WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene transfer technology

  1. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  2. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  3. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyantyn Zuzik

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  4. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  5. [Advances in research on radioiodine therapy of carcinoma mediated by gene transfer technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Da; Kuang, Anren

    2010-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of carcinoma could be mediated by transferring the genes which participate in the process of iodine metabolism in thyroid. The correlative genes are sodium/iodine symporter gene, thyroid peroxidase gene and the specific thyroid transcription factors, and others. The objective gene can specifically express in carcinoma by inserting the tissue-specific promoter/enhancer upstream of them, so radioiodine could be used to treat varied carcinomas. The radioiodine uptake in carcinoma cells was obviously increased and the radioiodine therapy of carcinoma was effective after those genes had expressed in carcinoma cells. The main problem was that the effective half-time of radioiodine in cells was too short to produce the ideal effect of radioiodine therapy. Moreover, 211At and 188Re could be transferred by sodium/iodine symporter and they could be used to treat the carcinoma that is capable of radioiodine uptake.

  6. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  7. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  8. Technology transfer 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  9. Technology transfer and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the fact that international technology transfer has been widely studied its management still encounters many difficulties. To fully understand the issues that are relevant to the process of transferring production technology, it is necessary to determine the important factors that influence

  10. The Trojan Horse Liposome Technology for Nonviral Gene Transfer across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Boado, Ruben J.; Pardridge, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The application of blood-borne gene therapy protocols to the brain is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Viruses have been extensively used as gene delivery systems. However, their efficacy in brain is limited by the lack of transport across the BBB following intravenous (IV) administration. Recent progress in the “Trojan Horse Liposome” (THL) technology applied to transvascular non-viral gene therapy of the brain presents a promising solution to the trans-vascular brai...

  11. Technology and technology transfer: some basic issues

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsavari, Ali; Adikibi, Owen; Taha, Yasser

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses various issues relating to technology and transfer of technology such as technology and society, technology and science, channels and models of technology transfer, the role of multinational companies in transfer of technology, etc. The ultimate objective is to pose the question of relevance of some existing models and ideas like technological independence in an increasingly globalised world economy.

  12. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  13. The Trojan Horse Liposome Technology for Nonviral Gene Transfer across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben J. Boado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of blood-borne gene therapy protocols to the brain is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Viruses have been extensively used as gene delivery systems. However, their efficacy in brain is limited by the lack of transport across the BBB following intravenous (IV administration. Recent progress in the “Trojan Horse Liposome” (THL technology applied to transvascular non-viral gene therapy of the brain presents a promising solution to the trans-vascular brain gene delivery problem. THLs are comprised of immunoliposomes carrying nonviral gene expression plasmids. The tissue target specificity of the THL is provided by peptidomimetic monoclonal antibody (MAb component of the THL, which binds to specific endogenous receptors located on both the BBB and on brain cellular membranes, for example, insulin receptor and transferrin receptor. These MAbs mediate (a receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL complex through the BBB, (b endocytosis into brain cells and (c transport to the brain cell nuclear compartment. The expression of the transgene in brain may be restricted using tissue/cell specific gene promoters. This manuscript presents an overview on the THL transport technology applied to brain disorders, including lysosomal storage disorders and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  15. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  16. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  17. University Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Cox

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the experiences and general observations of the author at Heriot-Watt University and concerns the transfer of university technology for the purposes of commercialisation. Full commercial exploitation of a university invention generally requires transferring that technology into the industrial arena, usually either by formation of a new company or licensing into an existing company. Commercialisation activities need to be carried out in unison with the prime activities of the university of research and teaching. Responsibility for commercialising university inventions generally rests with a specific group within the university, typically referred to as the technology transfer group. Each technology transfer should be considered individually and appropriate arrangements made for that particular invention. In general, this transfer process involves four stages: identification, evaluation, protection and exploitation. Considerations under these general headings are outlined from a university viewpoint. A phased approach is generally preferred where possible for the evaluation, protection and exploitation of an invention to balance risk with potential reward. Evaluation of the potential opportunity for a university invention involves essentially the same considerations as for an industrial invention. However, there are a range of commercial exploitation routes and potential deals so that only general guidelines can be given. Naturally, the final deal achieved is that which can be negotiated. The potential rewards for the university and inventor are both financial (via licensing income and equity realisation and non-financial.

  18. What Is Technology Transfer? | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between NIH research laboratories and external partners. With a team of technology transfer specialists, NCI TTC guides interactions from discovery to patenting, as well as from collaboration and invention development to licensing.

  19. What Is Technology Transfer? | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between NIH research laboratories and external partners. With a team of technology transfer specialists, NCI TTC guides interactions from discovery to patenting, as well as from collaboration and invention development to licensing.

  20. Technology transfer 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  1. Lateral gene transfer, rearrangement, reconciliation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patterson, M.D.; Szollosi, G.; Daubin, V.; Tannier, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Models of ancestral gene order reconstruction have progressively integrated different evolutionary patterns and processes such as unequal gene content, gene duplications, and implicitly sequence evolution via reconciled gene trees. These models have so far ignored lateral gene transfer,

  2. Dual Space Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowbel, W.; Loutfy, R.

    2009-03-01

    Over the past fifteen years, MER has had several NASA SBIR Phase II programs in the area of space technology, based upon carbon-carbon (C-C) composites. In addition, in November 2004, leading edges supplied by MER provided the enabling technology to reach a Mach 10 record for an air breathing engine on the X-43 A flight. The MER business model constitutes a spin-off of technologies initially by incubating in house, and ultimately creating spin-off stand alone companies. FMC was formed to provide for technology transfer in the area of fabrication of C-C composites. FMC has acquired ISO 9000 and AS9100 quality certifications. FMC is fabricating under AS9100 certification, flight parts for several flight programs. In addition, FMC is expanding the application of carbon-carbon composites to several critical military programs. In addition to space technology transfer to critical military programs, FMC is becoming the world leader in the commercial area of low-cost C-C composites for furnace fixtures. Market penetrations have been accomplished in North America, Europe and Asia. Low-cost, quick turn-around and excellent quality of FMC products paves the way to greatly increased sales. In addition, FMC is actively pursuing a joint venture with a new partner, near closure, to become the leading supplier of high temperature carbon based composites. In addition, several other spin-off companies such as TMC, FiC, Li-Tech and NMIC were formed by MER with a plethora of potential space applications.

  3. Managerial technology transfer

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Organisations need to think globally, but act locally - with a full appreciation of the diversity of local cultures. Major global companies must recognise that policies need to be managed with the broad context of business strategy and integrated into the work culture with the support of all elements of human resources management. Most currently, companies are accommodating national cultural differences while preserving work culture principals that encourage people to effectively execute the company's strategic objectives. Even to the casual observer, it is apparent that culture- a society's programming of the mind- has both a pervasive and changing influence on each national business environment. Global managers must recognise the influence of culture and be prepared to either respond to it or change it. This book examines current research in the study of managerial technology transfer.

  4. Search Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  5. Available Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  6. Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) is a mechanism with which EPA can patent its inventions and license them to companies, through which innovative technologies can enter the marketplace to improve the environment and human health.

  7. Federal Technology Transfer Act Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) partnerships demonstrate the many advantages of technology transfer and collaboration. EPA and partner organizations create valuable and applicable technologies for the marketplace.

  8. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  9. Technology Transfer: A Policy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    34 Caveman Club-Without Nail." More serious scholars indicate that understand- ing how to start and maintain fires was the first tech- nology transfer of...others. From caveman clubs to hyper- velocity missiles, technology transfer has played a significant military role; it also has assisted imperialis- tic

  10. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  11. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  12. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  13. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  14. Innovative technology transfer of nondestructive evaluation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Technology transfer is often an afterthought for many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) researchers. Effective technology transfer should be considered during the planning and execution of research projects. This paper outlines strategies for using technology transfer in NDE research and presents a wide variety of technology transfer methods used by a cooperative...

  15. Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1993-01-01

    Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.

  16. Macroeconomic level of technology transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnova Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available World practice of economic management has proved that the best indicator of competitiveness is achieved by that economic system, the economic units of which timely and adequately update the resource and technical base, thus achieving higher financial and economic indicators. Ensuring that sustainable development becomes possible due to the transfer of technological innovations, namely the diffusion from the developer to the customer on both commercial and free of charge basis. The article focuses on functioning of technology transfer at the macro level, namely the creation of its domestic models.

  17. Technology transfer and space science missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Mario

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer and space science missions are provided. Topics covered include: project scientist role within NASA; role of universities in technology transfer; role of government laboratories in research; and technology issues associated with science.

  18. Impact of equine assisted reproductive technologies (standard embryo transfer or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with in vitro culture and embryo transfer) on placenta and foal morphometry and placental gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Orlando A; Couturier-Tarrade, Anne; Choi, Young-Ho; Aubrière, Marie-Christine; Ritthaler, Justin; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2017-07-24

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), in vitro embryo culture and embryo transfer (ET) may be associated with alterations in fetal and placental development. In horses, ET has been used for decades. More recently, in vitro embryo production by ICSI and in vitro culture, followed by embryo transfer (ICSI-C) has become an accepted method for clinical foal production. However, no information is available on the effects of ICSI-C or even of standard ET itself on placental and neonatal parameters in horses. We therefore evaluated placental and neonatal morphology and placental gene expression in reining- and cutting-type American Quarter Horse foals produced using different technologies. Thirty foals and placentas (naturally conceived (NC), ET and ICSI-C; 10 in each group) were examined morphometrically. The only parameter that differed significantly between groups was the length of the foal upper hindlimb, which was longer in ET and ICSI-C than in NC foals. Evaluation of placental mRNA expression for 17 genes related to growth and vascularisation showed no difference in gene expression between groups. These data indicate that within this population, use of ARTs was not associated with meaningful changes in foal or placental morphometry or in expression of the placental genes evaluated.

  19. Technology Transfer: A Contact Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Nina P.

    1995-01-01

    Technology transfer is a dynamic process, involving dynamic people as the bridge between NASA Langley Research Center and the outside world. This bridge, for nonaerospace applications, is known as the Technology Applications Group. The introduction of new innovations and expertise where they are needed occurs through a 'push' and 'pull' process. A 'push' occurs when a new technology is first developed with high commercial potential and then a company is found to licence or further develop the technology. The 'pull' process occurs through problem statements. A company or group will submit a written statement of what they need and the shortcomings of commercially available technology. The Technology Transfer Team (T3) reviews these problem statements and decides where NASA LaRC can offer assistance. A researcher or group of researchers are then identified who can help solve the problem and they are put in contact with the company. Depending upon the situation in either method, a Space Act Agreement (SAA), or outline of the responsibilities for each party, is developed.

  20. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  1. A convenient cancer vaccine therapy with in vivo transfer of interleukin 12 expression plasmid using gene gun technology after priming with irradiated carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Masa-aki; Sakai, Tohru; Ishii, Kazunari; Zhang, Manxin; Nakano, Yoko; Nitta, Yoshio; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Kanayama, Hiro-omi; Kagawa, Susumu; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2002-02-01

    We studied interleukin (IL)-12 gene therapy using a gene gun as a new autologous vaccination strategy for cancer. In the first experiment, BALB/c mice were inoculated with syngeneic murine renal cancer cells (Renca) intradermally in the abdomen. This was followed by an injection of IL-12 expression plasmid using the gene gun. About 40% of the mice exhibited rejection of the tumor after the treatment and these mice also acquired immunological resistance against a secondary challenge with Renca cells. Based on these results, we examined whether antitumor activity can be potentiated when mice undergo combination treatment with intradermal inoculation of irradiated Renca cells and transfection with IL-12 gene. Inoculation of irradiated Renca cells alone was partially effective in inducing antitumor immunity, whereas the combined treatment remarkably intensified this effect. Moreover, this combined treatment inhibited tumor establishment and enhanced survival of the mice with tumor infiltration by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, even when the treatment was started after tumor-implantation at a distant site. This antitumor effect was antigen specific and we confirmed the induction of antitumor cytotoxic T cells by this treatment. These results show that local cutaneous transfer of IL-12 expression plasmid using gene gun technology enhances systemic and specific antitumor immunity primed by irradiated tumor cells.

  2. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR CUCUMBER (Cucumis sativus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dell

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... This technology transfer trials have shown the advantages and ... Key words: Cucumber production, protected agriculture tunnels, cost benefit ratio, technology transfer, ... Use of PA can increase production by more than five.

  3. EPA Reports to Congress on Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agencies are required to report to the Congress annually on their technology transfer activities. These reports summarize technology transfer activities of the EPA’s federal laboratories, by fiscal year.

  4. Accelerating the transfer of improved production technologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accelerating the transfer of improved production technologies: controlling African cassava mosaic ... African Crop Science Journal ... A national network of cassava workers (NANEC) was created to address the problem of technology transfer.

  5. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Final report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1996-02-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants often involves the introduction of homologous or partly homologous genes. Ectropic introduction of homologous sequences into plant genomes may trigger epigenetic changes, making expression of the genes unpredictable. The main project objective was to examine the feasibility of using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer for homologous gene targeting in plants.

  6. Technology transfer within the telecare technology innovation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlies, R.D. van der; Felix, E.

    2013-01-01

    Telecare technology is not common yet, although it is perceived as promising. Most studies on telecare technology transfer present a case involving the use of a single methodology and approach during some steps of technology transfer. Technology transfer models cannot be sensibly constructed if they

  7. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  8. Technological transfer to the education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Melamed-Varela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient strategies related to generation of differentiation factors which contribute to stability and sustainability in time as well as the  momentum of technological development in different territories is represented by the growth in scientific, technological and innovative development based on the structure of economic systems. Education is considered a fundamental element because it is the essence in the formation and fortification of the capacities, skills and competencies in human capital. This is needed for the management of research projects, development and innovation that will contribute to technology transfer and the progress of scientific knowledge that is encouraged from the inside of the organizational structures of the national economic sectors One of the most influential and conceptual tendencies of economic thinking in the countries (Gomez, Ibagón& Forero, 2014 are represented by the theories based on endogenous development in Latin America.  In addition,  the scientific development of a nation brewing from a process of internal learning and strengthening of the technical and technological capabilities that support the processes of education and research as generators of knowledge (Amar &Diazgranados, 2006, this principle is supported by Mazzucato´s (2014 theory,  who considers states as  capable of generating a platform for enabling capabilities of resources for the scientific and technological development entrepreneurs ;fact that are continuously supported by education. Starting from this series of concepts, the following question arises: do different levels of modern educational institutions use technological access? It must be taken into account that the scientific and technological progress results of the research, development and innovation (RDI is not indifferent for educational organizations, an activity that is mostly awarded to the universities and technological development centers (Ortiz, 2012

  9. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  10. Gas turbine heat transfer and cooling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin; Ekkad, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    FundamentalsNeed for Turbine Blade CoolingTurbine-Cooling TechnologyTurbine Heat Transfer and Cooling IssuesStructure of the BookReview Articles and Book Chapters on Turbine Cooling and Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 2010ReferencesTurbine Heat TransferIntroductionTurbine-Stage Heat TransferCascade Vane Heat-Transfer ExperimentsCascade Blade Heat TransferAirfoil Endwall Heat TransferTurbine Rotor Blade Tip Heat TransferLeading-Edge Region Heat TransferFlat-Surface Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 20102.10 ClosureReferencesTurbine Film CoolingIntroductionFilm Cooling on Rotat

  11. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  12. In vivo particle-mediated gene transfer for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmilevich, A L; Yang, N S

    2000-01-01

    During the past several years, particle-mediated delivery techniques have been developed as a nonviral technology for gene transfer (1-7). For mammalian somatic tissues, this technology, popularly known as the gene gun method, has been shown effective for transfection of skin, liver, pancreas, muscle, spleen, and other organs in vivo (3,4), brain, mammary, and leukocyte primary cultures or tissue explants ex vivo (2,5-7), and a wide range of cell lines in vitro (3,6,7). In this chapter, we describe the general principles, mechanisms, protocols, and uses of the particle-mediated gene transfer technology for in vivo gene transfer, mainly into skin tissues. Specific applications of this technology to basic studies in molecular biology as well as to gene therapy and genetic immunization against cancer are addressed.

  13. Judging the international transfer of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    International transfer of technology is a widely discussed area in the scientific literature. Although many different factors are discussed in the literature that affect the transfer of technology, it is not clear how to judge the performance of companies involved in international technology

  14. Judging The International Transfer Of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.

    2000-01-01

    International transfer of technology is a widely discussed area in the scientific literature. Although many different factors are discussed in the literature that affect the transfer of technology, it is not clear how to judge the performance of companies involved in international technology transfe

  15. A case of technology transfer in Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattacia Dabescki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As a process of transferring skills, knowledge, technologies, methods of manufacturing and facilities among organizations, the transfer of technology is instrumental for boosting the economy through creation of competitive products, new jobs and a better quality of life. The stagnant environment for technology transfers in Macedonia in the post-privatisation era is a result of a combination of factors. Among them is the outdated educational system that does not boost entrepreneurial spirit and innovation thinking. Main purpose of this paper is to examine the current status, conditions, anomalies and challenges for technology transfer in the Republic of Macedonia, as well as the potential for development and possibilities for improvement of the process. Through a lens of the technology transfer paradigm, this exploratory study will present a case in which the Foundation Business Start-up Centre in Macedonia, as a technology transfer agent provided links and cooperative platform for creation of new technologies and innovations within the local SME ecosystem. The focus will be on a couple of initiatives for technology development and transfer in a domestic context. Results from the process of implementation of these initiatives will be discussed, along with their stimulating impact on the environment for technology transfer.

  16. Technology Transfer/Commercialization Report 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Technology opportunities and successes in 2002: Hilbert-Huang transform. New sensors via sol-gel-filled fiber optics. Hierarchical segmentation software. 2. Activity in 2002: encouraging researcher involvment. 10th annual new technology reporting award program. Commercial technology development program. 3. Inventorying new technologies: Sensors and detectors. Environmental systems. Information systems. Guidance, navigation, and control. Thermal and cryogenics. Optics. Patenting Goddard technologies. Striking gold with NASA technology transfer.

  17. Technology Transfer/Commercialization Report 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Technology opportunities and successes in 2002: Hilbert-Huang transform. New sensors via sol-gel-filled fiber optics. Hierarchical segmentation software. 2. Activity in 2002: encouraging researcher involvment. 10th annual new technology reporting award program. Commercial technology development program. 3. Inventorying new technologies: Sensors and detectors. Environmental systems. Information systems. Guidance, navigation, and control. Thermal and cryogenics. Optics. Patenting Goddard technologies. Striking gold with NASA technology transfer.

  18. An integrated approach towards technology transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, L.F. van der; Eldering, C.J.J.; Putten, N.J. van

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 the European Space Agency (ESA), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Netherlands Organisation of applied scientific research TNO initiated the Dutch Technology Transfer Programme (DTTP). Since then, 'technology transfer' has been a relevant part of Dutch space policy. The DTTP aim

  19. An integrated approach towards technology transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, L.F. van der; Eldering, C.J.J.; Putten, N.J. van

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 the European Space Agency (ESA), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Netherlands Organisation of applied scientific research TNO initiated the Dutch Technology Transfer Programme (DTTP). Since then, 'technology transfer' has been a relevant part of Dutch space policy. The DTTP aim

  20. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  1. Technology Transfer/Commercialization Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Who we are. (2) Technology opportunities and successes in 2002: Hilbert-Huang transform; new sensors via sol-gel-filled fiber optics; hierarchical segmentation software. (3) Activities in 2002: encouraging researcher involvement; inventorying new technologies; patenting Goddard technologies; promoting Goddard technologies; establishing new agreements;seeking and bestowing awards. (4) How to reach Goddard's: technology commercialization office.

  2. Technology Transfer/Commercialization Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Who we are. (2) Technology opportunities and successes in 2002: Hilbert-Huang transform; new sensors via sol-gel-filled fiber optics; hierarchical segmentation software. (3) Activities in 2002: encouraging researcher involvement; inventorying new technologies; patenting Goddard technologies; promoting Goddard technologies; establishing new agreements;seeking and bestowing awards. (4) How to reach Goddard's: technology commercialization office.

  3. Technology Transfer brochure (Swedish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  4. Technology Transfer brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  5. Technology Transfer brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in the phytosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Turner, S.; Bailey, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, the ecological aspects of gene transfer processes between bacteria in the phytosphere are examined in the context of emerging evidence for the dominant role that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played in the evolutionary shaping of bacterial communities. Moreover, the impact of the putative

  7. Technology transfer — bridging space and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Students of Technology Transfer Design Project Team (ISU Summer Session 1997)

    Strategies, policies and methods by which technologies can be cross-fertilized between the space and non-space sectors were examined by students of the design project "Technology Transfer — Bridging Space and Society". This project was undertaken by students attending the 1997 10th Anniversary Summer Session Program of the International Space University. General issues relating to transfer of technology were discussed including definitions and mechanisms (push, pull, interactive and pro-active). As well as looking at case studies and the impact of national policies on space agencies, the design project also sought to look at technology transfer on a country-by-country basis, selecting various countries for scrutiny and reporting on their technology transfer status. The project report shows how transfer of technology varies between nations and when analyzed with the case studies identifies the general strategies, policies and methods in use and how they can be improved. Finally, the report seeks to recommend certain issues to governments, space agencies and industrial organizations to facilitate the transfer of technology. These include the development of a generic metrics system and the implementation of better appropriate procedures and mechanisms for a positive diffusion process between space and non-space sectors.

  8. Risk Management in Biologics Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Robert; Tsang, Jonathan; Xie, Jasmina; Hohwald, Stephen; Bain, David; Willison-Parry, Derek

    Technology transfer of biological products is a complex process that is important for product commercialization. To achieve a successful technology transfer, the risks that arise from changes throughout the project must be managed. Iterative risk analysis and mitigation tools can be used to both evaluate and reduce risk. The technology transfer stage gate model is used as an example tool to help manage risks derived from both designed process change and unplanned changes that arise due to unforeseen circumstances. The strategy of risk assessment for a change can be tailored to the type of change. In addition, a cross-functional team and centralized documentation helps maximize risk management efficiency to achieve a successful technology transfer. © PDA, Inc. 2016.

  9. [Technology transfer of building materials by ECOMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the plan for technology transfer of building materials developed by ECOMAT to the commercial private sector. Some of the materials are briefly discussed like foams, fiber reinforcement, fly ash development, and polymer fillers.

  10. Gene transfer strategies for augmenting cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppel, K; Koch, W J; Lefkowitz, R J

    1997-07-01

    Recent transgenic as well as gene-targeted animal models have greatly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of normal and compromised heart function. These studies have raised the possibility of using somatic gene transfer as a means for improving cardiac function. DNA transfer to a significant portion of the myocardium has thus far been difficult to accomplish. This review describes current efforts to achieve myocardial gene transfer in several model systems, with particular emphasis placed on adenovirus-mediated gene delivery, its possibilities, and current limitations. (Trend Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:145-150). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  12. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  13. Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Christina M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

  14. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  15. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers

  16. NASA's southeast technology transfer alliance: A cooperative technology assistance initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Harry G.; Sheehan, William; Johnson, Anne

    1996-03-01

    Since 1958, NASA has been charged with actively assisting in the transfer of technologies derived from the United States space program into the industrial sector of the U.S. economy. This has historically been accomplished through technology transfer offices working independently at each NASA field center. NASA recently restructured the program to provide regional coordination, maximize efficiencies, eliminate redundancies, and capitalize on each center's fundamental technology strengths. The nation is divided into six NASA technology transfer geographical regions with each region containing one or more NASA field centers and a regional technology transfer center. The southeast region includes the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The NASA field centers in this region are: the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama; the Kennedy Space Center in Florida; and the Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The centers have teamed to focus primarily on regional industries and businesses, to provide a wide range of resources for U.S. industries, including access to unique government facilities, regional workshops, and technical problem solving. Hundreds of American businesses have benefited from this new regional initiative, as evidenced by reports of over 10,500 added or saved jobs and over 988 million worth of economic impacts as a result of their technology transfer activities.

  17. 76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference...: The NIH Office of Technology Transfer extends invitations to attend the 2011 Technology Transfer... by the NIH Office of Technology Transfer, TTS Ltd. and regional host partners such as BIO Maryland...

  18. Technology transfer trends in Indian space programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhara Murthi, K. R.; Shoba, T. S.

    2010-10-01

    Indian space programme, whose objectives involve acceleration of economic and social development through applications of space technology, has been engaged in the development of state-of-the-art satellite systems, launch vehicles and equipment necessary for applications. Even during the early phase of evolution of this Programme, deliberate policies have been adopted by the national space agency, namely, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), to promote spin-off benefit from the technologies developed for the use of space projects. Consistently adhering to this policy, ISRO has transferred over 280 technologies till date, spanning a wide spectrum of disciplines. This has resulted in a fruitful two-way cooperation between a number of SMEs and the ISRO. In order to make the technology transfer process effective, ISRO has adopted a variety of functional and organizational policies that included awareness building measures, licensee selection methods, innovative contract systems, diverse transfer processes, post licencing services and feedback mechanisms. Besides analyzing these policies and their evolution, the paper discusses various models adopted for technology transfer and their impact on assessment. It also touches upon relevant issues relating to creating interface between public funded R&D and the private commercial enterprises. It suggests few models in which international cooperation could be pursued in this field.

  19. Technology Transfer Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Wendy Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to federal agencies, state and local governments, universities, and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, job creation, and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In some cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies, international organizations, domestic and foreign commercial entities, or small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further development of emerging technologies. In this multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of select INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions and research agreements that were executed during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to

  20. Local R&D and Technology Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    -2014. The propensity score matching (PSM) analysis reveals that the majority owned foreign companies spend less on R&D and more on technology transfers than their local counterparts. Overall, threshold equity holding and global conditions matter. A panel data regression analysis on matched sample confirms the findings...... and validates the PSM findings. A horizontal cluster analysis on 3-digit industry level data shows that foreign firms cluster in high technology industries....

  1. Plant gene technology: social considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 3 (3), pp. 156-158 ... The genetic modification of plants by gene technology is of immense potential benefits, but there may ... this modern age. ... advantages over the current rate of food production and.

  2. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  3. A New Strategic Approach to Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The principal goal of Federal research and development (R&D) is to solve problems for public benefit. Technology transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship: words and concepts that once belonged exclusively in the domain of private research enterprises, have quickly become part of everyday lexicon in Fe...

  4. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  5. Climate change scenarios and technology transfer protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, Socrates; Turton, Hal [Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    We apply a specific version of MERGE-ETL, an integrated assessment model, to study global climate policies supported by Technology Transfer Protocols (TTPs). We model a specific formulation of such a TTP where donor countries finance via carbon tax revenues, the diffusion of carbon-free technologies in developing countries (DCs) and quantify its benefits. Industrialized countries profit from increased technology exports, global diffusion of advanced technology (leading to additional technology learning and cost reductions) and reduced climate damages through the likelihood of greater global participation in a new international agreement. DCs experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and expected secondary benefits of carbon abatement (such as reduced local and regional air pollution). The analysis identifies potential candidate technologies that could be supported under a TTP, and the impact of a TTP on economic development (including the flow of transfer subsidies) and global emissions. Although a TTP may encourage additional participation, such a proposal is only likely to be successful if an increased willingness to pay to avoid climate damages is accepted, first by the present and future generations of the industrialized world and later on, when sufficient economic growth is accumulated, by today's developing countries. (author)

  6. Gene transfer to promote cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collesi, Chiara; Giacca, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    There is an impelling need to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with myocardial infarction and heart failure. Leading from the large quantity of new information gathered over the last few years on the mechanisms controlling cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryonic and fetal life, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on cardiac gene transfer. Different protein-coding genes controlling cell cycle progression or cardiomyocyte specification and differentiation, along with microRNA mimics and inhibitors regulating pre-natal and early post-natal cell proliferation, are amenable to transformation in potential therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. These gene therapy approaches are conceptually revolutionary, since they are aimed at stimulating the intrinsic potential of differentiated cardiac cells to proliferate, rather than relying on the implantation of exogenously expanded cells to achieve tissue regeneration. For efficient and prolonged cardiac gene transfer, vectors based on the Adeno-Associated Virus stand as safe, efficient and reliable tools for cardiac gene therapy applications.

  7. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  8. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  9. Conceptual Model for Transfer of Technology in a Shipyard

    OpenAIRE

    Firmansyah, Mohammad Rizal; Djafar, Wihdat

    2017-01-01

    Transfer of technology is an important program to be done by a shipyard if the respective shipyard is to maintain and increase its competitiveness. But sometimes, some aspects that need to be considered in a transfer of technology program are ignored. Before any transfer of technology program is to be conducted in any shipyard, identification of the required technology to be transferred and why the changes in shipyard technology are needed must be done. These identifications will lead to the ...

  10. Validation of InnoSPICE for technology transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mitašiūnas, Antanas; Besson, Jeremy Daniel; Boronowsky, Michael; Woronowicz, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Innovation and technology transfer consist mainly of process-oriented activities and can be described in process-oriented terms by an innovation and technology transfer process capability model such as InnoSPICE. To verify such a thesis, an extended validation of the InnoSPICE adequacy for different factual innovation and technology transfer activities is needed. The purpose of this paper is to validate the InnoSPICE model for technology transfer led by a technology developer based on capabil...

  11. Domestic Technology Transfer versus Technology Export Control - The Emerging National Policies and the Role of the Bench Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Defense Technology Transfer Fundamentals 10 B. Governmental Stimuli to Technology Transfer 1. Information Programs 2. Information Analysis Centers 3...networking. II. Domestic Technology Transfer A. Non- Defense Technology Transfer Fundamentals The nation’s technological reservoir is filled by

  12. Tropical medicine: Telecommunications and technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Llewellyn J.

    1991-01-01

    The potential for global outbreaks of tropical infectious diseases, and our ability to identify and respond to such outbreaks is a major concern. Rapid, efficient telecommunications is viewed as part of the solution to this set of problems - the means to link a network of epidemiological field stations via satellite with U.S. academic institutions and government agencies, for purposes of research, training in tropical medicine, and observation of and response to epidemic emergencies. At a workshop, telecommunications and technology transfer were addressed and applications of telecommunications technology in long-distance consultation, teaching and disaster relief were demonstrated. Applications in teaching and consultation in tropical infectious diseases is discussed.

  13. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  14. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  15. Technology and knowledge transfer for development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available . An indicative list of recommendations to turnaround the knowledge and technology transfer condition of Africa into a more resounding success than currently existing is indicated. A brief conclusion that includes critical percepts and thoughts on the future... growth and development. "Knowledge Management caters to the critical issues of organizational adaption, survival and competence in face of increasingly discontinuous environmental change. Essentially, it embodies organizational processes that seek...

  16. Lateral transfer of the lux gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Sabu; Okada, Kazuhisa; Hoshino, Akinori; Iida, Tetsuya; Honda, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    The lux operon is an uncommon gene cluster. To find the pathway through which the operon has been transferred, we sequenced the operon and both flanking regions in four typical luminous species. In Vibrio cholerae NCIMB 41, a five-gene cluster, most genes of which were highly similar to orthologues present in Gram-positive bacteria, along with the lux operon, is inserted between VC1560 and VC1563, on chromosome 1. Because this entire five-gene cluster is present in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01, about 1.5 Mbp upstream of the operon, we deduced that the operon and the gene cluster were transferred from V. cholerae to an ancestor of Pr. luminescens. Because in both V. fischeri and Shewanella hanedai, luxR and luxI were found just upstream of the operon, we concluded that the operon was transferred from either species to the other. Because most of the genes flanking the operon were highly similar to orthologues present on chromosome 2 of vibrios, we speculated that the operon of most species is located on this chromosome. The undigested genomic DNAs of five luminous species were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In all the species except V. cholerae, the operons are located on chromosome 2.

