WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene smed-prep defines

  1. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Felix

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is

  2. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2010-04-22

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi) leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi) animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation) to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is required for

  3. Kinetically-defined component actions in gene repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson C Chow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene repression by transcription factors, and glucocorticoid receptors (GR in particular, is a critical, but poorly understood, physiological response. Among the many unresolved questions is the difference between GR regulated induction and repression, and whether transcription cofactor action is the same in both. Because activity classifications based on changes in gene product level are mechanistically uninformative, we present a theory for gene repression in which the mechanisms of factor action are defined kinetically and are consistent for both gene repression and induction. The theory is generally applicable and amenable to predictions if the dose-response curve for gene repression is non-cooperative with a unit Hill coefficient, which is observed for GR-regulated repression of AP1LUC reporter induction by phorbol myristate acetate. The theory predicts the mechanism of GR and cofactors, and where they act with respect to each other, based on how each cofactor alters the plots of various kinetic parameters vs. cofactor. We show that the kinetically-defined mechanism of action of each of four factors (reporter gene, p160 coactivator TIF2, and two pharmaceuticals [NU6027 and phenanthroline] is the same in GR-regulated repression and induction. What differs is the position of GR action. This insight should simplify clinical efforts to differentially modulate factor actions in gene induction vs. gene repression.

  4. A gene expression signature that defines breast cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Seebach, Jeff; Field, Lori A; Heckman, Caroline; Kane, Jennifer; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Love, Brad; Shriver, Craig D

    2009-01-01

    The most important predictor of prognosis in breast cancer is lymph node status, yet little is known about molecular changes associated with lymph node metastasis. Here, gene expression analysis was performed on primary breast (PBT) and corresponding metastatic lymph node (MLN) tumors to identify molecular signatures associated with nodal metastasis. RNA was isolated after laser microdissection from frozen PBT and MLN from 20 patients with positive lymph nodes and hybridized to the microarray chips. Differential expression was determined using Mann-Whitney testing; Bonferroni corrected P values of 0.05 and 0.001 were calculated. Results were validated using TaqMan assays. Fifty-one genes were differentially expressed (P 100-fold higher expression in MLT while COL11A1, KRT14, MMP13, TAC1 and WNT2 had >100-fold higher expression in PBT. Gene expression differences between PBT and MLN suggests that expression of a unique set of genes is required for successful lymph node colonization. Genes expressed at higher levels in PBT are involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix, enabling cells with metastatic potential to disseminate, while genes expressed at higher levels in metastases are involved in transcription, signal transduction and immune response, providing cells with proliferation and survival advantages. These data improve our understanding of the biological processes involved in successful metastatis and provide new targets to arrest tumor cell dissemination and metastatic colonization.

  5. blue cheese Mutations Define a Novel, Conserved Gene Involved in Progressive Neural Degeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finley, Kim D; Edeen, Philip T; Cumming, Robert C; Mardahl-Dumesnil, Michelle D; Taylor, Barbara J; Rodriguez, Maria H; Hwang, Calvin E; Benedetti, Michael; McKeown, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... The Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) gene defines such a novel degenerative pathway. bchs mutants have a reduced adult life span with the age-dependent formation of protein aggregates throughout the neuropil of the CNS...

  6. Defining diversity, specialization, and gene specificity in transcriptomes through information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Octavio; Reyes-Valdés, M. Humberto

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptome is a set of genes transcribed in a given tissue under specific conditions and can be characterized by a list of genes with their corresponding frequencies of transcription. Transcriptome changes can be measured by counting gene tags from mRNA libraries or by measuring light signals in DNA microarrays. In any case, it is difficult to completely comprehend the global changes that occur in the transcriptome, given that thousands of gene expression measurements are involved. We propose an approach to define and estimate the diversity and specialization of transcriptomes and gene specificity. We define transcriptome diversity as the Shannon entropy of its frequency distribution. Gene specificity is defined as the mutual information between the tissues and the corresponding transcript, allowing detection of either housekeeping or highly specific genes and clarifying the meaning of these concepts in the literature. Tissue specialization is measured by average gene specificity. We introduce the formulae using a simple example and show their application in two datasets of gene expression in human tissues. Visualization of the positions of transcriptomes in a system of diversity and specialization coordinates makes it possible to understand at a glance their interrelations, summarizing in a powerful way which transcriptomes are richer in diversity of expressed genes, or which are relatively more specialized. The framework presented enlightens the relation among transcriptomes, allowing a better understanding of their changes through the development of the organism or in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:18606989

  7. RGST - Rat Gene Symbol Tracker, a database for defining official rat gene symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ståhl Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The names of genes are central in describing their function and relationship. However, gene symbols are often a subject of controversy. In addition, the discovery of mammalian genes is now so rapid that a proper use of gene symbol nomenclature rules tends to be overlooked. This is currently the situation in the rat and there is a need for a cohesive and unifying overview of all rat gene symbols in use. Based on the experiences in rat gene symbol curation that we have gained from running the "Ratmap" rat genome database, we have now developed a database that unifies different rat gene naming attempts with the accepted rat gene symbol nomenclature rules. Description This paper presents a newly developed database known as RGST (Rat Gene Symbol Tracker. The database contains rat gene symbols from three major sources: the Rat Genome Database (RGD, Ensembl, and NCBI-Gene. All rat symbols are compared with official symbols from orthologous human genes as specified by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC. Based on the outcome of the comparisons, a rat gene symbol may be selected. Rat symbols that do not match a human ortholog undergo a strict procedure of comparisons between the different rat gene sources as well as with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD. For each rat gene this procedure results in an unambiguous gene designation. The designation is presented as a status level that accompanies every rat gene symbol suggested in the database. The status level describes both how a rat symbol was selected, and its validity. Conclusion This database fulfils the important need of unifying rat gene symbols into an automatic and cohesive nomenclature system. The RGST database is available directly from the RatMap home page: http://ratmap.org.

  8. Characterization of pilin genes from seven serologically defined prototype strains of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, J L; Tennent, J M; Lepper, A W; Elleman, T C

    1994-08-01

    Numerous field isolates of Moraxella bovis have previously been classified by serological techniques into seven serogroups, each defined by homologous cross-reaction with antisera prepared against purified pili of a single prototype strain. The gene encoding pilin from each of the prototype strains has been characterized by nucleotide sequence determination. The coding sequences show extensive homology (70 to 80%) while the proximal downstream sequences show a dichotomy into nonhomologous sets. The pilin genes of three more strains were also characterized. The presence of an additional, partial pilin gene in each prototype strain was confirmed by Southern blot analysis, and the partial pilin genes from two strains of one serogroup were characterized by sequence determination. Features of the pilin gene sequences are considered in relation to pilin gene inversion and the serological variants of strains which may arise from gene inversion events.

  9. High-resolution phenotypic profiling defines genes essential for mycobacterial growth and cholesterol catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Griffin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathways that comprise cellular metabolism are highly interconnected, and alterations in individual enzymes can have far-reaching effects. As a result, global profiling methods that measure gene expression are of limited value in predicting how the loss of an individual function will affect the cell. In this work, we employed a new method of global phenotypic profiling to directly define the genes required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A combination of high-density mutagenesis and deep-sequencing was used to characterize the composition of complex mutant libraries exposed to different conditions. This allowed the unambiguous identification of the genes that are essential for Mtb to grow in vitro, and proved to be a significant improvement over previous approaches. To further explore functions that are required for persistence in the host, we defined the pathways necessary for the utilization of cholesterol, a critical carbon source during infection. Few of the genes we identified had previously been implicated in this adaptation by transcriptional profiling, and only a fraction were encoded in the chromosomal region known to encode sterol catabolic functions. These genes comprise an unexpectedly large percentage of those previously shown to be required for bacterial growth in mouse tissue. Thus, this single nutritional change accounts for a significant fraction of the adaption to the host. This work provides the most comprehensive genetic characterization of a sterol catabolic pathway to date, suggests putative roles for uncharacterized virulence genes, and precisely maps genes encoding potential drug targets.

  10. Peptides encoded by short ORFs control development and define a new eukaryotic gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Ibo Galindo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in developmental biology, and the sequencing and annotation of genomes, key questions regarding the organisation of cells into embryos remain. One possibility is that uncharacterised genes having nonstandard coding arrangements and functions could provide some of the answers. Here we present the characterisation of tarsal-less (tal, a new type of noncanonical gene that had been previously classified as a putative noncoding RNA. We show that tal controls gene expression and tissue folding in Drosophila, thus acting as a link between patterning and morphogenesis. tal function is mediated by several 33-nucleotide-long open reading frames (ORFs, which are translated into 11-amino-acid-long peptides. These are the shortest functional ORFs described to date, and therefore tal defines two novel paradigms in eukaryotic coding genes: the existence of short, unprocessed peptides with key biological functions, and their arrangement in polycistronic messengers. Our discovery of tal-related short ORFs in other species defines an ancient and noncanonical gene family in metazoans that represents a new class of eukaryotic genes. Our results open a new avenue for the annotation and functional analysis of genes and sequenced genomes, in which thousands of short ORFs are still uncharacterised.

  11. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  12. Fusion and fission of genes define a metric between fungal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Durrens

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusion and fission events are key mechanisms in the evolution of gene architecture, whose effects are visible in protein architecture when they occur in coding sequences. Until now, the detection of fusion and fission events has been performed at the level of protein sequences with a post facto removal of supernumerary links due to paralogy, and often did not include looking for events defined only in single genomes. We propose a method for the detection of these events, defined on groups of paralogs to compensate for the gene redundancy of eukaryotic genomes, and apply it to the proteomes of 12 fungal species. We collected an inventory of 1,680 elementary fusion and fission events. In half the cases, both composite and element genes are found in the same species. Per-species counts of events correlate with the species genome size, suggesting a random mechanism of occurrence. Some biological functions of the genes involved in fusion and fission events are slightly over- or under-represented. As already noted in previous studies, the genes involved in an event tend to belong to the same functional category. We inferred the position of each event in the evolution tree of the 12 fungal species. The event localization counts for all the segments of the tree provide a metric that depicts the "recombinational" phylogeny among fungi. A possible interpretation of this metric as distance in adaptation space is proposed.

  13. The Core Mouse Response to Infection by Neospora Caninum Defined by Gene Set Enrichment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Goodswen, Stephen; Kennedy, Paul J; Bush, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the BALB/c and Qs mouse responses to infection by the parasite Neospora caninum were investigated in order to identify host response mechanisms. Investigation was done using gene set (enrichment) analyses of microarray data. GSEA, MANOVA, Romer, subGSE and SAM-GS were used to study the contrasts Neospora strain type, Mouse type (BALB/c and Qs) and time post infection (6 hours post infection and 10 days post infection). The analyses show that the major signal in the core mouse response to infection is from time post infection and can be defined by gene ontology terms Protein Kinase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Transcription Initiation. Several terms linked to signaling, morphogenesis, response and fat metabolism were also identified. At 10 days post infection, genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were identified as up regulated in expression. The value of gene set (enrichment) analyses in the analysis of microarray data is discussed. PMID:23012496

  14. Expression of csp genes in E. coli K-12 in defined rich and defined minimal media during normal growth, and after cold-shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapski, Tiffaney R; Trun, Nancy

    2014-08-15

    Cold-shock proteins (Csps) are a family of small nucleic acid-binding proteins found in 72% of sequenced bacterial genomes. Where it has been examined, at least one csp gene is required for cell viability. In Escherichia coli K-12, there are nine homologous csp genes named A-I. Regulation studies performed on individual members of this family have suggested that cspA, cspB, cspG, and cspI are cold-induced, cspC and cspE are constitutively expressed, cspD is stationary phase induced, and the induction patterns for cspF and cspH have yet to be determined. Aside from microarray studies, transcript levels from all nine csp genes have never been assayed using the same technique or in the same cells. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative RT-PCR to establish csp expression patterns for all nine csp genes at 37°C in defined rich and defined minimal media, and after a shift to 15°C for either 1h or 4h. We found that transcript levels for each of the csp genes changed throughout the growth curve. Transcripts for cspA, -B, and -E were more abundant than those detected for the other csp genes in defined rich medium. cspE mRNA levels in defined minimal medium were drastically higher than mRNA for the other csp genes. Of the nine csp genes, only cspI showed a significant increase in mRNA accumulation after cold-shock in defined rich medium. When mRNA accumulation was compared across the nine csp genes, there were more cspE transcripts in the cell than cspA, -B, -G, or -I transcripts after 1h cold-shock in either defined rich or defined minimal media. In defined minimal medium, transcription of cspA, -B, -G, and -I was induced after cold-shock. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  16. Defining suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakov, Maria; Borra, Marco; Cambuli, Francesca Maria; Plateroti, Michelina

    2013-07-01

    The study of the mammalian intestinal epithelium concerns several aspects of cellular and molecular biology. In fact, most of these studies aim to define molecular components or mechanisms related with the control of stemness and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in physiopathological conditions. It is worth mentioning that real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approaches are commonly used, but only a few studies are available regarding suitable reference genes to normalize gene expression data. The present study was designed to validate potential reference genes in freshly isolated proliferating or differentiated epithelial cells from the mouse intestine. We also extended our analysis to the IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells, as a promising model to study intestinal physiopathology in vitro. The stability of six potential reference genes (Hprt1, Ppia, Gapdh, Rplp0, Ppib, and Vil1) has been tested both in epithelial cells isolated from the mouse intestine and in the IEC6 cell line. The software programs-geNorm and Normfinder-were used to obtain an estimation of the expression stability of each gene and, by comparing the results, to identify the most suitable genes for RT-qPCR data normalization. These multiple approaches allowed us to select different suitable reference genes for the correct quantification of mRNAs depending on the differentiated or proliferative nature of the cells.

  17. Characterization of pilin genes from seven serologically defined prototype strains of Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Numerous field isolates of Moraxella bovis have previously been classified by serological techniques into seven serogroups, each defined by homologous cross-reaction with antisera prepared against purified pili of a single prototype strain. The gene encoding pilin from each of the prototype strains has been characterized by nucleotide sequence determination. The coding sequences show extensive homology (70 to 80%) while the proximal downstream sequences show a dichotomy into nonhomologous set...

  18. Meta-analysis of gene expression signatures defining the epithelial to mesenchymal transition during cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J Gröger

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT represents a crucial event during cancer progression and dissemination. EMT is the conversion of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that associates with a higher cell motility as well as enhanced chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Notably, EMT has been increasingly recognized as an early event of metastasis. Numerous gene expression studies (GES have been conducted to obtain transcriptome signatures and marker genes to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying EMT. Yet, no meta-analysis considering the multitude of GES of EMT has been performed to comprehensively elaborate the core genes in this process. Here we report the meta-analysis of 18 independent and published GES of EMT which focused on different cell types and treatment modalities. Computational analysis revealed clustering of GES according to the type of treatment rather than to cell type. GES of EMT induced via transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α treatment yielded uniformly defined clusters while GES of models with alternative EMT induction clustered in a more complex fashion. In addition, we identified those up- and downregulated genes which were shared between the multitude of GES. This core gene list includes well known EMT markers as well as novel genes so far not described in this process. Furthermore, several genes of the EMT-core gene list significantly correlated with impaired pathological complete response in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive survey of available EMT expression signatures and shows fundamental insights into the mechanisms that are governing carcinoma progression.

  19. Expression of human skin-specific genes defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-02-01

    To increase our understanding of skin, it is important to define the molecular constituents of the cell types and epidermal layers that signify normal skin. We have combined a genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, using deep sequencing of mRNA from skin biopsies, with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to characterize the landscape of gene and protein expression in normal human skin. The transcriptomics and protein expression data of skin were compared to 26 (RNA) and 44 (protein) other normal tissue types. All 20,050 putative protein-coding genes were classified into categories based on patterns of expression. We found that 417 genes showed elevated expression in skin, with 106 genes expressed at least five-fold higher than that in other tissues. The 106 genes categorized as skin enriched encoded for well-known proteins involved in epidermal differentiation and proteins with unknown functions and expression patterns in skin, including the C1orf68 protein, which showed the highest relative enrichment in skin. In conclusion, we have applied a genome-wide analysis to identify the human skin-specific proteome and map the precise localization of the corresponding proteins in different compartments of the skin, to facilitate further functional studies to explore the molecular repertoire of normal skin and to identify biomarkers related to various skin diseases.

  20. Precursor De13.1 from Conus delessertii defines the novel G gene superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Manuel B; Ortiz, Ernesto; Kaas, Quentin; López-Vera, Estuardo; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D; de la Cotera, Edgar P Heimer

    2013-03-01

    Peptide de13a was previously purified from the venom of the worm-hunting cone snail Conus delessertii from the Yucatán Channel, México. This peptide has eight cysteine (Cys) residues in the unique arrangement C-C-C-CC-C-C-C, which defines the cysteine framework XIII ("-" represents one or more non-Cys residues). Remarkably, δ-hydroxy-lysine residues have been found only in conotoxin de13a, which also contains an unusually high proportion of hydroxylated amino acid residues. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the complete precursor De13.1 of a related peptide, de13b, which has the same Cys framework and inter-Cys spacings as peptide de13a, and shares high protein/nucleic acid sequence identity (87%/90%) with de13a, suggesting that both peptides belong to the same conotoxin gene superfamily. Analysis of the signal peptide of precursor De13.1 reveals that this precursor belongs to a novel conotoxin gene superfamily that we chose to name gene superfamily G. Thus far superfamily G only includes two peptides, each of which contains the same, distinctive Cys framework and a high proportion of amino acid residues with hydroxylated side chains.

  1. The mouse fidgetin gene defines a new role for AAA family proteins in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G A; Mahaffey, C L; Nystuen, A; Letts, V A; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    The mouse mutation fidget arose spontaneously in a heterogeneous albino stock. This mutant mouse is characterized by a side-to-side head-shaking and circling behaviour, due to reduced or absent semicircular canals. Fidget mice also have small eyes, associated with cell-cycle delay and insufficient growth of the retinal neural epithelium, and lower penetrance skeletal abnormalities, including pelvic girdle dysgenesis, skull bone fusions and polydactyly. By positional cloning, we found the gene mutated in fidget mice, fidgetin (Fign), which encodes a new member of the 'meiotic' or subfamily-7 (SF7; ref. 7) group of ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). We also discovered two closely related mammalian genes. AAA proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate a variety of functions, including membrane fusion, proteolysis, peroxisome biogenesis, endosome sorting and meiotic spindle formation, but functions for the SF7 AAA proteins are largely unknown. Fidgetin is the first mutant AAA protein found in a mammalian developmental mutant, thus defining a new role for these proteins in embryonic development.

  2. CDNA microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in blood mononuclear cells of SLA-DRB1-defined Yorkshire pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino-Soto, M I; Jozani, R J; Bridle, B; Mallard, B A

    2008-01-01

    Three lines of commercialYorkshire pigs with defined SLA-DRB1 alleles were developed at the University of Guelph for xenotransplantation and immune response studies. Two of the SLA-DRB1 alleles have been previously reported (SLA-DRB1*0502 and *0701), whereas the third one is a new allele. The influence of defined SLA-DRB1 alleles on transcriptional patterns of immune-related genes in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) of pigs was explored using cDNA microarray. Microarray analysis showed significant differential expression of inflammatory genes in association with the various SLA-DRB1 alleles. A better understanding of the association between SLA genotypes and gene activity can increase the knowledge of the function of these molecules, as well as define new strategies to control animal health and optimize animal production.

  3. Defining the cutoff value of MGMT gene promoter methylation and its predictive capacity in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigliadori, Giovanni; Foca, Flavia; Dall'Agata, Monia; Rengucci, Claudia; Melegari, Elisabetta; Cerasoli, Serenella; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele; Faedi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), median survival is 12-15 months. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation status is acknowledged as a predictive marker for temozolomide (TMZ) treatment. When MGMT promoter values fall into a "methylated" range, a better response to chemotherapy is expected. However, a cutoff that discriminates between "methylated" and "unmethylated" status has yet to be defined. We aimed to identify the best cutoff value and to find out whether variability in methylation profiles influences the predictive capacity of MGMT promoter methylation. Data from 105 GBM patients treated between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed. MGMT promoter methylation status was determined by analyzing 10 CpG islands by pyrosequencing. Patients were treated with radiotherapy followed by TMZ. MGMT promoter methylation status was classified into unmethylated 0-9 %, methylated 10-29 % and methylated 30-100 %. Statistical analysis showed that an assumed methylation cutoff of 9 % led to an overestimation of responders. All patients in the 10-29 % methylation group relapsed before the 18-month evaluation. Patients with a methylation status ≥30 % showed a median overall survival of 25.2 months compared to 15.2 months in all other patients, confirming this value as the best methylation cutoff. Despite wide variability among individual profiles, single CpG island analysis did not reveal any correlation between single CpG island methylation values and relapse or death. Specific CpG island methylation status did not influence the predictive value of MGMT. The predictive role of MGMT promoter methylation was maintained only with a cutoff value ≥30 %.

  4. Defining the expression of marker genes in equine mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Guest

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deborah J Guest1, Jennifer C Ousey1, Matthew RW Smith21Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU; 2Reynolds House Referrals, Greenwood Ellis and Partners, 166 High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 9WS, UKAbstract: Mesenchymal stromal (MS cells have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood. To date these cells have been investigated for their differentiation potential and are currently being used to treat damage to horse musculoskeletal tissues. However, no work has been done in horse MS cells to examine the expression profile of proteins and cell surface antigens that are expressed in human MS cells. The identification of such profiles in the horse will allow the comparison of putative MS cells isolated from different laboratories and different tissues. At present it is difficult to ascertain whether equivalent cells are being used in different reports. Here, we report on the expression of a range of markers used to define human MS cells. Using immunocytochemistry we show that horse MS cells homogenously express collagens, alkaline phosphatase activity, CD44, CD90 and CD29. In contrast, CD14, CD79α and the embryonic stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA (stage specific embryonic antigen -1, -3, -4, TRA (tumor rejection antigen -1–60 and -1–81 are not expressed. The MS cells also express MHC class I antigens but do not express class II antigens, although they are inducible by treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, equine, gene expression

  5. Defining the role of the MADS-box gene, Zea agamous like1, in maize domestication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic scans for genes that show the signature of past selection have been widely applied to a number of species and have identified a large number of selection candidate genes. In cultivated maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) selection scans have identified several hundred candidate domestication genes...

  6. Gene expression patterns to define stages of post-harvest senescence in Alstroemeria petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Emily; Wagstaff, Carol; Harrison, Elizabeth; Bramke, Irene; Rogers, Hilary; Stead, Anthony; Thomas, Brian; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky

    2004-03-01

    Petal senescence in many species is regulated by ethylene but some flowers, such as those on the monocotyledonous plant Alstroemeria, var. Rebecca are ethylene insensitive. Changes in gene expression during the post-harvest senescence of Alstroemeria flowers were investigated using several different techniques. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to obtain cDNA libraries enriched for genes expressed at selected stages of petal senescence. Sequencing of the EST clones obtained resulted in over 1000 sequences that represent approximately 500 different genes. Analysis of the potential functions of these genes provides a snapshot of the processes that are taking place during petal development. Both cell wall related genes and genes involved in metabolism were present at a higher proportion in the earlier stages. Genes encoding metal binding proteins (mostly metallothionein-like) were the major component of senescence enhanced libraries. This limited the diversity of genes identified showing differential expression at the later stages. Changes in the expression of all genes were analysed using microarray hybridization, and genes showing either up or down-regulation were identified. The expression pattern of a selection of genes was confirmed using Northern hybridization. Northern hybridization confirmed the up-regulation of metallothioneins after floral opening, however, this was not detected by the microarray analysis, indicating the importance of using a combination of methods to investigate gene expression patterns. Considerably more genes were up-regulated than down-regulated. This may reflect the need during Alstroemeria petal senescence for the expression of a whole new set of genes involved with degradation and mobilization. The potential uses of expression profiling to improve floral quality in breeding programmes or as a diagnostic tool are discussed.

  7. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  8. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...... for each gene and the common transcription factors likely to regulate the three genes. Our data imply Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediated silencing of Foxg1 in cerebellum CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses provide a comprehensive picture of the regulatory regions of the three genes involved in Rett...... Syndrome....

  9. Defining global neuroendocrine gene expression patterns associated with reproductive seasonality in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many vertebrates, including the goldfish, exhibit seasonal reproductive rhythms, which are a result of interactions between external environmental stimuli and internal endocrine systems in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. While it is long believed that differential expression of neuroendocrine genes contributes to establishing seasonal reproductive rhythms, no systems-level investigation has yet been conducted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, by analyzing multiple female goldfish brain microarray datasets, we have characterized global gene expression patterns for a seasonal cycle. A core set of genes (873 genes in the hypothalamus were identified to be differentially expressed between May, August and December, which correspond to physiologically distinct stages that are sexually mature (prespawning, sexual regression, and early gonadal redevelopment, respectively. Expression changes of these genes are also shared by another brain region, the telencephalon, as revealed by multivariate analysis. More importantly, by examining one dataset obtained from fish in October who were kept under long-daylength photoperiod (16 h typical of the springtime breeding season (May, we observed that the expression of identified genes appears regulated by photoperiod, a major factor controlling vertebrate reproductive cyclicity. Gene ontology analysis revealed that hormone genes and genes functionally involved in G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathway and transmission of nerve impulses are significantly enriched in an expression pattern, whose transition is located between prespawning and sexually regressed stages. The existence of seasonal expression patterns was verified for several genes including isotocin, ependymin II, GABA(A gamma2 receptor, calmodulin, and aromatase b by independent samplings of goldfish brains from six seasonal time points and real-time PCR assays. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using both

  10. Genetic contribution to aging: deleterious and helpful genes define life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J I; Montoriol, C; Morer, I; Beyer, K

    2005-12-01

    For the best understanding of aging, we must consider a genetic pool in which genes with negative effects (deleterious genes that shorten the life span) interact with genes with positive effects (helpful genes that promote longevity) in a constant epistatic relationship that results in a modulation of the final expression under particular environmental influences. Examples of deleterious genes affecting aging (predisposition to early-life pathology and disease) are those that confer risk for developing vascular disease in the heart, brain, or peripheral vessels (APOE, ACE, MTFHR, and mutation at factor II and factor V genes), a gene associated with sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (APOE E4), a polymorphism (COLIA1 Sp1) associated with an increased fracture risk, and several genetic polymorphisms involved in hormonal metabolism that affect adverse reactions to estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women. In summary, the process of aging can be regarded as a multifactorial trait that results from an interaction between stochastic events and sets of epistatic alleles that have pleiotropic age-dependent effects. Lacking those alleles that predispose to disease and having the longevity-enabling genes (those beneficial genetic variants that confer disease resistance) are probably both important to such a remarkable survival advantage.

  11. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H

    2001-01-01

    Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions...... resembling the expression pattern of late embryogenic abundant ABA-responsive genes. Differential expression of the two genes during plant development was confirmed in plants expressing transcriptional fusions between the two promoters and the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. This showed...... that, whereas high expression of AtCRL1 in mature seeds declines during subsequent vegetative growth, transcriptional activity from the AtCRL2 promoter increases during vegetative growth. Expression of both genes is restricted to vascular tissue. Based upon their homology to proteins involved in lignin...

  12. Defining the Sequence Elements and Candidate Genes for the Coloboma Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Robb

    Full Text Available The chicken coloboma mutation exhibits features similar to human congenital developmental malformations such as ocular coloboma, cleft-palate, dwarfism, and polydactyly. The coloboma-associated region and encoded genes were investigated using advanced genomic, genetic, and gene expression technologies. Initially, the mutation was linked to a 990 kb region encoding 11 genes; the application of the genetic and genomic tools led to a reduction of the linked region to 176 kb and the elimination of 7 genes. Furthermore, bioinformatics analyses of capture array-next generation sequence data identified genetic elements including SNPs, insertions, deletions, gaps, chromosomal rearrangements, and miRNA binding sites within the introgressed causative region relative to the reference genome sequence. Coloboma-specific variants within exons, UTRs, and splice sites were studied for their contribution to the mutant phenotype. Our compiled results suggest three genes for future studies. The three candidate genes, SLC30A5 (a zinc transporter, CENPH (a centromere protein, and CDK7 (a cyclin-dependent kinase, are differentially expressed (compared to normal embryos at stages and in tissues affected by the coloboma mutation. Of these genes, two (SLC30A5 and CENPH are considered high-priority candidate based upon studies in other vertebrate model systems.

  13. Data-driven asthma endotypes defined from blood biomarker and gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma is complicated by its mechanistically distinct subtypes (endotypes) driven by genetic susceptibility and modulating environmental factors. Clinical biomarkers and blood gene expression were collected from a stratified, cross-section...

  14. The Role of Genes in Defining a Molecular Biology of PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because environmental exposure to trauma is the sine qua non for the development of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD, the recent focus on genetic studies has been noteworthy. The main catalyst for such studies is the observation from epidemiological studies that not all trauma survivors develop this disorder. Furthermore, neuroendocrine findings suggest pre-existing hormonal alterations that confer risk for PTSD. This paper presents the rationale for examining genetic factors in PTSD and trauma exposure, but suggests that studies of genotype may only present a limited picture of the molecular biology of this disorder. We describe the type of information that can be obtained from candidate gene and genomic studies that incorporate environmental factors in the design (i.e., gene – environment interaction and gene-environment correlation studies and studies that capitalize on the idea that environment modifies gene expression, via epigenetic or other molecular mechanisms. The examination of epigenetic mechanisms in tandem with gene expression will help refine models that explain how PTSD risk, pathophysiology, and recovery is mediated by the environment. Since inherited genetic variation may also influence the extent of epigenetic or gene expression changes resulting from the environment, such studies should optimally be followed up by studies of genotype.

  15. Fusion of the NUP98 gene with the LEDGF/p52 gene defines a recurrent acute myeloid leukemia translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mario

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NUP98 gene is involved in multiple rearrangements in haematological malignancy. The leukemic cells in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML patient with a t(9;11(p22;p15 were recently shown to have a fusion between the NUP98 gene and the LEDGF gene but it was not demonstrated that this fusion was recurrent in other leukaemia patients with the same translocation. Results We used RT-PCR to analyse the leukemic cells from an AML patient who presented with a cytogenetically identical translocation as the sole chromosomal abnormality. A NUP98-LEDGF fusion transcript was observed and confirmed by sequencing. The reciprocal transcript was also observed. The fusion transcript was not detectable during remission and recurred at relapse. The breakpoints in the NUP98 and LEDGF genes were different to those previously reported. The NUP98 breakpoint occurs in the intron between exons 8 and 9. It is the most 5' breakpoint reported in a translocation involving the NUP98 gene. All of the LEDGF gene is included in the fusion except for exon 1 which codes for the first 24 amino terminal amino acids. Conclusions Our results show that fusion of the NUP98 and LEDGF genes is a new recurrent translocation in AML.

  16. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1; interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3; interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP; transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2; epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2; epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B; epithelial Ca(+2 signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY; terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2; maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3. The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  17. A small set of extra-embryonic genes defines a new landmark for bovine embryo staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrelle, Séverine A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Heyman, Yvan; Everts, Robin E; Campion, Evelyne; Richard, Christophe; Ducroix-Crépy, Céline; Tian, X Cindy; Lewin, Harris A; Renard, Jean-Paul; Robert-Granié, Christèle; Hue, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Axis specification in mouse is determined by a sequence of reciprocal interactions between embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues so that a few extra-embryonic genes appear as 'patterning' the embryo. Considering these interactions as essential, but lacking in most mammals the genetically driven approaches used in mouse and the corresponding patterning mutants, we examined whether a molecular signature originating from extra-embryonic tissues could relate to the developmental stage of the embryo proper and predict it. To this end, we have profiled bovine extra-embryonic tissues at peri-implantation stages, when gastrulation and early neurulation occur, and analysed the subsequent expression profiles through the use of predictive methods as previously reported for tumour classification. A set of six genes (CALM1, CPA3, CITED1, DLD, HNRNPDL, and TGFB3), half of which had not been previously associated with any extra-embryonic feature, appeared significantly discriminative and mainly dependent on embryonic tissues for its faithful expression. The predictive value of this set of genes for gastrulation and early neurulation stages, as assessed on naive samples, was remarkably high (93%). In silico connected to the bovine orthologues of the mouse patterning genes, this gene set is proposed as a new trait for embryo staging. As such, this will allow saving the bovine embryo proper for molecular or cellular studies. To us, it offers as well new perspectives for developmental phenotyping and modelling of embryonic/extra-embryonic co-differentiation.

  18. Gene expression profiling differentiates germ cell tumors from other cancers and defines subtype-specific signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, Dejan; Sale, Sanja; Hromas, Robert A.; Yu, Ron; Wang, Yan; Duran, George E.; Tibshirani, Robert; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2005-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are the predominant cancer among young men. We analyzed gene expression profiles of 50 GCTs of various subtypes, and we compared them with 443 other common malignant tumors of epithelial, mesenchymal, and lymphoid origins. Significant differences in gene expression were found among major histological subtypes of GCTs, and between them and other malignancies. We identified 511 genes, belonging to several critical functional groups such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, to be significantly differentially expressed in GCTs compared with other tumor types. Sixty-five genes were sufficient for the construction of a GCT class predictor of high predictive accuracy (100% training set, 96% test set), which might be useful in the diagnosis of tumors of unknown primary origin. Previously described diagnostic and prognostic markers were found to be expressed by the appropriate GCT subtype (AFP, POU5F1, POV1, CCND2, and KIT). Several additional differentially expressed genes were identified in teratomas (EGR1 and MMP7), yolk sac tumors (PTPN13 and FN1), and seminomas (NR6A1, DPPA4, and IRX1). Dynamic computation of interaction networks and mapping to existing pathways knowledge databases revealed a potential role of EGR1 in p21-induced cell cycle arrest and intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas. PMID:16306258

  19. Arabidopsis mutant analysis and gene regulation define a nonredundant role for glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Melo-Oliveira, R; I.C. Oliveira; Coruzzi, G M

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is ubiquitous to all organisms, yet its role in higher plants remains enigmatic. To better understand the role of GDH in plant nitrogen metabolism, we have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant (gdh1-1) defective in one of two GDH gene products and have studied GDH1 gene expression. GDH1 mRNA accumulates to highest levels in dark-adapted or sucrose-starved plants, and light or sucrose treatment each repress GDH1 mRNA accumulation. These results suggest that the GDH...

  20. Diagnosis by numbers: defining skin disease pathogenesis through collated gene signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Amr; McGrath, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disease gene expression profiles can be utilized as biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and targeted therapeutic purposes, although individual data sets may be of limited generic value. To develop broader clinical relevance from disease gene signatures, Inkeles et al. demonstrate how mining publically available microarray data from a range of skin disorders can elucidate disease pathways, generate a multi-disease classifier, and identify potential therapeutic targets. This integrative molecular classification and functional analysis offers a new approach to understanding disease pathogenesis, with significant implications for diagnostics and the development of personalized medicine.

  1. Data-driven asthma endotypes defined from blood biomarker and gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Jane George

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma is complicated by its mechanistically distinct subtypes (endotypes driven by genetic susceptibility and modulating environmental factors. Clinical biomarkers and blood gene expression were collected from a stratified, cross-sectional study of asthmatic and non-asthmatic children from Detroit, MI. This study describes four distinct asthma endotypes identified via a purely data-driven method. Our method was specifically designed to integrate blood gene expression and clinical biomarkers in a way that provides new mechanistic insights regarding the different asthma endotypes. For example, we describe metabolic syndrome-induced systemic inflammation as an associated factor in three of the four asthma endotypes. Context provided by the clinical biomarker data was essential in interpreting gene expression patterns and identifying putative endotypes, which emphasizes the importance of integrated approaches when studying complex disease etiologies. These synthesized patterns of gene expression and clinical markers from our research may lead to development of novel serum-based biomarker panels.

  2. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...

  3. Expression of VEGF and semaphorin genes define subgroups of triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Joseph Bender

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC are difficult to treat due to a lack of targets and heterogeneity. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy, but has had limited effectiveness so far in breast cancer. To quantify heterogeneity in angiogenesis-related gene expression in breast cancer, we focused on two families--VEGFs and semaphorins--that compete for neuropilin co-receptors on endothelial cells. We compiled microarray data for over 2,600 patient tumor samples and analyzed the expression of VEGF- and semaphorin-related ligands and receptors. We used principal component analysis to identify patterns of gene expression, and clustering to group samples according to these patterns. We used available survival data to determine whether these clusters had prognostic as well as therapeutic relevance. TNBC was highly associated with dysregulation of VEGF- and semaphorin-related genes; in particular, it appeared that expression of both VEGF and semaphorin genes were altered in a pro-angiogenesis direction. A pattern of high VEGFA expression with low expression of secreted semaphorins was associated with 60% of triple-negative breast tumors. While all TNBC groups demonstrated poor prognosis, this signature also correlated with lower 5-year survival rates in non-TNBC samples. A second TNBC pattern, including high VEGFC expression, was also identified. These pro-angiogenesis signatures may identify cancers that are more susceptible to VEGF inhibition.

  4. Arabidopsis mutant analysis and gene regulation define a nonredundant role for glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Oliveira, R; Oliveira, I C; Coruzzi, G M

    1996-05-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is ubiquitous to all organisms, yet its role in higher plants remains enigmatic. To better understand the role of GDH in plant nitrogen metabolism, we have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant (gdh1-1) defective in one of two GDH gene products and have studied GDH1 gene expression. GDH1 mRNA accumulates to highest levels in dark-adapted or sucrose-starved plants, and light or sucrose treatment each repress GDH1 mRNA accumulation. These results suggest that the GDH1 gene product functions in the direction of glutamate catabolism under carbon-limiting conditions. Low levels of GDH1 mRNA present in leaves of light-grown plants can be induced by exogenously supplied ammonia. Under such conditions of carbon and ammonia excess, GDH1 may function in the direction of glutamate biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis gdh-deficient mutant allele gdh1-1 cosegregates with the GDH1 gene and behaves as a recessive mutation. The gdh1-1 mutant displays a conditional phenotype in that seedling growth is specifically retarded on media containing exogenously supplied inorganic nitrogen. These results suggest that GDH1 plays a nonredundant role in ammonia assimilation under conditions of inorganic nitrogen excess. This notion is further supported by the fact that the levels of mRNA for GDH1 and chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) are reciprocally regulated by light.

  5. Expression of 6-Cys gene superfamily defines babesia bovis sexual stage development within rhipicephalus microplus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) and t...

