, are one of the major limiting factors of crop productivity worldwide. Examination of molecular and genetic mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in plants is of great interest to plant biologists. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which are the most important Ca2+ sensors in plants, are known to play one of the key roles in plant adaptation to abiotic stress. CDPK is a multigene family of enzymes. Analysis of CDPK gene expression under various abiotic stress conditions would help identify those CDPKs that might play important roles in plant adaptation to abiotic stress. We focused on studying CDPK gene expression under osmotic, water deficit, and temperature stress conditions in a wild-growing grapevine Vitis amurensis Rurp., which is native to the Russian Far East and is known to possess high adaptive potential and high level of resistance against adverse environmental conditions. Healthy V. amurensis cuttings (excised young stems with one healthy leaf were used for the treatments. For the non-stress treatment, we placed the cuttings in distilled water for 12 h at room temperature. For the water-deficit stress, detached cuttings were laid on a paper towel for 12 h at room temperature. For osmotic stress treatments, the cuttings were placed in 0.4 М NaCl and 0.4 М mannitol solutions for 12 h at room temperature. To examine temperature stress tolerance, the V. amurensis cuttings were placed in a growth chamber at +10oC and +37oC for 12 h. The total expression of VaCDPK genes was examined by semiquantitative RT-PCR with degenerate primers designed to the CDPK kinase domain. The total level of CDPK gene expression increased under salt and decreased under low temperature stress conditions. We sequenced 300 clones of the amplified part of different CDPK transcripts obtained from the analyzed cDNA probes. Analysis of the cDNA sequences identified 8 different

  15. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age : implications for surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J. F.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Menko, Fred H.

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation

  16. Cancer risk in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer due to MSH6 mutations: impact on counseling and surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Yvonne M. C.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Menko, Fred; Stormorken, Astrid; Quehenberger, Franz; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Møller, Pal; Genuardi, Maurizio; van Houwelingen, Hans; Tops, Carli; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Verkuijlen, Paul; Kenter, Gemma; van Mil, Anneke; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Tan, Gita B.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Fodde, Riccardo; Wijnen, Juul Th; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; Vasen, Hans

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is caused by a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene. The aim of our study was to determine the cumulative risk of developing cancer in a large series of MSH6 mutation carriers. METHODS: Mutation analysis was performed in 20

  17. Selection and Validation of Housekeeping Genes as Reference for Gene Expression Studies in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) under Heat and Salt Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pallavi; Saxena, Rachit K; Singh, Vikas K; Krishnamurthy, L; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    To identify stable housekeeping genes as a reference for expression analysis under heat and salt stress conditions in pigeonpea, the relative expression variation for 10 commonly used housekeeping genes (EF1α, UBQ10, GAPDH, 18Sr RNA, 25Sr RNA, TUB6, ACT1, IF4α, UBC, and HSP90) was studied in root, stem, and leaves tissues of Asha (ICPL 87119), a leading pigeonpea variety. Three statistical algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were used to define the stability of candidate genes. Under heat stress, UBC, HSP90, and GAPDH were found to be the most stable reference genes. In the case of salinity stress, GAPDH followed by UBC and HSP90 were identified to be the most stable reference genes. Subsequently, the above identified genes were validated using qRT-PCR based gene expression analysis of two universal stress-resposive genes namely uspA and uspB. The relative quantification of these two genes varied according to the internal controls (most stable, least stable, and combination of most stable and least stable housekeeping genes) and thus confirmed the choice as well as validation of internal controls in such experiments. The identified and validated housekeeping genes will facilitate gene expression studies under heat and salt stress conditions in pigeonpea.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Aluminum-Tolerance Genes in Higher Plants: Clarifying the Underlying Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit A. Daspute

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al rhizotoxicity is one of the major environmental stresses that decrease global food production. Clarifying the molecular mechanisms underlying Al tolerance may contribute to the breeding of Al-tolerant crops. Recent studies identified various Al-tolerance genes. The expression of these genes is inducible by Al. Studies of the major Arabidopsis thaliana Al-tolerance gene, ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER 1 (AtALMT1, which encodes an Al-activated malate transporter, revealed that the Al-inducible expression is regulated by a SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIXOTOXICITY 1 (STOP1 zinc-finger transcription factor. This system, which involves STOP1 and organic acid transporters, is conserved in diverse plant species. The expression of AtALMT1 is also upregulated by several phytohormones and hydrogen peroxide, suggesting there is crosstalk among the signals involved in the transcriptional regulation of AtALMT1. Additionally, phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS activate various transcriptional responses, including the expression of genes related to increased Al tolerance or the suppression of root growth under Al stress conditions. For example, Al suppressed root growth due to abnormal accumulation of auxin and cytokinin. It activates transcription of TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS 1 and other phytohormone responsive genes in distal transition zone, which causes suppression of root elongation. On the other hand, overexpression of Al inducible genes for ROS-detoxifying enzymes such as GLUTATHIONE–S-TRANSFERASE, PEROXIDASE, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE enhances Al resistance in several plant species. We herein summarize the complex transcriptional regulation of an Al-inducible genes affected by STOP1, phytohormones, and ROS.

  19. Mechanisms of Disease and Clinical Features of Mutations of the Gene for Mitofusin 2: An Important Cause of Hereditary Peripheral Neuropathy with Striking Clinical Variability in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouvrier, Robert; Grew, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Mitofusin 2, a large transmembrane GTPase located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, promotes membrane fusion and is involved in the maintenance of the morphology of axonal mitochondria. Mutations of the gene encoding mitofusin 2 ("MFN2") have recently been identified as the cause of approximately one-third of dominantly inherited cases of the…

  20. Characterization of a dehydrogenase activity responsible for oxidation of 11-cis-retinol in the retinal pigment epithelium of mice with a disrupted RDH5 gene. A model for the human hereditary disease fundus albipunctatus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jang, G.F.; Hooser, J.P. van; Kuksa, V.; McBee, J.K.; He, Y.G.; Janssen, J.J.M.; Driessen, C.A.G.G.; Palczewski, K.

    2001-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, the final step of visual chromophore production is the oxidation of 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal. This reaction is catalyzed by 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenases (11-cis-RDHs), prior to the chromophore rejoining with the visual pigment apo-proteins. The RDH5 gene encodes a

  1. Quantitative gene expression underlying 18f-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Binderup, Tina; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analogue 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is widely used in oncologic imaging. This study examines the molecular mechanism underlying the detection of colon cancer (CC) by FDG-PET. Methods: Pre-operative PET/CT scans and tissue samples....... Mean gene expression levels of GLUT1, HK2, ki67, HIF1α, VEGF and CaIX, but not HK1, were significantly higher in primary tumours than in surrounding normal colonic mucosa. Linear regressions pairing tumour SUVmax with gene expression levels showed significant correlations between SUVmax and HK2, ki67...

  2. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... as a control group. Unsupervised cluster analysis identified two distinct subgroups related to genetic complexity. Sporadic and HBOC associated tumors had complex genetic profiles with an average 41% of the genome altered, whereas the mismatch repair defective tumors had stable genetic profiles...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  3. Failure of signal transduction pathway of DNA damage in hereditary microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Matsuura, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the brain size determination are considered from an aspect of DNA-damage signaling recently revealed by studies on hereditary microcephaly (M), in relation to the radiation-induced M. International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) assesses the risk of M by in utero exposure as 40%/Sv, the threshold dose is about 0.2 Gy (deterministic effect), A-bomb M is conceived to be due to the exposure at 8-5 weeks of gestation, and M is induced by radiation at 10 days after fertilization in the mouse. Recent studies on causing genes of M have revealed its particular connection with signaling pathways: in ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), genes of ATM; in Seckel syndrome, of ATR (AT and Rad3-related) and pericentrin (PCNT); Nijmegen syndrome (NBS), of NBS1; NBS-like disease, of Rad50 and Mre11; AT-like disease, of Mre11; Lig4 syndrome, of Lig4; immunodeficiency combined with M, of XLF; primary M, of MCPH1, ASPM, CdkRap2, CENP-J and STIL. Single and double strand breaks of DNA respectively activate the signaling pathway of ATR where PCNT and MCPH1 participate, and pathway of ATM where NBS1, Mre11 and Rad50 do. PCNT is a major protein, pericentrin, composing the centrosome, of which defect results in the Seckel disease with spindle dysfunction. At present, M can be thus said to be of the cellular common features of failure of ATM/ATR signaling and of dysfunction of centrosome. As well, ASPM gene expression is recently reported to be suppressed by radiation. Thus future studies on M will spread to wider biological field of cell and development as well as radiation and inheritance. (K.T.)

  4. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, José F; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Suely L; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-08-28

    Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours) of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase), was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  5. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Neto José F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. Results In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase, was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Conclusions Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Basal Cell Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Susan; McCormack, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasians worldwide and its incidence is rising. It is generally considered a sporadic tumour, most likely to affect fair-skinned individuals exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This chapter focusses on the approach to recognising the relatively few individuals in whom a high-risk hereditary susceptibility may be present. Gorlin syndrome is the main consideration and the gene most commonly mutated is PTCH1, a key regulator of the Hedgehog developmental pathway. Recently, loss of function of another gene in the same pathway, SUFU, has been found to explain a subset of families. Understanding the pathogenesis of familial BCCs has advanced the understanding of the biology of sporadic tumours and led to targeted therapy trials. The management of familial BCCs remains a challenge due to significant unmet needs for non-surgical treatments and a high burden of disease for the individual. Together with the prospect of advances in gene discovery and translation, these challenges highlight the need for ongoing review of at-risk and affected individuals by a multidisciplinary team.

  7. The Application of Next-Generation Sequencing for Mutation Detection in Autosomal-Dominant Hereditary Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, Nicolas; Röthlisberger, Benno; Ludin, Katja; Schlegel, Christoph; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the causative mutation using next-generation sequencing in autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment, as mutation analysis in hereditary hearing impairment by classic genetic methods, is hindered by the high heterogeneity of the disease. Two Swiss families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. Amplified DNA libraries for next-generation sequencing were constructed from extracted genomic DNA, derived from peripheral blood, and enriched by a custom-made sequence capture library. Validated, pooled libraries were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq instrument, 300 cycles and paired-end sequencing. Technical data analysis was performed with SeqMonk, variant analysis with GeneTalk or VariantStudio. The detection of mutations in genes related to hearing loss by next-generation sequencing was subsequently confirmed using specific polymerase-chain-reaction and Sanger sequencing. Mutation detection in hearing-loss-related genes. The first family harbored the mutation c.5383+5delGTGA in the TECTA-gene. In the second family, a novel mutation c.2614-2625delCATGGCGCCGTG in the WFS1-gene and a second mutation TCOF1-c.1028G>A were identified. Next-generation sequencing successfully identified the causative mutation in families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. The results helped to clarify the pathogenic role of a known mutation and led to the detection of a novel one. NGS represents a feasible approach with great potential future in the diagnostics of hereditary hearing impairment, even in smaller labs.

  8. A mathematical model of weight loss under total starvation: evidence against the thrifty-gene hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2013-01-01

    The thrifty-gene hypothesis (TGH posits that the modern genetic predisposition to obesity stems from a historical past where famine selected for genes that promote efficient fat deposition. It has been previously argued that such a scenario is unfeasible because under such strong selection any gene favouring fat deposition would rapidly move to fixation. Hence, we should all be predisposed to obesity: which we are not. The genetic architecture of obesity that has been revealed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS, however, calls into question such an argument. Obesity is caused by mutations in many hundreds (maybe thousands of genes, each with a very minor, independent and additive impact. Selection on such genes would probably be very weak because the individual advantages they would confer would be very small. Hence, the genetic architecture of the epidemic may indeed be compatible with, and hence support, the TGH. To evaluate whether this is correct, it is necessary to know the likely effects of the identified GWAS alleles on survival during starvation. This would allow definition of their advantage in famine conditions, and hence the likely selection pressure for such alleles to have spread over the time course of human evolution. We constructed a mathematical model of weight loss under total starvation using the established principles of energy balance. Using the model, we found that fatter individuals would indeed survive longer and, at a given body weight, females would survive longer than males, when totally starved. An allele causing deposition of an extra 80 g of fat would result in an extension of life under total starvation by about 1.1–1.6% in an individual with 10 kg of fat and by 0.25–0.27% in an individual carrying 32 kg of fat. A mutation causing a per allele effect of 0.25% would become completely fixed in a population with an effective size of 5 million individuals in 6000 selection events. Because there have probably been about 24

  9. Expression of stress/defense-related genes in barley grown under space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Shagimardanova, Elena; Gusev, Oleg; Bingham, Gail; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir

    Plants are exposed to the extreme environment in space, especially space radiation is suspected to induce oxidative stress by generating high-energy free radicals and microgravity would enhance the effect of space radiation, however, current understandings of plant growth and responses on this synergistic effect of radiation and microgravity is limited to a few experiments. In this study, expression of stress/defense-related genes in barley grown under space environment was analyzed by RT-PCR and DNA microarray experiments to understand plant responses and adaptation to space environment and to develop the space stress-tolerant plants. The seeds of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Haruna nijo, kept in the international space station (ISS) over 4 months, were germinated after 3 days of irrigation in LADA plant growth chamber onboard Russian segment of ISS and the final germination ratio was over 90 %. The height of plants was about 50 to 60 cm and flag leaf has been opened after 26 days of irrigation under 24 hr lighting, showing the similar growth to ground-grown barley. Expression levels of stress/defense-related genes in space-grown barley were compared to those in ground-grown barley by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. In 17 stress/defense-related genes that are up-regulated by oxidative stress or other abiotic stress, only catalase, pathogenesis-related protein 13, chalcone synthase, and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase genes were increased in space-grown barley. DNA microarrya analysis with the GeneChip Barley Genome Array showed the similar expression profiles of the stress/defense-related genes to those by RT-PCR experiment, suggesting that the barley germinated and grown in LADA onboard ISS is not damaged by space environment, especially oxidative stress induced by space radiation and microgravity.

  10. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka

    2015-11-24

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  11. Genes underlying reproductive division of labor in termites, with comparisons to social Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eKorb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available All social insects are characterized by a reproductive division of labor. Within a colony only a few individuals reproduce (queens and in termites, also a king while the large majority (workers and soldiers forgo reproduction, at least temporarily. The evolution of such reproductive altruism can ultimately be explained by inclusive fitness theory. Here, I will review the proximate genetic mechanisms underlying this altruism in termites. As social cockroaches they evolved eusociality independently from the social Hymenoptera, which makes them interesting test cases to look for common underlying mechanisms of eusociality and lineage specific idiosyncrasies. First, I will provide a summary of the genes and their function that have been identified to underlie reproductive division of labor - so called 'queen genes,' - in the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus, an emerging model to study termite social evolution. Second, I outline how widespread these queen genes are across the termite phylogeny, using also evidence from recent genome analyses. I will provide hypotheses about the evolutionary origin of these queen genes, aiming to link proximate mechanisms with ultimate functions. Finally, I will draw comparisons to social Hymenoptera to indicate potential common underpinnings that warrant further testing.

  12. Inferring dynamic gene networks under varying conditions for transcriptomic network comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Teppei; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-04-15

    Elucidating the differences between cellular responses to various biological conditions or external stimuli is an important challenge in systems biology. Many approaches have been developed to reverse engineer a cellular system, called gene network, from time series microarray data in order to understand a transcriptomic response under a condition of interest. Comparative topological analysis has also been applied based on the gene networks inferred independently from each of the multiple time series datasets under varying conditions to find critical differences between these networks. However, these comparisons often lead to misleading results, because each network contains considerable noise due to the limited length of the time series. We propose an integrated approach for inferring multiple gene networks from time series expression data under varying conditions. To the best of our knowledge, our approach is the first reverse-engineering method that is intended for transcriptomic network comparison between varying conditions. Furthermore, we propose a state-of-the-art parameter estimation method, relevance-weighted recursive elastic net, for providing higher precision and recall than existing reverse-engineering methods. We analyze experimental data of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor or heregulin with several doses and provide novel biological hypotheses through network comparison. The software NETCOMP is available at http://bonsai.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ approximately shima/NETCOMP/.

  13. Subtractive libraries for prospecting differentially expressed genes in the soybean under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; de Fátima Corrêa Carvalho, Josirlei; do Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Neumaier, Norman; Farias, José Renato Bouças; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Marcelino, Francismar Corrêa; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima

    2012-06-01

    Soybean has a wide range of applications in the industry and, due to its crop potential, its improvement is widely desirable. During drought conditions, soybean crops suffer significant losses in productivity. Therefore, understanding the responses of the soybean under this stress is an effective way of targeting crop improvement techniques. In this study, we employed the Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) technique to investigate differentially expressed genes under water deficit conditions. Embrapa 48 and BR 16 soybean lines, known as drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were grown hydroponically and subjected to different short-term periods of stress by withholding the nutrient solution. Using this approach, we have identified genes expressed during the early response to water deficit in roots and leaves. These genes were compared among the lines to assess probable differences in the plant transcriptomes. In general, similar biochemical processes were predominant in both cultivars; however, there were more considerable differences between roots and leaves of Embrapa 48. Moreover, we present here a fast, clean and straightforward method to obtain drought-stressed root tissues and a large enriched collection of transcripts expressed by soybean plants under water deficit that can be useful for further studies towards the understanding of plant responses to stress.

  14. The humanistic burden of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero, Teresa; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease marked by spontaneous, recurrent attacks of swelling. The broad range of consequences of HAE on patients? lives is not well understood. The study objective was to comprehensively characterize the burden of illness......, traveling, and passing HAE to their children. Based on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, 38 and 14% had clinically meaningful anxiety and depression, respectively. Despite standard of care, HAE patients still have frequent and painful attacks. Patients experience substantial impairment...

  15. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...... mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions...

  16. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN)/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH) - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada. PMID:20667123

  17. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  18. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telengiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentina, Scarano; Daniele, De Santis; Patrizia, Suppressa; Patrizia, Lastella; Mariano, Lenato Gennaro; Vincenzo, Triggiani; Carlo, Sabbà

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was referred to our clinic for the rehabilitation of right hemiparesis caused by ischaemic stroke. Hypertension, postphlebitic syndrome of lower limbs, frequent nose bleeding, and anemia were present in his history; in his adolescence, he was treated for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Further investigations have revealed also microsomia, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of Kallmann syndrome, that is, an association, possible in males and females, of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with olfactory deficits. A definite diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was made based on clinical criteria and confirmed by genetic analysis. PMID:23710379

  19. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  20. Hereditary thrombophilia and recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Nielsen, H S; Hviid, T V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association among hereditary thrombophilia, recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and obstetric complications is yet uncertain. The objective of the study was to assess the prognostic value of the factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PT) mutations for the subsequent chance of live birth...... for women with RPL. METHODS: Pregnancy outcome was recorded in a retrospective cohort of 363 women with a minimum of three consecutive pregnancy losses (early miscarriage, late miscarriage or stillbirth/neonatal death) who were not treated with anticoagulation therapy. RESULTS: Of the 363 women, 29 were FVL...