  17. Horizontal gene transfer in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, is the model insect for the order Lepidoptera, has economically important values, and has gained some representative behavioral characteristics compared to its wild ancestor. The genome of B. mori has been fully sequenced while function analysis of BmChi-h and BmSuc1 genes revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT maybe bestow a clear selective advantage to B. mori. However, the role of HGT in the evolutionary history of B. mori is largely unexplored. In this study, we compare the whole genome of B. mori with those of 382 prokaryotic and eukaryotic species to investigate the potential HGTs. Results Ten candidate HGT events were defined in B. mori by comprehensive sequence analysis using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian method combining with EST checking. Phylogenetic analysis of the candidate HGT genes suggested that one HGT was plant-to- B. mori transfer while nine were bacteria-to- B. mori transfer. Furthermore, functional analysis based on expression, coexpression and related literature searching revealed that several HGT candidate genes have added important characters, such as resistance to pathogen, to B. mori. Conclusions Results from this study clearly demonstrated that HGTs play an important role in the evolution of B. mori although the number of HGT events in B. mori is in general smaller than those of microbes and other insects. In particular, interdomain HGTs in B. mori may give rise to functional, persistent, and possibly evolutionarily significant new genes.

  18. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  19. New Ways in Technology Transfer from University Towards Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Kroonenberg, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three approaches to technology transfer are described: passive, stimulative, and active. A condition for successful technology transfer to small- and medium-sized industry is the availability of "receivers" in the industries. Stimulating young engineers to start their own small company can affect technology transfer positively. (MSE)

  20. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  1. Viral vectors for gene transfer: current status of gene therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy for the correction of inherited or acquired disease has gained increasing importance in recent years. Successful treatment of children suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was achieved using retrovirus vectors for gene transfer. Encouraging improvements of vision were reported in a genetic eye disorder (LCA) leading to early childhood blindness. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were used for gene transfer in these trials. This chapter gives an overview of the design and delivery of viral vectors for the transport of a therapeutic gene into a target cell or tissue. The construction and production of retrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors are covered. The focus is on production methods suitable for biopharmaceutical upscaling and for downstream processing. Quality control measures and biological safety considerations for the use of vectors in clinical trials are discussed.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  3. Methods for particle-mediated gene transfer into skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, N S; McCabe, D E; Swain, W F

    1997-01-01

    During the past 5 yr, particle-mediated delivery techniques have been developed as a physical means for gene transfer into various eukaryotic systems, including plants, insects, fish, and mammals (1-7). For mammalian somatic tissues, this technology, popularly known as the gene gun method, has been shown effective in transfection of skin, liver, pancreas, muscle, spleen, and other organs in vivo (3,4); brain, mammary, and leukocyte pnmary cultures or explants ex vivo (2,5-7); and a wide range of different mammalian cell lines in vitro (3,6,7).

  4. TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-01-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during

  5. Progress report on technology transfer at CERN since December 1999

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    In March 1999 the Finance Committee endorsed the CERN Technology Transfer paper FC/4126 entitled "Technology Transfer Policy at CERN". In June 1999 Council took note of the plan to create a new Division, the Education and Technology Transfer Division, one of its essential aims being to enhance the Technology Transfer activities at CERN. A verbal activity report on Technology Transfer was given at the December 1999 meeting of the Finance Committee. Finally, in January 2000, ETT Division came into existence. This document contains a description of the current organisation of TT activities together with some relevant results and highlights for the year 2000.

  6. Marketing for Oak Ridge technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosser, G.A.

    1989-06-15

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., which manages major research and production facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the Department of Energy, has implemented a systematic approach to marketing for technology transfer. Unique mechanisms have been created to address the need for market research and analysis, strategy formulation, and the execution of plans designed to engender the broadest commercial use of government-funded technologies. Establishment of formal ties with the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Business has resulted in an expanded role for marketing in support of the Oak Ridge program. The creation of graduate research positions has enabled MBA students to contribute to, and learn from, a program which is at the forefront of an important national initiative.

  7. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the

  8. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  9. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer is a significant driver of gene innovation in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Brosnahan, Michael L; Hackett, Jeremiah D

    2013-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an evolutionarily and ecologically important group of microbial eukaryotes. Previous work suggests that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important source of gene innovation in these organisms. However, dinoflagellate genomes are notoriously large and complex, making genomic investigation of this phenomenon impractical with currently available sequencing technology. Fortunately, de novo transcriptome sequencing and assembly provides an alternative approach for investigating HGT. We sequenced the transcriptome of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense Group IV to investigate how HGT has contributed to gene innovation in this group. Our comprehensive A. tamarense Group IV gene set was compared with those of 16 other eukaryotic genomes. Ancestral gene content reconstruction of ortholog groups shows that A. tamarense Group IV has the largest number of gene families gained (314-1,563 depending on inference method) relative to all other organisms in the analysis (0-782). Phylogenomic analysis indicates that genes horizontally acquired from bacteria are a significant proportion of this gene influx, as are genes transferred from other eukaryotes either through HGT or endosymbiosis. The dinoflagellates also display curious cases of gene loss associated with mitochondrial metabolism including the entire Complex I of oxidative phosphorylation. Some of these missing genes have been functionally replaced by bacterial and eukaryotic xenologs. The transcriptome of A. tamarense Group IV lends strong support to a growing body of evidence that dinoflagellate genomes are extraordinarily impacted by HGT.

  11. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thane Papke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria.

  12. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  13. Adenovirus-mediated nitric oxide synthase gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Kathleen G; Shapiro, Richard A; Tzeng, Edith; Kibbe, Melina R

    2004-01-01

    The varied biological effects of nitric oxide (NO) have led to intense research into its diverse physiologic and pathophysiologic roles in multiple disease processes. It has been implicated in the development of altered vasomotor tone, intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis, impotence, host defense, and wound healing. Using the modern technologies of recombinant DNA and gene transfer using adenoviral vectors, the effects of NO derived from various NO synthase (NOS) enzymes can be studied in a variety of tissues and the therapeutic applications of NOS is possible. Such uses of NOS gene transfer have been investigated extensively in the vasculature where NO is critical to regulating vascular homeostasis. NOS gene therapy has the theoretical advantage of allowing NO delivery to be localized, thereby limiting potential adverse effects of NO. The benefits of adenoviral vectors in gene transfer include relatively high transduction efficiencies, both replicating and nonreplicating cells may be infected, and the high titers of adenovirus that can be produced. The methods described in this chapter include the cloning of the iNOS cDNA into a recombinant adenoviral vector, large-scale production of that vector AdiNOS preparation, and the use of the vector to transduce tissue in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Accelerated technology transfer: the UK quantum initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Simon D.

    2016-10-01

    A new generation of quantum technology based systems, exploiting effects such as superposition and entanglement, will enable widespread, highly disruptive applications which are expected to be of great economic significance. However, the technology is only just emerging from the physics laboratory and generally remains at low TRLs. The question is: where, and when, will this impact be first manifest? The UK, with substantial Government backing, has embarked on an ambitious national program to accelerate the process of technology transfer with the objective of seizing a significant and sustainable share of the future economic benefit for the UK. Many challenges and uncertainties remain but the combined and co-ordinated efforts of Government, Industry and Academia are making great progress. The level of collaboration is unusually high and the goal of embedding a "QT Ecosystem" in the UK looks to be attainable. This paper describes the UK national programme, its key players, and their respective roles. It will illustrate some of the likely first commercial applications and provide a status update. Some of the challenges that might prevent realisation of the goal will be highlighted.

  15. Ultrasound and Microbubbles: Their Functions in Gene Transfer In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunchao; HUANG Daozhong; LI Kaiyan; WANG Zhihui; HONG Kai; WANG Fen; ZANG Qingping

    2007-01-01

    To examine the role of ultrasound in gene delivery in vitro, three cells lines were exposed to the low-frequency ultrasound of varying intensities and for different durations to evaluate their effect on gene transfection and cell viability of the cells. Microbubble (MB), Optison (10%), was also used to observe the role of the microbubbles in gene transfection. The results demonstrated that as the ultrasound intensity and the exposure time increased, the gene transfer rate increased and the cell viability decreased, but at high energy intensities, the cell viability decreased dramatically, which caused the transfer rate to decrease. The most efficient ultrasound intensity for inducing gene transfer was 1 W/cm2 with duration being 20 s. At the same energy intensity, higher ultrasound intensity could achieve maximal gene transfer rate earlier. Microbubbles could increase ultrasound-induced cell gene transfer rate by about 2 to 3 times mainly at lower energy intensities. Moreover, microbubbles could raise the maximum gene transfer rate mediated by ultrasound. It is concluded that the low-frequency ultrasound can induce cell gene transfer and the cell gene transfer rate and viability are correlated with not only the ultrasound energy intensity but also the ultrasound intensity, the higher ultrasound intensity achieves its maximal transfer rate more quickly and the ultrasound intensity that can induce optimal gene transfer is 1 W/cm2 with duration being 20 s, and microbubbles can significantly increase the maximal gene transfer rate in vitro.

  16. A Study of the Factors Associated with Successful Technology Transfer and their Applicability to Air Force Technology Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    relay race, where one runner passes the baton to the next. Richard Dorf describes in "Models for Technology Transfer From Universities and Research...Meeting. 9. Dorf , Richard C. "Models for Technology Transfer From Universities and Research Laboratories," Technology Management Publication TM1.1988...both located at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Namely, Tim Sharp, Chief, Technology Transfer Division and my faculty advisor, Major Richard

  17. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and the productivity of host country domestic firms. We rely on a specially designed survey of over 4000 manufacturing firms in Vietnam, and separate out productivity gains along the supply chain (obtained through direct...... transfers of knowledge/technology between linked firms) from productivity effects through indirect FDI spillovers. In addition to identifying indirect vertical productivity spillovers from FDI, our results show that there are productivity gains associated with direct linkages between foreign......-owned and domestic firms along the supply chain not captured by commonly used measures of spillovers. This includes evidence of productivity gains through forward linkages for domestic firms which receive inputs from foreign-owned firms....

  19. OCT Technology Transfer and the OCT Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric A.

    The field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) has blossomed dramatically since the first studies by various researchers around the world began in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Since then cumulatively, there have been dozens of companies created, over a hundred research groups working on or with OCT, over a thousand OCT patents issued, over 10,000 research articles published, tens of millions of patients scanned with OCT, hundreds of millions of venture capital and corporate R&D dollars invested, hundreds of millions of dollars in company acquisitions, and over a billion of dollars of OCT system revenue. This chapter will describe some of the history and factors involved in OCT technology transfer and commercialization, give a snapshot of the current OCT market, and speculate on some future OCT issues.

  20. Technology transfer at NASA - A librarian's view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA programs, publications, and services promoting the transfer and utilization of aerospace technology developed by and for NASA are briefly surveyed. Topics addressed include the corporate sources of NASA technical information and its interest for corporate users of information services; the IAA and STAR abstract journals; NASA/RECON, NTIS, and the AIAA Aerospace Database; the RECON Space Commercialization file; the Computer Software Management and Information Center file; company information in the RECON database; and services to small businesses. Also discussed are the NASA publications Tech Briefs and Spinoff, the Industrial Applications Centers, NASA continuing bibliographies on management and patent abstracts (indexed using the NASA Thesaurus), the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches, and the Aerospace Research Information Network (ARIN).

  1. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the

  2. 76 FR 71562 - Emergint Technologies, Inc.; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... AGENCY Emergint Technologies, Inc.; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... claimed as Confidential Business Information (CBI) by the submitter, will be transferred to Emergint Technologies, Inc. in accordance with 40 CFR 2.307(h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2). Emergint Technologies, Inc. has...

  3. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nijboer, F

    2015-01-01

    .... Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed...

  4. Department of Defense Laboratories: Finding a Future in Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    investment. There is no mention of DoD even trying. This, then, presents a problem for Defense technology transfer management. The President expects both...effort, but nonetheless felt unable to express their effort quantitatively. The potential size and demand for Defense technology transfer calls for some... Defense technology transfer is taking place, it is doing so on the enthusiasm and drive of a few key individuals. Political demand and legislation

  5. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  6. Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, and International Technology Transfer: A Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamal Saggi

    2002-01-01

    ...? Using these questions as motivation, this article surveys the recent trade literature on international technology transfer, paying particular attention to the role of foreign direct investment...

  7. Gene Transfer in Eukaryotic Cells Using Activated Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennig, Jörg

    Gene transfer into eukaryotic cells plays an important role in cell biology. Over the last 30 years a number of transfection methods have been developed to mediate gene transfer into eukaryotic cells. Classical methods include co-precipitation of DNA with calcium phosphate, charge-dependent precipitation of DNA with DEAE-dextran, electroporation of nucleic acids, and formation of transfection complexes between DNA and cationic liposomes. Gene transfer technologies based on activated PAMAM-dendrimers provide another class of transfection reagents. PAMAM-dendrimers are highly branched, spherical molecules. Activation of newly synthesized dendrimers involves hydrolytic removal of some of the branches, and results in a molecule with a higher degree of flexibility. Activated dendrimers assemble DNA into compact structures via charge interactions. Activated dendrimer - DNA complexes bind to the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells, and are transported into the cell by non-specific endocytosis. A structural model of the activated dendrimer - DNA complex and a potential mechanism for its uptake into cells will be discussed.

  8. Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

  9. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, Viola [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States); Chapman, Kathy [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States); Lovendahl, Kristi [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) is a unique not-for-profit network that focuses on transferring Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic oil and natural gas producing industry. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, research and development (R&D) consortiums and governments. Local affordable workshops delivered by Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs), which are typically a university or geological survey, are a primary tool. PTTC also maintains a website network, issues a national newsletter, provides a column in a major trade publication, and exhibits at major industry events. It also encourages industry to ask technology-related questions, striving to find relevant answers that will save questioners significant time. Working since late 1993, the PTTC network has a proven track record of providing industry with technology insights they can apply. Volunteers at the regional and national level provide key guidance regarding where to focus technical effort and help connect PTTC with industry. At historical funding levels, PTTC had been able to hold well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000+ attendees. As funding decreased in the early 2000s, the level of activity decreased and PTTC sought a merger with the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), becoming an AAPG-managed organization at the start of FY08. This relationship with AAPG was terminated by mutual consent in May 2011 and PTTC once again operates independently. Chris Hall, California continued to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors until December 2013. At the time PTTC reorganized into a RLO led organization with Mary Carr and Jeremy Viscomi as co-Executive Directors. Jerry Anderson became the Chairman of the PTTC Board of Directors and Chris Hall continues to serve on the Board. Workshop activity stabilized at 55-65 workshops per year averaging 3,100 attendees. FY14 represented the fifth year in a multi

  10. Horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Matveeva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Most genetic engineering of plants uses Agrobacterium mediated transformation to introduce novel gene content. In nature, insertion of T-DNA in the plant genome and its subsequent transfer via sexual reproduction has been shown in several species in the genera Nicotiana and Linaria. In these natural examples of horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants, the T-DNA donor is assumed to be a mikimopine strain of A.rhizogenes. A sequence homologous to the T-DNA of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes was found in the genome of untransformed Nicotiana glauca about 30 years ago, and was named cellular T-DNA (cT-DNA. It represents an imperfect inverted repeat and contains homologues of several T-DNA oncogenes (NgrolB, NgrolC, NgORF13, NgORF14 and an opine synthesis gene (Ngmis. A similar cT-DNA has also been found in other species of the genus Nicotiana. These presumably ancient homologues of T-DNA genes are still expressed, indicating that they may play a role in the evolution of these plants. Recently T-DNA has been detected and characterized in Linaria vulgaris and L. dalmatica. In Linaria vulgaris the cT-DNA is present in two copies and organized as a tandem imperfect direct repeat, containing LvORF2, LvORF3, LvORF8, LvrolA, LvrolB, LvrolC, LvORF13, LvORF14, and the Lvmis genes. All L. vulgaris and L. dalmatica plants screened contained the same T-DNA oncogenes and the mis gene. Evidence suggests that there were several independent T-DNA integration events into the genomes of these plant genera. We speculate that ancient plants transformed by A. rhizogenes might have acquired a selective advantage in competition with the parental species. Thus, the events of T-DNA insertion in the plant genome might have affected their evolution, resulting in the creation of new plant species. In this review we focus on the structure and functions of cT-DNA in Linaria and Nicotiana and discuss their possible evolutionary role.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  12. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  13. Auto-disable syringes for immunization: issues in technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J S; Milstien, J B

    1999-01-01

    WHO and its partners recommend the use of auto-disable syringes, "bundled" with the supply of vaccines when donor dollars are used, in all mass immunization campaigns, and also strongly advocate their use in routine immunization programmes. Because of the relatively high price of auto-disable syringes, WHO's Technical Network for Logistics in Health recommends that activities be initiated to encourage the transfer of production technology for these syringes as a means of promoting their use and enhancing access to the technology. The present article examines factors influencing technology transfer, including feasibility, corporate interest, cost, quality assurance, intellectual property considerations, and probable time frames for implementation. Technology transfer activities are likely to be complex and difficult, and may not result in lower prices for syringes. Guidelines are offered on technology transfer initiatives for auto-disable syringes to ensure the quality of the product, the reliability of the supply, and the feasibility of the technology transfer activity itself.

  14. Aphids acquired symbiotic genes via lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakabachi Atsushi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphids possess bacteriocytes, which are cells specifically differentiated to harbour the obligate mutualist Buchnera aphidicola (γ-Proteobacteria. Buchnera has lost many of the genes that appear to be essential for bacterial life. From the bacteriocyte of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we previously identified two clusters of expressed sequence tags that display similarity only to bacterial genes. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that they are encoded in the aphid genome. In this study, in order to assess the possibility of lateral gene transfer, we determined the full-length sequences of these transcripts, and performed detailed structural and phylogenetic analyses. We further examined their expression levels in the bacteriocyte using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results Sequence similarity searches demonstrated that these fully sequenced transcripts are significantly similar to the bacterial genes ldcA (product, LD-carboxypeptidase and rlpA (product, rare lipoprotein A, respectively. Buchnera lacks these genes, whereas many other bacteria, including Escherichia coli, a close relative of Buchnera, possess both ldcA and rlpA. Molecular phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that the aphid ldcA was derived from a rickettsial bacterium closely related to the extant Wolbachia spp. (α-Proteobacteria, Rickettsiales, which are intracellular symbionts of various lineages of arthropods. The evolutionary origin of rlpA was not fully resolved, but it was clearly demonstrated that its double-ψ β-barrel domain is of bacterial origin. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that ldcA and rlpA are expressed 11.6 and 154-fold higher in the bacteriocyte than in the whole body, respectively. LdcA is an enzyme required for recycling murein (peptidoglycan, which is a component of the bacterial cell wall. As Buchnera possesses a cell wall composed of murein but lacks ldcA, a high level of expression of the aphid ldcA in the

  15. How technology transfer issues are managed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sink, C.H. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Easley, K.R. [Waste Policy Inst. (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1989, Secretary of Energy James Watkins made a commitment to accelerate DOE compliance with all applicable laws and standards aimed at protecting human health and the environment. At a minimum, this pledge requires the remediation of the 1989 inventory of chemical, radioactive, and mixed wastes at DOE production sites by 2019. The 1989 Complex inventory consisted of more than 3,700 sites, encompassing more than 26,000 acres contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In addition, over 500 surplus sites are awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties have contaminated soils (e.g., uranium tailings). Moreover, these problems exist at both inactive sites, where the primary focus is on environmental restoration, and at active sites, where the major emphasis is on improved waste management techniques. Although some of DOE`s problems are considered unique due to radioactivity, most forms of contamination resident in the Complex are not; rather, contaminants such as waste chemicals (e.g., inorganics), organics (e.g., fuels and solvents), halogenated organics (e.g., PCBs) and heavy metals commonly result in conventional industrial processes. Although certain other forms of contamination are more unique to DOE operations (e.g., radioactive materials, explosives, and pyrophorics), they are not exclusive to DOE. As DOE develops innovative solutions to these and related waste problems, it is imperative that technology systems and lessons learned be transferred from DOE sites and its R and D laboratories to private industry to maximize the nation`s return on environmental management technology investments.

  16. OPTIMIZING OUTCOME IN THE UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ALAVI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of

  17. Introduction to the workshop on technology transfer in software engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Warren; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    The goal of the Workshop on Technology Transfer in Software Engineering is to increase our understanding of technology transfer in software engineering, and to learn from successful case studies. We wanted to bring researchers and practitioners together to create an inventory of problems in software

  18. A southern region conference on technology transfer and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah F. Ashton; William G. Hubbard; H. Michael Rauscher

    2009-01-01

    Forest landowners and managers have different education and technology transfer needs and preferences. To be effective it is important to use a multi-faceted science delivery/technology transfer program to reach them. Multi-faceted science delivery programs can provide similar content over a wide range of mechanisms including printed publications, face-to-face...

  19. Academic Technology Transfer: Tracking, Measuring and Enhancing Its Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980 passage of the US Bayh-Dole Act, academic technology transfer has gained profile globally as a key component of knowledge-driven economic development. Research universities are seen as key contributors. In this article, focusing on the USA and drawing on over twenty years of experience in the field of academic technology transfer in…

  20. Academic Technology Transfer: Tracking, Measuring and Enhancing Its Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980 passage of the US Bayh-Dole Act, academic technology transfer has gained profile globally as a key component of knowledge-driven economic development. Research universities are seen as key contributors. In this article, focusing on the USA and drawing on over twenty years of experience in the field of academic technology transfer in…

  1. Progress in gene transfer by germ cells in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Use of germ cells as vectors for transgenesis in mammals has been well developed and offers exciting prospects for experimental and applied biology, agricultural and medical sciences.Such approach is referred to as either male germ cell mediated gene transfer (MGCMGT)or female germ cell mediated gene transfer(FGCMGT)technique.Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT),including its alternative method,testis-mediated gene transfer(TMGT),becomes an established and reliable method for transgenesis.They have been extensively used for producing transgenic animals.The newly developed approach of FGCMGT,ovary-mediated gene transfer(OMGT) is also a novel and useful tool for efficient transgenesis.This review highlights an overview of the recent progress in germ cell mediated gene transfer techniques,methods developed and mechanisms of nucleic acid uptake by germ cells.

  2. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  3. Plant genetics: gene transfer from parasitic to host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Jeffrey P; Stefanović, Sasa; Young, Gregory J; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2004-11-11

    Plant mitochondrial genes are transmitted horizontally across mating barriers with surprising frequency, but the mechanism of transfer is unclear. Here we describe two new cases of horizontal gene transfer, from parasitic flowering plants to their host flowering plants, and present phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence that this occurred as a result of direct physical contact between the two. Our findings complement the discovery that genes can be transferred in the opposite direction, from host to parasite plant.

  4. Technology transfer? The rise of China and India in green technology sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Lema, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    International technology transfer is central to the debate about how to curb the carbon emissions from rapid economic growth in China and India. But given China and India's great progress in building innovation capabilities and green industries, how relevant is technology transfer...... transfer in these sectors in China and India. We argue that the emphasis should shift from transfer of mitigation technology to international collaboration and local innovation...

  5. Toward equality of biodiversity knowledge through technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Monika; Collen, Ben

    2015-10-01

    To help stem the continuing decline of biodiversity, effective transfer of technology from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries is required. Biodiversity technology as defined by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a complex term, encompassing a wide variety of activities and interest groups. As yet, there is no robust framework by which to monitor the extent to which technology transfer might benefit biodiversity. We devised a definition of biodiversity technology and a framework for the monitoring of technology transfer between CBD signatories. Biodiversity technology within the scope of the CBD encompasses hard and soft technologies that are relevant to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, or make use of genetic resources, and that relate to all aspects of the CBD, with a particular focus on technology transfer from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries. Our proposed framework introduces technology transfer as a response indicator: technology transfer is increased to stem pressures on biodiversity. We suggest an initial approach of tracking technology flow between countries; charting this flow is likely to be a one-to-many relationship (i.e., the flow of a specific technology from one country to multiple countries). Future developments should then focus on integrating biodiversity technology transfer into the current pressure-state-response indicator framework favored by the CBD (i.e., measuring the influence of technology transfer on changes in state and pressure variables). Structured national reporting is important to obtaining metrics relevant to technology and knowledge transfer. Interim measures, that can be used to assess biodiversity technology or knowledge status while more in-depth indicators are being developed, include the number of species inventories, threatened species lists, or national red lists; databases on publications and project funding may provide measures of international cooperation. Such a

  6. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  7. New Technology Makes Gene Mapping Cheaper, Faster

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164255.html New Technology Makes Gene Mapping Cheaper, Faster: Study Researchers decoded ... they've developed a much cheaper and faster technology for mapping the genetic makeup of a living ...

  8. Impact on technology transfer innovation processes: Ukrainian and foreign experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna Nahornyak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper identified and reasonably effective mechanisms for technology transfer in Ukraine and several foreign countries. The analysis of the national and international technology transfer. It is shown that based on the experience of the transfer of innovative technologies in foreign countries, the priority areas of the state scientific and technical policy is to create conditions for innovation-based economic development and structural adjustment of industrial and technological sectors. The development of legislation affecting science and technology and innovation activity in Ukraine. Comparison of statistical data on the innovation process in the European Union and Ukraine. Investigated the technical and technological production in Ukraine, as well as the factors that hinder the development of innovations in the industry. Found effective mechanisms for technology transfer in foreign countries (USA, Germany, Japan, Russia. The role of technology transfer centres, public-private partnerships, long-term leasing of equipment, government contracts, the introduction of tax incentives to enterprises that carry out upgrading and development of new technologies. An effective means of technology transfer that will enhance innovation processes of enterprises in the innovation economy type.

  9. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  10. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  11. Gene Transfer & Hybridization Studies in Hyperthermophilic Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Karen E.

    2005-10-14

    A. ABSTRACT The importance of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microbial species has become increasingly evident with each completed microbial genome sequence. Most significantly, the genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8, a hyperthermophilic bacterium isolated by Karl Stetter and workers from Vulcano Italy in 1986, and sequenced at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville Maryland in 1999, revealed extensive LGT between % . this bacterium and members of the archaeal domain (in particular Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyracoccus frcriosus species). Based on whole genome comparisons, it was estimated that 24% of the genetic information in this organism was acquired by genetic exchange with archaeal species, Independent analyses including periodicity analysis of the T. maritimu genomic DNA sequence, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genes that appear archaeal-like, and codon and amino acid usage, have provided additional evidence for LGT between T. maritima and the archaea. More recently, DiRuggiero and workers have identified a very recent LGT event between two genera of hyperthermophilic archaea, where a nearly identical DNA fragment of 16 kb in length flanked by insertion sequence (IS) elements, exists. Undoubtedly, additional examples of LGT will be identified as more microbial genomes are completed. For the present moment however, the genome sequence of T. maritima and other hyperthermophiles including P. furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Pyrococcus abyssi, A. fulgidus, and Aquifex aeolicus, have significantly increased out awareness of evolution being a web of life rather than a tree of life, as suggested by single gene phylogenies. In this proposal, we will aim to determine the extent of LGT across the hyperthemophiles, employing iY maritima as the model organism. A variety of biochemical techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions will allow for a detailed and thorough characterization of the extent of LGT in this species. The

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L. I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  13. Computational and phylogenetic validation of nematode horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Bird David; Scholl Elizabeth H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Sequencing of expressed genes has shown that nematodes, particularly the plant-parasitic nematodes, have genes purportedly acquired from other kingdoms by horizontal gene transfer. The prevailing orthodoxy is that such transfer has been a driving force in the evolution of niche specificity, and a recent paper in BMC Evolutionary Biology that presents a detailed phylogenetic analysis of cellulase genes in the free-living nematode Pristionchus pacificus at the species, genus and family...

  14. HPCC technology awareness program: Improved economic competitiveness through technology awareness, transfer and application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    A need has been defined by Congress for the DOE National Laboratories to participate in various dual use and technology transfer programs. This requirement has spawned several technology transfer approaches at the DOE laboratories. These programs are designed to encourage large and small business to bring their problems and needs forward, and to allow the labs to transfer effective high performance computing technology to the commercial marketplace. This IG Technologies grant from the DOE was undertaken to address the issues and problems associated with technology transfer between the DOE National Laboratories and commercial industry. The key focus is to gain an understanding of how DOE and industry independently and collectively view the requirements and the missing elements that could allow DOE to facilitate HPCC technology transfer. At issue is HPCC Technology Transfer for the High Performance Computing industry and its relationship to the DOE National Laboratories. Several observations on this are addressed. The issue of a ``Technology Utilization Gap`` between the National Laboratories and Independent Software Vendors is discussed. This study addressed the HPCC Technology Transfer plans of all six DOE National Labs. Study team members briefed numerous industrial users of HPCC technology as to the feasibility of technology transfer for various applications. Significant findings of the effort are that the resistance to technology transfer is much higher than anticipated for both the National Labs and industry. Also, HPCC Technology Transfer is observed to be a large company`s dominion. Small businesses have a difficult time in addressing the requirements of technology transfer using Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s). Large businesses and the DOE National Labs however, often have requirements and objectives which are at cross purposes, making effective technology transfer difficult.

  15. [Technology transfer to the facility for production of medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregovykh, V V; Spitskiĭ, O P

    2013-01-01

    Innovation development of pharmaceutical industry is close connected to knowledge transfer going to each subsequent life cycle phase of medicinal product. Formal regulation of technology and knowledge transfer is essential for achievement high quality during production of medicines designed during development phase. Conceptual tools, approaches and requirements are considered that are necessary for knowledge and technology transfer across all the life cycle phases of medicines. They are based on scientific knowledge of medicinal products and take into account both international and Russian regulations in the area of development, production and distribution of medicines. Importance of taking into consideration all aspects related to quality of medicines in all steps of technology transfer is shown. An approach is described for technology transfer organization for Russian pharmaceutical manufacturers based on international guides in this area.

  16. The Evolutionary Business Valuation of Technology Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, M.S.; van der Sijde, Peter; Groen, Arend J.; Oakey, R.; Groen, A.; Cook, G.; van der Sijde, P.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional models for the business valuation of technology are usually financially oriented and only measure economic value. Several of these financially oriented approaches have been reviewed by Leloux and Groen (2007). Current monetary (financial) valuation methods for technology include

  17. Technology Transfer at CERN (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  18. Technology Transfer at CERN (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    Abrief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  19. Simultaneous identification of duplications and lateral gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofigh, Ali; Hallett, Michael; Lagergren, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The incongruency between a gene tree and a corresponding species tree can be attributed to evolutionary events such as gene duplication and gene loss. This paper describes a combinatorial model where so-called DTL-scenarios are used to explain the differences between a gene tree and a corresponding species tree taking into account gene duplications, gene losses, and lateral gene transfers (also known as horizontal gene transfers). The reasonable biological constraint that a lateral gene transfer may only occur between contemporary species leads to the notion of acyclic DTL-scenarios. Parsimony methods are introduced by defining appropriate optimization problems. We show that finding most parsimonious acyclic DTL-scenarios is NP-hard. However, by dropping the condition of acyclicity, the problem becomes tractable, and we provide a dynamic programming algorithm as well as a fixed-parameter tractable algorithm for finding most parsimonious DTL-scenarios.

  20. Food irradiation: Technology transfer in Asia, practical experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.

    1993-10-01

    Nordion International Inc., in cooperation with the Thai Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) recently completed a unique food irradiation technology transfer project in Thailand. This complete food irradiation technology transfer project included the design and construction of an automatic multipurpose irradiation facility as well as the services of construction and installation management and experts in facility operation, maintenance and training. This paper provides an insight into the many events that led to the succesful conclusion of the world's first complete food irradiation technology transfer project.

  1. Exploring the influence of technology size on the duration of production technology transfer implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between technology size and installation time in technology transfer projects. A literature study revealed that the installation time has so far not received much attention. Current studies address the effectiveness of technology transfer rather than efficiency.

  2. Advancing Green Economy through Technology Transfer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This qualitative study explores the transfer of renewable energy ... Based on experiences from the projects, a literature review, site visits and ... generated sustainable ideas, and disseminating information on successes and lessons learnt.