  6. Expression profiling of rectal tumors defines response to neoadjuvant treatment related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Palma

    Full Text Available To date, no effective method exists that predicts the response to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Nevertheless, identification of patients who have a higher likelihood of responding to preoperative CRT could be crucial in decreasing treatment morbidity and avoiding expensive and time-consuming treatments. The aim of this study was to identify signatures or molecular markers related to response to pre-operative CRT in LARC. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of 26 pre-treatment biopsies of LARC (10 responders and 16 non-responders without metastasis using Human WG CodeLink microarray platform. Two hundred and fifty seven genes were differentially over-expressed in the responder patient subgroup. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a significant ratio of differentially expressed genes related to cancer, cellular growth and proliferation pathways, and c-Myc network. We demonstrated that high Gng4, c-Myc, Pola1, and Rrm1 mRNA expression levels was a significant prognostic factor for response to treatment in LARC patients (p<0.05. Using this gene set, we were able to establish a new model for predicting the response to CRT in rectal cancer with a sensitivity of 60% and 100% specificity. Our results reflect the value of gene expression profiling to gain insight about the molecular pathways involved in the response to treatment of LARC patients. These findings could be clinically relevant and support the use of mRNA levels when aiming to identify patients who respond to CRT therapy.

  7. Flexibility and symmetry of prokaryotic genome rearrangement reveal lineage-associated core-gene-defined genome organizational frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Gu, Chaohao; Yuan, Lina; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Yanmin; Li, Xinna; Luo, Qibin; Xiao, Jingfa; Jiang, Daquan; Qian, Minping; Ahmed Khan, Aftab; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Jun

    2014-11-25

    The prokaryotic pangenome partitions genes into core and dispensable genes. The order of core genes, albeit assumed to be stable under selection in general, is frequently interrupted by horizontal gene transfer and rearrangement, but how a core-gene-defined genome maintains its stability or flexibility remains to be investigated. Based on data from 30 species, including 425 genomes from six phyla, we grouped core genes into syntenic blocks in the context of a pangenome according to their stability across multiple isolates. A subset of the core genes, often species specific and lineage associated, formed a core-gene-defined genome organizational framework (cGOF). Such cGOFs are either single segmental (one-third of the species analyzed) or multisegmental (the rest). Multisegment cGOFs were further classified into symmetric or asymmetric according to segment orientations toward the origin-terminus axis. The cGOFs in Gram-positive species are exclusively symmetric and often reversible in orientation, as opposed to those of the Gram-negative bacteria, which are all asymmetric and irreversible. Meanwhile, all species showing strong strand-biased gene distribution contain symmetric cGOFs and often specific DnaE (α subunit of DNA polymerase III) isoforms. Furthermore, functional evaluations revealed that cGOF genes are hub associated with regard to cellular activities, and the stability of cGOF provides efficient indexes for scaffold orientation as demonstrated by assembling virtual and empirical genome drafts. cGOFs show species specificity, and the symmetry of multisegmental cGOFs is conserved among taxa and constrained by DNA polymerase-centric strand-biased gene distribution. The definition of species-specific cGOFs provides powerful guidance for genome assembly and other structure-based analysis. Prokaryotic genomes are frequently interrupted by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and rearrangement. To know whether there is a set of genes not only conserved in position

  8. Protein N-glycosylation in Archaea: defining Haloferax volcanii genes involved in S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2006-07-01

    In this study, characterization of the N-glycosylation process in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii was undertaken. Initially, putative Hfx. volcanii homologues of genes involved in eukaryal or bacterial N-glycosylation were identified by bioinformatics. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed that the proposed N-glycosylation genes are transcribed, indicative of true proteins being encoded. Where families of related gene sequences were detected, differential transcription of family members under a variety of physiological and environmental conditions was shown. Gene deletions point to certain genes, like alg11, as being essential yet revealed that others, such as the two versions of alg5, are not. Deletion of alg5-A did, however, lead to slower growth and interfered with surface (S)-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, as detected by modified migration on SDS-PAGE and glycostaining approaches. As deletion of stt3, the only component of the oligosaccharide transferase complex detected in Archaea, did not affect cell viability, it appears that N-glycosylation is not essential in Hfx. volcanii. Deletion of stt3 did, nonetheless, hinder both cell growth and S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation. Thus, with genes putatively involved in Hfx. volcanii protein glycosylation identified and the ability to address the roles played by the encoded polypeptides in modifying a reporter glycoprotein, the steps of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway can be defined.

  9. VH1-44 gene usage defines a subset of canine B-cell lymphomas associated with better patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wei; Small, George W; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Suter, Steven E; Richards, Kristy L

    2014-02-15

    The use of specific immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (VH) genes has been associated with increased patient survival in human B-cell lymphomas (hBCL). Given the similarity of human and canine BCL (cBCL) in morphology and clinical treatment, we examined the choice of VH in cBCL and determined whether VH gene selection was a distinct feature associated with survival time in dogs. VH gene selection and mutational status in 52 cBCL, including 29 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (cDLBCL, the most common subtype of cBCL), were analyzed by comparison with the 80 published canine germline VH gene sequences. We further examined the prognostic impact of the subgroups defined by these features on canine survival. We found that VH1-44 was preferentially expressed in the majority of the 52 cBCLs (60%) as well as in the majority of the cDLBCL subset (59%). VH1-44 gene expression was associated with a statistically better overall survival (p=0.039) in cBCL patients, as well as in the cDLBCL subset of patients (p=0.038). These findings suggest that VH gene selection in cBCL is not random and may therefore have functional implications for cBCL lymphomagenesis, in addition to being a useful prognostic biomarker.

  10. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  11. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  12. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  13. Gene expression profiling defined pathways correlated with fibroblast cell proliferation induced by Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanitra Thuwajit; Peti Thuwajit; Kazuhiko Uchida; Daoyot Daorueang; Sasithorn Kaewkes; Sopit Wongkham; Masanao Miwa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of fibroblast cell proliferation stimulated by the Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory (ES) product.METHODS: NIH-3T3, mouse fibroblast cells were treated with O. viverrini ES product by non-contact co-cultured with the adult parasites. Total RNA from NIH-3T3 treated and untreated with O. viverrini was extracted, reverse transcribed and hybridized with the mouse 15K complementary DNA (cDNA) array. The result was analyzed by ArrayVision version 5 and GeneSpring version 5 softwares. After normalization, the ratios of gene expression of parasite treated to untreated NIH3T3 cells of 2-and more-fold upregulated was defined as the differentially expressed genes. The expression levels of the signal transduction genes were validated by semiquantitative SYBR-based real-time RT-PCR.RESULTS: Among a total of 15 000 genes/ESTs, 239genes with established cell proliferation-related function were 2 fold-and more-up-regulated by O. viverrini ES product compared to those in cells without exposure to the parasitic product. These genes were classified into groups including energy and metabolism, signal transduction, protein synthesis and translation, matrix and structural protein, transcription control, cell cycle and DNA replication. Moreover, the expressions of serinethreonine kinase receptor, receptor tyrosine kinase and collagen production-related genes were up-regulated by O. viverrini ES product. The expression level of signal transduction genes; pkC, pdgfrα, jak 1, eps 8, tgfβ 1/4,strap and h ras measured by real-time RT-PCR confirmed their expression levels to those obtained from cDNA array. However, only the up-regulated expression of pkC, eps 8 and tgfβ 1/4 which are the downstream signaling molecules of either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) showed statistical significance (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: O. viverrini ES product stimulates the significant changes of gene expression in several

  14. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kao

    novel candidate breast cancer genes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, breast cancer cell lines were genetically more complex than tumors, but retained expression patterns with relevance to the luminal-basal subtype distinction. The compendium of molecular profiles defines cell lines suitable for investigations of subtype-specific pathobiology, cancer stem cell biology, biomarkers and therapies, and provides a resource for discovery of new breast cancer genes.

  15. The precerebellar linear nucleus in the mouse defined by connections, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Palombi, Olivier; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2009-05-19

    The linear nucleus (Li) is a prominent cell group in the caudal hindbrain, which was first described in a study of cerebellar afferents in the rat by [Watson, C.R.R., Switzer, R.C. III, 1978. Trigeminal projections to cerebellar tactile areas in the rat origin mainly from N. interpolaris and N. principalis. Neurosci. Lett. 10, 77-82.]. It was named for its elongated appearance in transverse sections. Since this original description in the rat, reference to the nucleus seems to have been largely absent from experimental studies of mammalian precerebellar nuclei. We therefore set out to define the cytoarchitecture, cerebellar connections, and molecular characteristics of Li in the mouse. In coronal Nissl sections at the level of the rostral inferior olive, it consists of two parallel bands of cells joined at their dorsal apex by a further band of cells, making the shape of the Greek capital letter pi. Our three-dimensional reconstruction demonstrated that the nucleus is continuous with the lateral reticular nucleus (LRt) and that the ambiguus nucleus sits inside the arch of Li. Cerebellar horseradish peroxidase injections confirmed that the cells of Li project to cerebellum. We have shown that Li cells express Atoh1 and Wnt1 lineage markers that are known to label the rhombic lip derived precerebellar nuclei. We have examined the relationship of Li cells to a number of molecular markers, and have found that many of the cells express a nonphosphorylated epitope in neurofilament H (SMI 32), a feature they share with the LRt. The mouse Li therefore appears to be a rostrodorsal extension of the LRt.

  16. Preferred analysis methods for Affymetrix GeneChips. II. An expanded, balanced, wholly-defined spike-in dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Qianqian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant with the rise in the popularity of DNA microarrays has been a surge of proposed methods for the analysis of microarray data. Fully controlled "spike-in" datasets are an invaluable but rare tool for assessing the performance of various methods. Results We generated a new wholly defined Affymetrix spike-in dataset consisting of 18 microarrays. Over 5700 RNAs are spiked in at relative concentrations ranging from 1- to 4-fold, and the arrays from each condition are balanced with respect to both total RNA amount and degree of positive versus negative fold change. We use this new "Platinum Spike" dataset to evaluate microarray analysis routes and contrast the results to those achieved using our earlier Golden Spike dataset. Conclusions We present updated best-route methods for Affymetrix GeneChip analysis and demonstrate that the degree of "imbalance" in gene expression has a significant effect on the performance of these methods.

  17. Defining reference sequences for Nocardia species by similarity and clustering analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Helal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intra- and inter-species genetic diversity of bacteria and the absence of 'reference', or the most representative, sequences of individual species present a significant challenge for sequence-based identification. The aims of this study were to determine the utility, and compare the performance of several clustering and classification algorithms to identify the species of 364 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with a defined species in GenBank, and 110 sequences of 16S rRNA gene with no defined species, all within the genus Nocardia. METHODS: A total of 364 16S rRNA gene sequences of Nocardia species were studied. In addition, 110 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned only to the Nocardia genus level at the time of submission to GenBank were used for machine learning classification experiments. Different clustering algorithms were compared with a novel algorithm or the linear mapping (LM of the distance matrix. Principal Components Analysis was used for the dimensionality reduction and visualization. RESULTS: The LM algorithm achieved the highest performance and classified the set of 364 16S rRNA sequences into 80 clusters, the majority of which (83.52% corresponded with the original species. The most representative 16S rRNA sequences for individual Nocardia species have been identified as 'centroids' in respective clusters from which the distances to all other sequences were minimized; 110 16S rRNA gene sequences with identifications recorded only at the genus level were classified using machine learning methods. Simple kNN machine learning demonstrated the highest performance and classified Nocardia species sequences with an accuracy of 92.7% and a mean frequency of 0.578. CONCLUSION: The identification of centroids of 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters using novel distance matrix clustering enables the identification of the most representative sequences for each individual species of Nocardia and allows the quantitation of inter- and intra

  18. Outlier Analysis Defines Zinc Finger Gene Family DNA Methylation in Tumors and Saliva of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Gaykalova

    Full Text Available Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC is the fifth most common cancer, annually affecting over half a million people worldwide. Presently, there are no accepted biomarkers for clinical detection and surveillance of HNSCC. In this work, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of epigenetic alterations in primary HNSCC tumors was employed in conjunction with cancer-specific outlier statistics to define novel biomarker genes which are differentially methylated in HNSCC. The 37 identified biomarker candidates were top-scoring outlier genes with prominent differential methylation in tumors, but with no signal in normal tissues. These putative candidates were validated in independent HNSCC cohorts from our institution and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas. Using the top candidates, ZNF14, ZNF160, and ZNF420, an assay was developed for detection of HNSCC cancer in primary tissue and saliva samples with 100% specificity when compared to normal control samples. Given the high detection specificity, the analysis of ZNF DNA methylation in combination with other DNA methylation biomarkers may be useful in the clinical setting for HNSCC detection and surveillance, particularly in high-risk patients. Several additional candidates identified through this work can be further investigated toward future development of a multi-gene panel of biomarkers for the surveillance and detection of HNSCC.

  19. Different requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by disease resistance genes define at least two R gene-mediated signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, N; Metz, M; Holub, E; Staskawicz, B J; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1998-08-18

    The Arabidopsis genes EDS1 and NDR1 were shown previously by mutational analysis to encode essential components of race-specific disease resistance. Here, we examined the relative requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by a broad spectrum of Resistance (R) genes present in three Arabidopsis accessions (Columbia, Landsberg-erecta, and Wassilewskija). We show that there is a strong requirement for EDS1 by a subset of R loci (RPP2, RPP4, RPP5, RPP21, and RPS4), conferring resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Peronospora parasitica, and to Pseudomonas bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRps4. The requirement for NDR1 by these EDS1-dependent R loci is either weak or not measurable. Conversely, three NDR1-dependent R loci, RPS2, RPM1, and RPS5, operate independently of EDS1. Another RPP locus, RPP8, exhibits no strong exclusive requirement for EDS1 or NDR1 in isolate-specific resistance to P. parasitica, although resistance is compromised weakly by eds1. Similarly, resistance conditioned by two EDS1-dependent RPP genes, RPP4 and RPP5, is impaired partially by ndr1, implicating a degree of pathway cross-talk. Our results provide compelling evidence for the preferential utilization of either signaling component by particular R genes and thus define at least two disease resistance pathways. The data also suggest that strong dependence on EDS1 or NDR1 is governed by R protein structural type rather than pathogen class.

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of the family Iridoviridae: re-annotating and defining the core set of iridovirus genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton Chris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the family Iridoviridae can cause severe diseases resulting in significant economic and environmental losses. Very little is known about how iridoviruses cause disease in their host. In the present study, we describe the re-analysis of the Iridoviridae family of complex DNA viruses using a variety of comparative genomic tools to yield a greater consensus among the annotated sequences of its members. Results A series of genomic sequence comparisons were made among, and between the Ranavirus and Megalocytivirus genera in order to identify novel conserved ORFs. Of these two genera, the Megalocytivirus genomes required the greatest number of altered annotations. Prior to our re-analysis, the Megalocytivirus species orange-spotted grouper iridovirus and rock bream iridovirus shared 99% sequence identity, but only 82 out of 118 potential ORFs were annotated; in contrast, we predict that these species share an identical complement of genes. These annotation changes allowed the redefinition of the group of core genes shared by all iridoviruses. Seven new core genes were identified, bringing the total number to 26. Conclusion Our re-analysis of genomes within the Iridoviridae family provides a unifying framework to understand the biology of these viruses. Further re-defining the core set of iridovirus genes will continue to lead us to a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships between individual iridoviruses as well as giving us a much deeper understanding of iridovirus replication. In addition, this analysis will provide a better framework for characterizing and annotating currently unclassified iridoviruses.

  1. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  3. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  4. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair M. Chalk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014 in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457 provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  5. Sequence-defined cMET/HGFR-targeted Polymers as Gene Delivery Vehicles for the Theranostic Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnauer, Sarah; Morys, Stephan; Krhac Levacic, Ana; Müller, Andrea M; Schug, Christina; Schmohl, Kathrin A; Schwenk, Nathalie; Zach, Christian; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Wagner, Ernst; Spitzweg, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as well-characterized theranostic gene represents an outstanding tool to target different cancer types allowing noninvasive imaging of functional NIS expression and therapeutic radioiodide application. Based on its overexpression on the surface of most cancer types, the cMET/hepatocyte growth factor receptor serves as ideal target for tumor-selective gene delivery. Sequence-defined polymers as nonviral gene delivery vehicles comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cationic (oligoethanoamino) amide cores coupled with a cMET-binding peptide (cMBP2) were complexed with NIS-DNA and tested for receptor-specificity, transduction efficiency, and therapeutic efficacy in hepatocellular cancer cells HuH7. In vitro iodide uptake studies demonstrated high transduction efficiency and cMET-specificity of NIS-encoding polyplexes (cMBP2-PEG-Stp/NIS) compared to polyplexes without targeting ligand (Ala-PEG-Stp/NIS) and without coding DNA (cMBP2-PEG-Stp/Antisense-NIS). Tumor recruitment and vector biodistribution were investigated in vivo in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model showing high tumor-selective iodide accumulation in cMBP2-PEG-Stp/NIS-treated mice (6.6 ± 1.6% ID/g (123)I, biological half-life 3 hours) by (123)I-scintigraphy. Therapy studies with three cycles of polyplexes and (131)I application resulted in significant delay in tumor growth and prolonged survival. These data demonstrate the enormous potential of cMET-targeted sequence-defined polymers combined with the unique theranostic function of NIS allowing for optimized transfection efficiency while eliminating toxicity.

  6. Multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization to define abutting and overlapping gene expression in the embryonic zebrafish brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauptmann Giselbert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, mapping of overlapping and abutting regulatory gene expression domains by chromogenic two-color in situ hybridization has helped define molecular subdivisions of the developing vertebrate brain and shed light on its basic organization. Despite the benefits of this technique, visualization of overlapping transcript distributions by differently colored precipitates remains difficult because of masking of lighter signals by darker color precipitates and lack of three-dimensional visualization properties. Fluorescent detection of transcript distributions may be able to solve these issues. However, despite the use of signal amplification systems for increasing sensitivity, fluorescent detection in whole-mounts suffers from rapid quenching of peroxidase (POD activity compared to alkaline phosphatase chromogenic reactions. Thus, less strongly expressed genes cannot be efficiently detected. Results We developed an optimized procedure for fluorescent detection of transcript distribution in whole-mount zebrafish embryos using tyramide signal amplification (TSA. Conditions for hybridization and POD-TSA reaction were optimized by the application of the viscosity-increasing polymer dextran sulfate and the use of the substituted phenol compounds 4-iodophenol and vanillin as enhancers of POD activity. In combination with highly effective bench-made tyramide substrates, these improvements resulted in dramatically increased signal-to-noise ratios. The strongly enhanced signal intensities permitted fluorescent visualization of less abundant transcripts of tissue-specific regulatory genes. When performing multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments, the highly sensitive POD reaction conditions required effective POD inactivation after each detection cycle by glycine-hydrochloric acid treatment. This optimized FISH procedure permitted the simultaneous fluorescent visualization of up to three unique transcripts

  7. FBN1 gene mutation defines the profibrillin to fibrillin processing site and segregates with tall stature in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossfield, J.; Cao, S.; Milewicz, D. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from a 13-year-old boy with skeletal features of the Marfan syndrome were used to study fibrillin synthesis and processing. Synthesis and secretion of profibrillin was normal but only half of the secreted profibrillin was converted to fibrillin, an extracellular proteolytic processing that removes a 20 kDa fragment from the protein. All the secreted profibrillin was processed to fibrillin in control cells. Only the processed form of fibrillin was deposited into the extracellular matrix in both the proband`s and the control cells. Electron microscopic examination of rotary shadowed microfibrils made by the proband`s fibroblasts were indistinguishable from control cells. Screening exons in the 3{prime} end of the FBN1 gene revealed a heterozygous C to T transition at nucleotide 5482 of the FBN1 cDNA changing R 1828 to W. This mutation disrupts a known consensus sequence recognized by a cellular protease and is located in the carboxy terminus at a site predicted to remove a 19 kD fragment. The proband and his 22-year-old brother, also heterozygous for the mutation, have had normal echocardiograms and ophthalmologic exams. The mutation segregated in the proband`s three generation family with autosomal dominant inheritance of height (> 90th percentile) and no known cardiovascular or ocular problems, including the 67-year-old grandmother (exams pending). The mutation was not found in 90 chromosomes from unrelated individuals. In summary, (1) the mutation identifies the cleavage site for the conversion of profibrillin to fibrillin; (2) the characterized mutation segregates in the family with tall stature without known cardiovascular or ocular problems; (3) this mutation potentially defines the phenotype associated with a {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele for the FBN1 gene.

  8. Monoclonal antibody-based, selective isolation of DNA fragments containing an alkylated base to be quantified in defined gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochleitner, K; Thomale, J; Nikitin AYu; Rajewsky, M F

    1991-08-25

    We have established a sensitive, monoclonal antibody (Mab)-based procedure permitting the selective enrichment of sequences containing the miscoding alkylation product O6-ethylguanine (O6-EtGua) from mammalian DNA. H5 rat hepatoma cells were reacted with the N-nitroso carcinogen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in vitro, to give overall levels of greater than or equal to 25 O6-EtGua residues per diploid genome (corresponding to O6-EtGua/guanine molar ratios of greater than or equal to 10(-8). For analysis, enzymatically restricted DNA from these cells is incubated with an antibody specific for O6-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine, the resulting Mab-DNA complexes are separated from (O6-EtGua)-free fragments by filtration through a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane, and the DNA is recovered from the filter-bound complexes quantitatively. The efficiency of Mab binding to DNA fragments containing O6-EtGua is constant over a range of O6-EtGua/guanine molar ratios between 10(-5) and 10(-8). (O6-EtGua)-containing restriction fragments encompassing known gene sequences (e.g., the immunoglobulin E heavy chain gene of H5 rat hepatoma cells used as a model in this study) are subsequently amplified by PCR and quantified by slot-blot hybridisation. The content and distribution of a specific carcinogen-DNA adduct in defined sequences of genomic DNA can thus be analyzed as well as the kinetics of intragenomic (toposelective) repair of any DNA lesion for which a suitable Mab is available.

  9. HLA-A Gene Polymorphism Defined by High-Resolution Sequence Based Typing in 161 Northern Chinese Han People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Yan; Haiyan Sun; Xiuqing Zhang; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Shengbin Li; Ruilin Wang; Jingxiang Li; Yajun Deng; Dongying Wu; Hongbo Zhang; Hongxing Zhang; Lidong Wang; Chunrong Zhang

    2003-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic region known in the human genome. In the present study, we analyzed for the first time the HLA-A gene polymorphisms defined by the high-resolution typing methods--sequence-based typing (SBT) in 161 Northern Chinese Han people. A total of 74 different HLA-A gene types and 36 alleles were detected. The most frequent alleles were A*110101 (GF=0.2360), A*24020101 (GF=0.1646), and A*020101 (GF=0.1553); followed by A*3303 (GF=0.1180), A*3001 (GF=0.0590),and A*310102 (GF=0.0404). The frequencies of following alleles, A*0203, A*0205,A*0206, A*0207, A*030101, A*2423, A*2601, A*3201, and A*3301, are all higher than 0.0093. The homozygous alleles include A*020101, A*110101, A*24020101 and A*310102. Heterozygosity (H), polymorphism information content (PIC), discrimination power (DP) and probability of paternity exclusion (PPE) of HLA-A in the samples were calculated and their values were 0.8705, 0.8491, 0.6014, and 0.9475, respectively. These results by SBT analysis of HLA-A polymorphism in Northern Chinese Han population, especially the allele subtypes character, will be of great interest for clinical transplantation, disease-associated study and forensic identification. Implementation of high-resolution typing methods allows a significantly wider spectrum of HLA variation including rare alleles. This spectrum will further be extensively utilized in many fields.

  10. Comparative Genomics of cpn60-Defined Enterococcus hirae Ecotypes and Relationship of Gene Content Differences to Competitive Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Isha; Chaban, Bonnie; Hill, Janet E

    2016-11-01

    Natural microbial communities undergo selection-driven succession with changes in environmental conditions and available nutrients. In a previous study of the pig faecal Enterococcus community, we demonstrated that cpn60 universal target (UT) sequences could resolve phenotypically and genotypically distinct ecotypes of Enterococcus spp. that emerged over time in the faecal microbiome of growing pigs. In this study, we characterized genomic diversity in the identified Enterococcus hirae ecotypes in order to define further the nature and degree of genome content differences between taxa resolved by cpn60 UT sequences. Genome sequences for six representative isolates (two from each of three ecotypes) were compared. Differences in phosphotransferase systems and amino acid metabolism pathways for glutamine, proline and selenocysteine were observed. Differences in the lac family phosphotransferase system corresponded to lactose utilization phenotypes of the isolates. Competitive fitness of the E. hirae ecotypes was evaluated by in vitro growth competition assays in pig faecal extract medium. Isolates from E. hirae-1 and E. hirae-2 ecotypes were able to out-compete isolates from the E. hirae-3 ecotype, consistent with the relatively low abundance of E. hirae-3 relative to E. hirae-1 and E. hirae-2 previously observed in the pig faecal microbiome, and with observed differences between the ecotypes in gene content related to biosynthetic capacity. Results of this study provide a genomic basis for the definition of ecotypes within E. hirae and confirm the utility of the cpn60 UT sequence for high-resolution profiling of complex microbial communities.

  11. Analysis of gene expression patterns by microarray hybridization in blood mononuclear cells of SLA-DRB1 defined Canadian Yorkshire pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino-Soto, Maria I; Jozani, Razi Jafari; Bridle, Byram; Mallard, Bonnie A

    2008-06-23

    The Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) system encodes molecules for self-nonself discrimination and is associated with immune responses and disease resistance. Three lines of pigs defined by their SLA-DRB1 alleles were developed at the University of Guelph for xenotransplantation and immune response studies. The aim of this project was to explore the potential association between defined SLA-DRB1 alleles and gene transcriptional patterns of other immune-related genes in blood mononuclear cells. Three SLA-DRB1 alleles were characterized using a RT-PCR-based sequencing method. The loci represented included a new allele, DRB1*04ns01. Next, microarray heterologous (bovine-porcine) hybridization together with qPCR were used to explore differential gene expression between SLA-DRB1-defined groups. Microarray analysis showed significant (p SLA-DRB1 allele was characterized. A potential association was found between SLA-DRB1 alleles and inflammation-related genes. However, the influence of other genes cannot be ruled out. These preliminary findings agree with other studies linking MHC haplotypes and inflammation processes, including autoimmune disease. The study provides an initial view of the biological interactions between the SLA complex and other immune-related genes. Future studies will focus on characterization of SLA-haplotypes associated with these particular alleles and the dynamics of the immune response to antigenic challenges.

  12. Reverse engineering of modified genes by Bayesian network analysis defines molecular determinants critical to the development of glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Kunkle

    Full Text Available In this study we have identified key genes that are critical in development of astrocytic tumors. Meta-analysis of microarray studies which compared normal tissue to astrocytoma revealed a set of 646 differentially expressed genes in the majority of astrocytoma. Reverse engineering of these 646 genes using Bayesian network analysis produced a gene network for each grade of astrocytoma (Grade I-IV, and 'key genes' within each grade were identified. Genes found to be most influential to development of the highest grade of astrocytoma, Glioblastoma multiforme were: COL4A1, EGFR, BTF3, MPP2, RAB31, CDK4, CD99, ANXA2, TOP2A, and SERBP1. All of these genes were up-regulated, except MPP2 (down regulated. These 10 genes were able to predict tumor status with 96-100% confidence when using logistic regression, cross validation, and the support vector machine analysis. Markov genes interact with NFkβ, ERK, MAPK, VEGF, growth hormone and collagen to produce a network whose top biological functions are cancer, neurological disease, and cellular movement. Three of the 10 genes - EGFR, COL4A1, and CDK4, in particular, seemed to be potential 'hubs of activity'. Modified expression of these 10 Markov Blanket genes increases lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to the normal population. The glioblastoma risk estimates were dramatically increased with joint effects of 4 or more than 4 Markov Blanket genes. Joint interaction effects of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 Markov Blanket genes produced 9, 13, 20.9, 26.7, 52.8, 53.2, 78.1 or 85.9%, respectively, increase in lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to normal population. In summary, it appears that modified expression of several 'key genes' may be required for the development of glioblastoma. Further studies are needed to validate these 'key genes' as useful tools for early detection and novel therapeutic options for these tumors.

  13. Reverse engineering of modified genes by Bayesian network analysis defines molecular determinants critical to the development of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Brian W; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have identified key genes that are critical in development of astrocytic tumors. Meta-analysis of microarray studies which compared normal tissue to astrocytoma revealed a set of 646 differentially expressed genes in the majority of astrocytoma. Reverse engineering of these 646 genes using Bayesian network analysis produced a gene network for each grade of astrocytoma (Grade I-IV), and 'key genes' within each grade were identified. Genes found to be most influential to development of the highest grade of astrocytoma, Glioblastoma multiforme were: COL4A1, EGFR, BTF3, MPP2, RAB31, CDK4, CD99, ANXA2, TOP2A, and SERBP1. All of these genes were up-regulated, except MPP2 (down regulated). These 10 genes were able to predict tumor status with 96-100% confidence when using logistic regression, cross validation, and the support vector machine analysis. Markov genes interact with NFkβ, ERK, MAPK, VEGF, growth hormone and collagen to produce a network whose top biological functions are cancer, neurological disease, and cellular movement. Three of the 10 genes - EGFR, COL4A1, and CDK4, in particular, seemed to be potential 'hubs of activity'. Modified expression of these 10 Markov Blanket genes increases lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to the normal population. The glioblastoma risk estimates were dramatically increased with joint effects of 4 or more than 4 Markov Blanket genes. Joint interaction effects of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 Markov Blanket genes produced 9, 13, 20.9, 26.7, 52.8, 53.2, 78.1 or 85.9%, respectively, increase in lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to normal population. In summary, it appears that modified expression of several 'key genes' may be required for the development of glioblastoma. Further studies are needed to validate these 'key genes' as useful tools for early detection and novel therapeutic options for these tumors.

  14. Gene expression profiles of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines define molecular interaction networks governing cell migration processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Although there is extensive information on gene expression and molecular interactions in various cell types, integrating those data in a functionally coherent manner remains challenging. This study explores the premise that genes whose expression at the mRNA level is correlated over diverse cell lines are likely to function together in a network of molecular interactions. We previously derived expression-correlated gene clusters from the database of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and associated each cluster with function categories of the Gene Ontology (GO database. From a cluster rich in genes associated with GO categories related to cell migration, we extracted 15 genes that were highly cross-correlated; prominent among them were RRAS, AXL, ADAM9, FN14, and integrin-beta1. We then used those 15 genes as bait to identify other correlated genes in the NCI-60 database. A survey of current literature disclosed, not only that many of the expression-correlated genes engaged in molecular interactions related to migration, invasion, and metastasis, but that highly cross-correlated subsets of those genes engaged in specific cell migration processes. We assembled this information in molecular interaction maps (MIMs that depict networks governing 3 cell migration processes: degradation of extracellular matrix, production of transient focal complexes at the leading edge of the cell, and retraction of the rear part of the cell. Also depicted are interactions controlling the release and effects of calcium ions, which may regulate migration in a spaciotemporal manner in the cell. The MIMs and associated text comprise a detailed and integrated summary of what is currently known or surmised about the role of the expression cross-correlated genes in molecular networks governing those processes.

  15. The iron/heme regulated genes of Haemophilus influenzae: comparative transcriptional profiling as a tool to define the species core modulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth and possesses multiple mechanisms to obtain this essential nutrient. Although an understanding of the heme acquisition mechanisms of H. influenzae is emerging, significant gaps in our knowledge remain. Unresolved issues include the identities of all genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to iron and heme availability, the fraction of such genes functioning in iron/heme acquisition, and the heterogeneity of this gene set among clinical isolates. Previously we utilized H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 to demonstrate the utility of transcriptional profiling in defining the genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to environmental iron and heme levels. The current study expands upon those observations by determining the iron/heme modulons of two clinical isolates, the type b isolate 10810 and the nontypeable isolate R2866. These data are used to begin to define the core iron/heme modulon of the species. Results Microarray studies were performed to compare gene expression on transition from iron/heme-restricted to iron/heme-replete conditions for each isolate. Of 1820 ORFs on the array corresponding to R2866 genes, 363 were significantly differentially expressed: 233 were maximally transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 130 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Of the 1883 ORFs representing genes of strain 10810, 353 were significantly differentially transcribed: 150 were preferentially transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 203 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Comparison of the data sets indicated that 163 genes exhibited similar regulation in both isolates and that 74 of these exhibited similar patterns of regulation in Rd KW20. These comprise the putative core iron/heme modulon. Conclusion This study provides evidence for a conserved core of H. influenzae genes the transcription of which is altered by the availability of

  16. Sequential waves of gene expression in patients with clinically defined dengue illnesses reveal subtle disease phases and predict disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifang Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV infection can range in severity from mild dengue fever (DF to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF or dengue shock syndrome (DSS. Changes in host gene expression, temporally through the progression of DENV infection, especially during the early days, remains poorly characterized. Early diagnostic markers for DHF are also lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated host gene expression in a cohort of DENV-infected subjects clinically diagnosed as DF (n = 51 and DHF (n = 13 from Maracay, Venezuela. Blood specimens were collected daily from these subjects from enrollment to early defervescence and at one convalescent time-point. Using convalescent expression levels as baseline, two distinct groups of genes were identified: the "early" group, which included genes associated with innate immunity, type I interferon, cytokine-mediated signaling, chemotaxis, and complement activity peaked at day 0-1 and declined on day 3-4; the second "late" group, comprised of genes associated with cell cycle, emerged from day 4 and peaked at day 5-6. The up-regulation of innate immune response genes coincided with the down-regulation of genes associated with viral replication during day 0-3. Furthermore, DHF patients had lower expression of genes associated with antigen processing and presentation, MHC class II receptor, NK and T cell activities, compared to that of DF patients. These results suggested that the innate and adaptive immunity during the early days of the disease are vital in suppressing DENV replication and in affecting outcome of disease severity. Gene signatures of DHF were identified as early as day 1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals a broad and dynamic picture of host responses in DENV infected subjects. Host response to DENV infection can now be understood as two distinct phases with unique transcriptional markers. The DHF signatures identified during day 1-3 may have

  17. Reverse Engineering of Modified Genes by Bayesian Network Analysis Defines Molecular Determinants Critical to the Development of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Brian W.; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have identified key genes that are critical in development of astrocytic tumors. Meta-analysis of microarray studies which compared normal tissue to astrocytoma revealed a set of 646 differentially expressed genes in the majority of astrocytoma. Reverse engineering of these 646 genes using Bayesian network analysis produced a gene network for each grade of astrocytoma (Grade I–IV), and ‘key genes’ within each grade were identified. Genes found to be most influential to development of the highest grade of astrocytoma, Glioblastoma multiforme were: COL4A1, EGFR, BTF3, MPP2, RAB31, CDK4, CD99, ANXA2, TOP2A, and SERBP1. All of these genes were up-regulated, except MPP2 (down regulated). These 10 genes were able to predict tumor status with 96–100% confidence when using logistic regression, cross validation, and the support vector machine analysis. Markov genes interact with NFkβ, ERK, MAPK, VEGF, growth hormone and collagen to produce a network whose top biological functions are cancer, neurological disease, and cellular movement. Three of the 10 genes - EGFR, COL4A1, and CDK4, in particular, seemed to be potential ‘hubs of activity’. Modified expression of these 10 Markov Blanket genes increases lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to the normal population. The glioblastoma risk estimates were dramatically increased with joint effects of 4 or more than 4 Markov Blanket genes. Joint interaction effects of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 Markov Blanket genes produced 9, 13, 20.9, 26.7, 52.8, 53.2, 78.1 or 85.9%, respectively, increase in lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to normal population. In summary, it appears that modified expression of several ‘key genes’ may be required for the development of glioblastoma. Further studies are needed to validate these ‘key genes’ as useful tools for early detection and novel therapeutic options for these tumors. PMID:23737970

  18. Improved chitosan-mediated gene delivery based on easily dissociated chitosan polyplexes of highly defined chitosan oligomers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Köping-Höggård, M; Vårum, K M; Issa, M; Danielsen, S; Christensen, B E; Stokke, B T; Artursson, P

    2004-01-01

    Nonviral gene delivery systems based on conventional high-molecular-weight chitosans are efficient after lung administration in vivo, but have poor physical properties such as aggregated shapes, low...

  19. Fuzzy tandem repeats containing p53 response elements may define species-specific p53 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Simeonova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary forces that shape regulatory networks remain poorly understood. In mammals, the Rb pathway is a classic example of species-specific gene regulation, as a germline mutation in one Rb allele promotes retinoblastoma in humans, but not in mice. Here we show that p53 transactivates the Retinoblastoma-like 2 (Rbl2 gene to produce p130 in murine, but not human, cells. We found intronic fuzzy tandem repeats containing perfect p53 response elements to be important for this regulation. We next identified two other murine genes regulated by p53 via fuzzy tandem repeats: Ncoa1 and Klhl26. The repeats are poorly conserved in evolution, and the p53-dependent regulation of the murine genes is lost in humans. Our results indicate a role for the rapid evolution of tandem repeats in shaping differences in p53 regulatory networks between mammalian species.

  20. Gene Expression Patterns Define Key Transcriptional Events InCell-Cycle Regulation By cAMP And Protein Kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, Alexander C.; Zhang, Lingzhi; Minovitsky, Simon; Kanter, Joan R.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Salomonis, Nathan; Vranizan, Karen; Dubchak Inna,; Conklin, Bruce R.; Insel, Paul A.

    2005-06-01

    Although a substantial number of hormones and drugs increase cellular cAMP levels, the global impact of cAMP and its major effector mechanism, protein kinase A (PKA), on gene expression is not known. Here we show that treatment of murine wild-type S49 lymphoma cells for 24 h with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPTcAMP), a PKA-selective cAMP analog, alters the expression of approx equal to 4,500 of approx. equal to 13,600 unique genes. By contrast, gene expression was unaltered in Kin- S49 cells (that lack PKA) incubated with 8-CPTcAMP. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of several cell cycle regulators accompanied cAMP-induced G1-phase cell-cycle arrest of wild-type S49 cells. Within 2h, 8-CPT-cAMP altered expression of 152 genes that contain evolutionarily conserved cAMP-response elements within 5 kb of transcriptional start sites, including the circadian clock gene Per1. Thus, cAMP through its activation of PKA produces extensive transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells. These transcriptional networks include a primary group of cAMP-response element-containing genes and secondary networks that include the circadian clock.