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis and the Expression of Disease-Resistant Genes in Oryza meyeriana under Native Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana (O. meyeriana, with a GG genome type (2n = 24, accumulated plentiful excellent characteristics with respect to resistance to many diseases such as rice shade and blast, even immunity to bacterial blight. It is very important to know if the diseases-resistant genes exist and express in this wild rice under native conditions. However, limited genomic or transcriptomic data of O. meyeriana are currently available. In this study, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the O. meyeriana transcriptome using RNA-seq and obtained 185,323 contigs with an average length of 1,692 bp and an N50 of 2,391 bp. Through differential expression analysis, it was found that there were most tissue-specifically expressed genes in roots, and next to stems and leaves. By similarity search against protein databases, 146,450 had at least a significant alignment to existed gene models. Comparison with the Oryza sativa (japonica-type Nipponbare and indica-type 93-11 genomes revealed that 13% of the O. meyeriana contigs had not been detected in O. sativa. Many diseases-resistant genes, such as bacterial blight resistant, blast resistant, rust resistant, fusarium resistant, cyst nematode resistant and downy mildew gene, were mined from the transcriptomic database. There are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes (Xa1 and Xa26 differentially or specifically expressed in O. meyeriana. The 4 Xa1 contigs were all only expressed in root, while three of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression level in leaves, two of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression profile in stems and one of Xa26 contigs was expressed dominantly in roots. The transcriptomic database of O. meyeriana has been constructed and many diseases-resistant genes were found to express under native condition, which provides a foundation for future discovery of a number of novel genes and provides a basis for studying the molecular mechanisms associated with disease

  2. Knowledge regarding basic concepts of hereditary cancers, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In families with hereditary cancer, at-risk individuals can benefit from genetic counselling and testing. General practitioners (GPs) are ideally placed to identify such families and refer them appropriately. Objective. To assess the practices, knowledge and attitudes of GPs regarding common hereditary cancers.

  3. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R.M. Lammens (Chantal); E.M.A. Bleiker (Eveline); N.K. Aaronson (Neil); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); M. Jansweijer (Maaike); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); A. Wagner (Anja); R.H. Sijmons (Rolf); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); L. Spruijt (Liesbeth); S. Verhoef (Senno); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.W.G. Ruijs (Marielle)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer

  4. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for qPCR in kidney and hypothalamus of rats under testosterone influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Khadijeh; Loh, Su Yi; Salleh, Naguib; Lam, Sau Kuen; Hoe, See Ziau

    2017-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is the most reliable and accurate technique for analyses of gene expression. Endogenous reference genes are being used to normalize qPCR data even though their expression may vary under different conditions and in different tissues. Nonetheless, verification of expression of reference genes in selected studied tissue is essential in order to accurately assess the level of expression of target genes of interest. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to examine six commonly used reference genes in order to identify the gene being expressed most constantly under the influence of testosterone in the kidneys and hypothalamus. The reference genes include glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin beta (ACTB), beta-2 microglobulin (B2m), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT), peptidylprolylisomerase A (Ppia) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (Hmbs). The cycle threshold (Ct) value for each gene was determined and data obtained were analyzed using the software programs NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper, and rank aggregation. Results showed that Hmbs and Ppia genes were the most stably expressed in the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, in kidneys, Hmbs and GAPDH appeared to be the most constant genes. In conclusion, variations in expression levels of reference genes occur in kidneys and hypothalamus under similar conditions; thus, it is important to verify reference gene levels in these tissues prior to commencing any studies.

  5. A newly distal hereditary motor neuropathy caused by a rare AIFM1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Paula; Sánchez-Monteagudo, Ana; Collado, Antonio; Marco-Marín, Clara; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Camacho, Ana; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen; Lupo, Vincenzo

    2017-12-01

    In two siblings, who suffer from an early childhood-onset axonal polyneuropathy with exclusive involvement of motor fibers, the c.629T>C (p.F210S) mutation was identified in the X-linked AIFM1 gene, which encodes for the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). The mutation was predicted as deleterious, according to in silico analysis. A decreased expression of the AIF protein, altered cellular morphology, and a fragmented mitochondrial network were observed in the proband's fibroblasts. This new form of motor neuropathy expands the phenotypic spectrum of AIFM1 mutations and therefore, the AIFM1 gene should be considered in the diagnosis of hereditary motor neuropathies.

  6. Differential gene expression in Giardia lamblia under oxidative stress: significance in eukaryotic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Esha; Mukherjee, Avik K; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2014-02-10

    Giardia lamblia is a unicellular, early branching eukaryote causing giardiasis, one of the most common human enteric diseases. Giardia, a microaerophilic protozoan parasite has to build up mechanisms to protect themselves against oxidative stress within the human gut (oxygen concentration 60 μM) to establish its pathogenesis. G. lamblia is devoid of the conventional mechanisms of the oxidative stress management system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, and glutathione cycling, which are present in most eukaryotes. NADH oxidase is a major component of the electron transport chain of G. lamblia, which in concurrence with disulfide reductase, protects oxygen-labile proteins such as pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase against oxidative stress by sustaining a reduced intracellular environment. It also contains the arginine dihydrolase pathway, which occurs in a number of anaerobic prokaryotes, includes substrate level phosphorylation and adequately active to make a major contribution to ATP production. To study differential gene expression under three types of oxidative stress, a Giardia genomic DNA array was constructed and hybridized with labeled cDNA of cells with or without stress. The transcriptomic data has been analyzed and further validated using real time PCR. We identified that out of 9216 genes represented on the array, more than 200 genes encoded proteins with functions in metabolism, oxidative stress management, signaling, reproduction and cell division, programmed cell death and cytoskeleton. We recognized genes modulated by at least ≥ 2 fold at a significant time point in response to oxidative stress. The study has highlighted the genes that are differentially expressed during the three experimental conditions which regulate the stress management pathway differently to achieve redox homeostasis. Identification of some unique genes in oxidative stress regulation may help in new drug designing for this common enteric parasite prone to

  7. [Study on gene expression of Tamarix under NaHCO3 stress using SSH technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Gui-Feng; Jiang, Jing

    2004-09-01

    The gene expression of Tamarix androssowii under NaHCO3 stresses is studied by using SSH technique, in which the cDNA from the materials treated with NaHCO3 solution is as tester and the cDNA from the materials in normal growth is as driver. Total 36 genes related to NaHCO3 stress were obtained through Northern hybridization. Blastx analysis showed that the proteins encoded by these genes were homologous to the following proteins: the antioxidant enzymes catalase and peroxiredoxin; trehalose phosphatase, which was related to trehalose synthesis; a few regulation proteins such as bZIP transcription factor, MADS-box protein, glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins, CCCH-type zinc finger protein and F-box protein etc; early light-induced protein, which could protect and/or repair the photosynthetic apparatus damage induced by stress; cysteine proteinase and vacuolar processing enzyme that can make function in plant cell death, and lipid transfer protein precursor, polyubiquitin, chalcone synthase, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, salt-induced S12 protein, and oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1 etc. Among 36 genes obtained, the proteins encoded three genes were homologous to 3 putative proteins: HAK2, calcium-binding protein and RNA-binding protein, respectively. In addition, 6 new salt stress response squences were found. The result indicated that the salt-tolerant mechanism of Tamarix androssowii may be a complicated, interactive system involving multiple approaches and multiple genes, but not only a single salt gland-depended approach.

  8. Copy Number Variation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry N. Hannan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the commonest form of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC predisposition and by definition describes families which conform to the Amsterdam Criteria or reiterations thereof. In ~50% of patients adhering to the Amsterdam criteria germline variants are identified in one of four DNA Mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Loss of function of any one of these genes results in a failure to repair DNA errors occurring during replication which can be most easily observed as DNA microsatellite instability (MSI—a hallmark feature of this disease. The remaining 50% of patients without a genetic diagnosis of disease may harbour more cryptic changes within or adjacent to MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 or elsewhere in the genome. We used a high density cytogenetic array to screen for deletions or duplications in a series of patients, all of whom adhered to the Amsterdam/Bethesda criteria, to determine if genomic re-arrangements could account for a proportion of patients that had been shown not to harbour causative mutations as assessed by standard diagnostic techniques. The study has revealed some associations between copy number variants (CNVs and HNPCC mutation negative cases and further highlights difficulties associated with CNV analysis.

  9. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

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    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  10. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  11. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  13. Validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in preharvest and postharvest longan fruits under different experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyang eWu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR, a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression, relies on stable reference gene(s for data normalization. Although a few studies have been conducted on reference gene validation in fruit trees, none have been done on preharvest and postharvest longan fruits. In this study, 12 candidate reference genes, namely, CYP, RPL, GAPDH, TUA, TUB, Fe-SOD, Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, 18SrRNA, Actin, Histone H3 and EF-1a, were selected. Expression stability of these genes in 150 longan samples was evaluated and analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Preharvest samples consisted of seven experimental sets, including different developmental stages, organs, hormone stimuli (NAA, 2,4-D and ethephon and abiotic stresses (bagging and girdling with defoliation. Postharvest samples consisted of different temperature treatments (4 and 22 °C and varieties. Our findings indicate that appropriate reference gene(s should be picked for each experimental condition. Our data further showed that the commonly used reference gene Actin does not exhibit stable expression across experimental conditions in longan. Expression levels of the DlACO gene, which is a key gene involved in regulating fruit abscission under girdling with defoliation treatment, was evaluated to validate our findings. In conclusion, our data provide a useful framework for choice of suitable reference genes across different experimental conditions for RT-qPCR analysis of preharvest and postharvest longan fruits.

  14. Expression of fatty acid synthesis genes and fatty acid accumulation in haematococcus pluvialis under different stressors

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    Lei Anping

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofuel has been the focus of intensive global research over the past few years. The development of 4th generation biofuel production (algae-to-biofuels based on metabolic engineering of algae is still in its infancy, one of the main barriers is our lacking of understanding of microalgal growth, metabolism and biofuel production. Although fatty acid (FA biosynthesis pathway genes have been all cloned and biosynthesis pathway was built up in some higher plants, the molecular mechanism for its regulation in microalgae is far away from elucidation. Results We cloned main key genes for FA biosynthesis in Haematococcus pluvialis, a green microalga as a potential biodiesel feedstock, and investigated the correlations between their expression alternation and FA composition and content detected by GC-MS under different stress treatments, such as nitrogen depletion, salinity, high or low temperature. Our results showed that high temperature, high salinity, and nitrogen depletion treatments played significant roles in promoting microalgal FA synthesis, while FA qualities were not changed much. Correlation analysis showed that acyl carrier protein (ACP, 3-ketoacyl-ACP-synthase (KAS, and acyl-ACP thioesterase (FATA gene expression had significant correlations with monounsaturated FA (MUFA synthesis and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA synthesis. Conclusions We proposed that ACP, KAS, and FATA in H. pluvialis may play an important role in FA synthesis and may be rate limiting genes, which probably could be modified for the further study of metabolic engineering to improve microalgal biofuel quality and production.

  15. Identification and expression profiling of Oryza sativa nucleotidyl transferase protein (NTP) genes under various stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiqi; Song, Jianbo; Yue, Luming; Mo, Xiaowei; Song, Jun; Mo, Beixin

    2017-09-10

    Nucleotidyl transferase proteins (NTPs) modify the 3' ends of mature small RNAs, leading to their stabilization or degradation. The first two plant NTPs, HESO1 and URT1, were identified in Arabidopsis. These two NTPs act cooperatively to uridylate the 3' terminal nucleotide of specific miRNAs, leading to their degradation and thereby affecting the expression of genes regulated by these miRNAs. Little is known about NTPs in other plants. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 13 putative NTP genes in Oryza sativa, a major crop in global food production. Phylogenetic analysis showed homology among the NTPs from diverse plant species. Analysis of cis-acting promoter elements at OsNTP loci identified several stress response elements, indicating the potential involvement of NTPs in plant stress responses. The promoter analysis results were validated by expression of the OsNTP genes under abiotic stress treatments, with some OsNTPs clearly induced by salt, drought or cold stress. Moreover, the RT-PCR data showed that the OsNTP genes were differentially expressed in different developmental stages and tissues. These findings suggest that NTPs, which are involved in small RNA metabolic pathways, might play roles in plant stress resistance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Studies of Neuronal Gene Regulation Controlling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Neural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of the development and function of the nervous system is not preprogramed but responds to environmental stimuli to change neural development and function flexibly. This neural plasticity is a characteristic property of the nervous system. For example, strong synaptic activation evoked by environmental stimuli leads to changes in synaptic functions (known as synaptic plasticity). Long-lasting synaptic plasticity is one of the molecular mechanisms underlying long-term learning and memory. Since discovering the role of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein in learning and memory, it has been widely accepted that gene regulation in neurons contributes to long-lasting changes in neural functions. However, it remains unclear how synaptic activation is converted into gene regulation that results in long-lasting neural functions like long-term memory. We continue to address this question. This review introduces our recent findings on the gene regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and discusses how regulation of the gene participates in long-lasting changes in neural functions.

  17. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (Penterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in gene expression and catalase activity in Oryza sativa L. under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vighi, I L; Benitez, L C; do Amaral, M N; Auler, P A; Moraes, G P; Rodrigues, G S; da Maia, L C; Pinto, L S; Braga, E J B

    2016-11-03

    Different rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes were subjected to high salinity and low temperature (150 mM NaCl and 13°C, respectively) for 0, 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. We evaluated the simultaneous expression of the genes OsCATA, OsCATB, and OsCATC, correlated gene expression with enzyme activity, and verified the regulation of these genes through identification of cis-elements in the promoter region. The hydrogen peroxide content increased in a tolerant genotype and decreased in a sensitive genotype under both stress conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the tolerant genotype when exposed to cold, and in the sensitive genotype when exposed to high salinity. Catalase activity significantly increased in both genotypes when subjected to 13°C. In the tolerant genotype, OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to high salinity and cold, while in the sensitive genotype, OsCATA and OsCATC responded positively to saline stress, as did OsCATA and OsCATB to low temperature. Cis-element analysis identified different regulatory sequences in the catalase promoter region of each genotype. The sensitive genotype maintained a better balance between hydrogen oxyacid levels, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation under low temperature than the resistant genotype. OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive in the salt-tolerant genotype to cold, OsCATA and OsCATC were the most responsive to saline stress, and OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to chilling stress in the sensitive genotype. There were positive correlations between catalase activity and OsCATB expression in the tolerant genotype under saline stress and in the sensitive genotype under cold stress.

  19. [Expression of ZmPIP1 subgroup genes in maize roots under water shortage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, An-Hui; Zhang, Sui-Qi; Deng, Xi-Ping; Shan, Lun; Liu, Xiao-Fang

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the role of ZmPIP1-1 and ZmPIP1-2 in water uptake of roots and drought resistance of crops, semi-quantitative PCR was used to examine the expression of ZmPIP1-1 and ZmPIP1-2 in root systems of different maize genotypes under water deficit. These genotypes showed different resistance to water shortage under field conditions. The reference gene to target genes was tubulin. Maize seedlings were grown by hydroponics in a growth chamber. Water deficit was imposed on the seedlings with PEG-6000. The result showed that ZmPIP1-1 was up-regulated under water deficit in root systems of plants of the filial generation 'Hudan 4' and the mother line 'Tiansi', which were resistant to water shortage, but there was no noticeable up-regulation of ZmPIP1-1 in the root systems of the father line '803', which was sensitive to water deprivation. The result also showed that the extent of up-regulation was positively correlated with drought resistance of maize (Fig.3). On the other hand, the expression of ZmPIP1-1 showed different degrees of tendency after different duration of water stress in the root systems of the maize seedlings of different genotypes. The result showed that ZmPIP1-2 was identically expressed in three different species of maize and under different water conditions. The results support the theory that the intercellular water transport contributes to increased water uptake in root systems under water deficit by up-regulating the number of some kinds of aquaporins. The increases amount of transcripts of aquaporins is positively correlated to drought resistance of plant varieties. But not all kinds of number of aquaporins is up-regulated during water shortage, some kinds of aquaporins are identically expressed under water deficit conditions and well watered conditions.

  20. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for normalization of quantitative RT-PCR in soybean tissues under various abiotic stress conditions.

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    Dung Tien Le

    Full Text Available Quantitative RT-PCR can be a very sensitive and powerful technique for measuring differential gene expression. Changes in gene expression induced by abiotic stresses are complex and multifaceted, which make determining stably expressed genes for data normalization difficult. To identify the most suitable reference genes for abiotic stress studies in soybean, 13 candidate genes collected from literature were evaluated for stability of expression under dehydration, high salinity, cold and ABA (abscisic acid treatments using delta CT and geNorm approaches. Validation of reference genes indicated that the best reference genes are tissue- and stress-dependent. With respect to dehydration treatment, the Fbox/ABC, Fbox/60s gene pairs were found to have the highest expression stability in the root and shoot tissues of soybean seedlings, respectively. Fbox and 60s genes are the most suitable reference genes across dehydrated root and shoot tissues. Under salt stress the ELF1b/IDE and Fbox/ELF1b are the most stably expressed gene pairs in roots and shoots, respectively, while 60s/Fbox is the best gene pair in both tissues. For studying cold stress in roots or shoots, IDE/60s and Fbox/Act27 are good reference gene pairs, respectively. With regard to gene expression analysis under ABA treatment in either roots, shoots or across these tissues, 60s/ELF1b, ELF1b/Fbox and 60s/ELF1b are the most suitable reference genes, respectively. The expression of ELF1b/60s, 60s/Fbox and 60s/Fbox genes was most stable in roots, shoots and both tissues, respectively, under various stresses studied. Among the genes tested, 60s was found to be the best reference gene in different tissues and under various stress conditions. The highly ranked reference genes identified from this study were proved to be capable of detecting subtle differences in expression rates that otherwise would be missed if a less stable reference gene was used.

  1. Aqueous humor ferritin in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzhofer, Markus; Schroedl, Falk; Trost, Andrea; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Wiedemann, Helmut; Strohmaier, Clemens; Hohensinn, Melchior; Strasser, Michael; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Grabner, Guenther; Aigner, Elmar; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disease, characterized by hyperferritinemia but with absence of body iron excess and early onset of bilateral cataracts. Although 5- to 20-fold increased serum ferritin concentrations have been reported in HHCS patients, data of ferritin levels in aqueous humor have not been obtained. We therefore aimed to investigate the ferritin levels in aqueous humor and serum and further present histological and ultrastructural data of the lens. During cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation, aqueous humor and lens aspirate of a 37-year-old HHCS patient were obtained from both eyes. Ferritin levels in serum and aqueous humor were quantitatively analyzed via immunoassays in the HHCS patient and healthy control subjects (n = 6). Lens aspirate in HHCS was analyzed histologically and at the ultrastructural level. Further, genetic mutation screening by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing in blood was performed. Serum ferritin levels in the control group were 142.2 ± 38.7 μg/L, whereas in the HHCS patient, this parameter was excessively increased (1086 μg/L). Analysis of ferritin in aqueous humor revealed 6.4 ± 3.8 μg/L in normal control subjects and 146.3 μg/L (OD) and 160.4 μg/L (OS) in the HHCS patient. DNA analysis detected a C>A mutation on position +18, a T>G mutation on position +22, a T>C mutation on position +24, and a T>G polymorphism on position +26 in the iron-responsive element of the light-chain ferritin (L-ferritin) gene. In the HHCS patient, a 23-fold (OD) to 25-fold (OS) increased aqueous humor ferritin level was detected. Therefore, the formation of bilateral cataract in HHCS is most likely a result of elevated aqueous humor ferritin. In addition, a novel mutation in this rare disease in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin gene is reported.

