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  1. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

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    Irshad, Khushboo; Mohapatra, Saroj Kant; Srivastava, Chitrangda; Garg, Harshit; Mishra, Seema; Dikshit, Bhawana; Sarkar, Chitra; Gupta, Deepak; Chandra, Poodipedi Sarat; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sinha, Subrata; Chosdol, Kunzang

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s) characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN) was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2). Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  2. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

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    Khushboo Irshad

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM. Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2. Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  3. Multiple Transcriptome Data Analysis Reveals Biologically Relevant Atopic Dermatitis Signature Genes and Pathways.

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    Debajyoti Ghosh

    Full Text Available Several studies have identified genes that are differentially expressed in atopic dermatitis (AD compared to normal skin. However, there is also considerable variation in the list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs reported by different groups and the exact cause of AD is still not fully understood. Using a rank-based approach, we analyzed gene expression data from five different microarray studies, comprising a total of 127 samples and more than 250,000 transcripts. A total of 89 AD gene expression signatures '89ADGES', including FLG gene, were identified to show dysregulation consistently across these studies. Using a Support Vector Machine, we showed that the '89ADGES' discriminates AD from normal skin with 98% predictive accuracy. Functional annotation of these genes implicated their roles in immune responses (e.g., betadefensin, microseminoprotein, keratinocyte differentiation/epidermal development (e.g., FLG, CORIN, AQP, LOR, KRT16, inflammation (e.g., IL37, IL27RA, CCL18 and lipid metabolism (e.g., AKR1B10, FAD7, FAR2. Subsequently, we validated a subset of signature genes using quantitative PCR in a mouse model. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified keratinocyte pathway over-represented (P = <0.0006 among the 89 signature genes. Keratinocytes are known to play a major role in barrier function due to their location in the epidermis. Our result suggests that besides immune- mediated pathway, skin barrier pathways such as the keratinocyte differentiation pathway play a key role in AD pathogenesis. A better understanding of the role of keratinocytes in AD will be important for developing novel "barrier therapy" for this disease.

  4. Cyanobacterial signature genes.

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    Martin, Kirt A; Siefert, Janet L; Yerrapragada, Sailaja; Lu, Yue; McNeill, Thomas Z; Moreno, Pedro A; Weinstock, George M; Widger, William R; Fox, George E

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of 8 cyanobacterial genomes reveals that there are 181 shared genes that do not have obvious orthologs in other bacteria. These signature genes define aspects of the genotype that are uniquely cyanobacterial. Approximately 25% of these genes have been associated with some function. These signature genes may or may not be involved in photosynthesis but likely they will be in many cases. In addition, several examples of widely conserved gene order involving two or more signature genes were observed. This suggests there may be regulatory processes that have been preserved throughout the long history of the cyanobacterial phenotype. The results presented here will be especially useful because they identify which of the many genes of unassigned function are likely to be of the greatest interest.

  5. Functional relevance of a six mesenchymal gene signature in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) reversal by the triple angiokinase inhibitor, nintedanib (BIBF1120).

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    Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Kuay, Kuee Theng; Tan, Tuan Zea; Asad, Mohammad; Tang, Hei Mui; Ng, Aloysius Hsien Chun; Ye, Jieru; Chung, Vin Yee; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-09-08

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial mechanism in carcinoma progression, describes the process whereby epithelial cells lose their apico-basal polarity and junctional complexes and acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology. Several markers are considered to be authentic indicators of an epithelial or mesenchymal status; however, there is currently no comprehensive or systematic method with which to determine their functional relevance. Previously, we identified a 33-gene EMT signature comprising 25 epithelial and 6 mesenchymal genes that best describe this concept of the EMT spectrum. Here, we designed small-scale siRNA screens targeting these six mesenchymal signature genes (CD99L2, EMP3, ITGA5, SYDE1, VIM, ZEB1) to explore their functional relevance and their roles during EMT reversal by nintedanib (BIBF1120) in a mesenchymal-like SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell line. We found that neither cell proliferation nor cytotoxicity was affected by silencing any of these genes. SKOV3 cells expressing siRNA against mesenchymal genes (ZEB1, EMP3, CD99L2, ITGA5, and SYDE1) showed enhanced colony compaction (reduced inter-nuclear distance). Inductions of E-cadherin expression were only observed in SYDE1- and ZEB1-silenced SKOV3 cells. In addition, only SYDE1-silenced SKOV3 cells showed increased anoikis. Finally, we identified that SYDE1 and ZEB1 were down-regulated in nintedanib-treated SKOV3 cells and SYDE1- and ZEB1-silenced SKOV3 cells showed enhanced nintedanib-induced up-regulation of E-cadherin. Nintedanib-treated SKOV3 cells also showed colony compaction and decreases in EMT scores both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that SYDE1 and ZEB1 are functionally relevant in EMT reversal. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for the use of in vitro siRNA screening to explore the EMT-related functions of selected genes and their potential relevance in the discovery of EMT reversing drugs.

  6. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

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    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  7. SIGNATURE: A workbench for gene expression signature analysis

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    Chang Jeffrey T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenotype of a cell, such as a characteristic visual image or behavior, reflects activities derived from the expression of collections of genes. As such, an ability to measure the expression of these genes provides an opportunity to develop more precise and varied sets of phenotypes. However, to use this approach requires computational methods that are difficult to implement and apply, and thus there is a critical need for intelligent software tools that can reduce the technical burden of the analysis. Tools for gene expression analyses are unusually difficult to implement in a user-friendly way because their application requires a combination of biological data curation, statistical computational methods, and database expertise. Results We have developed SIGNATURE, a web-based resource that simplifies gene expression signature analysis by providing software, data, and protocols to perform the analysis successfully. This resource uses Bayesian methods for processing gene expression data coupled with a curated database of gene expression signatures, all carried out within a GenePattern web interface for easy use and access. Conclusions SIGNATURE is available for public use at http://genepattern.genome.duke.edu/signature/.

  8. Maximizing biomarker discovery by minimizing gene signatures

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    Chang Chang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene signatures can potentially be of considerable value in the field of clinical diagnosis. However, gene signatures defined with different methods can be quite various even when applied the same disease and the same endpoint. Previous studies have shown that the correct selection of subsets of genes from microarray data is key for the accurate classification of disease phenotypes, and a number of methods have been proposed for the purpose. However, these methods refine the subsets by only considering each single feature, and they do not confirm the association between the genes identified in each gene signature and the phenotype of the disease. We proposed an innovative new method termed Minimize Feature's Size (MFS based on multiple level similarity analyses and association between the genes and disease for breast cancer endpoints by comparing classifier models generated from the second phase of MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II, trying to develop effective meta-analysis strategies to transform the MAQC-II signatures into a robust and reliable set of biomarker for clinical applications. Results We analyzed the similarity of the multiple gene signatures in an endpoint and between the two endpoints of breast cancer at probe and gene levels, the results indicate that disease-related genes can be preferably selected as the components of gene signature, and that the gene signatures for the two endpoints could be interchangeable. The minimized signatures were built at probe level by using MFS for each endpoint. By applying the approach, we generated a much smaller set of gene signature with the similar predictive power compared with those gene signatures from MAQC-II. Conclusions Our results indicate that gene signatures of both large and small sizes could perform equally well in clinical applications. Besides, consistency and biological significances can be detected among different gene signatures, reflecting the

  9. Gene Expression Signature in Endemic Osteoarthritis by Microarray Analysis

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    Xi Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD is an endemic osteochondropathy with an unknown pathogenesis. Diagnosis of KBD is effective only in advanced cases, which eliminates the possibility of early treatment and leads to an inevitable exacerbation of symptoms. Therefore, we aim to identify an accurate blood-based gene signature for the detection of KBD. Previously published gene expression profile data on cartilage and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from adults with KBD were compared to select potential target genes. Microarray analysis was conducted to evaluate the expression of the target genes in a cohort of 100 KBD patients and 100 healthy controls. A gene expression signature was identified using a training set, which was subsequently validated using an independent test set with a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR algorithm and support vector machine (SVM algorithm. Fifty unique genes were differentially expressed between KBD patients and healthy controls. A 20-gene signature was identified that distinguished between KBD patients and controls with 90% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. This study identified a 20-gene signature that accurately distinguishes between patients with KBD and controls using peripheral blood samples. These results promote the further development of blood-based genetic biomarkers for detection of KBD.

  10. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development.

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    Eveland, Andrea L; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Meyer, Sandra; Beatty, Mary; Sakai, Hajime; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2010-11-01

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect the determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patterns, an important agronomic trait. In this work, we developed and tested a framework for analysis of tag-based, digital gene expression profiles using Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology and the newly assembled B73 maize reference genome. We also used a mutation in the RA3 gene to identify putative expression signatures specific to stem cell fate in axillary meristem determinacy. The RA3 gene encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and may act at the interface between developmental and metabolic processes. Deep sequencing of digital gene expression libraries, representing three biological replicate ear samples from wild-type and ra3 plants, generated 27 million 20- to 21-nucleotide reads with frequencies spanning 4 orders of magnitude. Unique sequence tags were anchored to 3'-ends of individual transcripts by DpnII and NlaIII digests, which were multiplexed during sequencing. We mapped 86% of nonredundant signature tags to the maize genome, which associated with 37,117 gene models and unannotated regions of expression. In total, 66% of genes were detected by at least nine reads in immature maize ears. We used comparative genomics to leverage existing information from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) in functional analyses of differentially expressed maize genes. Results from this study provide a basis for the analysis of short-read expression data in maize and resolved specific expression signatures that will help define mechanisms of action for the RA3 gene.

  11. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

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    Ruprecht Kuner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  12. Genetic signatures shared in embryonic liver development and liver cancer define prognostically relevant subgroups in HCC

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    Becker Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple activations of individual genes during embryonic liver and HCC development have repeatedly prompted speculations about conserved embryonic signatures driving cancer development. Recently, the emerging discussion on cancer stem cells and the appreciation that generally tumors may develop from progenitor cells of diverse stages of cellular differentiation has shed increasing light on the overlapping genetic signatures between embryonic liver development and HCC. However there is still a lack of systematic studies investigating this area. We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of differentially regulated genetic signaling pathways in embryonic and liver cancer development and investigated their biological relevance. Genetic signaling pathways were investigated on several publically available genome wide microarray experiments on liver development and HCC. Differentially expressed genes were investigated for pathway enrichment or underrepresentation compared to KEGG annotated pathways by Fisher exact evaluation. The comparative analysis of enrichment and under representation of differentially regulated genes in liver development and HCC demonstrated a significant overlap between multiple pathways. Most strikingly we demonstrated a significant overlap not only in pathways expected to be relevant to both conditions such as cell cycle or apoptosis but also metabolic pathways associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, we demonstrated the clinical significance of these findings as unsupervised clustering of HCC patients on the basis of these metabolic pathways displayed significant differences in survival. These results indicate that liver development and liver cancer share similar alterations in multiple genetic signaling pathways. Several pathways with markedly similar patterns of enrichment or underrepresentation of various regulated genes between liver development and HCC are of prognostic relevance in

  13. Simpler Evaluation of Predictions and Signature Stability for Gene Expression Data

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    Yvonne E. Pittelkow

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances are raising expectations that patient-tailored treatment will soon be available. The development of resulting clinical approaches needs to be based on well-designed experimental and observational procedures that provide data to which proper biostatistical analyses are applied. Gene expression microarray and related technology are rapidly evolving. It is providing extremely large gene expression profiles containing many thousands of measurements. Choosing a subset from these gene expression measurements to include in a gene expression signature is one of the many challenges needing to be met. Choice of this signature depends on many factors, including the selection of patients in the training set. So the reliability and reproducibility of the resultant prognostic gene signature needs to be evaluated, in such a way as to be relevant to the clinical setting. A relatively straightforward approach is based on cross validation, with separate selection of genes at each iteration to avoid selection bias. Within this approach we developed two different methods, one based on forward selection, the other on genes that were statistically significant in all training blocks of data. We demonstrate our approach to gene signature evaluation with a well-known breast cancer data set.

  14. Lab-specific gene expression signatures in pluripotent stem cells.

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    Newman, Aaron M; Cooper, James B

    2010-08-06

    Pluripotent stem cells derived from both embryonic and reprogrammed somatic cells have significant potential for human regenerative medicine. Despite similarities in developmental potential, however, several groups have found fundamental differences between embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that may have important implications for iPSC-based medical therapies. Using an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we further studied the genetic homogeneity of iPSC and ESC lines by reanalyzing microarray gene expression data from seven different laboratories. Unexpectedly, this analysis revealed a strong correlation between gene expression signatures and specific laboratories in both ESC and iPSC lines. Nearly one-third of the genes with lab-specific expression signatures are also differentially expressed between ESCs and iPSCs. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in vitro microenvironmental context differentially impacts the gene expression signatures of both iPSCs and ESCs.

  15. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

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    Ang Cui

    Full Text Available Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction. This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples.

  16. A gene expression signature that can predict the recurrence of tamoxifen-treated primary breast cancer.

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    Chanrion, Maïa; Negre, Vincent; Fontaine, Hélène; Salvetat, Nicolas; Bibeau, Frédéric; Mac Grogan, Gaëtan; Mauriac, Louis; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Molina, Franck; Theillet, Charles; Darbon, Jean-Marie

    2008-03-15

    The identification of a molecular signature predicting the relapse of tamoxifen-treated primary breast cancers should help the therapeutic management of estrogen receptor-positive cancers. A series of 132 primary tumors from patients who received adjuvant tamoxifen were analyzed for expression profiles at the whole-genome level by 70-mer oligonucleotide microarrays. A supervised analysis was done to identify an expression signature. We defined a 36-gene signature that correctly classified 78% of patients with relapse and 80% of relapse-free patients (79% accuracy). Using 23 independent tumors, we confirmed the accuracy of the signature (78%) whose relevance was further shown by using published microarray data from 60 tamoxifen-treated patients (63% accuracy). Univariate analysis using the validation set of 83 tumors showed that the 36-gene classifier is more efficient in predicting disease-free survival than the traditional histopathologic prognostic factors and is as effective as the Nottingham Prognostic Index or the "Adjuvant!" software. Multivariate analysis showed that the molecular signature is the only independent prognostic factor. A comparison with several already published signatures demonstrated that the 36-gene signature is among the best to classify tumors from both training and validation sets. Kaplan-Meier analyses emphasized its prognostic power both on the whole cohort of patients and on a subgroup with an intermediate risk of recurrence as defined by the St. Gallen criteria. This study identifies a molecular signature specifying a subgroup of patients who do not gain benefits from tamoxifen treatment. These patients may therefore be eligible for alternative endocrine therapies and/or chemotherapy.

  17. A Comprehensive Gene Expression Meta-analysis Identifies Novel Immune Signatures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

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    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Vishwakarma, Sandeep; Naz, Saima; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Khan, Nooruddin

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a symmetric polyarticular arthritis, has long been feared as one of the most disabling forms of arthritis. Identification of gene signatures associated with RA onset and progression would lead toward development of novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. This study was undertaken to identify unique gene signatures of RA patients through large-scale meta-profiling of a diverse collection of gene expression data sets. We carried out a meta-analysis of 8 publicly available RA patients' (107 RA patients and 76 healthy controls) gene expression data sets and further validated a few meta-signatures in RA patients through quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). We identified a robust meta-profile comprising 33 differentially expressed genes, which were consistently and significantly expressed across all the data sets. Our meta-analysis unearthed upregulation of a few novel gene signatures including PLCG2, HLA-DOB, HLA-F, EIF4E2, and CYFIP2, which were validated in peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of RA patients. Further, functional and pathway enrichment analysis reveals perturbation of several meta-genes involved in signaling pathways pertaining to inflammation, antigen presentation, hypoxia, and apoptosis during RA. Additionally, PLCG2 (phospholipase Cγ2) popped out as a novel meta-gene involved in most of the pathways relevant to RA including inflammasome activation, platelet aggregation, and activation, thereby suggesting PLCG2 as a potential therapeutic target for controlling excessive inflammation during RA. In conclusion, these findings highlight the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease onset, progression and possibly lead toward the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic interventions against RA.

  18. A Comprehensive Gene Expression Meta-analysis Identifies Novel Immune Signatures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

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    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Vishwakarma, Sandeep; Naz, Saima; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Khan, Nooruddin

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a symmetric polyarticular arthritis, has long been feared as one of the most disabling forms of arthritis. Identification of gene signatures associated with RA onset and progression would lead toward development of novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. This study was undertaken to identify unique gene signatures of RA patients through large-scale meta-profiling of a diverse collection of gene expression data sets. We carried out a meta-analysis of 8 publicly available RA patients’ (107 RA patients and 76 healthy controls) gene expression data sets and further validated a few meta-signatures in RA patients through quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). We identified a robust meta-profile comprising 33 differentially expressed genes, which were consistently and significantly expressed across all the data sets. Our meta-analysis unearthed upregulation of a few novel gene signatures including PLCG2, HLA-DOB, HLA-F, EIF4E2, and CYFIP2, which were validated in peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of RA patients. Further, functional and pathway enrichment analysis reveals perturbation of several meta-genes involved in signaling pathways pertaining to inflammation, antigen presentation, hypoxia, and apoptosis during RA. Additionally, PLCG2 (phospholipase Cγ2) popped out as a novel meta-gene involved in most of the pathways relevant to RA including inflammasome activation, platelet aggregation, and activation, thereby suggesting PLCG2 as a potential therapeutic target for controlling excessive inflammation during RA. In conclusion, these findings highlight the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease onset, progression and possibly lead toward the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic interventions against RA. PMID:28210261

  19. A prognostic gene expression signature in infratentorial ependymoma.

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    Wani, Khalida; Armstrong, Terri S; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Raghunathan, Aditya; Ellison, David; Gilbertson, Richard; Vaillant, Brian; Goldman, Stewart; Packer, Roger J; Fouladi, Maryam; Pollack, Ian; Mikkelsen, Tom; Prados, Michael; Omuro, Antonio; Soffietti, Riccardo; Ledoux, Alicia; Wilson, Charmaine; Long, Lihong; Gilbert, Mark R; Aldape, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Patients with ependymoma exhibit a wide range of clinical outcomes that are currently unexplained by clinical or histological factors. Little is known regarding molecular biomarkers that could predict clinical behavior. Since recent data suggest that these tumors display biological characteristics according to their location (cerebral vs. infratentorial vs. spinal cord), rather than explore a broad spectrum of ependymoma, we focused on molecular alterations in ependymomas arising in the infratentorial compartment. Unsupervised clustering of available gene expression microarray data revealed two major subgroups of infratentorial ependymoma. Group 1 tumors over expressed genes that were associated with mesenchyme, Group 2 tumors showed no distinct gene ontologies. To assess the prognostic significance of these gene expression subgroups, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays were performed on genes defining the subgroups in a training set. This resulted in a 10-gene prognostic signature. Multivariate analysis showed that the 10-gene signature was an independent predictor of recurrence-free survival after adjusting for clinical factors. Evaluation of an external dataset describing subgroups of infratentorial ependymomas showed concordance of subgroup definition, including validation of the mesenchymal subclass. Importantly, the 10-gene signature was validated as a predictor of recurrence-free survival in this dataset. Taken together, the results indicate a link between clinical outcome and biologically identified subsets of infratentorial ependymoma and offer the potential for prognostic testing to estimate clinical aggressiveness in these tumors.