  1. Neoplastic and stromal cells contribute to an extracellular matrix gene expression profile defining a breast cancer subtype likely to progress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Triulzi

    Full Text Available We recently showed that differential expression of extracellular matrix (ECM genes delineates four subgroups of breast carcinomas (ECM1, -2, -3- and -4 with different clinical outcome. To further investigate the characteristics of ECM signature and its impact on tumor progression, we conducted unsupervised clustering analyses in 6 additional independent datasets of invasive breast tumors from different platforms for a total of 643 samples. Use of four different clustering algorithms identified ECM3 tumors as an independent group in all datasets tested. ECM3 showed a homogeneous gene pattern, consisting of 58 genes encoding 43 structural ECM proteins. From 26 to 41% of the cases were ECM3-enriched, and analysis of datasets relevant to gene expression in neoplastic or corresponding stromal cells showed that both stromal and breast carcinoma cells can coordinately express ECM3 genes. In in vitro experiments, β-estradiol induced ECM3 gene production in ER-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, whereas TGFβ induced upregulation of the genes leading to ECM3 gene classification, especially in ER-negative breast carcinoma cells and in fibroblasts. Multivariate analysis of distant metastasis-free survival in untreated breast tumor patients revealed a significant interaction between ECM3 and histological grade (p = 0.001. Cox models, estimated separately in grade I-II and grade III tumors, indicated a highly significant association between ECM3 and worse survival probability only in grade III tumors (HR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.3-7.0, p = 0.0098. Gene Set Enrichment analysis of ECM3 compared to non-ECM3 tumors revealed significant enrichment of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT genes in both grade I-II and grade III subsets of ECM3 tumors. Thus, ECM3 is a robust cluster that identifies breast carcinomas with EMT features but with accelerated metastatic potential only in the undifferentiated (grade III phenotype. These findings support the

  2. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C; Bray, Isabella M; Reynolds, James P; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2015-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain.

  3. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  4. Growth and sporulation of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 under defined conditions: temporal expression of genes for key sigma factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Y.P.; Hornstra, L.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    An airlift fermentor system allowing precise regulation of pH and aeration combined with a chemically defined medium was used to study growth and sporulation of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. Sporulation was complete and synchronous. Expression of sigA, sigB, sigF, and sigG was monitored with real-time

  5. Temporal network based analysis of cell specific vein graft transcriptome defines key pathways and hub genes in implantation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Bhasin

    Full Text Available Vein graft failure occurs between 1 and 6 months after implantation due to obstructive intimal hyperplasia, related in part to implantation injury. The cell-specific and temporal response of the transcriptome to vein graft implantation injury was determined by transcriptional profiling of laser capture microdissected endothelial cells (EC and medial smooth muscle cells (SMC from canine vein grafts, 2 hours (H to 30 days (D following surgery. Our results demonstrate a robust genomic response beginning at 2 H, peaking at 12-24 H, declining by 7 D, and resolving by 30 D. Gene ontology and pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes indicated that implantation injury affects inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, mitosis, and extracellular matrix reorganization in both cell types. Through backpropagation an integrated network was built, starting with genes differentially expressed at 30 D, followed by adding upstream interactive genes from each prior time-point. This identified significant enrichment of IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB, dendritic cell maturation, glucocorticoid receptor, and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM-1 signaling, as well as PPARα activation pathways in graft EC and SMC. Interactive network-based analyses identified IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α, and Insulin Receptor (INSR as focus hub genes within these pathways. Real-time PCR was used for the validation of two of these genes: IL-6 and IL-8, in addition to Collagen 11A1 (COL11A1, a cornerstone of the backpropagation. In conclusion, these results establish causality relationships clarifying the pathogenesis of vein graft implantation injury, and identifying novel targets for its prevention.

  6. Zbtb20 Defines a Hippocampal Neuronal Identity Through Direct Repression of Genes That Control Projection Neuron Development in the Isocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate...... that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data...

  7. A 1463 gene cattle-human comparative map with anchor points defined by human genome sequence coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Kata, Srinivas R; Band, Mark R; Rebeiz, Mark; Larkin, Denis M; Everts, Robin E; Green, Cheryl A; Liu, Lei; Natarajan, Shreedhar; Goldammer, Tom; Lee, Jun Heon; McKay, Stephanie; Womack, James E; Lewin, Harris A

    2004-07-01

    A second-generation 5000 rad radiation hybrid (RH) map of the cattle genome was constructed primarily using cattle ESTs that were targeted to gaps in the existing cattle-human comparative map, as well as to sparsely populated map intervals. A total of 870 targeted markers were added, bringing the number of markers mapped on the RH(5000) panel to 1913. Of these, 1463 have significant BLASTN hits (E genes) were identified between the cattle and human genomes, of which 31 are newly discovered and 34 were extended singletons on the first-generation map. The new map represents an improvement of 20% genome-wide comparative coverage compared with the first-generation map. Analysis of gene content within human genome regions where there are gaps in the comparative map revealed gaps with both significantly greater and significantly lower gene content. The new, more detailed cattle-human comparative map provides an improved resource for the analysis of mammalian chromosome evolution, the identification of candidate genes for economically important traits, and for proper alignment of sequence contigs on cattle chromosomes. Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press ISSN

  8. Simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity in single cells in defined mixtures of pure cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Dalton, Helen M.; Angels, Mark;

    1997-01-01

    A protocol was developed to achieve the simultaneous determination of gene expression and bacterial identity at the level of single cells: a chromogenic beta-galactosidase activity assay was combined with in situ hybridization of Fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes to rRNA. The method a...

  9. Stress-related genes define essential steps in the response of maize seedlings to smoke-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Vilmos; Sebestyén, Endre; Juhász, Angéla; Pintér, János; Light, Marnie E; Van Staden, Johannes; Balázs, Ervin

    2009-05-01

    Smoke from burning vegetation is widely recognised as a germination cue for seed germination and recent reports suggest that smoke treatments can improve seedling vigour also. We investigated the effect of smoke-water on seedling vigour and changes of the global transcriptome in the early post-germination phase in maize. Application of smoke-water improved the germination characteristics and seedling vigour. The transcriptional response of embryos and emerging radicles 24 and 48 h after the onset of smoke treatment was investigated. The microarray study revealed a number of smoke-responsive genes amongst which stress- and abscisic acid (ABA)-related genes were over-represented. The global promoter analysis of the smoke-responsive genes revealed a tight correlation with the results obtained from Gene Ontology annotations. This concerted over-expression shows that smoke treatment induces stress and ABA-related responses in the early post-germination phase which leads to better adaptation to environmental stress factors occurring during germination, eventually resulting in greater seedling vigour.

  10. The ChIP-seq-defined networks of Bcl-3 gene binding support its required role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Jackman

    Full Text Available NF-kappaB transcriptional activation is required for skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. We are continuing to study how the activation of NF-kB regulates the genes that encode the protein products that cause atrophy. Using ChIP-sequencing we found that Bcl-3, an NF-kB transcriptional activator required for atrophy, binds to the promoters of a number of genes whose collective function describes two major aspects of muscle wasting. By means of bioinformatics analysis of ChIP-sequencing data we found Bcl-3 to be directing transcription networks of proteolysis and energy metabolism. The proteolytic arm of the Bcl-3 networks includes many E3 ligases associated with proteasomal protein degradation, including that of the N-end rule pathway. The metabolic arm appears to be involved in organizing the change from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in atrophying muscle. For one gene, MuRF1, ChIP-sequencing data identified the location of Bcl-3 and p50 binding in the promoter region which directed the creation of deletant and base-substitution mutations of MuRF1 promoter constructs to determine the effect on gene transcription. The results provide the first direct confirmation that the NF-kB binding site is involved in the muscle unloading regulation of MuRF1. Finally, we have combined the ChIP-sequencing results with gene expression microarray data from unloaded muscle to map several direct targets of Bcl-3 that are transcription factors whose own targets describe a set of indirect targets for NF-kB in atrophy. ChIP-sequencing provides the first molecular explanation for the finding that Bcl3 knockout mice are resistant to disuse muscle atrophy. Mapping the transcriptional regulation of muscle atrophy requires an unbiased analysis of the whole genome, which we show is now possible with ChIP-sequencing.

  11. Defining global gene expression changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female sGnRH-antisense transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus, 16 and 12 (pituitary, 119 and 93 (ovary, respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the

  12. Zbtb20 defines a hippocampal neuronal identity through direct repression of genes that control projection neuron development in the isocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Niels A

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which Zbtb20 suppresses the acquisition of an isocortical fate during archicortical neurogenesis to ensure commitment to a CA1 pyramidal neuron fate. We further show that the expression pattern of Zbtb20 is evolutionary conserved in the fetal human hippocampus, where it is complementary to the expression pattern of the Zbtb20 target gene Tbr1. Therefore, the disclosed Zbtb20-mediated transcriptional repressor mechanism may be involved in development of the human archicortex.

  13. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M; Seaton, Daniel D; McWatters, Harriet G; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell(-1)) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell(-1)) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Inflammatory gene networks in term human decidual cells define a potential signature for cytokine-mediated parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sherrine A; Ackerman, William E; Summerfield, Taryn L; Lockwood, Charles J; Schatz, Frederick; Kniss, Douglas A

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation is a proximate mediator of preterm birth and fetal injury. During inflammation several microRNAs (22 nucleotide noncoding ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules) are up-regulated in response to cytokines such as interleukin-1β. MicroRNAs, in most cases, fine-tune gene expression, including both up-regulation and down-regulation of their target genes. However, the role of pro- and antiinflammatory microRNAs in this process is poorly understood. The principal goal of the work was to examine the inflammatory genomic profile of human decidual cells challenged with a proinflammatory cytokine known to be present in the setting of preterm parturition. We determined the coding (messenger RNA) and noncoding (microRNA) sequences to construct a network of interacting genes during inflammation using an in vitro model of decidual stromal cells. The effects of interleukin-1β exposure on mature microRNA expression were tested in human decidual cell cultures using the multiplexed NanoString platform, whereas the global inflammatory transcriptional response was measured using oligonucleotide microarrays. Differential expression of select transcripts was confirmed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics tools were used to infer transcription factor activation and regulatory interactions. Interleukin-1β elicited up- and down-regulation of 350 and 78 nonredundant transcripts (false discovery rate signaling, including Toll-like receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Stimulation of decidual cells with interleukin-1β alters the expression of microRNAs that function to temper proinflammatory signaling. In this setting, some microRNAs may be involved in tissue-level inflammation during the bulk of gestation and assist in pregnancy maintenance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fixed differences in the paralytic gene define two lineages within the Lutzomyia longipalpis complex producing different types of courtship songs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M M A Lins

    Full Text Available The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae, the most important vector of American visceral leishmaniasis, is widely distributed in Latin America. There is currently a consensus that it represents a species complex, however, the number and distribution of the different siblings is still uncertain. Previous analyses have indicated that Brazilian populations of this vector can be divided into two main groups according to the type of courtship song (Burst vs. Pulse males produce during copulation. Nevertheless, no diagnostic differences have been observed between these two groups with most molecular markers used to date. We analyzed the molecular divergence in a fragment of the paralytic (para gene, a locus involved in the control of courtship songs in Drosophila, among a number of Lu. longipalpis populations from Brazil producing Burst and Pulse-type songs. Our results revealed a very high level of divergence and fixed differences between populations producing the two types of songs. We also compared Lu. longipalpis with a very closely related species, Lutzomyia cruzi, which produces Burst-type songs. The results indicated a higher number of fixed differences between Lu. cruzi and the Pulse-type populations of Lu. longipalpis than with those producing Burst-type songs. The data confirmed our previous assumptions that the presence of different sibling species of the Lu. longipalpis complex in Brazil can be divided into two main groups, one representing a single species and a second more heterogeneous group that probably represents a number of incipient species. We hypothesize that para might be one of the genes directly involved in the control of the courtship song differences between these two groups or that it is linked to other loci associated with reproductive isolation of the Brazilian species.

  16. Heterogeneous EGFR gene copy number increase is common in colorectal cancer and defines response to anti-EGFR therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Ålgars

    Full Text Available Anti-EGFR therapy is commonly used to treat colorectal cancer (CRC, although only a subset of patients benefit from the treatment. While KRAS mutation predicts non-responsiveness, positive predictive markers are not in clinical practice. We previously showed that immunohistochemistry (IHC-guided EGFR gene copy number (GCN analysis may identify CRC patients benefiting from anti-EGFR treatment. Here we tested the predictive value of such analysis in chemorefractory metastatic CRC, elucidated EGFR GCN heterogeneity within the tumors, and evaluated the association between EGFR GCN, KRAS status, and anti-EGFR antibody response in CRC cell lines. The chemorefractory patient cohort consisted of 54 KRAS wild-type (WT metastatic CRC patients. EGFR GCN status was analyzed by silver in situ hybridization using a cut-off value of 4.0 EGFR gene copies/cell. KRAS-WT and KRAS mutant CRC cell lines with different EGFR GCN were used in in vitro studies. The chemorefractory CRC tumors with EGFR GCN increase (≥4.0 responded better to anti-EGFR therapy than EGFR GCN (<4.0 tumors (clinical benefit, P = 0.0004; PFS, HR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.12-0.46. EGFR GCN counted using EGFR IHC guidance was significantly higher than the value from randomly selected areas verifying intratumoral EGFR GCN heterogeneity. In CRC cell lines, EGFR GCN correlated with EGFR expression. Best anti-EGFR response was seen with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 4 cells and poorest response with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 2 cells. Anti-EGFR response was associated with AKT and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was effectively inhibited only in cells with KRAS-WT and increased EGFR GCN. In conclusion, IHC-guided EGFR GCN is a promising predictor of anti-EGFR treatment efficacy in chemorefractory CRC.

  17. Defining the gene repertoire and spatiotemporal expression profiles of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Breanne L; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Sanchez, Nicholas E; Schiöth, Helgi B; Monk, Kelly R

    2015-02-08

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) are the second largest of the five GPCR families and are essential for a wide variety of physiological processes. Zebrafish have proven to be a very effective model for studying the biological functions of aGPCRs in both developmental and adult contexts. However, aGPCR repertoires have not been defined in any fish species, nor are aGPCR expression profiles in adult tissues known. Additionally, the expression profiles of the aGPCR family have never been extensively characterized over a developmental time-course in any species. Here, we report that there are at least 59 aGPCRs in zebrafish that represent homologs of 24 of the 33 aGPCRs found in humans; compared to humans, zebrafish lack clear homologs of GPR110, GPR111, GPR114, GPR115, GPR116, EMR1, EMR2, EMR3, and EMR4. We find that several aGPCRs in zebrafish have multiple paralogs, in line with the teleost-specific genome duplication. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that most zebrafish aGPCRs cluster closely with their mammalian homologs, with the exception of three zebrafish-specific expansion events in Groups II, VI, and VIII. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we have defined the expression profiles of 59 zebrafish aGPCRs at 12 developmental time points and 10 adult tissues representing every major organ system. Importantly, expression profiles of zebrafish aGPCRs in adult tissues are similar to those previously reported in mouse, rat, and human, underscoring the evolutionary conservation of this family, and therefore the utility of the zebrafish for studying aGPCR biology. Our results support the notion that zebrafish are a potentially useful model to study the biology of aGPCRs from a functional perspective. The zebrafish aGPCR repertoire, classification, and nomenclature, together with their expression profiles during development and in adult tissues, provides a crucial foundation for elucidating aGPCR functions and pursuing aGPCRs as therapeutic targets.

  18. The monitoring of gene functions on a cell-defined siRNA microarray in human bone marrow stromal and U2OS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hi Chul Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we developed a cell defined siRNA microarray (CDSM for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs designed to control the culture of cells inside the spot area without reducing the efficiency of siRNA silencing, “Development of a cell-defined siRNA microarray for analysis of gene functionin human bone marrow stromal cells” (Kim et al., 2016 [1]. First, we confirmed that p65 protein inhibition efficiency was maintained when hBMSCs were culture for 7 days on the siRNA spot, and siRNA spot activity remained in spite of long term storage (10 days and 2 months. Additionally, we confirmed p65 protein inhibition in U2OS cells after 48 h reverse transfection.

  19. Computational screen for spliceosomal RNA genes aids in defining the phylogenetic distribution of major and minor spliceosomal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Marcela Dávila; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Samuelsson, Tore

    2008-01-01

    The RNA molecules of the spliceosome are critical for specificity and catalysis during splicing of eukaryotic pre-mRNA. In order to examine the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of these RNAs, we analyzed 149 eukaryotic genomes representing a broad range of phylogenetic groups. RNAs were predicted using high-sensitivity local alignment methods and profile HMMs in combination with covariance models. The results provide the most comprehensive view so far of the phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs. RNAs were predicted in many phylogenetic groups where these RNA were not previously reported. Examples are RNAs of the major (U2-type) spliceosome in all fungal lineages, in lower metazoa and many protozoa. We also identified the minor (U12-type) spliceosomal U11 and U6atac RNAs in Acanthamoeba castellanii, where U12 spliceosomal RNA as well as minor introns were reported recently. In addition, minor-spliceosome-specific RNAs were identified in a number of phylogenetic groups where previously such RNAs were not observed, including the nematode Trichinella spiralis, the slime mold Physarum polycephalum and the fungal lineages Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota. The detailed map of the distribution of the U12-type RNA genes supports an early origin of the minor spliceosome and points to a number of occasions during evolution where it was lost. PMID:18390578

  20. Mapping of a gene for familial juvenile nephronophthisis: Refining the map and defining flanking markers on chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, F.; Singh-Sawhney, I.; Schnieders, B.; Centofante, L.; Omran, H.; Pohlmann, A.; Schmaltz, C.; Wedekind, H.; Schubotz, D.; Brandis, M. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany)); Antignac, C. (Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France)); Weber, J.L. (Marshfield Medical Foundation, WI (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Familial juvenile nephronophthisis (NPH) is an autosomal recessive kidney disease that leads to end-stage renal failure in adolescence and is associated with the formation of cysts at the cortico-medullary junction of the kidneys. NPH is responsible for about 15% of end-stage renal disease in children, as shown by Kleinknecht and Habib. NPH in combination with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa is known as the Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS) and exhibits renal pathology that is identical to NPH. The authors had excluded 40% of the human genome from linkage with a disease locus for NH or SLS when Antignac et al. first demonstrated linkage for an NPH locus on chromosome 2. The authors present confirmation of linkage of an NPH locus to microsatellite markers on chromosome 2 in nine families with NPH. By linkage analysis with marker AFM262xb5 at locus D2S176, a maximum lod score of 5.05 at a [theta][sub max] = .03 was obtained. In a large NPH family that yielded at D2S176 a maximum lod score of 2.66 at [theta][sub max] = .0, markers AFM172xc3 and AFM016yc5, representing loci D2S135 and D2S110, respectively, were identified as flanking markers, thereby defining the interval for an NPH locus to a region of approximately 15 cM. Furthermore, the cytogenetic assignment of the NPH region was specified to 2p12-(2q13 or adjacent bands) by calculation of linkage between these flanking markers and markers with known unique cytogenic assignment. The refined map may serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  2. Stage and gene specific signatures defined by histones H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accompany mammalian retina maturation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Xu, Xuming; DeWan, Andrew T; Salzberg, Anna C; Berg, Arthur; Hoh, Josephine; Zhang, Samuel S; Barnstable, Colin J

    2012-01-01

    The epigenetic contribution to neurogenesis is largely unknown. There is, however, growing evidence that posttranslational modification of histones is a dynamic process that shows many correlations with gene expression. Here we have followed the genome-wide distribution of two important histone H3 modifications, H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 during late mouse retina development. The retina provides an ideal model for these studies because of its well-characterized structure and development and also the extensive studies of the retinal transcriptome and its development. We found that a group of genes expressed only in mature rod photoreceptors have a unique signature consisting of de-novo accumulation of H3K4me2, both at the transcription start site (TSS) and over the whole gene, that correlates with the increase in transcription, but no accumulation of H3K27me3 at any stage. By in silico analysis of this unique signature we have identified a larger group of genes that may be selectively expressed in mature rod photoreceptors. We also found that the distribution of H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 on the genes widely expressed is not always associated with their transcriptional levels. Different histone signatures for retinal genes with the same gene expression pattern suggest the diversities of epigenetic regulation. Genes without H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accumulation at any stage represent a large group of transcripts never expressed in retina. The epigenetic signatures defined by H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 can distinguish cell-type specific genes from widespread transcripts and may be reflective of cell specificity during retina maturation. In addition to the developmental patterns seen in wild type retina, the dramatic changes of histone modification in the retinas of mutant animals lacking rod photoreceptors provide a tool to study the epigenetic changes in other cell types and thus describe a broad range of epigenetic events in a solid tissue in vivo.

  3. Stage and gene specific signatures defined by histones H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accompany mammalian retina maturation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya Y Popova

    Full Text Available The epigenetic contribution to neurogenesis is largely unknown. There is, however, growing evidence that posttranslational modification of histones is a dynamic process that shows many correlations with gene expression. Here we have followed the genome-wide distribution of two important histone H3 modifications, H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 during late mouse retina development. The retina provides an ideal model for these studies because of its well-characterized structure and development and also the extensive studies of the retinal transcriptome and its development. We found that a group of genes expressed only in mature rod photoreceptors have a unique signature consisting of de-novo accumulation of H3K4me2, both at the transcription start site (TSS and over the whole gene, that correlates with the increase in transcription, but no accumulation of H3K27me3 at any stage. By in silico analysis of this unique signature we have identified a larger group of genes that may be selectively expressed in mature rod photoreceptors. We also found that the distribution of H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 on the genes widely expressed is not always associated with their transcriptional levels. Different histone signatures for retinal genes with the same gene expression pattern suggest the diversities of epigenetic regulation. Genes without H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accumulation at any stage represent a large group of transcripts never expressed in retina. The epigenetic signatures defined by H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 can distinguish cell-type specific genes from widespread transcripts and may be reflective of cell specificity during retina maturation. In addition to the developmental patterns seen in wild type retina, the dramatic changes of histone modification in the retinas of mutant animals lacking rod photoreceptors provide a tool to study the epigenetic changes in other cell types and thus describe a broad range of epigenetic events in a solid tissue in vivo.

  4. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Guillaume; Walton, Emma L; Sterlin, Delphine; Hédouin, Sabrine; Nitta, Hirohisa; Ito, Yuya; Fouyssac, Fanny; Mégarbané, André; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Picard, Capucine; Francastel, Claire

    2014-04-17

    Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected relatives. The specific and robust

  5. LuxR- and acyl-homoserine-lactone-controlled non-lux genes define a quorum-sensing regulon in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, S M; Dunlap, P V

    2000-05-01

    The luminescence (lux) operon (luxICDABEG) of the symbiotic bacterium Vibrio fischeri is regulated by the transcriptional activator LuxR and two acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) autoinducers (the luxI-dependent 3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL [3-oxo-C6-HSL] and the ainS-dependent octanoyl-HSL [C8-HSL]) in a population density-responsive manner called quorum sensing. To identify quorum-sensing-regulated (QSR) proteins different from those encoded by lux genes, we examined the protein patterns of V. fischeri quorum-sensing mutants defective in luxI, ainS, and luxR by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five non-Lux QSR proteins, QsrP, RibB, AcfA, QsrV, and QSR 7, were identified; their production occurred preferentially at high population density, required both LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and was inhibited by C8-HSL at low population density. The genes encoding two of the QSR proteins were characterized: qsrP directs cells to synthesize an apparently novel periplasmic protein, and ribB is a homolog of the Escherichia coli gene for 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase, a key enzyme for riboflavin synthesis. The qsrP and ribB promoter regions each contained a sequence similar to the lux operon lux box, a 20-bp region of dyad symmetry necessary for LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL-dependent activation of lux operon transcription. V. fischeri qsrP and ribB mutants exhibited no distinct phenotype in culture. However, a qsrP mutant, in competition with its parent strain, was less successful in colonizing Euprymna scolopes, the symbiotic host of V. fischeri. The newly identified QSR genes, together with the lux operon, define a LuxR/acyl-HSL-responsive quorum-sensing regulon in V. fischeri.

  6. Defining excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  7. The flow cytometry-defined light chain cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index and an associated 12-gene expression signature are independent prognostic factors in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, X; Alapat, D; Rosenthal, A; Stein, C; Epstein, J; Owens, R; Yaccoby, S; Johnson, S; Bailey, C; Heuck, C; Tian, E; Joiner, A; van Rhee, F; Khan, R; Zangari, M; Jethava, Y; Waheed, S; Davies, F; Morgan, G; Barlogie, B

    2015-08-01

    As part of Total Therapy (TT) 3b, baseline marrow aspirates were subjected to two-color flow cytometry of nuclear DNA content and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (DNA/CIG) as well as plasma cell gene expression profiling (GEP). DNA/CIG-derived parameters, GEP and standard clinical variables were examined for their effects on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Among DNA/CIG parameters, the percentage of the light chain-restricted (LCR) cells and their cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index (CIg) were linked to poor outcome. In the absence of GEP data, low CIg CIg survived the model along with GEP70-defined high risk and low albumin. Low CIg was linked to beta-2-microglobulin >5.5 mg/l, a percentage of LCR cells exceeding 50%, C-reactive protein ⩾8 mg/l and GEP-derived high centrosome index. Further analysis revealed an association of low CIg with 12 gene probes implicated in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and drug transportation from which a risk score was developed in TT3b that held prognostic significance also in TT3a, TT2 and HOVON trials, thus validating its general applicability. Low CIg is a powerful new prognostic variable and has identified potentially drug-able targets.

  8. Measurement of circulating transcripts and gene cluster analysis predicts and defines therapeutic efficacy of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Kidd, M. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Modlin, I.M. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Severi, S.; Nicolini, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Drozdov, I. [Bering Limited, London (United Kingdom); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Erasmus Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Theranostics Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an effective method for treating neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). It is limited, however, in the prediction of individual tumor response and the precise and early identification of changes in tumor size. Currently, response prediction is based on somatostatin receptor expression and efficacy by morphological imaging and/or chromogranin A (CgA) measurement. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of circulating NET transcripts as a measure of PRRT efficacy, and moreover to identify prognostic gene clusters in pretreatment blood that could be interpolated with relevant clinical features in order to define a biological index for the tumor and a predictive quotient for PRRT efficacy. NET patients (n = 54), M: F 37:17, median age 66, bronchial: n = 13, GEP-NET: n = 35, CUP: n = 6 were treated with {sup 177}Lu-based-PRRT (cumulative activity: 6.5-27.8 GBq, median 18.5). At baseline: 47/54 low-grade (G1/G2; bronchial typical/atypical), 31/49 {sup 18}FDG positive and 39/54 progressive. Disease status was assessed by RECIST1.1. Transcripts were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and multianalyte algorithmic analysis (NETest); CgA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gene cluster (GC) derivations: regulatory network, protein:protein interactome analyses. Statistical analyses: chi-square, non-parametric measurements, multiple regression, receiver operating characteristic and Kaplan-Meier survival. The disease control rate was 72 %. Median PFS was not achieved (follow-up: 1-33 months, median: 16). Only grading was associated with response (p < 0.01). At baseline, 94 % of patients were NETest-positive, while CgA was elevated in 59 %. NETest accurately (89 %, χ{sup 2} = 27.4; p = 1.2 x 10{sup -7}) correlated with treatment response, while CgA was 24 % accurate. Gene cluster expression (growth-factor signalome and metabolome) had an AUC of 0.74 ± 0.08 (z-statistic = 2.92, p < 0

  9. Random mutagenesis defines a domain of Theiler's virus leader protein that is essential for antagonism of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and cytokine gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricour, Céline; Borghese, Fabian; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hato, Stanleyson V; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays an important role in the capacity of TMEV to establish persistent infection of the central nervous system. Mutant forms of the TMEV leader protein were generated by random mutagenesis and selected after retroviral transduction on the basis of the loss of the highly toxic nature of this protein. Selected mutations define a short C-terminal domain of the leader conserved in TMEV and Saffold virus but lacking in the EMCV leader and thus called the Theilo domain. Mutations in this domain had a dramatic impact on TMEV L protein activity. Like the zinc finger mutation, Theilo domain mutations affected all of the activities of the L protein tested: interferon gene transcription and IRF-3 dimerization antagonism, alteration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, nucleoporin 98 hyperphosphorylation, and viral persistence in vivo. This suggests that the Zn finger and the Theilo domain of the protein cooperate for function. Moreover, the fact that all of the activities tested were affected by these mutations suggests that the various leader protein functions are somehow coupled.

  10. Random Mutagenesis Defines a Domain of Theiler's Virus Leader Protein That Is Essential for Antagonism of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking and Cytokine Gene Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricour, Céline; Borghese, Fabian; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hato, Stanleyson V.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The leader protein of cardioviruses, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), is a multifunctional protein known to antagonize type I interferon expression and to interfere with nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of host proteins and mRNA. This protein plays an important role in the capacity of TMEV to establish persistent infection of the central nervous system. Mutant forms of the TMEV leader protein were generated by random mutagenesis and selected after retroviral transduction on the basis of the loss of the highly toxic nature of this protein. Selected mutations define a short C-terminal domain of the leader conserved in TMEV and Saffold virus but lacking in the EMCV leader and thus called the Theilo domain. Mutations in this domain had a dramatic impact on TMEV L protein activity. Like the zinc finger mutation, Theilo domain mutations affected all of the activities of the L protein tested: interferon gene transcription and IRF-3 dimerization antagonism, alteration of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, nucleoporin 98 hyperphosphorylation, and viral persistence in vivo. This suggests that the Zn finger and the Theilo domain of the protein cooperate for function. Moreover, the fact that all of the activities tested were affected by these mutations suggests that the various leader protein functions are somehow coupled. PMID:19710133

  11. IL-4-dependent effector phase in autoimmune exocrinopathy as defined by the NOD.IL-4-gene knockout mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, J B; Cha, S; Nagashima, H; Yasunari, U; Lindberg, A; Diggs, S; Martinez, J; Goa, J; Humphreys-Beher, M G; Peck, A B

    2001-01-01

    NOD mice manifest many features of autoimmune exocrinopathy (Sjögren's syndrome), a disease generally characterized by a chronic, progressive immunological attack against the exocrine tissues of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Previous studies using the NOD congenic partner strain, NOD.Igmu(null), defined an important role for B lymphocytes in the development of xerostomia, implicating autoantibodies reactive with the acetylcholine muscarinic receptor (M3R) as the possible effector mechanism. In the present study, we have examined the impact of the cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, on autoimmune exocrinopathy by using the IL-4 gene knockout (KO) NOD mouse strain, NOD.IL-4-/-. Despite manifesting the physiological aberrations and marked leukocytic infiltration of the salivary glands characteristic of autoimmune xerostomia in NOD mice, the NOD.IL-4-/- mice do not develop xerostomia. However, NOD.IL-4-/- mice that received adoptively transferred T lymphocytes derived from NOD.Igmu-/- mice progress to xerostomia, thereby reversing the defect. While progression or lack of progression to xerostomia correlated with the ability of the NOD.IL-4-/- mice to express detectable anti-M3R autoantibodies, the precise mechanism of how IL-4 influences the development of autoimmune xerostomia remains speculative.

  12. Defining suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis on human sertoli cells after 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Mariana Antunes; dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; de Moraes, Leonardo Nazário; Briton-Jones, Christine; Rainho, Cláudia Aparecida; Scarano, Wellerson Rodrigo

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) has proven to be a valuable molecular technique to quantify gene expression. There are few studies in the literature that describe suitable reference genes to normalize gene expression data. Studies of transcriptionally disruptive toxins, like tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), require careful consideration of reference genes. The present study was designed to validate potential reference genes in human Sertoli cells after exposure to TCDD. 32 candidate reference genes were analyzed to determine their applicability. geNorm and NormFinder softwares were used to obtain an estimation of the expression stability of the 32 genes and to identify the most suitable genes for qPCR data normalization.

  13. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  14. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  15. Site-specific expression of Polycomb-group genes encoding the HPC-HPH complex in clinically defined primary nodal and cutaneous large B cells lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, F.M.; Vermeer, M.; Fieret, E.; Blokzijl, T.; Dukers, N.H.T.M.; Sewalt, R.G.A.B.; Otte, A.P.; Willemze, R.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) genes preserve cell identity by gene silencing, and contribute to regulation of lymphopoiesis and malignant transformation. We show that primary nodal large B-cell lymphomas (LBCLs), and secondary cutaneous deposits from such lymphomas, abnormally express the BMI-1, RING1, and

  16. Analysis of variance, normal quantile-quantile correlation and effective expression support of pooled expression ratio of reference genes for defining expression stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshi, Himanshu; Das, Rekha; Kumar, Shivendra; Kishore, Pankaj; Kumar, Sujit

    2017-01-01

    Identification of a reference gene unaffected by the experimental conditions is obligatory for accurate measurement of gene expression through relative quantification. Most existing methods directly analyze variability in crossing point (Cp) values of reference genes and fail to account for template-independent factors that affect Cp values in their estimates. We describe the use of three simple statistical methods namely analysis of variance (ANOVA), normal quantile-quantile correlation (NQQC) and effective expression support (EES), on pooled expression ratios of reference genes in a panel to overcome this issue. The pooling of expression ratios across the genes in the panel nullify the sample specific effects uniformly affecting all genes that are falsely reflected as instability. Our methods also offer the flexibility to include sample specific PCR efficiencies in estimations, when available, for improved accuracy. Additionally, we describe a correction factor from the ANOVA method to correct the relative fold change of a target gene if no truly stable reference gene could be found in the analyzed panel. The analysis is described on a synthetic data set to simplify the explanation of the statistical treatment of data.

  17. Analysis of variance, normal quantile-quantile correlation and effective expression support of pooled expression ratio of reference genes for defining expression stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Priyadarshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of a reference gene unaffected by the experimental conditions is obligatory for accurate measurement of gene expression through relative quantification. Most existing methods directly analyze variability in crossing point (Cp values of reference genes and fail to account for template-independent factors that affect Cp values in their estimates. We describe the use of three simple statistical methods namely analysis of variance (ANOVA, normal quantile-quantile correlation (NQQC and effective expression support (EES, on pooled expression ratios of reference genes in a panel to overcome this issue. The pooling of expression ratios across the genes in the panel nullify the sample specific effects uniformly affecting all genes that are falsely reflected as instability. Our methods also offer the flexibility to include sample specific PCR efficiencies in estimations, when available, for improved accuracy. Additionally, we describe a correction factor from the ANOVA method to correct the relative fold change of a target gene if no truly stable reference gene could be found in the analyzed panel. The analysis is described on a synthetic data set to simplify the explanation of the statistical treatment of data.

  18. Transcriptional Profiling Defines Histone Acetylation as a Regulator of Gene Expression during Human-to-Mosquito Transmission of the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che J. Ngwa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum from the human to the mosquito is mediated by the intraerythrocytic gametocytes, which, once taken up during a blood meal, become activated to initiate sexual reproduction. Because gametocytes are the only parasite stages able to establish an infection in the mosquito, they are crucial for spreading the tropical disease. During gametocyte maturation, different repertoires of genes are switched on and off in a well-coordinated sequence, pointing to regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. While epigenetic gene control has been studied during erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum, little is known about this process during human-to-mosquito transmission of the parasite. To unveil the potential role of histone acetylation during gene expression in gametocytes, we carried out a microarray-based transcriptome analysis on gametocytes treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA. TSA-treatment impaired gametocyte maturation and lead to histone hyper-acetylation in these stages. Comparative transcriptomics identified 294 transcripts, which were more than 2-fold up-regulated during gametocytogenesis following TSA-treatment. In activated gametocytes, which were less sensitive to TSA, the transcript levels of 48 genes were increased. TSA-treatment further led to repression of ~145 genes in immature and mature gametocytes and 7 genes in activated gametocytes. Up-regulated genes are mainly associated with functions in invasion, cytoadherence, and protein export, while down-regulated genes could particularly be assigned to transcription and translation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated a link between gene activation and histone acetylation for selected genes. Among the genes up-regulated in TSA-treated mature gametocytes was a gene encoding the ring finger (RING-domain protein PfRNF1, a putative E3 ligase of the ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway. Immunochemistry

  19. Transcriptional Profiling Defines Histone Acetylation as a Regulator of Gene Expression during Human-to-Mosquito Transmission of the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Che J; Kiesow, Meike J; Papst, Olga; Orchard, Lindsey M; Filarsky, Michael; Rosinski, Alina N; Voss, Till S; Llinás, Manuel; Pradel, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum from the human to the mosquito is mediated by the intraerythrocytic gametocytes, which, once taken up during a blood meal, become activated to initiate sexual reproduction. Because gametocytes are the only parasite stages able to establish an infection in the mosquito, they are crucial for spreading the tropical disease. During gametocyte maturation, different repertoires of genes are switched on and off in a well-coordinated sequence, pointing to regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. While epigenetic gene control has been studied during erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum, little is known about this process during human-to-mosquito transmission of the parasite. To unveil the potential role of histone acetylation during gene expression in gametocytes, we carried out a microarray-based transcriptome analysis on gametocytes treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). TSA-treatment impaired gametocyte maturation and lead to histone hyper-acetylation in these stages. Comparative transcriptomics identified 294 transcripts, which were more than 2-fold up-regulated during gametocytogenesis following TSA-treatment. In activated gametocytes, which were less sensitive to TSA, the transcript levels of 48 genes were increased. TSA-treatment further led to repression of ~145 genes in immature and mature gametocytes and 7 genes in activated gametocytes. Up-regulated genes are mainly associated with functions in invasion, cytoadherence, and protein export, while down-regulated genes could particularly be assigned to transcription and translation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated a link between gene activation and histone acetylation for selected genes. Among the genes up-regulated in TSA-treated mature gametocytes was a gene encoding the ring finger (RING)-domain protein PfRNF1, a putative E3 ligase of the ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway. Immunochemistry demonstrated PfRNF1

  20. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  1. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. ZNF384-related fusion genes define a subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a characteristic immunotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Ohki, Kentaro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Okamura, Kohji; Yaguchi, Akinori; Terada, Kazuki; Saito, Yuya; Yoshimi, Ai; Ogata-Kawata, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kato, Motohiro; Fujimura, Junya; Hino, Moeko; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Kakuda, Harumi; Kurosawa, Hidemitsu; Kato, Keisuke; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Moriwaki, Koichi; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Kozue; Noguchi, Yasushi; Osumi, Tomoo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Takita, Junko; Yuza, Yuki; Matsuda, Koich; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hata, Kenichiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Matsubara, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takashi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Ohara, Akira; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Fusion genes involving ZNF384 have recently been identified in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 7 fusion partners have been reported. We further characterized this type of fusion gene by whole transcriptome sequencing and/or polymerase chain reaction. In addition to previously reported genes, we identified BMP2K as a novel fusion partner for ZNF384. Including the EP300-ZNF384 that we reported recently, the total frequency of ZNF384-related fusion genes was 4.1% in 291 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients enrolled in a single clinical trial, and TCF3-ZNF384 was the most recurrent, with a frequency of 2.4%. The characteristic immunophenotype of weak CD10 and aberrant CD13 and/or CD33 expression was revealed to be a common feature of the leukemic cells harboring ZNF384-related fusion genes. The signature gene expression profile in TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell features and related to that of EP300-ZNF384-positive patients, but was significantly distinct from that of TCF3-PBX1-positive and ZNF384-fusion-negative patients. However, clinical features of TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients are markedly different from those of EP300-ZNF384-positive patients, exhibiting higher cell counts and a younger age at presentation. TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients revealed a significantly poorer steroid response and a higher frequency of relapse, and the additional activating mutations in RAS signaling pathway genes were detected by whole exome analysis in some of the cases. Our observations indicate that ZNF384-related fusion genes consist of a distinct subgroup of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a characteristic immunophenotype, while the clinical features depend on the functional properties of individual fusion partners. PMID:27634205

  3. The use of the rare UUA codon to define "expression space" for genes involved in secondary metabolism, development and environmental adaptation in streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind

    2008-02-01

    In Streptomyces coelicolor, bldA encodes the only tRNA for a rare leucine codon, UUA. This tRNA is unnecessary for growth, but is required for some aspects of secondary metabolism and morphological development, as revealed by the phenotypes of bldA mutants in diverse streptomycetes. This article is a comprehensive review of out understanding of this unusual situation. Based on information from four sequenced genomes it now appears that, typically, about 2 approximately 3% of genes in any one streptomycete contain a TTA codon, most having been acquired through species-specific horizontal gene transfer. Among the few widely conserved TTA-containing genes, mutations in just one, the pleiotropic regulatory gene adpA, give an obvious phenotype: such mutants are defective in aerial growth and sporulation, but vary in the extent of their impairment in secondary metabolism in different streptomycetes. The TTA codon in adpA is largely responsible for the morphological phenotype of a bldA mutant of S. coelicolor. AdpA-dependent targets include several genes involved in the integrated action of extracellular proteases that, at least in some species, are involved in the conversion of primary biomass into spores. The effects of bldA mutations on secondary metabolism are mostly attributable to the presence of TTA codons in pathway-specific genes, particularly in transcriptional activator genes. This is not confined to S. coelicolor-it is true for about half of all known antibiotic biosynthetic gene sets from streptomycetes. Combined microarray and proteomic analysis of liquid (and therefore non-sporulating) S. coelicolor bldA mutant cultures revealed effects of the mutation during rapid growth, during transition phase, and in stationary phase. Some of these effects may be secondary consequences of changes in the pattern of ppGpp accumulation. It is argued that the preferential accumulation of the bldA tRNA under conditions in which growth is significantly constrained has evolved

  4. Comparative genomics defines the core genome of the growing N4-like phage genus and identifies N4-like Roseophage specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Zoe-Munn Chan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Two bacteriophages, RPP1 and RLP1, infecting members of the marine Roseobacter clade were isolated from seawater. Their linear genomes are 74.7 and 74.6 kb and encode 91 and 92 coding DNA sequences, respectively. Around 30% of these are homologous to genes found in Enterobacter phage N4. Comparative genomics of these two new Roseobacter phages and twenty-three other sequenced N4-like phages (three infecting members of the Roseobacter lineage and twenty infecting other Gammaproteobacteria revealed that N4-like phages share a core genome of 14 genes responsible for control of gene expression, replication and virion proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes placed the five N4-like roseophages (RN4 into a distinct subclade. Analysis of the RN4 phage genomes revealed they share a further 19 genes of which nine are found exclusively in RN4 phages and four appear to have been acquired from their bacterial hosts. Proteomic analysis of the RPP1 and RLP1 virions identified a second structural module present in the RN4 phages similar to that found in the Pseudomonas N4-like phage LIT1. Searches of various metagenomic databases, included the GOS database, using CDS sequences from RPP1 suggests these phages are widely distributed in marine environments in particular in the open ocean environment.