  2. WSSV-responsive gene expression under the influence of PmVRP15 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummamunkong, Phawida; Jaree, Phattarunda; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2018-01-01

    The viral responsive protein 15 from black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmVRP15), is highly up-regulated and produced in the hemocytes of shrimp with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. To investigate the differential expression of genes from P. monodon hemocytes that are involved in WSSV infection under the influence of PmVRP15 expression, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) of PmVRP15-silenced shrimp infected with WSSV was performed. The 189 cDNA clones of the forward library were generated by subtracting the cDNAs from WSSV-infected and PmVRP15 knockdown shrimp with cDNAs from WSSV-infected and GFP knockdown shrimp. For the opposite subtraction, the 176 cDNA clones in the reverse library was an alternative set of genes in WSSV-infected shrimp hemocytes in the presence of PmVRP15 expression. The abundant genes in forward SSH library had a defense/homeostasis of 26%, energy/metabolism of 23% and in the reverse SSH library a hypothetical protein with unknown function was found (30%). The differential expressed immune-related genes from each library were selected for expression analysis using qRT-PCR. All selected genes from the forward library showed high up-regulation in the WSSV-challenged PmVRP15 knockdown group as expected. Interestingly, PmHHAP, a hemocyte homeostasis associated protein, and granulin-like protein, a conserved growth factor, are extremely up-regulated in the absence of PmVRP15 expression in WSSV-infected shrimp. Only transcript level of transglutaminase II, that functions in regulating hematopoietic tissue differentiation and inhibits mature hemocyte production in shrimp, was obviously down-regulated as observed from SSH results. Taken together, our results suggest that PmVRP15 might have a function relevant to hemocyte homeostasis during WSSV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exogenous wild type p53 gene affects radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line under hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhua; Wang Feng; Liu Yongping; Zhang Yaping; Ni Yan; Li Shirong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of exogenous wild type p53 (wtp53) gene on radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line under hypoxia. Methods: Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was transfected with adenovirus carrying recombinant exogenous wtp53. Four irradiation groups were studied: normal cell (Group A), wtp53 transfected cell (Group B), normal cell under hypoxia (Group C) and wtp53 transfected cell under hypoxia(Group D). Cells were irradiated with 9 MeV electron beams. Cellular survival fraction was analyzed. Multi-target single-hit model was used to plot the survival curve. D 0 , D q , oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) and other parameters were used to evaluate the effects of wtp53 gene on radiosensitivity of A549. The cell apoptotic rate of each group was examined by flow cytometry. Results: OER was 1.75 and 0.81 before and after wtp53 transfection. SER was 1.77 in oxic circumstance and 3.84 under hypoxia. The cell apoptotic rate of Group A and B was lower than Group C and D (F=7.92, P=0.048), with Group A lower than B and Group C lower than D (F=82.50, P=0.001). But Group B and D were similar(t=2.04, P=0.111). Conclusions: Hypoxia can increase the radiation resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. The wtp53 can promote apoptosis and improve tumor radiosensitivity, especially under hypoxia. (authors)

  4. Bioluminescence imaging of β cells and intrahepatic insulin gene activity under normal and pathological conditions.

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    Tokio Katsumata

    Full Text Available In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse. BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-lucVUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP, the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Identification of Genes under Positive Selection Reveals Differences in Evolutionary Adaptation between Brown-Algal Species

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    Linhong Teng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown algae are an important taxonomic group in coastal ecosystems. The model brown algal species Ectocarpus siliculosus and Saccharina japonica are closely related lineages. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, they vary greatly in morphology and physiology. To obtain further insights into the evolutionary forces driving divergence in brown algae, we analyzed 3,909 orthologs from both species to identify Genes Under Positive Selection (GUPS. About 12% of the orthologs in each species were considered to be under positive selection. Many GUPS are involved in membrane transport, regulation of homeostasis, and sexual reproduction in the small sporophyte of E. siliculosus, which is known to have a complex life cycle and to occupy a wide range of habitats. Genes involved in photosynthesis and cell division dominated the group of GUPS in the large kelp of S. japonica, which might explain why this alga has evolved the ability to grow very rapidly and to form some of the largest sporophytes. A significant number of molecular chaperones (e.g., heat-shock proteins involved in stress responses were identified to be under positive selection in both species, potentially indicating their important roles for macroalgae to cope with the relatively variable environment of coastal ecosystems. Moreover, analysis of previously published microarray data of E. siliculosus showed that many GUPS in E. siliculosus were responsive to stress conditions, such as oxidative and hyposaline stress, whereas our RNA-seq data of S. japonica showed that GUPS in this species were most highly expressed in large sporophytes, which supports the suggestion that selection largely acts on different sets of genes in both marcoalgal species, potentially reflecting their adaptation to different ecological niches.

  6. Analysis of essential gene dynamics under antibiotic stress in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rami, Fadi; Kong, Xiangzhen; Parikh, Hardik; Zhu, Bin; Stone, Victoria; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2018-02-01

    The paradoxical response of Streptococcus sanguinis to drugs prescribed for dental and clinical practices has complicated treatment guidelines and raised the need for further investigation. We conducted a high throughput study on concomitant transcriptome and proteome dynamics in a time course to assess S. sanguinis behaviour under a sub-inhibitory concentration of ampicillin. Temporal changes at the transcriptome and proteome level were monitored to cover essential genes and proteins over a physiological map of intricate pathways. Our findings revealed that translation was the functional category in S. sanguinis that was most enriched in essential proteins. Moreover, essential proteins in this category demonstrated the greatest conservation across 2774 bacterial proteomes, in comparison to other essential functional categories like cell wall biosynthesis and energy production. In comparison to non-essential proteins, essential proteins were less likely to contain 'degradation-prone' amino acids at their N-terminal position, suggesting a longer half-life. Despite the ampicillin-induced stress, the transcriptional up-regulation of amino acid-tRNA synthetases and proteomic elevation of amino acid biosynthesis enzymes favoured the enriched components of essential proteins revealing 'proteomic signatures' that can be used to bridge the genotype-phenotype gap of S. sanguinis under ampicillin stress. Furthermore, we identified a significant correlation between the levels of mRNA and protein for essential genes and detected essential protein-enriched pathways differentially regulated through a persistent stress response pattern at late time points. We propose that the current findings will help characterize a bacterial model to study the dynamics of essential genes and proteins under clinically relevant stress conditions.

  7. Expression stabilities of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR under different stress conditions in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Ma

    Full Text Available Due to its accuracy, sensitivity and high throughput, real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR has been widely used in analysing gene expression. The quality of data from such analyses is affected by the quality of reference genes used. Expression stabilities for nine candidate reference genes widely used in soybean were evaluated under different stresses in this study. Our results showed that EF1A and ACT11 were the best under salinity stress, TUB4, TUA5 and EF1A were the best under drought stress, ACT11 and UKN2 were the best under dark treatment, and EF1B and UKN2 were the best under virus infection. EF1B and UKN2 were the top two genes which can be reliably used in all of the stress conditions assessed.

  8. Advances in the diagnosis of hereditary kidney cancer: Initial results of a multigene panel test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Espenschied, Carin R; LaDuca, Holly; Bhagat, Ansh M; Suarez-Sarmiento, Alfredo; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Brierley, Karina L; Hofstatter, Erin W; Shuch, Brian

    2017-11-15

    Panel testing has been recently introduced to evaluate hereditary cancer; however, limited information is available regarding its use in kidney cancer. The authors retrospectively reviewed test results and clinical data from patients who underwent targeted multigene panel testing of up to 19 genes associated with hereditary kidney cancer from 2013 to 2016. The frequency of positive (mutation/variant likely pathogenic), inconclusive (variant of unknown significance), and negative results was evaluated. A logistic regression analysis evaluated predictive factors for a positive test. Patients (n = 1235) had a median age at diagnosis of 46 years, which was significantly younger than the US population of individuals with kidney cancer (P kidney cancer. Panel tests may be particularly useful for patients who lack distinguishing clinical characteristics of known hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. The current results support the use of early age of onset for genetic counseling and/or testing. Cancer 2017;123:4363-71. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Insights into the dynamics of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerpen, J A.; Wider, C; Broderick, D F.; Dickson, D W.; Brown, L A.; Wszolek, Z K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report a new American family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), including serial, presymptomatic and symptomatic, cranial MRIs from the proband. Methods: We report clinical and genealogic investigations of an HDLS family, sequential brain MRIs of the proband, and autopsy slides of brain tissue from the proband’s father. Results: We identified seven affected family members (five deceased). The mean age at symptomatic disease onset was 35 years (range: 20–57), and the mean disease duration was 16 years (range: 3–46). Five affected individuals initially manifested memory disturbance and behavioral changes, whereas two experienced a mood disorder as their presenting symptom. Our proband’s father had been diagnosed clinically with vascular dementia, but his brain autopsy was consistent with HDLS. The proband had a cranial MRI prior to symptom onset, with two subsequent MRIs performed during follow-up. These serial images reveal a progressive, confluent, frontal-predominant leukoencephalopathy with symmetric cortical atrophy. Conclusions: The proband of our newly identified hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) kindred had subtle evidence of an incipient leukoencephalopathy on a presymptomatic cranial MRI. Conceivably, MRI may facilitate identifying affected presymptomatic individuals within known HDLS kindreds, increasing the likelihood of isolating the causative genes. GLOSSARY DLS = diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; FLAIR = fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; HDLS = hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; LENAS = leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids; LFB = Luxol fast blue; NAL = neuroaxonal leukodystrophy; POLD = pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy. PMID:18794495

  10. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  11. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  12. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  13. [Hereditary ichthyosis: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Almendra, Nadia; Aranibar Duran, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary ichthyoses are a group of genetic disorders of cornification, which are characterised by hyperkeratosis and scaling. The new classification identifies 36 types of ichthyosis, which are subdivided according to their frequency, pattern of inheritance and extracutaneous involvement. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features, since genetic studies are not available in our setting. Treatment is symptomatic and management should be performed by a multidisciplinary team. In this article, the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of different types of ichthyosis are reviewed, taking into account the nomenclature and modifications presented in the new classification. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  15. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  16. Expression Changes in Metal-Resistance Genes in Microbacterium liquefaciens Under Nickel and Vanadium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierros-Romero, Grisel; Wrosek-Cabrera, José A; Gómez-Ramírez, Marlenne; Pless, Reynaldo C; Rivas-Castillo, A M; Rojas-Avelizapa, Norma G

    2017-07-01

    Microbacterium liquefaciens MNSH2-PHGII-2 is a nickel-vanadium-resistant bacterium isolated from mine tailings located in Guanajuato, Mexico. In PHGII liquid media, M. liquefaciens has the ability to remove 29.5 ppm of Ni and 168.3 ppm of V. The present study reports, for the first time in M. liquefaciens, the presence of the genes nccA (Ni-Co-Cd resistance), hant (high-affinity nickel transporter), smtA, a metal-binding protein gene, and VAN2 (V resistance), which showed an increased expression under exposure to 200 ppm of Ni and 200 ppm of V during the logarithmic growth phase of the microorganism in PHGII liquid media. Data about the expression profile of genes conferring metal resistance to M. liquefaciens can improve the knowledge of those mechanisms involved in the processes of Ni-V resistance and probably in Ni-V removal processes. Based on our data, we can suggest that M. liquefaciens has the potential to be used in the biological treatment of toxic wastes with high Ni and V content.

  17. Testing Transgenic Aspen Plants with bar Gene for Herbicide Resistance under Semi-natural Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V G; Faskhiev, V N; Kovalenko, N P; Shestibratov, K A; Miroshnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining herbicide resistant plants is an important task in the genetic engineering of forest trees. Transgenic European aspen plants (Populus tremula L.) expressing the bar gene for phosphinothricin resistance have been produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Successful genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR analysis for thirteen lines derived from two elite genotypes. In 2014-2015, six lines were evaluated for resistance to herbicide treatment under semi-natural conditions. All selected transgenic lines were resistant to the herbicide Basta at doses equivalent to 10 l/ha (twofold normal field dosage) whereas the control plants died at 2.5 l/ha. Foliar NH4-N concentrations in transgenic plants did not change after treatment. Extremely low temperatures in the third ten-day period of October 2014 revealed differences in freeze tolerance between the lines obtained from Pt of f2 aspen genotypes. Stable expression of the bar gene after overwintering outdoors was confirmed by RT-PCR. On the basis of the tests, four transgenic aspen lines were selected. The bar gene could be used for retransformation of transgenic forest trees expressing valuable traits, such as increased productivity.

  18. Hereditary colon Cancer: Recommendations for prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarroca, C.

    2004-01-01

    Prevention in individuals with hereditary risk of colon cancer, is subject to clinical and molecular facts because their behavior differs to sporadic cancer. Hereditary cancer diseases affecting the colon in particular linked to other locations or that are associated with pre-cancer (polyps, osteoma s, lentigines) phenotypic markers represent a dissimilar to those who present directly in colorectal cancer status or associated conditions. In the first, the presence of previous injury (phenotypes) allows us to identify, while the latter is essential to have other diagnostic pathway (genotypes) .The location of genomic alterations manages to delve into the problem and identify those who will develop disease. The perspective will be different in the general population and those who do not carry mutations in terms suggestions for prevention, both primary and secondary. Not always the mutation is detected and in these high-risk situations, the clinic is sovereign and agrees to keep all members of these events surveillance strict about not being able to characterize those who are carriers of alterations and our condition is different in the proposition of preventive attitudes: set from when control about which organs and often starts, suffer because of accelerated carcinogenesis. The presentation is focused on populations at increased risk of cancer colorectal, regarding the management of the suggestions for primary prevention, secondary prevention while analyzing the early diagnosis of the disease and the suggestion of treatment, compared to the general population management. Primary prevention, including chemo prevention are described. While in secondary prevention is emphasized to management time tracking, optimization diagnostics according to the pathology suspected, the most common therapeutic approaches and findings relating prophylactic surgery

  19. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  20. Hereditary Angioedema - Consequences of a New Treatment Paradigm in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Experiences from a Danish patient cohort with hereditary angioedema are reported with focus on home therapy and burden of illness. Eighty patients have been prospectively followed over 11 years, having experienced a total of 7,809 attacks over 469 patient years. More than half of the patients...... stopped long-term prophylaxis with danazol or tranexamic acid and changed treatment regimen to on-demand treatment with C1 inhibitor concentrate or icatibant. At least 10% of the attacks remained un-treated. More than half of the patients felt that hereditary angioedema had a significant psychological...... therapy has profoundly improved the lives of hereditary angioedema patients....

  1. Gene Expression Patterns Underlying the Reinstatement of Plasticity in the Adult Visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Tiraboschi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is highly sensitive to experience during early postnatal life, but this phase of heightened plasticity decreases with age. Recent studies have demonstrated that developmental-like plasticity can be reactivated in the visual cortex of adult animals through environmental or pharmacological manipulations. These findings provide a unique opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adult plasticity. Here we used the monocular deprivation paradigm to investigate large-scale gene expression patterns underlying the reinstatement of plasticity produced by fluoxetine in the adult rat visual cortex. We found changes, confirmed with RT-PCRs, in gene expression in different biological themes, such as chromatin structure remodelling, transcription factors, molecules involved in synaptic plasticity, extracellular matrix, and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Our findings reveal a key role for several molecules such as the metalloproteases Mmp2 and Mmp9 or the glycoprotein Reelin and open up new insights into the mechanisms underlying the reopening of the critical periods in the adult brain.

  2. Management of upper airway edema caused by hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a rare disorder with a genetic background involving mutations in the genes encoding C1-INH and of factor XII. Its etiology is unknown in a proportion of cases. Recurrent edema formation may involve the subcutis and the submucosa - the latter can produce obstruction in the upper airways and thereby lead to life-threatening asphyxia. This is the reason for the high, 30-to 50-per-cent mortality of undiagnosed or improperly managed cases. Airway obstruction can be prevented through early diagnosis, meaningful patient information, timely recognition of initial symptoms, state-of-the-art emergency therapy, and close monitoring of the patient. Prophylaxis can substantially mitigate the risk of upper airway edema and also improve the patients' quality of life. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any form of upper airway edema should be regarded as a potentially life-threatening condition. None of the currently available prophylactic modalities is capable of preventing UAE with absolute certainty.

  3. New mosaic tiles in childhood hereditary autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato

    2018-01-01

    The protean clinical phenotypes of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders (HAID) are caused by abnormal activation of innate immunity and consist of seemingly unprovoked inflammatory flares localized to multiple organs, such as the skin, joints, serosal membranes, gut, and central nervous system. Different mutations in genes implied in activation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1)-structured inflammasome, cytoskeletal signaling and apoptosis contribute to the pathogenesis of different HAID, which mostly start in childhood with self-limited flares unrelated to infectious agents, autoantibody production or autoreactive cells. Though IL-1 remains pivotal in many inflammasome-mediated diseases, other cytokinopathies involving IL-18, nuclear factorκ-B, interferons, and tumor necrosis factor have provided new horizons in the definition of HAID of children: the list of HAID has expanded as a consequence of a better understanding of their pathogenetic molecular mechanisms and also application of new genetic technologies. However, diagnosis of most HAID is clinical and focused on several evidence-based criteria sets: their discrimination remains challenging for unexperienced pediatricians as there are no universally accepted algorithms, and a still relevant number of patients may linger without any clarifying genetic analysis, whose interpretation combined with processing of treatment options should be discussed on a multidisciplinary basis. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The proteomic profile of hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Sela

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. The goal of this study was to unravel new clues on the biological pathways leading to HIBM by proteomic comparison. Muscle cultures and biopsies were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and the same biopsy extracts by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. Proteins that were differentially expressed in all HIBM specimens versus all controls in each analysis were identified by mass spectrometry. The muscle cultures 2-DE analysis yielded 41 such proteins, while the biopsies 2-DE analysis showed 26 differentially expressed proteins. Out of the 400 proteins identified in biopsies by iTRAQ, 41 showed altered expression. In spite of the different nature of specimens (muscle primary cultures versus muscle biopsies and of the different methods applied (2D gels versus iTRAQ the differentially expressed proteins identified in each of the three analyses where related mainly to the same pathways, ubiquitination, stress response and mitochondrial processes, but the most robust cluster (30% was assigned to cytoskeleton and sarcomere organization. Taken together, these findings indicate a possible novel function of GNE in the muscle filamentous apparatus that could be involved in the pathogenesis of HIBM.

  5. Differentially expressed genes under simulated deep-sea conditions in the psychrotolerant yeast Cryptococcus sp. NIOCCPY13

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, P.; Raghukumar, C.; Verma, A.K.; Meena, R.M.

    to assist in the survival of microorganisms under stress conditions. Interestingly, about 50 percent of the upregulated genes matched with hypothetical proteins at a percentage similarity of less than or equal to 96, suggesting their probability of being...