  3. Identification and Categorization of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Prokaryotic Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Yong SHI; Xiao-Hui CAI; Da-fu DING

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), a process through which genomes acquire genetic materials from distantly related organisms, is believed to be one of the major forces in prokaryotic genome evolution.However, systematic investigation is still scarce to clarify two basic issues about HGT: (1) what types of genes are transferred; and (2) what influence HGT events over the organization and evolution of biological pathways. Genome-scale investigations of these two issues will advance the systematical understanding of HGT in the context of prokaryotic genome evolution. Having investigated 82 genomes, we constructed an HGT database across broad evolutionary timescales. We identified four function categories containing a high proportion of horizontally transferred genes: cell envelope, energy metabolism, regulatory functions, and transport/binding proteins. Such biased function distribution indicates that HGT is not completely random;instead, it is under high selective pressure, required by function restraints in organisms. Furthermore, we mapped the transferred genes onto the connectivity structure map of organism-specific pathways listed in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Our results suggest that recruitment of transferred genes into pathways is also selectively constrained because of the tuned interaction between original pathway members. Pathway organization structures still conserve well through evolution even with the recruitment of horizontally transferred genes. Interestingly, in pathways whose organization were significantly affected by HGT events, the operon-like arrangement of transferred genes was found to be prevalent. Such results suggest that operon plays an essential and directional role in the integration of alien genes into pathways.

  4. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  5. Creation of a European network dedicated to technology transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Council recently approved the creation of a technology transfer network, whose aim will be to improve European industry’s access to the technologies developed by the particle physics community in the Member States. The gas detectors for the TOTEM experiment (GEM) offer potential for fruitful collaboration within the framework of the TT network. Many other technologies are going down the same road.The desire to set up a technology transfer network follows on from the European Strategy for Particle Physics, approved by the CERN Council on 14 July 2006 in Lisbon. In this context, special emphasis was laid on European industry’s participation in the implementation of particle physics programmes and, in particular, its access to the new technologies developed by the scientific community. It was recognised that effort needs to be put into improving the efficiency of technology transfer...

  6. Gene transfer for congestive heart failure: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk

    2013-04-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing social and economic costs. There have been no new high impact therapeutic agents for this devastating disease for more than a decade. However, many pivotal regulators of cardiac function have been identified using cardiac-directed transgene expression and gene deletion in preclinical studies. Some of these increase function of the failing heart. Altering the expression of these pivotal regulators using gene transfer is now either being tested in clinical gene transfer trials, or soon will be. In this review, we summarize recent progress in cardiac gene transfer for clinical congestive heart failure.

  7. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  8. Problems associated with gene transfer and opportunities for microgravity environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, D.J. [Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Cornell University, Ithaca, New York14853 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The method of crop improvement by gene transfer is becoming increasingly routine with transgenic foods and ornamental crops now being marketed to consumers. However, biological processes of plants, and the physical barriers of current protocols continue to limit the application of gene transfer in many commercial crops. The goal of this paper is to outline the current limitations of gene transfer and to hypothesize possible opportunities for use of microgravity to overcome such limitations. The limitations detailed in this paper include host-range specificity of {ital Agrobacterium} mediated transformation, probability of gene insertion, position effects of the inserted genes, gene copy number, stability of foreign gene expression in host plants, and regeneration of recalcitrant plant species. Microgravity offers an opportunity for gene transfer where cell growth kinetics, DNA synthesis, and genetic recombination rates can be altered. Such biological conditions may enhance the ability for recombination of reporter genes and other genes of interest to agriculture. Proposed studies would be useful for understanding instability of foreign gene expression and may lead to stable transformed plants. Other aspects of gene transfer in microgravity are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Nonviral Technologies for Gene Therapy in Cardiovascular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Huang Su

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy, which is still at an experimental stage, is a technique that attempts to correct or prevent a disease by delivering genes into an individual's cells and tissues. In gene delivery, a vector is a vehicle for transferring genetic material into cells and tissues. Synthetic vectors are considered to be prerequisites for gene delivery, because viral vectors have fundamental problems in relation to safety issues as well as large-scale production. Among the physical approaches, ultrasound with its associated bioeffects such as acoustic cavitation, especially inertial cavitation, can increase the permeability of cell membranes to macromolecules such as plasmid DNA. Microbubbles or ultrasound contrast agents lower the threshold for cavitation by ultrasound energy. Furthermore, ultrasound-enhanced gene delivery using polymers or other nonviral vectors may hold much promise for the future but is currently at the preclinical stage. We all know aging is cruel and inevitable. Currently, among the promising areas for gene therapy in acquired diseases, the incidences of cancer and ischemic cardiovascular diseases are strongly correlated with the aging process. As a result, gene therapy technology may play important roles in these diseases in the future. This brief review focuses on understanding the barriers to gene transfer as well as describing the useful nonviral vectors or tools that are applied to gene delivery and introducing feasible models in terms of ultrasound-based gene delivery.

  10. Pollen irradiation and possible gene transfer in Nicotiana species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1985-01-01

    Progeny from crosses of Nicotiana langsdorffii with gamma irradiated pollen of Nicotiana alata ‘Crimson Bedder’ showed skewed segregation in the F2 favoring the maternal parent. This is probably not gene transfer in a strict sense, rather just an extreme case of reduced transmission of irradiated...... chromosomes, leading to massive overrepresentation of maternal genes. Gene transfer or mutational loss may explain some anomalous F1 plants. Segregation in the F2 progeny showed the presence of several genes from the irradiated pollen. Crosses of Nicotiana sylvestris, N. plumbaginifolia N. paniculata......, and Petunia parodii with irradiated pollen from N. alata and Petunia hybrida showed no evidence of gene transfer, nor did experiments with irradiated mentor pollen. This indicates that gene transfer with irradiated pollen between non-crossing species or between species giving sterile hybrids is probably...

  11. Japan acts to speed technology transfer from universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Saegusa, A

    1999-01-01

    A Japanese law will take effect in the autumn to promote technology transfer from universities and laboratories. The new measures aim to encourage collaborations with the commercial sector and allow industrial research partners to retain title to inventions (1 page).

  12. Collaborating with EPA through the Federal Technology Transfer Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA), EPA can collaborate with external parties on research projects, and share research materials. Learn more about the types of partnerships the EPA offers.

  13. Technology transfer in the space sector: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzfeld, Henry R

    2002-12-01

    This article is an introduction to four articles in this issue, all related to the different policy objectives and approaches of technology transfer in space programs run by the United States, the European Space Agency, Canada, and Russia.

  14. Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan; Hansen, Ulrich Elmer

    This guidebook provides practical and operational guidance on how to assess and overcome barriersfacing the transfer and diffusion of technologies for climate change mitigation and adaptation.The guidebook is designed to support the analysis of specific technologies, rather than pursuing asectoral...... (e.g. transport) or technology group (e.g. renewable energy) approach.Given that there is no single solution to enhancing technology transfer and diffusion policies needbe tailored to country-specific context and interests. Therefore, the guidebook presents a flexibleapproach, identifying various...

  15. special issue: Technology transfer in United States universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ann-Charlotte Fridh; Bo Carlsson

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the role of offices of technology transfer (OTT) in 12 U.S. universities in 1998 in commercializing research results in the form of patents, licenses, and start-ups of new companies. We study the organization and place of OTTs within the university structure, the process of technology transfer, and the staffing and funding of the office. Data were collected through a mail questionnaire followed up through telephone interviews. We also conducted a statistical analysis of da...

  16. Determination of Royalty Rates in the International Technology Transfer Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitsa, Yu.; Aralova, N.

    2015-01-01

    The existing approaches used in determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts and based on the experience of research institutions of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, research organizations and universities in Europe and USA were reviewed. The analysis of the existing rates has been made as well as recommendations on determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts between research institutions and foreign and domestic partners have been ...

  17. Determination of Royalty Rates in the International Technology Transfer Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapitsa, Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The existing approaches used in determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts and based on the experience of research institutions of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, research organizations and universities in Europe and USA were reviewed. The analysis of the existing rates has been made as well as recommendations on determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts between research institutions and foreign and domestic partners have been worked out.

  18. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  19. International Water and Sanitation Technology Transfers, Experiences from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Hophmayer-Tockich, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities of transferring cost-effective, innovative water and wastewater technologies on public water markets are discussed based on experiences of the Dutch water business cluster in the Central and Eastern European Countries. These transfers evolved under suitable conditions, among others fin

  20. International water and sanitation technology transfers, experiences from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Hophmayer Tokich, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities of transferring cost-effective, innovative water and wastewater technologies on public water markets are discussed based on experiences of the Dutch water business cluster in the Central and Eastern European Countries. These transfers evolved under suitable conditions, among others fin

  1. Fruit Fly Liquid Larval Diet Technology Transfer and Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since October 2006, USDA-ARS has been implementing a fruit fly liquid larval diet technology transfer, which has proceeded according to the following steps: (1) Recruitment of interested groups through request; (2) Establishment of the Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) with ARS; (3) Fruit fly liquid...

  2. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) SUMMARY: Under... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC... collaborations and alliances with the NIH. The needs of external technology transfer customers and stakeholders...

  3. Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

  4. Gene transfer approaches in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, S S; Georgiev, G P; Kiselev, S L

    2004-10-01

    The idea of enhancing or establishing effective immune response against endogenously developed tumor cells is not novel. More than a hundred years ago, bacterial components were used to develop antitumor immune response. Later, when a number of immune system-effecting cytokines had been discovered, they were used for systemic treatment of cancer patients. However, systemic treatment often resulted in even negative outcome. Recent developments of genetic approaches of cell modifications allowed developing of modern techniques of targeted tumor cell elimination. In the present paper, we review modern trends of the antitumor response enhancement based on immunoregulatory gene transfer into different cell types both in vivo and in vitro. Almost all these approaches are based on the activation of the adaptive arm of the immune system in response to tumor cells. However, recent studies indicate that the innate arm of the immune system, as well as adaptive arm, is involved in tumor suppression. The innate immune system uses nonrearranging germline receptors, which could trigger cellular effector responses that are conditional (or instructive) to the subsequent adaptive immune response. Last years' viewpoints on 'self' and 'non-self' recognition and primary induction of the immune response have changed. The key role of lymphocytes is pathogen recognition and, following immune response induction, switched on the central role of dendritic cells in 'non-self' recognition and induction of both innate and adaptive responses. Moreover, innate response is supposed to be an essential starting point in induction of successful and effective acquired response. Most cancer vaccines do not have 'non-self' marks presentation due to their endogenous origin, thus lacking their effectiveness in the induction of the specific long-lasting immune response. Taking this point into consideration, we can conclude that to make cancer vaccine more effective we have to present tumor antigens

  5. Nonviral gene transfer strategies to promote bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2013-10-01

    Despite the inherent ability of bone to regenerate itself, there are a number of clinical situations in which complete bone regeneration fails to occur. In view of shortcomings of conventional treatment, gene therapy may have a place in cases of critical-size bone loss that cannot be properly treated with current medical or surgical treatment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of gene therapy in general, nonviral techniques of gene transfer including physical and chemical methods, RNA-based therapy, therapeutic genes to be transferred for bone regeneration, route of application including ex vivo application, and direct gene therapy approaches to regenerate bone.

  6. Transfer of engineered genes from crop to wild plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Hauser, T.P.; Mikkelsen, T.R.;

    1996-01-01

    The escape of engineered genes - genes inserted using recombinant DNA techniques - from cultivated plants to wild or weedy relatives has raised concern about possible risks to the environment or to health. The media have added considerably to public concern by suggesting that such gene escape...... is a new and rather unexpected phenomenon. However, transfer of engineered genes between plants is not at-all surprising, because it is mediated by exactly the same mechanisms as those responsible for transferring endogenous plant genes: it takes place by sexual crosses, with pollen as the carrier...

  7. Development of Technological Profiles for Transfer of Energy- and Resource Saving Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysenko, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the methodological foundations for the development of technological profiles for «System of Transfer of Energy- and Resource Saving Technologies». It is determined that a compliance with the methodology and standards of the European network «Relay Centers» (Innovation Relay Centers — IRC network, since 2008 — EEN, the Russian Technology Transfer Network RTTN and Uk rainian Technology Transfer Network UTTN is the main pri nciple of the development process of technological requests and offers.

  8. 2017 Technology Showcase | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Technology Showcase is an inaugural, half-day event that will showcase technologies developed by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The goal of the Showcase is to encourage startup company formation, technology licensing, and public-private collaborations. It will introduce the Frederick community to the regional technology development stakeholders, as well as highlight available resources. WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Prospective investors, established companies, educators, those looking to commercialize technologies, and all interested stakeholders. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. A Program Office Guide to Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    maintenance is emphasized, interchan- tions. Second source component verification geability requirements are pushed lower to the activities often are...technology tiansfer risk, the program office considers the following: 10.7 THE TECNOLOGY TRANSFERPLAN * Schedule intensity and concurrency The

  10. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes.

  11. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  12. Florida commercial space initiatives and technology transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses commercial space policy for the State of Florida in the context of state initiatives for general technology and economic development. The paper also compares Florida's commercial space initiatives to national space policies and describes mechanisms for transferring space related technologies and research to Florida businesses for subsequent development and commercialization.

  13. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived…

  14. The Technology Transfer of the ICT Curriculum in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the process of "technology transfer", this paper aims to critically examine the production and usage of the information and communication technology (ICT) curriculum, and discusses its possibilities. It is found that the goals in both of the two stages of the ICT curriculum in Taiwan were rather "rhetorical". Three…

  15. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  16. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  17. The Technology Transfer of the ICT Curriculum in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the process of "technology transfer", this paper aims to critically examine the production and usage of the information and communication technology (ICT) curriculum, and discusses its possibilities. It is found that the goals in both of the two stages of the ICT curriculum in Taiwan were rather "rhetorical". Three…

  18. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  19. Technology Transfer: A Qualitative Analysis of Air Force Office of Research and Technology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    branch. Two, attending Department of Defense Technology Transfer Integrated Planning Team workshops. Three, attending two Federal Laboratory...Question 12 What database tools do you use to Perform ORTA duties? The number one database tool used was the Defense Technology Transfer Information

  20. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    , dramatically affecting the enzymes of core pathways, particularly amino acid and sugar metabolism, but also providing new genes of potential adaptive significance in the life of parasites. A broad range of prokaryotic donors is involved in such transfers, but there is clear and significant enrichment......BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... for bacterial groups that share the same habitats, including the human microbiota, as the parasites investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that ecology and lifestyle strongly influence gene origins and opportunities for gene transfer and reveal that, although the outlines of the core eukaryotic metabolism...

  1. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  2. Advanced Manufacturing Technology: A Department of Energy technology transfer initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, R.S. Jr.; Barkman, W.E.

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes a new initiative called the Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program that is managed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Martin Marietta Energy Systems in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The AMT Program seeks to assist the US manufacturing community regain some of the market share that it has lost to competiting companies in both Europe and the Far East. One key element to this program is the establishment of teaching and development facilities called manufacturing technology centers (MTCs) which will showcase unclassified DOE manufacturing technologies. This paper describes some of the precision flexible manufacturing system (PFMS) technology that is available through the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This technology will be highlighted in the first of the MTCs that is being established. 4 figs.

  3. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  4. Uplifting developing communities through sustained technology transfer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available feedback mechanisms to both the local Integrated Development Plan and the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy, was able to navigate potential conflict areas such as negotiating acceptable wage rates [below minimum wage] with the community... to mobilize and galvanize the community around the benefits of the project, as well as to explain and to iron out potential mine fields, such as the level of funding available, wage rate and payment policy, technology issues and project implementation...

  5. 2017 Technology Showcase Presentations | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations from the 2017 Technology Showcase by NIH Intramural Research Program scientists held at Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research on June 7, 2017. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  6. Nuclear transfer technology in mammalian cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, D P; Mitalipov, S; Norgren, R B

    2001-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells, our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT over 15 years ago from totipotent, embryonic blastomeres derived from early cleavage-stage embryos. However, once begun, the progression to somatic cell cloning or NT employing differentiated cells as the source of donor nuclei was meteoric, initially involving differentiated embryonic cell cultures in sheep in 1996 and quickly thereafter, fetal or adult somatic cells in sheep, cow, mouse, goat, and pig. Several recent reviews provide a background for and discussion of these successes. Here we will focus on the potential uses of reproductive cloning along with recent activities in the field and a discussion concerning current interests in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  7. Adaptation in the context of technology development and transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Anne

    2015-01-01

    and transfer. It summarizes what technologies for adaptation are, how they relate to development, and what their role is in adaptation. It subsequently highlights a number of policy and research issues that could be important to inform future policy. The commentary has two key messages. First, it argues...... that informed policy decisions on technology development and transfer to enhance adaptation require systematic assessments of the findings in the theoretical and empirical literature. Second, in light of the potential for overlap between processes for adaptation and processes for technologies for adaptation......Starting from a summary of key developments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) related to adaptation and technologies, the commentary provides an initial review of the available literature relevant to adaptation in the context of technology development...

  8. A DYNAMICAL SYSTEM APPROACH IN MODELING TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Husniah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a mathematical model of two parties technology transfer from a leader to a follower. The model is reconstructed via dynamical system approach from a known standard Raz and Assa model and we found some important conclusion which have not been discussed in the original model. The model assumes that in the absence of technology transfer from a leader to a follower, both the leader and the follower have a capability to grow independently with a known upper limit of the development. We obtain a rich mathematical structure of the steady state solution of the model. We discuss a special situation in which the upper limit of the technological development of the follower is higher than that of the leader, but the leader has started earlier than the follower in implementing the technology. In this case we show a paradox stating that the follower is unable to reach its original upper limit of the technological development could appear whenever the transfer rate is sufficiently high.  We propose a new model to increase realism so that any technological transfer rate could only has a positive effect in accelerating the rate of growth of the follower in reaching its original upper limit of the development.

  9. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  10. Local R&D and Technology Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    This study examines how inter-firm heterogeneities in technology modes and intensities are linked to ownership of firms in India, using a panel dataset of 2000 odd Bombay Stock Exchange listed firms for the period from 2003 to 2014 drawn from the PROWESS database of CMIE. For the analysis, foreign...... ownership is categorised according to the control exercisable by them as defined under the Companies’ Act of India. A comparative analysis of domestic and different categories of foreign firms was conducted at two time periods: the global boom period of 2004-2008 and post crisis period of 2008...

  11. MORE THAN MONEY: THE EXPONENTIAL IMPACT OF ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Valerie Landrio; Mendez-Hinds, Joelle; Winwood, David; Nijhawan, Vinit; Sherer, Todd; Ritter, John F; Sanberg, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    Academic technology transfer in its current form began with the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act in 1980, which allowed universities to retain ownership of federally funded intellectual property. Since that time, a profession has evolved that has transformed how inventions arising in universities are treated, resulting in significant impact to US society. While there have been a number of articles highlighting benefits of technology transfer, now, more than at any other time since the Bayh-Dole Act was passed, the profession and the impacts of this groundbreaking legislation have come under intense scrutiny. This article serves as an examination of the many positive benefits and evolution, both financial and intrinsic, provided by academic invention and technology transfer, summarized in Table 1.

  12. Technology transfer and technological learning through CERN's procurement activity

    CERN Document Server

    Autio, Erkko; Hameri, Ari-Pekka; CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the technological learning and innovation benefits derived from CERN's procurement activity during the period 1997-2001. The base population of our study, the technology-intensive suppliers to CERN, consisted of 629 companies out of 6806 companies during the same period, representing 1197 MCHF in procurement. The main findings from the study can be summarized as follows: the various learning and innovation benefits (e.g., technological learning, organizational capability development, market learning) tend to occur together. Learning and innovation benefits appear to be regulated by the quality of the supplier's relationship with CERN: the greater the amount of social capital built into the relationship, the greater the learning and innovation benefits. Regardless of relationship quality, virtually all suppliers derived significant marketing reference benefits from CERN. Many corollary benefits are associated with procurement activity. As an example, as many as 38% of the respondents devel...

  13. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  14. Some aspects of technology transfer and direct foreign investment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, R.

    1978-05-01

    A model showing technology transfer to developing countries links questions of appropriations with the socio-economic reasons for technological change. The rate at which foreign capital is used is found to be directly related to after-tax profits. If the developing country raises taxes on foreign capital, the effect is to increase the proportion of domestic capital needed and to widen the technological gap between the two countries. The analysis also shows a higher gain from new techniques with increased demand volume and suggests large developing countries with similar capital to invest are more likely to generate intermediate technologies. 8 references.

  15. 48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technology transfer and....2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA) established technology transfer as a mission for Government-owned,...

  16. Global Analysis of Horizontal Gene Transfer in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The co-occurrence of microbes within plants and other specialized niches may facilitate horizontal gene transfer (HGT) affecting host-pathogen interactions. We recently identified fungal-to-fungal HGTs involving metabolic gene clusters. For a global analysis of HGTs in the maize pathogen Fusarium ve...

  17. Regulation of mammalian horizontal gene transfer by apoptotic DNA fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, B; Wang, H; Li, F; Li, C-Y

    2006-01-01

    Previously it was shown that horizontal DNA transfer between mammalian cells can occur through the uptake of apoptotic bodies, where genes from the apoptotic cells were transferred to neighbouring cells phagocytosing the apoptotic bodies. The regulation of this process is poorly understood. It was shown that the ability of cells as recipient of horizontally transferred DNA was enhanced by deficiency of p53 or p21. However, little is known with regard to the regulation of DNA from donor apoptotic cells. Here we report that the DNA fragmentation factor/caspase-activated DNase (DFF/CAD), which is the endonuclease responsible for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, plays a significant role in regulation of horizontal DNA transfer. Cells with inhibited DFF/CAD function are poor donors for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) while their ability of being recipients of HGT is not affected. PMID:17146478

  18. Horizontal gene transfer between Wolbachia and the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT from Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria to their eukaryotic hosts is a topic of considerable interest and debate. Recent transfers of genome fragments from Wolbachia into insect chromosomes have been reported, but it has been argued that these fragments may be on an evolutionary trajectory to degradation and loss. Results We have discovered a case of HGT, involving two adjacent genes, between the genomes of Wolbachia and the currently Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito Aedes aegypti, an important human disease vector. The lower level of sequence identity between Wolbachia and insect, the transcription of all the genes involved, and the fact that we have identified homologs of the two genes in another Aedes species (Ae. mascarensis, suggest that these genes are being expressed after an extended evolutionary period since horizontal transfer, and therefore that the transfer has functional significance. The association of these genes with Wolbachia prophage regions also provides a mechanism for the transfer. Conclusion The data support the argument that HGT between Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts has produced evolutionary innovation.

  19. Low-carbon innovation and technology transfer in latecomer countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Lema, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational arrangements for technology supply in solar photovoltaic projects in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). It shows that while lower middle-income countries typically import solar PV equipment into CDM projects, China, India and Thailand have begun to use new...... the future of the global climate regime. Technology transfer does not become less important as developing countries' capabilities mature, but the nature of technology transfer changes over time. This suggests a need to differentiate between countries at different levels of development. Lower middle-income...... countries may have greater needs for building technological capabilities whereas cooperative activities may be suitable for upper middle-income countries that already have capabilities to address climate change...

  20. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains the following materials to support Volume 1: (1) Survey of Metal Fabrication Industry in Alabama; (2) Survey of Electronics Manufacturing/Assembly Industry in Alabama; (3) Apparel Modular Manufacturing Simulators; (4) Synopsis of a Stereolithography Project; (5) Transferring Modular Manufacturing Technology to an Apparel Firm; (6) Letters of Support; (7) Fact Sheets; (8) Publications; and (9) One Stop Access to NASA Technology Brochure.

  1. Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

  2. Identification of horizontally transferred genes in the genus Colletotrichum reveals a steady tempo of bacterial to fungal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Vinicio D Armijos; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2015-01-02

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the stable transmission of genetic material between organisms by means other than vertical inheritance. HGT has an important role in the evolution of prokaryotes but is relatively rare in eukaryotes. HGT has been shown to contribute to virulence in eukaryotic pathogens. We studied the importance of HGT in plant pathogenic fungi by identifying horizontally transferred genes in the genomes of three members of the genus Colletotrichum. We identified eleven HGT events from bacteria into members of the genus Colletotrichum or their ancestors. The HGT events include genes involved in amino acid, lipid and sugar metabolism as well as lytic enzymes. Additionally, the putative minimal dates of transference were calculated using a time calibrated phylogenetic tree. This analysis reveals a constant flux of genes from bacteria to fungi throughout the evolution of subphylum Pezizomycotina. Genes that are typically transferred by HGT are those that are constantly subject to gene duplication and gene loss. The functions of some of these genes suggest roles in niche adaptation and virulence. We found no evidence of a burst of HGT events coinciding with major geological events. In contrast, HGT appears to be a constant, albeit rare phenomenon in the Pezizomycotina, occurring at a steady rate during their evolution.

  3. 77 FR 46909 - Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directives... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) Policy... technology@sba.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Information SBA is publishing Policy Directives...

  4. RANGE: Gene Transfer of Reversibly Controlled Polycistronic Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a single vector recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV expression system for spatial and reversible control of polycistronic gene expression. Our approach (i integrates the advantages of the tetracycline (Tet-controlled transcriptional silencer tTSKid and the self-cleaving 2A peptide bridge, (ii combines essential regulatory components as an autoregulatory loop, (iii simplifies the gene delivery scheme, and (iv regulates multiple genes in a synchronized manner. Controlled by an upstream Tet-responsive element (TRE, both the ubiquitous chicken β-actin promoter (CAG and the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter (Syn could regulate expression of tTSKid together with two 2A-linked reporter genes. Transduction in vitro exhibited maximally 50-fold regulation by doxycycline (Dox. Determined by gene delivery method as well as promoter, highly specific tissues were transduced in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI visualized reversible “ON/OFF” gene switches over repeated “Doxy-Cycling” in living mice. Thus, the reversible rAAV-mediated N-cistronic gene expression system, termed RANGE, may serve as a versatile tool to achieve reversible polycistronic gene regulation for the study of gene function as well as gene therapy.

  5. RANGE: Gene Transfer of Reversibly Controlled Polycistronic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiwei; Cao, Liji; Luo, Chonglin; Ditzel, Désirée Aw; Peter, Jörg; Sprengel, Rolf

    2013-04-09

    We developed a single vector recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) expression system for spatial and reversible control of polycistronic gene expression. Our approach (i) integrates the advantages of the tetracycline (Tet)-controlled transcriptional silencer tTS(Kid) and the self-cleaving 2A peptide bridge, (ii) combines essential regulatory components as an autoregulatory loop, (iii) simplifies the gene delivery scheme, and (iv) regulates multiple genes in a synchronized manner. Controlled by an upstream Tet-responsive element (TRE), both the ubiquitous chicken β-actin promoter (CAG) and the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter (Syn) could regulate expression of tTS(Kid) together with two 2A-linked reporter genes. Transduction in vitro exhibited maximally 50-fold regulation by doxycycline (Dox). Determined by gene delivery method as well as promoter, highly specific tissues were transduced in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) visualized reversible "ON/OFF" gene switches over repeated "Doxy-Cycling" in living mice. Thus, the reversible rAAV-mediated N-cistronic gene expression system, termed RANGE, may serve as a versatile tool to achieve reversible polycistronic gene regulation for the study of gene function as well as gene therapy.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e85; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.15; published online 9 April 2013.

  6. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  7. Current status and potential of embryo transfer and reproductive technology in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, J F

    1992-10-01

    Significant use of embryo transfer in dairy cattle commenced with the introduction of nonsurgical embryo recovery in the mid-1970s and developed with the use of nonsurgical transfers in the late 1970s. Numbers of registered Holstein calves from embryo transfer doubled yearly through 1980, after which the rate of increase slowed; the total reached nearly 19,000 calves in 1990. However, the efficacy of superovulation procedures and commercial success rates of transferred fresh embryos have not improved the past 10 to 15 yr. Fertilization rates in superovulated donors remain low. Although embryo-splitting techniques were perfected in the early 1980s, they are not used widely. A practical, commercial embryo-sexing procedure remains unavailable. Recent significant improvement is apparent in the technology of ultrasound-guided oocyte collection and in vitro oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo culture. In the future, this technology may be used in conjunction with sperm separated by sex with a flow cytometer. Modest numbers of embryo clones have been produced in several commercial programs via nuclear transfer techniques. However, the efficiency of gene transfer experiments involving ova of cattle and other domestic species has been low. Recently, DNA probe technology has begun to provide genotype information for cattle and will ultimately be applied to embryos.

  8. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. Transfer bonding technology for batch fabrication of SMA microactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, T.; Guerre, R.; Despont, M.; Kohl, M.

    2008-05-01

    Currently, the broad market introduction of shape memory alloy (SMA) microactuators and sensors is hampered by technological barriers, since batch fabrication methods common to electronics industry are not available. The present study intends to overcome these barriers by introducing a wafer scale transfer process that allows the selective transfer of heat-treated and micromachined shape memory alloy (SMA) film or foil microactuators to randomly selected receiving sites on a target substrate. The technology relies on a temporary adhesive bonding layer between SMA film/foil and an auxiliary substrate, which can be removed by laser ablation. The transfer technology was tested for microactuators of a cold-rolled NiTi foil of 20 μm thickness, which were heat-treated in free-standing condition, then micromachined on an auxiliary substrate of glass, and finally selectively transferred to different target substrates of a polymer. For demonstration, the new technology was used for batch-fabrication of SMA-actuated polymer microvalves.

  10. THE EFFICIENCY OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER – THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Clara MUNTEANU

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and complexity level of technological transfer increased, the need of adequate systems of assessing the efficiency of this process became the more obvious. Introducing sustainability criteria requires the creation of a complex framework for analysing and studying efficiency that would incorporate all other three dimensions of contemporary economic development: economic, social and environmental.

  11. Building Technology Transfer Capacity in Turkish Universities: A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga, Marina; Temel, Serdal; Ar, Ilker Murat; Yesilay, Rustem Baris; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2016-01-01

    University technology transfer has been receiving significant government funding since 2012. Results of this major investment are now expected by the Turkish government and society, not only in terms of better teaching and research performance, but also of new jobs, new products and services, enhanced regional development and contribution to…

  12. Teacher Linguistic, Cultural, and Technological Awareness Development and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congcong

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes two studies: a pilot study on native-English-speaking preservice teachers' perceptions of learning a foreign language online and a follow-up study on inservice teachers' perceptions of transferring teacher linguistic, cultural and technological awareness into teaching practice. Conducted in 2010, the pilot…

  13. Space spin-offs: is technology transfer worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lance B.

    Dual-uses, spin-offs, and technology transfer have all become part of the space lexicon, creating a cultural attitude toward space activity justification. From the very beginning of space activities in the late 1950's, this idea of secondary benefits became a major part of the space culture and its beliefs system. Technology transfer has played a central role in public and political debates of funding for space activities. Over the years, several studies of the benefits of space activities have been performed, with some estimates reaching as high as a 60:1 return to the economy for each dollar spent in space activities. Though many of these models claiming high returns have been roundly criticized. More recent studies of technology transfer from federal laboratories to private sector are showing a return on investment of 2.8:1, with little evidence of jobs increases. Yet, a purely quantitative analysis is not sufficient as there exist cultural and social benefits attainable only through case studies. Space projects tend to have a long life cycle, making it difficult to track metrics on their secondary benefits. Recent studies have begun to make inroads towards a better understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of investing in technology transfer activities related to space, but there remains significant analyses to be performed which must include a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses.