  20. Gene expression signature in peripheral blood detects thoracic aortic aneurysm.

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    Yulei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA is usually asymptomatic and associated with high mortality. Adverse clinical outcome of TAA is preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. We hypothesized that gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells may correlate with TAA disease status. Our goal was to identify a distinct gene expression signature in peripheral blood that may identify individuals at risk for TAA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles from 94 peripheral blood samples (collected from 58 individuals with TAA and 36 controls were analyzed. Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM identified potential signature genes characterizing TAA vs. normal, ascending vs. descending TAA, and sporadic vs. familial TAA. Using a training set containing 36 TAA patients and 25 controls, a 41-gene classification model was constructed for detecting TAA status and an overall accuracy of 78+/-6% was achieved. Testing this classifier on an independent validation set containing 22 TAA samples and 11 controls yielded an overall classification accuracy of 78%. These 41 classifier genes were further validated by TaqMan real-time PCR assays. Classification based on the TaqMan data replicated the microarray results and achieved 80% classification accuracy on the testing set. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood cells that can characterize TAA status and subtypes of TAA. Moreover, a 41-gene classifier based on expression signature can identify TAA patients with high accuracy. The transcriptional programs in peripheral blood leading to the identification of these markers also provide insights into the mechanism of development of aortic aneurysms and highlight potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The classifier genes identified in this study, and validated by TaqMan real-time PCR, define a set of promising potential

  1. A gene signature to determine metastatic behavior in thymomas.

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    Yesim Gökmen-Polar

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Thymoma represents one of the rarest of all malignancies. Stage and completeness of resection have been used to ascertain postoperative therapeutic strategies albeit with limited prognostic accuracy. A molecular classifier would be useful to improve the assessment of metastatic behaviour and optimize patient management. METHODS: qRT-PCR assay for 23 genes (19 test and four reference genes was performed on multi-institutional archival primary thymomas (n = 36. Gene expression levels were used to compute a signature, classifying tumors into classes 1 and 2, corresponding to low or high likelihood for metastases. The signature was validated in an independent multi-institutional cohort of patients (n = 75. RESULTS: A nine-gene signature that can predict metastatic behavior of thymomas was developed and validated. Using radial basis machine modeling in the training set, 5-year and 10-year metastasis-free survival rates were 77% and 26% for predicted low (class 1 and high (class 2 risk of metastasis (P = 0.0047, log-rank, respectively. For the validation set, 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 97% and 30% for predicted low- and high-risk patients (P = 0.0004, log-rank, respectively. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rates for the validation set were 49% and 41% for Masaoka stages I/II and III/IV (P = 0.0537, log-rank, respectively. In univariate and multivariate Cox models evaluating common prognostic factors for thymoma metastasis, the nine-gene signature was the only independent indicator of metastases (P = 0.036. CONCLUSION: A nine-gene signature was established and validated which predicts the likelihood of metastasis more accurately than traditional staging. This further underscores the biologic determinants of the clinical course of thymoma and may improve patient management.

  2. A gene expression signature for RSV: clinical implications and limitations.

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    Peter J M Openshaw

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Peter Openshaw discusses the challenges in advancing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV treatments and the implications of a study by Mejias and colleagues using a newly identified gene signature for diagnosis and prediction of RSV severity. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  3. Yin Yang gene expression ratio signature for lung cancer prognosis.

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    Wayne Xu

    Full Text Available Many studies have established gene expression-based prognostic signatures for lung cancer. All of these signatures were built from training data sets by learning the correlation of gene expression with the patients' survival time. They require all new sample data to be normalized to the training data, ultimately resulting in common problems of low reproducibility and impracticality. To overcome these problems, we propose a new signature model which does not involve data training. We hypothesize that the imbalance of two opposing effects in lung cancer cells, represented by Yin and Yang genes, determines a patient's prognosis. We selected the Yin and Yang genes by comparing expression data from normal lung and lung cancer tissue samples using both unsupervised clustering and pathways analyses. We calculated the Yin and Yang gene expression mean ratio (YMR as patient risk scores. Thirty-one Yin and thirty-two Yang genes were identified and selected for the signature development. In normal lung tissues, the YMR is less than 1.0; in lung cancer cases, the YMR is greater than 1.0. The YMR was tested for lung cancer prognosis prediction in four independent data sets and it significantly stratified patients into high- and low-risk survival groups (p = 0.02, HR = 2.72; p = 0.01, HR = 2.70; p = 0.007, HR = 2.73; p = 0.005, HR = 2.63. It also showed prediction of the chemotherapy outcomes for stage II & III. In multivariate analysis, the YMR risk factor was more successful at predicting clinical outcomes than other commonly used clinical factors, with the exception of tumor stage. The YMR can be measured in an individual patient in the clinic independent of gene expression platform. This study provided a novel insight into the biology of lung cancer and shed light on the clinical applicability.

  4. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

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    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  5. Investigation of radiosensitivity gene signatures in cancer cell lines.

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    John S Hall

    Full Text Available Intrinsic radiosensitivity is an important factor underlying radiotherapy response, but there is no method for its routine assessment in human tumours. Gene signatures are currently being derived and some were previously generated by expression profiling the NCI-60 cell line panel. It was hypothesised that focusing on more homogeneous tumour types would be a better approach. Two cell line cohorts were used derived from cervix [n = 16] and head and neck [n = 11] cancers. Radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2 by clonogenic assay. Differential gene expression between radiosensitive and radioresistant cell lines (SF2 median was investigated using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0ST (cervix or U133A Plus2 (head and neck arrays. There were differences within cell line cohorts relating to tissue of origin reflected by expression of the stratified epithelial marker p63. Of 138 genes identified as being associated with SF2, only 2 (1.4% were congruent between the cervix and head and neck carcinoma cell lines (MGST1 and TFPI, and these did not partition the published NCI-60 cell lines based on SF2. There was variable success in applying three published radiosensitivity signatures to our cohorts. One gene signature, originally trained on the NCI-60 cell lines, did partially separate sensitive and resistant cell lines in all three cell line datasets. The findings do not confirm our hypothesis but suggest that a common transcriptional signature can reflect the radiosensitivity of tumours of heterogeneous origins.

  6. Functional relevance of microbiome signatures: The correlation era requires tools for consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttó, Ludovica F; Haller, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Compelling research over the past decade identified a fundamental role of the intestinal microbiome on human health. Compositional and functional changes of this microbial ecosystem are correlated with a variety of human pathologies. Metagenomic resolution and bioinformatic tools considerably improved, allowing even strain-level analysis. However, the search for microbial risk patterns in human cohorts is often confounded by environmental factors (eg, medication) and host status (eg, disease relapse), questioning the prognostic and therapeutic value of the currently available information. In addition to a better stratification of human phenotypes, the implementation of standardized protocols for sampling and analysis is needed to improve the reproducibility and comparability of microbiome signatures at a meaningful taxonomic resolution. At the level of mechanistic understanding, the molecular integration of pleiotropic signals coming from this complex and dynamically changing ecosystem is one of the biggest challenges in this field. The first successful attempts to apply reverse genetics based on the available metagenomic information yielded identification of small molecules and metabolites with functional relevance for microbe-host interactions. Further expansion on the isolation of bacteria from the "unculturable biomass" will help characterize microbiome signatures in model systems, finally aiming at the development of clinically relevant synthetic consortia with safe and functionally well-defined strains. In conclusion and beyond reasonable enthusiasm, the mechanistic implementation and clinical relevance of microbiome alterations on disease susceptibility is still in its infancy, but the integration of all the above-mentioned strategies will help overcome the correlation era in microbiome research and lead to a rational evaluation of clinical strategies relevant for targeted microbial intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  7. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon's plastic life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Horth, N.; Letcher, B.H.; Hofmann, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated-at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction-in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Combining gene signatures improves prediction of breast cancer survival.

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    Xi Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123 and test set (n = 81, respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014. Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001. The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. CONCLUSION: Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves

  9. KIT mutations confer a distinct gene expression signature in core binding factor leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Du, Juan; Gaidzik, Verena; Schlenk, Richard F; Pollack, Jonathan R; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) leukaemias, characterized by either inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(8;21)(q22;q22), constitute acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) subgroups with favourable prognosis. However, 40-50% of patients relapse, emphasizing the need for risk-adapted treatment approaches. In this regard, studying secondary genetic aberrations, such as mutations of the KIT gene, is of great interest, particularly as they can be targeted by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). However, so far little is known about the biology underlying KIT-mutated CBF leukaemias. We analysed gene expression profiles of 83 CBF AML cases with known KIT mutation status in order to gain novel insights in KIT-mutated CBF pathogenesis. KIT-mutated cases were characterized by deregulation of genes belonging to the NFkB signalling complex suggesting impaired control of apoptosis. Notably, a subgroup of KIT wildtype cases was also characterized by the KIT mutation signature due to yet unknown aberrations. Our data suggest that this CBF leukaemia subgroup might profit from TKI therapy, however, the relevance of the KIT mutation-associated signature remains to be validated prior to clinical implementation. Nevertheless, the existence of such a signature supports the notion of relevant biological differences in CBF leukaemia and might serve as diagnostic tool in the future.

  10. Diagnosis by numbers: defining skin disease pathogenesis through collated gene signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Amr; McGrath, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disease gene expression profiles can be utilized as biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and targeted therapeutic purposes, although individual data sets may be of limited generic value. To develop broader clinical relevance from disease gene signatures, Inkeles et al. demonstrate how mining publically available microarray data from a range of skin disorders can elucidate disease pathways, generate a multi-disease classifier, and identify potential therapeutic targets. This integrative molecular classification and functional analysis offers a new approach to understanding disease pathogenesis, with significant implications for diagnostics and the development of personalized medicine.

  11. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogner Per

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB; Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples. Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and/or dead of disease, p Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group's specific characteristics.

  12. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

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    Ausra Milano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc, 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc, 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001 and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs

  13. FARO server: Meta-analysis of gene expression by matching gene expression signatures to a compendium of public gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manijak, Mieszko P.; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although, systematic analysis of gene annotation is a powerful tool for interpreting gene expression data, it sometimes is blurred by incomplete gene annotation, missing expression response of key genes and secondary gene expression responses. These shortcomings may be partially...... circumvented by instead matching gene expression signatures to signatures of other experiments. FINDINGS: To facilitate this we present the Functional Association Response by Overlap (FARO) server, that match input signatures to a compendium of 242 gene expression signatures, extracted from more than 1700...

  14. A common molecular signature in ASD gene expression: following Root 66 to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Beltran, L; Esteban, F J; Wall, D P

    2016-01-05

    Several gene expression experiments on autism spectrum disorders have been conducted using both blood and brain tissue. Individually, these studies have advanced our understanding of the molecular systems involved in the molecular pathology of autism and have formed the bases of ongoing work to build autism biomarkers. In this study, we conducted an integrated systems biology analysis of 9 independent gene expression experiments covering 657 autism, 9 mental retardation and developmental delay and 566 control samples to determine if a common signature exists and to test whether regulatory patterns in the brain relevant to autism can also be detected in blood. We constructed a matrix of differentially expressed genes from these experiments and used a Jaccard coefficient to create a gene-based phylogeny, validated by bootstrap. As expected, experiments and tissue types clustered together with high statistical confidence. However, we discovered a statistically significant subgrouping of 3 blood and 2 brain data sets from 3 different experiments rooted by a highly correlated regulatory pattern of 66 genes. This Root 66 appeared to be non-random and of potential etiologic relevance to autism, given their enriched roles in neurological processes key for normal brain growth and function, learning and memory, neurodegeneration, social behavior and cognition. Our results suggest that there is a detectable autism signature in the blood that may be a molecular echo of autism-related dysregulation in the brain.

  15. Extraction and analysis of signatures from the Gene Expression Omnibus by the crowd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jagodnik, Kathleen M.; Fernandez, Nicolas F.; Gundersen, Gregory W.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Jenkins, Sherry L.; Feldmann, Axel S.; Hu, Kevin S.; McDermott, Michael G.; Duan, Qiaonan; Clark, Neil R.; Jones, Matthew R.; Kou, Yan; Goff, Troy; Woodland, Holly; Amaral, Fabio M. R.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Fuchs, Oliver; Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose, Sophia M.; Sharma, Shvetank; Schwartz, Uwe; Bausela, Xabier Bengoetxea; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Maroulis, Vasileios; Salykin, Anton; Barra, Carolina M.; Kruth, Candice D.; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Mathur, Vaibhav; Todoric, Radmila D.; Rubin, Udi E.; Malatras, Apostolos; Fulp, Carl T.; Galindo, John A.; Motiejunaite, Ruta; Jüschke, Christoph; Dishuck, Philip C.; Lahl, Katharina; Jafari, Mohieddin; Aibar, Sara; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Steenhuizen, Linda H.; Allison, Lindsey R.; Gamallo, Pablo; de Andres Segura, Fernando; Dae Devlin, Tyler; Pérez-García, Vicente; Ma'Ayan, Avi

    2016-09-01

    Gene expression data are accumulating exponentially in public repositories. Reanalysis and integration of themed collections from these studies may provide new insights, but requires further human curation. Here we report a crowdsourcing project to annotate and reanalyse a large number of gene expression profiles from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Through a massive open online course on Coursera, over 70 participants from over 25 countries identify and annotate 2,460 single-gene perturbation signatures, 839 disease versus normal signatures, and 906 drug perturbation signatures. All these signatures are unique and are manually validated for quality. Global analysis of these signatures confirms known associations and identifies novel associations between genes, diseases and drugs. The manually curated signatures are used as a training set to develop classifiers for extracting similar signatures from the entire GEO repository. We develop a web portal to serve these signatures for query, download and visualization.

  16. Extraction and analysis of signatures from the Gene Expression Omnibus by the crowd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jagodnik, Kathleen M.; Fernandez, Nicolas F.; Gundersen, Gregory W.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Jenkins, Sherry L.; Feldmann, Axel S.; Hu, Kevin S.; McDermott, Michael G.; Duan, Qiaonan; Clark, Neil R.; Jones, Matthew R.; Kou, Yan; Goff, Troy; Woodland, Holly; Amaral, Fabio M R.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Fuchs, Oliver; Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose, Sophia M.; Sharma, Shvetank; Schwartz, Uwe; Bausela, Xabier Bengoetxea; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Maroulis, Vasileios; Salykin, Anton; Barra, Carolina M.; Kruth, Candice D.; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Mathur, Vaibhav; Todoric, Radmila D; Rubin, Udi E.; Malatras, Apostolos; Fulp, Carl T.; Galindo, John A.; Motiejunaite, Ruta; Jüschke, Christoph; Dishuck, Philip C.; Lahl, Katharina; Jafari, Mohieddin; Aibar, Sara; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Steenhuizen, Linda H.; Allison, Lindsey R.; Gamallo, Pablo; de Andres Segura, Fernando; Dae Devlin, Tyler; Pérez-García, Vicente; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression data are accumulating exponentially in public repositories. Reanalysis and integration of themed collections from these studies may provide new insights, but requires further human curation. Here we report a crowdsourcing project to annotate and reanalyse a large number of gene expression profiles from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Through a massive open online course on Coursera, over 70 participants from over 25 countries identify and annotate 2,460 single-gene perturbation signatures, 839 disease versus normal signatures, and 906 drug perturbation signatures. All these signatures are unique and are manually validated for quality. Global analysis of these signatures confirms known associations and identifies novel associations between genes, diseases and drugs. The manually curated signatures are used as a training set to develop classifiers for extracting similar signatures from the entire GEO repository. We develop a web portal to serve these signatures for query, download and visualization. PMID:27667448

  17. Enhancing Interpretability of Gene Signatures with Prior Biological Knowledge

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    Margherita Squillario

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological interpretability is a key requirement for the output of microarray data analysis pipelines. The most used pipeline first identifies a gene signature from the acquired measurements and then uses gene enrichment analysis as a tool for functionally characterizing the obtained results. Recently Knowledge Driven Variable Selection (KDVS, an alternative approach which performs both steps at the same time, has been proposed. In this paper, we assess the effectiveness of KDVS against standard approaches on a Parkinson’s Disease (PD dataset. The presented quantitative analysis is made possible by the construction of a reference list of genes and gene groups associated to PD. Our work shows that KDVS is much more effective than the standard approach in enhancing the interpretability of the obtained results.

  18. Gene Expression Signatures of Lymph Node Metastasis in Oral Cancer: Molecular Characteristics and Clinical Significances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiqiang; Kolokythas, Antonia; Wang, Jianguang; Huang, Hongzhang; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Even though lymph node metastasis accounts for the vast majority of cancer death in patients with oral cancer (OC), the molecular mechanisms of lymph node metastasis remain elusive. Genome-wide microarray analyses and functional studies in vitro and in vivo, along with detailed clinical observations, have identified a number of molecules that may contribute to lymph node metastasis. These include lymphangionenic cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, basement membrane-interacting molecules, matrix enzymes and relevant downstream signaling pathways. However, defined gene signatures from different studies are highly variable, which hinders their translation to clinically relevant applications. To date, none of the identified signatures or molecular biomarkers has been successfully implemented as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. In this review, we will first introduce the significance of lymph node metastasis in OC, and clinical/experimental evidences that support the underlying molecular mechanisms. We will then provide a comprehensive review and integrative analysis of the existing gene expression studies that aim to identify the metastasis-related signatures in OC. Finally, the remaining challenges will be discussed and our insights on future directions will be provided. PMID:21709736

  19. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  20. A signature inferred from Drosophila mitotic genes predicts survival of breast cancer patients.

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    Christian Damasco

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The classification of breast cancer patients into risk groups provides a powerful tool for the identification of patients who will benefit from aggressive systemic therapy. The analysis of microarray data has generated several gene expression signatures that improve diagnosis and allow risk assessment. There is also evidence that cell proliferation-related genes have a high predictive power within these signatures. METHODS: We thus constructed a gene expression signature (the DM signature using the human orthologues of 108 Drosophila melanogaster genes required for either the maintenance of chromosome integrity (36 genes or mitotic division (72 genes. RESULTS: The DM signature has minimal overlap with the extant signatures and is highly predictive of survival in 5 large breast cancer datasets. In addition, we show that the DM signature outperforms many widely used breast cancer signatures in predictive power, and performs comparably to other proliferation-based signatures. For most genes of the DM signature, an increased expression is negatively correlated with patient survival. The genes that provide the highest contribution to the predictive power of the DM signature are those involved in cytokinesis. CONCLUSION: This finding highlights cytokinesis as an important marker in breast cancer prognosis and as a possible target for antimitotic therapies.

  1. Saliva microbiota carry caries-specific functional gene signatures.

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    Fang Yang

    Full Text Available Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis.

  2. Gene expression signatures for colorectal cancer microsatellite status and HNPCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, M; Jensen, J L; Laiho, P;

    2005-01-01

    The majority of microsatellite instable (MSI) colorectal cancers are sporadic, but a subset belongs to the syndrome hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Microsatellite instability is caused by dysfunction of the mismatch repair (MMR) system that leads to a mutator phenotype, and MSI...... of 101 stage II and III colorectal cancers (34 MSI, 67 microsatellite stable (MSS)) using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. From these data, we constructed a nine-gene signature capable of separating the mismatch repair proficient and deficient tumours. Subsequently, we demonstrated...

  3. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

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    Jun Yao

    Full Text Available Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT, recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  4. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoming; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N

    2012-01-01

    Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling) to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT), recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN) is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  5. A gene expression signature that defines breast cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Seebach, Jeff; Field, Lori A; Heckman, Caroline; Kane, Jennifer; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Love, Brad; Shriver, Craig D

    2009-01-01

    The most important predictor of prognosis in breast cancer is lymph node status, yet little is known about molecular changes associated with lymph node metastasis. Here, gene expression analysis was performed on primary breast (PBT) and corresponding metastatic lymph node (MLN) tumors to identify molecular signatures associated with nodal metastasis. RNA was isolated after laser microdissection from frozen PBT and MLN from 20 patients with positive lymph nodes and hybridized to the microarray chips. Differential expression was determined using Mann-Whitney testing; Bonferroni corrected P values of 0.05 and 0.001 were calculated. Results were validated using TaqMan assays. Fifty-one genes were differentially expressed (P 100-fold higher expression in MLT while COL11A1, KRT14, MMP13, TAC1 and WNT2 had >100-fold higher expression in PBT. Gene expression differences between PBT and MLN suggests that expression of a unique set of genes is required for successful lymph node colonization. Genes expressed at higher levels in PBT are involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix, enabling cells with metastatic potential to disseminate, while genes expressed at higher levels in metastases are involved in transcription, signal transduction and immune response, providing cells with proliferation and survival advantages. These data improve our understanding of the biological processes involved in successful metastatis and provide new targets to arrest tumor cell dissemination and metastatic colonization.

  6. Evolutionary signatures amongst disease genes permit novel methods for gene prioritization and construction of informative gene-based networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Priedigkeit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC, is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting "disease map" network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks.