  6. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in the adult rat submandibular gland under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Nicholas; Cotroneo, Emanuele; Proctor, Gordon; Osailan, Samira; Paterson, Katherine L; Carpenter, Guy H

    2008-01-01

    Background Real-time PCR is a reliable tool with which to measure mRNA transcripts, and provides valuable information on gene expression profiles. Endogenous controls such as housekeeping genes are used to normalise mRNA levels between samples for sensitive comparisons of mRNA transcription. Selection of the most stable control gene(s) is therefore critical for the reliable interpretation of gene expression data. For the purpose of this study, 7 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in salivary submandibular glands under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states. Results The program NormFinder identified the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative states, and GAPDH in the atrophic state. For normalisation to multiple housekeeping genes, for each individual state, the optimal number of housekeeping genes as given by geNorm was: ACTB/UBC in the normal, ACTB/YWHAZ in the inflamed, ACTB/HPRT in the atrophic and ACTB/GAPDH in the regenerative state. The most stable housekeeping gene identified between states (compared to normal) was UBC. However, ACTB, identified as one of the most stably expressed genes within states, was found to be one of the most variable between states. Furthermore we demonstrated that normalising between states to ACTB, rather than UBC, introduced an approximately 3 fold magnitude of error. Conclusion Using NormFinder, our studies demonstrated the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative groups and GAPDH in the atrophic group. However, if normalising to multiple housekeeping genes, we recommend normalising to those identified by geNorm. For normalisation across the physiological states, we recommend the use of UBC. PMID:18637167

  7. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in the adult rat submandibular gland under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osailan Samira

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time PCR is a reliable tool with which to measure mRNA transcripts, and provides valuable information on gene expression profiles. Endogenous controls such as housekeeping genes are used to normalise mRNA levels between samples for sensitive comparisons of mRNA transcription. Selection of the most stable control gene(s is therefore critical for the reliable interpretation of gene expression data. For the purpose of this study, 7 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in salivary submandibular glands under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states. Results The program NormFinder identified the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative states, and GAPDH in the atrophic state. For normalisation to multiple housekeeping genes, for each individual state, the optimal number of housekeeping genes as given by geNorm was: ACTB/UBC in the normal, ACTB/YWHAZ in the inflamed, ACTB/HPRT in the atrophic and ACTB/GAPDH in the regenerative state. The most stable housekeeping gene identified between states (compared to normal was UBC. However, ACTB, identified as one of the most stably expressed genes within states, was found to be one of the most variable between states. Furthermore we demonstrated that normalising between states to ACTB, rather than UBC, introduced an approximately 3 fold magnitude of error. Conclusion Using NormFinder, our studies demonstrated the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative groups and GAPDH in the atrophic group. However, if normalising to multiple housekeeping genes, we recommend normalising to those identified by geNorm. For normalisation across the physiological states, we recommend the use of UBC.

  8. Evaluation of putative reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR normalization in Lilium regale during development and under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Normalization to reference genes is the most common method to avoid bias in real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has been widely used for quantification of gene expression. Despite several studies on gene expression, Lilium, and particularly L. regale, has not been fully investigated regarding the evaluation of reference genes suitable for normalization. In this study, nine putative reference genes, namely 18S rRNA, ACT, BHLH, CLA, CYP, EF1, GAPDH, SAND and TIP41, were analyzed for accurate quantitative PCR normalization at different developmental stages and under different stress conditions, including biotic (Botrytis elliptica), drought, salinity, cold and heat stress. All these genes showed a wide variation in their Cq (quantification Cycle) values, and their stabilities were calculated by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. In a combination of the results from the three algorithms, BHLH was superior to the other candidates when all the experimental treatments were analyzed together; CLA and EF1 were also recommended by two of the three algorithms. As for specific conditions, EF1 under various developmental stages, SAND under biotic stress, CYP/GAPDH under drought stress, and TIP41 under salinity stress were generally considered suitable. All the algorithms agreed on the stability of SAND and GAPDH under cold stress, while only CYP was selected under heat stress by all of them. Additionally, the selection of optimal reference genes under biotic stress was further verified by analyzing the expression level of LrLOX in leaves inoculated with B. elliptica. Our study would be beneficial for future studies on gene expression and molecular breeding of Lilium. PMID:27019788

  9. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Hereditary Connective-Tissue Diseases Accompanied by Frequent Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent bone fractures in infancy require the elimination of a large number (> 100 of genetic disorders. The modern diagnostic method of hereditary diseases characterized by debilitating course is a new generation sequencing. The article presents the results of molecular-genetic study conducted in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of connective tissue disorders. 10 (56% patients had mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen chains, leading to the development of osteogenesis imperfecta, 5 (28% — mutations in IV and V type collagen genes that are responsible for the development of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 3 (17% patients had mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 protein, deficiency of which is manifested by Marfan syndrome. However, the correlation between patient's phenotype and discovered mutations in the investigated gene is established not in all cases.

  10. A hybrid network-based method for the detection of disease-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Cai, Meng; Dai, Yang; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-02-01

    Detecting disease-related genes is crucial in disease diagnosis and drug design. The accepted view is that neighbors of a disease-causing gene in a molecular network tend to cause the same or similar diseases, and network-based methods have been recently developed to identify novel hereditary disease-genes in available biomedical networks. Despite the steady increase in the discovery of disease-associated genes, there is still a large fraction of disease genes that remains under the tip of the iceberg. In this paper we exploit the topological properties of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to detect disease-related genes. We compute, analyze, and compare the topological properties of disease genes with non-disease genes in PPI networks. We also design an improved random forest classifier based on these network topological features, and a cross-validation test confirms that our method performs better than previous similar studies.

  11. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 years of life, the initial symptoms of infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis appear. Early symptoms include exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) and recurrent muscle spasms in the legs. As the condition progresses, affected ...

  13. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Axelle; Mougel, Florence; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Harry, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (re)colonize houses-a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes. In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 3 odorant receptors (ORs), 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs), 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs), 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary) and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE) contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system. Chemosensory genes could be good candidates for genes that contribute to adaptation or plastic

  14. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelle Marchant

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (recolonize houses-a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes.In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs, 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 3 odorant receptors (ORs, 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs, 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs, 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system.Chemosensory genes could be good candidates for genes that contribute to adaptation or

  15. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Axelle; Mougel, Florence; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (re)colonize houses—a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes. Methodology/Principal Finding In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 3 odorant receptors (ORs), 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs), 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs), 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary) and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE) contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system. Conclusion/Significance Chemosensory genes could be good

  16. Post-transcriptional mending of gene sequences: looking under the hood of mitochondrial gene expression in diplonemids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, M.; Moreira, S.; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 12 (2016), s. 1204-1211 ISSN 1547-6286 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptic genes * gene fragmentation * trans-splicing * RNA editing * multipartite mtDNA * diplonemids Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.900, year: 2016

  17. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF GENES UNDER CONTROL OF THE MATING-TYPE GENES IN THE SECONDARY MYCELIUM OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ASGEIRSDOTTIR, SA; VANWETTER, MA; WESSELS, JGH

    The Schizophyllum commune SC3 gene, which encodes a hydrophobin that coats aerial hyphae, is expressed in both monokaryons and dikaryons. The dikaryons were formed by mating two monokaryons with different MATA and MATB genes, leading to activation of the MATA- and MATB-controlled pathways (MATA-on

  18. Identification of candidate reference genes in perennial ryegrass for quantitative RT-PCR under various abiotic stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkai Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR is an important technique for analyzing differences in gene expression due to its sensitivity, accuracy and specificity. However, the stability of the expression of reference genes is necessary to ensure accurate qRT-PCR assessment of expression in genes of interest. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. is important forage and turf grass species in temperate regions, but the expression stability of its reference genes under various stresses has not been well-studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were evaluated for use as controls in qRT-PCR to quantify gene expression in perennial ryegrass under drought, high salinity, heat, waterlogging, and ABA (abscisic acid treatments. Four approaches--Delta CT, geNorm, BestKeeper and Normfinder were used to determine the stability of expression in these reference genes. The results are consistent with the idea that the best reference genes depend on the stress treatment under investigation. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4 alpha (eIF4A, Transcription elongation factor 1 (TEF1 and Tat binding protein-1 (TBP-1 were the three most stably expressed genes under drought stress and were also the three best genes for studying salt stress. eIF4A, TBP-1, and Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2 were the most suitable reference genes to study heat stress, while eIF4A, TEF1, and E2 were the three best reference genes for studying the effects of ABA. Finally, Ubiquitin (UBQ, TEF1, and eIF4A were the three best reference genes for waterlogging treatments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results will be helpful in choosing the best reference genes for use in studies related to various abiotic stresses in perennial ryegrass. The stability of expression in these reference genes will enable better normalization and quantification of the transcript levels for studies of gene expression in such studies.

  19. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy due to a new ND1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldath, Patrick; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    We report a proband with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), in whom we have identified a novel homoplasmic m.3,395A>G mutation in the ND1 gene. The mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in codon 30 which previously has been associated with LHON and leads to a severe selective complex...... and is present in the early stage of the disease. Furthermore, evaluation of two unaffected mutation carriers disclosed asymptomatic borderline ganglion cell loss and thin pRNFL in one....

  20. Guidelines for complex genetic analysis of hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome in slovak population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konecny M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC has been performed in Slovakia in many different forms before the year 2000. Complex HBOC genetic analysis consists of many steps, including the initial genetic consultation, laboratory testing of genes associated with HBOC, interpretation and report of DNA analysis results, secondary explanatory genetic consultation and recommendation of clinical management for pathological mutation carriers. Many clinicians are participating on this workflow, such as clinical geneticists, laboratory diagnosticians as well as gynaecologists, oncologists or radio-diagnosticians. Currently, genetic testing is still technically and financially demanding and aimed only at selected families or patients who fulfil the defined clinical indication criteria.

  1. Morphologic and molecular characteristics of uterine leiomyomas in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cancer (HLRCC) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Ortega, Julian; Vocke, Cathy; Stratton, Pamela; Linehan, William Marston; Merino, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are predisposed to the development of multiple leiomyomas of the skin and uterus and aggressive forms of kidney cancer. Affected individuals harbor a germline heterozygous loss-of-function mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Uterine leiomyomas are present in up to 77% of women with this syndrome. Previous studies have shown that inactivation of the FH gene is unusual for nonsyndromic leiomyomas. Therefore, it might be possible to distinguish 2 genetic groups of smooth muscle tumors: the most common group of sporadic uterine leiomyomas without FH gene inactivation and the more unusual group of HLRCC leiomyomas in patients who harbor a germline mutation of FH, although the exact prevalence of hereditary HLRCC is unknown. We reviewed the clinical, morphologic, and genotypic features of uterine leiomyomas in 19 HLRCC patients with FH germline mutations. Patients with HLRCC syndrome were younger in age compared with those with regular leiomyomata. DNA was extracted by microdissection, and analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 1q43 was performed. Uterine leiomyomas in HLRCC have young age of onset and are multiple, with size ranging from 1 to 8 cm. Histopathologically, HLRCC leiomyomas frequently had increased cellularity, multinucleated cells, and atypia. All cases showed tumor nuclei with large orangeophilic nucleoli surrounded by a perinucleolar halo similar to the changes found in HLRCC. Occasional mitoses were found in 3 cases; however, the tumors did not fulfill the criteria for malignancy. Our study also showed that LOH at 1q43 was frequent in HLRCC leiomyomas (8/10 cases), similarly to what has been previously found in renal cell carcinomas from HLRCC patients. LOH is considered to be the second hit that inactivates the FH gene. We conclude that uterine leiomyomas associated with HLRCC syndrome have characteristic morphologic

  2. Genome wide gene expression analysis of macrophages from ankylosing spondylitis patients under interferon-gamma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Ye, B; Wei, Q; Zhu, X D

    2013-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common and highly heritable arthropathy, but the pathogenesis of which is poorly understood, especially the mechanisms in genomics. Our work is aim to study the mechanisms of AS in genomics. we used microarray dataset GSE11886 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). According to our GSEA approach on the microarray datasets related to AS, we have identified the significantly associated pathways with this disease respectively dependent and independent to the factor of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). As a result, we have identified 9 most significant pathways in the comparison of AS patients to control under none treatment, including 5 up-regulated and 4 down-regulated pathways in IFN-gamma-independent study. On the contrary, 11 most significantly up-regulated pathways such as renin-angiotensin system, O-Glycan biosynthesis and gap junction in the comparison of AS patients to control under the treatment of IFN in IFN-gamma-dependent study. These may be helpful for understanding the mechanisms of AS regulation under interferon-gamma treatment in genome wide.

  3. Characteristic microglial features in patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Mari; Konno, Takuya; Tada, Masayoshi; Tezuka, Toshiyuki; Miura, Takeshi; Mezaki, Naomi; Okazaki, Ken-Ichi; Arakawa, Musashi; Itoh, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Toru; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Ishihara, Kenji; Horie, Masao; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Naito, Makoto; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the histopathological alterations of microglia in the brains of patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) caused by mutations of the gene encoding the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). We examined 5 autopsied brains and 1 biopsy specimen from a total of 6 patients with CSF-1R mutations. Detailed immunohistochemical, biochemical, and ultrastructural features of microglia were examined, and quantitative analyses were performed. In layers 3 to 4 of the frontal cortex in HDLS brains, microglia showed relatively uniform and delicate morphology, with thin and winding processes accompanying knotlike structures, and significantly smaller areas of Iba1 immunoreactivity and lower numbers of Iba1-positive cells were evident in comparison with control brains. On the other hand, in layers 5 to 6 and the underlying white matter, microglia were distributed unevenly; that is, in some areas they had accumulated densely, whereas in others they were scattered. Immunoblot analyses of microglia-associated proteins, including CD11b and DAP12, revealed that HDLS brains had significantly lower amounts of these proteins than diseased controls, although Ki-67-positive proliferative microglia were not reduced. Ultrastructurally, the microglial cytoplasm and processes in HDLS showed vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and disaggregated polyribosomes, indicating depression of protein synthesis. On the other hand, macrophages were immunonegative for GLUT-5 or P2ry12, indicating that they were derived from bone marrow. The pathogenesis of HDLS seems to be associated with microglial vulnerability and morphological alterations. Ann Neurol 2016;80:554-565. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bassam R; Ben-Rebeh, Imen; John, Anne; Akawi, Nadia A; Milhem, Reham M; Al-Shehhi, Nouf A; Al-Ameri, Mouza M; Al-Shamisi, Shamma A; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D) out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W) out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional residues are likely

  5. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Hereditary and Sporadic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricks-Santi, Luisel

    2006-01-01

    .... There is variable penetrance for breast cancer among women in families with known BRCA1 mutations, and we hypothesize that this might be due to genetic variants in wild-type BRCA1 or other DNA repair...

  6. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  7. Four novel mutations in the lactase gene (LCT underlying congenital lactase deficiency (CLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höglund Pia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD is a severe gastrointestinal disorder of newborns. The diagnosis is challenging and based on clinical symptoms and low lactase activity in intestinal biopsy specimens. The disease is enriched in Finland but is also present in other parts of the world. Mutations encoding the lactase (LCT gene have recently been shown to underlie CLD. The purpose of this study was to identify new mutations underlying CLD in patients with different ethnic origins, and to increase awareness of this disease so that the patients could be sought out and treated correctly. Methods Disaccharidase activities in intestinal biopsy specimens were assayed and the coding region of LCT was sequenced from five patients from Europe with clinical features compatible with CLD. In the analysis and prediction of mutations the following programs: ClustalW, Blosum62, PolyPhen, SIFT and Panther PSEC were used. Results Four novel mutations in the LCT gene were identified. A single nucleotide substitution leading to an amino acid change S688P in exon 7 and E1612X in exon 12 were present in a patient of Italian origin. Five base deletion V565fsX567 leading to a stop codon in exon 6 was found in one and a substitution R1587H in exon 12 from another Finnish patient. Both Finnish patients were heterozygous for the Finnish founder mutation Y1390X. The previously reported mutation G1363S was found in a homozygous state in two siblings of Turkish origin. Conclusion This is the first report of CLD mutations in patients living outside Finland. It seems that disease is more common than previously thought. All mutations in the LCT gene lead to a similar phenotype despite the location and/or type of mutation.

  8. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  9. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-05-17

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

  10. Genome-wide identification of genes required for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under ethanol stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorst, Frank; Houghton-Larsen, Jens; Jønson, Lars; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Brandt, Anders

    2006-04-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion collection was screened for impaired growth on glucose-based complex medium containing 6% ethanol. Forty-six mutants were found. Genes encoding proteins involved in vacuolar function, the cell integrity pathway, mitochondrial function, subunits of the co-chaperone complex GimC and components of the SAGA transcription factor complex were in this way found to be important for the growth of wild-type Saccharomyces yeast in the presence of ethanol. Several mutants were also sensitive to Calcofluor white (14 mutants), sorbic acid (9), increased temperature (5) and NaCl (3). The transcription factors Msn2p and Ars1p, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were translocated to the nucleus upon ethanol stress. Only one of the genes that contain STRE elements in the promoter was important under ethanol stress; this was TPS1, encoding trehalose 6-phosphate synthase. The map kinase of the cell integrity pathway, Slt2p, was phosphorylated when cells were treated with 6% ethanol. Two out of three mutants tested fermented 20% glucose more slowly than the wild-type. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The positioning logic and copy number control of genes in bacteria under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Austin, Robert; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Lau, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells when challenged with sublethal concentrations of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin cease to divide and form long filaments which contain multiple bacterial chromosomes. These filaments are individual mesoscopic environmental niches which provide protection for a community of chromosomes (as opposed to cells) under mutagenic stress and can provide an evolutionary fitness advantage within the niche. We use comparative genomic hybridization to show that the mesoscopic niche evolves within 20 minutes of ciprofloxacin exposure via replication of multiple copies of genes expressing ATP dependent transporters. We show that this rapid genomic amplification is done in a time efficient manner via placement of the genes encoding the pumps near the origin of replication on the bacterial chromosome. The de-amplification of multiple copies back to the wild type number is a function of the duration is a function of the ciprofloxacin exposure duration: the longer the exposure, the slower the removal of the multiple copies. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute

  12. Horizontal gene transfer promoted evolution of the ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang; Warneboldt, J.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions is an essential and unique trait of brewer's or baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae). To understand the evolution of facultative anaerobiosis we studied the dependence of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, more precisely the fourth enzymic...... activity catalysed by dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase), on the enzymes of the respiratory chain in several yeast species. While the majority of yeasts possess a mitochondrial DHODase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a cytoplasmatic enzyme, whose activity is independent of the presence of oxygen. From....... We show that these two S. kluyveri enzymes, and their coding genes, differ in their dependence on the presence of oxygen. Only the cytoplasmic DHODase promotes growth in the absence of oxygen. Apparently a Saccharomyces yeast progenitor which had a eukaryotic-like mitochondrial DHODase acquired...

  13. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-06-19

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential.