  14. Venture Creation Programs: Bridging Entrepreneurship Education and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackéus, Martin; Williams Middleton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how university-based entrepreneurship programs, incorporating real-life venture creation into educational design and delivery, can bridge the gap between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer within the university environment. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a literature review…

  15. Institutionalization of Technology Transfer Organizations in Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Han; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of in-depth studies on how technology transfer organizations (TTOs) are organized and developed. This paper examines the evolution/institutionalization of TTOs in Tsinghua University (TU), as a microcosm of the development of TTOs in Chinese universities. It explores two issues in particular: what kinds of TTOs have been developed…

  16. Agile manufacturing and technology transfer to industrialising countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Boer, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the requirements of agile manufacturing, the necessity to gain flexibility, can be reached by using a supplier network. A possible way to develop a supplier network is by subcontracting to parties in industrialising countries. In most cases, it is necessary to transfer technology. The

  17. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  18. Agile manufacturing and technology transfer to industrialising countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Boer, de Sirp

    2003-01-01

    One of the requirements of agile manufacturing, the necessity to gain flexibility, can be reached by using a supplier network. A possible way to develop a supplier network is by subcontracting to parties in industrialising countries. In most cases, it is necessary to transfer technology. The aircraf

  19. Venture Creation Programs: Bridging Entrepreneurship Education and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackéus, Martin; Williams Middleton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how university-based entrepreneurship programs, incorporating real-life venture creation into educational design and delivery, can bridge the gap between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer within the university environment. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a literature review…

  20. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  1. Institutionalization of Technology Transfer Organizations in Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Han; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of in-depth studies on how technology transfer organizations (TTOs) are organized and developed. This paper examines the evolution/institutionalization of TTOs in Tsinghua University (TU), as a microcosm of the development of TTOs in Chinese universities. It explores two issues in particular: what kinds of TTOs have been developed…

  2. Taxation and the transfer of technology by multinational firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes a multinational's transfer of technology to a foreign subsidiary for the case where there is a risk of expropriation. An expropriation is assumed to give rise to competition between the parts of the previous multinational enterprise. To reduce the benefit of expropriation, the

  3. 48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... benefits to the U.S. domestic economy. The Contractor shall consider the following factors in all of its... shall establish subject to the approval of the contracting officer a policy for making awards or sharing... believes that the transfer of technology to the U.S. domestic economy will benefit from, or other...

  4. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  5. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer to Chrysanthemum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wordragen, van M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants is a technique that enables us to add to the plant genome, in a precise and well controlled manner, one or a few new genes, coding for desirable traits. In contrast to this, the conventional method for the introduction of new properties in plants, by cross breeding, is

  6. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Research and internship programs in technology transfer, space commercialization, and information and communications policy are described. The intern's activities are reviewed. On-campus research involved work on the costs of conventional telephone technology in rural areas, an investigation of the lag between the start of a research and development project and the development of new technology, using NASA patent and patent waiver data, studies of the financial impact and economic prospects of a space operation center, a study of the accuracy of expert forecasts of uncertain quantities and a report on frequency coordination in the fixed and fixed satellite services at 4 and 6 GHz.

  7. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-12-22

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution.

  8. Biomedical technology transfer: Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The major efforts of the Stanford Biomedical Applications Team Program at the Stanford University School of Medicine for the period from October 1, 1975 to September 31, 1976 are covered. A completed EMG biotelemetry system which monitors the physiological signals of man and animals in space related research is discussed. The results of a pilot study involving lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative pressure unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology utilizes vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Extremely stable long term data using capacative pressure sensors has lead to the order of commercially manufactured monitoring systems base. Projects involving commercialization are: flexible medical electrodes, an echocardioscope, a miniature biotelemetry system, and an on-line ventricular contour detector.

  9. Technology Transfer: From the Research Bench to Commercialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A. Van Norman, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in medicine hinges on the successful translation of basic science discoveries into new medical devices, diagnostics, and therapeutics. “Technology transfer” is the process by which new innovations flow from the basic research bench to commercial entities and then to public use. In academic institutions, intellectual property rights do not usually fall automatically to the individual inventor per se, but most often are the property of the institution. Technology transfer offices are tasked with seeing to it that such intellectual property rights are properly managed and commercialized. This 2-part series explores the technology transfer process from invention to commercialization. Part 1 reviews basic aspects of intellectual property rights, primarily patents and copyrights. Part 2 will discuss the ways in which inventions become commercialized through startup companies and licensing arrangements with industry players.

  10. [Gene transfer as treatment for metabolic inherited liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, J L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study gene transfer looking for its future clinical application in the treatment of metabolic inherited liver diseases. METHODS: Bibliographic review about the subject. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Gene transfer into the liver would be an alternative to liver transplantation to treat some inherited metabolic diseases. Various vectors have been employed for gene transfer, including retrovirus vectors, whose integration into the chromosomal DNA would allow stable long term expression of the transgene. The integration of retrovirus vectors into the genoma of the target cell is only possible during mitosis. Therefore, these vectors must be delivered during hepatic regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, for example. Another obstacle to be overcome is the extra hepatic dissemination of retrovirus, in particular to the germinals cells, due to the risk of changing the genetical heritage of the progeniture.

  11. State of the Science in Technology Transfer: At the Confluence of Academic Research and Business Development--Merging Technology Transfer with Knowledge Translation to Deliver Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    The practice of technology transfer continues to evolve into a discipline. Efforts continue in the field of assistive technology (AT) to move technology-related prototypes, resulting from development in the academic sector, to product commercialization within the business sector. The article describes how technology transfer can be linked to…

  12. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  13. Combination of the somatic cell nuclear transfer method and RNAi technology for the production of a prion gene-knockdown calf using plasmid vectors harboring the U6 or tRNA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Sutou, Shizuyo; Kunishi, Miho; Dong, Ya Juan; Bai, Xuejin; Otoi, Takeshige

    2011-01-01

    By combining RNAi technology with SCNT method, we attempted to produce transgenic calves with knocked down bPRNP for technological assessments. The respective utilities of type II (tRNA) and type III (hU6) Pol III promoters in mediating plasmid vector-based RNAi for the production of a bPRNP-knockdown calf were compared. Plasmid harboring DNA for siRNA expression was introduced stably into the genome of primary cultured bovine cells. By inserting the transgenic cell into an enucleated bovine egg, SCNT embryos were produced. The ability for SCNT embryos to develop to blastocysts was higher in hU6 based vector groups (44-53%) than in a tRNA group (32%). In all, 30 hU6-embryos and 12 tRNA-embryos were transferred to 11 recipients. Only tRNA-embryos were able to impregnate recipients (6 out of 11 transfers), resulting in four aborted fetuses, one stillbirth, and one live-born calf. The expression of EGFP, a marker, was detected in all six. The bPRNP transcript levels in the nervous tissues (brain, cerebellum, spinal bulb, and spinal cord) from the calf, which was killed 20 days after birth, were reduced to 35% of those of the control calf on average, as determined by qRT-PCR. The PrPC levels, as estimated by western blot were reduced to 86% on average in the nervous tissues. These findings suggest that SCNT technology remains immature, that the tRNA promoter is useful, and that RNAi can significantly reduce PRNP mRNA levels, but insufficient reduction of PrPC levels exists in cattle under these conditions.

  14. Important aspects of placental-specific gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Melissa R; Albers, Renee E; Keoni, Chanel; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Natale, David R; Brown, Thomas L

    2014-10-15

    The placenta is a unique and highly complex organ that develops only during pregnancy and is essential for growth and survival of the developing fetus. The placenta provides the vital exchange of gases and wastes, the necessary nutrients for fetal development, acts as immune barrier that protects against maternal rejection, and produces numerous hormones and growth factors that promote fetal maturity to regulate pregnancy until parturition. Abnormal placental development is a major underlying cause of pregnancy-associated disorders that often result in preterm birth. Defects in placental stem cell propagation, growth, and differentiation are the major factors that affect embryonic and fetal well-being and dramatically increase the risk of pregnancy complications. Understanding the processes that regulate placentation is important in determining the underlying factors behind abnormal placental development. The ability to manipulate genes in a placenta-specific manner provides a unique tool to analyze development and eliminates potentially confounding results that can occur with traditional gene knockouts. Trophoblast stem cells and mouse embryos are not overly amenable to traditional gene transfer techniques. Most viral vectors, however, have a low infection rate and often lead to mosaic transgenesis. Although the traditional method of embryo transfer is intrauterine surgical implantation, the methodology reported here, combining lentiviral blastocyst infection and nonsurgical embryo transfer, leads to highly efficient and placental-specific gene transfer. Numerous advantages of our optimized procedures include increased investigator safety, a reduction in animal stress, rapid and noninvasive embryo transfer, and higher a rate of pregnancy and live birth.

  15. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states. Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids are independent replicons that enhance their own success by promoting inter-bacterial interactions. They typically also carry genes that heighten their hosts' direct fitness. Furthermore, current research shows that the so-called mafia traits encoded on mobile genetic elements can enforce bacteria to maintain stable social interactions. It also indicates that horizontal gene transfer ultimately enhances the relatedness of bacteria carrying the mobile genetic elements of the same origin. The perspective of this review extends to an overall interconnectedness between horizontal gene transfer, mobile genetic elements and social evolution of bacteria.

  16. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  17. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-14

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  18. A gene in the process of endosymbiotic transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Jiroutová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endosymbiotic birth of organelles is accompanied by massive transfer of endosymbiont genes to the eukaryotic host nucleus. In the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana the Psb28 protein is encoded in the plastid genome while a second version is nuclear-encoded and possesses a bipartite N-terminal presequence necessary to target the protein into the diatom complex plastid. Thus it can represent a gene captured during endosymbiotic gene transfer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To specify the origin of nuclear- and plastid-encoded Psb28 in T. pseudonana we have performed extensive phylogenetic analyses of both mentioned genes. We have also experimentally tested the intracellular location of the nuclear-encoded Psb28 protein (nuPsb28 through transformation of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum with the gene in question fused to EYFP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show here that both versions of the psb28 gene in T. pseudonana are transcribed. We also provide experimental evidence for successful targeting of the nuPsb28 fused with EYFP to the diatom complex plastid. Extensive phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that nucleotide composition of the analyzed genes deeply influences the tree topology and that appropriate methods designed to deal with a compositional bias of the sequences and the long branch attraction artefact (LBA need to be used to overcome this obstacle. We propose that nuclear psb28 in T. pseudonana is a duplicate of a plastid localized version, and that it has been transferred from its endosymbiont.

  19. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  20. Managing knowledge: a technology transfer case study in IEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ana Gabriella Amorim Abreu [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Transferencia de Tecnologia], e-mail: agaap@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge management is paramount nowadays. In order to enable the members of an organization to deal with their current situations effectively it is mandatory to know and enhance its intellectual capital. Managing the organization knowledge is important to the extent that it allows and reinforce its mission (what we are trying to accomplish?), and performance (how do we deliver the results?). As a result of a knowledge management effort, the organization can create value for itself and for society as a whole. In this paper, we argue that a technology developed at a research institute and transferred to an industry is knowledge to be managed in order to create value, both for the society and for the Institute. In order to manage such knowledge, it is proposed an approach to enhance the value creation potential of a technology transfer. This paper propose an investigation to expand the understanding on how a public research institute and a private firm could introduce their value creation wishes into a technology transfer agreement in a way to reflect and provide the realization of those wishes. It is proposed that, from the identification of the organizations expectations it is possible to infer which agreement attributes will contribute to that value creation and to establish satisfactory agreement configurations. These configurations have the potential to generate those consequences, given that, through the transfer, each organization seeks to increase potential benefits and to reduce potential sacrifices. Supported by exchange flow and value creation models, by the knowledge management and the means-end theory, an approach to increase the value creation potential of a technology transfer is proposed. Evidences from a case study sustain the proposed approach. The case study unity is the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, a public research institute. (author)

  1. Tech transfer outreach. An informal proceedings of the first technology transfer/communications conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, S. [ed.

    1992-10-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. ``Tech Transfer Outreach!`` was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  2. Experiments on Gene Transferring to Primary Hematopoietic Cells by Liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Liposomes have showed many advantages in mediating exogenous gene into many cell types in vitro and in vivo. But few data are available concerning gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. In this report, we described two-marker genes (Neo R and Lac Z) co-transferred into hematopoietic cells of human and mouse by using liposome in vitro. The efficiency of gene transfer was tested by Xgal staining and observation of colony formation. The X-gal blue staining rate of transduced cells was about (13.33±2. 68) % in human and about (16. 28±2.95) % in mouse without G418 selection. After G418 selection, the blue cell rate was (46. 06±3.47)%in human and (43. 45±4. 1) % in mouse, which were markedly higher than those before selection, suggesting that high-efficiency gene transfer and expression could be attained in primary hematopoietic cells using this easy and harmless transduction protocol. At the same time, this protocol provided experimental data for clinicians to investigate the biology of marrow reconstitution and trace the origin of relapse after autologous bone marrow transplantation for the patients with leukemia.

  3. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    implementation measures. I have also taken in to account the decisions of the annual meetings of the Conference of the parties (COPs) of the UNFCCC. The thesis has also made a brief comparative discussion between the provisions of international environmental laws and the provisions of intellectual property...... of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  4. TRIPS Agreement, International Technology Transfer and Least Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V. Shugurov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the role of the trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS Agreement in facilitation the international technology transfer to least developed countries (LDCs. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the new conditions of technology development of LDCs connected with TRIPS adoption. Special attention is paid to the potentials of Article 66.2 for solving the problem of LDCs capacity building. The article presents detailed analysis of the discussions on the impact of the TRIPS provisions concerning the strengthening of the intellectual property rights (IPRs and the protection of technology transfer to LDCs. An important finding of this study is the recognition of the need to take urgent measures for the transition unto a new model of partnership between developed countries and LDCs in area of technology transfer and IPRs protection. The study concluded that a new model needed to be elaborated at the international level should be based on the effective implementation of Article 66.2 of the TRIPS Agreement.

  5. Exploring student engagement and transfer in technology mediated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Suparna

    Exploring student engagement and transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills in computer-supported learning environments by SUPARNA SINHA Dissertation Director: Cindy Hmelo-Silver Computer-supported environments designed on learning science principles aim to provide a rich learning experience for students. Students are given opportunities to collaborate, model their understanding, have access to real-time data and engage in hypotheses testing to solve authentic problems. That is to say that affordances of technologies make it possible for students to engage in mechanistic reasoning, a complex inquiry-oriented practice (Machamer, Craver & Darden, 2000; Russ et al., 2008). However, we have limited understanding of the quality of engagement fostered in these contexts. This calls for close observations of the activity systems that the students participate in. The situative perspective focuses on analyzing interactions of individuals (students) with other people, tools and materials within activity systems (Greeno, 2006). Importantly, as the central goal of education is to provide learning experiences that are useful beyond the specific conditions of initial learning, analysis of such interactions sheds light on key experiences that lead to transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills. This is made possible, as computer-supported contexts are activity systems that bring forth trends in students' engagement. From a curriculum design perspective, observing student engagement can be a useful tool to identify features of interactions (with technological tools, peers, curriculum materials) that lead to successful learning. Therefore, the purpose of the present studies is to explore the extent to which technological affordances influence students' engagement and subsequent transfer of reasoning skills. Specifically, the goal of this research is to address the following research questions: How do learners generalize understanding of mechanistic reasoning in computer

  6. Imagining value, imagining users: academic technology transfer for health innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Sanders, Carrie B; Lehoux, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Governments have invested heavily in the clinical and economic promise of health innovation and express increasing concern with the efficacy and efficiency of the health innovation system. In considering strategies for 'better' health innovation, policy makers and researchers have taken a particular interest in the work of universities and related public research organizations: How do these organizations identify and transfer promising innovations to market, and do these efforts make best use of public sector investments? We conducted an ethnographic study of technology transfer offices (TTOs) in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada, to consider the place of health and health system imperatives in judgments of value in early-stage health innovation. Our analysis suggests that the valuation process is poorly specified as a set of task-specific judgments. Instead, we argue that technology transfer professionals are active participants in the construction of the innovation and assign value by 'imagining' the end product in its 'context of use'. Oriented as they are to the commercialization of health technology, TTOs understand users primarily as market players. The immediate users of TTOs' efforts are commercial partners (i.e., licensees, investors) who are capable of translating current discoveries into future commodities. The ultimate end users - patients, clinicians, health systems - are the future consumers of the products to be sold. Attention to these proximate and more distal users in the valuation process is a complex and constitutive feature of the work of health technology transfer. At the same time, judgements about individual technologies are made in relation to a broader imperative through which TTOs seek to imagine and construct sustainable innovation systems. Judgments of value are rendered sensible in relation to the logic of valuation for systems of innovation that, in turn, configure users of health innovation in systemic ways.

  7. Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

  8. Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

  9. BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

  10. Gene transfer from a parasitic flowering plant to a fern

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Charles C.; Anderson, William R.; Wurdack, Kenneth J

    2005-01-01

    The rattlesnake fern (Botrychium virginianum (L.) Sw.) is obligately mycotrophic and widely distributed across the northern hemisphere. Three mitochondrial gene regions place this species with other ferns in Ophioglossaceae, while two regions place it as a member of the largely parasitic angiosperm order Santalales (sandalwoods and mistletoes). These discordant phylogenetic placements suggest that part of the genome in B. virginianum was acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT), perhaps fro...

  11. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huddleston JR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer R HuddlestonBiology Department, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, USAAbstract: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.Keywords: gut microbiome, conjugation, natural transformation, transduction

  12. Gene Transfer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Shuttle Phasmids to Enlightenment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, William R

    2014-04-01

    Infectious diseases have plagued humankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems. Yet vaccines have eradicated smallpox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents. These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases, followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. The discovery of DNA as genetic material and the understanding of how this information translates into specific phenotypes have changed the paradigm for developing new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents. The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e., genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance. The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts. Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host. The construction of shuttle phasmids-chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages-was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis. This review will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis research.

  13. Bacterial genes in the aphid genome: absence of functional gene transfer from Buchnera to its host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruo Nikoh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria, which have highly reduced genomes (420-650 kb, raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD-carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,psiLdcA, five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD, 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys, DNA polymerase III alpha chain (psiDnaE, and ATP synthase delta chain (psiAtpH. Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (psiDnaE and psiAtpH. Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria. At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5 are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the

  14. Curbing international transfers of arms and military technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vayrynen, R.

    1978-07-01

    The magnitude of the value and quantity of transfers of arms and military technology, the internationalization and commercialization of armaments industry (through vastly increased direct investments, through co-production, licensing and sub-contracting arrangements), the supply of training and technical services as adjuncts of arms supply, the blurring of the dividing line between military and civilian technology--all have made control measures infinitely more complicated and difficult. What compounds the difficulty is the fact that, since an overwhelmingly preponderant portion of arms transfers is made up of government-to-government transactions, control measures must emanate from supplying and/or receiving governments. But even if by some miracle these measures were forthcoming and proved effective, they will have touched only a small part of the problem of disarmament, because the share of international transfers of arms and military technology amounts to only 5 to 6% of the total world military expenditure. The other, far larger and more intractable, part relates to the staggering stockpiles of both conventional and nuclear weapon systems, almost wholly concentrated in the hands of the two superpowers. Both transfers and stockpiles of armaments are inextricably enmeshed in the existing international structure, epitomized in a dominance-dependency relationship. This paper examines the measures that the supplier nations and recipient nations can take unilaterally, bilaterally, and multilaterally to curb arms transfers, and comes to the conclusion that unilateral initiatives, especially on the part of receiving nations, are more feasible. Not to take such initiatives on the ground that they cannot succeed unless taken in concert is only an excuse for doing nothing.

  15. Ethics and technology transfer: patients, patents, and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Deborah

    2011-06-01

    Universities and academic medical centers have been increasing their focus on technology transfer and research commercialization. With this shift in focus, academic-industry ties have become prevalent. These relationships can benefit academic researchers and help then to transform their research into tangible societal benefits. However, there also are concerns that these ties and the greater academic focus on commercialization might lead to conflicts of interest, especially financial conflicts of interest. This paper briefly explores some of these conflicts of interest, particularly relating to research and training. This paper also discusses some of the policies that have been, and are being, developed to try to mitigate and manage these conflicts so that academic involvement in technology transfer and commercialization can continue without jeopardizing academic work or the public's trust in them.

  16. Technology Transfer, Labour and Local Learning Processes in Malaysian Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    1999-01-01

    The transfer of technologies by the foreign electronic industries operating in Malaysia involves training of workers for various purposes. The upgrading of skills to assimilate the transferred technology aims at increasing productivity and product quality. Communicating awareness about work hazards...... is meant to reduce breakdowns in production and workers' accidents. How do the training paradigms, which transnationals introduce in their subsidiaries in Malaysia, interact with the preconditions of learning with the local labour force? In shaping local learning processes, what is the scope for workers...... and trade unions to articulate their interests and define the issues, in particular with regard to the working environment and the external environment? The paper will discuss these questions by exploring the significance of labour market structures, labour-management relations, concepts of knowledge...

  17. Transferring federally-funded technologies: New strategies for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenehjem, E.J.

    1993-02-01

    In almost every year of the post-war era, the federal government has spent more on research and development (R D) than has US industry. These expenditures have been divided largely among the nation's federal laboratories and universities and. contrary to widely held beliefs, devoted in greater measure to applied R D than basic research. As pointed out by Salvador, this federally-funded research has resulted in the development of market/application oriented'' technology that, for the most part, has failed to reach the commercial marketplace. This report discusses new strategies for a more success technology transfer.

  18. Transferring federally-funded technologies: New strategies for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenehjem, E.J.

    1993-02-01

    In almost every year of the post-war era, the federal government has spent more on research and development (R&D) than has US industry. These expenditures have been divided largely among the nation`s federal laboratories and universities and. contrary to widely held beliefs, devoted in greater measure to applied R&D than basic research. As pointed out by Salvador, this federally-funded research has resulted in the development of ``market/application oriented`` technology that, for the most part, has failed to reach the commercial marketplace. This report discusses new strategies for a more success technology transfer.

  19. Technology Transfer and Outreach for SNL/Rochester ALPHA Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinars, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the next stage goals and resource needs for the joint Sandia and University of Rochester ARPA-E project. A key portion of this project is Technology Transfer and Outreach, with the goal being to help ensure that this project develops a credible method or tool that the magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) research community can use to broaden the advocacy base, to pursue a viable path to commercial fusion energy, and to develop other commercial opportunities for the associated technology. This report describes an analysis of next stage goals and resource needs as requested by Milestone 5.1.1.

  20. Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Lynn; Jasper, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs fund the research, development, and demonstration of innovative technologies that fulfill NASA's needs as described in the annual Solicitations and have significant potential for successful commercialization. The only eligible participants are small business concern (SBC) with 500 or fewer employees or a nonprofit research institute such as a university or a research laboratory with ties to an SBC. These programs are potential sources of seed funding for the development of small business innovations.

  1. Engineering T cell immunity by TCR gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnemann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against tumor-antigens are frequently observed for some human malignancies, in particular melanoma. However, the spontaneous development of T cell responses of a sufficient strength to eradicate human malignancies is rare. The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) αβ genes into autologo

  2. Quasispecies theory for horizontal gene transfer and recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a generalization of the parallel, or Crow-Kimura, and Eigen models of molecular evolution to represent the exchange of genetic information between individuals in a population. We study the effect of different schemes of genetic recombination on the steady-state mean fitness and distribution of individuals in the population, through an analytic field theoretic mapping. We investigate both horizontal gene transfer from a population and recombination between pairs of individuals. Somewhat surprisingly, these nonlinear generalizations of quasispecies theory to modern biology are analytically solvable. For two-parent recombination, we find two selected phases, one of which is spectrally rigid. We present exact analytical formulas for the equilibrium mean fitness of the population, in terms of a maximum principle, which are generally applicable to any permutation invariant replication rate function. For smooth fitness landscapes, we show that when positive epistatic interactions are present, recombination or horizontal gene transfer introduces a mild load against selection. Conversely, if the fitness landscape exhibits negative epistasis, horizontal gene transfer or recombination introduces an advantage by enhancing selection towards the fittest genotypes. These results prove that the mutational deterministic hypothesis holds for quasispecies models. For the discontinuous single sharp peak fitness landscape, we show that horizontal gene transfer has no effect on the fitness, while recombination decreases the fitness, for both the parallel and the Eigen models. We present numerical and analytical results as well as phase diagrams for the different cases.

  3. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF UNIVERSITY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ON FIRMS’ INNOVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Cardamone; Valeria Pupo; Fernanda Ricotta

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of universities on Italian firms’ probability to innovate. Using firm-level data, we focus on institutionalised technology transfer (TT) activities in universities, namely spin-offs, patents and research contracts. Results show that TT activities play a significant role in the probability to innovate by Italian manufacturing firms located in the same province as the university. Nevertheless, the effect is not uniform: the contribution of university TT activit...

  4. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Adato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM. Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain.

  5. Optimising Gas Quenching Technology through Modelling of Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florent Chaffotte; Linda L(e)fevre; Didier Domergue; Aymeric Goldsteinas; Xavier Doussot; Qingfei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Gas Quenching represents an environmentally friendly alternative to more commonly-used oil quenching. Yet,the performances of this technology remain limited in terms of cooling rates reached compared to oil quenching. Distortion and process homogeneity also have to be controlled carefully. The efficiency of the gas quenching process fully depends on the heat transfer between the gas and the quenched parts. The goal of this study is the optimisation of the gas quenching process efficiency through a better understanding of the heat transfer phenomena involved. The study has been performed with modelling means and validated by an experimental approach. The configuration of the gas flow has a major influence on the heat transfer phenomena between the gas and the parts. The fluid dynamics modelling approach performed in this study allows to optimise the heat transfer phenomena. New gas quenching processes allowing enhanced gas quenching performance through higher cooling rates can be thereby identified. The new solutions have been validated in experimental and industrial conditions. Results obtained allow to expect significant improvement of high pressure gas quenching technology.

  6. Optimising Gas Quenching Technology through Modelling of Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FiorentChaffotte; LindaLefevre; DidierDomergue; AymericGoidsteinas; XavierDoussot; QingfeiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Gas Quenching represents an environmentally friendly alternative to more commonly-used oil quenching. Yet,the performances of this technology remain limited in terms of cooling rates reached compared to oil quenching. Distortion and process homogeneity also have to be controlled carefully. The efficiency of the gas quenching process fully depends on the heat transfer between the gas and the quenched parts. The goal of this study is the optimisation of the gas quenching process efficiency through a better understanding of the heat transfer phenomena involved. The study has been performed with modelling means and validated by an experimental approach. ThE configuration of the gas flow has a major influence on the heat transfer phenomena between the gas and the parts. The fluid dynamics modelling approach performed in this study allows to optimise the heat transfer phenomena. New gas quenching processes allowing enhanced gas quenching performance through higher cooling rates can be thereby identified. The new solutions have been validated in experimental and industrial conditions. Results obtained allow to expect significant improvement of high pressure gas quenching technology.

  7. Gene transfer for inherited metabolic disorders of the liver: immunological challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordts, Stephanie C; Van Craeyveld, Eline; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocytes are a key target for gene transfer directed at correction of inborn errors of metabolism. The theoretical potential of hepatocyte-directed gene transfer contrasts with the hurdles for clinical translation of this technology. Innate immune responses following gene transfer are initiated by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern recognition receptors like Toll-like receptors. Adaptive immune responses may constitute the most significant hurdle for efficient gene transfer. Besides the challenge imposed by adaptive immune responses against the vector and the potential problem of pre-existing immunity, immune responses against the transgene product may also constitute an obstacle. The liver is a tolerogenic organ. Naive T cells encounter liver antigens initially in the liver, rather than in lymphoid tissue. Lymph nodes and the spleen are anatomical compartments that provide a particular microarchitecture and microenvironment for the induction of immunity. In contrast, antigen presentation in the liver takes place in a completely different microarchitecture and microenvironment. This is a key aspect of the hepatic adaptive immune tolerance induction. Consistent with the tolerogenic nature of the liver microenvironment, the risk of antibody formation against the transgene product may be limited in the setting of hepatocyte-directed gene transfer and specifically by restricting transgene expression to hepatocytes by use of hepatocyte-specific expression cassettes. However, it is unclear to which extent animal experimental data following gene transfer predict immune responses in humans. Extrapolations from animals to humans are required but should be performed with sufficient insight into the dramatic species differences of the immune system.

  8. Comparative Characteristics of Technology Transfer in Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Palii

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The research into innovation transfer in the global economy is a very urgent issue under the modern conditions of development of any country. Comparative characteristics of technology transfer in such countries and regions as the USA, EU, Asia, presented in the article, permit us to detect certain patterns of this process inherent both in developed and developing countries. The analysis made in the article can be useful for developing technology transfer processes in the Danube countries’ economy. The analytical method used in this research allowed us to determine the factor that is crucial for the growth of the world market of high-technology products and services. The analysis was conducted on several criteria such as the level of expenditure on R&D in the whole global economy, as well as in individual countries and regions. Besides, there were taken into account the added value of high-tech industries and the share of expenditure on R&D in total production costs. The conclusions regarding the effectiveness of funds allocated for scientific research and experimental development in the U.S. can be drawn on the basis of data presented in the paper on the amount of added value of the U.S. high-tech industries.

  9. Technology transfer and catch-up; Lessons from the commercial aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Heerkens, Johannes M.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the technology development and technology transfer strategies in the aircraft manufacturing industry for four industrially developing countries. It is concluded from four case studies that technology catch-up is extremely difficult due to aircraft technology characteristics.

  10. Technology Maturation in Preparation for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Doherty, Michael P.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    In support of its goal to find an innovative path for human space exploration, NASA embarked on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Project, a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large in-space cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. Recognizing that key Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration would benefit from additional maturation to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) authorized funding for a one-year technology maturation phase of the CPST project. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, concept studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer of CFM technology sub-elements and components that were lower than a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. The specific technologies selected were grouped into five major categories: thick multilayer insulation, tank applied active thermal control, cryogenic fluid transfer, propellant gauging, and analytical tool development. Based on the success of the technology maturation efforts, the CPST project was approved to proceed to flight system development.

  11. Myeloprotection by Cytidine Deaminase Gene Transfer in Antileukemic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Lachmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer of drug resistance (CTX-R genes can be used to protect the hematopoietic system from the toxicity of anticancer chemotherapy and this concept recently has been proven by overexpression of a mutant O6-methylguaninemethyltransferase in the hematopoietic system of glioblastoma patients treated with temozolomide. Given its protection capacity against such relevant drugs as cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, gemcitabine, decitabine, or azacytidine and the highly hematopoiesis-specific toxicity profile of several of these agents, cytidine deaminase (CDD represents another interesting candidate CTX-R gene and our group recently has established the myeloprotective capacity of CDD gene transfer in a number of murine transplant studies. Clinically, CDD overexpression appears particularly suited to optimize treatment strategies for acute leukemias and myelodysplasias given the efficacy of ara-C (and to a lesser degree decitabine and azacytidine in these disease entities. This article will review the current state of the art with regard to CDD gene transfer and point out potential scenarios for a clinical application of this strategy. In addition, risks and potential side effects associated with this approach as well as strategies to overcome these problems will be highlighted.

  12. E-Beam—a new transfer system for isolator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Theo; Huber, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In every aseptic filling application, the sterile transfer of goods into the aseptic area is a challenge, and there are many different ways to do it. With isolator technology a higher sterility assurance level (SAL) is achieved. This SAL is only as good as the weakest segment in the chain of manufacturing. The transfer of goods into and out of the isolator is one of these critical segments. Today different techniques, some already well established, others still very new, are available on the market like: dry heat tunnel, autoclave, pulsed light, rapid transfer systems (RTP), H 2O 2 tunnel, UV light, etc. all these systems are either not applicable for continuous transfer, only good for heat-compatible materials like glass, or do not guarantee a 6 log spore reduction. E-Beam opens new perspectives in this field. With E-beam technology it is possible to transfer heat-sensitive (plastic), pre-sterilised materials at high speed, continuously into an aseptic area. E-Beam unifies three different technologies, that result in a very efficient and high-speed decontamination machine designed for the pharmaceutical industry. First, there is the electron beam that decontaminates the goods and an accurate shielding that protects the surrounding from this beam. Second, there is the conveyor system that guarantees the output and the correct exposure time underneath the beam. And third, there is the isolator interface to provide correct differential pressure and clean air inside the tunnel as well as the decontamination of the tunnel with H 2O 2 prior to production. The E-beam is a low-energy electron beam, capable of decontaminating any kind of surface. It penetrates only a few micrometers into the material and therefore does not deform the packaging media. Currently, machines are being built to transfer pre-sterilised syringes, packed in plastic tubs with a Tyvek cover into an aseptic filling isolator with the following data: decontamination efficiency of 10 6 (6 log spore

  13. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  14. 78 FR 48537 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... Administration (SBA) is publishing the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Commercialization Benchmark for the 11 participating agencies for public comment...