  7. Proteomic signatures reveal a dualistic and clinically relevant classification of anal canal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfs, Michael; Longuespée, Rémi; Quick, Charles M; Roncarati, Patrick; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Hubert, Pascale; Lebeau, Alizée; Bruyere, Diane; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Baiwir, Dominique; Lai, Keith; Dunn, Andrew; Obregon, Fabiola; Yang, Eric J; Pauw, Edwin De; Crum, Christopher P; Delvenne, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Aetiologically linked to HPV infection, malignancies of the anal canal have substantially increased in incidence over the last 20 years. Although most anal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) respond well to chemoradiotherapy, about 30% of patients experience a poor outcome, for undetermined reasons. Despite cumulative efforts for discovering independent predictors of overall survival, both nodal status and tumour size are still the only reliable factors predicting patient outcome. Recent efforts have revealed that the biology of HPV-related lesions in the cervix is strongly linked to the originally infected cell population. To address the hypothesis that topography also influences both gene expression profile and behaviour of anal (pre)neoplastic lesions, we correlated both proteomic signatures and clinicopathological features of tumours arising from two distinct portions of the anal canal: the lower part (squamous zone) and the more proximal anal transitional zone. Although microdissected cancer cells appeared indistinguishable by morphology (squamous phenotype), unsupervised clustering analysis of the whole proteome significantly highlighted the heterogeneity that exists within anal canal tumours. More importantly, two region-specific subtypes of SCC were revealed. The expression profile (sensitivity/specificity) of several selected biomarkers (keratin filaments) further confirmed the subclassification of anal (pre)cancers based on their cellular origin. Less commonly detected compared to their counterparts located in the squamous mucosa, SCCs originating in the transitional zone more frequently displayed a poor or basaloid differentiation, and were significantly correlated with reduced disease-free and overall survivals. Taken together, we present direct evidence that anal canal SCC comprises two distinct entities with different cells of origin, proteomic signatures, and survival rates. This study forms the basis for a dualistic classification of anal carcinoma

  8. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  9. Minimising immunohistochemical false negative ER classification using a complementary 23 gene expression signature of ER status.

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    Qiyuan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER in breast cancer predicts benefit from endocrine therapy. Minimising the frequency of false negative ER status classification is essential to identify all patients with ER positive breast cancers who should be offered endocrine therapies in order to improve clinical outcome. In routine oncological practice ER status is determined by semi-quantitative methods such as immunohistochemistry (IHC or other immunoassays in which the ER expression level is compared to an empirical threshold. The clinical relevance of gene expression-based ER subtypes as compared to IHC-based determination has not been systematically evaluated. Here we attempt to reduce the frequency of false negative ER status classification using two gene expression approaches and compare these methods to IHC based ER status in terms of predictive and prognostic concordance with clinical outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, ER status was discriminated by fitting the bimodal expression of ESR1 to a mixed Gaussian model. The discriminative power of ESR1 suggested bimodal expression as an efficient way to stratify breast cancer; therefore we identified a set of genes whose expression was both strongly bimodal, mimicking ESR expression status, and highly expressed in breast epithelial cell lines, to derive a 23-gene ER expression signature-based classifier. We assessed our classifiers in seven published breast cancer cohorts by comparing the gene expression-based ER status to IHC-based ER status as a predictor of clinical outcome in both untreated and tamoxifen treated cohorts. In untreated breast cancer cohorts, the 23 gene signature-based ER status provided significantly improved prognostic power compared to IHC-based ER status (P = 0.006. In tamoxifen-treated cohorts, the 23 gene ER expression signature predicted clinical outcome (HR = 2.20, P = 0.00035. These complementary ER signature-based strategies

  10. Meta-analysis of muscle transcriptome data using the MADMuscle database reveals biologically relevant gene patterns

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    Teusan Raluca

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology has had a great impact on muscle research and microarray gene expression data has been widely used to identify gene signatures characteristic of the studied conditions. With the rapid accumulation of muscle microarray data, it is of great interest to understand how to compare and combine data across multiple studies. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data is a valuable method to achieve it. It enables to highlight conserved gene signatures between multiple independent studies. However, using it is made difficult by the diversity of the available data: different microarray platforms, different gene nomenclature, different species studied, etc. Description We have developed a system tool dedicated to muscle transcriptome data. This system comprises a collection of microarray data as well as a query tool. This latter allows the user to extract similar clusters of co-expressed genes from the database, using an input gene list. Common and relevant gene signatures can thus be searched more easily. The dedicated database consists in a large compendium of public data (more than 500 data sets related to muscle (skeletal and heart. These studies included seven different animal species from invertebrates (Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrates (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Canis familiaris, Gallus gallus. After a renormalization step, clusters of co-expressed genes were identified in each dataset. The lists of co-expressed genes were annotated using a unified re-annotation procedure. These gene lists were compared to find significant overlaps between studies. Conclusions Applied to this large compendium of data sets, meta-analyses demonstrated that conserved patterns between species could be identified. Focusing on a specific pathology (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy we validated results across independent studies and revealed robust biomarkers and new pathways of interest

  11. 78 FR 740 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to mTOR and HDAC Inhibitor Combination Therapy... entitled, ``Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to Therapy'' , and all continuing... multiple myeloma, breast cancer, melanoma, lymphoma, and prostate cancer. DATES: Only written comments or...

  12. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    different subsignaling pathways. Analyses of the expression levels of dozens of genes and the protein-protein interactions among them demonstrated that CD and UC have relatively similar gene expression signatures, whereas the gene expression signatures of T1D and JRA relatively differ from the signatures of the other autoimmune diseases. These diseases are the only ones activated via the Fcɛ pathway. The relevant genes and pathways reported in this study are discussed at length, and may be helpful in the diagnoses and understanding of autoimmunity and/or specific autoimmune diseases.

  13. Alzheimer's disease gene signature says: beware of brain viral infections

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    Ianni Manuela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings from a genome wide association investigation in a large cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and non demented controls (CTR showed that a limited set of genes was in a strong association (p > l0-5 with the disease. Presentation of the hypothesis In this report we suggest that the polymorphism association in 8 of these genes is consistent with a non conventional interpretation of AD etiology. Nectin-2 (NC-2, apolipoprotein E (APOE, glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule- 16 (CEACAM-16, B-cell lymphoma-3 (Bcl-3, translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (T0MM-40, complement receptor-1 (CR-l, APOJ or clusterin and C-type lectin domain A family-16 member (CLEC-16A result in a genetic signature that might affect individual brain susceptibility to infection by herpes virus family during aging, leading to neuronal loss, inflammation and amyloid deposition. Implications of the hypothesis We hypothesized that such genetic trait may predispose to AD via complex and diverse mechanisms each contributing to an increase of individual susceptibility to brain viral infections

  14. Importance of Correlation between Gene Expression Levels: Application to the Type I Interferon Signature in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynier, Frédéric; Petit, Fabien; Paye, Malick; Turrel-Davin, Fanny; Imbert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hot, Arnaud; Mougin, Bruno; Miossec, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Background The analysis of gene expression data shows that many genes display similarity in their expression profiles suggesting some co-regulation. Here, we investigated the co-expression patterns in gene expression data and proposed a correlation-based research method to stratify individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Using blood from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we investigated the gene expression profiles from whole blood using Affymetrix microarray technology. Co-expressed genes were analyzed by a biclustering method, followed by gene ontology analysis of the relevant biclusters. Taking the type I interferon (IFN) pathway as an example, a classification algorithm was developed from the 102 RA patients and extended to 10 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and 100 healthy volunteers to further characterize individuals. We developed a correlation-based algorithm referred to as Classification Algorithm Based on a Biological Signature (CABS), an alternative to other approaches focused specifically on the expression levels. This algorithm applied to the expression of 35 IFN-related genes showed that the IFN signature presented a heterogeneous expression between RA, SLE and healthy controls which could reflect the level of global IFN signature activation. Moreover, the monitoring of the IFN-related genes during the anti-TNF treatment identified changes in type I IFN gene activity induced in RA patients. Conclusions In conclusion, we have proposed an original method to analyze genes sharing an expression pattern and a biological function showing that the activation levels of a biological signature could be characterized by its overall state of correlation. PMID:22043277

  15. An endometrial gene expression signature accurately predicts recurrent implantation failure after IVF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koot, Yvonne E. M.; van Hooff, Sander R.; Boomsma, Carolien M.; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Goddijn, Mariëtte; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Macklon, Nick S.

    2016-01-01

    The primary limiting factor for effective IVF treatment is successful embryo implantation. Recurrent implantation failure (RIF) is a condition whereby couples fail to achieve pregnancy despite consecutive embryo transfers. Here we describe the collection of gene expression profiles from mid-luteal phase endometrial biopsies (n = 115) from women experiencing RIF and healthy controls. Using a signature discovery set (n = 81) we identify a signature containing 303 genes predictive of RIF. Independent validation in 34 samples shows that the gene signature predicts RIF with 100% positive predictive value (PPV). The strength of the RIF associated expression signature also stratifies RIF patients into distinct groups with different subsequent implantation success rates. Exploration of the expression changes suggests that RIF is primarily associated with reduced cellular proliferation. The gene signature will be of value in counselling and guiding further treatment of women who fail to conceive upon IVF and suggests new avenues for developing intervention. PMID:26797113

  16. Gene Expression Signature in Adipose Tissue of Acromegaly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Irit; Tran, Quynh T.; Barkan, Ariel L.; Saltiel, Alan R.; Chandler, William F.; Bridges, Dave

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of chronic excess growth hormone on adipose tissue, we performed RNA sequencing in adipose tissue biopsies from patients with acromegaly (n = 7) or non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 11). The patients underwent clinical and metabolic profiling including assessment of HOMA-IR. Explants of adipose tissue were assayed ex vivo for lipolysis and ceramide levels. Patients with acromegaly had higher glucose, higher insulin levels and higher HOMA-IR score. We observed several previously reported transcriptional changes (IGF1, IGFBP3, CISH, SOCS2) that are known to be induced by GH/IGF-1 in liver but are also induced in adipose tissue. We also identified several novel transcriptional changes, some of which may be important for GH/IGF responses (PTPN3 and PTPN4) and the effects of acromegaly on growth and proliferation. Several differentially expressed transcripts may be important in GH/IGF-1-induced metabolic changes. Specifically, induction of LPL, ABHD5, and NRIP1 can contribute to enhanced lipolysis and may explain the elevated adipose tissue lipolysis in acromegalic patients. Higher expression of TCF7L2 and the fatty acid desaturases FADS1, FADS2 and SCD could contribute to insulin resistance. Ceramides were not different between the two groups. In summary, we have identified the acromegaly gene expression signature in human adipose tissue. The significance of altered expression of specific transcripts will enhance our understanding of the metabolic and proliferative changes associated with acromegaly. PMID:26087292

  17. Gene Expression Signature in Adipose Tissue of Acromegaly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Irit; Tran, Quynh T; Barkan, Ariel L; Saltiel, Alan R; Chandler, William F; Bridges, Dave

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of chronic excess growth hormone on adipose tissue, we performed RNA sequencing in adipose tissue biopsies from patients with acromegaly (n = 7) or non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 11). The patients underwent clinical and metabolic profiling including assessment of HOMA-IR. Explants of adipose tissue were assayed ex vivo for lipolysis and ceramide levels. Patients with acromegaly had higher glucose, higher insulin levels and higher HOMA-IR score. We observed several previously reported transcriptional changes (IGF1, IGFBP3, CISH, SOCS2) that are known to be induced by GH/IGF-1 in liver but are also induced in adipose tissue. We also identified several novel transcriptional changes, some of which may be important for GH/IGF responses (PTPN3 and PTPN4) and the effects of acromegaly on growth and proliferation. Several differentially expressed transcripts may be important in GH/IGF-1-induced metabolic changes. Specifically, induction of LPL, ABHD5, and NRIP1 can contribute to enhanced lipolysis and may explain the elevated adipose tissue lipolysis in acromegalic patients. Higher expression of TCF7L2 and the fatty acid desaturases FADS1, FADS2 and SCD could contribute to insulin resistance. Ceramides were not different between the two groups. In summary, we have identified the acromegaly gene expression signature in human adipose tissue. The significance of altered expression of specific transcripts will enhance our understanding of the metabolic and proliferative changes associated with acromegaly.

  18. Intrinsic Bio-Signature of Gene Delivery Nanocarriers May Impair Gene Therapy Goals

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    Jaleh Barar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-viral lipid/polymeric vectors have widely been used as nanocarriers (NCs for gene delivery. They possess large surface area to volume ratio and are able to interact with biomolecules through functional moieties, resulting in inadvertent biological impacts, in particular at genomic level. Thus, their genomic bio-signature needs to be investigated prior to use in vivo. Using high-throughput microarray and qPCR gene expression profiling techniques, we have reported the genomic impacts of lipid/polymeric NCs. Given the fact that the ultimate objectives of gene therapy may inevitably be impaired by nonspecific intrinsic genomic impacts of these NCs, here, we highlight their nonspecific genomic bio-signature. We envision that better understanding on the genotoxicity of gene delivery NCs, as guiding premise, will help us to develop much safer NCs and also to accelerate their translation into clinical use and to provide pivotal information on safety liabilities early in discovery and developments process prior to its inevitable consequences in vivo.

  19. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0107 TITLE: Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0107 Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target 5b...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We identified a tumor microenvironment -based activated fibroblast

  20. Clinical value of prognosis gene expression signatures in colorectal cancer: a systematic review.

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    Rebeca Sanz-Pamplona

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The traditional staging system is inadequate to identify those patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC at high risk of recurrence or with stage III CRC at low risk. A number of gene expression signatures to predict CRC prognosis have been proposed, but none is routinely used in the clinic. The aim of this work was to assess the prediction ability and potential clinical usefulness of these signatures in a series of independent datasets. METHODS: A literature review identified 31 gene expression signatures that used gene expression data to predict prognosis in CRC tissue. The search was based on the PubMed database and was restricted to papers published from January 2004 to December 2011. Eleven CRC gene expression datasets with outcome information were identified and downloaded from public repositories. Random Forest classifier was used to build predictors from the gene lists. Matthews correlation coefficient was chosen as a measure of classification accuracy and its associated p-value was used to assess association with prognosis. For clinical usefulness evaluation, positive and negative post-tests probabilities were computed in stage II and III samples. RESULTS: Five gene signatures showed significant association with prognosis and provided reasonable prediction accuracy in their own training datasets. Nevertheless, all signatures showed low reproducibility in independent data. Stratified analyses by stage or microsatellite instability status showed significant association but limited discrimination ability, especially in stage II tumors. From a clinical perspective, the most predictive signatures showed a minor but significant improvement over the classical staging system. CONCLUSIONS: The published signatures show low prediction accuracy but moderate clinical usefulness. Although gene expression data may inform prognosis, better strategies for signature validation are needed to encourage their widespread use in the clinic.

  1. Prognostic Biomarker Identification Through Integrating the Gene Signatures of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Properties

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    Jialin Cai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many molecular classification and prognostic gene signatures for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients have been established based on genome-wide gene expression profiling; however, their generalizability is unclear. Herein, we systematically assessed the prognostic effects of these gene signatures and identified valuable prognostic biomarkers by integrating these gene signatures. With two independent HCC datasets (GSE14520, N = 242 and GSE54236, N = 78, 30 published gene signatures were evaluated, and 11 were significantly associated with the overall survival (OS of postoperative HCC patients in both datasets. The random survival forest models suggested that the gene signatures were superior to clinical characteristics for predicting the prognosis of the patients. Based on the 11 gene signatures, a functional protein-protein interaction (PPI network with 1406 nodes and 10,135 edges was established. With tissue microarrays of HCC patients (N = 60, we determined the prognostic values of the core genes in the network and found that RAD21, CDK1, and HDAC2 expression levels were negatively associated with OS for HCC patients. The multivariate Cox regression analyses suggested that CDK1 was an independent prognostic factor, which was validated in an independent case cohort (N = 78. In cellular models, inhibition of CDK1 by siRNA or a specific inhibitor, RO-3306, reduced cellular proliferation and viability for HCC cells. These results suggest that the prognostic predictive capacities of these gene signatures are reproducible and that CDK1 is a potential prognostic biomarker or therapeutic target for HCC patients.

  2. A core invasiveness gene signature reflects epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but not metastatic potential in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples.

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    Melike Marsan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. METHODS & RESULTS: We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001. When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896-1.019, P = 0.186. DISCUSSION: These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential.

  3. Biclustering methods: biological relevance and application in gene expression analysis.

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    Ali Oghabian

    Full Text Available DNA microarray technologies are used extensively to profile the expression levels of thousands of genes under various conditions, yielding extremely large data-matrices. Thus, analyzing this information and extracting biologically relevant knowledge becomes a considerable challenge. A classical approach for tackling this challenge is to use clustering (also known as one-way clustering methods where genes (or respectively samples are grouped together based on the similarity of their expression profiles across the set of all samples (or respectively genes. An alternative approach is to develop biclustering methods to identify local patterns in the data. These methods extract subgroups of genes that are co-expressed across only a subset of samples and may feature important biological or medical implications. In this study we evaluate 13 biclustering and 2 clustering (k-means and hierarchical methods. We use several approaches to compare their performance on two real gene expression data sets. For this purpose we apply four evaluation measures in our analysis: (1 we examine how well the considered (biclustering methods differentiate various sample types; (2 we evaluate how well the groups of genes discovered by the (biclustering methods are annotated with similar Gene Ontology categories; (3 we evaluate the capability of the methods to differentiate genes that are known to be specific to the particular sample types we study and (4 we compare the running time of the algorithms. In the end, we conclude that as long as the samples are well defined and annotated, the contamination of the samples is limited, and the samples are well replicated, biclustering methods such as Plaid and SAMBA are useful for discovering relevant subsets of genes and samples.

  4. Comparative Analyses of Signature Genes in Acute Rejection and Operational Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Oh, Ji Won

    2017-08-01

    Using biomarkers as prediction tools or therapeutic targets can be a valuable strategy in transplantation. Recent studies identified biomarkers of acute rejection (AR) and operational tolerance (TOL) through the application of meta-analysis. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the signature genes in acute rejection and operational tolerance seen in human allogeneic transplantations using massive bioinformatical meta-analysis. To identify the signature genes in opposite immunological conditions, AR and TOL, we first collected the 1,252 gene expression data specifically intended for those circumstances. Then we excluded based on biological cut-values, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as well as Multi-Dimensional Scaling (MDS). Using differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from meta-analysis, we then applied a ranked scoring system to identify the signature genes of AR and TOL. We identified 53 up-regulated and 32 down-regulated signature genes in acute rejection condition. Among them, ISG20, CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL19, FCER1G, PMSE1, UBD are highly expressed in AR condition. In operational tolerance, we identified 110 up-regulated and 48 down-regulated signature genes. TCL1A, BLNK, MS4A1, EBF1, IGHM are up-regulated in TOL condition. These genes are highly representative of AR or TOL across the different organs such as liver, kidney and heart. Since immune response is the sum of complex biological and molecular dynamics, these signature genes as well as pathway analysis using a systems biology approach could be used to catch the insights of the certain pathways that would be overlooked with the conventional gene-level comparative analysis.

  5. Gene signatures derived from a c-MET-driven liver cancer mouse model predict survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Irena Ivanovska

    Full Text Available Biomarkers derived from gene expression profiling data may have a high false-positive rate and must be rigorously validated using independent clinical data sets, which are not always available. Although animal model systems could provide alternative data sets to formulate hypotheses and limit the number of signatures to be tested in clinical samples, the predictive power of such an approach is not yet proven. The present study aims to analyze the molecular signatures of liver cancer in a c-MET-transgenic mouse model and investigate its prognostic relevance to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Tissue samples were obtained from tumor (TU, adjacent non-tumor (AN and distant normal (DN liver in Tet-operator regulated (TRE human c-MET transgenic mice (n = 21 as well as from a Chinese cohort of 272 HBV- and 9 HCV-associated HCC patients. Whole genome microarray expression profiling was conducted in Affymetrix gene expression chips, and prognostic significances of gene expression signatures were evaluated across the two species. Our data revealed parallels between mouse and human liver tumors, including down-regulation of metabolic pathways and up-regulation of cell cycle processes. The mouse tumors were most similar to a subset of patient samples characterized by activation of the Wnt pathway, but distinctive in the p53 pathway signals. Of potential clinical utility, we identified a set of genes that were down regulated in both mouse tumors and human HCC having significant predictive power on overall and disease-free survival, which were highly enriched for metabolic functions. In conclusions, this study provides evidence that a disease model can serve as a possible platform for generating hypotheses to be tested in human tissues and highlights an efficient method for generating biomarker signatures before extensive clinical trials have been initiated.