  14. Risk of iron overload in carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis: UK Food Standards Agency workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Ashwell, Margaret; Sanderson, Peter; Cade, Janet; Moreton, Jennifer; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Roe, Mark; Marx, Joannes J M; Worwood, Mark; Cook, James D

    2006-10-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened a group of expert scientists to review current research investigating diet and carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis. The workshop concluded that individuals who are heterozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene do not appear to respond abnormally to dietary Fe and therefore do not need to change their diet to prevent accumulation of body Fe.

  15. Modeling neurodevelopment and cortical dysfunction in SPG11-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Himanshu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Mutations in the Spastic Paraplegia Gene11 (SPG11), encoding spatacsin, cause the most frequent form of autosomal recessive HSP. SPG11 patients are clinically distinguishable from most other HSPs, by severe cortical atrophy and presence of a thin corpus callosum (TCC), associated with cognitive deficits. Partly due to l...

  16. Hereditary and non-hereditary microangiopathies in the young. An up-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, E Bernd; Kleffner, Ilka; Dittrich, Ralf; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Ritter, Martin A

    2010-12-15

    In recent years, a considerable number of new sporadic or hereditary small artery diseases of the brain have been detected which preferably occur in younger age, below 45 years. Cerebral microangiopathies constitute an appreciable portion of all strokes. In middle aged patients, hereditary cerebral small vessel diseases have to be separated from sporadic degenerative cerebral microangiopathy which is mainly due to a high vascular risk load. Features of the following disorders and details how to differentiate them, are reviewed here, namely CADASIL, MELAS, AD-RVLC, HEMID, CARASIL, PADMAL, FABRY, COL4A1-related cerebral small vessel diseases and a Portuguese type of autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease (SVDB). The symptomatic overlap of the cerebral microangiopathies include also other distinctive non-hereditary diseases like posterior (reversible) encephalopathy and Susac's syndrome which are also described. Some of the microangiopathies described here are not only seen in the young but also in the elderly. The precise diagnosis has direct therapeutic implications in several of these entities. Cerebral microangiopathies cause recurring strokes and diffuse white matter lesions leading to a broad spectrum of gait disturbances and in most of these disorders cognitive impairment or even vascular dementia in the long term. Often, they also involve the eye, the inner ear or the kidney. Several typical imaging findings from illustrative cases are presented. The order in which these diseases are presented here is not dictated by an inner logic principle, because a genetically or pathophysiologically based classification system of all these entities does not exist yet. Some entities are well established and not unusual, whereas others have only been described in a few cases in total. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemochromatosis C282Y gene mutation as a potential susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G.M. Mokhtar

    2017-08-12

    Aug 12, 2017 ... Beta-thalassemia major. Hereditary hemochromatosis. The C282Y mutation. Iron overload complications. Egyptian. a b s t r a c t. Background: Hereditary hemochromatosis is the most frequent cause of primary iron overload that is associated with HFE gene's mutation especially the C282Y mutation.

  18. Differential fate of erythromycin and beta-lactam resistance genes from swine lagoon waste under different aquatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Charles W.; Zhang, Wen; Sturm, Belinda S.M.; Graham, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The attenuation and fate of erythromycin-resistance-methylase (erm) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamse (bla) genes were quantified over time in aquatic systems by adding 20-L swine waste to 11,300-L outdoor mesocosms that simulated receiving water conditions below intensive agricultural operations. The units were prepared with two different light-exposure scenarios and included artificial substrates to assess gene movement into biofilms. Of eleven genes tested, only erm(B), erm(F), bla SHV and bla TEM were found in sufficient quantity for monitoring. The genes disappeared rapidly from the water column and first-order water-column disappearance coefficients were calculated. However, detected gene levels became elevated in the biofilms within 2 days, but then disappeared over time. Differences were observed between sunlight and dark treatments and among individual genes, suggesting that ecological and gene-specific factors play roles in the fate of these genes after release into the environment. Ultimately, this information will aid in generating better predictive models for gene fate. - The disappearance and fate of erythromycin-resistance-methylase and beta-lactamase genes were monitored in outdoor mesocosms under different light conditions.

  19. Differential fate of erythromycin and beta-lactam resistance genes from swine lagoon waste under different aquatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Charles W., E-mail: charles.knapp@strath.ac.u [David Livingstone Centre for Sustainability, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 50 Richmond Street, Glasgow, G1 1XN (United Kingdom); School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Zhang, Wen; Sturm, Belinda S.M. [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Graham, David W. [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The attenuation and fate of erythromycin-resistance-methylase (erm) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamse (bla) genes were quantified over time in aquatic systems by adding 20-L swine waste to 11,300-L outdoor mesocosms that simulated receiving water conditions below intensive agricultural operations. The units were prepared with two different light-exposure scenarios and included artificial substrates to assess gene movement into biofilms. Of eleven genes tested, only erm(B), erm(F), bla{sub SHV} and bla{sub TEM} were found in sufficient quantity for monitoring. The genes disappeared rapidly from the water column and first-order water-column disappearance coefficients were calculated. However, detected gene levels became elevated in the biofilms within 2 days, but then disappeared over time. Differences were observed between sunlight and dark treatments and among individual genes, suggesting that ecological and gene-specific factors play roles in the fate of these genes after release into the environment. Ultimately, this information will aid in generating better predictive models for gene fate. - The disappearance and fate of erythromycin-resistance-methylase and beta-lactamase genes were monitored in outdoor mesocosms under different light conditions.

  20. Gene expression profiles in Parkinson disease prefrontal cortex implicate FOXO1 and genes under its transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dumitriu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. While the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD mainly takes place in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN region, other brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, develop Lewy bodies, the neuropathological hallmark of PD. We generated and analyzed expression data from the prefrontal cortex Brodmann Area 9 (BA9 of 27 PD and 26 control samples using the 44K One-Color Agilent 60-mer Whole Human Genome Microarray. All samples were male, without significant Alzheimer disease pathology and with extensive pathological annotation available. 507 of the 39,122 analyzed expression probes were different between PD and control samples at false discovery rate (FDR of 5%. One of the genes with significantly increased expression in PD was the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1 transcription factor. Notably, genes carrying the FoxO1 binding site were significantly enriched in the FDR-significant group of genes (177 genes covered by 189 probes, suggesting a role for FoxO1 upstream of the observed expression changes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from a recent meta-analysis of PD genome-wide association studies (GWAS were successfully genotyped in 50 out of the 53 microarray brains, allowing a targeted expression-SNP (eSNP analysis for 52 SNPs associated with PD affection at genome-wide significance and the 189 probes from FoxO1 regulated genes. A significant association was observed between a SNP in the cyclin G associated kinase (GAK gene and a probe in the spermine oxidase (SMOX gene. Further examination of the FOXO1 region in a meta-analysis of six available GWAS showed two SNPs significantly associated with age at onset of PD. These results implicate FOXO1 as a PD-relevant gene and warrant further functional analyses of its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  1. The 3p21.1-p21.3 hereditary vascular retinopathy locus increases the risk for Raynaud's phenomenon and migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hottenga, J. J.; Vanmolkot, K. R. J.; Kors, E. E.; Kheradmand Kia, S.; de Jong, P. T. V. M.; Haan, J.; Terwindt, G. M.; Frants, R. R.; Ferrari, M. D.; van den Maagdenberg, A. M. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we described a large Dutch family with hereditary vascular retinopathy (HVR), Raynaud's phenomenon and migraine. A locus for HVR was mapped on chromosome 3p21.1-p21.3, but the gene has not yet been identified. The fact that all three disorders share a vascular aetiology prompted us to

  2. MSH6 mutations are frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families with normal pMSH6 expression as detected by immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Henrik; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen; Thorlasius-Ussing, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant condition accounting for 2% to 4% of all colorectal cancer cases worldwide. Families with germ line mutations in 1 of 6 mismatch repair genes are known as Lynch syndrome families. The largest number of mutations has been...

  3. Identification and validation of reference genes for quantification of target gene expression with quantitative real-time PCR for tall fescue under four abiotic stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Yang

    Full Text Available Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. is widely utilized as a major forage and turfgrass species in the temperate regions of the world and is a valuable plant material for studying molecular mechanisms of grass stress tolerance due to its superior drought and heat tolerance among cool-season species. Selection of suitable reference genes for quantification of target gene expression is important for the discovery of molecular mechanisms underlying improved growth traits and stress tolerance. The stability of nine potential reference genes (ACT, TUB, EF1a, GAPDH, SAND, CACS, F-box, PEPKR1 and TIP41 was evaluated using four programs, GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and RefFinder. The combinations of SAND and TUB or TIP41 and TUB were most stably expressed in salt-treated roots or leaves. The combinations of GAPDH with TIP41 or TUB were stable in roots and leaves under drought stress. TIP41 and PEPKR1 exhibited stable expression in cold-treated roots, and the combination of F-box, TIP41 and TUB was also stable in cold-treated leaves. CACS and TUB were the two most stable reference genes in heat-stressed roots. TIP41 combined with TUB and ACT was stably expressed in heat-stressed leaves. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assays of the target gene FaWRKY1 using the identified most stable reference genes confirmed the reliability of selected reference genes. The selection of suitable reference genes in tall fescue will allow for more accurate identification of stress-tolerance genes and molecular mechanisms conferring stress tolerance in this stress-tolerant species.

  4. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  5. Impairment of autophagy: From hereditary disorder to drug intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication

  6. Immunohistochemical, genetic and epigenetic profiles of hereditary and triple negative breast cancers. Relevance in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murria, Rosa; Palanca, Sarai; de Juan, Inmaculada; Alenda, Cristina; Egoavil, Cecilia; Seguí, Francisco J; García-Casado, Zaida; Juan, María J; Sánchez, Ana B; Segura, Ángel; Santaballa, Ana; Chirivella, Isabel; Llop, Marta; Pérez, Gema; Barragán, Eva; Salas, Dolores; Bolufer, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the profile of immunohistochemical (IHC) parameters, copy number aberrations (CNAs) and epigenetic alterations [promoter methylation (PM) and miR expression] related to hereditary (H) and triple negative (TN) breast cancer (BC). This profile could be of relevance for guiding tumor response to treatment with targeting therapy. The study comprises 278 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded BCs divided into two groups: H group, including 88 hereditary BC (HBC) and 190 non hereditary (NHBC), and TN group, containing 79 TNBC and 187 non TNBC (NTNBC). We assessed IHC parameters (Ki67, ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK18 and Cadherin-E), CNA of 20 BC related genes, and PM of 24 tumor suppressor genes employing MLPA/MS-MLPA (MRC Holland, Amsterdam). MiR-4417, miR-423-3p, miR-590-5p and miR-187-3p expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR (Applied Biosystems). Binary logistic regression was applied to select the parameters that better differentiate the HBC or TN groups. For HBC we found that, ER expression, ERBB2 CNA and PM in RASSF1 and TIMP3 were associated with NHBC whereas; MYC and AURKA CNA were linked to HBC. For TNBC, we found that CDC6 CNA, GSTP1 and RASSF1 PM and miR-423-3p hyperexpression were characteristic of NTNBC, while MYC aberrations, BRCA1 hypermethylation and miR-590-5p and miR-4417 hyperexpression were more indicative of TNBC. The selected markers allow establishing BC subtypes, which are characterized by showing similar etiopathogenetic mechanisms, some of them being molecular targets for known drugs or possible molecular targets. These results could be the basis to implement a personalized therapy.

  7. Identifying Regulatory Patterns at the 3'end Regions of Over-expressed and Under-expressed Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Othoum, Ghofran K

    2013-05-01

    Promoters, neighboring regulatory regions and those extending further upstream of the 5’end of genes, are considered one of the main components affecting the expression status of genes in a specific phenotype. More recently research by Chen et al. (2006, 2012) and Mapendano et al. (2010) demonstrated that the 3’end regulatory regions of genes also influence gene expression. However, the association between the regulatory regions surrounding 3’end of genes and their over- or under-expression status in a particular phenotype has not been systematically studied. The aim of this study is to ascertain if regulatory regions surrounding the 3’end of genes contain sufficient regulatory information to correlate genes with their expression status in a particular phenotype. Over- and under-expressed ovarian cancer (OC) genes were used as a model. Exploratory analysis of the 3’end regions were performed by transforming the annotated regions using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by clustering the transformed data thereby achieving a clear separation of genes with different expression status. Additionally, several classification algorithms such as Naïve Bayes, Random Forest and Support Vector Machine (SVM) were tested with different parameter settings to analyze the discriminatory capacity of the 3’end regions of genes related to their gene expression status. The best performance was achieved using the SVM classification model with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 98.4%, sensitivity of 99.5% and specificity of 92.5%. For gene expression status for newly available instances, based on information derived from the 3’end regions, an SVM predictive model was developed with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 67.0%, sensitivity of 73.2% and specificity of 61.0%. Moreover, building an SVM with polynomial kernel model to PCA transformed data yielded an accuracy of 83.1%, sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 74.8% using

  8. Genetic Testing for Wolfram Syndrome Mutations in a Sample of 71 Patients with Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Negative Genetic Test Results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; Schatz, Patrik

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the authors present a sample of 71 patients with hereditary optic neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON. All of these patients later underwent genetic testing to rule out WFS. As a result, 53 patients (74.7%) were negative and 18 patients (25.3%) were positive for some type of mutation or variation in the WFS gene. The authors believe that this study is interesting because it shows that a sizeable percentage (25.3%) of patients with hereditary optic 25 neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON had WFS mutations or variants.

  9. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  10. Regulatory role of tetR gene in a novel gene cluster of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 under oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is the causal agent of bacterial brown stripe disease in rice. In this study, we characterized a novel horizontal transfer of a gene cluster, including tetR, on the chromosome of A. avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 by genome-wide analysis. TetR acted as a repressor in this gene cluster and the oxidative stress resistance was enhanced in tetR-deletion mutant strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA demonstrated that TetR regulator bound directly to the promoter of this gene cluster. Consistently, the results of quantitative real-time PCR also showed alterations in expression of associated genes. Moreover, the proteins affected by TetR under oxidative stress were revealed by comparing proteomic profiles of wild-type and mutant strains via 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS analyses. Taken together, our results demonstrated that tetR gene in this novel gene cluster contributed to cell survival under oxidative stress, and TetR protein played an important regulatory role in growth kinetics, biofilm-forming capability, SOD and catalase activity, and oxide detoxicating ability.

  11. Regulatory role of tetR gene in a novel gene cluster of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Yang, Chun-Lan; Ge, Meng-Yu; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Li, Bin; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Chen, Gong-You; Zhu, Bo; Xie, Guan-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is the causal agent of bacterial brown stripe disease in rice. In this study, we characterized a novel horizontal transfer of a gene cluster, including tetR, on the chromosome of A. avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 by genome-wide analysis. TetR acted as a repressor in this gene cluster and the oxidative stress resistance was enhanced in tetR-deletion mutant strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that TetR regulator bound directly to the promoter of this gene cluster. Consistently, the results of quantitative real-time PCR also showed alterations in expression of associated genes. Moreover, the proteins affected by TetR under oxidative stress were revealed by comparing proteomic profiles of wild-type and mutant strains via 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS analyses. Taken together, our results demonstrated that tetR gene in this novel gene cluster contributed to cell survival under oxidative stress, and TetR protein played an important regulatory role in growth kinetics, biofilm-forming capability, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, and oxide detoxicating ability.

  12. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R. [Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Prevalence and impact of founder mutations in hereditary breast cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ashton-Prolla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary and are primarily caused by germline, high penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Although most cancer predisposition genes are considered molecularly heterogeneous, displaying hundreds of different disease-causing sequence alterations, founder mutations have been identified in certain populations. In some Latin American countries, founder mutations associated with increased risk of breast and other cancers have been described. This is particularly interesting considering that in most of these countries, populations are highly admixed with genetic contributions from native populations and from the influx of several distinct populations of immigrants. In this article, we present a review of the scientific literature on the subject and describe current data available on founder mutations described in the most common breast cancer predisposition genes: BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53.

  14. The effect of frizzle gene and dwarf gene on reproductive performance of broiler breeder dams under high and normal ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, A R; Horst, P; Simianer, H

    2010-11-01

    In 3 experimental runs, the influence of genotype × temperature interactions on the reproductive traits (sexual maturity, egg production, fertility, hatchability, and chick production) of hens of a broiler breeder dam line carrying major genes for dwarfism (dw-) and frizzle (F) was investigated. In experiments 1 and 2, the hens were caged individually under hot (30°C) and temperate (19°C) temperatures, from wk 18 to 72 of age, whereas in experiment 3, hens were kept under moderate temperature (24°C). Hens in experiment 1 were heterozygous for the frizzle gene, and those in experiments 2 and 3 were homozygous, both with and without the dwarf gene. Hens without the above-mentioned major genes (ffDw-) served as control lines. In experiment 1, the frizzle gene (Ff) had no significant effect on sexual maturity, egg production, fertility, hatchability, and chick number under the 2 environmental conditions. In experiment 2, there was a significant interaction between feathering genotype (FF) and environmental temperature for all traits except sexual maturity. Under heat stress, there was a distinct reduction in all reproductive traits except sexual maturity for normally feathered hens compared with frizzle-feathered hens, whereas under temperate conditions, egg production and number of chicks of the FF genotype were reduced and sexual maturity was delayed. In experiments 1 and 2, the dw- gene showed a depressive effect on the growth of hens. In experiment 1, the interaction between dwarf genotype and environmental temperature for egg production was significant. Under temperate conditions, the egg production of dwarf hens was inferior to that of normally sized birds, whereas under hot temperatures, the egg production of the 2 body sizes did not differ. In experiment 2, for sexual maturity, egg production and fertility locus × locus interactions could be determined. The genotype combining the 2 major genes (FFdw-) proved to be inferior to the normally feathered dwarf

  15. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide microarray for the detection of genomic rearrangements associated with common hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini-DiNardo, Debora; Judkins, Thaddeus; Woolstenhulme, Nick; Burton, Collin; Schoenberger, Jeremy; Ryder, Matthew; Murray, Adam; Gutin, Natalia; Theisen, Aaron; Holladay, Jayson; Craft, Jonathan; Arnell, Christopher; Moyes, Kelsey; Roa, Benjamin

    2014-09-11

    Conventional Sanger sequencing reliably detects the majority of genetic mutations associated with hereditary cancers, such as single-base changes and small insertions or deletions. However, detection of genomic rearrangements, such as large deletions and duplications, requires special technologies. Microarray analysis has been successfully used to detect large rearrangements (LRs) in genetic disorders. We designed and validated a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for the detection of gene-level genomic rearrangements associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), Lynch, and polyposis syndromes. The microarray consisted of probes corresponding to the exons and flanking introns of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (≈1,700) and Lynch syndrome/polyposis genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, APC, MUTYH, and EPCAM (≈2,200). We validated the microarray with 990 samples previously tested for LR status in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, APC, MUTYH, or EPCAM. Microarray results were 100% concordant with previous results in the validation studies. Subsequently, clinical microarray analysis was performed on samples from patients with a high likelihood of HBOC mutations (13,124), Lynch syndrome mutations (18,498), and polyposis syndrome mutations (2,739) to determine the proportion of LRs. Our results demonstrate that LRs constitute a substantial proportion of genetic mutations found in patients referred for hereditary cancer genetic testing. The use of microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for the detection of LRs is well-suited as an adjunct technology for both single syndrome (by Sanger sequencing analysis) and extended gene panel testing by next generation sequencing analysis. Genetic testing strategies using microarray analysis will help identify additional patients carrying LRs, who are predisposed to various hereditary cancers.