  5. A novel system for simultaneous or sequential integration of multiple gene-loading vectors into a defined site of a human artificial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Human artificial chromosomes (HACs are gene-delivery vectors suitable for introducing large DNA fragments into mammalian cells. Although a HAC theoretically incorporates multiple gene expression cassettes of unlimited DNA size, its application has been limited because the conventional gene-loading system accepts only one gene-loading vector (GLV into a HAC. We report a novel method for the simultaneous or sequential integration of multiple GLVs into a HAC vector (designated as the SIM system via combined usage of Cre, FLP, Bxb1, and φC31 recombinase/integrase. As a proof of principle, we first attempted simultaneous integration of three GLVs encoding EGFP, Venus, and TdTomato into a gene-loading site of a HAC in CHO cells. These cells successfully expressed all three fluorescent proteins. Furthermore, microcell-mediated transfer of HACs enabled the expression of those fluorescent proteins in recipient cells. We next demonstrated that GLVs could be introduced into a HAC one-by-one via reciprocal usage of recombinase/integrase. Lastly, we introduced a fourth GLV into a HAC after simultaneous integration of three GLVs by FLP-mediated DNA recombination. The SIM system expands the applicability of HAC vectors and is useful for various biomedical studies, including cell reprogramming.

  6. A novel system for simultaneous or sequential integration of multiple gene-loading vectors into a defined site of a human artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Teruhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Hara, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) are gene-delivery vectors suitable for introducing large DNA fragments into mammalian cells. Although a HAC theoretically incorporates multiple gene expression cassettes of unlimited DNA size, its application has been limited because the conventional gene-loading system accepts only one gene-loading vector (GLV) into a HAC. We report a novel method for the simultaneous or sequential integration of multiple GLVs into a HAC vector (designated as the SIM system) via combined usage of Cre, FLP, Bxb1, and φC31 recombinase/integrase. As a proof of principle, we first attempted simultaneous integration of three GLVs encoding EGFP, Venus, and TdTomato into a gene-loading site of a HAC in CHO cells. These cells successfully expressed all three fluorescent proteins. Furthermore, microcell-mediated transfer of HACs enabled the expression of those fluorescent proteins in recipient cells. We next demonstrated that GLVs could be introduced into a HAC one-by-one via reciprocal usage of recombinase/integrase. Lastly, we introduced a fourth GLV into a HAC after simultaneous integration of three GLVs by FLP-mediated DNA recombination. The SIM system expands the applicability of HAC vectors and is useful for various biomedical studies, including cell reprogramming.

  7. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.

  8. Integrative analysis of gene expression patterns predicts specific modulations of defined cell functions by estrogen and tamoxifen in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadal, F; Starzec, A; Bozic, C; Pillot-Brochet, C; Malinge, S; Ozanne, V; Vicenzi, J; Buffat, L; Perret, G; Iris, F; Crepin, M

    2005-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms whereby estrogen and antiestrogen (tamoxifen (TAM)) can regulate breast cancer cell growth, we investigated gene expression changes in MCF7 cells treated with 17beta-estradiol (E2) and/or with 4-OH-TAM. The patterns of differential expression were determined by the ValiGen Gene IDentification (VGID) process, a subtractive hybridization approach combined with microarray validation screening. Their possible biologic consequences were evaluated by integrative data analysis. Over 1000 cDNA inserts were isolated and subsequently cloned, sequenced and analyzed against nucleotide and protein databases (NT/NR/EST) with BLAST software. We revealed that E2 induced differential expression of 279 known and 28 unknown sequences, whereas TAM affected the expression of 286 known and 14 unknown sequences. Integrative data analysis singled out a set of 32 differentially expressed genes apparently involved in broad cellular mechanisms. The presence of E2 modulated the expression patterns of 23 genes involved in anchors and junction remodeling; extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation; cell cycle progression, including G1/S check point and S-phase regulation; and synthesis of genotoxic metabolites. In tumor cells, these four mechanisms are associated with the acquisition of a motile and invasive phenotype. TAM partly reversed the E2-induced differential expression patterns and consequently restored most of the biologic functions deregulated by E2, except the mechanisms associated with cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we found that TAM affects the expression of nine additional genes associated with cytoskeletal remodeling, DNA repair, active estrogen receptor formation and growth factor synthesis, and mitogenic pathways. These modulatory effects of E2 and TAM upon the gene expression patterns identified here could explain some of the mechanisms associated with the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype by breast cancer cells, such as E2-independent

  9. A third phytoene synthase is devoted to abiotic stress-induced abscisic acid formation in rice and defines functional diversification of phytoene synthase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralf; Wüst, Florian; Bär, Cornelia; Al-Babili, Salim; Beyer, Peter

    2008-05-01

    We here report on the characterization of a novel third phytoene synthase gene (PSY) in rice (Oryza sativa), OsPSY3, and on the differences among all three PSY genes with respect to the tissue-specific expression and regulation upon various environmental stimuli. The two already known PSYs are under phytochrome control and involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in photosynthetically active tissues and exhibit different expression patterns during chloroplast development. In contrast, OsPSY3 transcript levels are not affected by light and show almost no tissue-specific differences. Rather, OsPSY3 transcripts are up-regulated during increased abscisic acid (ABA) formation upon salt treatment and drought, especially in roots. The simultaneous induction of genes encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases (NCEDs), involved in the initial steps of ABA biosynthesis, indicate that decreased xanthophyll levels are compensated by the induction of the third PSY gene. Furthermore, OsPSY3 and the OsNCEDs investigated were also induced by the application of ABA, indicating positive feedback regulation. The regulatory differences are mirrored by cis-acting elements in the corresponding promoter regions, with light-responsive elements for OsPSY1 and OsPSY2 and an ABA-response element as well as a coupling element for OsPSY3. The investigation of the gene structures and 5' untranslated regions revealed that OsPSY1 represents a descendant of an ancient PSY gene present in the common ancestor of monocots and dicots. Since the genomic structures of OsPSY2 and OsPSY3 are comparable, we conclude that they originated from the most recent common ancestor, OsPSY1.

  10. Turning off flagellum rotation requires the pleiotropic gene pleD: pleA, pleC, and pleD define two morphogenic pathways in Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three pleiotropic genes, pleA, pleC, and pleD, that are required for differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus. pleA and pleC mutants were isolated in an extensive screen for strains defective in both motility and adsorption of polar bacteriophage phi CbK; using temperature-sensitive alleles, we determined the time at which the two genes act. pleA was required for a short period at 0.7 of the swarmer cell cycle for flagellum biosynthesis, whereas pleC was requi...

  11. Single cell analysis of gene expression patterns of competence development and initiation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis grown on chemically defined media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veening, J. -W.; Smits, W. K.; Hamoen, L. W.; Kuipers, O. P.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Understanding the basis for the heterogeneous (or bistable) expression patterns of competence development and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Methods and Results: Using flow cytometric analyses of various promoter-GFP fusions, we have determined the single-cell gene expression patterns of com

  12. The human granzyme A (HFSP, CTLA3) gene maps to 5q11-q12 and defines a new locus of the serine protease superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P. (Institut fuer angewandte Tumorvirologie, Heidelberg (Germany)); Wekerle, H.; Zimmer, M.; Jenne, D.E. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Planegg-Martinsried (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    Human granzyme A (HFSP, Hanukah factor serine protease; CTLA3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated serine esterase-3), a homodimeric, trypsin-like serine protease of 60 kDa found in granules of cytolytic T cells and natural killer cells, is implicated in lymphocyte-mediated target cell lysis. It contributes to DNA fragmentation in perforin (PRF1)-lysed target cells through an unknown mechanism. The authors have isolated a cosmid clone for the functional gene of human granzyme A and established its complete exon-intron map of 10 kb. Using an 11-kb subfragment of the cloned genomic DNA as a probe, they have identified the chromosomal position of human granzyme A on 5q11-q12. Thus, the human granzyme A gene falls into a region of homology between human chromosome 5 and mouse chromosome 13, band D, where the mouse granzyme A gene has been located previously. The granzyme A gene is not linked to known members of the large superfamily of serine proteases. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Connolly, Morgan P; Choudhary, Pratibha; Brookins-Little, Tiffany S; Chatterjee, Snigdha; Raina, Ramesh; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000.

  14. Defining the Metabolic Functions and Roles in Virulence of the rpoN1 and rpoN2 Genes in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Lundgren

    Full Text Available The alternative sigma factor RpoN is a unique regulator found among bacteria. It controls numerous processes that range from basic metabolism to more complex functions such as motility and nitrogen fixation. Our current understanding of RpoN function is largely derived from studies on prototypical bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. Although the extent and necessity of RpoN-dependent functions differ radically between these model organisms, each bacterium depends on a single chromosomal rpoN gene to meet the cellular demands of RpoN regulation. The bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is often recognized for being the causative agent of wilt disease in crops, including banana, peanut and potato. However, this plant pathogen is also one of the few bacterial species whose genome possesses dual rpoN genes. To determine if the rpoN genes in this bacterium are genetically redundant and interchangeable, we constructed and characterized ΔrpoN1, ΔrpoN2 and ΔrpoN1 ΔrpoN2 mutants of R. solanacearum GMI1000. It was found that growth on a small range of metabolites, including dicarboxylates, ethanol, nitrate, ornithine, proline and xanthine, were dependent on only the rpoN1 gene. Furthermore, the rpoN1 gene was required for wilt disease on tomato whereas rpoN2 had no observable role in virulence or metabolism in R. solanacearum GMI1000. Interestingly, plasmid-based expression of rpoN2 did not fully rescue the metabolic deficiencies of the ΔrpoN1 mutants; full recovery was specific to rpoN1. In comparison, only rpoN2 was able to genetically complement a ΔrpoN E. coli mutant. These results demonstrate that the RpoN1 and RpoN2 proteins are not functionally equivalent or interchangeable in R. solanacearum GMI1000.

  15. Pollen-mediated gene flow in a highly fragmented landscape: consequences for defining a conservation strategy of the relict Laperrine's olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Guillaume; Baali-Cherif, Djamel; Bettinelli-Riccardi, Sandra; Parietti, Davis; Bouguedoura, Nadia

    2009-07-01

    In the present central Saharan conditions, the Laperrine's olive regeneration has never been observed and its populations are locally threatened. The production of plants originating from seeds was proposed as a multiplication strategy. In order to determine the impact of sexual reproduction, seeds issued from ten mothers (sampled from four locations in the Hoggar, Algeria) were genotyped using microsatellites. Compared to the initial population, a significant lost of allelic richness was revealed, indicating that our seed sampling was not representative of the local gene diversity. Paternity analyses allowed measurement of the effective pollen-mediated gene flow within patches. Preferential mating between some genotypes was revealed. A trend for a higher multipaternity on seeds collected on trees from relatively large patches was also observed. Lastly, seedlings issued from trees of small patches displayed low growth performance. The implications of our observations in the development of an efficient conservation strategy by seeds are discussed.

  16. Characterization of the mammalian YAP (Yes-associated protein) gene and its role in defining a novel protein module, the WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudol, M; Bork, P; Einbond, A; Kastury, K; Druck, T; Negrini, M; Huebner, K; Lehman, D

    1995-06-16

    We report cDNA cloning and characterization of the human and mouse orthologs of the chicken YAP (Yes-associated protein) gene which encodes a novel protein that binds to the SH3 (Src homology 3) domain of the Yes proto-oncogene product. Sequence comparison between mouse, human, and chicken YAP proteins showed an inserted sequence in the mouse YAP that represented an imperfect repeat of an upstream sequence. Further analysis of this sequence revealed a putative protein module that is found in various structural, regulatory, and signaling molecules in yeast, nematode, and mammals including human dystrophin. Because one of the prominent features of this sequence motif is two tryptophans (W), we named it the WW domain (Bork, P., and Sudol, M. (1994) Trends Biochem. Sci. 19, 531-533). Since its delineation, more proteins have been shown to contain this domain, and we report here on the widespread distribution of the WW module and present a discussion of its possible function. We have also shown that the human YAP gene is well conserved among higher eukaryotes, but it may not be conserved in yeast. Its expression at the RNA level in adult human tissues is nearly ubiquitous, being relatively high in placenta, prostate, ovary, and testis, but is not detectable in peripheral blood leukocytes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes and by analyzing rodent-human hybrids by Southern blot hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification, we mapped the human YAP gene to chromosome band 11q13, a region to which the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene has been mapped.

  17. Unique gene expression and MR T2 relaxometry patterns define chronic murine dextran sodium sulphate colitis as a model for connective tissue changes in human Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Breynaert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a chronic murine model resulting from repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS ingestion, to mimic the relapsing nature of the human disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DSS in drinking water for 1 week, followed by a recovery phase of 2 weeks. This cycle of exposure was repeated for up to 3 times (9 weeks in total. Colonic inflammation, fibrosis, extracellular matrix proteins and colonic gene expression were studied. In vivo MRI T 2 relaxometry was studied as a potential non-invasive imaging tool to evaluate bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Repeated cycles of DSS resulted in a relapsing and remitting disease course, which induced a chronic segmental, transmural colitis after 2 and 3 cycles of DSS with clear induction of fibrosis and remodeling of the muscular layer. Tenascin expression mirrored its expression in Crohn's colitis. Microarray data identified a gene expression profile different in chronic colitis from that in acute colitis. Additional recovery was associated with upregulation of unique genes, in particular keratins, pointing to activation of molecular pathways for healing and repair. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry of the colon showed a clear shift towards higher T2 values in the acute stage and a gradual regression of T2 values with increasing cycles of DSS. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated cycles of DSS exposure induce fibrosis and connective tissue changes with typical features, as occurring in Crohn's disease. Colonic gene expression analysis revealed unique expression profiles in chronic colitis compared to acute colitis and after additional recovery, pointing to potential new targets to intervene with the induction of fibrosis. In vivo T2 relaxometry is a promising non-invasive assessment of

  18. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Prasad, V. [Charite University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Severi, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Ambrosini, V. [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive {sup 68}Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV{sub max} measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ{sup 2} = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10{sup -6}). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV{sub max} (R {sup 2} = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV{sub max}. Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV{sub max} [ROC-derived AUC (R {sup 2} = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified

  19. Caveolin-1 (P132L), a common breast cancer mutation, confers mammary cell invasiveness and defines a novel stem cell/metastasis-associated gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casimiro, Mathew C; Sotgia, Federica; Wang, Chenguang; Liu, Manran; Katiyar, Sanjay; Zhou, Jie; Dew, Elliott; Capozza, Franco; Daumer, Kristin M; Minetti, Carlo; Milliman, Janet N; Alpy, Fabien; Rio, Marie-Christine; Tomasetto, Catherine; Mercier, Isabelle; Flomenberg, Neal; Frank, Philippe G; Pestell, Richard G; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Here we used the Met-1 cell line in an orthotopic transplantation model in FVB/N mice to dissect the role of the Cav-1(P132L) mutation in human breast cancer. Identical experiments were performed in parallel with wild-type Cav-1. Cav-1(P132L) up-regulated the expression of estrogen receptor-alpha as predicted, because only estrogen receptor-alpha-positive patients have been shown to harbor Cav-1(P132L) mutations. In the context of primary tumor formation, Cav-1(P132L) behaved as a loss-of-function mutation, lacking any tumor suppressor activity. In contrast, Cav-1(P132L) caused significant increases in cell migration, invasion, and experimental metastasis, consistent with a gain-of-function mutation. To identify possible molecular mechanism(s) underlying this invasive gain-of-function activity, we performed unbiased gene expression profiling. From this analysis, we show that the Cav-1(P132L) expression signature contains numerous genes that have been previously associated with cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. These include i) secreted growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins (Cyr61, Plf, Pthlh, Serpinb5, Tnc, and Wnt10a), ii) proteases that generate EGF and HGF (Adamts1 and St14), and iii) tyrosine kinase substrates and integrin signaling/adapter proteins (Akap13, Cdcp1, Ddef1, Eps15, Foxf1a, Gab2, Hs2st1, and Itgb4). Several of the P132L-specific genes are also highly expressed in stem/progenitor cells or are associated with myoepithelial cells, suggestive of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These results directly support clinical data showing that patients harboring Cav-1 mutations are more likely to undergo recurrence and metastasis.

  20. N-carbamylglutamate enhancement of ureagenesis leads to discovery of a novel deleterious mutation in a newly defined enhancer of the NAGS gene and to effective therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, Sandra K; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2011-10-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of glutamate and acetyl-CoA to NAG, the essential allosteric activator of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, the first urea cycle enzyme in mammals. A 17-year-old female with recurrent hyperammonemia attacks, the cause of which remained undiagnosed for 8 years in spite of multiple molecular and biochemical investigations, showed markedly enhanced ureagenesis (measured by isotope incorporation) in response to N-carbamylglutamate (NCG). This led to sequencing of the regulatory regions of the NAGS gene and identification of a deleterious single-base substitution in the upstream enhancer. The homozygous mutation (c.-3064C>A), affecting a highly conserved nucleotide within the hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism databases and in a screen of 1,086 alleles from a diverse population. Functional assays demonstrated that this mutation decreases transcription and binding of HNF-1 to the NAGS gene, while a consensus HNF-1 binding sequence enhances binding to HNF-1 and increases transcription. Oral daily NCG therapy restored ureagenesis in this patient, normalizing her biochemical markers, and allowing discontinuation of alternate pathway therapy and normalization of her diet with no recurrence of hyperammonemia. Inc.

  1. MHC II-β chain gene expression studies define the regional organization of the thymus in the developing bony fish Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchietti, S; Abelli, L; Guerra, L; Randelli, E; Proietti Serafini, F; Belardinelli, M C; Buonocore, F; Bernini, C; Fausto, A M; Scapigliati, G

    2015-02-01

    MHC II-β chain gene transcripts were quantified by real-time PCR and localised by in situ hybridization in the developing thymus of the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax, regarding the specialization of the thymic compartments. MHC II-β expression significantly rose when the first lymphoid colonization of the thymus occurred, thereafter increased further when the organ progressively developed cortex and medulla regions. The evolving patterns of MHC II-β expression provided anatomical insights into some mechanisms of thymocyte selection. Among the stromal cells transcribing MHC II-β, scattered cortical epithelial cells appeared likely involved in the positive selection, while those abundant in the cortico-medullary border and medulla in the negative selection. These latter most represent dendritic cells, based on typical localization and phenotype. These findings provide further proofs that efficient mechanisms leading to maturation of naïve T cells are operative in teleosts, strongly reminiscent of the models conserved in more evolved gnathostomes.

  2. How to consistently link extraversion and intelligence to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene: on defining and measuring psychological phenotypes in neurogenetic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Jan; Mueller, Erik M; Hennig, Jürgen; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    The evidence for associations between genetic polymorphisms and complex behavioral/psychological phenotypes (traits) has thus far been weak and inconsistent. Using the well-studied Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene as an example, we demonstrate that using theoretical models to guide phenotype definition and measuring the phenotypes of interest with a high degree of specificity reveals strong gene-behavior associations that are consistent with prior work and that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. Only after statistically controlling for irrelevant portions of phenotype variance did we observe strong (Cohen's d = 0.33-0.70) and significant associations between COMT Val158Met and both cognitive and affective traits in a healthy male sample (N = 201) in Study 1: Carriers of the Met allele scored higher in fluid intelligence (reasoning) but lower in both crystallized intelligence (general knowledge) and the agency facet of extraversion. In Study 2, we conceptually replicated the association of COMT Val158Met with the agency facet of extraversion after partialing irrelevant phenotype variance in a female sample (N = 565). Finally, through reanalysis of a large published data set we showed that Met allele carriers also scored higher in indicators of fluid intelligence after partialing verbal fluency. Because the Met allele codes for a less efficient variant of the enzyme COMT, resulting in higher levels of extrasynaptic prefrontal dopamine, these observations provide further support for a role for dopamine in both intelligence and extraversion. More importantly, the present findings have important implications for the definition of psychological phenotypes in neurogenetic research.

  3. Exon Array Analysis using re-defined probe sets results in reliable identification of alternatively spliced genes in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gröne Jörn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with novel targeted therapies is a major unmet clinical need. Alternative splicing is a mechanism which generates diverse protein products and is of functional relevance in cancer. Results In this study, a genome-wide analysis of the alteration of splicing patterns between lung cancer and normal lung tissue was performed. We generated an exon array data set derived from matched pairs of lung cancer and normal lung tissue including both the adenocarcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma subtypes. An enhanced workflow was developed to reliably detect differential splicing in an exon array data set. In total, 330 genes were found to be differentially spliced in non-small cell lung cancer compared to normal lung tissue. Microarray findings were validated with independent laboratory methods for CLSTN1, FN1, KIAA1217, MYO18A, NCOR2, NUMB, SLK, SYNE2, TPM1, (in total, 10 events and ADD3, which was analysed in depth. We achieved a high validation rate of 69%. Evidence was found that the activity of FOX2, the splicing factor shown to cause cancer-specific splicing patterns in breast and ovarian cancer, is not altered at the transcript level in several cancer types including lung cancer. Conclusions This study demonstrates how alternatively spliced genes can reliably be identified in a cancer data set. Our findings underline that key processes of cancer progression in NSCLC are affected by alternative splicing, which can be exploited in the search for novel targeted therapies.

  4. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans let-23 EGFR-like gene define elements important for cell-type specificity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, R V; Lesa, G M; Sternberg, P W

    1994-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans let-23 gene is a genetically characterized member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase family. Mutations in let-23 can produce five phenotypes in the nematode. Alleles of let-23 include null alleles, reduction-of-function alleles and alleles that disrupt function in some cell types and not others. We have sequenced some of these mutations to identify sequences and regions important for overall let-23 function and for let-23 function in specific cell types. Our data indicate that in vivo, the receptor's C-terminus can be partitioned into at least three domains that each contribute to receptor function in different cell types. In particular, we find distinct domains that mediate hermaphrodite fertility and vulval induction. Our data also demonstrate for the first time that a single, conserved residue in the ligand binding domain is critical for function in vivo and that mutations in the extracellular cysteines characteristic of the EGFR family can lead to a partial or a complete reduction of receptor function. Images PMID:8313880

  5. A sister of PIN1 gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) defines leaf and flower organ initiation patterns by maintaining epidermal auxin flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ciera C; Koenig, Daniel; Chitwood, Daniel H; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-11-01

    The spatiotemporal localization of the plant hormone auxin acts as a positional cue during early leaf and flower organogenesis. One of the main contributors to auxin localization is the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1). Phylogenetic analysis has revealed that PIN1 genes are split into two sister clades; PIN1 and the relatively uncharacterized Sister-Of-PIN1 (SoPIN1). In this paper we identify entire-2 as a loss-of-function SlSoPIN1a (Solyc10g078370) mutant in Solanum lycopersicum. The entire-2 plants are unable to specify proper leaf initiation leading to a frequent switch from the wild type spiral phyllotactic pattern to distichous and decussate patterns. Leaves in entire-2 are large and less complex and the leaflets display spatial deformities in lamina expansion, vascular development, and margin specification. During sympodial growth in entire-2 the specification of organ position and identity is greatly affected resulting in variable branching patterns on the main sympodial and inflorescence axes. To understand how SlSoPIN1a functions in establishing proper auxin maxima we used the auxin signaling reporter DR5: Venus to visualize differences in auxin localization between entire-2 and wild type. DR5: Venus visualization shows a widening of auxin localization which spreads to subepidermal tissue layers during early leaf and flower organogenesis, showing that SoPIN1 functions to focus auxin signaling to the epidermal layer. The striking spatial deformities observed in entire-2 help provide a mechanistic framework for explaining the function of the SoPIN1 clade in S.lycopersicum. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  7. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  8. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  9. Non-raft adenylyl cyclase 2 defines a cAMP signaling compartment that selectively regulates IL-6 expression in airway smooth muscle cells: differential regulation of gene expression by AC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Birg, Anna V; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2014-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms differ in their tissue distribution, cellular localization, regulation, and protein interactions. Most cell types express multiple AC isoforms. We hypothesized that cAMP produced by different AC isoforms regulates unique cellular responses in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Overexpression of AC2, AC3, or AC6 had distinct effects on forskolin (Fsk)-induced expression of a number of known cAMP-responsive genes. These data show that different AC isoforms can differentially regulate gene expression. Most notable, overexpression and activation of AC2 enhanced interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression, but overexpression of AC3 or AC6 had no effect. IL-6 production by BSMC was induced by Fsk and select G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, though IL-6 levels did not directly correlate with global cAMP levels. Treatment with PKA selective 6-Bnz-cAMP or Epac selective 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP cAMP analogs revealed a predominant role for PKA in cAMP-mediated induction of IL-6. IL-6 promoter mutations demonstrated that AP-1 and CRE transcription sites were required for Fsk to stimulate IL-6 expression. Our present study defines an AC2 cAMP signaling compartment that specifically regulates IL-6 expression in BSMC via Epac and PKA and demonstrates that other AC isoforms are excluded from this pool.

  10. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  11. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  12. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops t....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it........ The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  13. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  14. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  15. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  16. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  17. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  18. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...

  19. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  20. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  1. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  2. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  3. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  4. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  6. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  7. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  8. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  9. Decidability of definability

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Manuel Bodirsky; Michael Pinsker; Todor

    2010-01-01

    For a fixed infinite structure $\\Gamma$ with finite signature $\\tau$, we study the following computational problem: Input are quantifier-free first-order $\\tau$-formulas $\\phi_0,\\phi_1,\\dots,\\phi_n$ that define relations $R_0,R_1,\\dots,R_n$ over $\\Gamma$. The question is whether the relation $R_0$ is primitive positive definable from $R_1,\\ldots,R_n$, i.e., definable by a first-order formula that uses only relation symbols for $R_1, \\dots, R_n$, equality, conjunctions, and existential quantification (disjunction, negation, and universal quantification are forbidden). We show decidability of this problem for all structures $\\Gamma$ that have a first-order definition in an ordered homogeneous structure $\\Delta$ with a finite language whose age is a Ramsey class and determined by finitely many forbidden substructures. Examples for structures $\\Gamma$ with this property are the order of the rationals, the random graph, the homogeneous universal poset, the random tournament, all homogeneous universal $C$-relations...

  10. Defining Z in Q

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsmann, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We show that ${\\mathbb Z}$ is definable in ${\\mathbb Q}$ by a universal first-order formula in the language of rings. We also present an $\\forall\\exists$-formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$ with just one universal quantifier. We exhibit new diophantine subsets of ${\\mathbb Q}$ like the set of non-squares or the complement of the image of the norm map under a quadratic extension. Finally, we show that there is no existential formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$, provided one assumes a strong variant of the Bombieri-Lang Conjecture for varieties over ${\\mathbb Q}$ with many ${\\mathbb Q}$-rational points.

  11. Software-Defined Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂华; 杨晓君; 刘淘英

    2015-01-01

    The cluster architecture has played an important role in high-end computing for the past 20 years. With the advent of Internet services, big data, and cloud computing, traditional clusters face three challenges: 1) providing flexible system balance among computing, memory, and I/O capabilities;2) reducing resource pooling overheads;and 3) addressing low performance-power efficiency. This position paper proposes a software-defined cluster (SDC) architecture to deal with these challenges. The SDC architecture inherits two features of traditional cluster: its architecture is multicomputer and it has loosely-coupled interconnect. SDC provides two new mechanisms: global I/O space (GIO) and hardware-supported native access (HNA) to remote devices. Application software can define a virtual cluster best suited to its needs from resources pools provided by a physical cluster, and traditional cluster ecosystems need no modification. We also discuss a prototype design and implementation of a 32-processor cloud server utilizing the SDC architecture.

  12. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  13. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  14. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  15. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  16. Criteria to define HLA haplotype loss in human solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramal, LM; van der Zwan, AW; Collado, A; Lopez-Nevot, MA; Tilanus, M; Garrido, F

    2000-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers are currently used to define loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genes and chromosomes in tumors. Chromosome 6 and chromosome 15 STR markers are applied to define loss of HLA and related genes (e.g. TAP and beta(2)m) The number of STR identified in the HLA region is sti

  17. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  18. Defining orthologs and pangenome size metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Emanuele; Fani, Renato; Fondi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of ultra-massive sequencing techniques, the consequent drop-off in both price and time required made feasible the sequencing of increasingly more genomes from microbes belonging to the same taxonomic unit. Eventually, this led to the concept of pangenome, that is, the entire set of genes present in a group of representatives of the same genus/species, which, in turn, can be divided into core genome, defined as the set of those genes present in all the genomes under study, and a dispensable genome, the set of genes possessed only by one or a subset of organism. When analyzing a pangenome, an interesting point is to measure its size, thus estimating the gene repertoire of a given taxonomic group. This is usually performed counting the novel genes added to the overall pangenome when new genomes are sequenced and annotated. A pangenome can be also classified as open or close: in an open pangenome its size increases indefinitely when adding new genomes; thus sequencing additional strains will likely yield novel genes. Conversely, in a close pangenome, adding new genomes will not lead to the discovery of new coding capabilities. A central point in pangenomics is the definition of homology relationships between genes belonging to different genomes. This may turn into the search of those genes with similar sequences between different organisms (and including both paralogous and orthologous genes). In this chapter, methods for finding groups of orthologs between genomes and for estimating the pangenome size are discussed. Also, working codes to address these tasks are provided.

  19. Unique Gene Expression and MR T2 Relaxometry Patterns Define Chronic Murine Dextran Sodium Sulphate Colitis as a Model for Connective Tissue Changes in Human Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breynaert, Christine; Dresselaers, Tom; Perrier, Clémentine; Arijs, Ingrid; Cremer, Jonathan; Van Lommel, Leentje; Van Steen, Kristel; Ferrante, Marc; Schuit, Frans; Vermeire, Séverine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Himmelreich, Uwe; Ceuppens, Jan L.; Geboes, Karel; Van Assche, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a chronic murine model resulting from repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) ingestion, to mimic the relapsing nature of the human disease. Materials and Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DSS in drinking water for 1 week, followed by a recovery phase of 2 weeks. This cycle of exposure was repeated for up to 3 times (9 weeks in total). Colonic inflammation, fibrosis, extracellular matrix proteins and colonic gene expression were studied. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry was studied as a potential non-invasive imaging tool to evaluate bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis. Results Repeated cycles of DSS resulted in a relapsing and remitting disease course, which induced a chronic segmental, transmural colitis after 2 and 3 cycles of DSS with clear induction of fibrosis and remodeling of the muscular layer. Tenascin expression mirrored its expression in Crohn’s colitis. Microarray data identified a gene expression profile different in chronic colitis from that in acute colitis. Additional recovery was associated with upregulation of unique genes, in particular keratins, pointing to activation of molecular pathways for healing and repair. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry of the colon showed a clear shift towards higher T2 values in the acute stage and a gradual regression of T2 values with increasing cycles of DSS. Conclusions Repeated cycles of DSS exposure induce fibrosis and connective tissue changes with typical features, as occurring in Crohn’s disease. Colonic gene expression analysis revealed unique expression profiles in chronic colitis compared to acute colitis and after additional recovery, pointing to potential new targets to intervene with the induction of fibrosis. In vivo T2 relaxometry is a promising non-invasive assessment of inflammation and fibrosis

  20. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam;

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...... in large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...

  1. A Novel Mathematical Approach to Define the Genes/SNPs Conferring Risk or Protection in Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Based on Auto Contractive Map Neural Networks and Graph Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Buscema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS implicate phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Therefore, multiple genetic traits may show differential association with the disease. The Auto Contractive Map (AutoCM, belonging to the Artificial Neural Network (ANN architecture, “spatializes” the correlation among variables by constructing a suitable embedding space where a visually transparent and cognitively natural notion such as “closeness” among variables reflects accurately their associations. Results. In this pilot case-control study single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in several genes has been evaluated with a novel data mining approach based on an AutoCM. We have divided the ALS dataset into two dataset: Cases and Control dataset; we have applied to each one, independently, the AutoCM algorithm. Six genetic variants were identified which differently contributed to the complexity of the system: three of the above genes/SNPs represent protective factors, APOA4, NOS3, and LPL, since their contribution to the whole complexity resulted to be as high as 0.17. On the other hand ADRB3, LIPC, and MMP3, whose hub relevancies contribution resulted to be as high as 0.13, seem to represent susceptibility factors. Conclusion. The biological information available on these six polymorphisms is consistent with possible pathogenetic pathways related to ALS.

  2. Theoretical approaches to elections defining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Lebedeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical approaches to elections defining develop the nature, essence and content of elections, help to determine their place and a role as one of the major national law institutions in democratic system.

  3. Defining Modules, Modularity and Modularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Thomas Dedenroth; Pedersen, Per Erik Elgård

    The paper describes the evolution of the concept of modularity in a historical perspective. The main reasons for modularity are: create variety, utilize similarities, and reduce complexity. The paper defines the terms: Module, modularity, and modularization.......The paper describes the evolution of the concept of modularity in a historical perspective. The main reasons for modularity are: create variety, utilize similarities, and reduce complexity. The paper defines the terms: Module, modularity, and modularization....

  4. CD133/CD15 defines distinct cell subpopulations with differential in vitro clonogenic activity and stem cell-related gene expression profile in in vitro propagated glioblastoma multiforme-derived cell line with a PNET-like component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Ulf D; Bender, Noemi O; Maciaczyk, Donata; Bogiel, Tomasz; Bar, Eli E; Eberhart, Charles G; Nikkhah, Guido; Maciaczyk, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), as many other solid tumours, contains a subpopulation of cells termed cancer stem-like cells responsible for the initiation and propagation of tumour growth. However, a unique immunophenotype/surface antigen composition for the clear identification of brain tumour stem cells (BTSC) has not yet been found. Here we report a novel code of cell surface markers for the identification of different cell subpopulations in neurospheres derived from a GBM with a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET)-like component (GBM-PNET). These subgroups differ in their CD133/CD15 expression pattern and resemble cells with different stem-like genotype and developmental pathway activation levels. Strikingly, clonogenic analysis of cultures differentially expressing the investigated markers enabled the identification of distinct subpopulations of cells endowed with stem cell characteristics. High clonogenicity could be found in CD133(-)/CD15(-) and CD133(+)/CD15(+) but not in CD133(-)/CD15(+) cells. Moreover, cell subpopulations with pronounced clonogenic growth were characterized by high expression of stem cell-related genes. Interestingly, these observations were unique for GBM-PNET and differed from ordinary GBM cultures derived from tumours lacking a PNET component. This work elucidates the complex molecular heterogeneity of in vitro propagated glioblastoma-derived cells and potentially contributes to the development of novel diagnostic modalities aiming at the identification of the brain tumour stem-like cell population in a subgroup of GBMs.

  5. Defining the states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, P; Muzet, A

    2001-03-01

    Consciousness remains an elusive concept due to the difficulty to define what has been regarded for many years as a subjective experience, therefore irrelevant for scientific study. Recent development in this field of research has allowed to provide some new insight to a possible way to define consciousness. Going through the extensive literature in this domain, several perspectives are proposed to define this concept. (1) Consciousness and Attention may not reflect the same process. (2) Consciousness during wake and sleep may not involve the same mechanisms. (3) Besides physiological states of consciousness, human beings can experience modified states of consciousness either by self-training (transcendental meditation, hypnosis, etc.) or by drug intake (hallucinogens, anaesthetics, etc.). Altogether, we address the question of a more precise terminology, given the theoretical weight words can convey. To this respect, we propose different definitions for concepts like consciousness, vigilance, arousal and alertness as candidates to separate functional entities.

  6. Modular Software-Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiemeier Arnd-Ragnar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the technical and commercial boundary conditions for software-defined radio (SDR, it is suggestive to reconsider the concept anew from an unconventional point of view. The organizational principles of signal processing (rather than the signal processing algorithms themselves are the main focus of this work on modular software-defined radio. Modularity and flexibility are just two key characteristics of the SDR environment which extend smoothly into the modeling of hardware and software. In particular, the proposed model of signal processing software includes irregular, connected, directed, acyclic graphs with random node weights and random edges. Several approaches for mapping such software to a given hardware are discussed. Taking into account previous findings as well as new results from system simulations presented here, the paper finally concludes with the utility of pipelining as a general design guideline for modular software-defined radio.