  15. Horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinling HUANG; Jipei YUE

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) may not only create genome mosaicism,but also introduce evolutionary novelties to recipient organisms.HGT in plastid genomes,though relatively rare,still exists.HGT-derived genes are particularly common in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes and they also occur in multicellular plants.In particular,ancient HGT events occurring during the early evolution of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes were probably frequent.There is clear evidence that anciently acquired genes played an important role in the establishment of primary plastids and in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments.Although algal genes have often been used to infer historical plastids in plastid-lacking eukaryotes,reliable approaches are needed to distinguish endosymbionts-derived genes from those independently acquired from preferential feeding or other activities.

  16. Targeted gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor to alveolar type II epithelial cells reduces lung fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Temuri, Almas; Knudsen, Lars; Gugger, Mathias; Schmid, Ralph A; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient alveolar wound repair contributes to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent growth factor for alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECII) and may improve repair and reduce fibrosis. We studied whether targeted gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII improves lung fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. A plasmid encoding human HGF expressed from the human surfactant protein C promoter (pSpC-hHGF) was designed, and extracorporeal electroporation-mediated gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII was performed 7 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat. Animals were killed 7 days after hHGF gene transfer. Electroporation-mediated HGF gene transfer resulted in HGF expression specifically in AECII at biologically relevant levels. HGF gene transfer reduced pulmonary fibrosis as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline determination, and design-based stereology compared with controls. Our results indicate that the antifibrotic effect of HGF is due in part to a reduction of transforming growth factor-β(1), modulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and reduction of extravascular fibrin deposition. We conclude that targeted HGF gene transfer specifically to AECII decreases bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and may therefore represent a novel cell-specific gene transfer technology to treat pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Kidney-specific transposon-mediated gene transfer in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Lauren E.; Cheng, Jizhong; Welch, Richard C.; Williams, Felisha M.; Luo, Wentian; Gewin, Leslie S.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2017-01-01

    Methods enabling kidney-specific gene transfer in adult mice are needed to develop new therapies for kidney disease. We attempted kidney-specific gene transfer following hydrodynamic tail vein injection using the kidney-specific podocin and gamma-glutamyl transferase promoters, but found expression primarily in the liver. In order to achieve kidney-specific transgene expression, we tested direct hydrodynamic injection of a DNA solution into the renal pelvis and found that luciferase expression was strong in the kidney and absent from extra-renal tissues. We observed heterogeneous, low-level transfection of the collecting duct, proximal tubule, distal tubule, interstitial cells, and rarely glomerular cells following injection. To assess renal injury, we performed the renal pelvis injections on uninephrectomised mice and found that their blood urea nitrogen was elevated at two days post-transfer but resolved within two weeks. Although luciferase expression quickly decreased following renal pelvis injection, the use of the piggyBac transposon system improved long-term expression. Immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide stabilised luciferase expression, suggesting immune clearance of the transfected cells occurs in immunocompetent animals. Injection of a transposon expressing erythropoietin raised the haematocrit, indicating that the developed injection technique can elicit a biologic effect in vivo. Hydrodynamic renal pelvis injection enables transposon mediated-kidney specific gene transfer in adult mice. PMID:28317878

  18. Wolbachia genome integrated in an insect chromosome: evolution and fate of laterally transferred endosymbiont genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoh, Naruo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Kondo, Natsuko; Hizume, Masahiro; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2008-02-01

    Recent accumulation of microbial genome data has demonstrated that lateral gene transfers constitute an important and universal evolutionary process in prokaryotes, while those in multicellular eukaryotes are still regarded as unusual, except for endosymbiotic gene transfers from mitochondria and plastids. Here we thoroughly investigated the bacterial genes derived from a Wolbachia endosymbiont on the nuclear genome of the beetle Callosobruchus chinensis. Exhaustive PCR detection and Southern blot analysis suggested that approximately 30% of Wolbachia genes, in terms of the gene repertoire of wMel, are present on the insect nuclear genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization located the transferred genes on the proximal region of the basal short arm of the X chromosome. Molecular evolutionary and other lines of evidence indicated that the transferred genes are probably derived from a single lateral transfer event. The transferred genes were, for the length examined, structurally disrupted, freed from functional constraints, and transcriptionally inactive. Hence, most, if not all, of the transferred genes have been pseudogenized. Notwithstanding this, the transferred genes were ubiquitously detected from Japanese and Taiwanese populations of C. chinensis, while the number of the transferred genes detected differed between the populations. The transferred genes were not detected from congenic beetle species, indicating that the transfer event occurred after speciation of C. chinensis, which was estimated to be one or several million years ago. These features of the laterally transferred endosymbiont genes are compared with the evolutionary patterns of mitochondrial and plastid genome fragments acquired by nuclear genomes through recent endosymbiotic gene transfers.

  19. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  20. Horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal Amanita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaib De Mares, Maryam; Hess, Jaqueline; Floudas, Dimitrios; Lipzen, Anna; Choi, Cindy; Kennedy, Megan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pringle, Anne

    2015-03-01

    The genus Amanita encompasses both symbiotic, ectomycorrhizal fungi and asymbiotic litter decomposers; all species are derived from asymbiotic ancestors. Symbiotic species are no longer able to degrade plant cell walls. The carbohydrate esterases family 1 (CE1s) is a diverse group of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, including decomposition and carbon storage. CE1 genes of the ectomycorrhizal A. muscaria appear diverged from all other fungal homologues, and more similar to CE1s of bacteria, suggesting a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. In order to test whether AmanitaCE1s were acquired horizontally, we built a phylogeny of CE1s collected from across the tree of life, and describe the evolution of CE1 genes among Amanita and relevant lineages of bacteria. CE1s of symbiotic Amanita were very different from CE1s of asymbiotic Amanita, and are more similar to bacterial CE1s. The protein structure of one CE1 gene of A. muscaria matched a depolymerase that degrades the carbon storage molecule poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Asymbiotic Amanita do not carry sequence or structural homologues of these genes. The CE1s acquired through HGT may enable novel metabolisms, or play roles in signaling or defense. This is the first evidence for the horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  1. 76 FR 71048 - Sixth Annual Philip S. Chen, Jr. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Innovation and Technology Transfer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION....D. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer. DATES: Friday, December 9, 2011, at... Recombinant Immunotoxins: From Technology Transfer to the Patient.'' Dr. Pastan is an NIH Distinguished...

  2. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management and operating contracts that do not include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission,...

  3. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  4. Direct Gene Transfer into Rabbit Peripheral Nerve in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世强; 张经歧; 张英泽; 刘玲

    2001-01-01

    Exogenous gene suture was used to achieve peripheral nerve anastomoses to probe into the feasibility that the sites of anastomoses of nerves directly transfer gene and thus enable gene to be expressed at the sites of anastomoses under the condition that perfect nerve anastomoses are ensured. PCMVβ plasmid containing cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV promoter) and Escherichia coli (E.coli) β-Galactosidase (β-Gal) structural gene (lacZ gene) was conducted. A soaked medical 8-0nylon suture was used to perform epineurial repair of rabbit sciatic nerve. In the control group a suture soaked in sucrose PBS was used, while in the experimental group a suture soaked in PCMVβ plasmid solution was applied. The sites of anastomoses of nerves by stages were taken out, and β-Gal histochemical staining was performed and β-Gal enzyme activity was assayed with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside. Results showed that the sites of anastomoses of nerves were taken out 2 days, 7 days, 14 days and 30 days respectively after the operation. The β-Gal histochemical stains at the sites of anastomoses showed no indigo positive cells at different stages in the control group, whereas displayed indigo positive cells in the experimental group. In the control group, no β-Gal enzyme activity was detected at different stages after operation, but in the experimental group, β-Gal enzyme activity could be detected from the 3rd day to the 30th day after operation. It was concluded that by using exogenous gene suture, exogenous gene could be transferred to the sites of peripheral nerve and expressed the exogenous gene expression products with bioactivity, which provided the feasibility of using gene therapy to accelerate the recovery of nerve function.

  5. Examining Ancient Inter-domain Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C. Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Details of the genomic changes that occurred in the ancestors of Eukarya, Archaea and Bacteria are elusive. Ancient interdomain horizontal gene transfer (IDHGT amongst the ancestors of these three domains has been difficult to detect and analyze because of the extreme degree of divergence of genes in these three domains and because most evidence for such events are poorly supported. In addition, many researchers have suggested that the prevalence of IDHGT events early in the evolution of life would most likely obscure the patterns of divergence of major groups of organisms let alone allow the tracking of horizontal transfer at this level. In order to approach this problem, we mined the E. coli genome for genes with distinct paralogs. Using the 1,268 E. coli K-12 genes with 40% or higher similarity level to a paralog elsewhere in the E. coli genome we detected 95 genes found exclusively in Bacteria and Archaea and 86 genes found in Bacteria and Eukarya. These genes form the basis for our analysis of IDHGT. We also applied a newly developed statistical test (the node height test, to examine the robustness of these inferences and to corroborate the phylogenetically identifi ed cases of ancient IDHGT. Our results suggest that ancient inter domain HGT is restricted to special cases, mostly involving symbiosis in eukaryotes and specific adaptations in prokaryotes. Only three genes in the Bacteria + Eukarya class (Deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXPS, fructose 1,6-phosphate aldolase class II protein and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase and three genes–in the Bacteria + Archaea class (ABC-type FE3+ -siderophore transport system, ferrous iron transport protein B, and dipeptide transport protein showed evidence of ancient IDHGT. However, we conclude that robust estimates of IDHGT will be very difficult to obtain due to the methodological limitations and the extreme sequence saturation of the genes suspected of being involved in IDHGT.

  6. EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Security technologies and protocols for Asynchronous Transfer Mode networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarman, T.D.

    1996-06-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) is a new data communications technology that promises to integrate voice, video, and data traffic into a common network infrastructure. In order to fully utilize ATM`s ability to transfer real-time data at high rates, applications will start to access the ATM layer directly. As a result of this trend, security mechanisms at the ATM layer will be required. A number of research programs are currently in progress which seek to better understand the unique issues associated with ATM security. This paper describes some of these issues, and the approaches taken by various organizations in the design of ATM layer security mechanisms. Efforts within the ATM Forum to address the user communities need for ATM security are also described.

  8. A first thermodynamic interpretation of the technology transfer activities

    CERN Document Server

    Ripandelli, S

    2016-01-01

    In the last years new interdisciplinary approaches to economics and social science have been developed. A Thermodynamic approach to socio-economics has brought to a new interdisciplinary scientific field called econophysics. Why thermodynamic? Thermodynamic is a statistical theory for large atomic system under constraints of energy[1] and the economy can be considered a large system governed by complex rules. The present job proposes a new application, starting from econophysic, passing throughout the thermodynamic laws to interpret and to described the Technology Transfer (TT) activities. Using the definition of economy (i.e. economy[dictionary def.] = the process or system by which goods and services are produced, sold, and bought in a country or region) the TT can be considered an important sub-domain of the economy and a transversal new area of the scientific research. The TT is the process of transferring knowledge, that uses the results from the research to produce innovation and to ensure that scientif...

  9. Can Viruses be Modified to Achieve Sustained Gene Transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegund CJ Ertl

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It is very easy to replace a faulty gene in an immunocompromised mouse. First, one takes a well-characterized virus, such as an adenovirus or an adeno-associated virus, and incorporates the correct version of the faulty gene together with some regulatory sequences into the genome. Then, one transduces the recombinant genome into helper cells, which will add the viral capsid. At last, one injects the resulting viral vector into the sick mouse, and the mouse is cured. It is not that easy in an immunocompetent mouse, let alone in a human, as over the eons the immune system evolved to eliminate viruses regardless if they penetrate as dangerous pathogens or are injected by a well-meaning gene therapist. Here we offer our perspective on the potential of how viral vectors achieve sustained gene transfer in the face of a hostile immune system.

  10. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer directly to the swine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, B; Downey, H; Strange, R; Murray, L; Cinnamond, C; Lundberg, C; Israel, A; Chen, Y-J; Marshall, W; Heller, R

    2013-02-01

    In vivo gene transfer to the ischemic heart via electroporation holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of heart disease. In the current study, we investigated the use of in vivo electroporation for gene transfer using three different penetrating electrodes and one non-penetrating electrode. The hearts of adult male swine were exposed through a sternotomy. Eight electric pulses synchronized to the rising phase of the R wave of the electrocardiogram were administered at varying pulse widths and field strengths following an injection of either a plasmid encoding luciferase or one encoding green fluorescent protein. Four sites on the anterior wall of the left ventricle were treated. Animals were killed 48 h after injection and electroporation and gene expression was determined. Results were compared with sites in the heart that received plasmid injection but no electric pulses or were not treated. Gene expression was higher in all electroporated sites when compared with injection only sites demonstrating the robustness of this approach. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation can be a safe and effective non-viral method for delivering genes to the heart, in vivo.

  11. Characterization of an ancient lepidopteran lateral gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wheeler

    Full Text Available Bacteria to eukaryote lateral gene transfers (LGT are an important potential source of material for the evolution of novel genetic traits. The explosion in the number of newly sequenced genomes provides opportunities to identify and characterize examples of these lateral gene transfer events, and to assess their role in the evolution of new genes. In this paper, we describe an ancient lepidopteran LGT of a glycosyl hydrolase family 31 gene (GH31 from an Enterococcus bacteria. PCR amplification between the LGT and a flanking insect gene confirmed that the GH31 was integrated into the Bombyx mori genome and was not a result of an assembly error. Database searches in combination with degenerate PCR on a panel of 7 lepidopteran families confirmed that the GH31 LGT event occurred deep within the Order approximately 65-145 million years ago. The most basal species in which the LGT was found is Plutella xylostella (superfamily: Yponomeutoidea. Array data from Bombyx mori shows that GH31 is expressed, and low dN/dS ratios indicates the LGT coding sequence is under strong stabilizing selection. These findings provide further support for the proposition that bacterial LGTs are relatively common in insects and likely to be an underappreciated source of adaptive genetic material.

  12. Endosymbiotic gene transfer in tertiary plastid-containing dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Fabien; Imanian, Behzad; Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    Plastid establishment involves the transfer of endosymbiotic genes to the host nucleus, a process known as endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). Large amounts of EGT have been shown in several photosynthetic lineages but also in present-day plastid-lacking organisms, supporting the notion that endosymbiotic genes leave a substantial genetic footprint in the host nucleus. Yet the extent of this genetic relocation remains debated, largely because the long period that has passed since most plastids originated has erased many of the clues to how this process unfolded. Among the dinoflagellates, however, the ancestral peridinin-containing plastid has been replaced by tertiary plastids on several more recent occasions, giving us a less ancient window to examine plastid origins. In this study, we evaluated the endosymbiotic contribution to the host genome in two dinoflagellate lineages with tertiary plastids. We generated the first nuclear transcriptome data sets for the "dinotoms," which harbor diatom-derived plastids, and analyzed these data in combination with the available transcriptomes for kareniaceans, which harbor haptophyte-derived plastids. We found low level of detectable EGT in both dinoflagellate lineages, with only 9 genes and 90 genes of possible tertiary endosymbiotic origin in dinotoms and kareniaceans, respectively, suggesting that tertiary endosymbioses did not heavily impact the host dinoflagellate genomes.

  13. Gene transfer from a parasitic flowering plant to a fern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles C; Anderson, William R; Wurdack, Kenneth J

    2005-11-07

    The rattlesnake fern (Botrychium virginianum (L.) Sw.) is obligately mycotrophic and widely distributed across the northern hemisphere. Three mitochondrial gene regions place this species with other ferns in Ophioglossaceae, while two regions place it as a member of the largely parasitic angiosperm order Santalales (sandalwoods and mistletoes). These discordant phylogenetic placements suggest that part of the genome in B. virginianum was acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT), perhaps from root-parasitic Loranthaceae. These transgenes are restricted to B. virginianum and occur across the range of the species. Molecular and life-history traits indicate that the transfer preceded the global expansion of B. virginianum, and that the latter may have happened very rapidly. This is the first report of HGT from an angiosperm to a fern, through either direct parasitism or the mediation of interconnecting fungal symbionts.

  14. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair joint tissue in osteoarthritis: nonviral gene-transfer approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Loss of articular cartilage is a common clinical consequence of osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, substantial progress in tissue engineering, nonviral gene transfer, and cell transplantation have provided the scientific foundation for generating cartilaginous constructs from genetically modified cells. Combining tissue engineering with overexpression of therapeutic genes enables immediate filling of a cartilage defect with an engineered construct that actively supports chondrogenesis. Several pioneering studies have proved that spatially defined nonviral overexpression of growth-factor genes in constructs of solid biomaterials or hydrogels is advantageous compared with gene transfer or scaffold alone, both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these investigations were performed in models of focal cartilage defects, because advanced cartilage-repair strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering have not advanced sufficiently to enable resurfacing of extensively degraded cartilage as therapy for OA. These studies serve as prototypes for future technological developments, because they raise the possibility that cartilage constructs engineered from genetically modified chondrocytes providing autocrine and paracrine stimuli could similarly compensate for the loss of articular cartilage in OA. Because cartilage-tissue-engineering strategies are already used in the clinic, combining tissue engineering and nonviral gene transfer could prove a powerful approach to treat OA.

  15. Technology transfer: Half-way houses. No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    In the fall of 1993, 1 was asked by the Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the ways in which technology transfer and defense conversion had been accomplished at General Atomics (GA) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) by interviewing Harold Agnew, who had served as director of Los Alamos before becoming president of General Atomics in 1979, and J. Robert Beyster, who had been a staff member at Los Alamos and at General Atomics before founding SAIC in 1969. Harold Agnew readily complied with my request for an interview and also suggested that I talk to Douglas Fouquet, who is in charge of public relations at General Atomics and is their unofficial historian. Robert Beyster was not available for an interview, but, through the courtesy of John C. Hopkins, a former director of CNSS, I was able to interview SAIC`s executive vice president, Donald M. Kerr, who is also a former director at Los Alamos, and Steven Rockwood, a sector vice president at SAIC who was formerly a staff member at the Laboratory Because Agnew, Kerr, and Rockwood are all familiar with LANL, as well as with their respective companies, the interviews becam exercises In comparative analyses of technology transfer. In what follows, I have tried to summarize both the interviews and some of the research which attended them. It is the historian`s hope that by use of comparative institutional analyses, Laboratory administrators may learn something of value in directing their efforts toward the transfer of technology to private industry and other government agencies.

  16. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, F

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an analysis of perspectives from different stakeholders on the state-of-the-art of BCI. Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed. Second, the potential target group, which could benefit from BCIs as access technologies is expected to be very small. Development costs are therefore high, while reimbursements are expected to be low, which challenges the commercial viability. Third, potential target users should be much more included in the design process of BCIs to ensure that the end-products meet technical, ethical, legal and social requirements. These three issues need to be urgently addressed so that target users may benefit from this promising technology.

  17. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  18. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  19. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers: evidence from Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    This paper provides new evidence on the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and the productivity of domestic firms. Using a specially designed survey on a sample of over 7,500 manufacturing firms in Vietnam we uncover some of the mechanisms that explain productivity spillovers from....... Productivity externalities from upstream sectors are associated with joint venture foreign investors while downstream sectors experience direct technology transfers from upstream wholly foreign owned investors. Spillovers from FDI through backward linkages are also detected but only when competition from...

  20. Selective Gene Transfer to the Retina Using Intravitreal Ultrasound Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Sonoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal ultrasound (US irradiation for green fluorescent protein (GFP plasmid transfer into the rabbit retina using a miniature US transducer. Intravitreal US irradiation was performed by a slight modification of the transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system utilizing a small probe. After vitrectomy, the US probe was inserted through a scleral incision. A mixture of GFP plasmid (50 μL and bubble liposomes (BLs; 50 μL was injected into the vitreous cavity, and US was generated to the retina using a SonoPore 4000. The control group was not exposed to US. After 72 h, the gene-transfer efficiency was quantified by counting the number of GFP-positive cells. The retinas that received plasmid, BL, and US showed a significant increase in the number (average ± SEM of GFP-positive cells (32±4.9; n=7; P<0.01 . No GFP-positive cells were observed in the control eyes (n=7. Intravitreal retinal US irradiation can transfer the GFP plasmid into the retina without causing any apparent damage. This procedure could be used to transfer genes and drugs directly to the retina and therefore has potential therapeutic value.

  1. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because of their beli......Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because...... of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states....... Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids...

  2. Stable oncogenic transformation induced by microcell-mediated gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕有勇; Donald G.Blair

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenes have been identified using DNA-mediated transfection, but the size of the transferable and unrearranged DNA, gene rearrangement and amplification which occur during the transfection process limit the use of the techniques. We have evaluated microcell-mediated gene transfer techniques for the transfer and analysis of dominant oncogenes. MNNG-HOS, a transformed human cell line which contained the met oncogene mapping to human chromosome 7 was infected with retroviruses carrying drug resistance markers and used to optimize microcell preparation and transfer. Stable and drug-resistant hybrids containing single human chromosomes as well as the foci of the transformed cells containing the activated met oncogene and intact hitman chromosomes were obtained. Hybridization analysis with probes (i.e. collA2, pJ3.11) mapping up to 1 Mb away from met shows that the cells from the individual focr contain different amounts of apparently unrearranged human DNA associated with the oncogene, and the microcell-g

  3. Risks from GMOs due to horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keese, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the stable transfer of genetic material from one organism to another without reproduction or human intervention. Transfer occurs by the passage of donor genetic material across cellular boundaries, followed by heritable incorporation to the genome of the recipient organism. In addition to conjugation, transformation and transduction, other diverse mechanisms of DNA and RNA uptake occur in nature. The genome of almost every organism reveals the footprint of many ancient HGT events. Most commonly, HGT involves the transmission of genes on viruses or mobile genetic elements. HGT first became an issue of public concern in the 1970s through the natural spread of antibiotic resistance genes amongst pathogenic bacteria, and more recently with commercial production of genetically modified (GM) crops. However, the frequency of HGT from plants to other eukaryotes or prokaryotes is extremely low. The frequency of HGT to viruses is potentially greater, but is restricted by stringent selection pressures. In most cases the occurrence of HGT from GM crops to other organisms is expected to be lower than background rates. Therefore, HGT from GM plants poses negligible risks to human health or the environment.

  4. Evaluation of technology transferring: The experiences of the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    In August 1989 the Office of the Chief of Naval Research and the American Defense Preparedness Association conducted the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. The objective of the Transfair was to expose the US Navy`s years of solid experience across a broad span of technology to organizations outside of the Navy. It was an opportunity for private industry to capitalize on the Navy developed technology and this opening for industry was the primary focus of the Transfair. The event provided a unique forum to meet leading Navy scientific and engineering innovators face-to-face. Information was available concerning licensing of naval technology that was for sale to the private sector. Further, discussions covered opportunities for new cooperative research and development agreements with Navy laboratories and R&D activities. These agreements were authorized under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986. The Transfair program was conducted in such a manner as to allow each Navy inventor, either scientist or engineer, to present a system, piece of hardware, or licensable concept in a formal paper presentation. Then, the Navy inventors were available in two, two-hour periods in which individual discussions were conducted, with attendees pursuing specific venues of cooperative agreements as desired. This report provides specifics concerning the technologies that were made available for transfer to the private sector during the Transfair. The Transfair concept sought to add special emphasis to the opening that the 1988 Technology Transfer Act brought to the marketplace. The experience was a step in the education of the possibilities for cooperation between the government and the private sector to share technology. Of additional significance is the economic enhancement for business expansion with the application of the technology to markets beyond defense.

  5. Opportunities for the transfer of astronomical technology to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S

    2007-12-01

    There are many examples of technology transfer from astronomy to medicine, for example algorithms for reconstructing X-ray CT images were first developed for processing radio astronomy images. In more recent times, X-ray detectors developed for the Hubble Space Telescope have been used in a fine-needle breast biopsy system. Software originally developed to mosaic planetary images has been incorporated into a system for detecting breast cancer. Australia has expertise in the development of instrumentation for producing radio images from an array of radio telescopes and in multi-object fibre systems for capturing the spectra of hundreds of stellar objects simultaneously. Two possible applications of these Australian technologies are suggested that may merit further exploration. A meeting between interested parties is suggested to discuss future directions and funding.

  6. A rice Stowaway MITE for gene transfer in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Fattash

    Full Text Available Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs lack protein coding capacity and often share very limited sequence similarity with potential autonomous elements. Their capability of efficient transposition and dramatic amplification led to the proposition that MITEs are an untapped rich source of materials for transposable element (TE based genetic tools. To test the concept of using MITE sequence in gene transfer, a rice Stowaway MITE previously shown to excise efficiently in yeast was engineered to carry cargo genes (neo and gfp for delivery into the budding yeast genome. Efficient excision of the cargo gene cassettes was observed even though the excision frequency generally decreases with the increase of the cargo sizes. Excised elements insert into new genomic loci efficiently, with about 65% of the obtained insertion sites located in genes. Elements at the primary insertion sites can be remobilized, frequently resulting in copy number increase of the element. Surprisingly, the orientation of a cargo gene (neo on a construct bearing dual reporter genes (gfp and neo was found to have a dramatic effect on transposition frequency. These results demonstrated the concept that MITE sequences can be useful in engineering genetic tools to deliver cargo genes into eukaryotic genomes.

  7. Phylogeographic support for horizontal gene transfer involving sympatric bruchid species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Andrea

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report on the probable horizontal transfer of a mitochondrial gene, cytb, between species of Neotropical bruchid beetles, in a zone where these species are sympatric. The bruchid beetles Acanthoscelides obtectus, A. obvelatus, A. argillaceus and Zabrotes subfasciatus develop on various bean species in Mexico. Whereas A. obtectus and A. obvelatus develop on Phaseolus vulgaris in the Mexican Altiplano, A. argillaceus feeds on P. lunatus in the Pacific coast. The generalist Z. subfasciatus feeds on both bean species, and is sympatric with A. obtectus and A. obvelatus in the Mexican Altiplano, and with A. argillaceus in the Pacific coast. In order to assess the phylogenetic position of these four species, we amplified and sequenced one nuclear (28S rRNA and two mitochondrial (cytb, COI genes. Results Whereas species were well segregated in topologies obtained for COI and 28S rRNA, an unexpected pattern was obtained in the cytb phylogenetic tree. In this tree, individuals from A. obtectus and A. obvelatus, as well as Z. subfasciatus individuals from the Mexican Altiplano, clustered together in a unique little variable monophyletic unit. In contrast, A. argillaceus and Z. subfasciatus individuals from the Pacific coast clustered in two separated clades, identically to the pattern obtained for COI and 28S rRNA. An additional analysis showed that Z. subfasciatus individuals from the Mexican Altiplano also possessed the cytb gene present in individuals of this species from the Pacific coast. Zabrotes subfasciatus individuals from the Mexican Altiplano thus demonstrated two cytb genes, an "original" one and an "infectious" one, showing 25% of nucleotide divergence. The "infectious" cytb gene seems to be under purifying selection and to be expressed in mitochondria. Conclusion The high degree of incongruence of the cytb tree with patterns for other genes is discussed in the light of three hypotheses: experimental contamination

  8. Dynamic monitoring of horizontal gene transfer in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. Y.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Bennett, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microbial gene expression underlies microbial behaviors (phenotypes) central to many aspects of C, N, and H2O cycling. However, continuous monitoring of microbial gene expression in soils is challenging because genetically-encoded reporter proteins widely used in the lab are difficult to deploy in soil matrices: for example, green fluorescent protein cannot be easily visualized in soils, even in the lab. To address this problem we have developed a reporter protein that releases small volatile gases. Here, we applied this gas reporter in a proof-of-concept soil experiment, monitoring horizontal gene transfer, a microbial activity that alters microbial genotypes and phenotypes. Horizontal gene transfer is central to bacterial evolution and adaptation and is relevant to problems such as the spread of antibiotic resistance, increasing metal tolerance in superfund sites, and bioremediation capability of bacterial consortia. This process is likely to be impacted by a number of matrix properties not well-represented in the petri dish, such as microscale variations in water, nutrients, and O2, making petri-dish experiments a poor proxy for environmental processes. We built a conjugation system using synthetic biology to demonstrate the use of gas-reporting biosensors in safe, lab-based biogeochemistry experiments, and here we report the use of these sensors to monitor horizontal gene transfer in soils. Our system is based on the F-plasmid conjugation in Escherichia coli. We have found that the gas signal reports on the number of cells that acquire F-plasmids (transconjugants) in a loamy Alfisol collected from Kellogg Biological Station. We will report how a gas signal generated by transconjugants varies with the number of F-plasmid donor and acceptor cells seeded in a soil, soil moisture, and soil O2 levels.

  9. The impact of gene duplication, insertion, deletion, lateral gene transfer and sequencing error on orthology inference: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalquen, Daniel A; Altenhoff, Adrian M; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The identification of orthologous genes, a prerequisite for numerous analyses in comparative and functional genomics, is commonly performed computationally from protein sequences. Several previous studies have compared the accuracy of orthology inference methods, but simulated data has not typically been considered in cross-method assessment studies. Yet, while dependent on model assumptions, simulation-based benchmarking offers unique advantages: contrary to empirical data, all aspects of simulated data are known with certainty. Furthermore, the flexibility of simulation makes it possible to investigate performance factors in isolation of one another.Here, we use simulated data to dissect the performance of six methods for orthology inference available as standalone software packages (Inparanoid, OMA, OrthoInspector, OrthoMCL, QuartetS, SPIMAP) as well as two generic approaches (bidirectional best hit and reciprocal smallest distance). We investigate the impact of various evolutionary forces (gene duplication, insertion, deletion, and lateral gene transfer) and technological artefacts (ambiguous sequences) on orthology inference. We show that while gene duplication/loss and insertion/deletion are well handled by most methods (albeit for different trade-offs of precision and recall), lateral gene transfer disrupts all methods. As for ambiguous sequences, which might result from poor sequencing, assembly, or genome annotation, we show that they affect alignment score-based orthology methods more strongly than their distance-based counterparts.

  10. The impact of gene duplication, insertion, deletion, lateral gene transfer and sequencing error on orthology inference: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Dalquen

    Full Text Available The identification of orthologous genes, a prerequisite for numerous analyses in comparative and functional genomics, is commonly performed computationally from protein sequences. Several previous studies have compared the accuracy of orthology inference methods, but simulated data has not typically been considered in cross-method assessment studies. Yet, while dependent on model assumptions, simulation-based benchmarking offers unique advantages: contrary to empirical data, all aspects of simulated data are known with certainty. Furthermore, the flexibility of simulation makes it possible to investigate performance factors in isolation of one another.Here, we use simulated data to dissect the performance of six methods for orthology inference available as standalone software packages (Inparanoid, OMA, OrthoInspector, OrthoMCL, QuartetS, SPIMAP as well as two generic approaches (bidirectional best hit and reciprocal smallest distance. We investigate the impact of various evolutionary forces (gene duplication, insertion, deletion, and lateral gene transfer and technological artefacts (ambiguous sequences on orthology inference. We show that while gene duplication/loss and insertion/deletion are well handled by most methods (albeit for different trade-offs of precision and recall, lateral gene transfer disrupts all methods. As for ambiguous sequences, which might result from poor sequencing, assembly, or genome annotation, we show that they affect alignment score-based orthology methods more strongly than their distance-based counterparts.