  16. Physiological responses and differential gene expression in Prunus rootstocks under iron deficiency conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, María José; Moreno, María Ángeles; Gogorcena, Yolanda

    2011-06-15

    Two Prunus rootstocks, the Myrobalan plum P 2175 and the interspecific peach-almond hybrid, Felinem, were studied to characterize their biochemical and molecular responses induced under iron-Deficient conditions. Plants of both genotypes were submitted to different treatments using a hydroponic system that permitted removal of Fe from the nutrient solution. Control plants were grown in 90 μM Fe (III)-EDTA, Deficient plants were grown in an iron free solution, and plants submitted to an Inductor treatment were resupplied with 180 μM Fe (III)-EDTA over 1 and 2 days after a period of 4 or 15 days of growth on an iron-free solution. Felinem increased the activity of the iron chelate reductase (FC-R) in the Inductor treatment after 4 days of iron deprivation. In contrast, P 2175 did not show any response after at least 15 days without iron. The induction of the FC-R activity in this genotype was coincident in time with the medium acidification. These results suggest two different mechanisms of iron chlorosis tolerance in both Strategy I genotypes. Felinem would use the iron reduction as the main mechanism to capture the iron from the soil, and in P 2175, the mechanism of response would be slower and start with the acidification of the medium synchronized with the gradual loss of chlorophyll in leaves. To better understand the control of these responses at the molecular level, the differential expression of PFRO2, PIRT1 and PAHA2 genes involved in the reductase activity, the iron transport in roots, and the proton release, respectively, were analyzed. The expression of these genes, estimated by quantitative real-time PCR, was different between genotypes and among treatments. The results were in agreement with the physiological responses observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteogenic gene expression of murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells under cyclic tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, C T; Chen, C C; Cheong, U-I; Liu, S L; Huang, T H

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can promote cell proliferation. The remodeling ability of the tension side of orthodontic teeth affects post-orthodontic stability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the osteogenic effects of LLLT on osteoblast-like cells treated with a simulated tension system that provides a mechanical tension regimen. Murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in a Flexcell strain unit with programmed loads of 12% elongation at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 24 and 48 h. The cultured cells were treated with a low-level diode laser using powers of 5 J and 10 J. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The expression of osteogenic genes (type I collagen (Col-1), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), bone morphologic protein (BMP-2), and bone morphologic protein (BMP-4)) in MC3T3-E1 cells was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The proliferation rate of tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells under 5 J and 10 J LLLT increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). Prominent mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells was visible using a von Kossa stain in the 5 J LLLT group. Osteogenic genes (Col-1, OC, OPG and BMP-2) were significantly expressed in the MC3T3-E1 cells treated with 5 J and 10 J LLLT (p < 0.05). LLLT in tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells showed synergistic osteogenic effects, including increases in cell proliferation and Col-1, OPN, OC, OPG and BMP-2 gene expression. LLLT might be beneficial for bone remodeling on the tension side of orthodontics. (paper)

  18. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of circadian clock genes under environmental stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Ju; Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-05-19

    The circadian clock enables living organisms to anticipate recurring daily and seasonal fluctuations in their growth habitats and synchronize their biology to the environmental cycle. The plant circadian clock consists of multiple transcription-translation feedback loops that are entrained by environmental signals, such as light and temperature. In recent years, alternative splicing emerges as an important molecular mechanism that modulates the clock function in plants. Several clock genes are known to undergo alternative splicing in response to changes in environmental conditions, suggesting that the clock function is intimately associated with environmental responses via the alternative splicing of the clock genes. However, the alternative splicing events of the clock genes have not been studied at the molecular level. We systematically examined whether major clock genes undergo alternative splicing under various environmental conditions in Arabidopsis. We also investigated the fates of the RNA splice variants of the clock genes. It was found that the clock genes, including EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL) that have not been studied in terms of alternative splicing, undergo extensive alternative splicing through diverse modes of splicing events, such as intron retention, exon skipping, and selection of alternative 5' splice site. Their alternative splicing patterns were differentially influenced by changes in photoperiod, temperature extremes, and salt stress. Notably, the RNA splice variants of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) and ELF3 were degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway, whereas those of other clock genes were insensitive to NMD. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that the major clock genes examined undergo extensive alternative splicing under various environmental conditions, suggesting that alternative splicing is a molecular scheme that underlies the linkage between the clock and environmental stress

  19. Quantitative gene expression of somatostatin receptors and noradrenaline transporter underlying scintigraphic results in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Mellon Mogensen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To measure, by a quantitative approach, the gene expression underlying the results of somatostatin receptor (sst) scintigraphy ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide) and noradrenaline transporter (NAT) scintigraphy ((123)I-MIBG) in patients with neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. METHODS: The gene expression of...... to achieve a better understanding of the link between them, which in turn could aid in planning and development of noninvasive molecular imaging of key molecular processes....

  20. Identification of Appropriate Reference Genes for Normalization of miRNA Expression in Grafted Watermelon Plants under Different Nutrient Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weifang; Deng, Qin; Shi, Pibiao; Yang, Jinghua; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a globally important crop belonging to the family Cucurbitaceae. The grafting technique is commonly used to improve its tolerance to stress, as well as to enhance its nutrient uptake and utilization. It is believed that miRNA is most likely involved in its nutrient-starvation response as a graft-transportable signal. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction is the preferred method for miRNA functional analysis, in which reliable reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy. The purpose of this study was to select appropriate reference genes in scion (watermelon) and rootstocks (squash and bottle gourd) of grafted watermelon plants under normal growth conditions and nutrient stresses (nitrogen and phosphorus starvation). Under nutrient starvation, geNorm identified miR167c and miR167f as two most stable genes in both watermelon leaves and squash roots. miR166b was recommended by both geNorm and NormFinder as the best reference in bottle gourd roots under nutrient limitation. Expression of a new Cucurbitaceae miRNA, miR85, was used to validate the reliability of candidate reference genes under nutrient starvation. Moreover, by comparing several target genes expression in qRT-PCR analysis with those in RNA-seq data, miR166b and miR167c were proved to be the most suitable reference genes to normalize miRNA expression under normal growth condition in scion and rootstock tissues, respectively. This study represents the first comprehensive survey of the stability of miRNA reference genes in Cucurbitaceae and provides valuable information for investigating more accurate miRNA expression involving grafted watermelon plants.

  1. Quantitative changes of main components of erythrocyte membranes which define architectonics of cells under pttg gene knockout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. P. Kanyuka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A pttg gene knockout affects the functional state of erythron in mice which could be associated with structural changes in the structure of erythrocyte membranes. The pttg gene knockout causes a significant modification of fatty acids composition of erythrocyte membrane lipids by reducing the content of palmitic acid and increasing of polyunsaturated fatty acids amount by 18%. Analyzing the erythrocyte surface architectonics of mice under pttg gene knockout, it was found that on the background of reduction of the functionally complete biconcave discs population one could observe an increase of the number of transformed cells at different degeneration stages. Researches have shown that in mice with a pttg gene knockout compared with a control group of animals cytoskeletal protein – β-spectrin was reduced by 17.03%. However, there is a reduction of membrane protein band 3 by 33.04%, simultaneously the content of anion transport protein band 4.5 increases by 35.2% and protein band 4.2 by 32.1%. The lectin blot analysis has helped to reveal changes in the structure of the carbohydrate determinants of ery­throcyte membrane glycoproteins under conditions of directed pttg gene inactivation, accompanied by changes in the type of communication, which joins the terminal residue in carbohydrate determinant of glycoproteins. Thus, a significant redistribution of protein and fatty acids contents in erythrocyte membranes that manifested in the increase of the deformed shape of red blood cells is observed under pttg gene knockout.

  2. Differential SPL gene expression patterns reveal candidate genes underlying flowering time and architectural differences in Mimulus and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Stacy A; Preston, Jill C

    2014-04-01

    Evolutionary transitions in growth habit and flowering time responses to variable environmental signals have occurred multiple times independently across angiosperms and have major impacts on plant fitness. Proteins in the SPL family of transcription factors collectively regulate flowering time genes that have been implicated in interspecific shifts in annuality/perenniality. However, their potential importance in the evolution of angiosperm growth habit has not been extensively investigated. Here we identify orthologs representative of the major SPL gene clades in annual Arabidopsis thaliana and Mimulus guttatus IM767, and perennial A. lyrata and M. guttatus PR, and characterize their expression. Spatio-temporal expression patterns are complex across both diverse tissues of the same taxa and comparable tissues of different taxa, consistent with genic sub- or neo-functionalization. However, our data are consistent with a general role for several SPL genes in the promotion of juvenile to adult phase change and/or flowering time in Mimulus and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, several candidate genes were identified for future study whose differential expression correlates with growth habit and architectural variation in annual versus perennial taxa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations in Slovene hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaković, Srdjan; Milatović, Maša; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Krajc, Mateja; Hočevar, Marko; Zgajnar, Janez; Vakselj, Aleš

    2012-11-01

    The estimated proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers among all breast and ovarian cancer cases is 5-10%. According to the literature, inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumour-suppressor genes, account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. The aim of this report is to present novel mutations that have not yet been described in the literature and pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations which have been detected in HBOC families for the first time in the last three years. In the period between January 2009 and December 2011, 559 individuals from 379 families affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Three novel mutations were detected: one in BRCA1 - c.1193C>A (p.Ser398*) and two in BRCA2 - c.5101C>T (p.Gln1701*) and c.5433_5436delGGAA (p.Glu1811Aspfs*3). These novel mutations are located in the exons 11 of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and encode truncated proteins. Two of them are nonsense while one is a frameshift mutation. Also, 11 previously known pathogenic mutations were detected for the first time in the HBOC families studied here (three in BRCA1 and eight in BRCA2). All, except one cause premature formation of stop codons leading to truncation of the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 proteins.

  4. Exome sequencing released a case of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mimicking recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zi-Xiong; Liao, Xin-Xin; Du, Juan; Luo, Ying-Ying; Hu, Zhao-Ting; Wang, Jun-Ling; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Dai, Mei-Zhi; Zhang, Peng; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha; Shen, Lu

    2013-07-01

    Genetic heterogeneity is common in many Mendelian disorders such as hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), which makes the genetic diagnosis more complicated. The goal of this study was to investigate a Chinese family with recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia, of which causative mutations could not be identified using the conventional PCR-based direct sequencing. Next-generation sequencing of all the transcripts of whole genome exome, after on-array hybrid capture, was performed on two affected male subjects (the proband and his brother). A missense mutation (c.1661G>A, p.R554H) was identified in ABCD1. Subsequently, PCR-based direct sequencing of other family members revealed that the mutation was co-segregating with the disease, indicating that ABCD1 mutation was the pathogenic event for this family. Very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) assay in the two affected cases confirmed X-ALD. Our study suggests exome sequencing can be used not only to find a novel causative gene, but also to quickly identify mutations of known genes when the clinical elements are etiologically misleading. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids with Phenotype of Primary Progressive MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrenbauer, Virginija; Gustavsen, Marte; Bedri, Sahl; Glaser, Anna; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Zetterberg, Henrik; Harbo, Hanne; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Wszolek, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is a devastating, hereditary white matter (WM) disorder with heterogenous neuropsychiatric features. We looked for CSF1R mutations in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) patients and report the clinical features of a family with a novel CSF1R mutation. METHODS We sequenced CSF1R exons 12-22 in a cohort of 220 PPMS patients from the Swedish and Norwegian national MS registries. RESULTS One patient had a novel mutation, c.2562T>A; p.Asn854Lys, in the CSF1R gene. Her symptoms started at the age of 29 years with insidious onset of pyramidal weakness in the left leg. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed four IgG bands. An MRI performed 4 years after symptom onset demonstrated patchy deep WM lesions. She was diagnosed as having PPMS and treated with intramuscular interferon beta 1a. Due to slow disease progression, the development of memory decline, and cerebellar signs, she was given subcutaneous interferon beta 1a without any benefit. The updated pedigree indicated that 5 siblings also had the CSF1R gene mutation; one was diagnosed with PPMS. Six more distant relatives also had a neurological disorder; four were clinically diagnosed with PPMS. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that a chronic course of HDLS may mimic PPMS. Genetic testing for CSF1R mutations in PPMS cases with a positive family history of neurological disorders may establish the diagnosis of HDLS. PMID:25311247

  6. The prevalence of depression in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahter, L; Braschinsky, M; Haldre, S; Gross-Paju, K

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of depression and sensitivity and specificity of the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' for people with hereditary spastic paraplegia in Estonia. Single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' was used as a screening question for depression; all participants then completed the Beck Depression Inventory. People with hereditary spastic paraplegia identified from the epidemiological database who agreed to participate in the study. Beck Depression Inventory, clinical interview. The epidemiological database consisted of 59 patients with clinically confirmed diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Forty-eight of these consented to participate in the study. The Beck Depression Inventory score was higher than cut-off point in 58% (28/48) and lower in 42% (20/48). Of the study group, 44% (21/48) had mild, 13% (6/48) moderate and one person revealed severe depression. There was a statistically significant correlation between Beck Depression Inventory score and level of mobility; no other significant correlations with other measures were detected. Of the participants, 54% (26/48) had subjective complaints about depression and answered 'Yes' to the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?'. The sensitivity of the one-item interview in the hereditary spastic paraplegia group was 75% and specificity 75%. Our results show that mild depression is prevalent among people with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Although the single question may be helpful, it cannot be relied upon entirely when assessing a person for depression.

  7. Emerging perspectives on hereditary glomerulopathies in canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littman MP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Meryl P LittmanDepartment of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Familial glomerulopathies have been described in more than two dozen dog breeds. These canine spontaneous cases of glomerular disease are good models for their human counterparts. The dogs present clinically with protein-losing nephropathy and variable signs of hypertension, thromboembolic events, edema/effusions/nephrotic syndrome, or eventually with signs of renal disease such as anorexia, vomiting, weight loss, and/or polyuria/polydipsia. Laboratory changes include proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, and eventually azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, anemia, and isosthenuria. Renal biopsies examined with transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and thin section light microscopy may show ultrastructural glomerular basement membrane abnormalities, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis, non-amyloid fibrillary deposition, or breed-associated predispositions for immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Genome-wide association studies and fine sequencing of candidate genes have led to the discovery of variant alleles associated with disease in some breeds; eg, 1 glomerular basement membrane ultrastructural abnormalities due to defective collagen type IV, caused by different premature stop codons in each of four breeds; ie, in COL4A5 in Samoyeds and Navasota mix breed dogs (X-linked, and in COL4A4 in English Cocker Spaniels and English Springer Spaniels (autosomal recessive; and 2 glomerulosclerosis-related podocytopathy with slit diaphragm protein anomalies of both nephrin and Neph3/filtrin due to non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in conserved regions of their encoding genes, NPHS1 and KIRREL2, in Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers and Airedale Terriers, with a complex mode of inheritance. Age at onset and progression to end-stage renal disease vary depending on the model. Genetic

  8. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwatkin, R.B.L. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  9. Differential gene expression in Pyropia columbina (Bangiales, Rhodophyta under natural hydration and desiccation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretto Contreras-Porcia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In rocky shores, desiccation is triggered by daily tide changes, and experimental evidence suggests that local distribution of algal species across the intertidal rocky zone is related to their capacity to tolerate desiccation. In this context, the permanence of Pyropia columbina in the high intertidal rocky zone is explained by its exceptional physiological tolerance to desiccation. This study explored the metabolic pathways involved in tolerance to desiccation in the Chilean P. columbina, by characterizing its transcriptome under contrasting conditions of hydration. We obtained 1,410 ESTs from two subtracted cDNA libraries in naturally hydrated and desiccated fronds. Results indicate that transcriptome from both libraries contain transcripts from diverse metabolic pathways related to tolerance. Among the transcripts differentially expressed, 15% appears involved in protein synthesis, processing and degradation, 14.4% are related to photosynthesis and chloroplast, 13.1% to respiration and mitochondrial function (NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase proteins, 10.6% to cell wall metabolism, and 7.5% are involved in antioxidant activity, chaperone and defense factors (catalase, thioredoxin, heat shock proteins, cytochrome P450. Both libraries highlight the presence of genes/proteins never described before in algae. This information provides the first molecular work regarding desiccation tolerance in P. columbina, and helps, to some extent, explaining the classical patterns of ecological distribution described for algae across the intertidal zone.

  10. Osteogenic gene expression of murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells under cyclic tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C. T.; Chen, C. C.; Cheong, U.-I.; Liu, S. L.; Huang, T. H.

    2014-08-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can promote cell proliferation. The remodeling ability of the tension side of orthodontic teeth affects post-orthodontic stability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the osteogenic effects of LLLT on osteoblast-like cells treated with a simulated tension system that provides a mechanical tension regimen. Murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in a Flexcell strain unit with programmed loads of 12% elongation at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 24 and 48 h. The cultured cells were treated with a low-level diode laser using powers of 5 J and 10 J. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The expression of osteogenic genes (type I collagen (Col-1), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), bone morphologic protein (BMP-2), and bone morphologic protein (BMP-4)) in MC3T3-E1 cells was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The proliferation rate of tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells under 5 J and 10 J LLLT increased compared with that of the control group (p orthodontics.

  11. Protein analysis and gene expression indicate differential vulnerability of Iberian fish species under a climate change scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, João M.; Repolho, Tiago; Athanasiadis, Alekos; Rosa, Rui; Almeida-Val, Vera M. F.; Coelho, Maria M.

    2017-01-01

    Current knowledge on the biological responses of freshwater fish under projected scenarios of climate change remains limited. Here, we examine differences in the protein configuration of two endemic Iberian freshwater fish species, Squalius carolitertii and the critically endangered S. torgalensis that inhabit in the Atlantic-type northern and in the Mediterranean-type southwestern regions, respectively. We performed protein structure modeling of fourteen genes linked to protein folding, energy metabolism, circadian rhythms and immune responses. Structural differences in proteins between the two species were found for HSC70, FKBP52, HIF1α and GPB1. For S. torgalensis, besides structural differences, we found higher thermostability for two proteins (HSP90 and GBP1), which can be advantageous in a warmer environment. Additionally, we investigated how these species might respond to projected scenarios of 3° climate change warming, acidification (ΔpH = -0.4), and their combined effects. Significant changes in gene expression were observed in response to all treatments, particularly under the combined warming and acidification. While S. carolitertii presented changes in gene expression for multiple proteins related to folding (hsp90aa1, hsc70, fkbp4 and stip1), only one such gene was altered in S. torgalensis (stip1). However, S. torgalensis showed a greater capacity for energy production under both the acidification and combined scenarios by increasing cs gene expression and maintaining ldha gene expression in muscle. Overall, these findings suggest that S. torgalensis is better prepared to cope with projected climate change. Worryingly, under the simulated scenarios, disturbances to circadian rhythm and immune system genes (cry1aa, per1a and gbp1) raise concerns for the persistence of both species, highlighting the need to consider multi-stressor effects when evaluating climate change impacts upon fish. This work also highlights that assessments of the potential of

  12. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  13. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  14. Hereditary stomatocytosis: First case report from Valley of Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatocytes are erythrocytes with a central slit or mouth-shaped (stoma area of central pallor when examined on dried smears. In wet preparations, they are uniconcave rather than biconcave, giving them a bowllike appearance. In vitro, stomatocytes are produced by drugs that intercalate into the inner half of the lipid bilayer, thereby expanding the inner lipid surface area relative to that of the outer half of the bilayer. Hereditary stomatocytosis (also known as hereditary hydrocytosis, or overhydrated stomatocytosis refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant hemolytic anemias caused by altered sodium permeability of the red cell membrane. We present the first case report of hereditary stomatocytosis in a 10-year-old male from the valley of Kashmir. Only eight families with this condition have been described worldwide.