  6. Detection of gene expression signatures related to underlying disease and treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serikawa, Kyle A; Jacobsen, Søren; Lundsgaard, Dorthe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gene expression signatures can provide an unbiased view into the molecular changes underlying biologically and medically interesting phenotypes. We therefore initiated this study to identify signatures that would be of utility in studying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We used...... microarray profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 30 RA patients to assess the effect of different biologic agent (biologics) treatments and to quantify the degree of a type-I interferon (IFN) signature in these patients. A numeric score was derived for the quantification step and applied...... to be heterogeneous for an IFN component. A comparison of individuals currently untreated with a biologic with those treated with infliximab, tocilizumab, or abatacept suggested that each biologic induces a specific gene signature in PBMCs. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to observe signs of type-I IFN pathway activation...

  7. Complex signatures of locus-specific selective pressures and gene conversion on Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Laura; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Kelgo, Piret; Laan, Maris

    2008-10-01

    Reduced birth weight and slow neonatal growth are risks correlated with the development of common diseases in adulthood. The Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin (hGH/CSH) gene cluster (48 kb) at 17q22-24, consisting of one pituitary-expressed postnatal (GH1) and four placental genes (GH2, CSH1, CSH2, and CSHL1) may contribute to common variation in intrauterine and infant growth, and also to the regulation of feto-maternal and adult glucose metabolism. In contrast to GH1, there are limited genetic data on the hGH/CSH genes expressed in utero. We report the first survey of sequence variation encompassing all five hGH/CSH genes. Resequencing identified 113 SNPs/indels (ss86217675-ss86217787 in dbSNP) including 66 novel variants, and revealed remarkable differences in diversity patterns among the homologous duplicated genes as well as between the study populations of European (Estonians), Asian (Han Chinese), and African (Mandenkalu) ancestries. A dominant feature of the hGH/CSH region is hyperactive gene conversion, with the rate exceeding tens to hundreds of times the rate of reciprocal crossing-over and resulting in near absence of linkage disequilibrium. The initiation of gene conversion seems to be uniformly distributed because the data do not predict any recombination hotspots. Signatures of different selective constraints acting on each gene indicate functional specification of the hGH/CSH genes. Most strikingly, the GH2 coding for placental growth hormone shows strong intercontinental diversification (F(ST)=0.41-0.91; p<10(-6)) indicative of balancing selection, whereas the flanking CSH1 exhibits low population differentiation (F(ST)=0.03-0.09), low diversity (non-Africans, pi=8-9 x 10(-5); Africans, pi=8.2 x 10(-4)), and one dominant haplotype worldwide, consistent with purifying selection. The results imply that the success of an association study targeted to duplicated genes may be enhanced by prior resequencing of the study population in order

  8. A core MYC gene expression signature is prominent in basal-like breast cancer but only partially overlaps the core serum response.

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    Sanjay Chandriani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The MYC oncogene contributes to induction and growth of many cancers but the full spectrum of the MYC transcriptional response remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarrays, we conducted a detailed kinetic study of genes that respond to MYCN or MYCNDeltaMBII induction in primary human fibroblasts. In parallel, we determined the response to steady state overexpression of MYCN and MYCNDeltaMBII in the same cell type. An overlapping set of 398 genes from the two protocols was designated a 'Core MYC Signature' and used for further analysis. Comparison of the Core MYC Signature to a published study of the genes induced by serum stimulation revealed that only 7.4% of the Core MYC Signature genes are in the Core Serum Response and display similar expression changes to both MYC and serum. Furthermore, more than 50% of the Core MYC Signature genes were not influenced by serum stimulation. In contrast, comparison to a panel of breast cancers revealed a strong concordance in gene expression between the Core MYC Signature and the basal-like breast tumor subtype, which is a subtype with poor prognosis. This concordance was supported by the higher average level of MYC expression in the same tumor samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Core MYC Signature has clinical relevance as this profile can be used to deduce an underlying genetic program that is likely to contribute to a clinical phenotype. Therefore, the presence of the Core MYC Signature may predict clinical responsiveness to therapeutics that are designed to disrupt MYC-mediated phenotypes.

  9. A novel gene signature for molecular diagnosis of human prostate cancer by RT-qPCR.

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    Federica Rizzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is one of the most relevant causes of cancer death in Western Countries. Although detection of CaP at early curable stage is highly desirable, actual screening methods present limitations and new molecular approaches are needed. Gene expression analysis increases our knowledge about the biology of CaP and may render novel molecular tools, but the identification of accurate biomarkers for reliable molecular diagnosis is a real challenge. We describe here the diagnostic power of a novel 8-genes signature: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (OAZ, adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC, spermidine/spermine N(1-acetyltransferase (SSAT, histone H3 (H3, growth arrest specific gene (GAS1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and Clusterin (CLU in tumour detection/classification of human CaP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 8-gene signature was detected by retrotranscription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in frozen prostate surgical specimens obtained from 41 patients diagnosed with CaP and recommended to undergo radical prostatectomy (RP. No therapy was given to patients at any time before RP. The bio-bank used for the study consisted of 66 specimens: 44 were benign-CaP paired from the same patient. Thirty-five were classified as benign and 31 as CaP after final pathological examination. Only molecular data were used for classification of specimens. The Nearest Neighbour (NN classifier was used in order to discriminate CaP from benign tissue. Validation of final results was obtained with 10-fold cross-validation procedure. CaP versus benign specimens were discriminated with (80+/-5% accuracy, (81+/-6% sensitivity and (78+/-7% specificity. The method also correctly classified 71% of patients with Gleason score or =7, an important predictor of final outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method showed high sensitivity in a collection of specimens in which a significant

  10. Gene expression signatures in the peripheral blood after radiosurgery of human cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel-du Bois, Angelika [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of RadioOncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Wagner-Ecker, Mechthild; Schwager, Christian; Wirkner, Ute; Huber, Peter E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Debus, Juergen [Dept. of RadioOncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of RadioOncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Center of Cancer Systems Biology, Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To unravel biological mechanisms potentially resulting in the obliteration process after radiosurgery (RS) of human cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by investigating molecular signatures on the transcriptomic level in peripheral blood of patients. Patients and Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained at definite points of time before and after RS. The samples were tested for radiation-induced changes regarding biological markers (mRNA) using cDNA and oligo-microarray technology. The corresponding expression profiles were correlated with clinical data and obliteration signs in radiologic imaging. Results: The proof of principle that RS outcome can be successfully correlated with transcriptomics of cellular blood components as disease parameter was demonstrated. The authors identified 76 differentially regulated genes (p < 0.001) after RS. Interestingly, in particular genes with known roles in antiangiogenic and procoagulative pathways were identified as potentially relevant. In particularly, the authors found a significant downregulation of neuropilin-2, protein C inhibitor and cyclin-dependent kinase 6. They also found that low pretreatment blood mRNA levels of TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) correlated with fast obliteration of AVMs. Conclusion: The authors report on a novel technique for molecular biological analysis of blood from patients with cerebral AVM treated with RS. Differential regulation of genes in peripheral blood was successfully correlated with RS and time to obliteration of AVMs. The identified genes indicate a potential new methodology to monitor RS, which may result in an individualized therapy and optimized follow-up. (orig.)

  11. Predictive gene signatures: molecular markers distinguishing colon adenomatous polyp and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Mayer, Claus Dieter; Vase, Hollie F; Coates, Philip J; Steele, Robert J; Carey, Francis A

    2014-01-01

    Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2), proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12), differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2), apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1), fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1), structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES), gene transcription (HDAC1), stem cell (LGR5), endothelial (VWF) and mucin production (MUC2). Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material.

  12. Predictive gene signatures: molecular markers distinguishing colon adenomatous polyp and carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice E Drew

    Full Text Available Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2, proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12, differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2, apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1, fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1, structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES, gene transcription (HDAC1, stem cell (LGR5, endothelial (VWF and mucin production (MUC2. Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material.

  13. Distinct gene expression signatures in human embryonic stem cells differentiated towards definitive endoderm at single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Karin; Strömbeck, Anna; Semb, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of anterior definitive endoderm (DE). Here, we differentiated human embryonic stem cells towards DE using three different activin A based treatments. Differentiation efficiencies were evaluated by gene expression profiling over time at cell population level. A panel of key markers was used to study DE...... for the three activin A based protocols applied. Our data provide novel insights in DE gene expression at the cellular level of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells, and illustrate the power of using single-cell gene expression profiling to study differentiation heterogeneity and to characterize......Characterization of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards therapeutically relevant cell types, including pancreatic beta-cells and hepatocytes, depends on molecular markers and assays that resolve the signature of individual cells. Pancreas and liver both have a common origin...

  14. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F., E-mail: mkelley2@its.jnj.com; Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  15. Hybrid models identified a 12-gene signature for lung cancer prognosis and chemoresponse prediction.

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    Ying-Wooi Wan

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The recurrence rate ranges from 35-50% among early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. To date, there is no fully-validated and clinically applied prognostic gene signature for personalized treatment.From genome-wide mRNA expression profiles generated on 256 lung adenocarcinoma patients, a 12-gene signature was identified using combinatorial gene selection methods, and a risk score algorithm was developed with Naïve Bayes. The 12-gene model generates significant patient stratification in the training cohort HLM & UM (n = 256; log-rank P = 6.96e-7 and two independent validation sets, MSK (n = 104; log-rank P = 9.88e-4 and DFCI (n = 82; log-rank P = 2.57e-4, using Kaplan-Meier analyses. This gene signature also stratifies stage I and IB lung adenocarcinoma patients into two distinct survival groups (log-rank P<0.04. The 12-gene risk score is more significant (hazard ratio = 4.19, 95% CI: [2.08, 8.46] than other commonly used clinical factors except tumor stage (III vs. I in multivariate Cox analyses. The 12-gene model is more accurate than previously published lung cancer gene signatures on the same datasets. Furthermore, this signature accurately predicts chemoresistance/chemosensitivity to Cisplatin, Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Etoposide, Erlotinib, and Gefitinib in NCI-60 cancer cell lines (P<0.017. The identified 12 genes exhibit curated interactions with major lung cancer signaling hallmarks in functional pathway analysis. The expression patterns of the signature genes have been confirmed in RT-PCR analyses of independent tumor samples.The results demonstrate the clinical utility of the identified gene signature in prognostic categorization. With this 12-gene risk score algorithm, early stage patients at high risk for tumor recurrence could be identified for adjuvant chemotherapy; whereas stage I and II patients at low risk could be spared the toxic side effects of

  16. Prognostic Gene-Expression Signature for Patients with Hepatitis C-Related Early-Stage Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshida, Yujin; Villanueva, Augusto; Sangiovanni, Angelo; Sole, Manel; Hur, Chin; Andersson, Karin L.; Chung, Raymond T; Gould, Joshua; Kojima, Kensuke; Gupta, Supriya; Taylor, Bradley; Crenshaw, Andrew; Gabriel, Stacey; Minguez, Beatriz; Iavarone, Massimo; Friedman, Scott L.; Colombo, Massimo; Llovet, Josep M.; Golub, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver cirrhosis affects 1%–2% of population and is the major risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatitis C cirrhosis-related HCC is the most rapidly increasing cause of cancer death in the US. Non-invasive methods have been developed to identify patients with asymptomatic, early-stage cirrhosis, increasing the burden of HCC surveillance, but biomarkers are needed to identify patients with cirrhosis who are most in need of surveillance. We investigated whether a liver-derived 186-gene signature previously associated with outcomes of patients with HCC is prognostic for patients newly diagnosed with cirrhosis but without HCC. Methods We performed gene expression profile analysis of formalin-fixed needle biopsies from the livers of 216 patients with hepatitis C-related early-stage (Child-Pugh class A) cirrhosis who were prospectively followed for a median of 10 years at an Italian center. We evaluated whether the 186-gene signature was associated with death, progression of cirrhosis, and development of HCC. Results Fifty-five (25%), 101 (47%), and 60 (28%) patients were classified as having poor-, intermediate-, and good-prognosis signatures, respectively. In multivariable Cox regression modeling, the poor-prognosis signature was significantly associated with death (P=.004), progression to advanced cirrhosis (P<.001), and development of HCC (P=.009). The 10-year rates of survival were 63%, 74%, and 85% and the annual incidences of HCC were 5.8%, 2.2%, and 1.5% for patients with poor-, intermediate-, and good-prognosis signatures, respectively. Conclusions A 186-gene signature used to predict outcomes of patients with HCC is also associated with outcomes of patients with hepatitis C-related early-stage cirrhosis. This signature might be used to identify patients with cirrhosis in most need of surveillance and strategies to prevent their development of HCC. PMID:23333348

  17. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  18. Gene pair signatures in cell type transcriptomes reveal lineage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Nykter, Matti; Kramer, Roger; Wienecke-Baldacchino, Anke; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Zhou, Joseph Xu; Kreisberg, Richard; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Huang, Sui; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    The distinct cell types of multicellular organisms arise due to constraints imposed by gene regulatory networks on the collective change of gene expression across the genome, creating self-stabilizing expression states, or attractors. We compiled a resource of curated human expression data comprising 166 cell types and 2,602 transcription regulating genes and developed a data driven method built around the concept of expression reversal defined at the level of gene pairs, such as those participating in toggle switch circuits. This approach allows us to organize the cell types into their ontogenetic lineage-relationships and to reflect regulatory relationships among genes that explain their ability to function as determinants of cell fate. We show that this method identifies genes belonging to regulatory circuits that control neuronal fate, pluripotency and blood cell differentiation, thus offering a novel large-scale perspective on lineage specification. PMID:23603899

  19. Low Concordance between Gene Expression Signatures in ER Positive HER2 Negative Breast Carcinoma Could Impair Their Clinical Application.

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    Enora Laas

    Full Text Available Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures have been recently described. Among the signatures there is variation in the constituent genes that are utilized. We aim to evaluate prognostic concordance among eight gene expression signatures, on a large dataset of ER positive HER2 negative breast cancers.We analysed the performance of eight gene expression signatures on six different datasets of ER+ HER2- breast cancers. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival function. We assessed discrimination and concordance between the 8 signatures on survival and recurrence rates The Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI was used to to stratify the risk of recurrence/death.The discrimination ability of the whole signatures, showed fair discrimination performances, with AUC ranging from 0.64 (95%CI 0.55-0.73 for the 76-genes signatures, to 0.72 (95%CI 0.64-0.8 for the Molecular Prognosis Index T17. Low concordance was found in predicting events in the intermediate and high-risk group, as defined by the NPI. Low risk group was the only subgroup with a good signatures concordance.Genomic signatures may be a good option to predict prognosis as most of them perform well at the population level. They exhibit, however, a high degree of discordance in the intermediate and high-risk groups. The major benefit that we could expect from gene expression signatures is the standardization of proliferation assessment.

  20. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  1. Relevance and signature of C-interstitials and their complexes in SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattausch, A.; Bockstedte, M.; Pankratov, O.

    2002-03-01

    Based on an phab initio method employing DFT we investigate the relevant diffusion mechanisms of carbon interstitials and their vibrational spectra. C-interstitials play a pivotal role for diffusion processes in SiC. With migration barriers around 1 eV(A. Mattausch phet al.) Mat. Sci. Forum, 353-356 (2001) 323. they are very mobile. Though theory predicts a low equilibrium concentration, implantation processes produce large amounts of these defects. Their high mobility can explain the annealing of EPR-centers commonly related to the carbon vacancy (V_C). For the recombination process we find low barriers around 1,2 eV. An active role of V_C in its annealing is prohibited by its low mobility. Besides, we find a high affinity between C-interstitials and the C-antisite. The resulting Di-carbon antisite complex (C_sp,C_Si ) should be very stable. Our investigation shows that C-interstitials possess localized vibrational modes (LVMs) above the SiC phonon spectrum due to their short bond lengths. Especially for C_sp,C_Si we find LVMs in excellent agreement with phonon replica of the D_II center.(A. Mattausch phet al.) Physica B, 308-310 (2002) 656.

  2. Gene expression profiles in rat brain disclose CNS signature genes and regional patterns of functional specialisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breilid Harald

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian brain is divided into distinct regions with structural and neurophysiological differences. As a result, gene expression is likely to vary between regions in relation to their cellular composition and neuronal function. In order to improve our knowledge and understanding of regional patterns of gene expression in the CNS, we have generated a global map of gene expression in selected regions of the adult rat brain (frontomedial-, temporal- and occipital cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum; both right and left sides as well as in three major non-neural tissues (spleen, liver and kidney using the Applied Biosystems Rat Genome Survey Microarray. Results By unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we found that the transcriptome within a region was highly conserved among individual rats and that there were no systematic differences between the two hemispheres (right versus left side. Further, we identified distinct sets of genes showing significant regional enrichment. Functional annotation of each of these gene sets clearly reflected several important physiological features of the region in question, including synaptic transmission within the cortex, neurogenesis in hippocampus and G-protein-mediated signalling in striatum. In addition, we were able to reveal potentially new regional features, such as mRNA transcription- and neurogenesis-annotated activities in cerebellum and differential use of glutamate signalling between regions. Finally, we determined a set of 'CNS-signature' genes that uncover characteristics of several common neuronal processes in the CNS, with marked over-representation of specific features of synaptic transmission, ion transport and cell communication, as well as numerous novel unclassified genes. Conclusion We have generated a global map of gene expression in the rat brain and used this to determine functional processes and pathways that have a regional preference or ubiquitous

  3. Psychotropic drug effects on gene transcriptomics relevant to Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Psychotropics are widely prescribed in Alzheimer disease (AD) without regard to their pathobiological effects. Results summarize a comprehensive survey of psychotropic effects on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression for 52 genes linked to AD. Pending future investigations, current data indicate that atypical antipsychotics, lithium, and fluoxetine reduce AD risk, whereas other drug classes promote risk. Risk may be attenuated by antipsychotics and lithium (down-regulate TNF), atypical antipsychotics (down-regulate TF), risperidone (down-regulates IL1B), olanzapine (up-regulates TFAM, down-regulates PRNP), fluoxetine (up-regulates CLU, SORCS1, NEDD9, GRN, and ECE1), and lithium coadministered with antipsychotics (down-regulates IL1B). Risk may be enhanced by neuroleptics (up-regulate TF), haloperidol (up-regulates IL1B and PION), olanzapine (down-regulates THRA and PRNP, up-regulates IL1A), and chlorpromazine, imipramine, maprotiline, fluvoxamine, and diazepam (up-regulate IL1B). There were no results for dextromethorphan-plus-quinidine. Fluoxetine effects on CLU, NEDD9, and GRN were statistically robust. Drug effects on specific variants, polymorphisms, genotypes, and other genes (CCR2, TF, and PRNP) are detailed. Translational AD risk applications and their limitations related to specific genes, mutations, variants, polymorphisms, genotypes, brain site, sex, clinical population, AD stage, and other factors are discussed. This report provides an initial summary and framework to understand the potential impact of psychotropic drugs on AD-relevant genes.

  4. A novel gene expression signature for bone metastasis in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savci-Heijink, C Dilara; Halfwerk, Hans; Koster, Jan; van de Vijver, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic cancer remains the leading cause of death for patients with breast cancer. To understand the mechanisms underlying the development of distant metastases to specific sites is therefore important and of potential clinical value. From 157 primary breast tumours of the patients with known metastatic disease, gene expression profiling data were generated and correlated to metastatic behaviour including site-specific metastasis, metastasis pattern and survival outcomes. We analysed gene expression signatures specifically associated with the development of bone metastases. As a validation cohort, we used a published dataset of 376 breast carcinomas for which gene expression data and site-specific metastasis information were available. 80.5 % of luminal-type tumours developed bone metastasis as opposed to 41.7 % of basal and 55.6 % of HER2-like tumours. A novel 15-gene signature identified 82.4 % of the tumours with bone metastasis, 85.2 % of the tumours which had bone metastasis as first site of metastasis and 100 % of the ones with bone metastasis only (p 9.99e-09), in the training set. In the independent dataset, 81.2 % of the positive tested tumours had known metastatic disease to the bone (p 4.28e-10). This 15-gene signature showed much better correlation with the development of bone metastases than previously identified signatures and was predictive in both ER-positive as well as in ER-negative tumours. Multivariate analyses revealed that together with the molecular subtype, our 15-gene expression signature was significantly correlated to bone metastasis status (p genes, APOPEC3B, ATL2, BBS1, C6orf61, C6orf167, MMS22L, KCNS1, MFAP3L, NIP7, NUP155, PALM2, PH-4, PGD5, SFT2D2 and STEAP3, encoded mainly membrane-bound molecules with molecular function of protein binding. The expression levels of the up-regulated genes (NAT1, BBS1 and PH-4) were also found to be correlated to epithelial to mesenchymal transition status of the tumour. We have identified a

  5. A machine learning approach for identifying amino acid signatures in the HIV env gene predictive of dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G Holman

    Full Text Available The identification of nucleotide sequence variations in viral pathogens linked to disease and clinical outcomes is important for developing vaccines and therapies. However, identifying these genetic variations in rapidly evolving pathogens adapting to selection pressures unique to each host presents several challenges. Machine learning tools provide new opportunities to address these challenges. In HIV infection, virus replicating within the brain causes HIV-associated dementia (HAD and milder forms of neurocognitive impairment in 20-30% of patients with unsuppressed viremia. HIV neurotropism is primarily determined by the viral envelope (env gene. To identify amino acid signatures in the HIV env gene predictive of HAD, we developed a machine learning pipeline using the PART rule-learning algorithm and C4.5 decision tree inducer to train a classifier on a meta-dataset (n = 860 env sequences from 78 patients: 40 HAD, 38 non-HAD. To increase the flexibility and biological relevance of our analysis, we included 4 numeric factors describing amino acid hydrophobicity, polarity, bulkiness, and charge, in addition to amino acid identities. The classifier had 75% predictive accuracy in leave-one-out cross-validation, and identified 5 signatures associated with HAD diagnosis (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test. These HAD signatures were found in the majority of brain sequences from 8 of 10 HAD patients from an independent cohort. Additionally, 2 HAD signatures were validated against env sequences from CSF of a second independent cohort. This analysis provides insight into viral genetic determinants associated with HAD, and develops novel methods for applying machine learning tools to analyze the genetics of rapidly evolving pathogens.