  11. Estimating the Frequency of Horizontal Gene Transfer Using Phylogenetic Models of Gene Gain and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Okasha, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Jakub; Higgs, Paul G

    2016-07-01

    We analyze patterns of gene presence and absence in a maximum likelihood framework with rate parameters for gene gain and loss. Standard methods allow independent gains and losses in different parts of a tree. While losses of the same gene are likely to be frequent, multiple gains need to be considered carefully. A gene gain could occur by horizontal transfer or by origin of a gene within the lineage being studied. If a gene is gained more than once, then at least one of these gains must be a horizontal transfer. A key parameter is the ratio of gain to loss rates, a/v We consider the limiting case known as the infinitely many genes model, where a/v tends to zero and a gene cannot be gained more than once. The infinitely many genes model is used as a null model in comparison to models that allow multiple gains. Using genome data from cyanobacteria and archaea, it is found that the likelihood is significantly improved by allowing for multiple gains, but the average a/v is very small. The fraction of genes whose presence/absence pattern is best explained by multiple gains is only 15% in the cyanobacteria and 20% and 39% in two data sets of archaea. The distribution of rates of gene loss is very broad, which explains why many genes follow a treelike pattern of vertical inheritance, despite the presence of a significant minority of genes that undergo horizontal transfer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Formal and Informal Technology Transfer from Academia to Industry : Complementarity Effects and Innovation Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Literature has identified formal and informal channels in university technology transfer. While formal technology transfer typically involves a legal contract on a patent or on collaborative research activities, informal transfer channels refer to personal contacts and hence to the tacit dimension of knowledge transfer. Research is, however, scarce regarding the interaction of formal and informal transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we analyze whether these activities are mutually reinforcing,...

  13. The role of technological transfer in the societies based on knowledge economy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge based economy is an economy based on innovation. Implementing innovation requires acquiring new technology, using the technique of technological transfer. The problems and the timing for implementing an emerging technology are under discussion in this paper.

  14. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light......-driven proton translocation across the cell membrane. So far, proteorhodopsin genes have been well documented only in proteobacteria and a few other bacterial groups. Here we report the presence and distribution of proteorhodopsin genes in Archaea affiliated with the order Thermoplasmatales, in the ocean......'s upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent...

  15. Lateral Gene Transfer Dynamics in the Ancient Bacterial Genus Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bradon R; Currie, Cameron R

    2017-06-06

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) profoundly shapes the evolution of bacterial lineages. LGT across disparate phylogenetic groups and genome content diversity between related organisms suggest a model of bacterial evolution that views LGT as rampant and promiscuous. It has even driven the argument that species concepts and tree-based phylogenetics cannot be applied to bacteria. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are surprisingly rare in the ubiquitous and biomedically important bacterial genus Streptomyces Using a molecular clock, we estimate that the Streptomyces bacteria are ~380 million years old, indicating that this bacterial genus is as ancient as land vertebrates. Calibrating LGT rate to this geologic time span, we find that on average only 10 genes per million years were acquired and subsequently maintained. Over that same time span, Streptomyces accumulated thousands of point mutations. By explicitly incorporating evolutionary timescale into our analyses, we provide a dramatically different view on the dynamics of LGT and its impact on bacterial evolution.IMPORTANCE Tree-based phylogenetics and the use of species as units of diversity lie at the foundation of modern biology. In bacteria, these pillars of evolutionary theory have been called into question due to the observation of thousands of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events within and between lineages. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are exceedingly rare in the bacterial genus Streptomyces, with merely one gene acquired in Streptomyces lineages every 100,000 years. These findings stand in contrast to the current assumption of rampant genetic exchange, which has become the dominant hypothesis used to explain bacterial diversity. Our results support a more nuanced understanding of genetic exchange, with LGT impacting evolution over short timescales but playing a significant role over long timescales. Deeper understanding of LGT provides new

  16. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eTechtmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is commonly known as a toxic gas, yet it is used by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and many archaea. In this study, we determined the prevalence of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (anaerobic CODHs, or [Ni,Fe]-CODHs in currently available genomic sequence databases. More than 6% (185 genomes out of 2887 bacterial and archaeal genome sequences in the IMG database possess at least one gene encoding [Ni,Fe]-CODH, the key enzyme for anaerobic CO utilization. The phylogenetic study of this extended protein family revealed nine distinct clades of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs. These clades consisted of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs that, while apparently monophyletic within the clades, were encoded by microorganisms of disparate phylogeny, based on 16S rRNA sequences, and widely ranging physiology. Following this discovery, it was therefore of interest to examine the extent and possible routes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT affecting [Ni,Fe]-CODH genes and gene clusters that include [Ni,Fe]-CODHs.The genome sequence of the extreme thermophile Thermosinus carboxydivorans was used as a case study for HGT. The [Ni,Fe]-CODH operon of T. carboxydivorans differs from its whole genome in its G+C content by 8.2 mol%. Here, we apply statistical methods to establish acquisition by T. carboxydivorans of the gene cluster including [Ni,Fe]-CODH via HGT. Analysis of tetranucleotide frequency and codon usage with application of the Kullback-Leibler divergence metric showed that the [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon of T. carboxidyvorans is quite dissimilar to the whole genome. Using the same metrics, the T. carboxydivorans [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon is highly similar to the genome of the phylogenetically distant anaerobic carboxydotroph Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. These results allow to assume recent HTG of the gene cluster from a relative of C. hydrogenoformans to T. carboxydivorans or a more ancient transfer from a C. hydrogenoformans ancestor to a T. carboxydivorans

  17. Inside the triple helix: technology transfer and commercialization in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eric G; Powers, Joshua B; Blumenthal, David; Biles, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The transfer and subsequent application of academic research results has demonstrable benefits for health care, researchers, universities, companies, and local economies. Nonetheless, at least three general concerns exist: bias in the reporting of results, limited revenues from these activities, and the lack of data to evaluate technology transfer activities. Future efforts with regard to technology transfer in the life sciences will need to recognize its importance without ignoring concerns or overestimating benefits. Next steps include better monitoring of university-industry relationships, the development of a better data system, the dissemination of best practices in technology transfer management, and evaluation of national technology-transfer policies.

  18. Identification of a saxitoxin biosynthesis gene with a history of frequent horizontal gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellmann, Ralf; Mihali, Troco Kaan; Michali, Troco Kaan; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Neilan, Brett Adam

    2008-11-01

    The paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, saxitoxin, and its derivatives, are produced by a complex and unique biosynthetic pathway. It involves reactions that are rare in other metabolic pathways, however, distantly related organisms, such as dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria, produce these toxins by an identical pathway. Speculative explanations for the unusual phylogenetic distribution of this metabolic pathway have been proposed, including a polyphyletic origin, the involvement of symbiotic bacteria, and horizontal gene transfer. This study describes for the first time the identity of one gene, sxt1, that is involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin in cyanobacteria. It encoded an O-carbamoyltransferase (OCTASE) that was proposed to carbamoylate the hydroxymethyl side chain of saxitoxin precursor. Orthologues of sxt1 were exclusively present in PSP-toxic strains of cyanobacteria and had a high sequence similarity to each other. L. wollei had a naturally mutated sxt1 gene that encoded an inactive enzyme, and was incapable of producing carbamoylated PSP-toxin analogues, supporting the proposed function of Sxt1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that OCATSE genes were present exclusively in prokaryotic organisms and were characterized by a high rate of horizontal gene transfer. OCTASE has most likely evolved from an ancestral O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase from proteobacteria, whereas the most likely phylogenetic origin of sxt1 was an ancestral alpha-proteobacterium. The phylogeny of sxt1 suggested that the entire set of genes required for saxitoxin biosynthesis may spread by horizontal gene transfer.

  19. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  20. Reverse knowledge and technology transfer: imbalances caused by cognitive barriers in asymmetric relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Choi, Chong-Ju

    2009-01-01

    An imbalance exists in almost any type of knowledge and technology transfer due to the information asymmetry of the relationship. However, this is especially the case for reverse technology and knowledge transfer which is epitomised for us by "transfers from an MNC's subsidiary to its headquarters".

  1. FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions

  2. FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions

  3. Does Technology Transfer Help Small and Medium Companies? Empirical Evidence from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hwan Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We challenge the view that technology transfer from big companies to small and medium (SM size companies helps SM companies to prosper. With a large dataset of SM companies in Korea, we utilize the stochastic production frontier (SPF model to examine the productivity of inputs and the generalized linear model (GLM to compare business performance between two groups of SM companies: SM companies that receive technology transfer and those that do not receive technology transfer from big companies. The empirical results demonstrate that the transfer of technology from big companies to SM companies help SM companies to enjoy productivity of capital. Nonetheless, SM companies receiving technology transfer were found to underperform in terms of labor productivity and profit margin compared to their counterparts. We further investigate the reasons why SM companies receiving technology transfer from big companies underperform relative to their counterparts, and our findings shows that the former do not export much of their product and face more difficulties such as lower price for their products imposed by big companies than the latter. By identifying the negative rather than the conventionally assumed positive effect of technology transfer, this paper contributes to the literature on the relationship between technology transfer and SM companies’ prosperity in the case of Korea. Our findings have important implications for how SM companies should strategize and rethink about the clauses embedded in the transfer of technology that they receive from big companies because technology transfer plays as a barrier to their prosperity.

  4. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    House Christopher H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. Results We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria. We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  5. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in osmotrophs: playing with public goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2013-10-01

    Osmotrophic microorganisms, such as fungi and oomycetes, feed by secreting depolymerizing enzymes to process complex food sources in the extracellular environment, and taking up the resulting simple sugars, micronutrients and amino acids. As a consequence of this lifestyle, osmotrophs engage in the acquisition and protection of public goods. In this Opinion article, we propose that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a key part in shaping both the repertoire of proteins required for osmotrophy and the nature of public goods interactions in which eukaryotic microorganisms engage.

  7. Gene transfer in Nocotiana rustica using irradiated pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks, J.L.; Caligari, P.D.S.; Ingram, N.R. (Birmingham Univ. (UK))

    1981-06-18

    The results of a selection study of major gene controlled characters, using 10 - 20 krad ..gamma.. irradiated pollen of Nicotiana rustica, are reported. By selecting within the progenies it has been shown that lines can be isolated with the characteristics of the pure-breeding maternal variety but with the exception of a specific characteristic transferred from the paternal variety. The advantages of the irradiation technique as against the conventional system requiring a combination of many generations of recurrent backcrossing and selection are stressed.

  8. Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.; Waligura, A.J.

    1988-06-01

    The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the US Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). This substantial program of technology transfer was initiated in 1976. The United States Departments of State and Energy, the Arms control and Disarmament Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have each accepted responsibility for parts of the Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards. Funding is provided by state through the Foreign Assistance Act. This report provides a discussion of this program.

  9. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  10. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

  11. Analysis and technology transfer report, 1989 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The buildings sector used 29.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy in 1989, or 36 percent of the total primary energy consumed in the United States. The major uses are for space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and lighting. Electricity is the dominant fuel, followed by natural gas, petroleum, and other fuels. Although there were dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in this sector from 1975 to 1985, in recent years energy use has grown rapidly. The large growth expected in commercial building floor space and in residential units means that total building-sector energy consumption could increase dramatically by the year 2030. The mission of the US DOE's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) is to lead a national program supporting private sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings and to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources. The Office is also responsible for energy efficiency planning and management for Federal buildings as well as buildings-related associated information, financial incentives, and regulatory functions that are determined to be appropriate for the Federal government. To accomplish its goals, OBT plans and conducts research and development to make technologies available and provides information on their effectiveness. The selection and management of OBT research activities requires an understanding of where and how energy is used within the buildings sectors, how energy use is expected to change in the future, and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies on energy use. Analysis activities serve to collect energy use information, provide the analysis necessary to apply this information to research and development planning, and develop analysis tools which the program uses to set priorities for research projects. This report summarizes analysis and technology transfer activities undertaken by OBT during 1989 and 1990. 101 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Massive mitochondrial gene transfer in a parasitic flowering plant clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiang Xi

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT, especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae, whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%-41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms.

  13. Massive mitochondrial gene transfer in a parasitic flowering plant clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yuguo; Bradley, Robert K; Sugumaran, M; Marx, Christopher J; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT), especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae), whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%-41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria) and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism) where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms.

  14. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Pectinases from Bacteria Preceded the Diversification of Stick and Leaf Insects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelomi, Matan; Danchin, Etienne G J; Heckel, David; Wipfler, Benjamin; Bradler, Sven; Zhou, Xin; Pauchet, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    ...) genes in stick insects (Phasmatodea). By mapping the distribution of pectinase genes on a Polyneoptera phylogeny, we identified the transfer of pectinase genes from known phasmatodean gut microbes into the genome of an early...

  15. Information to Change the World--Fulfilling the Information Needs of Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberman, Josh; Zeller, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Provides an introduction to fulfilling the information needs of technology transfer. Highlights include a definition of technology transfer; government and university involvement; industry's role; publishers; an annotated list of information sources and contacts; technology assessment, including patent searching, competitive intelligence, and…

  16. 78 FR 59410 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... period for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR... Street SW., Washington, DC 20416; or send an email to Technology@sba.gov . Highlight the information that...

  17. Manufacturing process applications team (MATEAM). [technology transfer in the areas of machine tools and robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technology to the industrial sector is reported. Presentations to the machine tool and robot industries and direct technology transfers of the Adams Manipulator arm, a-c motor control, and the bolt tension monitor are discussed. A listing of proposed RTOP programs with strong potential is included. A detailed description of the rotor technology available to industry is given.

  18. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  19. The Software Technology Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Software engineering technology transfer in a scientific R&D laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucconi, L.

    1993-12-01

    Software engineering technology transfer for productivity and quality improvement can be difficult to initiate and sustain in a non-profit research laboratory where the concepts of profit and loss do not exist. In this experience report, the author discusses the approach taken to establish and maintain a software engineering technology transfer organization at a large R&D laboratory.

  20. Interleukin-10 Gene Transfer in Rat Limbal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Claude; Mortimer, Lauren A; Brereton, Helen M; Irani, Yazad D; Parker, Douglas Ga; Anson, Donald S; Bachmann, Lucas M; Williams, Keryn A

    2017-09-19

    To evaluate the gene transfer of the interleukin (IL)-10 cytokine as a treatment modality for prolonging limbal allograft survival in a rat model. Adenoviral (AV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors were produced for ex vivo gene transfer into limbal graft tissue prior to orthotopic transplantation. Experimental groups comprised unmodified isografts, unmodified allografts, allografts transfected with a reporter gene, and allografts transfected with IL-10. The functional effects of the transgenes were determined by clinical assessment and by following donor cell survival in the recipient animal. Group comparisons were made using survival analysis and tested with the log-rank test. Differences in mean rejection times between groups were tested using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Isografts survived during the entire observation period of 56 days. Allografts underwent clinical rejection at a mean of 6.7 days (standard deviation 2.0) postoperatively, irrespective of the presence of transgenes (p < 0.001 for difference in rejection times). For both the AV and LV vector systems, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a statistically significant difference with respect to time-to-graft failure when comparing allografts transfected with IL-10 with allografts transfected with reporter gene alone (p = 0.011 and p < 0.001, respectively). In the isografts, donor cells could be detected during the complete observation period. In all the allograft groups, however, donor cell detection declined after 1 week and was lost after 4 weeks. Under the conditions tested in the present model, both the AV and the LV vector systems were able to transfect limbal graft tissue ex vivo with biologically active IL-10, leading to delayed rejection compared to the controls.

  1. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-re- lated exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another per- son in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular prod- uct or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most signifi- cant to influence technology transfer performance.

  2. Technology Transfer Challenges in Indonesia: An Experience from Industry Turbine Overhaul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subiakto Soekarno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problems and challenges that Indonesia faces in the process of its technology transfer. Matters discussed in this paper are based on the lead writer’s personal observation and experience of the technology transfer taking place in Indonesia’s turbine maintenance and overhaul industry.The first challenge faced is the lack of basic skills on the part of factory workers. The next challenge is the lack of supporting industries. Furthermore, the low level of English proficiency of the workforce has contribution to the technology transfer problems. Final challenges are the low credibility of the government entities that oversee the turbine maintenance industry in Indonesia. The steps undertaken in the technology transfer in the turbine maintenance and overhaul industry in Indonesia is done through several complex stages.Keywords: challenges in the transfer of technology, technology transfer in Indonesia, turbine maintenance and overhaul industry.

  3. Study on magnetic gene transfer using HTS bulk magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Kota, E-mail: nakagawa@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohaku, Yoshihiro; Tamada, Junya; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Nakagami, Hironori [Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •DNA–magnetite complexes were prepared as ferromagnetic DNA carrier. •The condition of magnetic field to suppress the diffusion was found by calculation. •The result of model experiment showed the validity of the calculated value. •The results of in vivo experiments showed that the amount of gene expression was significantly increased by magnetic field. -- Abstract: This study aimed to realize local and high-efficient gene expression by suppressing the diffusion of ferromagnetic DNA carriers in a strong magnetic field generated by HTS bulk magnet. DNA–magnetite complexes were prepared as ferromagnetic DNA carrier and the magnetic gene transfer using the DNA carriers was examined. From the results of the simulation and the model experiment, it was shown that the particle diffusion was suppressed within 10 mm in diameter by the magnetic field at 20 mm above the HTS bulk magnet. The results of in vivo experiments showed that the amount of gene expression was significantly increased by magnetic field.

  4. Genome-wide experimental determination of barriers to horizontal gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward; Sorek, Rotem; Zhu, Yiwen; Creevey, Christopher J.; Francino, M. Pilar; Bork, Peer; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-09-24

    Horizontal gene transfer, in which genetic material is transferred from the genome of one organism to another, has been investigated in microbial species mainly through computational sequence analyses. To address the lack of experimental data, we studied the attempted movement of 246,045 genes from 79 prokaryotic genomes into E. coli and identified genes that consistently fail to transfer. We studied the mechanisms underlying transfer inhibition by placing coding regions from different species under the control of inducible promoters. Their toxicity to the host inhibited transfer regardless of the species of origin and our data suggest that increased gene dosage and associated increased expression is a predominant cause for transfer failure. While these experimental studies examined transfer solely into E. coli, a computational analysis of gene transfer rates across available bacterial and archaeal genomes indicates that the barriers observed in our study are general across the tree of life.

  5. Analyzing the Impacts of an IPM Vegetable Technology Transfer in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Evan Tyler

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness and impacts of USAID's IPM IL vegetable technology transfer subproject in Bangladesh. The effectiveness of the technology transfer is evaluated in four ways: IPM adoption rates and determinants of IPM adoption, measuring the impact of IPM adoption on vegetable yields, pest management costs, and the number of pesticide applications used, estimation of the economic impacts of IPM adoption and the technology transfer, and analysis of the relative efficienc...

  6. Technology Transfer: A Compilation of Varied Approaches to the Management of Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Intergovernmental Cooperation in Science and Tech- nology--J. E. Clark 89. Department of Defense Technology Transfer Consor- tium: An Overview--G. F...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER CONSORTIUM: AN OVERVIEW George F. Linsteadt Abstract The federal R&D laboratories represent a large...agencies who have compatible requirements. The Department of Defense Technology Transfer Consortium, as a subset of the Federal Laboratory Consortium for

  7. Intra- and inter-generic transfer of pathogenicity island-encoded virulence genes by cos phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John; Carpena, Nuria; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Ram, Geeta; Novick, Richard P; Penadés, José R

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer is one of the primary driving forces of bacterial evolution. The pac-type phages are generally thought to facilitate most of the phage-mediated gene transfer between closely related bacteria, including that of mobile genetic elements-encoded virulence genes. In this study, we report that staphylococcal cos-type phages transferred the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov5 to non-aureus staphylococcal species and also to different genera. Our results describe the first intra- and intergeneric transfer of a pathogenicity island by a cos phage, and highlight a gene transfer mechanism that may have important implications for pathogen evolution.

  8. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-10-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs.

  9. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  10. Foreign gene transfer into Chinese shrimps (Penaeus chinensis) with gene gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Plasmids pG DNA-RZ1 with a GFP (green fluorescent protein) reporter gene and a ribozyme gene incising penaeid white spot baculovirus (WSBV) were first introduced into the fertilized eggs of Chinese shrimps by gene gun. The treated and control samples of different development stages were observed with a fluorescent microscope. The transient expression of GFP gene was high in nauplius and zoea larvae. Results from RT-PCR and PCR for adults showed that the foreign genes had been transferred into the shrimps and had expressed the corresponding proteins. This work has established a transgenic method for penaeid shrimps, which will set base for the application of genetic engineering breeding into industry.

  11. The Histidine Decarboxylase Gene Cluster of Lactobacillus parabuchneri Was Gained by Horizontal Gene Transfer and Is Mobile within the Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Daniel; Berthoud, Hélène; Wechsler, Daniel; Eugster, Elisabeth; Irmler, Stefan; Bruggmann, Rémy

    2017-01-01

    Histamine in food can cause intolerance reactions in consumers. Lactobacillus parabuchneri (L. parabuchneri) is one of the major causes of elevated histamine levels in cheese. Despite its significant economic impact and negative influence on human health, no genomic study has been published so far. We sequenced and analyzed 18 L. parabuchneri strains of which 12 were histamine positive and 6 were histamine negative. We determined the complete genome of the histamine positive strain FAM21731 with PacBio as well as Illumina and the genomes of the remaining 17 strains using the Illumina technology. We developed the synteny aware ortholog finding algorithm SynOrf to compare the genomes and we show that the histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene cluster is located in a genomic island. It is very likely that the HDC gene cluster was transferred from other lactobacilli, as it is highly conserved within several lactobacilli species. Furthermore, we have evidence that the HDC gene cluster was transferred within the L. parabuchneri species. PMID:28261177

  12. GENE TRANSFER IN TOBACCO MITOCHONDRIA IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyshev A.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we had showed that isolated mitochondria from different organisms can import DNA. Exploiting this mechanism, we assessed the possibility of genes transfer in tobacco mitochondria in vitro and in vivo. Whereas homologous recombination is a rare occasion in higher plant nuclei, recombination between the large direct repeats in plant mitochondrial genome generates its multipartite structure. Following transfection of isolated organelles with constructs composed of a partial gfp gene flanked by mitochondrial DNA fragments, we showed the homologous recombination of imported DNA with the resident DNA and the integration of the reporter gene. The recombination yielded an insertion of a continuous exogenous DNA fragment including the gfp sequence and at least the 0.5 kb of the flanking sequence on each side. Using of transfection constructs carrying multiple sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA could be suitable for insertion of a target gene into any region of the mitochondrial genome, which turns this approach to be of a general and methodical importance. Usually mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS level is under strict control of the antioxidant system including the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. MnSOD is presented in multiple forms encoded by several genes in plants. Possibly, this enzyme, beside its catalytic function, fulfills as well some unknown biochemical functions. Thus, one of maize SOD enzymes (SOD3.4 could bind with mitochondrial DNA. Another SOD form (SOD3.1 is located in close proximity to mitochondrial respiratory complexes, where ROS are generated. To study possible physiological functions of this enzyme, we cloned the maize SOD3.1 gene. Compared to the SOD3.4, this enzyme didn't demonstrate DNA-binding activity. At the same time, SOD3.1 didn't show non-specific DNA-hydrolyzing activity as Cu/ZnSOD does. It means that this enzyme might have some DNA protective function. We made NtPcob-sod3.1-IGR

  13. Development of a Screening Tool to Facilitate Technology Transfer of an Innovative Technology to Treat Perchlorate-Contaminated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    specific technology screening instrument, Mandalas et al. (1998) demonstrated that technology transfer can be facilitated by making available user...S. D., and Aly, O. M. (1998). Chemistry of Water Treatment, 2nd Edition. Boca Raton, Florida: Lewis Publishers. Goltz, M. N., Mandalas , G. C...McGraw-Hill. Mandalas , G., Christ, J., and Goltz, M. (1998). Software to Aid Transfer of an Innovative In Situ Bioremediation Technology

  14. Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; new ways of doing business; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; ans robotics technologies. More than 77 papers, 20 presentations, and 20 exhibits covering various disciplines were presented b experts from NASA, universities, and industry.

  15. Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume of papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools; systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development; perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; and robotics technologies.

  16. Moving R&D to the Marketplace, A Guidebook for Technology Transfer Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, John E.; Kenkeremath, Deepak C.; Janis, F. Timothy

    1993-01-01

    This Guidebook serves as an introduction as well as a refresher for technology transfer managers. It focuses on the question: What can the Technology Transfer manager do when confronted by complex situations and events? The main functional issues addressed here concern the conduct of technology transfer in Technology Utilization programs. These R&D programs whose primary mission is to develop technologies that will be used outside of the Federal sector. Renewable energy, health care, and agricultural advances are technologies of this type. The contents of this Guidebook will be of value to managers in a variety of Federal, State, university and industry technology development and transfer programs. The general area of transferring service innovations is not covered here. The Guidebook is primarily about the development and care of hardware. This Guidebook makes no attempt to judge the value of specific technologies in meeting societal needs. Rather, it addresses the improvement of the technology transfer process itself. It does, however, include reminders that ascertainment of the social value of specific technologies is one of the important yet difficult tasks of R&D and technology transfer programs. [DJE-2005

  17. CEP290 gene transfer rescues Leber congenital amaurosis cellular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnight, E R; Wiley, L A; Drack, A V; Braun, T A; Anfinson, K R; Kaalberg, E E; Halder, J A; Affatigato, L M; Mullins, R F; Stone, E M; Tucker, B A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in CEP290 are the most common cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal degenerative disease for which there is currently no cure. Autosomal recessive CEP290-associated LCA is a good candidate for gene replacement therapy, and cells derived from affected individuals give researchers the ability to study human disease and therapeutic gene correction in vitro. Here we report the development of lentiviral vectors carrying full-length CEP290 for the purpose of correcting the CEP290 disease-specific phenotype in human cells. A lentiviral vector containing CMV-driven human full-length CEP290 was constructed. Following transduction of patient-specific, iPSC-derived, photoreceptor precursor cells, reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed vector-derived expression. As CEP290 is important in ciliogenesis, the ability of fibroblast cultures from CEP290-associated LCA patients to form cilia was investigated. In cultures derived from these patients, fewer cells formed cilia compared with unaffected controls. Cilia that were formed were shorter in patient-derived cells than in cells from unaffected individuals. Importantly, lentiviral delivery of CEP290 rescued the ciliogenesis defect. The successful construction and viral transfer of full-length CEP290 brings us closer to the goal of providing gene- and cell-based therapies for patients affected with this common form of LCA.

  18. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  19. Giving It Away : Free Technology Transfer to the Irish SME Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Peter; Maguire, Andy; Casey, James J.

    2006-01-01

    One of Europe’s major weaknesses lies in its inferiority in terms of transforming the results of technological research and skills into innovations and competitive advantages. (European Commission, 1995, p. 8.) Technology transfer is a key aspect of economic development and research administration. These concerns are shared equally between academia and industry on both sides of the Atlantic. As technology is developed at a greater rate, concerns about the technology transfer will heighten....

  20. LAN technology transfer using the Naval Postgraduate School as a case study

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    In today's Department of Defense (DoD) environment, more emphasis is being placed on using computing resources to receive and process information. Local area networks (LANs) are used to access these computing resources by users. As new resources are added to networks, an effective mechanism is required to transfer this technology to the users. The effective transfer of technology requires user awareness of the technology and the ability of the user to use the technology. NA NA U.S. N...

  1. Novel "Superspreader" Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Eric C; Bliskovsky, Valery V; Malagon, Francisco; Baker, James D; Prince, Jeffrey S; Klaus, James S; Adhya, Sankar L

    2017-01-17

    Bacteriophages infect an estimated 10(23) to 10(25) bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance). However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub "superspreaders," releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses that infect bacteria, are the planet's most numerous biological

  2. The Effects of Absorptive Capacity and Recipient Collaborativeness as Technology Recipient Characteristics on Degree of Inter-Firm Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Sazali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: As an efficient means to increase global competitiveness, technological capabilities and potential for local innovation, organizations in the developing countries are working hard to collaborate, learn and internalize their foreign partner’s technological knowledge by forming strategic alliances or International Joint Ventures (IJVs. Technology recipient characteristics, as one of the important actors/facilitators of inter-firm technology transfer, have increasingly become crucial factors in determining the success or failure of inter-firm technology transfer within IJVs. Since the current issue on inter-firm Technology Transfer (TT in the developing countries is centered on the efficiency and effectiveness of the transfer process by the Multinationals (MNCs therefore the success is often associated with or measured by degree of technology transferred to local partners. Based on the underlying knowledge-based view and organizational learning perspective, this study aims to empirically examine the effects of two critical elements of technology recipient characteristics: Absorptive Capacity (ACAP and Recipient Collaborativeness (RCOL on degree of technology transfer: Degree of tacit and explicit knowledge in IJVs. Approach: Using the quantitative analytical approach, the theoretical model and hypotheses in this study were tested based on empirical data gathered from 128 joint venture companies registered with the Registrar of Companies Of Malaysia (ROC. Data obtained from the survey questionnaires were analyzed using the correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analyses. Results: The results revealed that recipient collaborativeness as the critical element of technology recipient characteristics has strong significant effects on both degrees of tacit and explicit knowledge. Although absorptive capacity has been strongly emphasized of its significance effect, however, the results are not statistically significant

  3. Technology transfer at CERN a study on inter-organizational knowledge transfer within multi-national R&D collaborations

    CERN Document Server

    Huuse, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2004-01-01

    This study focus on the knowledge aspect of inter-organizational technology transfer projects. We have studied two large R&D collaborations where CERN is involved as one of several participating organizations, in order to reveal the causalities related to the knowledge transfer processes within these projects. The objective of the study is to understand how knowledge transfer happens, identify influencing factors to the process, and finally investigate the outcome of such processes. The study is founded on a thorough literature review where we examine different aspects of inter-organizational knowledge transfer. Based on the theory, we develop an analytic framework and establish different elements in the knowledge transfer process to study in more detail. This framework illustrates the relation between the different elements in a knowledge transfer process and provides the structure for our empirical foundation. We perform an explanatory embedded multiple case study and analyze our findings in terms of th...

  4. Using CASE to Exploit Process Modeling in Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz-Olar, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    A successful business will be one that has processes in place to run that business. Creating processes, reengineering processes, and continually improving processes can be accomplished through extensive modeling. Casewise(R) Corporate Modeler(TM) CASE is a computer aided software engineering tool that will enable the Technology Transfer Department (TT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to capture these abilities. After successful implementation of CASE, it could then go on to be applied in other departments at MSFC and other centers at NASA. The success of a business process is dependent upon the players working as a team and continuously improving the process. A good process fosters customer satisfaction as well as internal satisfaction in the organizational infrastructure. CASE provides a method for business process success through functions consisting of systems and processes business models; specialized diagrams; matrix management; simulation; report generation and publishing; and, linking, importing, and exporting documents and files. The software has an underlying repository or database to support these functions. The Casewise. manual informs us that dynamics modeling is a technique used in business design and analysis. Feedback is used as a tool for the end users and generates different ways of dealing with the process. Feedback on this project resulted from collection of issues through a systems analyst interface approach of interviews with process coordinators and Technical Points of Contact (TPOCs).

  5. Your idea and your university: issues in academic technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved she or he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases, a university out-licenses the intellectual property, whereas in other cases, the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, and his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This paper discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spinout company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product's commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies often are the source of early funding for new biomedical companies.