  15. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  16. Mastectomy versus Lumpectomy in Hereditary Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Narod, StSteven

    1998-01-01

    ...% in carriers of mutations in either of these genes (Ford et al, 1994). It is now possible to identify families with mutations in these two genes and genetic testing is underway in the laboratories of the principal investigator and the co-investigator...

  17. Upregulation of fatty acid synthesis and the suppression of hepatic triglyceride lipase as a direct cause of hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Naoki; Ito, Tsunekata; Ohwada, Kazuo; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Rabbits with hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemia exhibit central obesity and are regarded as a reliable model for metabolic syndrome. This study was performed to gain insight into the affected process of lipid metabolism and into the causative genes of the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia rabbits. Eleven genes that play key roles in lipid metabolism were selected, their mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative PCR, and their expressions were compared among postprandial hypertriglyc...

  18. A nonspecific Setaria italica lipid transfer protein gene plays a critical role under abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are a class of cysteine-rich soluble proteins having small molecular weights. LTPs participate in flower and seed development, cuticular wax deposition, also play important roles in pathogen and abiotic stress responses. A nonspecific LTP gene (SiLTP was isolated from a foxtail millet (Setaria italica suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH library enriched for differentially expressed genes after abiotic stress treatments. A semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that SiLTP was expressed in all foxtail millet tissues. Additionally, the SiLTP promoter drove GUS expression in root tips, stems, leaves, flowers and siliques of transgenic Arabidopsis. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the SiLTP expression was induced by NaCl, polyethylene glycol and abscisic acid. SiLTP was localized in the cytoplasm of tobacco leaf epidermal cells and maize protoplasts. The ectopic expression of SiLTP in tobacco resulted in higher levels of salt and drought tolerance than in the wild type (WT. To further assess the function of SiLTP, SiLTP overexpression (OE and RNA interference (RNAi-based transgenic foxtail millet were obtained. SiLTP-OE lines performed better under salt and drought stresses compared with WT plants. In contrast, the RNAi lines were much more sensitive to salt and drought compared than WT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and yeast one-hybrids indicated that the transcription factor (TF ABA-responsive DRE-binding protein (SiARDP could bind to the dehydration-responsive element of SiLTP promoter in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Moreover, the SiLTP expression levels were higher in SiARDP-OE plants compared than the WT. These results confirmed that SiLTP plays important roles in improving salt and drought stress tolerance of foxtail millet, and may partly be up-regulated by SiARDP. SiLTP may provide an effective genetic resource for molecular breeding in crops to enhance salt and

  19. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R S; Katballe, N; Wikman, F P

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions......, identified after mutation screening of MSH2 and MLH1. All patients in the families were haplotyped using markers flanking the MSH2 gene. The haplotypes revealed that the five families with high probability descended from only two founders. The N596del segregated with the HNPCC phenotype with lod scores of 3...

  20. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Yang

    Full Text Available The genetic etiology of hereditary breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. Although germline mutations of high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1/2 are implicated in development of hereditary breast cancers, at least half of all breast cancer families are not linked to these genes. To identify a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population, we performed an analysis of germline mutations in 2,165 coding exons of 152 genes associated with hereditary cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS in 99 breast cancer patients from families of cancer patients regardless of cancer types. Forty-two deleterious germline mutations were identified in 21 genes of 34 patients, including 18 (18.2% BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, 3 (3% TP53 mutations, 5 (5.1% DNA mismatch repair gene mutations, 1 (1% CDH1 mutation, 6 (6.1% Fanconi anemia pathway gene mutations, and 9 (9.1% mutations in other genes. Of seven patients who carried mutations in more than one gene, 4 were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and their average onset age was much younger than patients with only BRCA1/2 mutations. Almost all identified high-penetrance gene mutations in those families fulfill the typical phenotypes of hereditary cancer syndromes listed in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines, except two TP53 and three mismatch repair gene mutations. Furthermore, functional studies of MSH3 germline mutations confirmed the association between MSH3 mutation and tumorigenesis, and segregation analysis suggested antagonism between BRCA1 and MSH3. We also identified a lot of low-penetrance gene mutations. Although the clinical significance of those newly identified low-penetrance gene mutations has not been fully appreciated yet, these new findings do provide valuable epidemiological information for the future studies. Together, these findings highlight the importance of genetic testing based on NCCN guidelines and a multi-gene analysis

  1. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii gene expression is under the control of regulatory pathways acting through chromatin structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bougdour A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity state of a gene is determined by a complex regulatory network of co-acting factors affecting the structure of the chromatin into which the gene is embedded. While significant changes of the transcriptome occur during cell differentiation in apicomplexan parasites, basic mechanisms controlling gene expression are still unknown. Recent studies support and expand the concept of the chromatin environment being key factor for the control of transcriptional activity in these lower eukaryotes organisms. Here, we review recent advances in the field of epigenetic gene regulation in Toxoplasma gondii, the model apicomplexan.

  3. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  4. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Githu, Tangayi [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Radiology of Huntsville, P.C., Huntsville, AL (United States); Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Garrison, Aaron P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Akron Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Akron, OH (United States); Brown, Rebeccah L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  5. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Githu, Tangayi; Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Brown, Rebeccah L.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  6. SPG20 mutation in three siblings with familial hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Roelens, Filip; Race, Valerie; Souche, Erika; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2017-07-01

    Troyer syndrome (MIM#275900) is an autosomal recessive form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is characterized by progressive lower extremity spasticity and weakness, dysarthria, distal amyotrophy, developmental delay, short stature, and subtle skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by deleterious mutations in the SPG20 gene, encoding spartin, on Chromosome 13q13. Until now, six unrelated families with a genetically confirmed diagnosis have been reported. Here we report the clinical findings in three brothers of a consanguineous Moroccan family, aged 24, 17, and 7 yr old, with spastic paraplegia, short stature, motor and cognitive delay, and severe intellectual disability. Targeted exon capture and sequencing showed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the SPG20 gene, c.1369C>T (p.Arg457*), in the three affected boys. © 2017 Dardour et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome due to a BMPR1A mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2010-06-01

    The conditions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome (JPS) and Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome (HMPS) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. The genetic mechanisms which explain these conditions have until recently been poorly understood. Recent interest has focused on the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway and, in particular, on mutations in the SMAD4 gene. However, not all cases of JPS and HMPS have mutations in SMAD4 and focus has now shifted to other components of the TGF-beta pathway to clarify the genetic mechanisms involved in these conditions. In this report, we describe the significance of a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A gene mutation in an Irish family.

  8. Defining the genetic basis of early onset hereditary spastic paraplegia using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore R; Wali, G M; Kamate, Mahesh; Wali, Gautam; Minoche, André E; Puttick, Clare; Pinese, Mark; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Dinger, Marcel E; Roscioli, Tony; Sue, Carolyn M; Cowley, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) in nine families from India with early-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We obtained a genetic diagnosis in 4/9 (44 %) families within known HSP genes (DDHD2 and CYP2U1), as well as perixosomal biogenesis disorders (PEX16) and GM1 gangliosidosis (GLB1). In the remaining patients, no candidate structural variants, copy number variants or predicted splice variants affecting an extended candidate gene list were identified. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of using WGS for diagnosing early-onset HSP, particularly in consanguineous families (4/6 diagnosed), highlighting that two of the diagnoses would not have been made using a targeted approach.

  9. Genetic, epidemiological, and clinical aspects of hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a population-based, well-defined group of patients first regarded as having pancreatitis of unknown origin (PUO), we identified, described, and compared the clinical and genetic aspects of patients with hereditary pancreatitis (HP) and with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance...... regulator gene (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 gene (SPINK1) mutations with patients who retained the diagnosis of true idiopathic pancreatitis (tIP) after genetic testing for HP, SPINK1, and CFTR mutations. METHODS: Patients with PUO were identified in the Danish National Registry...... of Patients or were referred by clinicians. DNA from blood was analyzed for cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, and CFTR mutations. Considering the diagnosis of HP, a pedigree was drawn for each patient. RESULTS: A genetic mutation was found in 40% of 122 patients with PUO. After testing first...

  10. HEREDITARY DISEASES AND SYNDROMES ACCOMPANIED BY FEBRILE CONVULSIONS: CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERISTICS AND DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dadali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors provide a review of the clinical and genetic characteristics of hereditary diseases and syndromes accompanied by febrile convulsions, which is illustrated by examples of their own observations. The paper sets forth the possibilities and limitations of using current methods for the molecular genetic diagnosis of idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies. The most effective and less expensive technique of molecular genetic analysis is shown to be an exome sequencing test using the panels of genes responsible for the occurrence of diseases with simi1ar clinical symptoms. The paper also presents the structure of the panel of genes responsible for the occurrence of monogenic epilepsies, which has been designed at the Genomed Clinic and includes 448 genetic variants. It also determines the significance of using a chromosomal microarray analysis to diagnose both chromosomal and monogenic diseases accompanied by convulsions. 

  11. An inducible HSP70 gene from the midge Chironomus dilutus: Characterization and transcription profile under environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Rao, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterized an inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from the midge Chironomus dilutus and investigated the transcriptional profile of the gene under baseline and environmentally stressful conditions. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we observed increased expression of CD-HSP70-1 in response to both heat shock and copper stress. We also investigated the expression of this gene during midge development. All C. dilutus developmental stages expressed CD-HSP70-1 under normal conditions, although at extremely low levels. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence demonstrated distinct clustering of this gene with inducible HSP70s from other insect species. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Identification and validation of housekeeping genes in brains of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria under different developmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Temmerman, Liesbet; Van Soest, Sofie; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Huybrechts, Roger; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Simonet, Gert

    2009-06-09

    To obtain reliable quantitative RT-PCR data, normalization relative to stable housekeeping genes is required. However, in practice, expression levels of 'typical' housekeeping genes have been found to vary between tissues and under different experimental conditions. To date, validation studies of reference genes in insects are extremely rare and have never been performed in locusts. In this study, putative housekeeping genes were identified in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria and two different software programs (geNorm and Normfinder) were applied to assess the stability of these genes. We have identified seven orthologs of commonly used housekeeping genes in the desert locust. The selected genes were the orthologs of actin, EF1a, GAPDH, RP49, TubA1, Ubi, and CG13220. By employing real time RT-PCR we have analysed the expression of these housekeeping genes in brain tissue of fifth instar nymphs and adults. In the brain of fifth instar nymphs geNorm indicated Sg-EF1a, Sg-GAPDH and Sg-RP49 as most stable genes, while Normfinder ranked Sg-RP49, Sg-EF1a and Sg-ACT as most suitable candidates for normalization. The best normalization candidates for gene expression studies in the brains of adult locusts were Sg-EF1a, Sg-GAPDH and Sg-Ubi according to geNorm, while Normfinder determined Sg-GAPDH, Sg-Ubi and Sg-ACT as the most stable housekeeping genes. To perform transcript profiling studies on brains of the desert locust, the use of Sg-RP49, Sg-EF1a and Sg-ACT as reference genes is proposed for studies of fifth instar nymphs. In experiments with adult brains, however, the most preferred reference genes were Sg-GAPDH, Sg-Ubi and Sg-EF1a. These data will facilitate transcript profiling studies in desert locusts and provide a good starting point for the initial selection of genes for validation studies in other insects.

  13. Variants in congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism genes identified in an Indonesian cohort of 46,XY under-virilised boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Katie L; Bouty, Aurore; Robevska, Gorjana; van den Bergen, Jocelyn A; Juniarto, Achmad Zulfa; Listyasari, Nurin Aisyiyah; Sinclair, Andrew H; Faradz, Sultana M H

    2017-02-16

    Congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are caused by disruption to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (H-P-G) axis. In particular, reduced production, secretion or action of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is often responsible. Various genes, many of which play a role in the development and function of the GnRH neurons, have been implicated in these disorders. Clinically, CHH and KS are heterogeneous; however, in 46,XY patients, they can be characterised by under-virilisation phenotypes such as cryptorchidism and micropenis or delayed puberty. In rare cases, hypospadias may also be present. Here, we describe genetic mutational analysis of CHH genes in Indonesian 46,XY disorder of sex development patients with under-virilisation. We present 11 male patients with varying degrees of under-virilisation who have rare variants in known CHH genes. Interestingly, many of these patients had hypospadias. We postulate that variants in CHH genes, in particular PROKR2, PROK2, WDR11 and FGFR1 with CHD7, may contribute to under-virilisation phenotypes including hypospadias in Indonesia.

  14. Assessment of Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing as a Tool for the Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Hereditary Motor Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; García-García, Francisco; Sancho, Paula; Tello, Cristina; García-Romero, Mar; Villarreal, Liliana; Alberti, Antonia; Sivera, Rafael; Dopazo, Joaquín; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Márquez-Infante, Celedonio; Casasnovas, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is characterized by broad genetic heterogeneity with >50 known disease-associated genes. Mutations in some of these genes can cause a pure motor form of hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetics of which are poorly characterized. We designed a panel comprising 56 genes associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. We validated this diagnostic tool by first testing 11 patients with pathological mutations. A cohort of 33 affected subjects was selected for this study. The DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation was detected in two cases; novel changes and/or variants with low frequency (A mutation was also detected in three additional families. On haplotype analysis, all of the patients from these five families shared the same haplotype; therefore, the DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation may be a founder event. Our gene panel allowed us to perform a very rapid and cost-effective screening of genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. Our diagnostic strategy was robust in terms of both coverage and read depth for all of the genes and patient samples. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in achieving a definitive molecular diagnosis because of the complexity of interpreting new variants and the genetic heterogeneity that is associated with these neuropathies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring single-cell gene regulation under dynamically controllable conditions with integrated microfluidics and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Matthias; Jug, Florian; Julou, Thomas; Deshpande, Siddharth; Pfohl, Thomas; Silander, Olin K; Myers, Gene; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2018-01-15

    Much is still not understood about how gene regulatory interactions control cell fate decisions in single cells, in part due to the difficulty of directly observing gene regulatory processes in vivo. We introduce here a novel integrated setup consisting of a microfluidic chip and accompanying analysis software that enable long-term quantitative tracking of growth and gene expression in single cells. The dual-input Mother Machine (DIMM) chip enables controlled and continuous variation of external conditions, allowing direct observation of gene regulatory responses to changing conditions in single cells. The Mother Machine Analyzer (MoMA) software achieves unprecedented accuracy in segmenting and tracking cells, and streamlines high-throughput curation with a novel leveraged editing procedure. We demonstrate the power of the method by uncovering several novel features of an iconic gene regulatory program: the induction of Escherichia coli's lac operon in response to a switch from glucose to lactose.

  16. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Zi, Xiaohong; Li, Lin; Zhan, Yajing; Huang, Shunxiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xuning; Li, Xigui; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Ruxu

    2012-01-01

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced. PMID:25337104

  17. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Results Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden) and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus) were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase), SAND (SAND protein), ACT (actin), and A-Tub (α-tubulin) genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Conclusion Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin). It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified genes in this study

  18. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Results Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase, SAND (SAND protein, ACT (actin, and A-Tub (α-tubulin genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Conclusion Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin. It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified

  19. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  20. Positive Selection Underlies Faster-Z Evolution of Gene Expression in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca; Harrison, Peter W; Wright, Alison E; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-10-01

    The elevated rate of evolution for genes on sex chromosomes compared with autosomes (Fast-X or Fast-Z evolution) can result either from positive selection in the heterogametic sex or from nonadaptive consequences of reduced relative effective population size. Recent work in birds suggests that Fast-Z of coding sequence is primarily due to relaxed purifying selection resulting from reduced relative effective population size. However, gene sequence and gene expression are often subject to distinct evolutionary pressures; therefore, we tested for Fast-Z in gene expression using next-generation RNA-sequencing data from multiple avian species. Similar to studies of Fast-Z in coding sequence, we recover clear signatures of Fast-Z in gene expression; however, in contrast to coding sequence, our data indicate that Fast-Z in expression is due to positive selection acting primarily in females. In the soma, where gene expression is highly correlated between the sexes, we detected Fast-Z in both sexes, although at a higher rate in females, suggesting that many positively selected expression changes in females are also expressed in males. In the gonad, where intersexual correlations in expression are much lower, we detected Fast-Z for female gene expression, but crucially, not males. This suggests that a large amount of expression variation is sex-specific in its effects within the gonad. Taken together, our results indicate that Fast-Z evolution of gene expression is the product of positive selection acting on recessive beneficial alleles in the heterogametic sex. More broadly, our analysis suggests that the adaptive potential of Z chromosome gene expression may be much greater than that of gene sequence, results which have important implications for the role of sex chromosomes in speciation and sexual selection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Araújo, Pedro; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Souza, Uiara Romero; Viana, Juliana de Oliveira Fernandes; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-11-14

    The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden) and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus) were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase), SAND (SAND protein), ACT (actin), and A-Tub (α-tubulin) genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin). It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified genes in this study should be used as reference genes

  2. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Levi, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled generation of bradykinin (BK) due to insufficient levels of protease inhibitors controlling contact phase (CP) activation, increased activity of CP proteins, and/or inadequate degradation of BK into inactive peptides increases vascular permeability via BK-receptor 2 (BKR2) and results in subcutaneous and submucosal edema formation. Hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE and -AAE) are diseases characterized by serious and potentially fatal attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of upper airways, facial structures, abdomen, and extremities, due to inadequate control of BK generation. A decreased activity of C1-inhibitor is the hallmark of C1-INH-HAE (types 1 and 2) due to a mutation in the C1-inhibitor gene, whereas the deficiency in C1-inhibitor in C1-INH-AAE is the result of autoimmune phenomena. In HAE with normal C1-inhibitor, a significant percentage of patients have an increased activity of factor XIIa due to a FXII mutation (FXII-HAE). Treatment of C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focuses on restoring control of BK generation by inhibition of CP proteases by correcting the balance between CP inhibitors and BK breakdown or by inhibition of BK-mediated effects at the BKR2 on endothelial cells. This review will address the pathophysiology, clinical picture, diagnosis and available treatment in C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focusing on BK-release and its regulation. Key Messages Inadequate control of bradykinin formation results in the formation of characteristic subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of the skin, upper airways, facial structures, abdomen and extremities as seen in hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema. Diagnosis of hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema may be troublesome as illustrated by the fact that there is a significant delay in diagnosis; a certain grade of suspicion is therefore crucial for quick diagnosis. Submucosal edema formation in