  7. Defining the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Benghozi, Pierre-Jean; Bureau, Sylvain; Massit-Folléa, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    How can a definition be given to what does not yet exist ? The Internet of Things, as it is conceptualized by researchers or imagined by science-fiction writers such as Bruce Sterling, is not yet reality and if we try to define it accurately we risk rash predictions. In order to better comprehend this notion, let us first define the main principles of the IoT as given in research papers and reports on the subject. Definitions gradually established Almost all agree that the Internet of Things...

  8. Defining the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Benghozi, Pierre-Jean; Bureau, Sylvain; Massit-Folléa, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    How can a definition be given to what does not yet exist ? The Internet of Things, as it is conceptualized by researchers or imagined by science-fiction writers such as Bruce Sterling, is not yet reality and if we try to define it accurately we risk rash predictions. In order to better comprehend this notion, let us first define the main principles of the IoT as given in research papers and reports on the subject. Definitions gradually established Almost all agree that the Internet of Things...

  9. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    Juni, E; Heym, G A

    1986-01-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  10. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Programme

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial you are going to learn how to define the programme of a conference in Indico. The program of your conference is divided in different “tracks”. Tracks represent the subject matter of the conference, such as “Online Computing”, “Offline Computing”, and so on.

  11. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    on the intrinsic relation between definition and measurement. In the area of usability, this relation has been developed over several years. It is described how usability is defined and measured in contemporary approaches. Based on that, it is discussed to what extent we can employ experience from the conceptual...

  12. Defining sphincter of oddi dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P

    1996-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi (SO) dysmotility may give rise to pain. The golden standard for the demonstration of SO dysfunction is endoscopic manometry. A number of abnormalities are observed in patients with postcholecystectomy pain and in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. Criteria for defi...... for defining SO dysfunction and the possible mechanisms for the precipitation of pain are discussed....

  13. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, E; Heym, G A

    1986-10-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  14. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  15. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage buffe...

  16. Defining and Differentiating the Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousay, Tonia A.

    2017-01-01

    Many resources now punctuate the maker movement landscape. However, some schools and communities still struggle to understand this burgeoning movement. How do we define these spaces and differentiate them from previous labs and shops? Through a multidimensional framework, stakeholders should consider how the structure, access, staffing, and tools…

  17. Software defined radio architectures evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Palomo, Alvaro; Villing, Rudi; Farrell, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an performance evaluation of GNU Radio and OSSIE, two open source Software Defined Radio (SDR) architectures. The two architectures were compared by running implementations of a BPSK waveform utilising a software loopback channel on each. The upper bound full duplex throughput was found to be around 700kbps in both cases, though OSSIE was slightly faster than GNU Radio. CPU and memory loads did not differ significantly.

  18. AIDS defining disease: Disseminated cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Anupama

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated cryptococcosis is one of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining criteria and the most common cause of life threatening meningitis. Disseminated lesions in the skin manifest as papules or nodules that mimic molluscum contagiosum (MC. We report here a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient who presented with MC like lesions. Disseminated cryptococcosis was confirmed by India ink preparation and histopathology. The condition of the patient improved with amphotercin B.

  19. How to define green adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out.

  20. UNIQLO, Define Your Own Fashion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2009-01-01

    @@ Yes,women like and enjoy shopping.Always,they want to buy some well-designed clothes with the most 'in'factors; and what's of the great importance,they would like to hear the words:"wow! You fit the wear well!"However,the most satisfied right things could not be always waiting for you there or you would not help complaining the so-fast changing trends day by day.At that time,why not to seek some delights from the basic classic collections?UNIQLO maybe is a choice for you to define your own fashion.

  1. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    User experience is being used to denote what a user goes through while using a computerized system. The concept has gained momentum as a means to distinguish new types of applications such as games and entertainment software from more traditional work-related applications. This paper focuses...... on the intrinsic relation between definition and measurement. In the area of usability, this relation has been developed over several years. It is described how usability is defined and measured in contemporary approaches. Based on that, it is discussed to what extent we can employ experience from the conceptual...... definition of usability to develop the notion of user experience....

  2. Defining Life: The Virus Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism—the virus—producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  3. Defining life: the virus viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism-the virus-producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  4. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular

  5. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular char

  6. Defining Life: Synthesis and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. §1 defends that the recognition of “life” has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. §2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. §3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about “life”. The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (§4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. §5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers to two conditions

  7. Defining life: synthesis and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. Section 1 defends that the recognition of "life" has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. Section 2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. Section 3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about "life". The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (Section 4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. Section 5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers

  8. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  9. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm....... The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals...

  10. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage...... buffering, scheduling, and processing over the network. On the other hand, NC has shown great potential for increasing robustness and performance when deployed on intermediate nodes in the network. This new paradigm changes the dynamics of network protocols, requiring new designs that exploit its potential....... This paper advocates for the use of SDN to bring about future Internet and 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides a fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, that may also...

  11. Defining biocultural approaches to conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Michael C; McCarter, Joe; Mead, Aroha; Berkes, Fikret; Stepp, John Richard; Peterson, Debora; Tang, Ruifei

    2015-03-01

    We contend that biocultural approaches to conservation can achieve effective and just conservation outcomes while addressing erosion of both cultural and biological diversity. Here, we propose a set of guidelines for the adoption of biocultural approaches to conservation. First, we draw lessons from work on biocultural diversity and heritage, social-ecological systems theory, integrated conservation and development, co-management, and community-based conservation to define biocultural approaches to conservation. Second, we describe eight principles that characterize such approaches. Third, we discuss reasons for adopting biocultural approaches and challenges. If used well, biocultural approaches to conservation can be a powerful tool for reducing the global loss of both biological and cultural diversity.

  12. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  13. Asymptomatic Alzheimer disease: Defining resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Timothy J; McLaren, Donald G; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Gifford, Katherine A; Libon, David J; Jefferson, Angela L

    2016-12-06

    To define robust resilience metrics by leveraging CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology within a latent variable framework and to demonstrate the ability of such metrics to predict slower rates of cognitive decline and protection against diagnostic conversion. Participants with normal cognition (n = 297) and mild cognitive impairment (n = 432) were drawn from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Resilience metrics were defined at baseline by examining the residuals when regressing brain aging outcomes (hippocampal volume and cognition) on CSF biomarkers. A positive residual reflected better outcomes than expected for a given level of pathology (high resilience). Residuals were integrated into a latent variable model of resilience and validated by testing their ability to independently predict diagnostic conversion, cognitive decline, and the rate of ventricular dilation. Latent variables of resilience predicted a decreased risk of conversion (hazard ratio 0.02, p < 0.001), and slower rates of ventricular dilation (β < -4.7, p < 2 × 10(-15)). These results were significant even when analyses were restricted to clinically normal individuals. Furthermore, resilience metrics interacted with biomarker status such that biomarker-positive individuals with low resilience showed the greatest risk of subsequent decline. Robust phenotypes of resilience calculated by leveraging AD biomarkers and baseline brain aging outcomes provide insight into which individuals are at greatest risk of short-term decline. Such comprehensive definitions of resilience are needed to further our understanding of the mechanisms that protect individuals from the clinical manifestation of AD dementia, especially among biomarker-positive individuals. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated proposes the Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) program to facilitate the development of a Software Defined Radio...

  15. Defining Tobacco Regulatory Science Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Heather L; Berman, Micah; Hanson, Kacey; Kelder, Steven; Solis, Amy; Villanti, Andrea C; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Meissner, Helen I; Anderson, Roger

    2017-02-01

    In 2013, the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration funded a network of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) with a mission that included research and training. A cross-TCORS Panel was established to define tobacco regulatory science (TRS) competencies to help harmonize and guide their emerging educational programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Panel's work to develop core TRS domains and competencies. The Panel developed the list of domains and competencies using a semistructured Delphi method divided into four phases occurring between November 2013 and August 2015. The final proposed list included a total of 51 competencies across six core domains and 28 competencies across five specialized domains. There is a need for continued discussion to establish the utility of the proposed set of competencies for emerging TRS curricula and to identify the best strategies for incorporating these competencies into TRS training programs. Given the field's broad multidisciplinary nature, further experience is needed to refine the core domains that should be covered in TRS training programs versus knowledge obtained in more specialized programs. Regulatory science to inform the regulation of tobacco products is an emerging field. The paper provides an initial list of core and specialized domains and competencies to be used in developing curricula for new and emerging training programs aimed at preparing a new cohort of scientists to conduct critical TRS research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Defining the molecular genetic basis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T M; Keating, M T

    1997-02-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a significant health care problem. The etiology is idiopathic in approximately half of the patients. Recognition that 20%-25% of idiopathic DCM cases are familial has advanced the hypothesis that single gene defects are important in the disease's pathogenesis. General linkage analyses in rare, large DCM families have determined the chromosome location of five idiopathic DCM genes. Candidate-gene mutational analyses in more typical, small pedigrees represent an alternative strategy for DCM gene identification. Human molecular genetics will play a fundamental role in defining pathogenic mechanisms for DCM with the prospect of new, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:60-63). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. On defining semantics of extended attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1980-01-01

    Knuth has introduced attribute grammars (AGs) as a tool to define the semanitcs of context-free languages. The use of AGs in connection with programming language definitions has mostly been to define the context-sensitive syntax of the language and to define a translation in code for a hypothetical...

  18. Defining moments in leadership character development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Critical moments in life define one's character and clarify true values. Reflective leadership is espoused as an important practice for transformational leaders. Professional development educators can help surface and explore defining moments, strengthen leadership behavior with defining moments as a catalyst for change, and create safe spaces for leaders to expand their leadership capacity.

  19. The LOLITA User-Definable Template Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Košmelj, Katarina

    2001-01-01

    The development of user-definable templates interfaces which allow the user to design new templates definitions in a user-friendly way is a new issue in the field of information extraction. The LOLITA user-definable templates interface allows the user to define new templates using sentences in natural language text with a few restrictions and formal elements. This approach is rather different from previous approaches to information extraction which require developers to code the template defi...

  20. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated (CLX) proposes the development of a Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) that leverages the inherent advantages of an...

  1. Externally definable sets and dependent pairs II

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem

    2012-01-01

    We continue investigating the structure of externally definable sets in NIP theories and preservation of NIP after expanding by new predicates. Most importantly: types over finite sets are uniformly definable; over a model, a family of non-forking instances of a formula (with parameters ranging over a type-definable set) can be covered with finitely many invariant types; we give some criteria for the boundedness of an expansion by a new predicate in a distal theory; naming an arbitrary small indiscernible sequence preserves NIP, while naming a large one doesn't; there are models of NIP theories over which all 1-types are definable, but not all n-types.

  2. A definability theorem for first order logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butz, C.; Moerdijk, I.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will present a definability theorem for first order logic This theorem is very easy to state and its proof only uses elementary tools To explain the theorem let us first observe that if M is a model of a theory T in a language L then clearly any definable subset S M ie a subset S

  3. Defining Dynamic Graphics by a Graphical Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛其昌; 戴汝为

    1991-01-01

    A graphical language which can be used for defining dynamic picture and applying control actions to it is defined with an expanded attributed grammar.Based on this a system is built for developing the presentation of application data of user interface.This system provides user interface designers with a friendly and high efficient programming environment.

  4. 7 CFR 29.12 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 29.12 Section 29.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.12 Terms defined. As used in this subpart and in all...

  5. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  6. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  7. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W., E-mail: hans.w.schumacher@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  8. Defining the recognition elements of Lewis Y-reactive antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somdutta Saha

    Full Text Available Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2 response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1-4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens.

  9. Defining the Recognition Elements of Lewis Y-Reactive Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Siegel, Eric R.; Murali, Ramachandran; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ) B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY) to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1–4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens. PMID:25117628

  10. Defining the recognition elements of Lewis Y-reactive antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Siegel, Eric R; Murali, Ramachandran; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ) B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY) to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1-4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens.

  11. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Automation Inc, (IAI) is currently developing a software defined radio (SDR) platform that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation for...

  12. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI is actively developing Software Defined Radio platforms that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation by modifying both transmit waveforms and...

  13. Convolutional Goppa codes defined on fibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Curto, J I Iglesias; Martín, F J Plaza; Sotelo, G Serrano

    2010-01-01

    We define a new class of Convolutional Codes in terms of fibrations of algebraic varieties generalizaing our previous constructions of Convolutional Goppa Codes. Using this general construction we can give several examples of Maximum Distance Separable (MDS) Convolutional Codes.

  14. Radiation Tolerant Software Defined Video Processor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MaXentric's is proposing a radiation tolerant Software Define Video Processor, codenamed SDVP, for the problem of advanced motion imaging in the space environment....

  15. Towards a Southern African English Defining Vocabulary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In my experience, defining vocabularies compiled for English dictionaries for a British or .... Oxford 3000, which contains 3 540 entries, and is available on the Internet. ... One thing that became apparent was a lack of consistency within lexical.

  16. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this research is to propose a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-band, multi-mode, miniaturized frequency-agile EVA software defined radio...

  17. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of Phase 2 is to build a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-mode, miniaturized EVA Software Defined Radio (SDR) that supports data telemetry,...

  18. Optimum Criteria for Developing Defined Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic aspects concerning distributed applications are presented: definition, particularities and importance. For distributed applications linear, arborescent, graph structures are defined with different versions and aggregation methods. Distributed applications have associated structures which through their characteristics influence the costs of the stages in the development cycle and the exploitation costs transferred to each user. The complexity of the defined structures is analyzed. The minimum and maximum criteria are enumerated for optimizing distributed application structures.

  19. Selective constraints in experimentally defined primate regulatory regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene regulation may be important in evolution. However, the evolutionary properties of regulatory mutations are currently poorly understood. This is partly the result of an incomplete annotation of functional regulatory DNA in many species. For example, transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, a major component of eukaryotic regulatory architecture, are typically short, degenerate, and therefore difficult to differentiate from randomly occurring, nonfunctional sequences. Furthermore, although sites such as TFBSs can be computationally predicted using evolutionary conservation as a criterion, estimates of the true level of selective constraint (defined as the fraction of strongly deleterious mutations occurring at a locus in regulatory regions will, by definition, be upwardly biased in datasets that are a priori evolutionarily conserved. Here we investigate the fitness effects of regulatory mutations using two complementary datasets of human TFBSs that are likely to be relatively free of ascertainment bias with respect to evolutionary conservation but, importantly, are supported by experimental data. The first is a collection of almost >2,100 human TFBSs drawn from the literature in the TRANSFAC database, and the second is derived from several recent high-throughput chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with genomic microarray (ChIP-chip analyses. We also define a set of putative cis-regulatory modules (pCRMs by spatially clustering multiple TFBSs that regulate the same gene. We find that a relatively high proportion ( approximately 37% of mutations at TFBSs are strongly deleterious, similar to that at a 2-fold degenerate protein-coding site. However, constraint is significantly reduced in human and chimpanzee pCRMS and ChIP-chip sequences, relative to macaques. We estimate that the fraction of regulatory mutations that have been driven to fixation by positive selection in humans is not significantly different from zero. We also find

  20. Defining the genetic architecture of human developmental language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Bartlett, Christopher W

    2012-04-09

    Language is a uniquely human trait, which poses limitations on animal models for discovering biological substrates and pathways. Despite this challenge, rapidly developing biotechnology in the field of genomics has made human genetics studies a viable alternative route for defining the molecular neuroscience of human language. This is accomplished by studying families that transmit both normal and disordered language across generations. The language disorder reviewed here is specific language impairment (SLI), a developmental deficiency in language acquisition despite adequate opportunity, normal intelligence, and without any apparent neurological etiology. Here, we describe disease gene discovery paradigms as applied to SLI families and review the progress this field has made. After review the evidence that genetic factors influence SLI, we discuss methods and findings from scans of the human chromosomes, including the main replicated regions on chromosomes 13, 16 and 19 and two identified genes, ATP2C2 and CMIP that appear to account for the language variation on chromosome 16. Additional work has been done on candidate genes, i.e., genes chosen a priori and not through a genome scanning studies, including several studies of CNTNAP2 and some recent work implicating BDNF as a gene x gene interaction partner of genetic variation on chromosome 13 that influences language. These recent developments may allow for better use of post-mortem human brain samples functional studies and animal models for circumscribed language subcomponents. In the future, the identification of genetic variation associated with language phenotypes will provide the molecular pathways to understanding human language. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Software-Defined Cellular Mobile Network Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong Li; Peng Liu; Hongyan Li

    2014-01-01

    The emergency relating to software-defined networking (SDN), especially in terms of the prototype associated with OpenFlow, pro-vides new possibilities for innovating on network design. Researchers have started to extend SDN to cellular networks. Such new programmable architecture is beneficial to the evolution of mobile networks and allows operators to provide better services. The typical cellular network comprises radio access network (RAN) and core network (CN); hence, the technique roadmap diverges in two ways. In this paper, we investigate SoftRAN, the latest SDN solution for RAN, and SoftCell and MobileFlow, the latest solu-tions for CN. We also define a series of control functions for CROWD. Unlike in the other literature, we emphasize only software-defined cellular network solutions and specifications in order to provide possible research directions.

  2. BIOMARKERS TO DEFINE OPTIMAL PROTEIN REQUIREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Filippo Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins are the source of the amino acids required by the body for tissue growth and maintenance. The Population Reference Intake (PRI) for proteins, as defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for healthy adults, including the elderly, is 0.83 g/kg body weight/day. This amount is defined on the net balance of body protein (or “nitrogen balance”, given by the difference between dietary nitrogen intake and losses) equivalent to 0.66 g/kg/day plus a safety factor for interp...

  3. GNU Based Security in Software Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Bhadka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Various new technologies are explored for radio communication toward the 21st century. Among them the technology of "software defined radio" attracts large attention. Software Defined Radio (SDR technology implements some of the functional modules of a radio system in software enabling highly flexible handsets. SDR devices may be reconfigured dynamically via the download of new software modules. Malicious or malfunctioning downloaded software present serious security risks to SDR devices and networks in which they operate. Together with the use of software downloading, future terminals will become a platform to support the deployment of yet unspecified services and applications.

  4. Medical abortion. defining success and categorizing failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, Christina; Nørgaard, Mogens; Vestermark, Vibeke;

    2003-01-01

    Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks. The differe......Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks...

  5. What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

    1995-01-01

    Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

  6. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  7. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools.

  8. Restandardisation defined as democratising language planning1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aims to define restandardisation as democratising language planning, i.e. a .... disintegration of the Soviet Union of Yugoslavia, the opening of borders in Europe, and the ..... descriptive framework for standardisation as a language planning process. .... belonging to the same language group in order to form one common ...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.2 Terms defined. Words in the regulations in this part in the singular form shall be deemed.... “Federal-State Inspection Agency” means any State agency, business association or trade organization... plant. “Packing plant” means the premises, buildings, structures, and equipment including but...

  10. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linsen, S.M.; Zitman, F.G.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of conten

  11. 47 CFR 54.401 - Lifeline defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Low-Income Consumers § 54.401 Lifeline defined. (a) As used in this... assistance. Eligible telecommunications carriers not subject to state commission jurisdiction also shall...

  12. THEORETICAL APPROACHES DEFINE SENSE OF INVESTMENT PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. A. Burduzha

    2010-01-01

    The essence of terms “project”, “investment project” is defined in the article, as well as the difference between definitions of terms “project”, “plan” and “program” is determined. The main approaches to the treatment of definition of term “investment project” are considered.

  13. Precise Interval Timer for Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A precise digital fractional interval timer for software defined radios which vary their waveform on a packet-by-packet basis. The timer allows for variable length in the preamble of the RF packet and allows to adjust boundaries of the TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) Slots of the receiver of an SDR based on the reception of the RF packet of interest.

  14. Externally definable sets and dependent pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem

    2010-01-01

    We prove that externally definable sets in first order NIP theories have honest definitions, giving a new proof of Shelah's expansion theorem. Also we discuss a weak notion of stable embeddedness true in this context. Those results are then used to prove a general theorem on dependent pairs, which in particular answers a question of Baldwin and Benedikt on naming an indiscernible sequence.

  15. Defining Parental Involvement: Perception of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Clara Y.; Austin, Sheila M.; Growe, Roslin

    2013-01-01

    There remains a plaguing question of how to get parents involved with their child's education. Many parents and educators have different perceptions of what parental involvement means. Miscommunication between the two groups often exists because of how parental involvement is conceptualized. While educators define parental involvement as…

  16. Defining enthesitis in spondyloarthritis by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, E; Iagnocco, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To standardize ultrasound (US) in enthesitis. Methods: An Initial Delphi exercise was undertaken to define US detected enthesitis and its core components. These definitions were subsequently tested on static images taken from Spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients in order to evaluate...

  17. 16 CFR 303.1 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that solicit ultimate consumers to purchase such textile products by mail, telephone, electronic mail... REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.1 Terms defined. As used in this part, unless the context otherwise specifically requires: (a) The term Act means the Textile Fiber...

  18. Acquisition Cycle Time: Defining the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    prescribe appetite suppression and fiscal discipline . Still others diagnose inept management and excessive bureaucracy, and prescribe streamlined...complex the system, the higher this bound. • Software development consists of completing known work and discovering new work. There are fundamental ... taxonomy of acquisition risk categories, with corresponding development timelines. In that report, a low-risk acquisition is defined to be one that

  19. Defining Grammatical Difficulty: A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, Johan; Coppen, Peter-Arno

    2015-01-01

    Numerous second language acquisition (SLA) researchers have tried to define grammatical difficulty in second and foreign language acquisition--often as part of an attempt to relate the efficacy of different types of instruction to the degree of difficulty of grammatical structures. The resulting proliferation of definitions and the lack of a…

  20. 16 CFR 502.2 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and customary and regular when used with the term price means the price at which a consumer commodity..., package, label, person, commerce, principal display panel, and random package have the same meaning as those terms are defined under part 500 of this chapter. (b) The term packager and labeler means any...

  1. Software-defined anything challenges status quo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Wayne; Borders, Tammie

    2015-01-01

    INL successfully developed a proof of concept for "Software Defined Anything" by emulating the laboratory's business applications that run on Virtual Machines. The work INL conducted demonstrates to industry on how this methodology can be used to improve security, automate and repeat processes, and improve consistency.

  2. Defining collaborative business rules management solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Johan Versendaal

    2014-01-01

    From the publishers' website: The goal of this research is to define a method for configuring a collaborative business rules management solution from a value proposition perspective. In an earlier published study (Business rules management solutions: added value by means of business

  3. Defining and Operationalising L2 Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulte, Bram; Housen, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This chapter takes a critical look at complexity in L2 research. We demonstrate several problems in the L2 literature in terms of how complexity has been defined and operationalised as a construct. In the first part of the chapter we try to unravel its highly complex, multidimensional nature by presenting a taxonomic model that identifies major…

  4. THEORETICAL APPROACHES DEFINE SENSE OF INVESTMENT PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Burduzha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The essence of terms “project”, “investment project” is defined in the article, as well as the difference between definitions of terms “project”, “plan” and “program” is determined. The main approaches to the treatment of definition of term “investment project” are considered.

  5. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Ge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype.

  6. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING QUALITY AND ITS DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra M. ACHIM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance ofhigh-quality financial statements is highlighted by the main standard-setting institutions activating in the field of accounting and reporting. These have issued Conceptual Frameworks which state and describe the qualitative characteristics of accounting information. In this qualitative study, the research methodology consists of reviewing the literature related to the definition of accounting quality and striving for understanding how it can be explained. The main objective of the study is to identify the characteristics information should possess in order to be of high quality. These characteristics also contribute to the way of defining financial accounting quality. The main conclusions that arise from this research are represented by the facts that indeed financial accounting quality cannot be uniquely defined and that financial information is of good quality when it enhances the characteristics incorporated in the conceptual frameworks issued by both International Accounting Standards Board and Financial Accounting Standards Board.

  7. Defining Tiger Parenting in Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeong

    2013-09-01

    "Tiger" parenting, as described by Amy Chua [2011], has instigated scholarly discourse on this phenomenon and its possible effects on families. Our eight-year longitudinal study, published in the Asian American Journal of Psychology [Kim, Wang, Orozco-Lapray, Shen, & Murtuza, 2013b], demonstrates that tiger parenting is not a common parenting profile in a sample of 444 Chinese American families. Tiger parenting also does not relate to superior academic performance in children. In fact, the best developmental outcomes were found among children of supportive parents. We examine the complexities around defining tiger parenting by reviewing classical literature on parenting styles and scholarship on Asian American parenting, along with Amy Chua's own description of her parenting method, to develop, define, and categorize variability in parenting in a sample of Chinese American families. We also provide evidence that supportive parenting is important for the optimal development of Chinese American adolescents.

  8. Defining life or bringing biology to life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Peretó, Juli; Moreno, Alvaro

    2010-04-01

    In the present, post-genomic times, systemic or holistic approaches to living phenomena are compulsory to overcome the limits of traditional strategies, such as the methodological reductionism of molecular biology. In this paper, we propose that theoretical and philosophical efforts to define life also contribute to those integrative approaches, providing a global theoretical framework that may help to deal with or interpret the huge amount of data being collected by current high-throughput technologies, in this so-called 'omics' revolution. We claim that two fundamental notions can capture the core of the living, (basic) autonomy and open-ended evolution, and that only the complementary combination of these two theoretical constructs offers an adequate solution to the problem of defining the nature of life in specific enough-but also encompassing enough-terms. This tentative solution should also illuminate, in its most elementary version, the leading steps towards living beings on Earth.

  9. Control of System with Defined Risk Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Tomasov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following paper the basic requirements for system control with defined risk level is presented. The paper should be an introduction to describe of theoretical apparatus, which was created during some years of research work in the Department of information and safety systems in this area. It a modification or creation of new parts of Information theory, System theory, and Control theory means. This parts are necessary for the analysis and synthesis tasks in the systems where dominant attribute of control is defined risk level. The basic problem is the creation of protect mechanism again the threats from inside and from controlled system environs. For each risk reduction mechanism is needed some redundancy which should be into control algorithm to put by exactly determined way.

  10. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed.

  11. Gene doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement.

  12. Fingerprinting Software Defined Networks and Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...Networking Defined Within a computer network, switching devices contain three abstractly organized services known as planes [9]. As shown in Figure 2.1, these...stations that exist within an exploitable network. The final threat vector is the lack of trusted resources for forensics and remediation for when an

  13. Research misconduct oversight: defining case costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Elizabeth; Franzini, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a sequential mixed method study design to define cost elements of research misconduct among faculty at academic medical centers. Using time driven activity based costing, the model estimates a per case cost for 17 cases of research misconduct reported by the Office of Research Integrity for the period of 2000-2005. Per case cost of research misconduct was found to range from $116,160 to $2,192,620. Research misconduct cost drivers are identified.

  14. Quantum Thought Experiments Can Define Nature

    CERN Document Server

    McCartor, D

    2004-01-01

    One would not think that thought experiments could matter to nature, for they are a humble human device. Yet quantum mechanics very naturally frames thought experiments (as distinct from precisely defining what exists). They exemplify the informing powers of radiation. Though based on wave functions that have time symmetry, these tableaux inevitably tell of irreversible behavior by nature. The paper sketches how John von Neumann's measurement theory fits into this and retells N. David Mermin's baseball story.

  15. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of contents. From a total of 250 papers (published between 1988 and 1991) 51 provided 126 dependence-related definitions. Six studies referred to the DSM definitions and one to the WHO definition. The obsol...

  16. Defining viability in mammalian cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Susan M.; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A large number of assays are available to monitor viability in mammalian cell cultures with most defining loss of viability as a loss of plasma membrane integrity, a characteristic of necrotic cell death. However, the majority of cultured cells die by apoptosis and early apoptotic cells, although non-viable, maintain an intact plasma membrane and are thus ignored. Here we measure the viability of cultures of a number of common mammalian cell lines by assays that measure me...

  17. Thermodynamics. Using Affinities to define reversible processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ritacco, Hernán A

    2016-01-01

    In this article a definition of reversible processes in terms of differences in intensive Thermodynamics properties (Affinities) is proposed. This definition makes it possible to both define reversible processes before introducing the concept of entropy and avoid the circularity problem that follows from the Clausius definition of entropy changes. The convenience of this new definition compared to those commonly found in textbooks is demonstrated with examples.

  18. How Should Energy Be Defined Throughout Schooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächtold, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    The question of how to teach energy has been renewed by recent studies focusing on the learning and teaching progressions for this concept. In this context, one question has been, for the most part, overlooked: how should energy be defined throughout schooling? This paper addresses this question in three steps. We first identify and discuss two main approaches in physics concerning the definition of energy, one claiming there is no satisfactory definition and taking conservation as a fundamental property, and the other based on Rankine's definition of energy as the capacity of a system to produce changes. We then present a study concerning how energy is actually defined throughout schooling in the case of France by analyzing national programs, physics textbooks, and the answers of teachers to a questionnaire. This study brings to light a consistency problem in the way energy is defined across school years: in primary school, an adapted version of Rankine's definition is introduced and conservation is ignored; in high school, conservation is introduced and Rankine's definition is ignored. Finally, we address this consistency problem by discussing possible teaching progressions. We argue in favor of the use of Rankine's definition throughout schooling: at primary school, it is a possible substitute to students' erroneous conceptions; at secondary school, it might help students become aware of the unifying role of energy and thereby overcome the compartmentalization problem.

  19. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions.

  20. HIV-induced immunodeficiency and mortality from AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Abrams, Donald; Pradier, Christian; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter; Bonnet, Fabrice; Kirk, Ole; Law, Matthew; De Wit, Stephane; Friis-Møller, Nina; Phillips, Andrew N; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate deaths from AIDS-defining malignancies (ADM) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (nADM) in the D:A:D Study and to investigate the relationship between these deaths and immunodeficiency. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. METHODS: Patients (23 437) were followed prospectively f

  1. Crohn's Disease Defined in Three Elderly Disters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Three elderly sisters presented with symptomatic Crohn's disease. All had ileocolic involvement, and granulomatous inflammation was documented in endoscopic biopsies or surgically resected intestinal specimens. The present report documents the unusual occurrence of very late phenotypical expression of familial ileocolic Crohn's disease. The observations presented here reflect a possible gene-based predisposition to Crohn's disease or, alternatively, disease clustering related to a commonly shared environmental factor.

  2. Defining the genetics of thrombotic microangiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Martins, Paula; El Sissy, Carine; Bordereau, Pauline; Gruber, Aurelia; Rosain, Jeremie; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic.

  3. Software Defined Radio: Basic Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raúl Machado-Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author makes a review of the SDR (Software Defined Radio technology, including hardware schemes and application fields. A low performance device is presented and several tests are executed with it using free software. With the acquired experience, SDR employment opportunities are identified for low-cost solutions that can solve significant problems. In addition, a list of the most important frameworks related to the technology developed in the last years is offered, recommending the use of three of them.

  4. Software defined networks a comprehensive approach

    CERN Document Server

    Goransson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Software Defined Networks discusses the historical networking environment that gave rise to SDN, as well as the latest advances in SDN technology. The book gives you the state of the art knowledge needed for successful deployment of an SDN, including: How to explain to the non-technical business decision makers in your organization the potential benefits, as well as the risks, in shifting parts of a network to the SDN modelHow to make intelligent decisions about when to integrate SDN technologies in a networkHow to decide if your organization should be developing its own SDN applications or

  5. Rates of Convergence of Recursively Defined Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambov, Branimir Zdravkov

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a generalization of a result by Matiyasevich which gives explicit rates of convergence for monotone recursively defined sequences. The generalization is motivated by recent developments in fixed point theory and the search for applications of proof mining to the field. It relaxes...... the requirement for monotonicity to the form xn+1 ≤ (1+an)xn+bn where the parameter sequences have to be bounded in sum, and also provides means to treat computational errors. The paper also gives an example result, an application of proof mining to fixed point theory, that can be achieved by the means discussed...

  6. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang, Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; Katsanis, J S; Lee, Jeong-A; Lewis, Gladius; Lovell, Nigel H; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Morales, George G; Matis, Timothy; Matthews, Judith T; Mazur, Lukasz; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Oommen, K J; Ormand, Kevin; Rohde, Tarald; Sánchez-Morillo, Daniel; Sanz-Calcedo, Justo García; Sawan, Mohamad; Shen, Chwan-Li; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Su, Chao-Ton; Sun, Lilly; Sun, Mingui; Sun, Yi; Tewolde, Senay N; Williams, Eric A; Yan, Chongjun; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term "Healthcare Engineering" has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of "Healthcare Engineering" remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  7. Defining Cyberbullying: A Multiple Perspectives Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipan, Alexandra; Skues, Jason; Theiler, Stephen; Wise, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been a lack of consensus among researchers, practitioners, and laypersons about the definition of cyberbullying. Researchers have typically applied the key characteristics of intent to harm, power imbalance, and repetition from the definition of traditional bullying to cyberbullying, but how these characteristics transfer from the real world to a technology-mediated environment remains ambiguous. Moreover, very few studies have specifically investigated how cyberbullying is defined from the perspective of bullies, victims and bystanders. To this end, this article will propose a three-part definition of cyberbullying, which incorporates the perspective of bullies, victims and bystanders.

  8. UNIQLO,Define Your Own Fashion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Yes,women like and enjoy shopping.Always,they want to buy some well-designed clothes with the most ‘in’ factors;and what’s of the great importance,they would like to hear the words:"wow! You fit the wear well!" However,the most satisfied right things could not be always waiting for you thereory ou would not help complaining the so-fast changing trends day by day.At that time,why not to seek some delights from the basic classic collections? UNIQLO maybe is a choice for you to define youro wn fashion.

  9. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2015-01-01

    phosphatases. The main objective of this study was to quantify the binding affinity of different enzymes that are involved in this cyclic process. We established a protocol to quickly, reproducibly, and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE...... glucan phosphatases showed similar affinities for the short oligosaccharide β-cyclodextrin. We performed structure-guided mutagenesis to define the mechanism of these differences. We found that the carbohydrate binding module (CBM) domain provided a stronger binding affinity compared to surface binding...

  10. Defining Requirements for Improved Photovoltaic System Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maish, A.B.

    1998-12-21

    Reliable systems are an essential ingredient of any technology progressing toward commercial maturity and large-scale deployment. This paper defines reliability as meeting system fictional requirements, and then develops a framework to understand and quantify photovoltaic system reliability based on initial and ongoing costs and system value. The core elements necessary to achieve reliable PV systems are reviewed. These include appropriate system design, satisfactory component reliability, and proper installation and servicing. Reliability status, key issues, and present needs in system reliability are summarized for four application sectors.

  11. Languages for Software-Defined Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1 Languages for Software-Defined Networks Nate Foster∗, Michael J. Freedman†, Arjun Guha∗, Rob Harrison‡, Naga Praveen Katta†, Christopher Monsanto ...2012. [12] “The Frenetic project.” http://www.frenetic-lang.org/, Sept. 2012. [13] N. Foster, R. Harrison, M. J. Freedman, C. Monsanto , J. Rexford...performance networks,” in ACM SIGCOMM, pp. 254–265, Aug. 2011. [15] C. Monsanto , N. Foster, R. Harrison, and D. Walker, “A compiler and run-time system for

  12. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  13. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    This report is identical to an earlier version of May 1978 except that Chapter 5 has been revised. A new paper: "A Petri Net Definition of a System Description Language", DAIMI, April 1979, 20 pages, extends the Petri net model to include a data state representing the program variables. Delta...... and the possibility of using predicates to specify state changes. In this paper a formal semantics for Delta is defined and analysed using Petri nets. Petri nets was chosen because the ideas behind Petri nets and Delta concide on several points. A number of proposals for changes in Delta, which resulted from...

  14. Defining recovery in adult bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jessica; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To examine how different definitions of recovery lead to varying rates of recovery, maintenance of recovery, and relapse in bulimia nervosa (BN), end-of-treatment (EOT) and follow-up data were obtained from 96 adults with BN. Combining behavioral, physical, and psychological criteria led to recovery rates between 15.5% and 34.4% at EOT, though relapse was approximately 50%. Combining these criteria and requiring abstinence from binge eating and purging when defining recovery may lead to lower recovery rates than those found in previous studies; however, a strength of this definition is that individuals who meet this criteria have no remaining disordered behaviors or symptoms.

  15. Cyanobacterial signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kirt A; Siefert, Janet L; Yerrapragada, Sailaja; Lu, Yue; McNeill, Thomas Z; Moreno, Pedro A; Weinstock, George M; Widger, William R; Fox, George E

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of 8 cyanobacterial genomes reveals that there are 181 shared genes that do not have obvious orthologs in other bacteria. These signature genes define aspects of the genotype that are uniquely cyanobacterial. Approximately 25% of these genes have been associated with some function. These signature genes may or may not be involved in photosynthesis but likely they will be in many cases. In addition, several examples of widely conserved gene order involving two or more signature genes were observed. This suggests there may be regulatory processes that have been preserved throughout the long history of the cyanobacterial phenotype. The results presented here will be especially useful because they identify which of the many genes of unassigned function are likely to be of the greatest interest.

  16. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brettin, Thomas S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bruce, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detter, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Cliff S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Munik, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Seon Y [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Haley, Bradd J [U. MARYLAND; Taviani, Elisa [U. MARYLAND; Jeon, Yoon - Seong [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Kim, Dong Wook [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Lee, Jae - Hak [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Walters, Ronald A [PNNL; Hug, Anwar [NATL. INST. CHOLERIC ENTERIC DIS.; Colwell, Rita R [U. MARYLAND

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to

  17. The Defining Characteristics of Urban Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Steen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The organization of supported and sustainable urban interventions is challenging, with multiple actors involved, fragmented decision-making powers, and multiple values at stake. Globally, urban living labs have become a fashionable phenomenon to tackle this challenge, fostering the development and implementation of innovation, experimentation, and knowledge in urban, real-life settings while emphasizing the important role of participation and co-creation. However, although urban living labs could in this way help cities to speed up the sustainable transition, urban living lab experts agree that, in order to truly succeed in these ambitious tasks, the way urban living labs are being shaped and steered needs further research. Yet, they also confirm the existing variation and opaqueness in the definition of the concept. This article contributes to conceptual clarity by developing an operationalized definition of urban living labs, which has been used to assess 90 sustainable urban innovation projects in the city of Amsterdam. The assessment shows that the majority of the projects that are labelled as living labs do not include one or more of the defining elements of a living lab. In particular, the defining co-creation and development activities were found to be absent in many of the projects. This article makes it possible to categorize alleged living lab projects and distill the “true” living labs from the many improperly labelled or unlabelled living labs, allowing more specific analyses and, ultimately, better targeted methodological recommendations for urban living labs.