  6. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  7. Validation of a prognostic multi-gene signature in high-risk neuroblastoma using the high throughput digital NanoString nCounter™ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Thomas P; Morales La Madrid, Andres; Chlenski, Alexandre; Guerrero, Lisa; Salwen, Helen R; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Furman, Wayne; Bahrami, Armita; Shohet, Jason M; Zage, Peter E; Hicks, M John; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suganuma, Rie; Park, Julie R; So, Sara; London, Wendy B; Pytel, Peter; Maclean, Kirsteen H; Cohn, Susan L

    2014-05-01

    Microarray-based molecular signatures have not been widely integrated into neuroblastoma diagnostic classification systems due to the complexities of the assay and requirement for high-quality RNA. New digital technologies that accurately quantify gene expression using RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues are now available. In this study, we describe the first use of a high-throughput digital system to assay the expression of genes in an "ultra-high risk" microarray classifier in FFPE high-risk neuroblastoma tumors. Customized probes corresponding to the 42 genes in a published multi-gene neuroblastoma signature were hybridized to RNA isolated from 107 FFPE high-risk neuroblastoma samples using the NanoString nCounter™ Analysis System. For classification of each patient, the Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated between the standardized nCounter™ data and the molecular signature from the microarray data. We demonstrate that the nCounter™ 42-gene panel sub-stratified the high-risk cohort into two subsets with statistically significantly different overall survival (p = 0.0027) and event-free survival (p = 0.028). In contrast, none of the established prognostic risk markers (age, stage, tumor histology, MYCN status, and ploidy) were significantly associated with survival. We conclude that the nCounter™ System can reproducibly quantify expression levels of signature genes in FFPE tumor samples. Validation of this microarray signature in our high-risk patient cohort using a completely different technology emphasizes the prognostic relevance of this classifier. Prospective studies testing the prognostic value of molecular signatures in high-risk neuroblastoma patients using FFPE tumor samples and the nCounter™ System are warranted.

  8. A Core MYC Gene Expression Signature Is Prominent in Basal-Like Breast Cancer but Only Partially Overlaps the Core Serum Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Frengen, Eirik; Cowling, Victoria H.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Perou, Charles M.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The MYC oncogene contributes to induction and growth of many cancers but the full spectrum of the MYC transcriptional response remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarrays, we conducted a detailed kinetic study of genes that respond to MYCN or MYCNΔMBII induction in primary human fibroblasts. In parallel, we determined the response to steady state overexpression of MYCN and MYCNΔMBII in the same cell type. An overlapping set of 398 genes from the two protocols was designated a ‘Core MYC Signature’ and used for further analysis. Comparison of the Core MYC Signature to a published study of the genes induced by serum stimulation revealed that only 7.4% of the Core MYC Signature genes are in the Core Serum Response and display similar expression changes to both MYC and serum. Furthermore, more than 50% of the Core MYC Signature genes were not influenced by serum stimulation. In contrast, comparison to a panel of breast cancers revealed a strong concordance in gene expression between the Core MYC Signature and the basal-like breast tumor subtype, which is a subtype with poor prognosis. This concordance was supported by the higher average level of MYC expression in the same tumor samples. Conclusions/Significance The Core MYC Signature has clinical relevance as this profile can be used to deduce an underlying genetic program that is likely to contribute to a clinical phenotype. Therefore, the presence of the Core MYC Signature may predict clinical responsiveness to therapeutics that are designed to disrupt MYC-mediated phenotypes. PMID:19690609

  9. Gene expression risk signatures maintain prognostic power in multiple myeloma despite microarray probe set translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, N E U; Borup, R; Andersen, M K

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gene expression profiling (GEP) risk models in multiple myeloma are based on 3'-end microarrays. We hypothesized that GEP risk signatures could retain prognostic power despite being translated and applied to whole-transcript microarray data. METHODS: We studied CD138-positive bone...... marrow plasma cells in a prospective cohort of 59 samples from newly diagnosed patients eligible for high-dose therapy (HDT) and 67 samples from previous HDT patients with progressive disease. We used Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST microarrays for GEP. Nine GEP risk signatures were translated by probe set......-87). Various translated GEP risk signatures or combinations hereof were significantly correlated with survival: among newly diagnosed patients mainly in combination with cytogenetic high-risk markers and among relapsed patients mainly in combination with ISS stage III. CONCLUSION: Translated GEP risk...

  10. The Signature of Selection Mediated by Expression on Human Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Urrutia, Araxi O.; Hurst, Laurence D

    2003-01-01

    As the efficacy of natural selection is expected to be a function of population size, in humans it is usually presumed that selection is a weak force and hence that gene characteristics are mostly determined by stochastic forces. In contrast, in species with large population sizes, selection is expected to be a much more effective force. Evidence for this has come from examining how genic parameters vary with expression level, which appears to determine many of a gene's features, such as codo...

  11. Gene expression signature-based screening identifies new broadly effective influenza a antivirals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Josset

    Full Text Available Classical antiviral therapies target viral proteins and are consequently subject to resistance. To counteract this limitation, alternative strategies have been developed that target cellular factors. We hypothesized that such an approach could also be useful to identify broad-spectrum antivirals. The influenza A virus was used as a model for its viral diversity and because of the need to develop therapies against unpredictable viruses as recently underlined by the H1N1 pandemic. We proposed to identify a gene-expression signature associated with infection by different influenza A virus subtypes which would allow the identification of potential antiviral drugs with a broad anti-influenza spectrum of activity. We analyzed the cellular gene expression response to infection with five different human and avian influenza A virus strains and identified 300 genes as differentially expressed between infected and non-infected samples. The most 20 dysregulated genes were used to screen the connectivity map, a database of drug-associated gene expression profiles. Candidate antivirals were then identified by their inverse correlation to the query signature. We hypothesized that such molecules would induce an unfavorable cellular environment for influenza virus replication. Eight potential antivirals including ribavirin were identified and their effects were tested in vitro on five influenza A strains. Six of the molecules inhibited influenza viral growth. The new pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not used to define the gene expression signature of infection, was inhibited by five out of the eight identified molecules, demonstrating that this strategy could contribute to identifying new broad anti-influenza agents acting on cellular gene expression. The identified infection signature genes, the expression of which are modified upon infection, could encode cellular proteins involved in the viral life cycle. This is the first study showing that gene expression

  12. A REST derived gene signature stratifies glioblastomas into chemotherapy resistant and responsive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagoner Matthew P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastomas are the most common central nervous system neoplasia in adults, with 9,000 cases in the US annually. Glioblastoma multiformae, the most aggressive glioma subtype, has an 18% one-year survival rate, and 3% two year survival rate. Recent work has highlighted the role of the transcription factor RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor, REST in glioblastoma but how REST function correlates with disease outcome has not been described. Method Using a bioinformatic approach and mining of publicly available microarray datasets, we describe an aggressive subtype of gliomas defined by a gene signature derived from REST. Using this REST gene signature we predict that REST function is enhanced in advanced glioblastoma. We compare disease outcomes between tumors based on REST status and treatment regimen, and describe downstream targets of REST that may contribute to the decreased benefits observed with high dose chemotherapy in REM tumors. Results We present human data showing that patients with “REST Enhanced Malignancies” (REM tumors present with a shorter disease free survival compared to non-REM gliomas. Importantly, REM tumors are refractory to multiple rounds of chemotherapy and patients fail to respond to this line of treatment. Conclusions This report is the first to describe a REST gene signature that predicts response to multiple rounds of chemotherapy, the mainline therapy for this disease. The REST gene signature may have important clinical implications for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  13. Identification of a three-gene expression signature of poor-prognosis breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozlu Sengül

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical course of breast cancer is difficult to predict on the basis of established clinical and pathological prognostic criteria. Given the genetic complexity of breast carcinomas, it is not surprising that correlations with individual genetic abnormalities have also been disappointing. The use of gene expression profiles could result in more accurate and objective prognostication. Results To this end, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays to quantify the mRNA expression of a large panel (n = 47 of genes previously identified as candidate prognostic molecular markers in a series of 100 ERα-positive breast tumor samples from patients with known long-term follow-up. We identified a three-gene expression signature (BRCA2, DNMT3B and CCNE1 as an independent prognostic marker (P = 0.007 by univariate analysis; P = 0.006 by multivariate analysis. This "poor prognosis" signature was then tested on an independent panel of ERα-positive breast tumors from a well-defined cohort of 104 postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with primary surgery followed by adjuvant tamoxifen alone: although this "poor prognosis" signature was associated with shorter relapse-free survival in univariate analysis (P = 0.029, it did not persist as an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (P = 0.27. Conclusion Our results confirm the value of gene expression signatures in predicting the outcome of breast cancer.

  14. Sex hormones and gene expression signatures in peripheral blood from postmenopausal women - the NOWAC postgenome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rylander Charlotta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT influences endogenous hormone concentrations and increases the risk of breast cancer. Gene expression profiling may reveal the mechanisms behind this relationship. Our objective was to explore potential associations between sex hormones and gene expression in whole blood from a population-based, random sample of postmenopausal women Methods Gene expression, as measured by the Applied Biosystems microarray platform, was compared between hormone therapy (HT users and non-users and between high and low hormone plasma concentrations using both gene-wise analysis and gene set analysis. Gene sets found to be associated with HT use were further analysed for enrichment in functional clusters and network predictions. The gene expression matrix included 285 samples and 16185 probes and was adjusted for significant technical variables. Results Gene-wise analysis revealed several genes significantly associated with different types of HT use. The functional cluster analyses provided limited information on these genes. Gene set analysis revealed 22 gene sets that were enriched between high and low estradiol concentration (HT-users excluded. Among these were seven oestrogen related gene sets, including our gene list associated with systemic estradiol use, which thereby represents a novel oestrogen signature. Seven gene sets were related to immune response. Among the 15 gene sets enriched for progesterone, 11 overlapped with estradiol. No significant gene expression patterns were found for testosterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH or sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG. Conclusions Distinct gene expression patterns associated with sex hormones are detectable in a random group of postmenopausal women, as demonstrated by the finding of a novel oestrogen signature.

  15. A feature selection approach for identification of signature genes from SAGE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Paulo JS

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One goal of gene expression profiling is to identify signature genes that robustly distinguish different types or grades of tumors. Several tumor classifiers based on expression profiling have been proposed using microarray technique. Due to important differences in the probabilistic models of microarray and SAGE technologies, it is important to develop suitable techniques to select specific genes from SAGE measurements. Results A new framework to select specific genes that distinguish different biological states based on the analysis of SAGE data is proposed. The new framework applies the bolstered error for the identification of strong genes that separate the biological states in a feature space defined by the gene expression of a training set. Credibility intervals defined from a probabilistic model of SAGE measurements are used to identify the genes that distinguish the different states with more reliability among all gene groups selected by the strong genes method. A score taking into account the credibility and the bolstered error values in order to rank the groups of considered genes is proposed. Results obtained using SAGE data from gliomas are presented, thus corroborating the introduced methodology. Conclusion The model representing counting data, such as SAGE, provides additional statistical information that allows a more robust analysis. The additional statistical information provided by the probabilistic model is incorporated in the methodology described in the paper. The introduced method is suitable to identify signature genes that lead to a good separation of the biological states using SAGE and may be adapted for other counting methods such as Massive Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS or the recent Sequencing-By-Synthesis (SBS technique. Some of such genes identified by the proposed method may be useful to generate classifiers.

  16. Gene signature of the post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Rusinek, Dagmara; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Medical University of Warsaw, Genomic Medicine, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery, Warsaw (Poland); Dom, Genevieve; Maenhaut, Carine; Detours, Vincent [Universite libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Institute of Interdisciplinary Research, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unger, Kristian [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Helmholtz-Zentrum, Research Unit Radiation Cytogenetics, Munich (Germany); Bogdanova, Tetiana [Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kiev (Ukraine); Thomas, Geraldine [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Likhtarov, Ilya [Academy of Technological Sciences of Ukraine, Radiation Protection Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Jaksik, Roman [Silesian University of Technology, Systems Engineering Group, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Informatics, Gliwice (Poland); Chmielik, Ewa [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Tumour Pathology, Gliwice (Poland); Jarzab, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, IIIrd Department of Radiation Therapy, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Andrzej [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Automatic Control, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-07-15

    Following the nuclear accidents in Chernobyl and later in Fukushima, the nuclear community has been faced with important issues concerning how to search for and diagnose biological consequences of low-dose internal radiation contamination. Although after the Chernobyl accident an increase in childhood papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) was observed, it is still not clear whether the molecular biology of PTCs associated with low-dose radiation exposure differs from that of sporadic PTC. We investigated tissue samples from 65 children/young adults with PTC using DNA microarray (Affymetrix, Human Genome U133 2.0 Plus) with the aim of identifying molecular differences between radiation-induced (exposed to Chernobyl radiation, ECR) and sporadic PTC. All participants were resident in the same region so that confounding factors related to genetics or environment were minimized. There were small but significant differences in the gene expression profiles between ECR and non-ECR PTC (global test, p < 0.01), with 300 differently expressed probe sets (p < 0.001) corresponding to 239 genes. Multifactorial analysis of variance showed that besides radiation exposure history, the BRAF mutation exhibited independent effects on the PTC expression profile; the histological subset and patient age at diagnosis had negligible effects. Ten genes (PPME1, HDAC11, SOCS7, CIC, THRA, ERBB2, PPP1R9A, HDGF, RAD51AP1, and CDK1) from the 19 investigated with quantitative RT-PCR were confirmed as being associated with radiation exposure in an independent, validation set of samples. Significant, but subtle, differences in gene expression in the post-Chernobyl PTC are associated with previous low-dose radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. RNA Chimeras as a Gene Signature of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    chimeric RNA sequence databases available for the public, we wrote a simple computer code to screen public databases , in a collaboration with...ESTs in the NCBI database contain such SHS, which on average has 6.4-6.5 nucleotides (nt) overlapped by the two partner genes (see the table above...preparation. These RNA or DNA shards could serve as endogenous random primers (ERP) during RT or PCR. The existence of ERP and the SHS together set

  18. Ensemble of gene signatures identifies novel biomarkers in colorectal cancer activated through PPARγ and TNFα signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Maria Pagnotta

    Full Text Available We describe a novel bioinformatic and translational pathology approach, gene Signature Finder Algorithm (gSFA to identify biomarkers associated with Colorectal Cancer (CRC survival. Here a robust set of CRC markers is selected by an ensemble method. By using a dataset of 232 gene expression profiles, gSFA discovers 16 highly significant small gene signatures. Analysis of dichotomies generated by the signatures results in a set of 133 samples stably classified in good prognosis group and 56 samples in poor prognosis group, whereas 43 remain unreliably classified. AKAP12, DCBLD2, NT5E and SPON1 are particularly represented in the signatures and selected for validation in vivo on two independent patients cohorts comprising 140 tumor tissues and 60 matched normal tissues. Their expression and regulatory programs are investigated in vitro. We show that the coupled expression of NT5E and DCBLD2 robustly stratifies our patients in two groups (one of which with 100% survival at five years. We show that NT5E is a target of the TNF-α signaling in vitro; the tumor suppressor PPARγ acts as a novel NT5E antagonist that positively and concomitantly regulates DCBLD2 in a cancer cell context-dependent manner.

  19. Astrocyte-specific overexpressed gene signatures in response to methamphetamine exposure in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Bortell, Nikki

    2017-03-09

    BackgroundAstrocyte activation is one of the earliest findings in the brain of methamphetamine (Meth) abusers. Our goal in this study was to identify the characteristics of the astrocytic acute response to the drug, which may be critical in pathogenic outcomes secondary to the use.MethodsWe developed an integrated analysis of gene expression data to study the acute gene changes caused by the direct exposure to Meth treatment of astrocytes in vitro, and to better understand how astrocytes respond, what are the early molecular markers associated with this response. We examined the literature in search of similar changes in gene signatures that are found in central nervous system disorders.ResultsWe identified overexpressed gene networks represented by genes of an inflammatory and immune nature and that are implicated in neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions. The overexpressed networks are linked to molecules that were highly upregulated in astrocytes by all doses of methamphetamine tested and that could play a role in the central nervous system. The strongest overexpressed signatures were the upregulation of MAP2K5, GPR65, and CXCL5, and the gene networks individually associated with these molecules. Pathway analysis revealed that these networks are involved both in neuroprotection and in neuropathology. We have validated several targets associated to these genes.ConclusionsGene signatures for the astrocytic response to Meth were identified among the upregulated gene pool, using an in vitro system. The identified markers may participate in dysfunctions of the central nervous system but could also provide acute protection to the drug exposure. Further in vivo studies are necessary to establish the role of these gene networks in drug abuse pathogenesis.

  20. Supplementary Material for: Astrocyte-specific overexpressed gene signatures in response to methamphetamine exposure in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Bortell, Nikki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Astrocyte activation is one of the earliest findings in the brain of methamphetamine (Meth) abusers. Our goal in this study was to identify the characteristics of the astrocytic acute response to the drug, which may be critical in pathogenic outcomes secondary to the use. Methods We developed an integrated analysis of gene expression data to study the acute gene changes caused by the direct exposure to Meth treatment of astrocytes in vitro, and to better understand how astrocytes respond, what are the early molecular markers associated with this response. We examined the literature in search of similar changes in gene signatures that are found in central nervous system disorders. Results We identified overexpressed gene networks represented by genes of an inflammatory and immune nature and that are implicated in neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions. The overexpressed networks are linked to molecules that were highly upregulated in astrocytes by all doses of methamphetamine tested and that could play a role in the central nervous system. The strongest overexpressed signatures were the upregulation of MAP2K5, GPR65, and CXCL5, and the gene networks individually associated with these molecules. Pathway analysis revealed that these networks are involved both in neuroprotection and in neuropathology. We have validated several targets associated to these genes. Conclusions Gene signatures for the astrocytic response to Meth were identified among the upregulated gene pool, using an in vitro system. The identified markers may participate in dysfunctions of the central nervous system but could also provide acute protection to the drug exposure. Further in vivo studies are necessary to establish the role of these gene networks in drug abuse pathogenesis.