  3. Methods for Determining the Statistical Significance of Enrichment or Depletion of Gene Ontology Classifications under Weighted Membership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto eIacucci

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput molecular biology studies, such as microarray assays of gene expression, two-hybrid experiments for detecting protein interactions, or ChIP-Seq experiments for transcription factor binding, often result in an interesting set of genes—say, genes that are co-expressed or bound by the same factor. One way of understanding the biological meaning of such a set is to consider what processes or functions, as defined in an ontology, are over-represented (enriched or under-represented (depleted among genes in the set. Usually, the significance of enrichment or depletion scores is based on simple statistical models and on the membership of genes in different classifications. We consider the more general problem of computing p-values for arbitrary integer additive statistics, or weighted membership functions. Such membership functions can be used to represent, for example, prior knowledge on the role of certain genes or classifications, differential importance of different classifications or genes to the experimenter, hierarchical relationships between classifications, or different degrees of interestingness or evidence for specific genes. We describe a generic dynamic programming algorithm that can compute exact p-values for arbitrary integer additive statistics. We also describe several optimizations for important special cases, which can provide orders-of-magnitude speed up in the computations. We apply our methods to datasets describing oxidative phosphorylation and parturition and compare p-values based on computations of several different statistics for measuring enrichment. We find major differences between p-values resulting from these statistics, and that some statistics recover gold standard annotations of the data better than others. Our work establishes a theoretical and algorithmic basis for far richer notions of enrichment or depletion of gene sets with respect to gene ontologies than has previously been available.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of WOX genes in upland cotton and their expression pattern under different stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoen; Gong, Qian; Qin, Wenqiang; Yang, Zuoren; Cheng, Yuan; Lu, Lili; Ge, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Chaojun; Wu, Zhixia; Li, Fuguang

    2017-07-06

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) family members play significant roles in plant growth and development, such as in embryo patterning, stem-cell maintenance, and lateral organ formation. The recently published cotton genome sequences allow us to perform comprehensive genome-wide analysis and characterization of WOX genes in cotton. In this study, we identified 21, 20, and 38 WOX genes in Gossypium arboreum (2n = 26, A 2 ), G. raimondii (2n = 26, D 5 ), and G. hirsutum (2n = 4x = 52, (AD) t ), respectively. Sequence logos showed that homeobox domains were significantly conserved among the WOX genes in cotton, Arabidopsis, and rice. A total of 168 genes from three typical monocots and six dicots were naturally divided into three clades, which were further classified into nine sub-clades. A good collinearity was observed in the synteny analysis of the orthologs from At and Dt (t represents tetraploid) sub-genomes. Whole genome duplication (WGD) and segmental duplication within At and Dt sub-genomes played significant roles in the expansion of WOX genes, and segmental duplication mainly generated the WUS clade. Copia and Gypsy were the two major types of transposable elements distributed upstream or downstream of WOX genes. Furthermore, through comparison, we found that the exon/intron pattern was highly conserved between Arabidopsis and cotton, and the homeobox domain loci were also conserved between them. In addition, the expression pattern in different tissues indicated that the duplicated genes in cotton might have acquired new functions as a result of sub-functionalization or neo-functionalization. The expression pattern of WOX genes under different stress treatments showed that the different genes were induced by different stresses. In present work, WOX genes, classified into three clades, were identified in the upland cotton genome. Whole genome and segmental duplication were determined to be the two major impetuses for the expansion of gene numbers during the

  5. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  6. Promoter engineering of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RIM15 gene for improvement of alcoholic fermentation rates under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Kaneko, Akie; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    A loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene, which encodes a Greatwall-like protein kinase, is one of the major causes of the high alcoholic fermentation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains closely related to Kyokai no. 7 (K7). However, impairment of Rim15p may not be beneficial under more severe fermentation conditions, such as in the late fermentation stage, as it negatively affects stress responses. To balance stress tolerance and fermentation performance, we inserted the promoter of a gluconeogenic gene, PCK1, into the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain to achieve repression of RIM15 gene expression in the glucose-rich early stage with its induction in the stressful late stage of alcoholic fermentation. The promoter-engineered strain exhibited a fermentation rate comparable to that of the RIM15-deleted strain with no decrease in cell viability. The engineered strain achieved better alcoholic fermentation performance than the RIM15-deleted strain under repetitive and high-glucose fermentation conditions. These data demonstrated the validity of promoter engineering of the RIM15 gene that governs inhibitory control of alcoholic fermentation. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Refinement of the hereditary xerocytosis locus on chromosome 16q in a large Canadian kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, B L; Zelinski, T; Israels, S J; Coghlan, G; Chodirker, B N; Gallagher, P G; Houston, D S; Zarychanski, R

    2011-12-15

    The hereditary stomatocytoses are a group of heterogeneous conditions associated with chronic red cell hemolysis for which the causative genetic mutations are not known. We investigated 137 members of a large Canadian kindred with phenotypic findings consistent with hereditary xerocytosis, one of the most common stomatocytosis syndromes. The objectives of this study were to characterize the clinical hallmarks of the hemolytic process, and to define the chromosomal region carrying the disease locus. The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Affected family members had a well-compensated hemolysis, associated with an elevated MCHC, decreased osmotic fragility, decreased haptoglobin, and indirect hyperbilirubinemia. Cholelithiasis and progressive iron loading were common, despite normal hemoglobin levels. Quantitative erythrocyte morphologic evaluation revealed increased schistocytes, target cells, reticulocytes, and eccentrocytes in affected individuals; stomatocytes were not increased. Genetic linkage analysis confirmed the localization of the disease phenotype to chromosome 16q, and refined the candidate region to 16q24.2-16qter, a 2.4 million base pair interval containing 51 known or predicted genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular testing for hereditary retinal disease as part of clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Katy; Zacks, David N; Caruso, Rafael; Karoukis, Athanasios J; Branham, Kari; Yashar, Beverly M; Haimann, Mark H; Trzupek, Karmen; Meltzer, Meira; Blain, Delphine; Richards, Julia E; Weleber, Richard G; Heckenlively, John R; Sieving, Paul A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2007-02-01

    To describe clinical molecular testing for hereditary retinal degenerations, highlighting results, interpretation, and patient education. Mutation analysis of 8 retinal genes was performed by dideoxy sequencing. Pretest and posttest genetic counseling was offered to patients. The laboratory report listed results and provided individualized interpretation. A total of 350 tests were performed. The molecular basis of disease was determined in 133 of 266 diagnostic tests; the disease-causing mutations were not identified in the remaining 133 diagnostic tests. Predictive and carrier tests were requested for 9 and 75 nonsymptomatic patients with known familial mutations, respectively. Molecular testing can confirm a clinical diagnosis, identify carrier status, and confirm or rule out the presence of a familial mutation in nonsymptomatic at-risk relatives. Because causative mutations cannot be identified in all patients with retinal diseases, it is essential that patients are counseled before testing regarding the benefits and limitations of this emerging diagnostic tool. The molecular definition of the genetic basis of disease provides a unique adjunct to the clinical care of patients with hereditary retinal degenerations.

  9. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of BSCL2 Mutations in a Taiwanese Cohort with Hereditary Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Tsung Hsiao

    Full Text Available A small group of patients with inherited neuropathy that has been shown to be caused by mutations in the BSCL2 gene. However, little information is available about the role of BSCL2 mutations in inherited neuropathies in Taiwan.Utilizing targeted sequencing, 76 patients with molecularly unassigned Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2 and 8 with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, who were selected from 348 unrelated patients with inherited neuropathies, were screened for mutations in the coding regions of BSCL2. Two heterozygous BSCL2 mutations, p.S90L and p.R96H, were identified, of which the p.R96H mutation is novel. The p.S90L was identified in a pedigree with CMT2 while the p.R96H was identified in a patient with apparently sporadic dHMN. In vitro studies demonstrated that the p.R96H mutation results in a remarkably low seipin expression and reduced cell viability.BSCL2 mutations account for a small number of patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan. The p.R96H mutation is associated with dHMN. This study expands the molecular spectrum of BSCL2 mutations and also emphasizes the pathogenic role of BSCL2 mutations in molecularly unassigned hereditary neuropathies.

  10. Genome-wide identification of differentially expressed genes under water deficit stress in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wonkeun; Scheffler, Brian E; Bauer, Philip J; Campbell, B Todd

    2012-06-15

    Cotton is the world's primary fiber crop and is a major agricultural commodity in over 30 countries. Like many other global commodities, sustainable cotton production is challenged by restricted natural resources. In response to the anticipated increase of agricultural water demand, a major research direction involves developing crops that use less water or that use water more efficiently. In this study, our objective was to identify differentially expressed genes in response to water deficit stress in cotton. A global expression analysis using cDNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism was conducted to compare root and leaf gene expression profiles from a putative drought resistant cotton cultivar grown under water deficit stressed and well watered field conditions. We identified a total of 519 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments. Of these, 147 transcript derived fragment sequences were functionally annotated according to their gene ontology. Nearly 70 percent of transcript derived fragments belonged to four major categories: 1) unclassified, 2) stress/defense, 3) metabolism, and 4) gene regulation. We found heat shock protein-related and reactive oxygen species-related transcript derived fragments to be among the major parts of functional pathways induced by water deficit stress. Also, twelve novel transcripts were identified as both water deficit responsive and cotton specific. A subset of differentially expressed transcript derived fragments was verified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Differential expression analysis also identified five pairs of duplicated transcript derived fragments in which four pairs responded differentially between each of their two homologues under water deficit stress. In this study, we detected differentially expressed transcript derived fragments from water deficit stressed root and leaf tissues in tetraploid cotton and provided their gene ontology, functional/biological distribution, and

  11. Note on generalized topological spaces with hereditary classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Renukadevi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we extend the study of $\\Psi_\\mathcal{H}$ operator  introduced and studied in [5] and rectify the errors in the paper. Moreover, characterizations of $\\mu-$codense and strongly $\\mu-$codense hereditary classes in generalized topological spaces are also given.

  12. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  13. [The spectrum of hereditary skeletal-muscle channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, J.; Drost, G.; Ginjaar, H.B.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Faber, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases in which a defective ion channel is responsible for the symptoms. They manifest as diseases of the heart, brain or skeletal muscle. Hereditary skeletal-muscle channelopathies are characterised by myotonia, periodic paralysis or a

  14. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Breedveld (Guido); A. Guala (Andrea); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.K. Percy; L.S. Dure; P. Harper; W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); L.P. Lazarou; H. van der Linde; B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); M. Joosse (Marijke); M.E. MacDonald; H. Krude; A. Grüters (Annette); J.W.F. van Dongen (Jeroen); C. Danesino (Cesare); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBenign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder

  15. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, G.J.; Dongen, J.W. van; Danesino, C.; Guala, A.; Percy, A.K.; Dure, L.S.; Harper, P.; Lazarou, L.P.; Linde, H. van der; Joosse, M.; Gruters, A.; MacDonald, M.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Arts, P.J.W.; Oostra, B.A.; Krude, H.; Heutink, P.

    2002-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder results from a developmental

  16. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity in benign hereditary chorea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, G.J.; Percy, A.K.; MacDonald, M.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Yapijakis, C.; Dure, L.S.; Ippel, E.F.; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Heutink, P.; Arts, P.J.W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that can be distinguished from Huntington disease by its early onset, stable or only slightly progressive course, and absence of mental deterioration. The variation in clinical features is such that its very existence has

  17. Calf enlargement in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Ongerboer, B. W.; Verbeeten, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Six members originating from two families with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (hypertrophic and neuronal types) were noted to have enlarged calf muscles. Muscle computed tomography revealed that muscle enlargement in the propositus of the family with the hypertrophic type of HMSN was due to

  18. Hereditary primary open angle glaucoma: case study of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To present a case of hereditary primary open angle glaucoma in a Nigerian family. Method: Six members of an Ibo family from Delta State, Nigeria were interviewed and examined by the authors. Information on age, gender, tribe, history of blindness, eye disease and other medical conditions was recorded.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found in the cells of the nervous system, including sensory neurons. The mutations involved in HSAN2A result in ... Samuels M, Rouleau GA. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II. J Clin Invest. 2008 Jul; ...

  20. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  1. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  2. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorwinden, Jan S.; Jaspers, Jan P C

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors

  3. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS: T...

  4. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  5. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  6. Hereditary atypical retinitis pigmentosa: case report | Omoti | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report presents four generations of hereditary atypical (pericentric) retinitis pigmentosa in an Itsekiri family of Warri, Delta state of Nigeria. The patients presented with nyctalopia, waxy disc pallor, arteriolar attenuation, pigment deposits around the optic nerve and visual field loss. The cases were typically mild with ...

  7. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Houlden H, King R, Blake J, Groves M, Love S, Woodward C, Hammans S, Nicoll J, Lennox G, O'Donovan DG, Gabriel C, Thomas PK, Reilly MM. Clinical, pathological and genetic characterization of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN I). Brain. 2006 Feb;129(Pt 2):411-25. Epub ...

  9. The neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy vs Mobius syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy. METHODS: The authors compared brainstem pathology of three members of one family with autosomal dominant congenital facial palsy to that in three age-matched controls. The neuropathologic findings of the familial

  10. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...

  11. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, or SMAD4. Around 90% of HHT patients present with a heterozygous pathogenic genetic variation. Almost all cases of HHT have a family history. Very few cases are de...

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  13. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged.

  14. Introduction of the ZmDof1 gene into rice enhances carbon and nitrogen assimilation under low-nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurai, Tomohiro; Wakayama, Masataka; Abiko, Tomomi; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Aoki, Naohiro; Ohsugi, Ryu

    2011-10-01

    The excessive application of nitrogen fertilizer to maximize crop yields causes negative environmental effects such as pollution and ecological imbalance. To overcome this problem, researchers have attempted to improve the nitrogen assimilation capacity of crops. Maize Dof1 (ZmDof1) is a plant-specific transcription factor shown to promote nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) even under nitrogen-deficient conditions. The present study examines the effect of the introduction of the ZmDof1 gene on carbon and nitrogen assimilation in rice. ZmDof1 induced the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) genes in transgenic rice plants and transactivated the PEPC promoters in protoplast transient assays, showing similar effects in rice as in Arabidopsis. Transgenic rice expressing ZmDof1 and grown in the presence of 360 μm (nitrogen-sufficient) or 90 μm (nitrogen-deficient) of nitrogen concentrations showed modulation of metabolite content and gene expression associated with the anaplerotic pathway for the TCA cycle, suggesting an increased carbon flow towards nitrogen assimilation. Furthermore, increases in carbon and nitrogen amounts per seedling were found in Dof1 rice grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions. Nitrogen deficiency also resulted in the predominant distribution of nitrogen to roots, accompanied by significant increases in root biomass and modification of the shoot-to-root ratio. Measurement of the CO₂ gas exchange rate showed a significant increase in the net photosynthesis rate in Dof1 rice under nitrogen-deficient conditions. Taken these together, the present study displayed that ZmDof1 expression in rice could induce gene expressions such as PEPC genes, modulate carbon and nitrogen metabolites, increase nitrogen assimilation and enhance growth under low-nitrogen conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell

  15. Treatment for dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) in hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Keage, Megan J; Johansson, Kerstin; Schalling, Ellika

    2015-11-13

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in progressive inco-ordination. Swallowing impairment, also known as dysphagia, is a common and potentially life threatening sequel of disease progression. The incidence and nature of dysphagia in these conditions is largely unknown. The loss of an effective and safe swallow can dramatically affect the health and well-being of an individual. Remediation of difficulties of eating and drinking is an important goal in the clinical care of people with hereditary ataxia. To assess the effects of interventions for swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in people with hereditary ataxias. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) on 14 September 2015. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts, and Trials Registries on 24 September 2015. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxia with placebo or no treatment. We only included studies measuring dysphagia. Three review authors (ES, KJ, MK) independently screened all titles and abstracts. In the event of any disagreement or uncertainty over the inclusion of a particular paper, the review authors planned to meet and reach consensus. We identified no RCTs from the 519 titles and abstracts screened. We excluded papers primarily for not including participants with a hereditary ataxia (that is, being focused on other neurological conditions), being theoretical reviews rather than intervention studies, or being neither randomised nor quasi-randomised trials.We identified five papers of various design that described treatment for dysphagia, or improvement to swallow as a by-product of treatment, in people with hereditary ataxia. None of these studies were RCTs or

  16. An investigation of gene action on different traits of tobacco under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Nicotiana tabacum). Information Bulletin Coresta Congress japan. 183. SHoaei DM, Honarnejad R (2003). Gene effects and Combining ability of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of Burley Tobacco. Information Bulletin ...

  17. Identification and characterization of genes underlying chitinolysis in Collimonas fungivorans Ter331

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsche, K.; De Boer, W.; Gerards, S.; Van den Berg, M.; Van Veen, J.A.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Through a combinatorial approach of plasposon mutagenesis, genome mining, and heterologous expression, we identified genes contributing to the chitinolytic phenotype of bacterium Collimonas fungivorans Ter331. One of five mutants with abolished ability to hydrolyze colloidal chitin carried its

  18. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; van Tol, M.J.D.; Wang, J.; Dam, M.; van Eggermond, M.C.J.A.; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; van der Burg, M.; Graham Davies, E.; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; van den Elsen, P.J.; van der Maarel, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  19. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; Tol, M.J. van; Wang, J; Ostaijen-ten Dam, M.M. van; Eggermond, M.C. van; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; Burg, M. van der; aham Davies, E. Gr; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; Elsen, P.J. van den; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  20. Genome-Wide Survey of Genes Under Positive Selection in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Hongo, Jorge Augusto; Vicentini, Renato; Verma, Renu; Maluta, Renato Pariz; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias

    2017-05-01

    The ability to obtain bacterial genomes from the same host has allowed for comparative studies that help in the understanding of the molecular evolution of specific pathotypes. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a group of extraintestinal strains responsible for causing colibacillosis in birds. APEC is also suggested to possess a role as a zoonotic agent. Despite its importance, APEC pathogenesis still has several cryptic pathogenic processes that need to be better understood. In this work, a genome-wide survey of eight APEC strains for genes with evidence of recombination revealed that ∼14% of the homologous groups evaluated present signs of recombination. Enrichment analyses revealed that nine Gene Ontology (GO) terms were significantly more represented in recombinant genes. Among these GO terms, several were noted to be ATP-related categories. The search for positive selection in these APEC genomes revealed 32 groups of homologous genes with evidence of positive selection. Among these groups, we found several related to cell metabolism, as well as several uncharacterized genes, beyond the well-known virulence factors ompC, lamB, waaW, waaL, and fliC. A GO term enrichment test showed a prevalence of terms related to bacterial cell contact with the external environment (e.g., viral entry into host cell, detection of virus, pore complex, bacterial-type flagellum filament C, and porin activity). Finally, the genes with evidence of positive selection were retrieved from genomes of non-APEC strains and tested as were done for APEC strains. The result revealed that none of the groups of genes presented evidence of positive selection, confirming that the analysis was effective in inferring positive selection for APEC and not for E. coli in general, which means that the study of the genes with evidence of positive selection identified in this study can contribute for the better understanding of APEC pathogenesis processes.