  18. COMMENSURABLE ENCRYPTION USING USER- DEFINE KEY TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ripal dilipbhai ranpara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is the gold standard for security. It is used to protect the transmission and storage of data between two parties by encrypting it into an unreadable format. Cryptography has enabled the first wave of secure transmissions, which has helped fuel the growth of transactions like shopping, banking, and finance over the world’s biggest public network, the Internet. Many Internet applications such as e-mail, databases, and browsers store a tremendous amount of personal and financial information, but frequently the data is left unprotected. Traditional network security is frequently less effective at preventing hackers from accessing this data. For instance, once-private databases are now completely exposed on the Internet. It turns out that getting to the database that holds millions of credit card numbers—the transmission—is secure through the use of cryptography, but the database itself isn’t, fueling the rise of credit card information theft. A paradigm shift is now under way for cryptography. The only way to make data secure in any application that runs over the Internet is to use secret (also known as private key cryptography. The current security methods focus on securing Internet applications using public keys techniques that are no longer effective.so according to my knowledge no one has addressed on COMMENSURABLE USER-DEFINE KEY TECHNIQUE that is used to encrypt the data as per the user-define key

  19. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  20. Using experimental design to define boundary manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Erik; Högberg, Dan; Hanson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    When evaluating human-machine interaction it is central to consider anthropometric diversity to ensure intended accommodation levels. A well-known method is the use of boundary cases where manikins with extreme but likely measurement combinations are derived by mathematical treatment of anthropometric data. The supposition by that method is that the use of these manikins will facilitate accommodation of the expected part of the total, less extreme, population. In literature sources there are differences in how many and in what way these manikins should be defined. A similar field to the boundary case method is the use of experimental design in where relationships between affecting factors of a process is studied by a systematic approach. This paper examines the possibilities to adopt methodology used in experimental design to define a group of manikins. Different experimental designs were adopted to be used together with a confidence region and its axes. The result from the study shows that it is possible to adapt the methodology of experimental design when creating groups of manikins. The size of these groups of manikins depends heavily on the number of key measurements but also on the type of chosen experimental design.

  1. Defining professional pharmacy services in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2013-01-01

    Multiple terms and definitions exist to describe specific aspects of pharmacy practice and service provision, yet none encompass the full range of professional services delivered by community pharmacy. The majority of current pharmacy service definitions and nomenclature refer to either the professional philosophy of pharmaceutical care or to specific professional pharmacy services; particularly pharmaceutical services provided by pharmacists with a focus on drug safety, effectiveness and health outcomes. The objective of this paper is therefore to define a professional pharmacy service within the context of the community pharmacy model of service provision. A professional pharmacy service is defined as "an action or set of actions undertaken in or organised by a pharmacy, delivered by a pharmacist or other health practitioner, who applies their specialised health knowledge personally or via an intermediary, with a patient/client, population or other health professional, to optimise the process of care, with the aim to improve health outcomes and the value of healthcare." Based on Donabedian's framework, the professional pharmacy service definition incorporates the concepts of organizational structure, process indicators and outcome measures. The definition will assist in many areas including recognition of the full range of services provided by community pharmacy and facilitating the identification of indicators of professional pharmacy service implementation and sustainable provision. A simple conceptual model for incorporating all services provided by community pharmacy is proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Medical abortion. defining success and categorizing failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, Christina; Nørgaard, Mogens; Vestermark, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks. The differe......Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks....... The difference in short- and long-term success rates increased with increasing gestational age. The majority of failures (76%) were diagnosed more than 2 weeks after initiation of the abortion. At a 2-week follow-up visit, the women who turned out to be failures had a larger endometrial width, higher beta......-hCG values and smaller reductions of beta-hCG than those treated successfully. To optimize comparison of success rates after different medical abortion regimens, we suggest that the criteria for success are stated clearly, that the success rates are stratified according to gestational age...

  3. Molecular and genetic profiles of radiographically defined de novo meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yohei; Sasaki, Hikaru; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2012-05-01

    With the exception of radiation-induced tumors, benign meningiomas that are known to have developed within a defined time period are extremely rare. We have genetically characterized two cases of radiographically defined de novo, sporadic meningiomas--a 5-cm, left parasagittal tumor in a 61-year-old male and a 2.3-cm, right falx tumor in a 53-year-old female. Neither tumor was observed during MRIs performed for unrelated complaints 49 and 28 months before surgery, respectively. Both tumors were totally resected, and histopathological examination revealed WHO grade I meningiomas. In both cases, the MIB-1 staining indices were high for grade I meningioma (5.6% for case 1 and 9.1% for case 2), and abnormal accumulation of p53 were observed by immunohistochemistry. The two tumors shared losses of chromosome arms 1p and 7p by comparative genomic hybridization. The tumor suppressor merlin, product of the NF2 gene, was not detected in either tumor. These abnormalities found in common in both of the de novo meningiomas likely to play significant roles in the pathogenesis and/or rapid development of meningiomas. Moreover, taken together with previous studies, our findings indicate that the combined loss of 1p and 7p may play a critical role in the tumorigenesis of de novo, aggressive meningiomas.

  4. Human vascular model with defined stimulation medium - a characterization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttala, Outi; Vuorenpää, Hanna; Toimela, Tarja; Uotila, Jukka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Ylikomi, Timo; Sarkanen, Jertta-Riina; Heinonen, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    The formation of blood vessels is a vital process in embryonic development and in normal physiology. Current vascular modelling is mainly based on animal biology leading to species-to-species variation when extrapolating the results to humans. Although there are a few human cell based vascular models available these assays are insufficiently characterized in terms of culture conditions and developmental stage of vascular structures. Therefore, well characterized vascular models with human relevance are needed for basic research, embryotoxicity testing, development of therapeutic strategies and for tissue engineering. We have previously shown that the in vitro vascular model based on co-culture of human adipose stromal cells (hASC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) is able to induce an extensive vascular-like network with high reproducibility. In this work we developed a defined serum-free vascular stimulation medium (VSM) and performed further characterization in terms of cell identity, maturation and structure to obtain a thoroughly characterized in vitro vascular model to replace or reduce corresponding animal experiments. The results showed that the novel vascular stimulation medium induced intact and evenly distributed vascular-like network with morphology of mature vessels. Electron microscopic analysis assured the three-dimensional microstructure of the network containing lumen. Additionally, elevated expressions of the main human angiogenesis-related genes were detected. In conclusion, with the new defined medium the vascular model can be utilized as a characterized test system for chemical testing as well as in creating vascularized tissue models.

  5. Defining the biological bases of individual differences in musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Honing, Henkjan; Peretz, Isabelle; Trainor, Laurel J; Fisher, Simon E

    2015-03-19

    Advances in molecular technologies make it possible to pinpoint genomic factors associated with complex human traits. For cognition and behaviour, identification of underlying genes provides new entry points for deciphering the key neurobiological pathways. In the past decade, the search for genetic correlates of musicality has gained traction. Reports have documented familial clustering for different extremes of ability, including amusia and absolute pitch (AP), with twin studies demonstrating high heritability for some music-related skills, such as pitch perception. Certain chromosomal regions have been linked to AP and musical aptitude, while individual candidate genes have been investigated in relation to aptitude and creativity. Most recently, researchers in this field started performing genome-wide association scans. Thus far, studies have been hampered by relatively small sample sizes and limitations in defining components of musicality, including an emphasis on skills that can only be assessed in trained musicians. With opportunities to administer standardized aptitude tests online, systematic large-scale assessment of musical abilities is now feasible, an important step towards high-powered genome-wide screens. Here, we offer a synthesis of existing literatures and outline concrete suggestions for the development of comprehensive operational tools for the analysis of musical phenotypes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the biological bases of individual differences in musicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Honing, Henkjan; Peretz, Isabelle; Trainor, Laurel J.; Fisher, Simon E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular technologies make it possible to pinpoint genomic factors associated with complex human traits. For cognition and behaviour, identification of underlying genes provides new entry points for deciphering the key neurobiological pathways. In the past decade, the search for genetic correlates of musicality has gained traction. Reports have documented familial clustering for different extremes of ability, including amusia and absolute pitch (AP), with twin studies demonstrating high heritability for some music-related skills, such as pitch perception. Certain chromosomal regions have been linked to AP and musical aptitude, while individual candidate genes have been investigated in relation to aptitude and creativity. Most recently, researchers in this field started performing genome-wide association scans. Thus far, studies have been hampered by relatively small sample sizes and limitations in defining components of musicality, including an emphasis on skills that can only be assessed in trained musicians. With opportunities to administer standardized aptitude tests online, systematic large-scale assessment of musical abilities is now feasible, an important step towards high-powered genome-wide screens. Here, we offer a synthesis of existing literatures and outline concrete suggestions for the development of comprehensive operational tools for the analysis of musical phenotypes. PMID:25646515

  7. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanginakudru Sriramana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. Results Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define molecular correlates of behavioral state, we used microarray analysis of 9417 unique cDNA sequences. Gene expression profiles reveal a suite of 40 genes whose differential expression in brain correlates with oriented flight behavior in individual migrants, independent of juvenile hormone activity, thereby molecularly separating fall migrants from summer butterflies. Intriguing genes that are differentially regulated include the clock gene vrille and the locomotion-relevant tyramine beta hydroxylase gene. In addition, several differentially regulated genes (37.5% of total are not annotated. We also identified 23 juvenile hormone-dependent genes in brain, which separate reproductive from non-reproductive monarchs; genes involved in longevity, fatty acid metabolism, and innate immunity are upregulated in non-reproductive (juvenile-hormone deficient migrants. Conclusion The results link key behavioral traits with gene expression profiles in brain that

  8. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haisun; Gegear, Robert J; Casselman, Amy; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Reppert, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. Results Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define molecular correlates of behavioral state, we used microarray analysis of 9417 unique cDNA sequences. Gene expression profiles reveal a suite of 40 genes whose differential expression in brain correlates with oriented flight behavior in individual migrants, independent of juvenile hormone activity, thereby molecularly separating fall migrants from summer butterflies. Intriguing genes that are differentially regulated include the clock gene vrille and the locomotion-relevant tyramine beta hydroxylase gene. In addition, several differentially regulated genes (37.5% of total) are not annotated. We also identified 23 juvenile hormone-dependent genes in brain, which separate reproductive from non-reproductive monarchs; genes involved in longevity, fatty acid metabolism, and innate immunity are upregulated in non-reproductive (juvenile-hormone deficient) migrants. Conclusion The results link key behavioral traits with gene expression profiles in brain that differentiate migratory

  9. "Defining Computer 'Speed': An Unsolved Challenge"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The reason we use computers is their speed, and the reason we use parallel computers is that they're faster than single-processor computers. Yet, after 70 years of electronic digital computing, we still do not have a solid definition of what computer 'speed' means, or even what it means to be 'faster'. Unlike measures in physics, where the definition of speed is rigorous and unequivocal, in computing there is no definition of speed that is universally accepted. As a result, computer customers have made purchases misguided by dubious information, computer designers have optimized their designs for the wrong goals, and computer programmers have chosen methods that optimize the wrong things. This talk describes why some of the obvious and historical ways of defining 'speed' haven't served us well, and the things we've learned in the struggle to find a definition that works. Biography: Dr. John Gustafson is a Director ...

  10. Software Defined Networking Demands on Software Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galinac Grbac, T.; Caba, Cosmin Marius; Soler, José

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a networking approach based on a centralized control plane architecture with standardised interfaces between control and data planes. SDN enables fast configuration and reconfiguration of the network to enhance resource utilization and service performances....... This new approach enables a more dynamic and flexible network, which may adapt to user needs and application requirements. To this end, systemized solutions must be implemented in network software, aiming to provide secure network services that meet the required service performance levels. In this paper......, we review this new approach to networking from an architectural point of view, and identify and discuss some critical quality issues that require new developments in software technologies. These issues we discuss along with use case scenarios. Here in this paper we aim to identify challenges...

  11. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2016-12-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  12. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralda, Irina; Uriarte, Silvia M.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:28611952

  13. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  14. Defining and measuring pilot mental workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantowitz, Barry H.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is sought that is general enough to help the researcher deal with a wide range of situations involving pilot mental stress. A limited capacity theory of attention forms the basis for the theory. Mental workload is then defined as an intervening variable, similar to attention, that modulates or indexes the tuning between the demands of the environment and the capacity of the organism. Two methods for measuring pilot mental workload are endorsed: (1) objective measures based on secondary tasks; and (2) psychophysiological measures, which have not yet been perfected but which will become more useful as theoretical models are refined. Secondary-task research is illustrated by simulator studies in which flying performance has been shown not to be adversely affected by adding a complex choice-reaction secondary task.

  15. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question.

  16. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper;

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a vital energy molecule in plants that has a wide variety of uses in industry, such as feedstock for biomaterial processing and biofuel production. Plants employ a three enzyme cyclic process utilizing kinases, amylases, and phosphatases to degrade starch in a diurnal manner. Starch...... is comprised of the branched glucan amylopectin and the more linear glucan amylose. Our lab has determined the first structures of these glucan phosphatases and we have defined their enzymatic action. Despite this progress, we lacked a means to quickly and efficiently quantify starch binding to glucan...... phosphatases. The main objective of this study was to quantify the binding affinity of different enzymes that are involved in this cyclic process. We established a protocol to quickly, reproducibly, and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE...

  17. Using archetypes for defining CDA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moner, David; Moreno, Alberto; Maldonado, José A; Robles, Montserrat; Parra, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    While HL7 CDA is a widely adopted standard for the documentation of clinical information, the archetype approach proposed by CEN/ISO 13606 and openEHR is gaining recognition as a means of describing domain models and medical knowledge. This paper describes our efforts in combining both standards. Using archetypes as an alternative for defining CDA templates permit new possibilities all based on the formal nature of archetypes and their ability to merge into the same artifact medical knowledge and technical requirements for semantic interoperability of electronic health records. We describe the process followed for the normalization of existing legacy data in a hospital environment, from the importation of the HL7 CDA model into an archetype editor, the definition of CDA archetypes and the application of those archetypes to obtain normalized CDA data instances.

  18. Oscillator metrology with software defined radio

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Jeff A

    2016-01-01

    Analog electrical elements such as mixers, filters, transfer oscillators, isolating buffers, dividers, and even transmission lines contribute technical noise and unwanted environmental coupling in time and frequency measurements. Software defined radio (SDR) techniques replace many of these analog components with digital signal processing (DSP) on rapidly sampled signals. We demonstrate that, generically, commercially available multi-channel SDRs are capable of time and frequency metrology, outperforming purpose-built devices by as much as an order-of-magnitude. For example, for signals at 10 MHz and 6 GHz, we observe SDR time deviation noise floors of about 20 fs and 1 fs, respectively, in under 10 ms of averaging. Examining the other complex signal component, we find a relative amplitude measurement instability of 3e-7 at 5 MHz. We discuss the scalability of a SDR-based system for simultaneous measurement of many clocks. SDR's frequency agility allows for comparison of oscillators at widely different freque...

  19. Can we define climate using information theory?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, J Walter, E-mail: larson@mcs.anl.go [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); School of Computer Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    The standard definition of climate is, by convention, based on a thirty-year sample. But why? One way to define the sampling period for constructing climatologies is to ask: What is a sufficient sample to construct probability density functions (PDF) for key meteorological variables? I propose an information-theoretic framework for evaluating climatic sampling periods based on level of detail and associated uncertainties in the estimated PDF, the Shannon entropy growth curve and its discrete derivative, and the Kullback-Leibler divergence. I compute these quantities for 235 years of daily data from the Central UK Temperature record and use these statistics to compare popular sampling periods and discuss the feasibility of determining an optimal sampling period.

  20. Defining and Distinguishing Secular and Religious Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather S. Gregg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Religious terrorism is typically characterised as acts of unrestrained, irrational and indiscriminant violence, thus offering few if any policy options for counterterrorism measures. This assumption about religious terrorism stems from two challenges in the literature: disproportionate attention to apocalyptic terrorism, and a lack of distinction between religious terrorism and its secular counterpart. This article, therefore, aims to do four things: define and differentiate religiously motivated terrorism from traditional terrorism; investigate three goals of religious terrorism (fomenting the apocalypse, creating a religious government, and establishing a religiously pure state; consider the role of leadership and target selection of religious terrorists; and, finally, suggest a range of counterterrorism strategies based on these observations.

  1. Defining and testing a granular continuum element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Kamrin, Ken; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2007-12-03

    Continuum mechanics relies on the fundamental notion of amesoscopic volume "element" in which properties averaged over discreteparticles obey deterministic relationships. Recent work on granularmaterials suggests a continuum law may be inapplicable, revealinginhomogeneities at the particle level, such as force chains and slow cagebreaking. Here, we analyze large-scale Discrete-Element Method (DEM)simulations of different granular flows and show that a "granularelement" can indeed be defined at the scale of dynamical correlations,roughly three to five particle diameters. Its rheology is rather subtle,combining liquid-like dependence on deformation rate and solid-likedependence on strain. Our results confirm some aspects of classicalplasticity theory (e.g., coaxiality of stress and deformation rate),while contradicting others (i.e., incipient yield), and can guide thedevelopment of more realistic continuum models.

  2. Computing platforms for software-defined radio

    CERN Document Server

    Nurmi, Jari; Isoaho, Jouni; Garzia, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses Software-Defined Radio (SDR) baseband processing from the computer architecture point of view, providing a detailed exploration of different computing platforms by classifying different approaches, highlighting the common features related to SDR requirements and by showing pros and cons of the proposed solutions. Coverage includes architectures exploiting parallelism by extending single-processor environment (such as VLIW, SIMD, TTA approaches), multi-core platforms distributing the computation to either a homogeneous array or a set of specialized heterogeneous processors, and architectures exploiting fine-grained, coarse-grained, or hybrid reconfigurability. Describes a computer engineering approach to SDR baseband processing hardware; Discusses implementation of numerous compute-intensive signal processing algorithms on single and multicore platforms; Enables deep understanding of optimization techniques related to power and energy consumption of multicore platforms using several basic a...

  3. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software-Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Software-defined radio (SDR) technology allows radios to be reconfigured to perform different communication functions without using multiple radios to accomplish each task. Intelligent Automation, Inc., has developed SDR platforms that switch adaptively between different operation modes. The innovation works by modifying both transmit waveforms and receiver signal processing tasks. In Phase I of the project, the company developed SDR cognitive capabilities, including adaptive modulation and coding (AMC), automatic modulation recognition (AMR), and spectrum sensing. In Phase II, these capabilities were integrated into SDR platforms. The reconfigurable transceiver design employs high-speed field-programmable gate arrays, enabling multimode operation and scalable architecture. Designs are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and are modular in nature, making it easier to upgrade individual components rather than redesigning the entire SDR platform as technology advances.

  4. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions.

  5. Nurse leader resilience: career defining moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is an essential component of effective nursing leadership. It is defined as the ability to survive and thrive in the face of adversity. Resilience can be developed and internalized as a measure to improve retention and reduce burnout. Nurse leaders at all levels should develop these competencies to survive and thrive in an increasingly complex health care environment. Building positive relationships, maintaining positivity, developing emotional insight, creating work-life balance, and reflecting on successes and challenges are effective strategies for resilience building. Nurse leaders have a professional obligation to develop resilience in themselves, the teams they supervise, and the organization as a whole. Additional benefits include reduced turnover, reduced cost, and improved quality outcomes through organizational mindfulness.

  6. Defining the limits of prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, R M

    1994-08-01

    The term prion disease applies to any disease in which there is an accumulation in brain of the abnormal isoform of prion protein, known as PrPsc. These diseases include all the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of humans and animals and their related atypical forms. Although there are clear clinical and neuropathological indicators in the majority of cases, the atypical forms present particular diagnostic difficulties because their clinical presentation may closely resemble much more common forms of dementia. On pathological examination the brain may show no spongiform encephalopathy, and attempts at transmission are often not successful in these cases. There are various biochemical and immunohistochemical ways in which prion disease can be detected. Some of these require the use of fresh/frozen tissue which is often not available unless prion disease is already suspected. Some previously unsuspected cases have been detected by genetic analysis of the PrP gene. This approach must be used with caution since there are several rare polymorphisms in the PrP gene which are not pathogenic and possession of a pathogenic mutation does not prevent the occurrence of more common neurological disorders at an earlier age, some of which may be treatable.

  7. Software Defined Radios - Architectures, Systems and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Herb

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Radio is an industry term describing a method of utilizing a minimum amount of Radio Frequency (RF)/analog electronics before digitization takes place. Upon digitization all other functions are performed in software/firmware. There are as many different types of SDRs as there are data systems. Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 90's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast the foundations of transponder technology presently qualified for satellite applications were developed during the early space program of the 1960's. SDR technology offers potential to revolutionize satellite transponder technology by increasing science data through-put capability by at least an order of magnitude. While the SDR is adaptive in nature and is "One-size-fits-all" by design, conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be redesigned for every new bus. The SDR uses a minimum amount of analog/Radio Frequency components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from a digital format. Once analog data is digitized, all processing is performed using hardware logic. Typical SDR processes include; filtering, modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. This presentation will show how the emerging SDR market has leveraged the existing commercial sector to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will reduce the cost of transceivers, a decrease in power requirements and a commensurate reduction in volume. A second pay-off is the increased flexibility of the SDR by allowing the same hardware to implement multiple transponder types by altering hardware logic - no change of analog hardware is required - all of which can be ultimately accomplished in orbit. This in turn would provide high capability and low cost

  8. Defining nodes in complex brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lawrence Stanley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Network science holds great promise for expanding our understanding of the human brain in health, disease, development, and aging. Network analyses are quickly becoming the method of choice for analyzing functional MRI data. However, many technical issues have yet to be confronted in order to optimize results. One particular issue that remains controversial in functional brain network analyses is the definition of a network node. In functional brain networks a node represents some predefined collection of brain tissue, and an edge measures the functional connectivity between pairs of nodes. The characteristics of a node, chosen by the researcher, vary considerably in the literature. This manuscript reviews the current state of the art based on published manuscripts and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of three main methods for defining nodes. Voxel-wise networks are constructed by assigning a node to each, equally sized brain area (voxel. The fMRI time-series recorded from each voxel is then used to create the functional network. Anatomical methods utilize atlases to define the nodes based on brain structure. The fMRI time-series from all voxels within the anatomical area are averaged and subsequently used to generate the network. Functional activation methods rely on data from traditional fMRI activation studies, often from databases, to identify network nodes. Such methods identify the peaks or centers of mass from activation maps to determine the location of the nodes. Small (~10-20 millimeter diameter spheres located at the coordinates of the activation foci are then applied to the data being used in the network analysis. The fMRI time-series from all voxels in the sphere are then averaged, and the resultant time series is used to generate the network. We attempt to clarify the discussion and move the study of complex brain networks forward. While the correct method to be used remains an open, possibly unsolvable question that

  9. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated.

  10. Self-defining memories and self-defining future projections in hypomania-prone individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardi Robyn, Claudia; Ghisletta, Paolo; Van der Linden, Martial

    2012-06-01

    Mania and hypomania involve dysfunctional beliefs about the self, others, and the world, as well about affect regulation. The present study explored the impact of these beliefs on self-defining memories and self-defining future projections of individuals with a history of hypomanic symptoms. The main findings showed that a history of hypomanic symptoms was related to enhanced retrieval of memories describing positive relationships and to reduced future projections about relationships, suggesting both a need for social bonding and a striving for autonomy. Moreover, hypomania-prone individuals tended to describe more recent events and to produce self-defining memories with references to tension that were more integrated in their self-structure. All of these findings support the presence of conflicting dysfunctional beliefs and the importance of memories containing references to tension in hypomania.

  11. Defining nodes in complex brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Matthew L; Moussa, Malaak N; Paolini, Brielle M; Lyday, Robert G; Burdette, Jonathan H; Laurienti, Paul J

    2013-11-22

    Network science holds great promise for expanding our understanding of the human brain in health, disease, development, and aging. Network analyses are quickly becoming the method of choice for analyzing functional MRI data. However, many technical issues have yet to be confronted in order to optimize results. One particular issue that remains controversial in functional brain network analyses is the definition of a network node. In functional brain networks a node represents some predefined collection of brain tissue, and an edge measures the functional connectivity between pairs of nodes. The characteristics of a node, chosen by the researcher, vary considerably in the literature. This manuscript reviews the current state of the art based on published manuscripts and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of three main methods for defining nodes. Voxel-wise networks are constructed by assigning a node to each, equally sized brain area (voxel). The fMRI time-series recorded from each voxel is then used to create the functional network. Anatomical methods utilize atlases to define the nodes based on brain structure. The fMRI time-series from all voxels within the anatomical area are averaged and subsequently used to generate the network. Functional activation methods rely on data from traditional fMRI activation studies, often from databases, to identify network nodes. Such methods identify the peaks or centers of mass from activation maps to determine the location of the nodes. Small (~10-20 millimeter diameter) spheres located at the coordinates of the activation foci are then applied to the data being used in the network analysis. The fMRI time-series from all voxels in the sphere are then averaged, and the resultant time series is used to generate the network. We attempt to clarify the discussion and move the study of complex brain networks forward. While the "correct" method to be used remains an open, possibly unsolvable question that deserves extensive

  12. Defining microbiota for developing new probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Collado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The human body harbors complex communities of microbes that play a prominent role in human health. Detailed characterization of the microbiota in the target population forms the basis of probiotic use. Probiotics are defined as live bacterial preparations with clinically documented health effects in humans, and independent of their genus and species, probiotic strains are unique and their beneficial properties on human health have to be assessed in a case-by-case manner. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics influence microbiota would facilitate the use of probiotics for both dietary management and reduction in risk of specific diseases. The development of high throughput sequencing methods has allowed metagenomic approaches to study the human microbiome. These efforts are starting to generate an inventory of bacterial taxons and functional features bound to particular health or disease status that allow inferring aspects of the microbiome's function. In the future, this information will allow the rational design of dietary interventions aimed to improve consumer's health via modulation of the microbiota.

  13. Defining Astrology in Ancient and Classical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Astrology in the ancient and classical worlds can be partly defined by its role, and partly by the way in which scholars spoke about it. The problem is complicated by the fact that the word is Greek - it has no Babylonian or Egyptian cognates - and even in Greece it was interchangeable with its cousin, 'astronomy'. Yet if we are to understand the role of the sky, stars and planets in culture, debates about the nature of ancient astrology, by both classical and modern scholars, must be taken into account. This talk will consider modern scholars' typologies of ancient astrology, together with ancient debates from Cicero in the 1st century BC, to Plotinus (204/5-270 AD) and Isidore of Seville (c. 560 - 4 April 636). It will consider the implications for our understanding of astronomy's role in culture, and conclude that in the classical period astrology may be best understood through its diversity and allegiance to competing philosophies, and that its functions were therefore similarly varied.

  14. CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION AS DEFINED BY WORKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maria Guedes Gondim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Creativity and innovation are now required given the new configurations in work processes, in organizational formats, in physical and intangible technologies, as well as in products and markets. In parallel with the growing centrality and interest in the phenomena of creativity and innovation, a broadening of its concepts is observed. The inflation and trivialization of uses tend to make them self-explanatory and not very enlightening regarding situations to which they apply and the associated effects. The lack of conceptual clarity thus contributes both to undermining policies to promote creativity and innovation in organizations, as well as to hinder the employees' adherence to such policies. The study aimed to characterize the key elements of workers' informal definitions of creativity and innovation, and identify their alignment with definitions and theoretical perspectives. The study included 231 workers from Portuguese-, Spanish-, and Basque-speaking countries, aged 22-75 years. The qualitative data analysis software ATLAS.ti 7 was used for coding and categorization. One point of convergence with the specialized literature was that creativity and innovation strongly associated with novelty in the development of an idea / product / process / service. Creativity, however, is defined more in terms of dispositional factors rather than contextual and situational factors, diverging from current theoretical perspectives. Planning as a key aspect for organizational innovation development is practically absent from the workers' definitions. It discusses some impacts of these settings for organizational management practices.

  15. Like Beauty, Complexity is Hard to Define

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsallis, Constantino

    Like beauty, complexity is hard to define and rather easy to identify: nonlinear dynamics, strongly interconnected simple elements, some sort of divisoria aquorum between order and disorder. Before focusing on complexity, let us remember that the theoretical pillars of contemporary physics are mechanics (Newtonian, relativistic, quantum), Maxwell electromagnetism, and (Boltzmann-Gibbs, BG) statistical mechanics - obligatory basic disciplines in any advanced course in physics. The firstprinciple statistical-mechanical approach starts from (microscopic) electro-mechanics and theory of probabilities, and, through a variety of possible mesoscopic descriptions, arrives to (oscopic) thermodynamics. In the middle of this trip, we cross energy and entropy. Energy is related to the possible microscopic configurations of the system, whereas entropy is related to the corresponding probabilities. Therefore, in some sense, entropy represents a concept which, epistemologically speaking, is one step further with regard to energy. The fact that energy is not parameter-independent is very familiar: the kinetic energy of a truck is very different from that of a fly, and the relativistic energy of a fast electron is very different from its classical value, and so on. What about entropy? One hundred and forty years of tradition, and hundreds - we may even say thousands - of impressive theoretical successes of the parameter-free BG entropy have sedimented, in the mind of many scientists, the conviction that it is unique. However, it can be straightforwardly argued that, in general, this is not the case...

  16. Software-defined Quantum Networking Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The software enables a user to perform modeling and simulation of software-defined quantum networks. The software addresses the problem of how to synchronize transmission of quantum and classical signals through multi-node networks and to demonstrate quantum information protocols such as quantum teleportation. The software approaches this problem by generating a graphical model of the underlying network and attributing properties to each node and link in the graph. The graphical model is then simulated using a combination of discrete-event simulators to calculate the expected state of each node and link in the graph at a future time. A user interacts with the software by providing an initial network model and instantiating methods for the nodes to transmit information with each other. This includes writing application scripts in python that make use of the software library interfaces. A user then initiates the application scripts, which invokes the software simulation. The user then uses the built-in diagnostic tools to query the state of the simulation and to collect statistics on synchronization.

  17. Methodologies for defining quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glicken, J. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-10

    Quality of life as a concept has been used in many ways in the public policy arena. It can be used in summative evaluations to assess the impacts of policies or programs. Alternatively, it can be applied to formative evaluations to provide input to the formation of new policies. In short, it provides the context for the understanding needed to evaluate the results of choices that have been made in the public policy arena, or the potential of choices yet to be made. In either case, the public policy question revolves around the positive or negative impact the choice will have on quality of life, and the magnitude of that impact. This discussion will develop a conceptual framework that proposes that an assessment of quality of life is based on a comparison of expectations with experience. The framework defines four basic components from which these expectations arise: natural conditions, social conditions, the body, and the mind. Each one of these components is generally described, and associated with a general policy or rhetorical category which gives it its policy vocabulary--environmental quality, economic well-being, human health, and self-fulfillment.

  18. Defining fitness in an uncertain world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, Paul; Gratwick, Richard; Grafen, Alan

    2017-07-29

    The recently elucidated definition of fitness employed by Fisher in his fundamental theorem of natural selection is combined with reproductive values as appropriately defined in the context of both random environments and continuing fluctuations in the distribution over classes in a class-structured population. We obtain astonishingly simple results, generalisations of the Price Equation and the fundamental theorem, that show natural selection acting only through the arithmetic expectation of fitness over all uncertainties, in contrast to previous studies with fluctuating demography, in which natural selection looks rather complicated. Furthermore, our setting permits each class to have its characteristic ploidy, thus covering haploidy, diploidy and haplodiploidy at the same time; and allows arbitrary classes, including continuous variables such as condition. The simplicity is achieved by focussing just on the effects of natural selection on genotype frequencies: while other causes are present in the model, and the effect of natural selection is assessed in their presence, these causes will have their own further effects on genoytpe frequencies that are not assessed here. Also, Fisher's uses of reproductive value are shown to have two ambivalences, and a new axiomatic foundation for reproductive value is endorsed. The results continue the formal darwinism project, and extend support for the individual-as-maximising-agent analogy to finite populations with random environments and fluctuating class-distributions. The model may also lead to improved ways to measure fitness in real populations.

  19. Defining microbiota for developing new probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2012-01-01

    The human body harbors complex communities of microbes that play a prominent role in human health. Detailed characterization of the microbiota in the target population forms the basis of probiotic use. Probiotics are defined as live bacterial preparations with clinically documented health effects in humans, and independent of their genus and species, probiotic strains are unique and their beneficial properties on human health have to be assessed in a case-by-case manner. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics influence microbiota would facilitate the use of probiotics for both dietary management and reduction in risk of specific diseases. The development of high throughput sequencing methods has allowed metagenomic approaches to study the human microbiome. These efforts are starting to generate an inventory of bacterial taxons and functional features bound to particular health or disease status that allow inferring aspects of the microbiome's function. In the future, this information will allow the rational design of dietary interventions aimed to improve consumer's health via modulation of the microbiota. PMID:23990820

  20. Defining microbiota for developing new probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2012-01-01

    The human body harbors complex communities of microbes that play a prominent role in human health. Detailed characterization of the microbiota in the target population forms the basis of probiotic use. Probiotics are defined as live bacterial preparations with clinically documented health effects in humans, and independent of their genus and species, probiotic strains are unique and their beneficial properties on human health have to be assessed in a case-by-case manner. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics influence microbiota would facilitate the use of probiotics for both dietary management and reduction in risk of specific diseases. The development of high throughput sequencing methods has allowed metagenomic approaches to study the human microbiome. These efforts are starting to generate an inventory of bacterial taxons and functional features bound to particular health or disease status that allow inferring aspects of the microbiome's function. In the future, this information will allow the rational design of dietary interventions aimed to improve consumer's health via modulation of the microbiota.

  1. Defining and resolving current systems in geospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, N. Y.; Liemohn, M. W.; Dubyagin, S.; Daglis, I. A.; Dandouras, I.; De Zeeuw, D. L.; Ebihara, Y.; Ilie, R.; Katus, R.; Kubyshkina, M.; Milan, S. E.; Ohtani, S.; Ostgaard, N.; Reistad, J. P.; Tenfjord, P.; Toffoletto, F.; Zaharia, S.; Amariutei, O.

    2015-11-01

    Electric currents flowing through near-Earth space (R ≤ 12 RE) can support a highly distorted magnetic field topology, changing particle drift paths and therefore having a nonlinear feedback on the currents themselves. A number of current systems exist in the magnetosphere, most commonly defined as (1) the dayside magnetopause Chapman-Ferraro currents, (2) the Birkeland field-aligned currents with high-latitude "region 1" and lower-latitude "region 2" currents connected to the partial ring current, (3) the magnetotail currents, and (4) the symmetric ring current. In the near-Earth nightside region, however, several of these current systems flow in close proximity to each other. Moreover, the existence of other temporal current systems, such as the substorm current wedge or "banana" current, has been reported. It is very difficult to identify a local measurement as belonging to a specific system. Such identification is important, however, because how the current closes and how these loops change in space and time governs the magnetic topology of the magnetosphere and therefore controls the physical processes of geospace. Furthermore, many methods exist for identifying the regions of near-Earth space carrying each type of current. This study presents a robust collection of these definitions of current systems in geospace, particularly in the near-Earth nightside magnetosphere, as viewed from a variety of observational and computational analysis techniques. The influence of definitional choice on the resulting interpretation of physical processes governing geospace dynamics is presented and discussed.

  2. Defining Ecosystem Assets for Natural Capital Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Lars; Bagstad, Ken; Edens, Bram; Obst, Carl; de Jong, Rixt; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural capital accounting, ecosystems are assets that provide ecosystem services to people. Assets can be measured using both physical and monetary units. In the international System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, ecosystem assets are generally valued on the basis of the net present value of the expected flow of ecosystem services. In this paper we argue that several additional conceptualisations of ecosystem assets are needed to understand ecosystems as assets, in support of ecosystem assessments, ecosystem accounting and ecosystem management. In particular, we define ecosystems' capacity and capability to supply ecosystem services, as well as the potential supply of ecosystem services. Capacity relates to sustainable use levels of multiple ecosystem services, capability involves prioritising the use of one ecosystem service over a basket of services, and potential supply considers the ability of ecosystems to generate services regardless of demand for these services. We ground our definitions in the ecosystem services and accounting literature, and illustrate and compare the concepts of flow, capacity, capability, and potential supply with a range of conceptual and real-world examples drawn from case studies in Europe and North America. Our paper contributes to the development of measurement frameworks for natural capital to support environmental accounting and other assessment frameworks.

  3. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Marilyn; Akbari, Hashem; Blumstein, Carl; Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard; Calwell, Chris; Carter, Sheryl; Cavanagh, Ralph; Chang, Audrey; Claridge, David; Craig, Paul; Diamond, Rick; Eto, Joseph H.; Fulkerson, William; Gadgil, Ashok; Geller, Howard; Goldemberg, Jose; Goldman, Chuck; Goldstein, David B.; Greenberg, Steve; Hafemeister, David; Harris, Jeff; Harvey, Hal; Heitz, Eric; Hirst, Eric; Hummel, Holmes; Kammen, Dan; Kelly, Henry; Laitner, Skip; Levine, Mark; Lovins, Amory; Masters, Gil; McMahon, James E.; Meier, Alan; Messenger, Michael; Millhone, John; Mills, Evan; Nadel, Steve; Nordman, Bruce; Price, Lynn; Romm, Joe; Ross, Marc; Rufo, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant; Schipper, Lee; Schneider, Stephen H; Sweeney, James L; Verdict, Malcolm; Vorsatz, Diana; Wang, Devra; Weinberg, Carl; Wilk, Richard; Wilson, John; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-03-01

    The growing investment by governments and electric utilities in energy efficiency programs highlights the need for simple tools to help assess and explain the size of the potential resource. One technique that is commonly used in this effort is to characterize electricity savings in terms of avoided power plants, because it is easier for people to visualize a power plant than it is to understand an abstraction such as billions of kilowatt-hours. Unfortunately, there is no standardization around the characteristics of such power plants. In this letter we define parameters for a standard avoided power plant that have physical meaning and intuitive plausibility, for use in back-of-the-envelope calculations. For the prototypical plant this article settles on a 500 MW existing coal plant operating at a 70percent capacity factor with 7percent T&D losses. Displacing such a plant for one year would save 3 billion kW h per year at the meter and reduce emissions by 3 million metric tons of CO2 per year. The proposed name for this metric is the Rosenfeld, in keeping with the tradition among scientists of naming units in honor of the person most responsible for the discovery and widespread adoption of the underlying scientific principle in question--Dr. Arthur H. Rosenfeld.

  4. Oscillator metrology with software defined radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jeff A; Jördens, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Analog electrical elements such as mixers, filters, transfer oscillators, isolating buffers, dividers, and even transmission lines contribute technical noise and unwanted environmental coupling in time and frequency measurements. Software defined radio (SDR) techniques replace many of these analog components with digital signal processing (DSP) on rapidly sampled signals. We demonstrate that, generically, commercially available multi-channel SDRs are capable of time and frequency metrology, outperforming purpose-built devices by as much as an order-of-magnitude. For example, for signals at 10 MHz and 6 GHz, we observe SDR time deviation noise floors of about 20 fs and 1 fs, respectively, in under 10 ms of averaging. Examining the other complex signal component, we find a relative amplitude measurement instability of 3 × 10(-7) at 5 MHz. We discuss the scalability of a SDR-based system for simultaneous measurement of many clocks. SDR's frequency agility allows for comparison of oscillators at widely different frequencies. We demonstrate a novel and extreme example with optical clock frequencies differing by many terahertz: using a femtosecond-laser frequency comb and SDR, we show femtosecond-level time comparisons of ultra-stable lasers with zero measurement dead-time.