  1. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  2. Microbial signatures of oral dysbiosis, periodontitis and edentulism revealed by Gene Meter methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M Colby; Pozhitkov, Alex E; Noble, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    Conceptual models suggest that certain microorganisms (e.g., the "red" complex) are indicative of a specific disease state (e.g., periodontitis); however, recent studies have questioned the validity of these models. Here, the abundances of 500+ microbial species were determined in 16 patients with clinical signs of one of the following oral conditions: periodontitis, established caries, edentulism, and oral health. Our goal was to determine if the abundances of certain microorganisms reflect dysbiosis or a specific clinical condition that could be used as a 'signature' for dental research. Microbial abundances were determined by the analysis of 138,718 calibrated probes using Gene Meter methodology. Each 16S rRNA gene was targeted by an average of 194 unique probes (n=25nt). The calibration involved diluting pooled gene target samples, hybridizing each dilution to a DNA microarray, and fitting the probe intensities to adsorption models. The fit of the model to the experimental data was used to assess individual and aggregate probe behavior; good fits (R(2)>0.90) were retained for back-calculating microbial abundances from patient samples. The abundance of a gene was determined from the median of all calibrated individual probes or from the calibrated abundance of all aggregated probes. With the exception of genes with low abundances (periodontitis and edentulism when contrasted with health. Similarly, 13 genera were classified as 'signatures of periodontitis', and 14 genera were classified as 'signatures of edentulism'. The signatures could be used, individually or in combination, to assess the clinical status of a patient (e.g., evaluating treatments such as antibiotic therapies). Comparisons of the same patient samples revealed high false negatives (45%) for next-generation-sequencing results and low false positives (7%) for Gene Meter results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A sputum gene expression signature predicts oral corticosteroid response in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Bronwyn S; Gibson, Peter G; Wood, Lisa G; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley K; Baines, Katherine J

    2017-06-01

    Biomarkers that predict responses to oral corticosteroids (OCS) facilitate patient selection for asthma treatment. We hypothesised that asthma patients would respond differently to OCS therapy, with biomarkers and inflammometry predicting response.Adults with stable asthma underwent a randomised controlled cross-over trial of 50 mg prednisolone daily for 10 days (n=55). A six-gene expression biomarker signature (CLC, CPA3, DNASE1L3, IL1B, ALPL and CXCR2) in induced sputum, and eosinophils in blood and sputum were assessed and predictors of response were investigated (changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (ΔFEV1), six-item Asthma Control Questionnaire score (ΔACQ6) or exhaled nitric oxide fraction (ΔFeNO)).At baseline, responders to OCS (n=25) had upregulated mast cell CPA3 gene expression, poorer lung function, and higher sputum and blood eosinophils. Following treatment, CLC and CPA3 gene expression was reduced, whereas DNASE1L3, IL1B, ALPL and CXCR2 expression remained unchanged. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed the six-gene expression biomarker signature as a better predictor of clinically significant responses to OCS than blood and sputum eosinophils.The six-gene expression signature including eosinophil and Th2 related mast cell biomarkers showed greater precision in predicting OCS response in stable asthma. Thus, a novel sputum gene expression signature highlights an additional role of mast cells in asthma, and could be a useful measurement to guide OCS therapy in asthma. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  4. A machine learning approach for identifying amino acid signatures in the HIV env gene predictive of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Alexander G; Gabuzda, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The identification of nucleotide sequence variations in viral pathogens linked to disease and clinical outcomes is important for developing vaccines and therapies. However, identifying these genetic variations in rapidly evolving pathogens adapting to selection pressures unique to each host presents several challenges. Machine learning tools provide new opportunities to address these challenges. In HIV infection, virus replicating within the brain causes HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and milder forms of neurocognitive impairment in 20-30% of patients with unsuppressed viremia. HIV neurotropism is primarily determined by the viral envelope (env) gene. To identify amino acid signatures in the HIV env gene predictive of HAD, we developed a machine learning pipeline using the PART rule-learning algorithm and C4.5 decision tree inducer to train a classifier on a meta-dataset (n = 860 env sequences from 78 patients: 40 HAD, 38 non-HAD). To increase the flexibility and biological relevance of our analysis, we included 4 numeric factors describing amino acid hydrophobicity, polarity, bulkiness, and charge, in addition to amino acid identities. The classifier had 75% predictive accuracy in leave-one-out cross-validation, and identified 5 signatures associated with HAD diagnosis (pmachine learning tools to analyze the genetics of rapidly evolving pathogens.

  5. Epigenetic signature and enhancer activity of the human APOE gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-En; Cudaback, Eiron; Foraker, Jessica; Thomson, Zachary; Leong, Lesley; Lutz, Franziska; Gill, James Anthony; Saxton, Aleen; Kraemer, Brian; Navas, Patrick; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas; Bekris, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    The human apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene plays an important role in lipid metabolism. It has three common genetic variants, alleles ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4, which translate into three protein isoforms of apoE2, E3 and E4. These isoforms can differentially influence total serum cholesterol levels; therefore, APOE has been linked with cardiovascular disease. Additionally, its ɛ4 allele is strongly associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas the ɛ2 allele appears to have a modest protective effect for AD. Despite decades of research having illuminated multiple functional differences among the three apoE isoforms, the precise mechanisms through which different APOE alleles modify diseases risk remain incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the genomic structure of APOE in search for properties that may contribute novel biological consequences to the risk of disease. We identify one such element in the ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 allele-carrying 3′-exon of APOE. We show that this exon is imbedded in a well-defined CpG island (CGI) that is highly methylated in the human postmortem brain. We demonstrate that this APOE CGI exhibits transcriptional enhancer/silencer activity. We provide evidence that this APOE CGI differentially modulates expression of genes at the APOE locus in a cell type-, DNA methylation- and ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 allele-specific manner. These findings implicate a novel functional role for a 3′-exon CGI and support a modified mechanism of action for APOE in disease risk, involving not only the protein isoforms but also an epigenetically regulated transcriptional program at the APOE locus driven by the APOE CGI. PMID:23892237

  6. A 7-Gene Signature Depicts the Biochemical Profile of Early Prefibrotic Myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    been argued that simple blood tests, including the leukocyte count and plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) may be useful tools to separate genuine ET from prePMF, the latter disease entity more often being featured by anemia, leukocytosis and elevated LDH. Whole blood gene expression profiling...... was performed in 17 and 9 patients diagnosed with ET and PMF, respectively. Using elevated LDH obtained at the time of diagnosis as a marker of prePMF, a 7-gene signature was identified which correctly predicted the prePMF group with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 89%. The 7 genes included MPO...

  7. Transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies human breast cancer susceptibility genes and signatures for stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Pillai, Andrea Mun Ching; Ivshina, Anna V.; Ow, Ghim Siong; Efthimios, Motakis; Zhiqun, Tang; Lee, Song-Choon; Rogers, Keith; Ward, Jerrold M.; Mori, Seiichi; Adams, David J.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Ban, Kenneth Hon-Kim; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Robust prognostic gene signatures and therapeutic targets are difficult to derive from expression profiling because of the significant heterogeneity within breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Here, we performed forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis to identify candidate BC driver genes in an unbiased manner, using a stabilized N-terminal truncated β-catenin gene as a sensitizer. We identified 134 mouse susceptibility genes from 129 common insertion sites within 34 mammary tumors. Of these, 126 genes were orthologous to protein-coding genes in the human genome (hereafter, human BC susceptibility genes, hBCSGs), 70% of which are previously reported cancer-associated genes, and ∼16% are known BC suppressor genes. Network analysis revealed a gene hub consisting of E1A binding protein P300 (EP300), CD44 molecule (CD44), neurofibromin (NF1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which are linked to a significant number of mutated hBCSGs. From our survival prediction analysis of the expression of human BC genes in 2,333 BC cases, we isolated a six-gene-pair classifier that stratifies BC patients with high confidence into prognostically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk subgroups. Furthermore, we proposed prognostic classifiers identifying three basal and three claudin-low tumor subgroups. Intriguingly, our hBCSGs are mostly unrelated to cell cycle/mitosis genes and are distinct from the prognostic signatures currently used for stratifying BC patients. Our findings illustrate the strength and validity of integrating functional mutagenesis screens in mice with human cancer transcriptomic data to identify highly prognostic BC subtyping biomarkers. PMID:28251929

  8. A 16 Yin Yang gene expression ratio signature for ER+/node- breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wayne; Jia, Gaofeng; Cai, Nianguang; Huang, Shujun; Davie, James R; Pitz, Marshall; Banerji, Shantanu; Murphy, Leigh

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. It is a complex and heterogeneous disease with different clinical outcomes. Stratifying patients into subgroups with different outcomes could help guide clinical decision making. In this study, we used two opposing groups of genes, Yin and Yang, to develop a prognostic expression ratio signature. Using the METABRIC cohort we identified a16-gene signature capable of stratifying breast cancer patients into four risk levels with intention that low-risk patients would not undergo adjuvant systemic therapy, intermediate-low-risk patients will be treated with hormonal therapy only, and intermediate-high- and high-risk groups will be treated by chemotherapy in addition to the hormonal therapy. The 16-gene signature for four risk level stratifications of breast cancer patients has been validated using 14 independent datasets. Notably, the low-risk group (n = 51) of 205 estrogen receptor-positive and node negative (ER+/node-) patients from three different datasets who had not had any systemic adjuvant therapy had 100% 15-year disease-specific survival rate. The Concordance Index of YMR for ER+/node negative patients is close to the commercially available signatures. However, YMR showed more significance (HR = 3.7, p = 8.7e-12) in stratifying ER+/node- subgroup than OncotypeDx (HR = 2.7, p = 1.3e-7), MammaPrint (HR = 2.5, p = 5.8e-7), rorS (HR = 2.4, p = 1.4e-6), and NPI (HR = 2.6, p = 1.2e-6). YMR signature may be developed as a clinical tool to select a subgroup of low-risk ER+/node- patients who do not require any adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT). © 2016 UICC.

  9. Signatures of positive selection in LY96 gene in vertebrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tonghai Dou; Maobin Fu; Yixia Wang; Yang Zhao; Zhengshi Wang; Zhengqian Bian; Yan Zhou

    2013-12-01

    As a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the extracellular domain of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Lymphocyte Antigen 96 (LY96), also called myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2), is required for the activation of TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and plays an important role in innate immunity, which is the first line of defence against microbial infections. Previous studies have proposed that mammalian toll-like receptors (TLRs) have evolved under diversifying selection due to their role in pathogen detection. Given the fact that LY96 is highly functionally linked to TLR4, it would be interesting to test whether LY96 is under the intense pressure of natural selection. To investigate the natural selection hypothesis, we compared the coding sequences from 13 vertebrates and evaluated the molecular evolution of LY96 gene in these species. Result shows that natural selection at exon 4 has indeed played a role in shaping the function of LY96 in the course of evolution. In addition to the study of Nakajima, we found the two branch nodes with Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1: the one leading to cow and pig and the other to rabbit and the primates.

  10. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  11. Improved gene expression signature of testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Leffers, Henrik; Lothe, Ragnhild A;

    2007-01-01

    on global gene expression in testicular CIS have been previously published. We have merged the two data sets on CIS samples (n = 6) and identified the shared gene expression signature in relation to expression in normal testis. Among the top-20 highest expressed genes, one-third was transcription factors...... and the list included some 'novel' CIS markers (i.e. DOCK11 and ANXA3). Genes related to biological terms 'nucleic acid binding' and 'translational activity' (e.g. transcription factors and ribosomal proteins, respectively) were consistently and significantly over-represented. Some of the significantly over......-expressed genes in CIS cells were selected for validation by RT-PCR (IFI16, DOCK11, and ANXA3), immunohistochemistry (HLXB9), or in situ hybridization (IFI16). High-level analysis utilizing the Ingenuity pathway analysis tool indicated that networks relating to 'gene expression in cancer' and 'embryonic...

  12. Analytical validation of a melanoma diagnostic gene signature using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanocytic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warf, M Bryan; Flake, Darl D; Adams, Doug; Gutin, Alexander; Kolquist, Kathryn A; Wenstrup, Richard J; Roa, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    These studies were to validate the analytical performance of a gene expression signature that differentiates melanoma and nevi, using RNA expression from 14 signature genes and nine normalization genes that generates a melanoma diagnostic score (MDS). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanocytic lesions were evaluated in these studies. The overall SD of the assay was determined to be 0.69 MDS units. Individual amplicons within the signature had an average amplification efficiency of 92% and a SD less than 0.5 CT. The MDS was reproducible across a 2000-fold dilution range of input RNA. Melanin, an inhibitor of PCR, does not interfere with the signature. These studies indicate this signature is robust and reproducible and is analytically validated on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanocytic lesions.

  13. Cell-type independent MYC target genes reveal a primordial signature involved in biomass accumulation.

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    Hongkai Ji

    Full Text Available The functions of key oncogenic transcription factors independent of context have not been fully delineated despite our richer understanding of the genetic alterations in human cancers. The MYC oncogene, which produces the Myc transcription factor, is frequently altered in human cancer and is a major regulatory hub for many cancers. In this regard, we sought to unravel the primordial signature of Myc function by using high-throughput genomic approaches to identify the cell-type independent core Myc target gene signature. Using a model of human B lymphoma cells bearing inducible MYC, we identified a stringent set of direct Myc target genes via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, global nuclear run-on assay, and changes in mRNA levels. We also identified direct Myc targets in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We further document that a Myc core signature (MCS set of target genes is shared in mouse and human ESCs as well as in four other human cancer cell types. Remarkably, the expression of the MCS correlates with MYC expression in a cell-type independent manner across 8,129 microarray samples, which include 312 cell and tissue types. Furthermore, the expression of the MCS is elevated in vivo in Eμ-Myc transgenic murine lymphoma cells as compared with premalignant or normal B lymphocytes. Expression of the MCS in human B cell lymphomas, acute leukemia, lung cancers or Ewing sarcomas has the highest correlation with MYC expression. Annotation of this gene signature reveals Myc's primordial function in RNA processing, ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation as its key roles in cancer and stem cells.

  14. Semantic Signature: Comparative Interpretation of Gene Expression on a Semantic Space

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    Jihun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Interpretation of microarray data remains challenging because biological meaning should be extracted from enormous numeric matrices and be presented explicitly. Moreover, huge public repositories of microarray dataset are ready to be exploited for comparative analysis. This study aimed to provide a platform where essential implication of a microarray experiment could be visually expressed and various microarray datasets could be intuitively compared. Results. On the semantic space, gene sets from Molecular Signature Database (MSigDB were plotted as landmarks and their relative distances were calculated by Lin’s semantic similarity measure. By formal concept analysis, a microarray dataset was transformed into a concept lattice with gene clusters as objects and Gene Ontology terms as attributes. Concepts of a lattice were located on the semantic space reflecting semantic distance from landmarks and edges between concepts were drawn; consequently, a specific geographic pattern could be observed from a microarray dataset. We termed a distinctive geography shared by microarray datasets of the same category as “semantic signature.” Conclusions. “Semantic space,” a map of biological entities, could serve as a universal platform for comparative microarray analysis. When microarray data were displayed on the semantic space as concept lattices, “semantic signature,” characteristic geography for a microarray experiment, could be discovered.

  15. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  16. Building prognostic models for breast cancer patients using clinical variables and hundreds of gene expression signatures

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    Liu Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple breast cancer gene expression profiles have been developed that appear to provide similar abilities to predict outcome and may outperform clinical-pathologic criteria; however, the extent to which seemingly disparate profiles provide additive prognostic information is not known, nor do we know whether prognostic profiles perform equally across clinically defined breast cancer subtypes. We evaluated whether combining the prognostic powers of standard breast cancer clinical variables with a large set of gene expression signatures could improve on our ability to predict patient outcomes. Methods Using clinical-pathological variables and a collection of 323 gene expression "modules", including 115 previously published signatures, we build multivariate Cox proportional hazards models using a dataset of 550 node-negative systemically untreated breast cancer patients. Models predictive of pathological complete response (pCR to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were also built using this approach. Results We identified statistically significant prognostic models for relapse-free survival (RFS at 7 years for the entire population, and for the subgroups of patients with ER-positive, or Luminal tumors. Furthermore, we found that combined models that included both clinical and genomic parameters improved prognostication compared with models with either clinical or genomic variables alone. Finally, we were able to build statistically significant combined models for pathological complete response (pCR predictions for the entire population. Conclusions Integration of gene expression signatures and clinical-pathological factors is an improved method over either variable type alone. Highly prognostic models could be created when using all patients, and for the subset of patients with lymph node-negative and ER-positive breast cancers. Other variables beyond gene expression and clinical-pathological variables, like gene mutation status or DNA

  17. Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.

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    Howard Y Chang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer invasion and metastasis have been likened to wound healing gone awry. Despite parallels in cellular behavior between cancer progression and wound healing, the molecular relationships between these two processes and their prognostic implications are unclear. In this study, based on gene expression profiles of fibroblasts from ten anatomic sites, we identify a stereotyped gene expression program in response to serum exposure that appears to reflect the multifaceted role of fibroblasts in wound healing. The genes comprising this fibroblast common serum response are coordinately regulated in many human tumors, allowing us to identify tumors with gene expression signatures suggestive of active wounds. Genes induced in the fibroblast serum-response program are expressed in tumors by the tumor cells themselves, by tumor-associated fibroblasts, or both. The molecular features that define this wound-like phenotype are evident at an early clinical stage, persist during treatment, and predict increased risk of metastasis and death in breast, lung, and gastric carcinomas. Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas.

  18. Immune signatures and disorder-specific patterns in a cross-disorder gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Patel, Hamel; Lee, Sanghyuck; Dempster, David; Curtis, Charles; Paya-Cano, Jose; Murphy, Declan; Wilson, C. Ellie; Horder, Jamie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Asherson, Philip; Rivera, Margarita; Costello, Helen; Maltezos, Stefanos; Whitwell, Susannah; Pitts, Mark; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Bolton, Patrick; Curran, Sarah; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to overlap between neuropsychiatric disorders in symptomatology and genetic aetiology. Aims To systematically investigate genomics overlap between childhood and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Analysis of whole-genome blood gene expression and genetic risk scores of 318 individuals. Participants included individuals affected with adult ADHD (n = 93), childhood ADHD (n = 17), MDD (n = 63), ASD (n = 51), childhood dual diagnosis of ADHD–ASD (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 78). Results Weighted gene co-expression analysis results reveal disorder-specific signatures for childhood ADHD and MDD, and also highlight two immune-related gene co-expression modules correlating inversely with MDD and adult ADHD disease status. We find no significant relationship between polygenic risk scores and gene expression signatures. Conclusions Our results reveal disorder overlap and specificity at the genetic and gene expression level. They suggest new pathways contributing to distinct pathophysiology in psychiatric disorders and shed light on potential shared genomic risk factors. PMID:27151072

  19. Gene expression profiling specifies chemokine, mitochondrial and lipid metabolism signatures in leprosy.

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    Luana Tatiana Albuquerque Guerreiro

    Full Text Available Herein, we performed microarray experiments in Schwann cells infected with live M. leprae and identified novel differentially expressed genes (DEG in M. leprae infected cells. Also, we selected candidate genes associated or implicated with leprosy in genetic studies and biological experiments. Forty-seven genes were selected for validation in two independent types of samples by multiplex qPCR. First, an in vitro model using THP-1 cells was infected with live Mycobacterium leprae and M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG. In a second situation, mRNA obtained from nerve biopsies from patients with leprosy or other peripheral neuropathies was tested. We detected DEGs that discriminate M. bovis BCG from M. leprae infection. Specific signatures of susceptible responses after M. leprae infection when compared to BCG lead to repression of genes, including CCL2, CCL3, IL8 and SOD2. The same 47-gene set was screened in nerve biopsies, which corroborated the down-regulation of CCL2 and CCL3 in leprosy, but also evidenced the down-regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, and the up-regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and ubiquitination. Finally, a gene expression signature from DEG was identified in patients confirmed of having leprosy. A classification tree was able to ascertain 80% of the cases as leprosy or non-leprous peripheral neuropathy based on the expression of only LDLR and CCL4. A general immune and mitochondrial hypo-responsive state occurs in response to M. leprae infection. Also, the most important genes and pathways have been highlighted providing new tools for early diagnosis and treatment of leprosy.