  6. NANOPARTICLE AS A NEW GENE TRANSFERRING VECTOR IN SPECIFIC EXPRESSION GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管珩; 李拥军; 郑曰宏; 刘昌伟; 杨菁; 宋存先; 王彭延; 赵三妹; 王宗立; 佘铭鹏

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the possibility and efficiency of nanoparticle as a new vector in specific gene transference.Methods. Nanoparticle-DNA complex was prepared with Poly- dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) beating antisense monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (A-MCP-1), a specific expression gene, and the package efficiency, release progress in vitro, and the size of the complex were determined. The possibility of the new vector was evaluated with genomic DNA PCR by transferring gene into cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC), cationic lipids as a control. For study in vivo, jugular vein-to-artery bypass grafting procedures were performed on 20 New Zealand white rabbits, of which 6 grafts were transferred with nanoparticle-A-MCP-1 (200 μg), 6 with A - MCP - 1(200 μ g) by cationic liposome, 4 with LNCX plasmid, and 4 as control. Fourteen days after the grafts were harvested, the expression of A-MCP-1 and its effect on MCP-1 in vein grafts were detected by dot blot, and the morphologic evaluation of grafts was performed.Results. The package efficiency of the nanoparticle-DNA complex was 0. 9%, release progress in vitro lasted 2 weeks, and the size ranged from 150 to 300nm. SMC genomic DNA PCR showed that A-MCP-1 gene could be successfully transfected into cells by nanoparticle. The study in vivo indicated that A-MCP-1 mRNA was expressed in both local gene delivery groups, nanoparticle and liposome, meanwhile, MCP-1 expression in vein grafts was significantly inhibited and neointimal hyperplasia was notably reduced.Conclusion. Nanoparticle can act as a vector to transfect specific gene.

  7. Technology transfer and catch-up; Lessons from the commercial aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.; Heerkens, Hans

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the technology development and technology transfer strategies in the aircraft manufacturing industry for four industrially developing countries. It is concluded from four case studies that technology catch-up is extremely difficult due to aircraft technology characteristics. Base

  8. Digital technology impacts on the Arnhem transfer hall structural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Straat, R.; Hofman, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Paul, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The new Transfer Hall in Arnhem is one of the key projects to prepare the Dutch railways for the increased future demands for capacity. UNStudio developed a master plan in 1996 for the station area of which the completion of the Transfer Hall in 2015 will be a final milestone. The Transfer Hall is a

  9. Digital technology impacts on the Arnhem transfer hall structural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Straat, R.; Hofman, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Paul, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The new Transfer Hall in Arnhem is one of the key projects to prepare the Dutch railways for the increased future demands for capacity. UNStudio developed a master plan in 1996 for the station area of which the completion of the Transfer Hall in 2015 will be a final milestone. The Transfer Hall is a

  10. A Predictive Model of Technology Transfer Using Patent Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaehyun Choi; Dongsik Jang; Sunghae Jun; Sangsung Park

    2015-01-01

    The rapid pace of technological advances creates many difficulties for R&D practitioners in analyzing emerging technologies. Patent information analysis is an effective tool in this situation. Conventional patent information analysis has focused on the extraction of vacant, promising, or core technologies and the monitoring of technological trends. From a technology management perspective, the ultimate purpose of R&D is technology commercialization. The core of technology commercializ...

  11. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  12. Isolated limb perfusion for local gene delivery: efficient and targeted adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into soft tissue sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.K. de Roos; J.H.W. de Wilt (Johannes); M.E. van der Kaaden; E.R. Manusama (Eric); M.W. de Vries; A. Bout; T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo); D. Valerio (Dinko); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential of isolated limb perfusion (ILP) for efficient and tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in sarcoma-bearing rats. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A major concern in adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in cancer is the transfer of ge

  13. Extensive intra-kingdom horizontal gene transfer converging on a fungal fructose transporter gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Coelho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics revealed in the last decade a scenario of rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT among prokaryotes, but for fungi a clearly dominant pattern of vertical inheritance still stands, punctuated however by an increasing number of exceptions. In the present work, we studied the phylogenetic distribution and pattern of inheritance of a fungal gene encoding a fructose transporter (FSY1 with unique substrate selectivity. 109 FSY1 homologues were identified in two sub-phyla of the Ascomycota, in a survey that included 241 available fungal genomes. At least 10 independent inter-species instances of horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving FSY1 were identified, supported by strong phylogenetic evidence and synteny analyses. The acquisition of FSY1 through HGT was sometimes suggestive of xenolog gene displacement, but several cases of pseudoparalogy were also uncovered. Moreover, evidence was found for successive HGT events, possibly including those responsible for transmission of the gene among yeast lineages. These occurrences do not seem to be driven by functional diversification of the Fsy1 proteins because Fsy1 homologues from widely distant lineages, including at least one acquired by HGT, appear to have similar biochemical properties. In summary, retracing the evolutionary path of the FSY1 gene brought to light an unparalleled number of independent HGT events involving a single fungal gene. We propose that the turbulent evolutionary history of the gene may be linked to the unique biochemical properties of the encoded transporter, whose predictable effect on fitness may be highly variable. In general, our results support the most recent views suggesting that inter-species HGT may have contributed much more substantially to shape fungal genomes than heretofore assumed.

  14. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  15. Public Relations and Technology Transfer Offices: An Assessment of US Universities' Relations with Media and Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, James M.; Cohn, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance for technology transfer offices of sound media and government relations strategies. It reports the results of a nationwide electronic survey in the USA and interviews with technology transfer managers on how they handle public relations issues in their offices. Strengths and weaknesses of their communication …

  16. Why NIH Scientists Need to Report an Invention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an NIH scientist, you must report new inventions, including improvements of previously reported inventions, to the Technology Transfer Manager assigned to your Laboratory. If you do not know the name of your TTM, please call or email the Technology Transfer Center.  | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  17. A New Technology Transfer Paradigm: How State Universities Can Collaborate with Industry in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Catherine S.; Cope, Jeff; Dix, Molly; Hersey, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In some US states, policy makers, pressed by local and regional industrial interests, are debating how to "reform" technology transfer at public universities. "Reform" in this context is generally understood to mean redirecting university technology transfer activities to increase the benefits of state-funded research to local industries.…

  18. Assessment of research and technology transfer needs for wood-frame housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Powell; David Tilotta; Karen Martinson

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to housing will require both research and the transfer of that research to homebuilders, homebuyers, and others in need of technology. This report summarizes results of a national survey on research and technology transfer needs for housing and prioritizes those needs. Survey participants included academicians, builders, code officials, government...

  19. Introduction to the Workshop on Software Technology Transfer in Software Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Warren; Wieringa, Roel

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the Workshop on Technology Transfer in Software Engineering is to increase our understanding of technology transfer in software engineering, and to learn from successful case studies. We wanted to bring researchers and practitioners together to create an inventory of problems in software

  20. A New Technology Transfer Paradigm: How State Universities Can Collaborate with Industry in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Catherine S.; Cope, Jeff; Dix, Molly; Hersey, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In some US states, policy makers, pressed by local and regional industrial interests, are debating how to "reform" technology transfer at public universities. "Reform" in this context is generally understood to mean redirecting university technology transfer activities to increase the benefits of state-funded research to local industries.…

  1. High-efficiency gene transfer into skeletal muscle mediated by electric pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mir, L M; Bureau, M F; Gehl, J;

    1999-01-01

    Gene delivery to skeletal muscle is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle disorders and for the systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins. However, present DNA delivery technologies have to be improved with regard to both the level of expression and interindividual variability. We...... report very efficient plasmid DNA transfer in muscle fibers by using square-wave electric pulses of low field strength (less than 300 V/cm) and of long duration (more than 1 ms). Contrary to the electropermeabilization-induced uptake of small molecules into muscle fibers, plasmid DNA has to be present...... in the tissue during the electric pulses, suggesting a direct effect of the electric field on DNA during electrotransfer. This i.m. electrotransfer method increases reporter and therapeutic gene expression by several orders of magnitude in various muscles in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Moreover, i...

  2. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holkers, M.; Maggio, I.; Liu, J.; Janssen, J.M.; Miselli, F; Mussolino, C.; Recchia, A; Cathomen, T.; Goncalves, M. A. F. V.

    2012-01-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehi...

  3. The Status Quo and Prospect of Chinese-funded Enterprises Technology Transfer to Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Guang; Li Xinfeng; Chen Mo

    2015-01-01

    Weak technical foundation is an important bottleneck to restrict economic growth of African countries. To promote the technological progress of Africa, the Chinese African strategy always encourages and supports Chinese-funded enterprises to transfer technology to Africa, but it is worth nothing that the critique by some African scholars and local communities on technology transfer to Africa by the Chinese-funded enterprises is spreading. In fact, in order to implement the "localization" strategy, develop African market or honor cooperation agreement on additional technical transfer, Chinese-funded enterprises always adhere to actively carrying out technology transfer to Africa, and have made certain achievements in improving the host countries’ technical environment, increasing labor income and others. In order to cope with the challenges and dispel the crisis of public opinion, China should uphold the concept of "teaching how to fish" and push forward the continuous upgrading and optimization of technology transfer to Africa all-dimensionally.

  4. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP, which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics.

  5. The recent transfer of a homing endonuclease gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Peik; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; Vader, Anna; Coucheron, Dag H.; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Steinar D.

    2005-01-01

    The myxomycete Didymium iridis (isolate Panama 2) contains a mobile group I intron named Dir.S956-1 after position 956 in the nuclear small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. The intron is efficiently spread through homing by the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-DirI. Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) usually spread with their associated introns as a unit, but infrequently also spread independent of introns (or inteins). Clear examples of HEG mobility are however sparse. Here, we provide evidence for the transfer of a HEG into a group I intron named Dir.S956-2 that is inserted into the SSU rDNA of the Costa Rica 8 isolate of D.iridis. Similarities between intron sequences that flank the HEG and rDNA sequences that flank the intron (the homing endonuclease recognition sequence) suggest that the HEG invaded the intron during the recent evolution in a homing-like event. Dir.S956-2 is inserted into the same SSU site as Dir.S956-1. Remarkably, the two group I introns encode distantly related splicing ribozymes with phylogenetically related HEGs inserted on the opposite strands of different peripheral loop regions. The HEGs are both interrupted by small spliceosomal introns that must be removed during RNA maturation. PMID:15891115

  6. Construction of Cashmere Goat Embryos Carrying K2.9 Gene by Transgenic Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Technology%转K2.9基因绒山羊体细胞核移植技术体系的优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晓燕; 于永生; 刘晓辉; 王正朝; 王晓阳; 朴庆林; 张立春; 金海国

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] In order to change the protein composition of wool and improve the quality of wool, transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer technology was used to prepare K2.9 (gene from hair keratin intermediate filament type II) transgenic cashmere goat embryos to produce transgenic goats. [Method] Cashmere goat fetal fibroblast cells were transfected by hair follice-specific expression vector pcDNA3.1-K containing K2.9 and Neor gene, and G418 was used to select transgenic cells as donor cells. To improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer technology, the effects of the activation methods and the sources of donor cells and oocytes on the development of parthenogenetic embryos were studied. Identification of the genomic DNA of transgenic blastocysts by ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) has proved that the exogenous gene had already been integrated into genomes of blastocyst cells. [Result] The cleavage rate of adult cashmere goat parthenogenetic embryos was significantly increased by Iono+6-D activation. lono+6-D was more suitable to the activation of adult cashmere goat oocytes than A23187+6-D. The cleavage rate of lamb pathenogenetic embryos was significantly lower than that of adult cashmere goat parthenogenetic embryos, but the blastocyst rate had no significant difference. The development of nuclear transfer embryos from the transgenic fibroblast cells of two cashmere goat fetuses as donor cells weren't affected, but the fusion rate of nuclear transfer embryos from the transgenic fibroblast cells of 2nd cashmere goat fetuse as donor cells were greatly increased. The development of nuclear transfer embryos from lamb oocytes was signicicantly reduced. The manipulated blastocysts were confirmed carrying K2.9 gene by PCR. [Conclusion] The transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer technology could produce cashmere goat blastocysts carrying K2.9 gene , which were constructed through K2.9 transgenic cashmere goat fetal fibroblast cells by hair follicle-specific expression

  7. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  8. Multiple inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfers in the evolution of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmei Peng

    Full Text Available Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought.

  9. Center for fetal monkey gene transfer for heart, lung, and blood diseases: an NHLBI resource for the gene therapy community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantal, Alice F; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2012-11-01

    The goals of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases are to conduct gene transfer studies in monkeys to evaluate safety and efficiency; and to provide NHLBI-supported investigators with expertise, resources, and services to actively pursue gene transfer approaches in monkeys in their research programs. NHLBI-supported projects span investigators throughout the United States and have addressed novel approaches to gene delivery; "proof-of-principle"; assessed whether findings in small-animal models could be demonstrated in a primate species; or were conducted to enable new grant or IND submissions. The Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases successfully aids the gene therapy community in addressing regulatory barriers, and serves as an effective vehicle for advancing the field.

  10. Technology transfer metrics: Measurement and verification of data/reusable launch vehicle business analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1996-01-01

    Congress and the Executive Branch have mandated that all branches of the Federal Government exert a concentrated effort to transfer appropriate government and government contractor-developed technology to the industrial use in the U.S. economy. For many years, NASA has had a formal technology transfer program to transmit information about new technologies developed for space applications into the industrial or commercial sector. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been in the forefront of the development of U.S. industrial assistance programs using technologies developed at the Center. During 1992-93, MSFC initiated a technology transfer metrics study. The MSFC study was the first of its kind among the various NASA centers. The metrics study is a continuing process, with periodic updates that reflect on-going technology transfer activities.

  11. Phylogenetic analyses of cyanobacterial genomes: Quantification of horizontal gene transfer events

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Charlebois, Robert L.; Doolittle, W Ford; Papke, R Thane

    2006-01-01

    Using 1128 protein-coding gene families from 11 completely sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we attempt to quantify horizontal gene transfer events within cyanobacteria, as well as between cyanobacteria and other phyla. A novel method of detecting and enumerating potential horizontal gene transfer events within a group of organisms based on analyses of “embedded quartets” allows us to identify phylogenetic signal consistent with a plurality of gene families, as well as to delineate cases of c...

  12. Elements of style: consent form language and the therapeutic misconception in phase 1 gene transfer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, Jonathan; Levenstadt, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic misconception arises wherever human subjects misinterpret the primary purpose of a clinical trial as therapeutic. Such misconceptions are particularly prevalent in trials involving severely ill subjects or novel and well-publicized investigational agents. In order to identify possible sources of the therapeutic misconception in gene transfer trials, 286 phase 1 human gene transfer consent documents were analyzed for their description of purpose, alternatives, and their use of the term gene transfer. We report that 20% of trials fail to explain their purpose as safety and dosage, only 41% of oncology trials identify comfort care as an alternative to participation, and that the term gene therapy is used with twice the frequency of the term gene transfer. Trends and coherence in consent form language were analyzed as well. Our results indicate that consent forms used in gene transfer phase 1 trials often contain language that promotes, or does little to deter, therapeutic misconceptions.

  13. The role of Ethics in the process of Technology Transfer and Development of 206 Peugeot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Mazlomi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Looking at the past history we find that the first phenomenon of technology transfer was taught by people who were traveling to another community and bring their technology, they move. After theindustrialization, transfer of knowledge from individuals to maintain their importance. However, now the situation for developing countries is controversial because it denied people with technical skills fromdeveloped countries to developing countries do not migrate, but the reverse is the professionals that are developing countries to developed countries loan go. Until developing countries can train your human resources specialist, they powerful companies overseas are the means of technology transfer, whether through direct investment, and whether through the sale of licenses and other means. (Noble, p. 105 - 106, 1367 Technology transfer is an important issue that should be given the capacity of countries to assess the possibility of application, absorption and its compatibility with local conditions to increase. Ie the transfer of technology and gain access to technology for its effective use for economic development and growth of countries relatively backward technology provides. (Archibugi, 2003 Today, the role of ethics in technology transfer and development is of great importance. The meaning of ethics and technology than are harvested, ethical values that have roles in the formation of modern technology. Another meaning of ethics and technology than is reached, that moral people who are dealing with technology, they must observe. It also includes technology to those that exist and sets it to those who apply and who are the analysis and criticism. In this article factors and ethical factors in the process of technology transfer and development for Peugeot 206 in Iran Khodro Company has been studied. For this purpose a questionnaire to determine and evaluate factors is designed and results are analyzed.

  14. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

  15. Heat-transfer-based detection of SNPs in the PAH gene of PKU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanden Bon N

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natalie Vanden Bon,1 Bart van Grinsven,2 Mohammed Sharif Murib,2 Weng Siang Yeap,2 Ken Haenen,2,3 Ward De Ceuninck,2,3 Patrick Wagner,2,3 Marcel Ameloot,1 Veronique Vermeeren,1 Luc Michiels11Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 2Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 3IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, BelgiumAbstract: Conventional neonatal diagnosis of phenylketonuria is based on the presence of abnormal levels of phenylalanine in the blood. However, for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, direct detection of disease-correlated mutations is needed. To speed up and simplify mutation screening in genes, new technologies are developed. In this study, a heat-transfer method is evaluated as a mutation-detection technology in entire exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene. This method is based on the change in heat-transfer resistance (Rth upon thermal denaturation of dsDNA (double-stranded DNA on nanocrystalline diamond. First, ssDNA (single-stranded DNA fragments that span the size range of the PAH exons were successfully immobilized on nanocrystalline diamond. Next, it was studied whether an Rth change could be observed during the thermal denaturation of these DNA fragments after hybridization to their complementary counterpart. A clear Rth shift during the denaturation of exon 5, exon 9, and exon 12 dsDNA was observed, corresponding to lengths of up to 123 bp. Finally, Rth was shown to detect prevalent single-nucleotide polymorphisms, c.473G>A (R158Q, c.932T>C (p.L311P, and c.1222C>T (R408W, correlated with phenylketonuria, displaying an effect related to the different melting temperatures of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes.Keywords: mutation detection, heat-transfer resistance, melting temperature, nanocrystalline diamond, persistence length

  16. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  17. Information for Our Partners | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY). | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  18. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dziaková, A.; Valenčáková, A.; Hatalová, E.; J. Kalinová

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including canc...

  19. The role of technological transfer in the societies based on knowledge economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela HÎNCU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge based economy is an economy based on innovation. Implementing innovation requires acquiring new technology, using the technique of technological transfer. The problems and the timing for implementing an emerging technology are under discussion in this paper.

  20. Tools, courses, and learning pathways offered by the National Interagency Fuels, Fire, and Vegetation Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva K. Strand; Kathy H. Schon; Jeff Jones

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances in the area of fuel and wildland fire management have created a need for effective decision support tools and technology training. The National Interagency Fuels Committee and LANDFIRE have chartered a team to develop science-based learning tools for assessment of fire and fuels and to provide online training and technology transfer to help...

  1. What do we need from intermediaries for technology transfer to China?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Cross-national technology transfer has been one of the most important vehicles by which firms in developed countries exploit the value of their technological innovations, and firms in developing countries gain access to technological and organizational knowledge from developed economies. To facil...

  2. An Empirical Analysis of Technology Transfer of National R&D Projects in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Sun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at seeking policy implications for the policy makers of South Korean government and finding a direction to support R&D institutions in performing R&D activities more efficiently, by analyzing the factors influencing technology transfer of the national R&D projects. The data retrieved from NTIS (National Science & Technology Information Service was used in analyzing the results of 575 projects with 1,903 cases of technology transfer, performed by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, between 2002 and 2012. We found that there were significant differences between the government funded institutions and the universities and between basic R&D and applied ones. We also discovered that the government funded institutions did not necessarily take a better position than the universities in terms of the quantity of technology transfer. Lastly, the applied R&D of the universities was very vulnerable in terms of technology transfer.

  3. Transfer and Detection of barstar Gene to Maize Inbred Line 18-599 (White) by Particle Bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qing-quan; ZHANG Ying; RONG Ting-zhao; DONG Shu-ting; ZUO Zhen-peng

    2007-01-01

    In China, the purity of maize hybrid strain is discomforting to the development of seed industrialization. Finding a new method for reproduction of maize hybrid strain is necessary. In this study, using particle bombardment, barstar gene was transferred into maize inbred line 18-599 (White), which is an antiviral and high quality maize inbred line. By molecular detection of the anther of transgenic maize, two plants transferred with barstar gene were gained in this study, which are two restorer lines. The two plants showed normal male spike, and lively microspores. But the capacity of the two restorer lines should be studied in the future. The aim of this study is to find a new method of reproduction of maize hybrid strain using engineering restorer lines and engineering sterility lines by gene engineering technology.

  4. Persistent gene expression in mouse nasal epithelia following feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Patrick L; Burnight, Erin R; Hickey, Melissa A; Blissard, Gary W; McCray, Paul B

    2005-10-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 10(6) transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 10(7) to 10(9) TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (approximately 10(9) TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for approximately 1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity.

  5. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  6. Technologies for Lunar Surface Power Systems Power Beaming and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville; Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Chang, Kai; Little, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Wireless power transmission within a given working area is required or enabling for many NASA Exploration Systems. Fields of application include robotics, habitats, autonomous rendezvous and docking, life support, EVA, and many others. In robotics applications, for example, the robots must move in the working area without being hampered by power cables and, meanwhile, obtain a continuous and constant power from a power transmitter. The development of modern technology for transmitting electric power over free space has been studied for several decades, but its use in a system has been mainly limited to low power, 1-2 Vdc output voltage at a transmission distance of few meters for which relatively less than 0.5 mW/cm2 is required (e.g., Radio frequency identification RFID). Most of the rectenna conversion efficiency research to date has concentrated in low GHz frequency range of 2.45 to 10 GHz, with some work at 35 GHz. However, for space application, atmospheric adsorbtion is irrelevant and higher frequency systems with smaller transmit and receive apertures may be appropriate. For high power, most of the work on rectennas has concentrated on optimizing the conversion efficiency of the microwave rectifier element; the highest power demonstrated was 35 kW of power over a distance of 1.5 km. The objective of this paper is to establish the manner in which a very large number of very low power microwave devices can be synchronized to provide a beam of microwaves that can be used to efficiently and safely transport a significant amount of power to a remote location where it can be converted to dc (or ac) power by a ``rectenna.'' The proposed system is based on spatial power combining of the outputs of a large number of devices synchronized by mutual injection locking. We have demonstrated at JPL that such power could be achieved by combining 25 sources in a configuration that allows for convenient steering of the resulting beam of microwaves. Retrodirective beam

  7. An Efficient Low Cost Method for Gene Transfer to T Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Chicaybam; Andressa Laino Sodre; Bianca Azevedo Curzio; Martin Hernan Bonamino

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Gene transfer to T lymphocytes has historically relied on retro and lentivirus, but recently transposon-based gene transfer is rising as a simpler and straight forward approach to achieve stable transgene expression. Transfer of expression cassettes to T lymphocytes remains challenging, being based mainly on commercial kits. AIMS: We herein report a convenient and affordable method based on in house made buffers, generic cuvettes and utilization of the widely available Lonza nucle...

  8. A hypertext-based Internet-assessable database for the MSFC Technology Transfer Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    There exists a continuing need to disseminate technical information and facilities capabilities from NASA field centers in an effort to promote the successful transfer of technologies developed with public funds to the private sector. As technology transfer is a stated NASA mission, there exists a critical need for NASA centers to document technology capabilities and disseminate this information on as wide a basis as possible. Certainly local and regional dissemination is critical, but global dissemination of scientific and engineering facilities and capabilities gives NASA centers the ability to contribute to technology transfer on a much broader scale. Additionally, information should be disseminated in a complete and rapidly available form. To accomplish this information dissemination, the unique capabilities of the Internet are being exploited. The Internet allows widescale information distribution in a rapid fashion to aid in the accomplishment of technology transfer goals established by the NASA/MSFC Technology Transfer Office. Rapid information retrieval coupled with appropriate electronic feedback, allows the scientific and technical capabilities of Marshall Space Flight Center, often unique in the world, to be explored by a large number of potential benefactors of NASA (or NASA-derived) technologies. Electronic feedback, coupled with personal contact with the MSFC Technology Transfer Office personnel, allows rapid responses to technical requests from industry and academic personnel as well as private citizens. The remainder of this report gives a brief overview of the Mosaic software and a discussion of technology transfer office and laboratory facilities data that have been made available on the Internet to promote technology transfer.

  9. [Nasal submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract preparation technology research based on phase transfer of solute technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-jun; Shi, Jun-hui; Chen, Shi-bin; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Based on the demand of nasal drug delivery high drug loadings, using the unique phase transfer of solute, integrating the phospholipid complex preparation and submicron emulsion molding process of Scutellariae Radix extract, the study obtained the preparation of the high drug loadings submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract. In the study of drug solution dispersion method, the uniformity of drug dispersed as the evaluation index, the traditional mixing method, grinding, homogenate and solute phase transfer technology were investigated, and the solute phase transfer technology was adopted in the last. With the adoption of new technology, the drug loading capacity reached 1.33% (phospholipid complex was 4%). The drug loading capacity was improved significantly. The transfer of solute method and timing were studied as follows,join the oil phase when the volume of phospholipid complex anhydrous ethanol solution remaining 30%, the solute phase transfer was completed with the continued recycling of anhydrous ethanol. After drug dissolved away to oil phase, the preparation technology of colostrum was determined with the evaluation index of emulsion droplet form. The particle size of submicron emulsion, PDI and stability parameters were used as evaluation index, orthogonal methodology were adopted to optimize the submicron emulsion ingredient and main influential factors of high pressure homogenization technology. The optimized preparation technology of Scutellariae Radix extract nasal submicron emulsion is practical and stable.

  10. Gene recruitment--a common mechanism in the evolution of transfer RNA gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of alloacceptor transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been traditionally thought to occur vertically and reflect the evolution of the genetic code. Yet there have been several indications that a tRNA gene could evolve horizontally, from a copy of an alloacceptor tRNA gene in the same genome. Earlier, we provided the first unambiguous evidence for the occurrence of such "tRNA gene recruitment" in nature--in the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the demosponge Axinella corrugata. Yet the extent and the pattern of this process in the evolution of tRNA gene families remained unclear. Here we analyzed tRNA genes from 21 mt genomes of demosponges as well as nuclear genomes of rhesus macaque, chimpanzee and human. We found four new cases of alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment in mt genomes and eleven cases in the nuclear genomes. In most of these cases we observed a single nucleotide substitution at the middle position of the anticodon, which resulted in the change of not only the tRNA's amino-acid identity but also the class of the amino-acyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) involved in amino-acylation. We hypothesize that the switch to a different class of aaRSs may have prevented the conflict between anticodon and amino-acid identities of recruited tRNAs. Overall our results suggest that gene recruitment is a common phenomenon in tRNA multigene family evolution and should be taken into consideration when tRNA evolutionary history is reconstructed.

  11. New research trends on high-precision time transfer technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Ruifang; QUAN; Run’ai; HOU; Feiyan; WANG; Shaofeng; XIANG; Xiao; ZHOU; Conghua; WANG; Mengmeng; LIU; Tao; ZHANG; Shou’gang

    2015-01-01

    High-precision time transfer plays an important role in the areas of fundamental research and applications. Accompanying w ith the remarkable improvements in the ability of generating and measuring high-accuracy time-frequency signal,seeking for new time-transfer techniques betw een distant clocks w ith much further improved accuracy attracts attentions w orld-w idely. The time-transfer technique based on optical pulses has the highest precision presently,and the further improvement in the accuracy is heavily dependent on the time-domain properties of the pulse as w ell as the sensitivity of the applied measurement on the exchanged pulse. The application of optical frequency comb in time transfer for a precision up to femtosecond level are currently the focus of much interest,and has recently achieved many breakthroughs. Further investigations show that,utilizing quantum techniques,i.e. quantum measurement technique and quantum optical pulse source,can lead to a new limit on the measured timing information. Furthermore,it can be immune from atmospheric parameters,such as pressure,temperature,humidity and so on.Such quantum improvements on time-transfer have a bright prospect in the future applications requiring extremely high-accuracy timing and ranging. The potential achievements w ill form a technical basis for the future realization of sub-femtosecond time transfer system.

  12. Asialoglycoprotein receptor and liposome synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李崇辉; 温守明; 翟海峰; 孙曼霁

    1999-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes was performed by employing cationic liposome as DNA carrier and the specific ligand of hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), asialofetuin, as liver-targeting ligand. The resuits showed that asialofetuin, when added to the gene transfer complexes, could significantly increase the hepatocyte transfeetion efficiency, and alleviate the cellular toxicity of Lipofectin. Several synthetic ligands of ASGPR (galactosyl albumin) could also increase the transfection efficiency of hepatocyte like asialofetuin. It was proved that ASGPR and cationic liposome could synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatoeytes. This novel gene delivery system provided a safer, more simple and efficient gene transfer method for primary hepatocytes, and showed prospecting application in hepatic gene therapy.

  13. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology. The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  14. Estimating the extent of horizontal gene transfer in metagenomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in complete genomes has been widely studied, its influence in the evolution of natural communities of prokaryotes remains unknown. The availability of metagenomic sequences allows us to address the study of global patterns of prokaryotic evolution in samples from natural communities. However, the methods that have been commonly used for the study of HGT are not suitable for metagenomic samples. Therefore it is important to develop new methods or to adapt existing ones to be used with metagenomic sequences. Results We have created two different methods that are suitable for the study of HGT in metagenomic samples. The methods are based on phylogenetic and DNA compositional approaches, and have allowed us to assess the extent of possible HGT events in metagenomes for the first time. The methods are shown to be compatible and quite precise, although they probably underestimate the number of possible events. Our results show that the phylogenetic method detects HGT in between 0.8% and 1.5% of the sequences, while DNA compositional methods identify putative HGT in between 2% and 8% of the sequences. These ranges are very similar to these found in complete genomes by related approaches. Both methods act with a different sensitivity since they probably target HGT events of different ages: the compositional method mostly identifies recent transfers, while the phylogenetic is more suitable for the detections of older events. Nevertheless, the study of the number of HGT events in metagenomic sequences from different communities shows a consistent trend for both methods: the lower amount is found for the sequences of the Sargasso Sea metagenome, while the higher quantity is found in the whale fall metagenome from the bottom of the ocean. The significance of these observations is discussed. Conclusion The computational approaches that are used to find possible HGT events in complete

  15. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a...

  16. Evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer from the draft genome of a tardigrade

    OpenAIRE

    Boothby, Thomas C; Tenlen, Jennifer R.; Smith, Frank W.; Wang, Jeremy R; Patanella, Kiera A.; Osborne Nishimura, Erin; Tintori, Sophia C.; Li, Qing; Jones, Corbin D.; Yandell, Mark; Messina, David N.; Glasscock, Jarret; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Despite fascinating scientists for over 200 years, little at the molecular level is known about tardigrades, microscopic animals resistant to extreme stresses. We present the genome of a tardigrade. Approximately one-sixth of the genes in the tardigrade genome were found to have been acquired through horizontal transfer, a proportion nearly double the proportion of previous known cases of extreme horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in animals. Foreign genes have impacted the composition of the tar...

  17. GENE TECHNOLOGY: A NEW WAY TO TREAT CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajapati P M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is the process of introducing genetic material RNA or DNA into a person's cells to fight disease. Gene therapy treats disease by either replacing damaged or missing genes with normal ones, or by providing new genes. The concept of gene therapy was born more than thirty years ago; however, new technology is opening the door to dramatically new possibilities in the treatment of cancers of all kinds. The long-term goal of cancer gene therapy is to develop treatments that attack only cancer cells, thereby eliminating adverse effects on the body and improving the possibility to cure disease. Gene therapy may someday soon make cancer a manageable disease with nominal side effects to the patients. Furthermore, since gene therapy has potential for other diseases such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, sickle-cell anemia, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson's, the value of research and discovery has broad applications.

  18. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-07-27

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese's complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity 16S rRNA gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes.