  5. Defining functional dyspepsia Definiendo la dispepsia funcional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Mearin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications. During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc. The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome; and b epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome. These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity or pain; b postprandial heaviness; and c early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn. All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the

  6. Groups definable in o-minimal structures: structure theorem, G^000, definable amenability and bounded orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Pillay, Anand

    2010-01-01

    We settle some open problems in the special case of groups in o-minimal structures, such as the equality of G^00 and G^000 and the equivalence of definable amenability and existence of a type with bounded orbit. We prove almost exactness of the G to G^00 functor. We ask further questions about types with bounded orbits in NIP theories.

  7. Future Scenarios for Software-Defined Metro and Access Networks and Software-Defined Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Muciaccia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, architectures, devices, and components in telecommunication networks have been challenged by evolutionary and revolutionary factors which are drastically changing the traffic features. Most of these changes imply the need for major re-configurability and programmability not only in data-centers and core networks, but also in the metro-access segment. In a wide variety of contexts, this necessity has been addressed by the proposed introduction of the innovative paradigm of software-defined networks (SDNs. Several solutions inspired by the SDN model have been recently proposed also for metro and access networks, where the adoption of a new generation of software-defined reconfigurable integrated photonic devices is highly desirable. In this paper, we review the possible future application scenarios for software-defined metro and access networks and software-defined photonics (SDP, on the base of analytics, statistics, and surveys. This work describes the reasons underpinning the presented radical change of paradigm and summarizes the most significant solutions proposed in literature, with a specific emphasis to physical-layer reconfigurable networks and a focus on both architectures and devices.

  8. A Methodology to Define Flood Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourbier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flood resilience has become an internationally used term with an ever-increasing number of entries on the Internet. The SMARTeST Project is looking at approaches to flood resilience through case studies at cities in various countries, including Washington D.C. in the United States. In light of U.S. experiences a methodology is being proposed by the author that is intended to meet ecologic, spatial, structural, social, disaster relief and flood risk aspects. It concludes that: "Flood resilience combines (1) spatial, (2) structural, (3) social, and (4) risk management levels of flood preparedness." Flood resilience should incorporate all four levels, but not necessarily with equal emphasis. Stakeholders can assign priorities within different flood resilience levels and the considerations they contain, dividing 100% emphasis into four levels. This evaluation would be applied to planned and completed projects, considering existing conditions, goals and concepts. We have long known that the "road to market" for the implementation of flood resilience is linked to capacity building of stakeholders. It is a multidisciplinary enterprise, involving the integration of all the above aspects into the decision-making process. Traditional flood management has largely been influenced by what in the UK has been called "Silo Thinking", involving constituent organizations that are responsible for different elements, and are interested only in their defined part of the system. This barrier to innovation also has been called the "entrapment effect". Flood resilience is being defined as (1) SPATIAL FLOOD RESILIENCE implying the management of land by floodplain zoning, urban greening and management to reduce storm runoff through depression storage and by practicing Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUD's), Best Management Practices (BMP's, or Low Impact Development (LID). Ecologic processes and cultural elements are included. (2) STRUCTURAL FLOOD RESILIENCE referring to permanent flood defense

  9. Defining the core Arabidopsis thaliana root microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Jase; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tremblay, Julien; Engelbrektson, Anna; Kunin, Victor; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Edgar, Robert C.; Eickhorst, Thilo; Ley, Ruth E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tringe, Susannah Green; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Land plants associate with a root microbiota distinct from the complex microbial community present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing therhizosphere(immediately surroundingthe root) and the endophytic compartment (within the root) contribute to plant growth, productivity, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation1-3. Colonization of the root occurs despite a sophisticated plant immune system4,5, suggesting finely tuned discrimination of mutualists and commensals from pathogens. Genetic principles governing the derivation of host-specific endophyte communities from soil communities are poorly understood. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of more than 600 Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test the hypotheses that the root rhizosphere and endophytic compartment microbiota of plants grown under controlled conditions in natural soils are sufficiently dependent on the host to remain consistent across different soil types and developmental stages, and sufficiently dependent on host genotype to vary between inbred Arabidopsis accessions. We describe different bacterial communities in two geochemically distinct bulk soils and in rhizosphere and endophytic compartments prepared from roots grown in these soils. The communities in each compartment are strongly influenced by soil type. Endophytic compartments from both soils feature overlapping, low-complexity communities that are markedly enriched in Actinobacteria and specific families from other phyla, notably Proteobacteria. Some bacteria vary quantitatively between plants of different developmental stage and genotype. Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plantmicrobe interactions derived from complex soil communities. PMID:22859206

  10. Defining food literacy: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Emily; Lane, Daniel; Elliott, Charlene

    2017-09-01

    The term "food literacy" describes the idea of proficiency in food related skills and knowledge. This prevalent term is broadly applied, although its core elements vary from initiative to initiative. In light of its ubiquitous use-but varying definitions-this article establishes the scope of food literacy research by identifying all articles that define 'food literacy', analysing its key conceptualizations, and reporting outcomes/measures of this concept. A scoping review was conducted to identify all articles (academic and grey literature) using the term "food literacy". Databases included Medline, Pubmed, Embase, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, Scopus, JSTOR, and Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Of 1049 abstracts, 67 studies were included. From these, data was extracted on country of origin, study type (methodological approach), primary target population, and the primary outcomes relating to food literacy. The majority of definitions of food literacy emphasize the acquisition of critical knowledge (information and understanding) (55%) over functional knowledge (skills, abilities and choices) (8%), although some incorporate both (37%). Thematic analysis of 38 novel definitions of food literacy reveals the prevalence of six themes: skills and behaviours, food/health choices, culture, knowledge, emotions, and food systems. Study outcomes largely focus on knowledge generating measures, with very few focusing on health related outcome measures. Current definitions of food literacy incorporate components of six key themes or domains and attributes of both critical and functional knowledge. Despite this broad definition of the term, most studies aiming to improve food literacy focus on knowledge related outcomes. Few articles address health outcomes, leaving an important gap (and opportunity) for future research in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC, convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer.

  12. A hierarchical approach to defining marine heatwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobday, Alistair J.; Alexander, Lisa V.; Perkins, Sarah E.; Smale, Dan A.; Straub, Sandra C.; Oliver, Eric C. J.; Benthuysen, Jessica A.; Burrows, Michael T.; Donat, Markus G.; Feng, Ming; Holbrook, Neil J.; Moore, Pippa J.; Scannell, Hillary A.; Sen Gupta, Alex; Wernberg, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Marine heatwaves (MHWs) have been observed around the world and are expected to increase in intensity and frequency under anthropogenic climate change. A variety of impacts have been associated with these anomalous events, including shifts in species ranges, local extinctions and economic impacts on seafood industries through declines in important fishery species and impacts on aquaculture. Extreme temperatures are increasingly seen as important influences on biological systems, yet a consistent definition of MHWs does not exist. A clear definition will facilitate retrospective comparisons between MHWs, enabling the synthesis and a mechanistic understanding of the role of MHWs in marine ecosystems. Building on research into atmospheric heatwaves, we propose both a general and specific definition for MHWs, based on a hierarchy of metrics that allow for different data sets to be used in identifying MHWs. We generally define a MHW as a prolonged discrete anomalously warm water event that can be described by its duration, intensity, rate of evolution, and spatial extent. Specifically, we consider an anomalously warm event to be a MHW if it lasts for five or more days, with temperatures warmer than the 90th percentile based on a 30-year historical baseline period. This structure provides flexibility with regard to the description of MHWs and transparency in communicating MHWs to a general audience. The use of these metrics is illustrated for three 21st century MHWs; the northern Mediterranean event in 2003, the Western Australia 'Ningaloo Niño' in 2011, and the northwest Atlantic event in 2012. We recommend a specific quantitative definition for MHWs to facilitate global comparisons and to advance our understanding of these phenomena.

  13. Defining a Minimum End Mill Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Dreval'

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial observations show that the standard mill designs in many cases do not provide a complete diversity of manufacturing operations, and a lot of enterprises are forced to design and manufacture special (original designs of tools. The information search has revealed a lack of end mill diameter calculations in publications. There is a proposal to calculate the end mill diameter either by empirical formulas [2, 3], or by selection from the tables [4].To estimate a minimum diameter of the end mill to perform the specified manufacturing operations based on the mill body strength the formulas are obtained. The initial data for calculation are the flow sheet of milling operation and properties of processed and tool materials. The end mill is regarded, as a cantilevered beam of the circular cross section having Dс diameter (mill core diameter with overhang Lв from rigid fixing and loaded by the maximum bending force and torque.In deriving the formulas were used the following well-reasoned assumptions based on the analysed sizes of the structural elements of the standard mills: a diameter of mill core is linearly dependent on the mill diameter and the overhang; the 4τ 2 to σ 2 4τ2 ratio is constant and equal to 0.065 for contour milling and 0.17 for slot milling.The formulas for calculating the minimum diameter are as follows:  3 обр в 1 121 1.1  K S L L D m C z    for contour milling;  3 обр в 1 207 1.1  K S L L D m C z    for slot milling.Obtained dependences that allow defining a minimum diameter of the end mill in terms of ensuring its strength can be used to design mills for contour milling with radius transition sections, holes of different diameters in the body parts and other cases when for processing a singlemill is preferable.Using the proposed dependencies for calculating a feed of the maximum tolerable strength is reasonable in designing the mills for slots.Assumptions used in deriving

  14. Studying Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Studying Genes Studying Genes Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area Other Fact Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions ...

  15. DEFINE Synthesis Report: DEFINE - Development of an Evaluation Framework for the Introduction of Electromobility

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtblau, Günther; Stix, Sigrid; Gerbaulet, Clemens; Schill, Wolf-Peter; Totschnig, Gerhard; Litzlbauer, Markus; Miess, Michael; Schmelzer, Stefan; Ščasný, Milan; Weinzettell, Jan; MÁCA Vojtěch; Zvěřinová, Iva; Czajkowski, Mikolaj

    2015-01-01

    The project DEFINE – Development of an Evaluation Framework for the Introduction of Electromobility – was conducted by the Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS), Vienna, in cooperation with the Environment Agency Austria (EAA), the Vienna University of Technology (TUW), Austria; the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), the Institute for Applied Ecology (Oeko-Institut), Germany; and with the Center for Social and Economic Research (CASE), Poland.

  16. Defining the Thrombotic Risk in Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Vianello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycythemia vera (PV and essential thrombocythemia (ET are two Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN associated with an acquired mutation in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase gene. There is a rare incidence of progression to myelofibrosis and myeloid metaplasia in both disorders, which may or may not precede transformation to acute myeloid leukemia, but thrombosis is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of thrombosis in patients with MPN is complex. Traditionally, abnormalities of platelet number and function have been claimed as the main players, but increased dynamic interactions between platelets, leukocytes, and the endothelium do probably represent a fundamental interplay in generating a thrombophilic state. In addition, endothelial dysfunction, a well-known risk factor for vascular disease, may play a role in the thrombotic risk of patients with PV and ET. The identification of plasma markers translating the hemostatic imbalance in patients with PV and ET would be extremely helpful in order to define the subgroup of patients with a significant clinical risk of thrombosis.

  17. Multiple sequence alignment with user-defined anchor points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pöhler Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated software tools for multiple alignment often fail to produce biologically meaningful results. In such situations, expert knowledge can help to improve the quality of alignments. Results Herein, we describe a semi-automatic version of the alignment program DIALIGN that can take pre-defined constraints into account. It is possible for the user to specify parts of the sequences that are assumed to be homologous and should therefore be aligned to each other. Our software program can use these sites as anchor points by creating a multiple alignment respecting these constraints. This way, our alignment method can produce alignments that are biologically more meaningful than alignments produced by fully automated procedures. As a demonstration of how our method works, we apply our approach to genomic sequences around the Hox gene cluster and to a set of DNA-binding proteins. As a by-product, we obtain insights about the performance of the greedy algorithm that our program uses for multiple alignment and about the underlying objective function. This information will be useful for the further development of DIALIGN. The described alignment approach has been integrated into the TRACKER software system.

  18. Defining nephrotic syndrome from an integrative genomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Matthew G; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a clinical condition with a high degree of morbidity and mortality, caused by failure of the glomerular filtration barrier, resulting in massive proteinuria. Our current diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic decisions in NS are largely based upon clinical or histological patterns such as "focal segmental glomerulosclerosis" or "steroid sensitive". Yet these descriptive classifications lack the precision to explain the physiologic origins and clinical heterogeneity observed in this syndrome. A more precise definition of NS is required to identify mechanisms of disease and capture various clinical trajectories. An integrative genomics approach to NS applies bioinformatics and computational methods to comprehensive experimental, molecular and clinical data for holistic disease definition. A unique aspect is analysis of data together to discover NS-associated molecules, pathways, and networks. Integrating multidimensional datasets from the outset highlights how molecular lesions impact the entire individual. Data sets integrated range from genetic variation to gene expression, to histologic changes, to progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review will introduce the tenets of integrative genomics and suggest how it can increase our understanding of NS from molecular and pathophysiological perspectives. A diverse group of genome-scale experiments are presented that have sought to define molecular signatures of NS. Finally, the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) will be introduced as an international, prospective cohort study of patients with NS that utilizes an integrated systems genomics approach from the outset. A major NEPTUNE goal is to achieve comprehensive disease definition from a genomics perspective and identify shared molecular drivers of disease.

  19. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P; Bernstein, Bradley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K; Ward, Lucas D; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L; Farnham, Peggy J; Feingold, Elise A; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C; Gilbert, David M; Gingeras, Thomas R; Green, Eric D; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D; Myers, Richard M; Pazin, Michael J; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P; Hardison, Ross C

    2014-04-29

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease.

  20. Rapid Induction of Cerebral Organoids From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Chemically Defined Hydrogel and Defined Cell Culture Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Beth A; Brekke, John H; Vegoe, Amanda L; Ulrich, Connor B; Haider, Kerri T; Subramaniam, Sandhya; Venhuizen, Scott L; Eide, Cindy R; Orchard, Paul J; Chen, Weili; Wang, Qi; Pelaez, Francisco; Scott, Carolyn M; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Keirstead, Susan A; Dutton, James R; Tolar, Jakub; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue organoids are a promising technology that may accelerate development of the societal and NIH mandate for precision medicine. Here we describe a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids (cOrgs) from human pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. By using no additional neural induction components, cOrgs appeared on the hydrogel surface within 10-14 days, and under static culture conditions, they attained sizes up to 3 mm in greatest dimension by day 28. Histologically, the organoids showed neural rosette and neural tube-like structures and evidence of early corticogenesis. Immunostaining and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated protein and gene expression representative of forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain development. Physiologic studies showed responses to glutamate and depolarization in many cells, consistent with neural behavior. The method of cerebral organoid generation described here facilitates access to this technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. Tissue organoids are a promising technology with many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical screens and development of in vitro disease models, particularly for human polygenic conditions where animal models are insufficient. This work describes a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. This method, by virtue of its simplicity and use of defined materials, greatly facilitates access to cerebral organoid technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. How eukaryotic genes are transcribed

    OpenAIRE

    Venters, Bryan J; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is far more complex than one might have imagined thirty years ago. However, progress towards understanding gene regulatory mechanisms has been rapid and comprehensive, which has made the integration of detailed observations into broadly connected concepts a challenge. This review attempts to integrate the following concepts: 1) a well-defined organization of nucleosomes and modification states at most genes, 2) regulatory networks of sequence-specific ...

  2. Defined ambition: op weg naar een houdbaar pensioencontract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamerus, J.

    2011-01-01

    In juni promoveerde Jan Tamerus op ‘defined ambition’. In deze bijdrage legt hij in het kort uit waarom en hoe defined ambition een noodzakelijke stap vormt op de weg naar een houdbaar pensioencontract.

  3. Towards an ontological model defining the social engineering domain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available information. Although Social Engineering is an important branch of Information Security, the discipline is not well defined; a number of different definitions appear in the literature. Several concepts in the domain of Social Engineering are defined...

  4. Increased STAG2 dosage defines a novel cohesinopathy with intellectual disability and behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman; Corbett, Mark A; Van Bon, Bregje W M; Gardner, Alison; Woenig, Joshua A; Jolly, Lachlan A; Douglas, Evelyn; Friend, Kathryn; Tan, Chuan; Van Esch, Hilde; Holvoet, Maureen; Raynaud, Martine; Field, Michael; Leffler, Melanie; Budny, Bartłomiej; Wisniewska, Marzena; Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Batanian, Jacqueline; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Jensen, Corinna; Bienek, Melanie; Froyen, Guy; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hu, Hao; Love, Michael I; Haas, Stefan A; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Baxendale, Anne; Nicholl, Jillian; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Haan, Eric; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Gecz, Jozef

    2015-12-20

    Next generation genomic technologies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the genetic architecture of human neurodevelopmental disorders. Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in the genetics of intellectual disability (ID). For many CNVs, and copy number gains in particular, the responsible dosage-sensitive gene(s) have been hard to identify. We have collected 18 different interstitial microduplications and 1 microtriplication of Xq25. There were 15 affected individuals from 6 different families and 13 singleton cases, 28 affected males in total. The critical overlapping region involved the STAG2 gene, which codes for a subunit of the cohesin complex that regulates cohesion of sister chromatids and gene transcription. We demonstrate that STAG2 is the dosage-sensitive gene within these CNVs, as gains of STAG2 mRNA and protein dysregulate disease-relevant neuronal gene networks in cells derived from affected individuals. We also show that STAG2 gains result in increased expression of OPHN1, a known X-chromosome ID gene. Overall, we define a novel cohesinopathy due to copy number gain of Xq25 and STAG2 in particular.

  5. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population. The...

  6. Telemetry Modernization with Open Architecture Software-Defined Radio Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As the market demand for use of the existing Telemetry Modernization with Open Architecture Software-Defined Radio Technology Lincoln Laboratory...is conducting a software-defined radio technology development program to improve the way telemetered information is collected and processed...architecture software-defined radio technology . Approved for public release; distribution unlimited (SMDC-5102 26OCT2015). This material is based

  7. Skew category algebras associated with partially defined dynamical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundström, Patrik; Öinert, Per Johan

    2012-01-01

    We introduce partially defined dynamical systems defined on a topological space. To each such system we associate a functor s from a category G to Topop and show that it defines what we call a skew category algebra A ⋊σ G. We study the connection between topological freeness of s and, on the one...

  8. Defining Generic Architecture for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; de Laat, C.

    2011-01-01

    Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is one of the provisioning models for Clouds as defined in the NIST Clouds definition. Although widely used, current IaaS implementations and solutions doesn’t have common and well defined architecture model. The paper attempts to define a generic architecture for

  9. Defining generic architecture for Cloud IaaS provisioning model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Demchenko; C. de Laat; A. Mavrin

    2011-01-01

    Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is one of the provisioning models for Clouds as defined in the NIST Clouds definition. Although widely used, current IaaS implementations and solutions doesn’t have common and well defined architecture model. The paper attempts to define a generic architecture for

  10. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  11. Immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, T. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Alt, F.W. (Columbia Univ., Dobbs Ferry, NY (USA). Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  12. Defining High-Risk Precursor Signaling to Advance Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Currently, the only way these women can eliminate their risk is to undergo bilateral mastectomy before...prognosis, treatment and /or rehabilitation of a disease, injury or condition, or to improve the quality of life . Examples include: None to date. New...breast cancer development. There is no substitute for the ability to define and understand the early, pre-malignant changes as they occur in women

  13. Molecular and morphological changes in zebrafish following transient ethanol exposure during defined developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengjin; Frazier, Jared M; Chen, Hao; Liu, Yao; Lee, Ju-Ahng; Cole, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a teratogen that has diverse effects on brain and craniofacial development, leading to a constellation of developmental disorders referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The molecular basis of ethanol insult remains poorly understood, as does the relationship between molecular and behavioral changes as a consequence of prenatal ethanol exposure. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of ethanol concentrations (0.5-5.0%) during defined developmental stages, and examined for morphological phenotypes characteristic of FASD. Embryos were also analyzed by in situ hybridization for changes in expression of defined cell markers for neural cell types that are sonic hedgehog-dependent. We show that transient binge-like ethanol exposures during defined developmental stages, such as early gastrulation and early neurulation, result in a range of phenotypes and changes in expression of Shh-dependent genes. The severity of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) morphological phenotypes, such as microphthalmia, depends on the embryonic stage and concentration of alcohol exposure, as does diminution of retinal Pax6a or forebrain and hindbrain GAD1 gene expression. We also show that changes in eye and brain morphology correlate with changes in Pax6a and GAD1 gene expression. Our results therefore show that transient binge-like ethanol exposures in zebrafish embryos produce the stereotypical morphological phenotypes of FAS, with the severity of phenotypes depending on the developmental stage and alcohol concentration of exposure.

  14. Single-cell RNAseq reveals cell adhesion molecule profiles in electrophysiologically defined neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földy, Csaba; Darmanis, Spyros; Aoto, Jason; Malenka, Robert C; Quake, Stephen R; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-30

    In brain, signaling mediated by cell adhesion molecules defines the identity and functional properties of synapses. The specificity of presynaptic and postsynaptic interactions that is presumably mediated by cell adhesion molecules suggests that there exists a logic that could explain neuronal connectivity at the molecular level. Despite its importance, however, the nature of such logic is poorly understood, and even basic parameters, such as the number, identity, and single-cell expression profiles of candidate synaptic cell adhesion molecules, are not known. Here, we devised a comprehensive list of genes involved in cell adhesion, and used single-cell RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyze their expression in electrophysiologically defined interneurons and projection neurons. We compared the cell type-specific expression of these genes with that of genes involved in transmembrane ion conductances (i.e., channels), exocytosis, and rho/rac signaling, which regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Using these data, we identified two independent, developmentally regulated networks of interacting genes encoding molecules involved in cell adhesion, exocytosis, and signal transduction. Our approach provides a framework for a presumed cell adhesion and signaling code in neurons, enables correlating electrophysiological with molecular properties of neurons, and suggests avenues toward understanding synaptic specificity.

  15. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  16. Software Defined Radio for Wireless Sensors & Cognitive Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    Software Defined Radio is a communication system where major parts of the sig-nal processing are done with the help of software compare to the application specific hardware. This kind of system consists of computer, a radio frequency front end and Analog-to-Digital Converter and Digital-to-Analog Converter. Software Defined Radio modifies new protocols which are flexible and quick to deploy [1]. The ComNet department at Aalto University is exploring the feasibility of using Software Defin...

  17. Defining the primary research question in veterinary clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Michelle A

    2016-09-01

    A thoughtful, clearly defined research question should be the foundation of any clinical trial or research study. The research question helps determine key study methods, and defining a specific research question helps avoid problems with inadequate sample size, inappropriate design, or multiple statistical comparisons. Rationales and strategies for formulating research questions and using them to define study protocols are discussed, with a focus on application in clinical trials.

  18. A defined system for in vitro lambda DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Y; Feiss, M

    1995-08-20

    We constructed a defined in vitro system for packaging lambda DNA which is composed of purified proheads, the noncapsid proteins terminase and gpFI, and the Escherichia coli DNA binding/bending protein IHF. The defined packaging system: (i) is free from endogenous ATP, DNAs, and DNases and (ii) packages 30% of the input mature lambda DNA efficiently. In this defined packaging system, IHF and gpFI make modest contributions to packaging efficiency. The defined packaging reactions showed that DNA packaging gave a linear response to the concentration of mature lambda DNA and terminase. DNA packaging showed a sigmoidal relationship with respect to the concentration of ATP and proheads.

  19. Defining and Quantifying the Social Phenotype in Autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klin, Ami; Jones, Warren; Schultz, Robert; Volkmar, Fred; Cohen, Donald

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetic and neurofunctional research in autism has highlighted the need for improved characterization of the core social disorder defining the broad spectrum of syndrome manifestations. METHOD...

  20. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  1. ChIP-Seq of ERalpha and RNA polymerase II defines genes differentially responding to ligands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welboren, W.; Driel, M.A. van; Janssen-Megens, E.M.; Heeringen, S.J. van; Sweep, C.G.J.; Span, P.N.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    We used ChIP-Seq to map ERalpha-binding sites and to profile changes in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy in MCF-7 cells in response to estradiol (E2), tamoxifen or fulvestrant. We identify 10 205 high confidence ERalpha-binding sites in response to E2 of which 68% contain an estrogen response

  2. Rules in Regulation: Defining principles of gene expression control by FOXO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelenboom, A.

    2014-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and metabolism. In model organisms, FOXO activity affects stem cell maintenance and lifespan as well as age-related diseases, such as cancer and diabetes. Multiple upstream pathways regulate FOXO

  3. A developmental transcriptional network for maize defines coexpression modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Gregory S; Bi, Yong-Mei; Colasanti, Joseph; Wu, Wenqing; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J; Lukens, Lewis N

    2013-04-01

    Here, we present a genome-wide overview of transcriptional circuits in the agriculturally significant crop species maize (Zea mays). We examined transcript abundance data at 50 developmental stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, for 34,876 gene models and classified genes into 24 robust coexpression modules. Modules were strongly associated with tissue types and related biological processes. Sixteen of the 24 modules (67%) have preferential transcript abundance within specific tissues. One-third of modules had an absence of gene expression in specific tissues. Genes within a number of modules also correlated with the developmental age of tissues. Coexpression of genes is likely due to transcriptional control. For a number of modules, key genes involved in transcriptional control have expression profiles that mimic the expression profiles of module genes, although the expression of transcriptional control genes is not unusually representative of module gene expression. Known regulatory motifs are enriched in several modules. Finally, of the 13 network modules with more than 200 genes, three contain genes that are notably clustered (P < 0.05) within the genome. This work, based on a carefully selected set of major tissues representing diverse stages of maize development, demonstrates the remarkable power of transcript-level coexpression networks to identify underlying biological processes and their molecular components.

  4. 26 CFR 1.812-6 - New company defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New company defined. 1.812-6 Section 1.812-6...) INCOME TAXES Gain and Loss from Operations § 1.812-6 New company defined. Section 812(e) provides that for purposes of part I, subchapter L, chapter 1 of the Code, a life insurance company is a...

  5. 33 CFR 211.1 - Real estate defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real estate defined. 211.1... DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Real Estate; General § 211.1 Real estate defined. The term real estate as used in this part includes land...

  6. Normal Functions as a New Way of Defining Computable Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Dubiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Report sets new method of defining computable functions. This is formalization of traditional function descriptions, so it allows to define functions in very intuitive way. Discovery of Ackermann function proved that not all functions that can be easily computed can be so easily described with Hilbert's system of recursive functions. Normal functions lack this disadvantage.

  7. Normal Functions As A New Way Of Defining Computable Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Dubiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Report sets new method of defining computable functions. This is formalization of traditional function descriptions, so it allows to define functions in very intuitive way. Discovery of Ackermann function proved that not all functions that can be easily computed can be so easily described with Hilbert’s system of recursive functions. Normal functions lack this disadvantage.

  8. THE PITS PROPERTY OF ENTIRE FUNCTIONS DEFINED BY DIRICHLET SERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Lina; Gao Zongsheng

    2009-01-01

    The value distribution of entire functions defined by Dirichlet series are studied in this present article. It is proved that entire functions defined by Dirichlet series have the pits property, which improve the relative results on lacunary Taylor series obtained by Littlewood J.E. and Offord A.C.

  9. Defining management competencies anno 2025: A Business-University collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropes, Donald

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a business – university collaborative research project on defining lower management competencies in the year 2025. The purpose of the research was to help a large local airport to define and understand what competencies lower management will need in order to functi

  10. The algebraic numbers definable in various exponential fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Jonathan; Onshuus, Alf

    2011-01-01

    We prove the following theorems: Theorem 1: For any E-field with cyclic kernel, in particular $\\mathbb C$ or the Zilber fields, all real abelian algebraic numbers are pointwise definable. Theorem 2: For the Zilber fields, the only pointwise definable algebraic numbers are the real abelian numbers.

  11. 12 CFR 914.1 - Regulatory Report defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Bank. (b) Examples. Regulatory Report includes: (1) Call reports and reports of instrument-level risk... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory Report defined. 914.1 Section 914.1... DATA AVAILABILITY AND REPORTING § 914.1 Regulatory Report defined. (a) Definition. Regulatory...

  12. 48 CFR 311.7000 - Defining electronic information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defining electronic information technology requirements. 311.7000 Section 311.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH... Accessibility Standards 311.7000 Defining electronic information technology requirements. HHS staff that...

  13. Definability of types over finite partial order indiscernibles

    CERN Document Server

    Guingona, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a partitioned formula \\phi is dependent if and only if \\phi has uniform definability of types over finite partial order indiscernibles. This generalizes our result from a previous paper [1]. We show this by giving a decomposition of the truth values of an externally definable formula on a finite partial order indiscernible.

  14. 16 CFR 238.0 - Bait advertising defined. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bait advertising defined. 1 238.0 Section... BAIT ADVERTISING § 238.0 Bait advertising defined. 1 1 For the purpose of this part “advertising” includes any form of public notice however disseminated or utilized. Bait advertising is an alluring...

  15. Defining Sustainable Universities Following Public Opinion Formation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaptcioglu Celikdemir, Deniz; Gunay, Gonca; Katrinli, Alev; Penbek Alpbaz, Sebnem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to define the sustainable university in Turkey, by considering perspectives of various stakeholders such as experts, intellectual, public, political parties and media using public opinion formation analysis. The paper aims to re-define the "sustainable university" with all dimensions including…

  16. Defining a Maturity Scale for Governing Operational Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    of technology and innovation continues to accelerate. Sponsorship, strategic planning, and oversight of operational resilience are the most crucial...identify shortfalls across these defined activities, make incremental improvements, and measure improvement against a defined, accepted maturity scale. The...the granu- larity needs for organizations committed to making incremental improvements in governing oper- ational resilience. To achieve a more

  17. Defining Child Neglect Based on Child Protective Services Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowitz, H.; Pitts, S.C.; Litrownik, A.J.; Cox, C.E.; Runyan, D.; Black, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives:: To compare neglect defined by Child Protective Services official codes with neglect defined by a review of CPS narrative data, and to examine the validity of the different neglect measures using children's functioning at age 8 years. Methods:: Data are from 740 children participating in a consortium of longitudinal studies on child…

  18. 26 CFR 1.1250-2 - Additional depreciation defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Additional depreciation defined. 1.1250-2... Additional depreciation defined. (a) In general—(1) Definition for purposes of section 1250(b)(1). Except as... depreciation means: (i) In the case of property which at the time of disposition has a holding period...

  19. Defining and Assessing Team Skills of Business and Accountancy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghalith, Nabil; Blum, Michael; Medlock, Amanda; Weber, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the project are (1) to define the skills necessary for students to work effectively with others to achieve common goals, and (2) to develop an assessment instrument to measure student progress toward achieving these skills. The defined skill set will form a basis for common expectations related to team skills that will be shared…

  20. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Heffron Fred; Van Bruggen Dirk; DeJongh Matthew; Best Aaron A; Tintle Nathan L; Porwollik Steffen; Taylor Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, ...

  1. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis defines shared inflammatory responses in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Celine C; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Nair, Viji; Ramanujam, Meera; Zhang, Weijia; Bottinger, Erwin P; Segerer, Stephan; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D; Davidson, Anne; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Therapeutic studies in mouse LN models do not always predict outcomes of human therapeutic trials, raising concerns about the human relevance of these preclinical models. In this study, we used an unbiased transcriptional network approach to define, in molecular terms, similarities and differences among three lupus models and human LN. Genome-wide gene-expression networks were generated using natural language processing and automated promoter analysis and compared across species via suboptimal graph matching. The three murine models and human LN share both common and unique features. The 20 commonly shared network nodes reflect the key pathologic processes of immune cell infiltration/activation, endothelial cell activation/injury, and tissue remodeling/fibrosis, with macrophage/dendritic cell activation as a dominant cross-species shared transcriptional pathway. The unique nodes reflect differences in numbers and types of infiltrating cells and degree of remodeling among the three mouse strains. To define mononuclear phagocyte-derived pathways in human LN, gene sets activated in isolated NZB/W renal mononuclear cells were compared with human LN kidney profiles. A tissue compartment-specific macrophage-activation pattern was seen, with NF-κB1 and PPARγ as major regulatory nodes in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular networks, respectively. Our study defines which pathologic processes in murine models of LN recapitulate the key transcriptional processes active in human LN and suggests that there are functional differences between mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating different renal microenvironments.

  2. Behavioral Features of Williams Beuren Syndrome Compared to Fragile X Syndrome and Subjects with Intellectual Disability without Defined Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, D.; Granero, R.; Gallastegui, F.; Perez-Jurado, L. A.; Brun-Gasca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a heterozygous deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome band 7q11.23. During the past few years, researchers and clinicians have significantly contributed to define the phenotype of the syndrome, including its cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, it…

  3. A molecularly defined duplication set for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Popodi, Ellen; Holtzman, Stacy L.; Schulze, Karen L.; Park, Soo; Carlson, Joseph W.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2010-07-22

    We describe a molecularly defined duplication kit for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. A set of 408 overlapping P[acman] BAC clones was used to create small duplications (average length 88 kb) covering the 22-Mb sequenced portion of the chromosome. The BAC clones were inserted into an attP docking site on chromosome 3L using C31 integrase, allowing direct comparison of different transgenes. The insertions complement 92% of the essential and viable mutations and deletions tested, demonstrating that almost all Drosophila genes are compact and that the current annotations of the genome are reasonably accurate. Moreover, almost all genes are tolerated at twice the normal dosage. Finally, we more precisely mapped two regions at which duplications cause diplo-lethality in males. This collection comprises the first molecularly defined duplication set to cover a whole chromosome in a multicellular organism. The work presented removes a long-standing barrier to genetic analysis of the Drosophila X chromosome, will greatly facilitate functional assays of X-linked genes in vivo, and provides a model for functional analyses of entire chromosomes in other species.

  4. Chemically Defined Medium and Caenorhabditis elegans: A Powerful Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, N. J.; Kozak, E.; Conley, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Growth in a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of me in large-scale growth and screening of animals. Here we present our initial results from developing culture systems with CeMM. We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats of using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change defined medium composition. As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  5. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-10-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5' and 3' flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5' ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its 'Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1-2 nucleosomes at 5' ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with 'open'/DPN and 'closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with 'closed' promoters, associated with 'noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of 'open' and 'closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate.

  6. Mechanisms by Which Different Functional States of Mitochondria Define Yeast Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Adam; Leonov, Anna; Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Svistkova, Veronika; Lutchman, Vicky; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial functionality is vital to organismal physiology. A body of evidence supports the notion that an age-related progressive decline in mitochondrial function is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging in evolutionarily distant eukaryotes. Studies of the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a unicellular eukaryote, have led to discoveries of genes, signaling pathways and chemical compounds that modulate longevity-defining cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms across phyla. These studies have provided deep insights into mechanistic links that exist between different traits of mitochondrial functionality and cellular aging. The molecular mechanisms underlying the essential role of mitochondria as signaling organelles in yeast aging have begun to emerge. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding mechanisms by which different functional states of mitochondria define yeast longevity, outline the most important unanswered questions and suggest directions for future research. PMID:25768339

  7. Defining the molecular character of the developing and adult kidney podocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W Brunskill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The podocyte is a remarkable cell type, which encases the capillaries of the kidney glomerulus. Although mesodermal in origin it sends out axonal like projections that wrap around the capillaries. These extend yet finer projections, the foot processes, which interdigitate, leaving between them the slit diaphragms, through which the glomerular filtrate must pass. The podocytes are a subject of keen interest because of their key roles in kidney development and disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report we identified and characterized a novel transgenic mouse line, MafB-GFP, which specifically marked the kidney podocytes from a very early stage of development. These mice were then used to facilitate the fluorescent activated cell sorting based purification of podocytes from embryos at E13.5 and E15.5, as well as adults. Microarrays were then used to globally define the gene expression states of podocytes at these different developmental stages. A remarkable picture emerged, identifying the multiple sets of genes that establish the neuronal, muscle, and phagocytic properties of podocytes. The complete combinatorial code of transcription factors that create the podocyte was characterized, and the global lists of growth factors and receptors they express were defined. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The complete molecular character of the in vivo podocyte is established for the first time. The active molecular functions and biological processes further define their unique combination of features. The results provide a resource atlas of gene expression patterns of developing and adult podocytes that will help to guide further research of these incredible cells.

  8. Multi-channel software defined radio experimental evaluation and analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, JR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel software-defined radios (SDRs) can be utilised as inexpensive prototyping platforms for transceiver arrays. The application for multi-channel prototyping is discussed and measured results of coherent channels for both receiver...

  9. NONDENSELY DEFINED IMPULSIVE NEUTRAL FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL INCLUSIONS WITH NONLOCAL CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueju Cao; Xianlong Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, using a fixed point theorem for condensing multi-valued maps, we investigate the existence of integral solutions to a class of nondensely defined neutral evolution impulsive differential inclusions with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces.

  10. An Initial Load-Based Green Software Defined Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ying Hu; Tao Luo; Norman C Beaulieu; Wenjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Software defined network (SDN) is a new network architecture in which the control function is decoupled from the data forwarding plane, that is attracting wide attentions from both research and industry sectors...

  11. 7 CFR 90.2 - General terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS INTRODUCTION Subchapter Definitions § 90.2 General terms defined. Words used in the regulations in...

  12. On Certain Subclasses of Analytic Functions Defined by Differential Subordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Mahzoon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study certain subclasses of analytic functions which are defined by differential subordination. Coefficient inequalities, some properties of neighborhoods, distortion and covering theorems, radius of starlikeness, and convexity for these subclasses are given.

  13. 20 CFR 410.412 - “Total disability” defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.412 “Total disability” defined. (a) A miner shall be considered totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis if:...

  14. 26 CFR 1.815-5 - Other accounts defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES Distributions to Shareholders § 1.815-5 Other accounts defined. The term other accounts, as... included in the shareholders surplus account under section 815(b) and paragraph (b) of § 1.815-3, or in...

  15. Quantifier hierarchies over the first-Order definable tree languages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈云付

    1996-01-01

    Using Boolean operations and concatenation product w.r.t special trees,quantifier hierarchies are given by way of alternate existential and universal quantifiers for the first-order definable tree languages.

  16. 12 CFR 702.104 - Risk portfolios defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification § 702.104 Risk portfolios defined. A risk portfolio is a portfolio....20; and (h) Allowance. The Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses not to exceed the equivalent of...