  20. A novel volume-age-KPS (VAK glioblastoma classification identifies a prognostic cognate microRNA-gene signature.

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    Pascal O Zinn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have established Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM prognostic and predictive models based on age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, while very few studies evaluated the prognostic and predictive significance of preoperative MR-imaging. However, to date, there is no simple preoperative GBM classification that also correlates with a highly prognostic genomic signature. Thus, we present for the first time a biologically relevant, and clinically applicable tumor Volume, patient Age, and KPS (VAK GBM classification that can easily and non-invasively be determined upon patient admission. METHODS: We quantitatively analyzed the volumes of 78 GBM patient MRIs present in The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA corresponding to patients in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA with VAK annotation. The variables were then combined using a simple 3-point scoring system to form the VAK classification. A validation set (N = 64 from both the TCGA and Rembrandt databases was used to confirm the classification. Transcription factor and genomic correlations were performed using the gene pattern suite and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS: VAK-A and VAK-B classes showed significant median survival differences in discovery (P = 0.007 and validation sets (P = 0.008. VAK-A is significantly associated with P53 activation, while VAK-B shows significant P53 inhibition. Furthermore, a molecular gene signature comprised of a total of 25 genes and microRNAs was significantly associated with the classes and predicted survival in an independent validation set (P = 0.001. A favorable MGMT promoter methylation status resulted in a 10.5 months additional survival benefit for VAK-A compared to VAK-B patients. CONCLUSIONS: The non-invasively determined VAK classification with its implication of VAK-specific molecular regulatory networks, can serve as a very robust initial prognostic tool, clinical trial selection criteria, and important step toward

  1. Evaluation of New Drugs for Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gene Signatures and the Connectivity Map Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0351 TITLE: Evaluation of new drugs for treatment of...3. DATES COVERED 1 June 2011 – 31 May 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of new drugs for treatment of prostate cancer...specific gene signatures can be linked to particular drug-associated gene signatures in the CMAP database. We proposed to identify and validate new drugs against

  2. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  3. Meta-analysis of gene expression signatures defining the epithelial to mesenchymal transition during cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J Gröger

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT represents a crucial event during cancer progression and dissemination. EMT is the conversion of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that associates with a higher cell motility as well as enhanced chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Notably, EMT has been increasingly recognized as an early event of metastasis. Numerous gene expression studies (GES have been conducted to obtain transcriptome signatures and marker genes to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying EMT. Yet, no meta-analysis considering the multitude of GES of EMT has been performed to comprehensively elaborate the core genes in this process. Here we report the meta-analysis of 18 independent and published GES of EMT which focused on different cell types and treatment modalities. Computational analysis revealed clustering of GES according to the type of treatment rather than to cell type. GES of EMT induced via transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α treatment yielded uniformly defined clusters while GES of models with alternative EMT induction clustered in a more complex fashion. In addition, we identified those up- and downregulated genes which were shared between the multitude of GES. This core gene list includes well known EMT markers as well as novel genes so far not described in this process. Furthermore, several genes of the EMT-core gene list significantly correlated with impaired pathological complete response in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive survey of available EMT expression signatures and shows fundamental insights into the mechanisms that are governing carcinoma progression.

  4. Predicting Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Blood-based Gene Expression Signatures and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Il Bin; Kim, Seok Hyeon; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify a transcriptomic signature that could be used to classify subjects with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to controls on the basis of blood gene expression profiles. The gene expression profiles could ultimately be used as diagnostic biomarkers for ASD. Methods We used the published microarray data (GSE26415) from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 21 young adults with ASD and 21 age- and sex-matched unaffected controls. Nineteen differentially expressed probes were identified from a training dataset (n=26, 13 ASD cases and 13 controls) using the limma package in R language (adjusted p value <0.05) and were further analyzed in a test dataset (n=16, 8 ASD cases and 8 controls) using machine learning algorithms. Results Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that subjects with ASD were relatively well-discriminated from controls. Based on the support vector machine and K-nearest neighbors analysis, validation of 19-DE probes with a test dataset resulted in an overall class prediction accuracy of 93.8% as well as a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion The results of our exploratory study suggest that the gene expression profiles identified from the peripheral blood samples of young adults with ASD can be used to identify a biological signature for ASD. Further study using a larger cohort and more homogeneous datasets is required to improve the diagnostic accuracy. PMID:28138110

  5. A genetic signature of spina bifida risk from pathway-informed comprehensive gene-variant analysis.

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    Nicholas J Marini

    Full Text Available Despite compelling epidemiological evidence that folic acid supplements reduce the frequency of neural tube defects (NTDs in newborns, common variant association studies with folate metabolism genes have failed to explain the majority of NTD risk. The contribution of rare alleles as well as genetic interactions within the folate pathway have not been extensively studied in the context of NTDs. Thus, we sequenced the exons in 31 folate-related genes in a 480-member NTD case-control population to identify the full spectrum of allelic variation and determine whether rare alleles or obvious genetic interactions within this pathway affect NTD risk. We constructed a pathway model, predetermined independent of the data, which grouped genes into coherent sets reflecting the distinct metabolic compartments in the folate/one-carbon pathway (purine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, and homocysteine recycling to methionine. By integrating multiple variants based on these groupings, we uncovered two provocative, complex genetic risk signatures. Interestingly, these signatures differed by race/ethnicity: a Hispanic risk profile pointed to alterations in purine biosynthesis, whereas that in non-Hispanic whites implicated homocysteine metabolism. In contrast, parallel analyses that focused on individual alleles, or individual genes, as the units by which to assign risk revealed no compelling associations. These results suggest that the ability to layer pathway relationships onto clinical variant data can be uniquely informative for identifying genetic risk as well as for generating mechanistic hypotheses. Furthermore, the identification of ethnic-specific risk signatures for spina bifida resonated with epidemiological data suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis may differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic groups.

  6. Embryonic stem cell gene expression signatures in the canine mammary tumor: a bioinformatics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Canine breast cancer was considered as an ideal model of comparative oncology for the human breast cancer, as there is significant overlap between biological and clinical characteristics of the human and canine breast cancer. We attempt to clarify expression profile of the embryonic stem cell (ES) gene signatures in canine breast cancer. Using microarray datasets (GSE22516 and GSE20718), expression of the three major ES gene signatures (modules or gene-sets), including Myc, ESC-like, and PRC modules, was primarily analyzed through Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) method in tumor and healthy datasets. For confirmation of the primary results, an additional 13 ES gene-sets which were categorized into four groups including ES expressed (ES exp1 and ES exp2), NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, NOS targets, and NOS TFs), Polycomb targets (Suz12 targets, Eed targets, H3K27 bound, and PRC2 targets), and Myc targets (Myc targets1, and Myc targets2) were tested in the tumor and healthy datasets. Our results revealed that there is a valuable overlap between canine and human breast cancer ES gene-sets expression profile, where Myc and ESC-like modules were up-regulated and PRC module was down-regulated in metastatic canine mammary gland tumors. Further analysis of the secondary gene-sets indicated overexpression of the ES expressed, NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, and NOS targets), and Myc targets and underexpression of the Polycomb targets in metastatic canine breast cancer.

  7. A robust prognostic gene expression signature for early stage lung adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzystanek, Marcin; Moldvay, Judit; Szüts, David;

    2016-01-01

    Stage I lung adenocarcinoma is usually not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy; however, around half of these patients do not survive 5 years. Therefore, a reliable prognostic biomarker for early stage patients would be critical to identify those most likely to benefit from early additional treatm...... not given adjuvant therapy. Seven genes consistently obtained statistical significance in Cox regression for overall survival. The combined signature has a weighted mean hazard ratio of 3.2 in all cohorts and 3.0 (C.I. 1.3-7.4, p ...... treatments. Several studies have searched for gene expression prognostic biomarkers for lung adenocarcinoma, but these have not yielded a widely accepted prognosticator. We analyzed gene expression from seven published lung adenocarcinoma cohorts for which we included only stage I and II patients who were...

  8. A hemocyte gene expression signature correlated with predictive capacity of oysters to survive Vibrio infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rafael

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex balance between environmental and host factors is an important determinant of susceptibility to infection. Disturbances of this equilibrium may result in multifactorial diseases as illustrated by the summer mortality syndrome, a worldwide and complex phenomenon that affects the oysters, Crassostrea gigas. The summer mortality syndrome reveals a physiological intolerance making this oyster species susceptible to diseases. Exploration of genetic basis governing the oyster resistance or susceptibility to infections is thus a major goal for understanding field mortality events. In this context, we used high-throughput genomic approaches to identify genetic traits that may characterize inherent survival capacities in C. gigas. Results Using digital gene expression (DGE, we analyzed the transcriptomes of hemocytes (immunocompetent cells of oysters able or not able to survive infections by Vibrio species shown to be involved in summer mortalities. Hemocytes were nonlethally collected from oysters before Vibrio experimental infection, and two DGE libraries were generated from individuals that survived or did not survive. Exploration of DGE data and microfluidic qPCR analyses at individual level showed an extraordinary polymorphism in gene expressions, but also a set of hemocyte-expressed genes whose basal mRNA levels discriminate oyster capacity to survive infections by the pathogenic V. splendidus LGP32. Finally, we identified a signature of 14 genes that predicted oyster survival capacity. Their expressions are likely driven by distinct transcriptional regulation processes associated or not associated to gene copy number variation (CNV. Conclusions We provide here for the first time in oyster a gene expression survival signature that represents a useful tool for understanding mortality events and for assessing genetic traits of interest for disease resistance selection programs.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of antiviral signature genes in porcine macrophages at different activation statuses.

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    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Macrophages (MФs can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1, alternative (M2, and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153-5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS and interferon (IFNγ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20-50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis.

  10. A p53 drug response signature identifies prognostic genes in high-risk neuroblastoma.

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    Eveline Barbieri

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy induces apoptosis and tumor regression primarily through activation of p53-mediated transcription. Neuroblastoma is a p53 wild type malignancy at diagnosis and repression of p53 signaling plays an important role in its pathogenesis. Recently developed small molecule inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction are able to overcome this repression and potently activate p53 dependent apoptosis in malignancies with intact p53 downstream signaling. We used the small molecule MDM2 inhibitor, Nutlin-3a, to determine the p53 drug response signature in neuroblastoma cells. In addition to p53 mediated apoptotic signatures, GSEA and pathway analysis identified a set of p53-repressed genes that were reciprocally over-expressed in neuroblastoma patients with the worst overall outcome in multiple clinical cohorts. Multifactorial regression analysis identified a subset of four genes (CHAF1A, RRM2, MCM3, and MCM6 whose expression together strongly predicted overall and event-free survival (p<0.0001. The expression of these four genes was then validated by quantitative PCR in a large independent clinical cohort. Our findings further support the concept that oncogene-driven transcriptional networks opposing p53 activation are essential for the aggressive behavior and poor response to therapy of high-risk neuroblastoma.

  11. Gene expression signature of normal cell-of-origin predicts ovarian tumor outcomes.

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    Melissa A Merritt

    Full Text Available The potential role of the cell-of-origin in determining the tumor phenotype has been raised, but not adequately examined. We hypothesized that distinct cells-of-origin may play a role in determining ovarian tumor phenotype and outcome. Here we describe a new cell culture medium for in vitro culture of paired normal human ovarian (OV and fallopian tube (FT epithelial cells from donors without cancer. While these cells have been cultured individually for short periods of time, to our knowledge this is the first long-term culture of both cell types from the same donors. Through analysis of the gene expression profiles of the cultured OV/FT cells we identified a normal cell-of-origin gene signature that classified primary ovarian cancers into OV-like and FT-like subgroups; this classification correlated with significant differences in clinical outcomes. The identification of a prognostically significant gene expression signature derived solely from normal untransformed cells is consistent with the hypothesis that the normal cell-of-origin may be a source of ovarian tumor heterogeneity and the associated differences in tumor outcome.

  12. A three-gene signature for prognosis in patients with MGMT promoter-methylated glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Fan; Wang, Haoyuan; Liang, Tingyu; Wu, Fan; Lan, Qing; Wang, Jiangfei; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-10-25

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant tumor and has high mortality rate. The methylated prompter of MGMT results in chemotherapy sensitivity for these patients. However, there are still other factors that affected the prognosis for the glioblastoma patients with similar MGMT methylation status. We developed a signature with three genes screened from the whole genome mRNA expression profile from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) and RNAseq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Patients with MGMT methylation in low risk group had longer survival than those in high risk group (median overall survival 1074 vs. 372 days; P = 0.0033). Moreover, the prognostic value of the signature was significant difference in cohorts stratified by MGMT methylation and chemotherapy (P=0.0473), while there is no significant difference between low and high risk group or unmethylated MGMT patients without chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that the risk score was an independent prognosis factor (P = 0.004). In conclusion, our results showed that the signature has prognostic value for patients with MGMT promoter-methylated glioblastomas based on bioinformatics analysis.

  13. Inflammation, Adenoma and Cancer: Objective Classification of Colon Biopsy Specimens with Gene Expression Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Galamb

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression analysis of colon biopsies using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays can contribute to the understanding of local pathophysiological alterations and to functional classification of adenoma (15 samples, colorectal carcinomas (CRC (15 and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD (14. Total RNA was extracted, amplified and biotinylated from frozen colonic biopsies. Genome-wide gene expression profile was evaluated by HGU133plus2 microarrays and verified by RT-PCR. We applied two independent methods for data normalization and used PAM for feature selection. Leave one-out stepwise discriminant analysis was performed. Top validated genes included collagenIVα1, lipocalin-2, calumenin, aquaporin-8 genes in CRC; CD44, met proto-oncogene, chemokine ligand-12, ADAM-like decysin-1 and ATP-binding casette-A8 genes in adenoma; and lipocalin-2, ubiquitin D and IFITM2 genes in IBD. Best differentiating markers between Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were cyclin-G2; tripartite motif-containing-31; TNFR shedding aminopeptidase regulator-1 and AMICA. The discriminant analysis was able to classify the samples in overall 96.2% using 7 discriminatory genes (indoleamine-pyrrole-2,3-dioxygenase, ectodermal-neural cortex, TIMP3, fucosyltransferase-8, collectin sub-family member 12, carboxypeptidase D, and transglutaminase-2. Using routine biopsy samples we successfully performed whole genomic microarray analysis to identify discriminative signatures. Our results provide further insight into the pathophysiological background of colonic diseases. The results set up data warehouse which can be mined further.

  14. Gene Signature of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts: Comparison with Dermal Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Keiko Miyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosa is a useful material for regeneration therapy with the advantages of its accessibility and versatility regardless of age and gender. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of oral mucosa. Here we report the first comparative profiles of the gene signatures of human oral mucosa fibroblasts (hOFs, human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs, and hOF-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hOF-iPSCs, linking these with biological roles by functional annotation and pathway analyses. As a common feature of fibroblasts, both hOFs and hDFs expressed glycolipid metabolism-related genes at higher levels compared with hOF-iPSCs. Distinct characteristics of hOFs compared with hDFs included a high expression of glycoprotein genes, involved in signaling, extracellular matrix, membrane, and receptor proteins, besides a low expression of HOX genes, the hDFs-markers. The results of the pathway analyses indicated that tissue-reconstructive, proliferative, and signaling pathways are active, whereas senescence-related genes in p53 pathway are inactive in hOFs. Furthermore, more than half of hOF-specific genes were similarly expressed to those of hOF-iPSC genes and might be controlled by WNT signaling. Our findings demonstrated that hOFs have unique cellular characteristics in specificity and plasticity. These data may provide useful insight into application of oral fibroblasts for direct reprograming.

  15. Translating Research into Practice: the Prosigna® (PAM50) Gene Signature Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Ralph V

    2015-06-01

    Gene expression analyses using DNA microarrays found that breast cancer tumors can be classified into 4 main subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-enriched, and basal-like. These intrinsic subtypes differ in their relapse patterns. For example, Luminal A breast cancer is associated with a low risk of relapse, but the time frame for relapse can extend beyond 10 years. In basal-type disease, relapses typically occur within the first 5 years. The prediction analysis of microarray PAM50 gene set is the standard test used for identifying the gene expression–based intrinsic subtypes in breast cancer. Studies suggest that the PAM50 gene set assay can be used to help predict prognosis in metastatic breast cancer, risk of recurrence in estrogen receptor–positive patients, and benefit of chemotherapy. Multiple laboratory techniques can be used to quantify gene expression, including the nCounter system, which can be used to evaluate expression of multiple genes simultaneously and does not require signal amplification for detection. In the future, gene signatures may allow selection of specific chemotherapy agents for certain patients.

  16. Prostate cancer gene expression signature of patients with high body mass index

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    Sharad, Shashwat; Srivastava, Anjali; Ravulapalli, Suma; Parker, Patrick; Chen, Yongmei; Li, Hua; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Dobi, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate prostate cancer gene expression signatures associated with elevated body mass index (BMI). Global gene expression profiles of prostate tumor cells and matching normal epithelial cells were compared between patients with features of normal- and high BMI at the time of radical prostatectomy. Knowledge-based analyses revealed an association of high BMI with altered levels of lipid metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis genes, such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) and insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1), respectively, in prostate tumor cells. These genes were connected to known pathways of tumorigenesis revealed by the v-maf (musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma) oncogene homolog (MAF), notch receptor ligand, jagged 1 (JAG1), and the alanyl aminopeptidase (ANPEP/CD13) genes. This study highlighted that SCD1, a known target of statins, may play a mechanistic role in the recently noted beneficial effects of statin treatment in reducing biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. An additional finding of our study is that some of the obesity related genes were upregulated in tumor-matched normal cells within the high BMI group, when compared to normal cells within the normal BMI cohort. PMID:21060327

  17. Gene expression in the urinary bladder: a common carcinoma in situ gene expression signature exists disregarding histopathological classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær

    2004-01-01

    that contained genes with similar expression levels in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with surrounding CIS and invasive TCC. However, no close relationship between TCC with adjacent CIS and invasive TCC was observed using hierarchical cluster analysis. Expression profiling of a series of biopsies from normal...... urothelium and urothelium with CIS lesions from the same urinary bladder revealed that the gene expression found in sTCC with surrounding CIS is found also in CIS biopsies as well as in histologically normal samples adjacent to the CIS lesions. Furthermore, we also identified similar gene expression changes...... not only in CIS biopsies but also in sTCC, mTCC, and, remarkably, in histologically normal urothelium from bladders with CIS. Identification of this expression signature could provide guidance for the selection of therapy and follow-up regimen in patients with early stage bladder cancer....

  18. Liver regeneration signature in hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated acute liver failure identified by gene expression profiling.

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    Oriel Nissim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The liver has inherent regenerative capacity via mitotic division of mature hepatocytes or, when the hepatic loss is massive or hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, through activation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. The dramatic clinical course of acute liver failure (ALF has posed major limitations to investigating the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration and the role of HSPC in this setting. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration in 4 patients who underwent liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated ALF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiling of 17 liver specimens from the 4 ALF cases and individual specimens from 10 liver donors documented a distinct gene signature for ALF. However, unsupervised multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering identified two clusters of ALF that segregated according to histopathological severity massive hepatic necrosis (MHN; 2 patients and submassive hepatic necrosis (SHN; 2 patients. We found that ALF is characterized by a strong HSPC gene signature, along with ductular reaction, both of which are more prominent in MHN. Interestingly, no evidence of further lineage differentiation was seen in MHN, whereas in SHN we detected cells with hepatocyte-like morphology. Strikingly, ALF was associated with a strong tumorigenesis gene signature. MHN had the greatest upregulation of stem cell genes (EpCAM, CK19, CK7, whereas the most up-regulated genes in SHN were related to cellular growth and proliferation. The extent of liver necrosis correlated with an overriding fibrogenesis gene signature, reflecting the wound-healing process. CONCLUSION: Our data provide evidence for a distinct gene signature in HBV-associated ALF whose intensity is directly correlated with the histopathological severity. HSPC activation and fibrogenesis positively correlated with the extent of liver necrosis. Moreover, we detected a tumorigenesis gene signature

  19. Visualization and analysis for multidimensional gene expressions signature of cigarette smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changbo; Xiao, Zhao; Zhang, Tianlun; Cui, Jin; Pang, Chenming

    2011-11-01

    Biologists often use gene chip to get massive experimental data in the field of bioscience and chemical sciences. Facing a large amount of experimental data, researchers often need to find out a few interesting data or simple regulations. This paper presents a set of methods to visualize and analyze the data for gene expression signatures of people who smoke. We use the latest research data from National Center for Biotechnology Information. Totally, there are more than 400 thousand expressions data. Using these data, we can use parallel coordinates method to visualize the different gene expressions between smokers and nonsmokers and we can distinguish non-smokers, former smokers and current smokers by using the different colors. It can be easy to find out which gene is more important during the lung cancer angiogenesis in the smoking people. In another way, we can use a hierarchical model to visualize the inner relation of different genes. The location of the nodes shows different expression moment and the distance to the root shows the sequence of the expression. We can use the ring layout to represent all the nodes, and connect the different nodes which are related with color lines. Combined with the parallel coordinates method, the visualization result show the important genes and some inner relation obviously, which is useful for examination and prevention of lung cancer.