  19. Preparation of Trojan horse liposomes (THLs) for gene transfer across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2010-04-01

    Nonviral plasmid DNA is delivered to the brain via a transvascular route across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intravenous administration of DNA encapsulated within Trojan horse liposomes (THLs), also called PEGylated immunoliposomes (PILs). The liposome surface is covered with several thousand strands of polymer (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), and the tips of 1%-2% of the polymer strands are conjugated with a targeting monoclonal antibody that acts as a molecular Trojan horse (MTH). The MTH binds to a receptor (e.g., for transferrin or insulin) on the BBB and brain cell membrane, triggering receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL across the BBB in vivo, and receptor-mediated endocytosis into brain cells beyond the BBB. The persistence of transgene expression in the brain is inversely related to the rate of degradation of the episomal plasmid DNA. THL technology enables an exogenous gene to be widely expressed in the majority of cells in adult brain (or other organs) within 1 d of a single intravenous administration. Applications of the THLs include tissue-specific gene expression with tissue-specific promoters, complete normalization of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase in experimental Parkinson's disease following intravenous tyrosine hydroxylase gene therapy, a 100% increase in survival time of mice with brain tumors following weekly intravenous antisense gene therapy using THLs, and a 90% increase in survival time with weekly intravenous RNA interference (RNAi) gene therapy in mice with intracranial brain tumors. This protocol describes the preparation of THLs for use in gene transfer in vitro or in vivo.

  20. University technology transfer: comparative study of US, European and Australian universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinig, T.; van Rijsbergen, P.; Malach-Pines, A.; Özbilgin, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the factors that influence university knowledge commercialization through university Technology Transfer Office (TTO). We analyzed the resources associated with commercialization performance as measured by patenting, licensing, and spin-off activities in a sample of 124 Australian, Europe

  1. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)

  2. Technology transfer of large aggregate mix base [LAMBS] on Johannesburg roads.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horak, E

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available done by the Department of Transport. The need for structural strengthening of the M2-Motorway in Johannesburg during its rehabilitation afforded opportunity of transferring the technology to the road construction industry. LAMBS were selected...

  3. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  4. Technology Transfer In Rural Industries of Thailand: The Case of Dessert And Palm Tree Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apisek Pansuwan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In last decade, the small industrial sector has increasingly received attention from Thai policy makers. This study investigates the relationship between small industries and community in rural area in term of technology transfer. In the research area, knowledge and experience gathered from workplace as an employee and family businesses are the core resources to establish and run busineSses. Technically, technology transfer is divided into 2 characteristics; intra-enterprise and inter-enterprise. Intra-enterprise technology transfer comes from employers to employees, emphasizing production development. Beside, technology transfer of inter-enterprise has two directions. Firstly, direction points from the entrepreneur to material suppliers aiming to secure raw material quality. Secondly direction points from consumers to the entrepreneur aiming to put a great emphasis on product development, quality control and management.

  5. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  6. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy.

  7. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueyo, Ana, E-mail: anapueyo@hotmail.com [Technical University of Madrid (UPM)-Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (ETSII), Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Rodrigo [Centro de Energias Renovables (CER), Santiago de Chile (Chile); Mendiluce, Maria [World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Geneva (Switzerland); Morales, Dario [InnovaChile-CORFO Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2011-07-15

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues that successful technology transfer in a smaller economy like Chile requires: a minimum internal demand and access to regional markets to attract foreign knowledge providers; a focus in the types of technologies where the recipient country or company have a competitive advantage; and active learning processes by the recipient company. Lessons are drawn for improving the design and implementation of technology-push and market-pull policies in small or medium emerging economies. - Highlights: > We analyse the case of a Chilean company starting up wind blades production. > Technology transfer is required as the relevant knowledge is not available in the country. > We examine the factors that enable technology transfer to draw policy conclusions. > We highlight the particularities of medium sized developing countries.

  8. Fundamental Research on Convective Heat Transfer in Electronic Cooling Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.F.Ma; Y.P.Gan; 等

    1992-01-01

    During the past six years comprehensive research programs have been conducted at the Beijing Polytechnic University to provide a better understanding of heat transfer characteristics of existing and condidate cooling techniques for electronic and microelestanding of heat transfer characteristics of existing and condidate cooling techniques for electronic and microleectronic devices.This paper provides a review and summary of the programs with emphasis on direct liquid cooling.Included in this review are the heat transfer investigations related to the following cooling modes:liquid free,mixed and forced convection.liquid jet impingement,flowing liquid film cooling,pool boiling,spray cooling,foreign gas jet impingement in liquid pool,and forced convection air-cooling.

  9. Issues of social policy and ethics in gene technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, R M

    1994-09-01

    Technical developments in the last ten years have made possible mapping and sequencing of the entire human genome, along with the possibility of treating genetic disorders by manipulating DNA. A variety of issues regarding potential uses and abuses of these technologies have become apparent. They relate to both genetic screening and gene therapy. Problems facing individuals and their families mostly revolve around rights of self-determination and of confidentiality. Health care professionals will need to design optimal systems to provide genetic counseling and to protect confidentiality of DNA data bases. Society and social institutions will need to develop policies and laws that protect the privacy of individuals whose DNA is stored in data banks. Patenting of the results of gene research remains controversial internationally. Moreover, there is concern in many quarters about society's potential abuse of gene technology for eugenic purposes. Gene therapy is now a reality. There is little disagreement on the use of gene therapy to treat genetic diseases in individuals by somatic cell therapy. There is much controversy, however, over the use of germ-line cell therapy. Gene technology has contributed to the growth among a small group of influential people of the Post-Modern Movement, which is strongly antiscience and antitechnology. This movement may pose a long-term threat to future technological advances and should not be ignored. There is much outside of the laboratory that scientists, particularly molecular biologists, can do to assure a secure place for science and technology in our culture.

  10. Inward technology transfer as an interactive process: A case study of ICI.

    OpenAIRE

    Trott, Paul

    1993-01-01

    This thesis sets out to explore the area of inward technology transfer and in particular the notion of "receptivity". A conceptual framework is developed which identifies four major components of the inward technology transfer process. These are: "Awareness"- "Association"-"Assimilation"-"Application". Using this conceptual device a series of investigations are undertaken into three of these components. These studies are conducted within a number of businesses within ICI Che...

  11. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  12. Technology and Knowledge Transfer in the Graz Region Ten Years of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Franz; Adametz, Christoph; Holzer, Franz

    2004-01-01

    Technology and knowledge transfer from universities to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is seen as one way to strengthen a region's innovation capability. But what if SMEs do not want to play along? Looking back at some 10 years' experience of supporting SMEs, the authors describe in detail the 'Active Knowledge Transfer' programme, which…

  13. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  14. The Use of Viral Vectors in Gene Transfer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziaková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is strategy based on using genes as pharmaceuticals. Gene therapy is a treatment that involves altering the genes inside body's cells to stop disease. Genes contain DNA- the code controlling body form and function. Genes that do not work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new gene in an attempt to cure disease or improve the ability of the body to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Various types of genetic material are used in gene therapy; double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, plasmid DNA and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASON. The success of gene therapy depends on assuring the entrance of the therapeutic gene to targeted cells without any form of biodegradation. Commonly used vectors in gene therapy are: adenoviruses (400 clinical studies; 23.8%, retroviruses (344 clinical studies; 20.5%, unenveloped/plasmid DNA (304 clinical studies, 17.7%, adeno-associated viruses (75 clinical studies; 4.5% and others. In this paper, we have reviewed the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors.

  15. Direct gene transfer into rat articular cartilage by in vivo electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossin, Laurent; Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Mir, Lluis M; Liagre, Bertrand; Dumas, Dominique; Etienne, Stéphanie; Guingamp, Corinne; Netter, Patrick; Gillet, Pierre

    2003-05-01

    To establish a system for efficient direct in vivo gene targeting into rat joint, we have evaluated a strategy of gene transfer by means of the delivery of external electric pulses (EP) to the knee after intra-articular injection of a reporter gene (GFP). Rats were killed at various times after the electro gene-therapy to analyze GFP gene expression by immunohistochemistry. GFP staining was detected in the superficial, middle, and deep zones of the patellar cartilage at days 2 and 9, and thereafter only in the deep zone (months 1 and 2). The average percentage of GFP-positive cells was estimated at 30% both one and 2 months after the gene transfer. Moreover, no pathologic change caused by the EP was detected in the cartilage. The level and stability of the long-term GFP expression found in this study demonstrate the feasibility of a treatment of joint disorders (inflammatory or degenerative, focal or diffuse) using electric gene transfer.

  16. Health care technology transfer in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coe, G.A.; Banta, H.D.

    1992-01-01

    The greatest problem concerning health care technology for developing countries is that they are dependent upon the industrialized world for technology. The only short-term solution to this problem is to improve the choices that are available to them. This goal will require changes in the structure

  17. Technology transfer: how to remove obstacles in advancing employment growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, P.; Geenhuizen, van M.

    1995-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that technology is a major determinant of thecompetitiveness of cities and regions nowadays. The availability of new technologyessentially reduces the amount of uncertainty with which companies deal in their dailyoperations. In addition, new technology is a basis f

  18. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  19. Gene Transfer to Dendritic Cells Induced a Protective Immunity against Melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pat Metharom; Kay A.O. Ellem; Ming Q. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have shown promises for efficient gene transfer to dividing as well as nondividing cells. In this study, we explored lentiviral vector-mediated, the entire mTRP-2 gene transfer and expression in dendritic cells (DCs). Adoptive transfer of DCs-expressing mTRP-2 (DC-HR'CmT2) into C57BL/6 mouse was also assessed.Dendritic cells were harvested from bone marrow and functional DCs were proved by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Lentiviral vectors were produced by transient transfection of 293T cells. Transduction of DCs was proved by marker gene expression and PCR and RT-PCR amplification. Implantation of the transduced DCs, depletion of immune cells as well as the survival of the mice after tumour challenge were investigated. High efficiency of gene transfer into mature DCs was achieved. The high level expression of the functional antigen (TRP-2) and induction of protective immunity by adoptive transfer of TRP-2 gene modified DCs were demonstrated. In vivo study showed a complete protection of mice from further melanoma cell challenge. In comparison, only 83% of mice survived when mTRP-2 peptide-pulsed DCs were administered, suggesting the generation of specific protection. Together, these results demonstrated the usefulness of this gene transfer to DC approach for immunotherapy of cancer and indicated that using tumour associated antigens (TAAs) for gene transfer may be potentially beneficial for the therapy of melanoma.

  20. Future of health technology assessment studies in gene and cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... The application of new knowledge and technological change is a key driver of the achievements in policy decisions in health ... extension of human life, reduction of pain, disease risk .... of uncertainty, (ii) the transferring of results of evaluations between .... up R&D companies are benefitting especially at the.

  1. Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

    2011-07-01

    Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool.

  2. Widespread occurrence and lateral transfer of the cyanobactin biosynthesis gene cluster in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikoski, Niina; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2009-02-01

    Cyanobactins are small cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Here we demonstrate the widespread but sporadic occurrence of the cyanobactin biosynthetic pathway. We detected a cyanobactin biosynthetic gene in 48 of the 132 strains included in this study. Our results suggest that cyanobactin biosynthetic genes have a complex evolutionary history in cyanobacteria punctuated by a series of ancient horizontal gene transfer events.

  3. Widespread Occurrence and Lateral Transfer of the Cyanobactin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Cyanobacteria ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Leikoski, Niina; Fewer, David P.; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobactins are small cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Here we demonstrate the widespread but sporadic occurrence of the cyanobactin biosynthetic pathway. We detected a cyanobactin biosynthetic gene in 48 of the 132 strains included in this study. Our results suggest that cyanobactin biosynthetic genes have a complex evolutionary history in cyanobacteria punctuated by a series of ancient horizontal gene transfer events.

  4. Assessment and Improvement of Gene Transfer into Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Breems (Dimitri)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe application of somatic gene transfer as a potential treatment in human disease has progressed from speculation to reality in a short time [4,20,21,84,85,87,105,117,174]. In May 1989 the first clinical marker gene protocol took place [145], followed by the first gene therapy protocol

  5. Nuclear transfer of goat somatic cells transgenic for human lactoferrin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan LI; Wei SHEN; Lingjiang MIN; Qingyu PAN; Yujiang SUN; Jixian DENG; Qingjie PAN

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are used to produce recombinant proteins with appropri-ate post-translational modifications.The nuclear transfer of transgenic somatic cells is a powerful method to pro-duce mammary gland bioreactors.We established an effi-cient gene transfer and nuclear transfer approach in goat somatic cells.Gene targeting vector pGBC2LF was con-structed by cloning human lactoferrin (LF) gene cDNA into exon 2 of the milk goat beta-casein gene and the endogenous start codon was replaced by that of human LF gene.Goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with lin-earized pGBC2LF and 14 cell lines were positive accord-ing to PCR and Southern blot.The transgenic cells were used as donor cells of nuclear transfer and some of recon-structed embryos could develop into blastocyst in vitro.

  6. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Store cryogenic propellants in a manner that maximizes their availability for use regardless of mission duration. 2) Efficiently transfer conditioned cryogenic propellant to an engine or tank situated in a microgravity environment. 3) Accurately monitor and gauge cryogenic propellants situated in a microgravity environment.

  7. Leu452His mutation in lipoprotein lipase gene transfer associated with hypertriglyceridemia in mice in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyue Sun

    Full Text Available Mutated mouse lipoprotein lipase (LPL containing a leucine (L to histidine (H substitution at position 452 was transferred into mouse liver by hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HD. Mutated-LPL (MLPL gene transfer significantly increased the concentrations of plasma MLPL and triglyceride (TG but significantly decreased the activity of plasma LPL. Moreover, the gene transfer caused adiposis hepatica and significantly increased TG content in mouse liver. To understand the effects of MLPL gene transfer on energy metabolism, we investigated the expression of key functional genes related to energy metabolism in the liver, epididymal fat, and leg muscles. The mRNA contents of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, fatty acid-binding protein (FABP, and uncoupling protein (UCP were found to be significantly reduced. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which MLPL gene transfer affected fat deposition in the liver, fat tissue, and muscle. The gene expression and protein levels of forkhead Box O3 (FOXO3, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α were found to be remarkably decreased in the liver, fat and muscle. These results suggest that the Leu452His mutation caused LPL dysfunction and gene transfer of MLPL in vivo produced resistance to the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathway in mice.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of transcriptionalregulation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-12-20

    Background: Most bacterial genes were acquired by horizontalgene transfer from other bacteria instead of being inherited bycontinuous vertical descent from an ancient ancestor}. To understand howthe regulation of these {acquired} genes evolved, we examined theevolutionary histories of transcription factors and of regulatoryinteractions from the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12. Results:Although most transcription factors have paralogs, these usually arose byhorizontal gene transfer rather than by duplication within the E. colilineage, as previously believed. In general, most neighbor regulators --regulators that are adjacent to genes that they regulate -- were acquiredby horizontal gene transfer, while most global regulators evolvedvertically within the gamma-Proteobacteria. Neighbor regulators wereoften acquired together with the adjacent operon that they regulate, sothe proximity might be maintained by repeated transfers (like "selfishoperons"). Many of the as-yet-uncharacterized (putative) regulators havealso been acquired together with adjacent genes, so we predict that theseare neighbor regulators as well. When we analyzed the histories ofregulatory interactions, we found that the evolution of regulation byduplication was rare, and surprisingly, many of the regulatoryinteractions that are shared between paralogs result from convergentevolution. Another surprise was that horizontally transferred genes aremore likely than other genes to be regulated by multiple regulators, andmost of this complex regulation probably evolved after the transfer.Conclusions: Our results highlight the rapid evolution of niche-specificgene regulation in bacteria.

  9. Generation of biallelic knock-out sheep via gene-editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honghui; Wang, Gui; Hao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Guozhong; Qing, Yubo; Liu, Shuanghui; Qing, Lili; Pan, Weirong; Chen, Lei; Liu, Guichun; Zhao, Ruoping; Jia, Baoyu; Zeng, Luyao; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhao, Lixiao; Zhao, Heng; Lv, Chaoxiang; Xu, Kaixiang; Cheng, Wenmin; Li, Hushan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Wang, Wen; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-09-22

    Transgenic sheep can be used to achieve genetic improvements in breeds and as an important large-animal model for biomedical research. In this study, we generated a TALEN plasmid specific for ovine MSTN and transfected it into fetal fibroblast cells of STH sheep. MSTN biallelic-KO somatic cells were selected as nuclear donor cells for SCNT. In total, cloned embryos were transferred into 37 recipient gilts, 28 (75.7%) becoming pregnant and 15 delivering, resulting in 23 lambs, 12 of which were alive. Mutations in the lambs were verified via sequencing and T7EI assay, and the gene mutation site was consistent with that in the donor cells. Off-target analysis was performed, and no off-target mutations were detected. MSTN KO affected the mRNA expression of MSTN relative genes. The growth curve for the resulting sheep suggested that MSTN KO caused a remarkable increase in body weight compared with those of wild-type sheep. Histological analyses revealed that MSTN KO resulted in muscle fiber hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate the successful generation of MSTN biallelic-KO STH sheep via gene editing in somatic cells using TALEN technology and SCNT. These MSTN mutant sheep developed and grew normally, and exhibited increased body weight and muscle growth.

  10. The Analysis of the Relationship between Clean Technology Transfer and Chinese Intellectual Property Countering the Climate Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Hao

    This report discusses the relationship between the Chinese intellectual property systems which counter with the climate change and the transfer of clean technology, and states how to encourage the developed countries transfer the clean technology to the developing countries according...... to the relative international climate convention program. The report also proposes the current hindrances and developing strategies according to Chinese current situation at this field. The report is mainly divided into three subjects: the relationship between clean technology transfer and the intellectual...... property countering the climate changes; the analysis of current technology transfer modes relating to the climate; the difficulties of Chinese countering climate changes technology transfer and strategic thinking....

  11. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realist...

  12. Exact Algorithms for Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul S

    2017-06-01

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation is a powerful method for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation seeks to reconcile gene trees with species trees by postulating speciation, duplication, transfer, and loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. In practice, however, gene trees are often non-binary due to uncertainty in the gene tree topologies, and DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we present the first exact algorithms for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees. Specifically, we (i) show that the DTL reconciliation problem for non-binary gene trees is fixed-parameter tractable in the maximum degree of the gene tree, (ii) present an exponential-time, but in-practice efficient, algorithm to track and enumerate all optimal binary resolutions of a non-binary input gene tree, and (iii) apply our algorithms to a large empirical data set of over 4700 gene trees from 100 species to study the impact of gene tree uncertainty on DTL-reconciliation and to demonstrate the applicability and utility of our algorithms. The new techniques and algorithms introduced in this paper will help biologists avoid incorrect evolutionary inferences caused by gene tree uncertainty.

  13. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  14. Conjugal gene transfer between bacteria in soil and rhizosphere.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.

    1994-01-01

    The extent of possible conjugal transfer of recombinant DNA present in genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) was studied. Occurrence of transfer of recombinant DNA is only one of the concerns regarding the use of GEMs (Chapter 2). Other potential hazards preventing the application of GEMs for

  15. Vaccination Using Gene-Gun Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Leitner, Wolfgang W

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines against infection with Plasmodium have been highly successful in rodent models of malaria and have shown promise in the very limited number of clinical trials conducted so far. The vaccine platform is highly attractive for numerous reasons, such as low cost and a very favorable safety profile. Gene gun delivery of DNA plasmids drastically reduces the vaccine dose and does not only have the potential to make vaccines more accessible and affordable, but also simplifies (a) the testing of novel antigens as vaccine candidates, (b) the testing of antigen combinations, and (c) the co-delivery of antigens with molecular adjuvants such as cytokines or costimulatory molecules. Described in this chapter are the preparation of the inoculum (i.e., DNA plasmids attached to gold particles, coating to the inside of plastic tubing also referred to as gene gun "bullets" or cartridges), the gene gun vaccination procedure, and the challenge of mice with Plasmodium berghei parasites to test the efficacy of the experimental vaccine.

  16. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  17. Exemplar Practices for Department of Defense Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    as Amazon, Discovery Studios, Google, Under Armour , McCormick, and Cisco are invited to speak to researchers about innovation, how they manage it...commercialization and marketing strategies for each of the selected DoD technologies; • actively markets these technologies to industry...Publication This work was conducted by the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) under contract DASW01-04-C-0003, Task AI-6-3558 “Review of DoD

  18. The Commercialization of New Technologies Transfer from Laboratory to Firm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-09

    immediate market introduction . A gap exists, which is a measure of technology maturity, that reflects the amount of additional research and development the...as successful commercialization. A failure occurs when a 15 potential innovation does not reach the point of market introduction for any reason. THE...ready for immediate * market introduction . A gap exists, which is a measure of technology maturity, that reflects the amount of additional

  19. A Conceptual Decision Methodology for High Technology Transfer Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    review and provide input within given time periods on selected technologies. The basic industrial export control mechanism continues to be centered in...Department of Commerce is the center of the export control system, it is by no means predominate in the control of all exports. True, it is a key...Department of State endorsed the venture as, "in the national interest." The technology was promised during the Nixon- Pompidou Summit in the Azores. Without

  20. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  1. A new computational method for the detection of horizontal gene transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in the amounts of available genomic data has made it easier to appreciate the extent by which organisms increase their genetic diversity through horizontally transferred genetic material. Such transfers have the potential to give rise to extremely dynamic genomes where a significant proportion of their coding DNA has been contributed by external sources. Because of the impact of these horizontal transfers on the ecological and pathogenic character of the recipient organisms, methods are continuously sought that are able to computationally determine which of the genes of a given genome are products of transfer events. In this paper, we introduce and discuss a novel computational method for identifying horizontal transfers that relies on a gene's nucleotide composition and obviates the need for knowledge of codon boundaries. In addition to being applicable to individual genes, the method can be easily extended to the case of clusters of horizontally transferred genes. With the help of an extensive and carefully designed set of experiments on 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, we demonstrate that the new method exhibits significant improvement in sensitivity when compared to previously published approaches. In fact, it achieves an average relative improvement across genomes of between 11 and 41% compared to the Codon Adaptation Index method in distinguishing native from foreign genes. Our method's horizontal gene transfer predictions for 123 microbial genomes are available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT/.

  2. Brazilian university technology transfer to rural areas Transferência de tecnologia de universidades brasileiras na área rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchesan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture, there is a difference between average yield obtained by farmers and crop potential. There is technology available to increase yields, but not all farmers have access to it and/or use this information. This clearly characterizes an extension and technology transference problem. There are several technology transfer systems, but there is no system to fit all conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to create extension solutions according to local conditions. Another rural extension challenge is efficiency, despite continuous funding reductions. One proposal that has resulted from extension reform worldwide has suggested integration between the public and private sectors. The public universities could play the role of training and updating technical assistance of human resources, which is the one of the main aspects that has limited technology transfer. The objective of this study was to identify approaches to promote technology transfer generated in Brazilian public universities to rural areas through literature review. An experimental approach of technology transfer is presented here where a Brazilian university extension Vice-chancellor incorporates professionals from consolidated research groups according to demand. In this way, public universities take part of their social functions, by integrating teaching, research, and extension.Em agricultura, há diferenças entre a produtividade média obtida pelos produtores e o potencial produtivo dos cultivos. Há informação tecnológica disponível para aumentar a produtividade, mas nem todos os produtores têm acesso e/ou usam a informação. Isso caracteriza claramente um problema de extensão e transferência de tecnologia. Há vários sistemas de transferência de tecnologia, mas, como não há sistema que se ajuste a todas as condições, é necessário criar alternativas adequadas às condições de cada local. Outro desafio da extensão rural é ser eficiente, apesar da cont

  3. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  4. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  5. Research on localization and alignment technology for transfer cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingchuan, E-mail: jchwang@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, Shanghai (China); Yang, Ming; Chen, Weidong [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A method for the alignment between TB and HCB based on localizability is proposed. • A localization method based on the localizability estimation is proposed to realize the cask's localization accurately and ensures the transfer cask's accurate docking in the front of the window of Tokmak Building. • The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm works well in the indoor simulation environment. This system will be test in EAST of China. - Abstract: According to the long length characteristics of transfer cask compared to the environment space between Tokmak Building (TB) and HCB (Hot Cell Building), this paper proposes an autonomous localization and alignment method for the internal components transportation and replacement. A localization method based on the localizability estimation is used to realize the cask's localization and navigation accurately. Once the cask arrives at the front of the TB window, the position and attitude measurement system is used to detect the relative alignment error between the seal door of pallet and the window of TB real-time. The alignment between seal door and TB window could be realized based on this offset. The simulation experiment based on the real model is designed according to the real TB situation. The experiment results show that the proposed localization and alignment method can be used for transfer cask.

  6. International Scientist Mobility and the Locus of Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edler, Jakob; Fier, Hedie; Grimpe, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing interest of scholars and policymakers to better understand the determinants for researchers in public science to transfer knowledge and technology to firms, little is known how temporary international mobility of scientists affects both their propensity to engage in knowledge ...... circulation”. The article contributes to the growing strand of the literature on scientist mobility and on the determinants of industry–science linkages at the individual level.Scientist......Despite the growing interest of scholars and policymakers to better understand the determinants for researchers in public science to transfer knowledge and technology to firms, little is known how temporary international mobility of scientists affects both their propensity to engage in knowledge...... and technology transfer (KTT) as well as the locus of such transfer. Based on a sample of more than 950 German academics from science and engineering faculties, we investigate how the duration and the frequency of scientists’ visits at research institutions outside their home country affect KTT activities. We...

  7. Innovation, Technology Transfer and Labor Productivity Linkages: Evidence from a Panel of Manufacturing Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apergis, N.; Economidou, C.; Filippidis, I.

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the linkages between labor productivity, innovation and technology spillovers in a panel of manufacturing industries. The roles of R&D, human capital and international trade are considered in stimulating innovation and/or facilitating technology transfer. Using panel-based unit ro

  8. Technology Transfer Strategies for Creating Growth Opportunities in Frontier Markets of Sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik B.

    be the new growth frontier. Evidence has shown that if countries in SSA where using the same level of technology utilized by industrial countries, income levels in SSA would be significantly higher. The paper aims to address this issue, and study how Danish agriculture firms can use technology transfer...... to create growth opportunities in Frontier Markets of Sub-Saharan Africa....

  9. Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1998-01-01

    The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

  10. Technology Transfer: A Think Tank Approach to Managing Innovation in the Public Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, J. W., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews a joint attempt of the United States Forest Service and the Naval Service to enhance the utilization of research results and the new technologies through improved effectiveness of technology transfer efforts. It consists of an introduction by J. W. Creighton and seven papers: (1) "Management for Change" by P. A.…

  11. Investigating Practices in Teacher Education That Promote and Inhibit Technology Integration Transfer in Early Career Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Aimee M.; Brill, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify instructional technology integration strategies and practices in preservice teacher education that contribute to the transfer of technology integration knowledge and skills to the instructional practices of early career teachers. This study used a two-phase, sequential explanatory strategy. Data were…

  12. Technology Transfer and Climate Change: Additional Considerations for Implementation under the UNFCCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sullivan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer is recognised as playing a central and critical role in the global response to climate change, as embodied in the Unite Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. However, technology transfer is a complex process, and despite numerous attempts to prescribe approaches to optimisation, there remain serious obstacles to its effective operation. The breadth of technologies and range of would-be recipient territories under the climate change regime serve to complicate things even further. Against this background, the Expert Group on Technology Transfer have produced a robust Strategy, which it will now fall to the Technology Mechanism announced in Cancun to implement. However, despite the rigour with which the technology transfer strategy was produced, it is never possible to cover all possible eventualities. It is on this basis that this article presents a number of tactical and strategic issues which may merit further consideration as the implementation process moves forward. At the operational level, such issues include a possible role for a centralised or regional technology procurement effort, the need for greater emphasis on sectoral specific approaches to technology transfer, and a pragmatic approach to reducing the impact of some barriers to transactions by the expedient use of insurance to reduce risk, as opposed to the longer term approach of international standardisation. At the strategic level, there are major issues with regard to prioritisation of resources applied to technology transfer, and in particular the resolution of the tensions existing between achieving sustainable development and the time critical need to achieve climate stabilisation.

  13. Poverty Alleviation and Environmental Sustainability through Improved Regimes of Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Bosselmann

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the Millennium Development Goals, international technology transfer can play a major role for poverty alleviation and environmental sustainability. At present, there are economic, social and legal (rather than technical barriers preventing the transfer of environmentally sound technology (EST from a wider use in international regimes. Removing these barriers requires greater political and regulatory efforts both domestically and internationally. To enable EST transfer, developed States need to improve domestic market conditions such as removal of negative subsidies and barriers to foreign investment, targeted fiscal incentives and law reforms favouring sustainable production and use of energy. There is no realistic perspective for international EST transfer as long as it is disadvantaged domestically. A coherent EST transfer regime is only possible through greater governmental intervention at the national and international level, including environmental regulations, national systems of innovation, and creating an enabling environment for EST. Such intervention should include effective public-private partnerships, both within and between States. Partnerships, if guided by law, could ensure EST innovation more efficiently than purely State-driven or market-driven EST transfers. In search for a model, the EST transfer regime under the Vienna Ozone Layer Convention and the Montreal Protocol deserves recognition. For example, the clean development mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol allows for considerable scope for EST transfer. The potential of EST transfer for climate change and for meeting the Millennium Development Goals has yet to be realized.

  14. Biomedical technical transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology is based on NASA research, using vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Additional laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Three new biomedical problems to which NASA technology is applicable are also identified. These are: a communication device for the speech impaired, the NASA development liquid-cooled garment, and miniature force transducers for heart research.

  15. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  16. Anaerobic digestion: technology transfer, engineering performance and efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchi, F.; Traverso, P.G.; Ganapini, W.

    1987-10-01

    The chemical, technological and process aspects of anaerobic digestion process are analysed on the basis of the Authors' experience and of scientific literature. Emphasis is put on the necessity of integrating the presentation of experimental data and some suggestions are common to those of the EEC to improve the knowledge of the process. An analysis of the types of full-scale digesters used in Europe and in the USA is supplied and suggestions are proposed on the future development of anaerobic technology with the aim of improving performance and efficiency.

  17. Incorporation of a horizontally transferred gene into an operon during cnidarian evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Dana

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing has revealed examples of horizontally transferred genes, but we still know little about how such genes are incorporated into their host genomes. We have previously reported the identification of a gene (flp that appears to have entered the Hydra genome through horizontal transfer. Here we provide additional evidence in support of our original hypothesis that the transfer was from a unicellular organism, and we show that the transfer occurred in an ancestor of two medusozoan cnidarian species. In addition we show that the gene is part of a bicistronic operon in the Hydra genome. These findings identify a new animal phylum in which trans-spliced leader addition has led to the formation of operons, and define the requirements for evolution of an operon in Hydra. The identification of operons in Hydra also provides a tool that can be exploited in the construction of transgenic Hydra strains.

  18. Genome-wide identification of horizontal gene transfer in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different lineages, breaks species boundaries and generates new biological diversity. In eukaryotes, despite potential barriers, like the nuclear envelope and multicellularity, HGT may be facilitated by t...

  19. Bacteriophage WO Can Mediate Horizontal Gene Transfer in Endosymbiotic Wolbachia Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan H.; Sun, Bao F.; Xiong, Tuan L.; Wang, Yan K.; Murfin, Kristen E.; Xiao, Jin H.; Huang, Da W.

    2016-01-01

    Phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common in free-living bacteria, and many transferred genes can play a significant role in their new bacterial hosts. However, there are few reports concerning phage-mediated HGT in endosymbionts (obligate intracellular bacteria within animal or plant hosts), such as Wolbachia. The Wolbachia-infecting temperate phage WO can actively shift among Wolbachia genomes and has the potential to mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains. In the present study, we extend previous findings by validating that the phage WO can mediate transfer of non-phage genes. To do so, we utilized bioinformatic, phylogenetic, and molecular analyses based on all sequenced Wolbachia and phage WO genomes. Our results show that the phage WO can mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains, regardless of whether the transferred genes originate from Wolbachia or other unrelated bacteria. PMID:27965627

  20. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)