  17. Software Defined Optical Networks and Its Innovation Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yajie; ZHAO Yongli; ZHANG Jie; WANG Dajiang; WANG Jiayu

    2016-01-01

    Software defined optical networks (SDONs) integrate software defined technology with optical communication networks and represent the promising development trend of future optical networks. The key technologies for SDONs include software⁃defined optical transmission, switching, and networking. The main features include control and transport separation, hard⁃ware universalization, protocol standardization, controllable optical network, and flexible optical network applications. This paper introduces software defined optical networks and its innovation environment, in terms of network architecture, protocol extension solution, experiment platform and typical applications. Batch testing has been conducted to evaluate the performance of this SDON testbed. The results show that the SDON testbed has good scalability in different sizes. Meanwhile, we notice that controller output bandwidth has great influence on lightpath setup delay.

  18. Multiplexed Dosing Assays by Digitally Definable Hydrogel Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack

    2016-01-01

    Stable and low-cost multiplexed drug sensitivity assays using small volumes of cells or tissue are in demand for personalized medicine, including patientspecific combination chemotherapy. Spatially defined projected light photopolymerization of hydrogels with embedded active compounds is introduc...

  19. Software defined radios from smart(er) to cognitive

    CERN Document Server

    Pollin, Sofie; Van der Perre, Liesbet

    2011-01-01

    Software Defined Radios presents a systematic approach to dealing with the complexity of wireless systems with varying standards. The text aims to enable smart operation of radios with impressive efficiency gains, without hampering the quality of service.

  20. High Resolution Software Defined Radar System for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Software Radio Peripheral USRP NI2920, a software defined transceiver so far mainly used in Software Defined Radio applications, is adopted in this work to design a high resolution L-Band Software Defined Radar system. The enhanced available bandwidth, due to the Gigabit Ethernet interface, is exploited to obtain a higher slant-range resolution with respect to the existing Software Defined Radar implementations. A specific LabVIEW application, performing radar operations, is discussed, and successful validations are presented to demonstrate the accurate target detection capability of the proposed software radar architecture. In particular, outdoor and indoor test are performed by adopting a metal plate as reference structure located at different distances from the designed radar system, and results obtained from the measured echo are successfully processed to accurately reveal the correct target position, with the predicted slant-range resolution equal to 6 m.

  1. Defining species specific genome differences in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kingsley J L; Hu, Guangan; Bozdech, Zbynek; Peter, Preiser R

    2010-02-23

    In recent years a number of genome sequences for different plasmodium species have become available. This has allowed the identification of numerous conserved genes across the different species and has significantly enhanced our understanding of parasite biology. In contrast little is known about species specific differences between the different genomes partly due to the lower sequence coverage and therefore relatively poor annotation of some of the draft genomes particularly the rodent malarias parasite species. To improve the current annotation and gene identification status of the draft genomes of P. berghei, P. chabaudi and P. yoelii, we performed genome-wide comparisons between these three species. Through analyses via comparative genome hybridizations using a newly designed pan-rodent array as well as in depth bioinformatics analysis, we were able to improve on the coverage of the draft rodent parasite genomes by detecting orthologous genes between these related rodent parasite species. More than 1,000 orthologs for P. yoelii were now newly associated with a P. falciparum gene. In addition to extending the current core gene set for all plasmodium species this analysis also for the first time identifies a relatively small number of genes that are unique to the primate malaria parasites while a larger gene set is uniquely conserved amongst the rodent malaria parasites. These findings allow a more thorough investigation of the genes that are important for host specificity in malaria.

  2. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  3. Defining the Impact of Non-Native Species

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Tim M Blackburn; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E.; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward ...

  4. Research Network of Tehran Defined Population: Methodology and Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Asghar Kolahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We need a defined population for determining prevalence and incidence of diseases, as well as conducting interventional, cohort and longitudinal studies, calculating correct and timely public health indicators, assessing actual health needs of community, performing educational programs and interventions to promote healthy lifestyle, and enhancing quality of primary health services.The objective of this project was to determine a defined population which is representative of Tehran, the Capital of Iran. This article reports the methodology and establishment of the research network of Tehran defined population.Methods: This project started by selecting two urban health centers from each of the five district health centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Inside each selected urban health center, one defined population research station was established. Two new centers have been added during 2013 and 2014. For the time being, the number of the covered population of the network has reached 40000 individuals. The most important criterion for the defined population has been to be representative of the population of Tehran. For this, we selected two urban health centers from 12 of 22 municipality districts and from each of the five different socioeconomic of Greater Tehran. Merely 80000 individuals in neighborhoods of each defined population research station were considered as control group of the project.Findings: Totally we selected 12 defined population research stations and their under-covered population developed a defined population which is representative of Tehran population.Conclusion: a population lab is ready now in metropolitan of Tehran.

  5. Defining characteristics of the nursing diagnosis: excess fluid volume.

    OpenAIRE

    Narriman Silva De Oliveira Boery, Rita; Bottura Leite De Barros, Alba Lúcia; de Fátima Lucena, Amália

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive exploratory study about the defining characteristics of the nursing diagnosis: excess fluid volume, founde by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association – NANDA. Carried out in an institution in São Paulo, SP, it aimed at the detection of the usage and significance assigned to the defining characteristics, as well as the skills associated to the propaedeutic procedures used in nursing clinical practice to determine such diagnosis. Data were collected through a questionnair...

  6. On uniform definability of types over finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Guingona, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, using definability of types over indiscernible sequences as a template, we study a property of formulas and theories called "uniform definability of types over finite sets" (UDTFS). We explore UDTFS and show how it relates to well-known properties in model theory. We recall that stable theories and weakly o-minimal theories have UDTFS and UDTFS implies dependence. We then show that all dp-minimal theories have UDTFS.

  7. DEFINING SPATIAL VIOLENCE. BUCHAREST AS A STUDY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia GHYKA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the spatial manifestations of violence, aiming to define the category of spatial violence by focusing on the recent urban history of Bucharest; it establishes links with the longer history of natural and inflicted disasters that defined the city, and it explores the spatial, urban, social and symbolical conflicts that occured during the last 25 years, pointing at their consequences on the social and urban substance of the city.

  8. Comprehensive dissection of PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways in PDGFR genetically defined cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erxi Wu

    Full Text Available Despite the growing understanding of pdgf signaling, studies of pdgf function have encountered two major obstacles: the functional redundancy of PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta in vitro and their distinct roles in vivo. Here we used wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF, MEF null for either PDGFRalpha, beta, or both to dissect PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways. These four PDGFR genetically defined cells provided us a platform to study the relative contributions of the pathways triggered by the two PDGF receptors. They were treated with PDGF-BB and analyzed for differential gene expression, in vitro proliferation and differential response to pharmacological effects. No genes were differentially expressed in the double null cells, suggesting minimal receptor-independent signaling. Protean differentiation and proliferation pathways are commonly regulated by PDGFRalpha, PDGFRbeta and PDGFRalpha/beta while each receptor is also responsible for regulating unique signaling pathways. Furthermore, some signaling is solely modulated through heterodimeric PDGFRalpha/beta.

  9. Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Defining BMP functions in the hair follicle by conditional ablation of BMP receptor IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobielak, Krzysztof; Pasolli, H Amalia; Alonso, Laura; Polak, Lisa; Fuchs, Elaine

    2003-11-10

    Using conditional gene targeting in mice, we show that BMP receptor IA is essential for the differentiation of progenitor cells of the inner root sheath and hair shaft. Without BMPRIA activation, GATA-3 is down-regulated and its regulated control of IRS differentiation is compromised. In contrast, Lef1 is up-regulated, but its regulated control of hair differentiation is still blocked, and BMPRIA-null follicles fail to activate Lef1/beta-catenin-regulated genes, including keratin genes. Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation can be restored by transfecting BMPRIA-null keratinocytes with a constitutively activated beta-catenin. This places the block downstream from Lef1 expression but upstream from beta-catenin stabilization. Because mice lacking the BMP inhibitor Noggin fail to express Lef1, our findings support a model, whereby a sequential inhibition and then activation of BMPRIA is necessary to define a band of hair progenitor cells, which possess enough Lef1 and stabilized beta-catenin to activate the hair specific keratin genes and generate the hair shaft.

  11. DNA copy number changes define spatial patterns of heterogeneity in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Childs, Liam Harold; Aust, Daniela; Heim, Daniel; Melching, Friederike; Oliveira, Cristiano; Wolf, Thomas; Durek, Pawel; Schumacher, Dirk; Bläker, Hendrik; von Winterfeld, Moritz; Gastl, Bastian; Möhr, Kerstin; Menne, Andrea; Zeugner, Silke; Redmer, Torben; Lenze, Dido; Tierling, Sascha; Möbs, Markus; Weichert, Wilko; Folprecht, Gunnar; Blanc, Eric; Beule, Dieter; Schäfer, Reinhold; Morkel, Markus; Klauschen, Frederick; Leser, Ulf; Sers, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity between and within tumours is a major factor determining cancer progression and therapy response. Here we examined DNA sequence and DNA copy-number heterogeneity in colorectal cancer (CRC) by targeted high-depth sequencing of 100 most frequently altered genes. In 97 samples, with primary tumours and matched metastases from 27 patients, we observe inter-tumour concordance for coding mutations; in contrast, gene copy numbers are highly discordant between primary tumours and metastases as validated by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To further investigate intra-tumour heterogeneity, we dissected a single tumour into 68 spatially defined samples and sequenced them separately. We identify evenly distributed coding mutations in APC and TP53 in all tumour areas, yet highly variable gene copy numbers in numerous genes. 3D morpho-molecular reconstruction reveals two clusters with divergent copy number aberrations along the proximal–distal axis indicating that DNA copy number variations are a major source of tumour heterogeneity in CRC. PMID:28120820

  12. Sleep Health: Can We Define It? Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysse, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Good sleep is essential to good health. Yet for most of its history, sleep medicine has focused on the definition, identification, and treatment of sleep problems. Sleep health is a term that is infrequently used and even less frequently defined. It is time for us to change this. Indeed, pressures in the research, clinical, and regulatory environments require that we do so. The health of populations is increasingly defined by positive attributes such as wellness, performance, and adaptation, and not merely by the absence of disease. Sleep health can be defined in such terms. Empirical data demonstrate several dimensions of sleep that are related to health outcomes, and that can be measured with self-report and objective methods. One suggested definition of sleep health and a description of self-report items for measuring it are provided as examples. The concept of sleep health synergizes with other health care agendas, such as empowering individuals and communities, improving population health, and reducing health care costs. Promoting sleep health also offers the field of sleep medicine new research and clinical opportunities. In this sense, defining sleep health is vital not only to the health of populations and individuals, but also to the health of sleep medicine itself. Citation: Buysse DJ. Sleep health: can we define it? Does it matter? SLEEP 2014;37(1):9-17. PMID:24470692

  13. Defining Integrals Over Connections in the Discretized Gravitational Functional Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    Integration over connection type variables in the path integral for the discrete form of the first-order formulation of general relativity theory is studied. The result (a generalized function of the rest of variables of the type of tetrad or elementary areas) can be defined through its moments, i.e. integrals of it with the area tensor monomials. In our previous paper these moments have been defined by deforming integration contours in the complex plane as if we had passed to a Euclidean-like region. In this paper we define and evaluate the moments in the genuine Minkowski region. The distribution of interest resulting from these moments in this non-positively defined region contains the divergences. We prove that the latter contribute only to the singular (δ-function like) part of this distribution with support in the non-physical region of the complex plane of area tensors while in the physical region this distribution (usual function) confirms that defined in our previous paper which decays exponentially at large areas. Besides that, we evaluate the basic integrals over which the integral over connections in the general path integral can be expanded.

  14. Molecular signatures define alopecia areata subtypes and transcriptional biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jabbari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia areata (AA is an autoimmune disease typified by nonscarring hair loss with a variable clinical course. In this study, we conducted whole genome gene expression analysis of 96 human scalp skin biopsy specimens from AA or normal control subjects. Based on gene expression profiling, samples formed distinct clusters based on the presence or absence of disease as well as disease phenotype (patchy disease compared with alopecia totalis or universalis. Differential gene expression analysis allowed us to robustly demonstrate graded immune activity in samples of increasing phenotypic severity and generate a quantitative gene expression scoring system that classified samples based on interferon and cytotoxic T lymphocyte immune signatures critical for disease pathogenesis.

  15. Defining a Cancer Dependency Map | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most human epithelial tumors harbor numerous alterations, making it difficult to predict which genes are required for tumor survival. To systematically identify cancer dependencies, we analyzed 501 genome-scale loss-of-function screens performed in diverse human cancer cell lines. We developed DEMETER, an analytical framework that segregates on- from off-target effects of RNAi. 769 genes were differentially required in subsets of these cell lines at a threshold of six SDs from the mean.

  16. SNAP benefits: Can an adequate benefit be defined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaktine, Ann L; Caswell, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) increases the food purchasing power of participating households. A committee convened by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) examined the question of whether it is feasible to define SNAP allotment adequacy. Total resources; individual, household, and environmental factors; and SNAP program characteristics that affect allotment adequacy were identified from a framework developed by the IOM committee. The committee concluded that it is feasible to define SNAP allotment adequacy; however, such a definition must take into account the degree to which participants' total resources and individual, household, and environmental factors influence the purchasing power of SNAP benefits and the impact of SNAP program characteristics on the calculation of the dollar value of the SNAP allotment. The committee recommended that the USDA Food and Nutrition Service investigate ways to incorporate these factors and program characteristics into research aimed at defining allotment adequacy.

  17. Self-dual Codes Defined on Factor Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-song; WANG Jun; DU Qun; ZENG Gui-hua

    2007-01-01

    A definition of a self-dual code on graph and a procedure based on factor graphs to judge a self-dual code were presented.Three contributions of this paper were described as follows.To begin with, transform TR→L were defined, which was the basis of self-dual codes defined on graphs and played a key role in the paper.The second were that a self-dual code could be defined on factor graph, which was much different from conventional algebraic method.The third was that a factor graph approach to judge a self-dual code was illustrated, which took advantage of duality properties of factor graphs and our proposed transform TR→L to offer a convenient and geometrically intuitive process to judge a self-dual code.

  18. A flexible acquisition cycle for incompletely defined fieldbus protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Vasile-Gheorghita; Gaitan, Nicoleta-Cristina; Ungurean, Ioan

    2014-05-01

    Real time data-acquisition from fieldbuses strongly depends on the network type and protocol used. Currently, there is an impressive number of fieldbuses, some of them are completely defined and others are incompletely defined. In those from the second category, the time variable, the main element in real-time data acquisition, does not appear explicitly. Examples include protocols such as Modbus ASCII/RTU, M-bus, ASCII character-based, and so on. This paper defines a flexible acquisition cycle based on the Master-Slave architecture that can be implemented on a Master station, called a Base Station Gateway (BSG). The BSG can add a timestamp for temporal location of data. It also presents a possible extension for the Modbus protocol, developed as simple and low cost solution based on existing hardware.

  19. How microbiology helps define the rhizome of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Kalliopi; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the tree of life (TOF) theory, species are mosaics of gene sequences with different origins. Observations of the extensive lateral sequence transfers in all organisms have demonstrated that the genomes of all life forms are collections of genes with different evolutionary histories that cannot be represented by a single TOF. Moreover, genes themselves commonly have several origins due to recombination. The human genome is not free from recombination events, so it is a mosaic like other organisms' genomes. Recent studies have demonstrated evidence for the integration of parasitic DNA into the human genome. Lateral transfer events have been accepted as major contributors of genome evolution in free-living bacteria. Furthermore, the accumulation of genomic sequence data provides evidence for extended genetic exchanges in intracellular bacteria and suggests that such events constitute an agent that promotes and maintains all bacterial species. Archaea and viruses also form chimeras containing primarily bacterial but also eukaryotic sequences. In addition to lateral transfers, orphan genes are indicative of the fact that gene creation is a permanent and unsettled phenomenon. Currently, a rhizome may more adequately represent the multiplicity and de novo creation of a genome. We wanted to confirm that the term "rhizome" in evolutionary biology applies to the entire cellular life history. This view of evolution should resemble a clump of roots representing the multiple origins of the repertoires of the genes of each species.

  20. How microbiology helps define the rhizome of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi eGeorgiades

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the tree of life theory, species are mosaics of gene sequences with different origins. Observations of the extensive lateral sequence transfers in all organisms have demonstrated that the genomes of all life forms are collections of genes with different evolutionary histories that cannot be represented by a single tree of life. Moreover, genes themselves commonly have several origins due to recombination. The human genome is not free from recombination events, so it is a mosaic like other organisms’ genomes. Recent studies have demonstrated evidence for the integration of parasitic DNA into the human genome. Lateral transfer events have been accepted as major contributors of genome evolution in free-living bacteria. Furthermore, the accumulation of genomic sequence data provides evidence for extended genetic exchanges in intracellular bacteria and suggests that such events constitute an agent that promotes and maintains all bacterial species. Archaea and viruses also form chimeras containing primarily bacterial but also eukaryotic sequences. In addition to lateral transfers, orphan genes are indicative of the fact that gene creation is a permanent and unsettled phenomenon. Currently, a rhizome may more adequately represent the multiplicity and de novo creation of a genome. We wanted to confirm that the term rhizome in evolutionary biology applies to the entire cellular life history. This view of evolution should resemble a clump of roots representing the multiple origins of the repertoires of the genes of each species.

  1. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  2. Programmable bandwidth management in software-defined EPON architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Wei; Hu, Weisheng; Xia, Ming

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a software-defined EPON architecture which replaces the hardware-implemented DBA module with reprogrammable DBA module. The DBA module allows pluggable bandwidth allocation algorithms among multiple ONUs adaptive to traffic profiles and network states. We also introduce a bandwidth management scheme executed at the controller to manage the customized DBA algorithms for all date queues of ONUs. Our performance investigation verifies the effectiveness of this new EPON architecture, and numerical results show that software-defined EPONs can achieve less traffic delay and provide better support to service differentiation in comparison with traditional EPONs.

  3. PREPARATION OF CHEMICALLY WELL-DEFINED CARBOHYDRATE DENDRIMER CONJUGATES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A method for the synthesis of dendrimer conjugates having a well-defined chemical structure, comprising one or more carbohydrate moieties and one or more immunomodulating substances coupled to a dendrimer, is presented. First, the carbohydrate is bound to the dendrimer in a chemoselective manner....... Subsequently, the immunomodulating substance is also bound in a chemoselective manner, to give a dendrimer conjugate with a well-defined structure and connectivity and containing a precise, pre-determined ratio of carbohydrate to immunomodulating substance. The invention also relates to novel dendrimer...

  4. Optimization of the Actuarial Model of Defined Contribution Pension Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the actuarial models of defined contribution pension plan. Through assumptions and calculations, the expected replacement ratios of three different defined contribution pension plans are compared. Specially, more significant considerable factors are put forward in the further cost and risk analyses. In order to get an assessment of current status, the paper finds a relationship between the replacement ratio and the pension investment rate using econometrics method. Based on an appropriate investment rate of 6%, an expected replacement ratio of 20% is reached.

  5. Defining infidelity in research and couple counseling: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Naomi P; Vossler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Infidelity can destroy relationships, but there is long-standing debate in the field about how best to define the construct. A clear definition of infidelity is important theoretically, empirically, and therapeutically; however, research on the topic is limited. This study explores how seven experienced couple counselors define infidelity on the basis of their work with heterosexual couples presenting with this issue. Thematic analysis was used to analyze interview transcripts and research findings suggest a rich web of conflicting definitions of infidelity for couples counselors and, in their accounts, clients. The findings support an understanding of infidelity as socially constructed and the implications of this for the field are discussed.

  6. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinton David E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases. Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development.

  7. Establishment of trophoblast stem cells under defined culture conditions in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Ohinata

    Full Text Available The inner cell mass (ICM and trophoblast cell lineages duet early embryonic development in mammals. After implantation, the ICM forms the embryo proper as well as some extraembryonic tissues, whereas the trophoectoderm (TE exclusively forms the fetal portion of the placenta and the trophoblast giant cells. Although embryonic stem (ES cells can be derived from ICM in cultures of mouse blastocysts in the presence of LIF and/or combinations of small-molecule chemical compounds, and the undifferentiated pluripotent state can be stably maintained without use of serum and feeder cells, defined culture conditions for derivation and maintenance of undifferentiated trophoblast stem (TS cells have not been established. Here, we report that addition of FGF2, activin A, XAV939, and Y27632 are necessary and sufficient for derivation of TS cells from both of E3.5 blastocysts and E6.5 early postimplantation extraembryonic ectoderm. Moreover, the undifferentiated TS cell state can be stably maintained in chemically defined culture conditions. Cells derived in this manner expressed TS cell marker genes, including Eomes, Elf5, Cdx2, Klf5, Cdh1, Esrrb, Sox2, and Tcfap2c; differentiated into all trophoblast subtypes (trophoblast giant cells, spongiotrophoblast, and labyrinthine trophoblast in vitro; and exclusively contributed to trophoblast lineages in chimeric animals. This delineation of minimal requirements for derivation and self-renewal provides a defined platform for precise description and dissection of the molecular state of TS cells.

  8. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  9. The Human Pancreas Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Uhlén, Mathias; Korsgren, Olle; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is composed of both exocrine glands and intermingled endocrine cells to execute its diverse functions, including enzyme production for digestion of nutrients and hormone secretion for regulation of blood glucose levels. To define the molecular constituents with elevated expression in the human pancreas, we employed a genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of the human transcriptome to identify genes with elevated expression in the human pancreas. This quantitative transcriptomics data was combined with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to allow mapping of the corresponding proteins to different compartments and specific cell types within the pancreas down to the single cell level. Analysis of whole pancreas identified 146 genes with elevated expression levels, of which 47 revealed a particular higher expression as compared to the other analyzed tissue types, thus termed pancreas enriched. Extended analysis of in vitro isolated endocrine islets identified an additional set of 42 genes with elevated expression in these specialized cells. Although only 0.7% of all genes showed an elevated expression level in the pancreas, this fraction of transcripts, in most cases encoding secreted proteins, constituted 68% of the total mRNA in pancreas. This demonstrates the extreme specialization of the pancreas for production of secreted proteins. Among the elevated expression profiles, several previously not described proteins were identified, both in endocrine cells (CFC1, FAM159B, RBPJL and RGS9) and exocrine glandular cells (AQP12A, DPEP1, GATM and ERP27). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the pancreas transcriptome and proteome with a comprehensive list of genes and proteins with elevated expression in pancreas. This list represents an important starting point for further studies of the molecular repertoire of pancreatic cells and their relation to disease states or treatment effects. PMID:25546435

  10. The human pancreas proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Angelika; Pontén, Fredrik; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Korsgren, Olle; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is composed of both exocrine glands and intermingled endocrine cells to execute its diverse functions, including enzyme production for digestion of nutrients and hormone secretion for regulation of blood glucose levels. To define the molecular constituents with elevated expression in the human pancreas, we employed a genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of the human transcriptome to identify genes with elevated expression in the human pancreas. This quantitative transcriptomics data was combined with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to allow mapping of the corresponding proteins to different compartments and specific cell types within the pancreas down to the single cell level. Analysis of whole pancreas identified 146 genes with elevated expression levels, of which 47 revealed a particular higher expression as compared to the other analyzed tissue types, thus termed pancreas enriched. Extended analysis of in vitro isolated endocrine islets identified an additional set of 42 genes with elevated expression in these specialized cells. Although only 0.7% of all genes showed an elevated expression level in the pancreas, this fraction of transcripts, in most cases encoding secreted proteins, constituted 68% of the total mRNA in pancreas. This demonstrates the extreme specialization of the pancreas for production of secreted proteins. Among the elevated expression profiles, several previously not described proteins were identified, both in endocrine cells (CFC1, FAM159B, RBPJL and RGS9) and exocrine glandular cells (AQP12A, DPEP1, GATM and ERP27). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the pancreas transcriptome and proteome with a comprehensive list of genes and proteins with elevated expression in pancreas. This list represents an important starting point for further studies of the molecular repertoire of pancreatic cells and their relation to disease states or treatment effects.

  11. 20 CFR 725.511 - Use and benefit defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bearing account in a bank or trust company or in a savings and loan association if the account is either... in an interest or dividend bearing account in a bank or trust company or in a savings and loan... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use and benefit defined. 725.511 Section...

  12. Defining a framework for health information technology evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eric L; Juzwishin, Don; Kushniruk, Andre W; Nahm, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Governments and providers are investing in health information technologies with little evidence as to their ultimate value. We present a conceptual framework that can be used by hospitals, clinics, and health care systems to evaluate their health information technologies. The framework contains three dimensions that collectively define generic evaluation types. When these types are combined with contextual considerations, they define specific evaluation problems. The first dimension, domain, determines whether the evaluation will address the information intervention or its outcomes. The second dimension, mechanism, identifies the specific components of the new information technology and/or its health care system that will be the subject of the evaluation study. And, the third dimension, timing, determines whether the evaluation occurs before or after the health information technology is implemented. Answers to these questions define a set of evaluation types each with generic sets of evaluation questions, study designs, data collection requirements, and analytic methods. When these types are combined with details of the evaluation context, they define specific evaluation problems.

  13. Defining the healthy "core microbiome" of oral microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Zaura; B.J.F. Keijser; S.M. Huse; W. Crielaard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Most studies examining the commensal human oral microbiome are focused on disease or are limited in methodology. In order to diagnose and treat diseases at an early and reversible stage an in-depth definition of health is indispensible. The aim of this study therefore was to define the h

  14. Defining the healthy "core microbiome" of oral microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; Keijser, B.J.; Huse, S.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Most studies examining the commensal human oral microbiome are focused on disease or are limited in methodology. In order to diagnose and treat diseases at an early and reversible stage an in-depth definition of health is indispensible. The aim of this study therefore was to define the h

  15. Defining collaborative business rules management solutions : framework and method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoet, Martijn; Versendaal, Johan

    2014-01-01

    From the publishers' website: The goal of this research is to define a method for configuring a collaborative business rules management solution from a value proposition perspective. In an earlier published study (Business rules management solutions: added value by means of business interoperability

  16. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  17. User constraints for reliable user-defined smart home scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Nielsen, Michael Kvist; Pedersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of constraints restricting the control commands that can be used inside user-defined scenarios. The system is based on timed automata model checking abstracted by event condition action rules. A prototype was implemented, including a user interface to interact with the user. The usability of the system...

  18. Toward Edge-Defined Holey Boron Nitride Nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfan; Connell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Holey" two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets with well-defined holy morphology and edge chemistry are highly desirable for applications such as energy storage, catalysis, sensing, transistors, and molecular transport/separation. For example, holey grapheme is currently under extensive investigation for energy storage applications because of the improvement in ion transport due to through the thickness pathways provided by the holes. Without the holes, the 2D materials have significant limitations for such applications in which efficient ion transport is important. As part of an effort to apply this approach to other 2D nanomaterials, a method to etch geometrically defined pits or holes on the basal plane surface of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets has been developed. The etching, conducted via heating in ambient air using metal nanoparticles as catalysts, was facile, controllable, and scalable. Starting h-BN layered crystals were etched and subsequently exfoliated into boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). The as-etched and exfoliated h-BN nanosheets possessed defined pit and hole shapes that were comprised of regulated nanostructures at the edges. The current finding are the first step toward the bulk preparation of holey BNNSs with defined holes and edges.

  19. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  20. Facet-defining inequalities for the simple graph partitioning polytope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Malmros

    2007-01-01

    The simple graph partitioning problem is to partition an edge-weighted graph into mutually node-disjoint subgraphs, each containing at most b nodes, such that the sum of the weights of all edges in the subgraphs is maximal. In this paper we provide several classes of facet-defining inequalities...

  1. 184 Compounding in Igala: Defining Criteria, Forms and Functions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    semantic criteria have been proposed and used in the analysis and definition of ... frequently used means of producing new lexemes has its overall defining .... shop/store'. One can ..... 'one who is wealth and has many clothes'. It is important to ...

  2. Revisiting Ferguson's Defining Cases of Diglossia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Don

    2013-01-01

    While the defining cases of diglossia offered in Charles Ferguson's 1959 article have long been useful as vehicles for introducing this important form of societal multilingualism, they are also problematic in that they differ from each other in a number of significant ways. This article proposes a modified and more precise framework in which…

  3. Convolution operators defined by singular measures on the motion group

    CERN Document Server

    Brandolini, Luca; Thangavelu, Sundaram; Travaglini, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains an $L^{p}$ improving result for convolution operators defined by singular measures associated to hypersurfaces on the motion group. This needs only mild geometric properties of the surfaces, and it extends earlier results on Radon type transforms on $\\mathbb{R}^{n}$. The proof relies on the harmonic analysis on the motion group.

  4. Nonadditive Set Functions Defined by Aumann Fuzzy Integrals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彦奎; 刘宝碇

    2003-01-01

    A novel concept, called nonadditive set-valued measure, is first defined as a monotone and continuous set function. Then the interconnections between nonadditive set-valued measure and the additive set-valued measure as well as the fuzzy measure are discussed. Finally, an approach to construct a nonadditive compact set-valued measure is presented via Aumann fuzzy integral.

  5. A Generic Synthesis Algorithm for Well-Defined Parametric Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotborgh, W.O.; Kokkeler, F.G.M.; Tragter, H.; Bomhoff, M.J.; Houten, van F.J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to improve the way synthesis tools can be built by formalizing: 1) the design artefact, 2) related knowledge and 3) an algorithm to generate solutions. This paper focuses on well-defined parametric engineering design, ranging from machine elements to industrial products. A design art

  6. Frameworks for defining and managing the wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning

    2012-01-01

    A large and growing body of research on outdoor recreation and the wilderness experience has been conducted over the nearly 50 years since passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964. A number of conceptual and empirical frameworks have emerged from this body of knowledge that can be used to help define and manage the wilderness experience.

  7. What Is Violence Against Women? Defining and Measuring the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2004-01-01

    Violence against women (VAW) is a prevalent problem with substantial physical and mental health consequences throughout the world, and sound public policy is dependent on having good measures of VAW. This article (a) describes and contrasts criminal justice and public health approaches toward defining VAW, (b) identifies major controversies…

  8. How Do States Define Alternative Education? REL 2014-038

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowski, Allan; O'Conner, Rosemarie; Luo, Jia Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an overview of similarities and differences in how states and state education agencies define alternative education, as well as which states have alternative education standards and what those standards entail. The study reviewed information on alternative education definitions and programs from state and federal websites and…

  9. Defining an Approach for Future Close Air Support Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ARROYO CENTER Defining an Approach for Future Close Air Support Capability John Matsumura, John Gordon IV, Randall Steeb Prepared for the United...capabilities; however, this research subsequently refocused specifically on close air support (CAS) capabilities in recent conflict and the possible...1 Definition of Close Air Support

  10. Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-08-01

    The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

  11. 26 CFR 1.761-1 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TAXES Definitions § 1.761-1 Terms defined. (a) Partnership. The term partnership means a partnership as... means a member of a partnership. (c) Partnership agreement. For the purposes of subchapter K, a partnership agreement includes the original agreement and any modifications thereof agreed to by all the...

  12. Defining the complement biomarker profile of c3 glomerulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Nester, Carla M; Martin, Bertha;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) applies to a group of renal diseases defined by a specific renal biopsy finding: a dominant pattern of C3 fragment deposition on immunofluorescence. The primary pathogenic mechanism involves abnormal control of the alternative complement pathway...

  13. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  14. A Contemporary Matrix Approach to Defining Shared Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Richard; Daniels, Elaine; Jones, James; Kesseler, Roger; Mowrey, Merlyn

    This paper outlines a matrix approach to shared governance developed at Central Michigan University (CMU), designed to help faculty and administrators focus on specific decision areas and to define existing roles more clearly. The process began at CMU in spring 1998 with the formation of an ad hoc committee on governance which surveyed faculty and…

  15. Women's Leadership Development: A Study of Defining Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlvig, Jolyn E.; Longman, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a grounded theory study of "defining moments" that were described as pivotal in the personal and professional journeys of women who had been identified as emerging leaders within Christian higher education. Analysis of transcripts from interviews with 16 participants in a Women's Leadership Development…

  16. Software defined radio receivers exploiting noise cancelling: a tutorial review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric; Nauta, Bram

    2014-01-01

    Traditional radio receivers were narrowband and dedicated to a single frequency band exploiting LC tanks, whereas software defined radios target a flexibly programmable frequency. The broadband noise cancelling circuit technique has proven useful to achieve this target, as it breaks the traditional

  17. DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Johnsen, Lars

    visualizations of integrated data automatically. The second key aim of this poster is to define the notion of concept maps 3.0 by adopting an existing set of recommendations for publishing data on the Web, namely the Web Data Principles (http://dret.github.io/webdata/) and transforming these into fundamental...

  18. Responsibility for proving and defining in abstract algebra class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukawa-Connelly, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    There is considerable variety in inquiry-oriented instruction, but what is common is that students assume roles in mathematical activity that in a traditional, lecture-based class are either assumed by the teacher (or text) or are not visible at all in traditional math classrooms. This paper is a case study of the teaching of an inquiry-based undergraduate abstract algebra course. In particular, gives a theoretical account of the defining and proving processes. The study examines the intellectual responsibility for the processes of defining and proving that the professor devolved to the students. While the professor wanted the students to engage in all aspects of defining and proving, he was only successful at devolving responsibility for certain aspects and much more successful at devolving responsibility for proving than conjecturing or defining. This study suggests that even a well-intentioned instructor may not be able to devolve responsibility to students for some aspects of mathematical practice without using a research-based curriculum or further professional development.

  19. Defining Object-Oriented Execution Semantics Using Graph Transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastenberg, H.; Kleppe, A.G.; Rensink, Arend; Gorrieri, R.; Wehrheim, H.

    In this paper we describe an application of the theory of graph transformations to the practise of language design. In particular, we have defined the static and dynamic semantics of a small but realistic object-oriented language (called TAAL) by mapping the language constructs to graphs (the static

  20. Defining Success in Action Learning: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Hyeon-Cheol; Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore how the two groups of action learning experts (Korean and non-Korean experts) define success of action learning to see whether there are any cultural differences. To this end, the authors conducted a total of 44 interviews with action learning experts around the world. Research questions guiding…

  1. Defining and Responding to Issues of Canada's Coastal Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    Defines and discusses critical issues for each of Canada's coastal regions (Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic, and Great Lakes) in environmental, technological, social, and political contexts; reviews recent efforts to obtain and use environmental information; and highlights alternative ways of achieving better stewardship. (Author/DH)

  2. 36 CFR 1206.3 - What terms have you defined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What terms have you defined... GENERAL RULES NATIONAL HISTORICAL PUBLICATIONS AND RECORDS COMMISSION General § 1206.3 What terms have you..., and application instructions. (f) The term historical records means documentary material...

  3. Information sets from defining sets in abelian codes

    CERN Document Server

    Bernal, José Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    We describe a technique to construct a set of check positions (and hence an information set) for every abelian code solely in terms of its defining set. This generalizes that given by Imai in \\cite{Imai} in the case of binary TDC codes.

  4. Properties of dual codes defined by nondegenerate forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Szabo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual codes are defined with respect to non-degenerate sesquilinear or bilinear forms over a finite Frobenius ring. These dual codes have the properties one expects from a dual code: they satisfy a double-dual property, they have cardinality complementary to that of the primal code, and they satisfy the MacWilliams identities for the Hamming weight.

  5. Defining Leadership: Collegiate Women's Learning Circles: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Cunningham, Tammie; Elbert, Chanda D.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2017-01-01

    The researchers employed qualitative methods to evaluate first-year female students' definition of "leadership" through involvement in the Women's Learning Circle. The findings revealed that students defined leadership in two dimensions: traits and behaviors. The qualitative findings explore a multidimensional approach to the voices of…

  6. 26 CFR 53.4942(a)-3 - Qualifying distributions defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... contribution to: (a) A private foundation which is not an operating foundation (as defined in section 4942(j)(3... distribution, since it is a contribution for section 170(c)(2)(B) purposes to an organization which is not... month period for paying the amount set aside may, for good cause shown, be extended by the Commissioner...

  7. 26 CFR 1.952-1 - Subpart F income defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... payment is illegal if the payment would be unlawful under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 if the... exempt from the income tax imposed by chapter 1 (relating to normal taxes and surtaxes) of the Code or is...)(B), or qualified banking or financing income as defined in section 954(h)(3)(A), from a person...

  8. 38 CFR 17.31 - Duty periods defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions and Active Duty § 17.31 Duty periods defined. Full-time duty as a member of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, Women's Reserve of the Navy and Marine Corps and Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard... Patient Rights...

  9. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  10. A definable number which cannot be approximated algorithmically

    CERN Document Server

    Brener, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The Turing machine (TM) and the Church thesis have formalized the concept of computable number, this allowed to display non-computable numbers. This paper defines the concept of number "approachable" by a TM and shows that some (if not all) known non-computable numbers are approachable by TMs. Then an example of a number not approachable by a TM is given.

  11. Defining Deviance: Sex, Science, and Delinquent Girls, 1890-1960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review on "Defining deviance: sex, science, and delinquent girls, 1890-1960," by Michael A. Rembis. This is the first book by Michael A. Rembis, an Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Disability Studies at the University of Buffalo. Drawing on thousands of case files from the Illinois State Training School in…

  12. 75 FR 27927 - Diversification Requirements for Certain Defined Contribution Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... disclosure of the fund's portfolio holdings (for example, Form N-CSR, ``Certified Shareholder Report of... securities that violate the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section. (2) Definitions, effective dates, and transition rules. The definitions of applicable defined contribution plan, employer...

  13. Mitigating the controller performance bottlenecks in Software Defined Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius; Soler, José

    2016-01-01

    The centralization of the control plane decision logic in Software Defined Networking (SDN) has raised concerns regarding the performance of the SDN Controller (SDNC) when the network scales up. A number of solutions have been proposed in the literature to address these concerns. This paper propo...

  14. APIs for QoS configuration in Software Defined Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius; Soler, José

    2015-01-01

    The OpenFlow (OF) protocol is widely used in Software Defined Networking (SDN) to realize the communication between the controller and forwarding devices. OF allows great flexibility in managing traffic flows. However, OF alone is not enough to build more complex SDN services that require complet...

  15. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... clarification filed by Cisco Systems, Inc. (``Cisco'') requesting that the Commission clarify: (1) The... of software that controls security measures in software defined radios. 3. In responding to the Cisco... response to the Cisco petition for reconsideration that raised the issue of using open source software...

  16. Defining Leadership: Collegiate Women's Learning Circles: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Cunningham, Tammie; Elbert, Chanda D.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2017-01-01

    The researchers employed qualitative methods to evaluate first-year female students' definition of "leadership" through involvement in the Women's Learning Circle. The findings revealed that students defined leadership in two dimensions: traits and behaviors. The qualitative findings explore a multidimensional approach to the voices of…

  17. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  18. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  19. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  20. Mutant p53: multiple mechanisms define biologic activity in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Paul Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of p53 alterations involve missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may acquire novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in multiple model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 are reviewed and their limitations discussed.