  20. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve...to determine whether Fetal Mammary Stem Cell (fMaSC) signatures correlate with response to chemotherapy and metastasis in different breast cancer...positioned to achieve its aims. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer Prognosis, Mammary Stem Cells, Embryonic Development, Single Cell Transcriptomics 16

  1. A meta-analysis of gene expression signatures of blood pressure and hypertension.

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    Tianxiao Huan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs that are associated with blood pressure (BP. Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05. Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%-9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2. Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension.

  2. Gene expression signatures differentiate adenocarcinoma of lung and breast origin in effusions.

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    Davidson, Ben; Stavnes, Helene Tuft; Risberg, Björn; Nesland, Jahn M; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Yang, Yanqin; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2012-05-01

    Lung and breast adenocarcinoma at advanced stages commonly involve the serosal cavities, giving rise to malignant effusions. The aim of the present study was to compare the global gene expression patterns of metastases from these 2 malignancies, to expand and improve the diagnostic panel of biomarkers currently available for their differential diagnosis, as well as to define type-specific biological targets. Gene expression profiles of 7 breast and 4 lung adenocarcinoma effusions were analyzed using the HumanRef-8 BeadChip from Illumina. Differentially expressed candidate genes were validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using all 54,675 genes in the array separated lung from breast adenocarcinoma samples. We identified 289 unique probes that were significantly differentially expressed in the 2 cancers by greater than 2-fold using moderated t statistics, of which 65 and 224 were overexpressed in breast and lung adenocarcinoma, respectively. Genes overexpressed in breast adenocarcinoma included TFF1, TFF3, FOXA1, CA12, PITX1, RARRES1, CITED4, MYC, TFAP2A, EFHD1, TOB1, SPDEF, FASN, and TH. Genes overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma included TITF1, SFTPG, MMP7, EVA1, GPR116, HOP, SCGB3A2, and MET. The differential expression of 15 genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR, and differences in 8 gene products were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Expression profiling distinguishes breast adenocarcinoma from lung adenocarcinoma and identifies genes that are differentially expressed in these 2 tumor types. The molecular signatures unique to these cancers may facilitate their differential diagnosis and may provide a molecular basis for therapeutic target discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust gene signatures from microarray data using genetic algorithms enriched with biological pathway keywords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Baena, R M; Urda, D; Gonzalo Claros, M; Franco, L; Jerez, J M

    2014-06-01

    Genetic algorithms are widely used in the estimation of expression profiles from microarrays data. However, these techniques are unable to produce stable and robust solutions suitable to use in clinical and biomedical studies. This paper presents a novel two-stage evolutionary strategy for gene feature selection combining the genetic algorithm with biological information extracted from the KEGG database. A comparative study is carried out over public data from three different types of cancer (leukemia, lung cancer and prostate cancer). Even though the analyses only use features having KEGG information, the results demonstrate that this two-stage evolutionary strategy increased the consistency, robustness and accuracy of a blind discrimination among relapsed and healthy individuals. Therefore, this approach could facilitate the definition of gene signatures for the clinical prognosis and diagnostic of cancer diseases in a near future. Additionally, it could also be used for biological knowledge discovery about the studied disease.

  4. Prediction of the prognosis of breast cancer in routine histologic specimens using a simplified, low-cost gene expression signature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcell, S.A.; Balazs, A.; Emese, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of the prognosis of breast cancer in routine histologic specimens using a simplified, low-cost gene expression signature Background: Grade 2 breast carcinomas do not form a uniform prognostic group. Aim: To extend the number of patients and the investigated genes of a previously...... identified prognostic signature described by the authors that reflect chromosomal instability in order to refine characterization of grade 2 breast cancers and identify driver genes. Methods: Using publicly available databases, the authors selected 9 target and 3 housekeeping genes that are capable to divide...... prognosis groups. Centroid-based ranking showed that 3 genes, FOXM1, TOP2A and CLDN4 were able to separate the good and poor prognostic groups of grade 2 breast carcinomas. Conclusion: Using appropriately selected control genes, a limited set of genes is able to split prognostic groups of breast carcinomas...

  5. Expression of a neuroendocrine gene signature in gastric tumor cells from CEA 424-SV40 large T antigen-transgenic mice depends on SV40 large T antigen.

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    Fritz Ihler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large fraction of murine tumors induced by transgenic expression of SV40 large T antigen (SV40 TAg exhibits a neuroendocrine phenotype. It is unclear whether SV40 TAg induces the neuroendocrine phenotype by preferential transformation of progenitor cells committed to the neuroendocrine lineage or by transcriptional activation of neuroendocrine genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this question we analyzed CEA424-SV40 TAg-transgenic mice that develop spontaneous tumors in the antral stomach region. Immunohistology revealed expression of the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A in tumor cells. By ELISA an 18-fold higher level of serotonin could be detected in the blood of tumor-bearing mice in comparison to nontransgenic littermates. Transcriptome analyses of antral tumors combined with gene set enrichment analysis showed significant enrichment of genes considered relevant for human neuroendocrine tumor biology. This neuroendocrine gene signature was also expressed in 424GC, a cell line derived from a CEA424-SV40 TAg tumor, indicating that the tumor cells exhibit a similar neuroendocrine phenotype also in vitro. Treatment of 424GC cells with SV40 TAg-specific siRNA downregulated expression of the neuroendocrine gene signature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SV40 TAg thus appears to directly induce a neuroendocrine gene signature in gastric carcinomas of CEA424-SV40 TAg-transgenic mice. This might explain the high incidence of neuroendocrine tumors in other murine SV40 TAg tumor models. Since the oncogenic effect of SV40 TAg is caused by inactivation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and RB1 and loss of function of these proteins is commonly observed in human neuroendocrine tumors, a similar mechanism might cause neuroendocrine phenotypes in human tumors.

  6. Human cancer cells express Slug-based epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression signature obtained in vivo

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    Anastassiou Dimitris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological mechanisms underlying cancer cell motility and invasiveness remain unclear, although it has been hypothesized that they involve some type of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods We used xenograft models of human cancer cells in immunocompromised mice, profiling the harvested tumors separately with species-specific probes and computationally analyzing the results. Results Here we show that human cancer cells express in vivo a precise multi-cancer invasion-associated gene expression signature that prominently includes many EMT markers, among them the transcription factor Slug, fibronectin, and α-SMA. We found that human, but not mouse, cells express the signature and Slug is the only upregulated EMT-inducing transcription factor. The signature is also present in samples from many publicly available cancer gene expression datasets, suggesting that it is produced by the cancer cells themselves in multiple cancer types, including nonepithelial cancers such as neuroblastoma. Furthermore, we found that the presence of the signature in human xenografted cells was associated with a downregulation of adipocyte markers in the mouse tissue adjacent to the invasive tumor, suggesting that the signature is triggered by contextual microenvironmental interactions when the cancer cells encounter adipocytes, as previously reported. Conclusions The known, precise and consistent gene composition of this cancer mesenchymal transition signature, particularly when combined with simultaneous analysis of the adjacent microenvironment, provides unique opportunities for shedding light on the underlying mechanisms of cancer invasiveness as well as identifying potential diagnostic markers and targets for metastasis-inhibiting therapeutics.

  7. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

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    Jessica Kao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes-luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like-with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs. Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes. METHODS: Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression. FINDINGS: Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented, and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and

  8. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

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    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  9. Gene expression signature of cigarette smoking and its role in lung adenocarcinoma development and survival.

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    Maria Teresa Landi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is responsible for over 90% of lung cancer cases, and yet the precise molecular alterations induced by smoking in lung that develop into cancer and impact survival have remained obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed gene expression analysis using HG-U133A Affymetrix chips on 135 fresh frozen tissue samples of adenocarcinoma and paired noninvolved lung tissue from current, former and never smokers, with biochemically validated smoking information. ANOVA analysis adjusted for potential confounders, multiple testing procedure, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, and GO-functional classification were conducted for gene selection. Results were confirmed in independent adenocarcinoma and non-tumor tissues from two studies. We identified a gene expression signature characteristic of smoking that includes cell cycle genes, particularly those involved in the mitotic spindle formation (e.g., NEK2, TTK, PRC1. Expression of these genes strongly differentiated both smokers from non-smokers in lung tumors and early stage tumor tissue from non-tumor tissue (p1.5, for each comparison, consistent with an important role for this pathway in lung carcinogenesis induced by smoking. These changes persisted many years after smoking cessation. NEK2 (p<0.001 and TTK (p = 0.002 expression in the noninvolved lung tissue was also associated with a 3-fold increased risk of mortality from lung adenocarcinoma in smokers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work provides insight into the smoking-related mechanisms of lung neoplasia, and shows that the very mitotic genes known to be involved in cancer development are induced by smoking and affect survival. These genes are candidate targets for chemoprevention and treatment of lung cancer in smokers.

  10. Transforming RNA-Seq data to improve the performance of prognostic gene signatures.

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    Isabella Zwiener

    Full Text Available Gene expression measurements have successfully been used for building prognostic signatures, i.e for identifying a short list of important genes that can predict patient outcome. Mostly microarray measurements have been considered, and there is little advice available for building multivariable risk prediction models from RNA-Seq data. We specifically consider penalized regression techniques, such as the lasso and componentwise boosting, which can simultaneously consider all measurements and provide both, multivariable regression models for prediction and automated variable selection. However, they might be affected by the typical skewness, mean-variance-dependency or extreme values of RNA-Seq covariates and therefore could benefit from transformations of the latter. In an analytical part, we highlight preferential selection of covariates with large variances, which is problematic due to the mean-variance dependency of RNA-Seq data. In a simulation study, we compare different transformations of RNA-Seq data for potentially improving detection of important genes. Specifically, we consider standardization, the log transformation, a variance-stabilizing transformation, the Box-Cox transformation, and rank-based transformations. In addition, the prediction performance for real data from patients with kidney cancer and acute myeloid leukemia is considered. We show that signature size, identification performance, and prediction performance critically depend on the choice of a suitable transformation. Rank-based transformations perform well in all scenarios and can even outperform complex variance-stabilizing approaches. Generally, the results illustrate that the distribution and potential transformations of RNA-Seq data need to be considered as a critical step when building risk prediction models by penalized regression techniques.

  11. A gene expression signature shared by human mature oocytes and embryonic stem cells

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    Pantesco Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first week of human pre-embryo development is characterized by the induction of totipotency and then pluripotency. The understanding of this delicate process will have far reaching implication for in vitro fertilization and regenerative medicine. Human mature MII oocytes and embryonic stem (ES cells are both able to achieve the feat of cell reprogramming towards pluripotency, either by somatic cell nuclear transfer or by cell fusion, respectively. Comparison of the transcriptome of these two cell types may highlight genes that are involved in pluripotency initiation. Results Based on a microarray compendium of 205 samples, we compared the gene expression profile of mature MII oocytes and human ES cells (hESC to that of somatic tissues. We identified a common oocyte/hESC gene expression profile, which included a strong cell cycle signature, genes associated with pluripotency such as LIN28 and TDGF1, a large chromatin remodelling network (TOP2A, DNMT3B, JARID2, SMARCA5, CBX1, CBX5, 18 different zinc finger transcription factors, including ZNF84, and several still poorly annotated genes such as KLHL7, MRS2, or the Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SEPHS1. Interestingly, a large set of genes was also found to code for proteins involved in the ubiquitination and proteasome pathway. Upon hESC differentiation into embryoid bodies, the transcription of this pathway declined. In vitro, we observed a selective sensitivity of hESC to the inhibition of the activity of the proteasome. Conclusion These results shed light on the gene networks that are concurrently overexpressed by the two human cell types with somatic cell reprogramming properties.

  12. Gene-expression signature predicts postoperative recurrence in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

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    Lu, Yan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Pengyuan; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset -142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = -0.83, P85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients.

  13. Gene-expression signature predicts postoperative recurrence in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

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    Yan Lu

    Full Text Available About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset -142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = -0.83, P85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients.

  14. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

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    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  15. Use of gene expression and pathway signatures to characterize the complexity of human melanoma.

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    Freedman, Jennifer A; Tyler, Douglas S; Nevins, Joseph R; Augustine, Christina K

    2011-06-01

    A defining characteristic of most human cancers is heterogeneity, resulting from the somatic acquisition of a complex array of genetic and genomic alterations. Dissecting this heterogeneity is critical to developing an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease and to paving the way toward personalized treatments of the disease. We used gene expression data sets from the analysis of primary and metastatic melanomas to develop a molecular description of the heterogeneity that characterizes this disease. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene set enrichment analyses, and pathway activity analyses were used to describe the genetic heterogeneity of melanomas. Patterns of gene expression that revealed two distinct classes of primary melanoma, two distinct classes of in-transit melanoma, and at least three subgroups of metastatic melanoma were identified. Expression signatures developed to predict the status of oncogenic signaling pathways were used to explore the biological basis underlying these differential patterns of expression. This analysis of activities revealed unique pathways that distinguished the primary and metastatic subgroups of melanoma. Distinct patterns of gene expression across primary, in-transit, and metastatic melanomas underline the genetic heterogeneity of this disease. This heterogeneity can be described in terms of deregulation of signaling pathways, thus increasing the knowledge of the biological features underlying individual melanomas and potentially directing therapeutic opportunities to individual patients with melanoma.

  16. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA) is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC), hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT) cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1) oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells. PMID:27446218

  17. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sebastian Staege

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC, hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1 oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells.

  18. A gene expression signature that can predict green tea exposure and chemopreventive efficacy of lung cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Yao, Ruisheng; Yan, Ying; Wang, Yian; Hara, Yukihiko; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2006-02-15

    Green tea has been shown to be a potent chemopreventive agent against lung tumorigenesis in animal models. Previously, we found that treatment of A/J mice with either green tea (0.6% in water) or a defined green tea catechin extract (polyphenon E; 2.0 g/kg in diet) inhibited lung tumor tumorigenesis. Here, we described expression profiling of lung tissues derived from these studies to determine the gene expression signature that can predict the exposure and efficacy of green tea in mice. We first profiled global gene expressions in normal lungs versus lung tumors to determine genes which might be associated with the tumorigenic process (TUM genes). Gene expression in control tumors and green tea-treated tumors (either green tea or polyphenon E) were compared to determine those TUM genes whose expression levels in green tea-treated tumors returned to levels seen in normal lungs. We established a 17-gene expression profile specific for exposure to effective doses of either green tea or polyphenon E. This gene expression signature was altered both in normal lungs and lung adenomas when mice were exposed to green tea or polyphenon E. These experiments identified patterns of gene expressions that both offer clues for green tea's potential mechanisms of action and provide a molecular signature specific for green tea exposure.

  19. Identification and Validation of HCC-specific Gene Transcriptional Signature for Tumor Antigen Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Caruso, Francesca Pia; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Costa, Valerio; Aprile, Marianna; Esposito, Roberta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-07-08

    A novel two-step bioinformatics strategy was applied for identification of signatures with therapeutic implications in hepatitis-associated HCC. Transcriptional profiles from HBV- and HCV-associated HCC samples were compared with non-tumor liver controls. Resulting HCC modulated genes were subsequently compared with different non-tumor tissue samples. Two related signatures were identified, namely "HCC-associated" and "HCC-specific". Expression data were validated by RNA-Seq analysis carried out on unrelated HCC samples and protein expression was confirmed according to The Human Protein Atlas" (http://proteinatlas.org/), a public repository of immunohistochemistry data. Among all, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10, and IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 3 were found strictly HCC-specific with no expression in 18/20 normal tissues. Target peptides for vaccine design were predicted for both proteins associated with the most prevalent HLA-class I and II alleles. The described novel strategy showed to be feasible for identification of HCC-specific proteins as highly potential target for HCC immunotherapy.

  20. Ontology based molecular signatures for immune cell types via gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background New technologies are focusing on characterizing cell types to better understand their heterogeneity. With large volumes of cellular data being generated, innovative methods are needed to structure the resulting data analyses. Here, we describe an ‘Ontologically BAsed Molecular Signature’ (OBAMS) method that identifies novel cellular biomarkers and infers biological functions as characteristics of particular cell types. This method finds molecular signatures for immune cell types based on mapping biological samples to the Cell Ontology (CL) and navigating the space of all possible pairwise comparisons between cell types to find genes whose expression is core to a particular cell type’s identity. Results We illustrate this ontological approach by evaluating expression data available from the Immunological Genome project (IGP) to identify unique biomarkers of mature B cell subtypes. We find that using OBAMS, candidate biomarkers can be identified at every strata of cellular identity from broad classifications to very granular. Furthermore, we show that Gene Ontology can be used to cluster cell types by shared biological processes in order to find candidate genes responsible for somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells. Moreover, through in silico experiments based on this approach, we have identified genes sets that represent genes overexpressed in germinal center B cells and identify genes uniquely expressed in these B cells compared to other B cell types. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of incorporating structured ontological knowledge into biological data analysis – providing a new method for defining novel biomarkers and providing an opportunity for new biological insights. PMID:24004649

  1. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  2. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  3. Aging-dependent alterations in gene expression and a mitochondrial signature of responsiveness to human influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Juilee; Mohanty, Subhasis; West, A Phillip; Joshi, Samit R; Ueda, Ikuyo; Wilson, Jean; Meng, Hailong; Blevins, Tamara P; Tsang, Sui; Trentalange, Mark; Siconolfi, Barbara; Park, Koonam; Gill, Thomas M; Belshe, Robert B; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate gene expression pathways underlying age-associated impairment in influenza vaccine response, we screened young (age 21-30) and older (age≥65) adults receiving influenza vaccine in two consecutive seasons and identified those with strong or absent response to vaccine, including a subset of older adults meeting criteria for frailty. PBMCs obtained prior to vaccination (Day 0) and at day 2 or 4, day 7 and day 28 post-vaccine were subjected to gene expression microarray analysis. We defined a response signature and also detected induction of a type I interferon response at day 2 and a plasma cell signature at day 7 post-vaccine in young responders. The response signature was dysregulated in older adults, with the plasma cell signature induced at day 2, and was never induced in frail subjects (who were all non-responders). We also identified a mitochondrial signature in young vaccine responders containing genes mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation that was consistent in two different vaccine seasons and verified by analyses of mitochondrial content and protein expression. These results represent the first genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of age-associated dynamics following influenza vaccination, and implicate changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as a critical factor in human vaccine responsiveness.

  4. Identify the signature genes for diagnose of uveal melanoma by weight gene co-expression network analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai; Shi; Zhi-Tong; Bing; Gui-Qun; Cao; Ling; Guo; Ya-Na; Cao; Hai-Ou; Jiang; Mei-Xia; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify and understand the relationship between co-expression pattern and clinic traits in uveal melanoma, weighted gene co-expression network analysis(WGCNA) is applied to investigate the gene expression levels and patient clinic features. Uveal melanoma is the most common primary eye tumor in adults. Although many studies have identified some important genes and pathways that were relevant to progress of uveal melanoma, the relationship between co-expression and clinic traits in systems level of uveal melanoma is unclear yet. We employ WGCNA to investigate the relationship underlying molecular and phenotype in this study.METHODS: Gene expression profile of uveal melanoma and patient clinic traits were collected from the Gene Expression Omnibus(GEO) database. The gene co-expression is calculated by WGCNA that is the R package software. The package is used to analyze the correlation between pairs of expression levels of genes.The function of the genes were annotated by gene ontology(GO).RESULTS: In this study, we identified four co-expression modules significantly correlated with clinictraits. Module blue positively correlated with radiotherapy treatment. Module purple positively correlates with tumor location(sclera) and negatively correlates with patient age. Module red positively correlates with sclera and negatively correlates with thickness of tumor. Module black positively correlates with the largest tumor diameter(LTD). Additionally, we identified the hug gene(top connectivity with other genes) in each module. The hub gene RPS15 A, PTGDS, CD53 and MSI2 might play a vital role in progress of uveal melanoma.CONCLUSION: From WGCNA analysis and hub gene calculation, we identified RPS15 A, PTGDS, CD53 and MSI2 might be target or diagnosis for uveal melanoma.

  5. Identify the signature genes for diagnose of uveal melanoma by weight gene co-expression network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Shi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify and understand the relationship between co-expression pattern and clinic traits in uveal melanoma, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA is applied to investigate the gene expression levels and patient clinic features. Uveal melanoma is the most common primary eye tumor in adults. Although many studies have identified some important genes and pathways that were relevant to progress of uveal melanoma, the relationship between co-expression and clinic traits in systems level of uveal melanoma is unclear yet. We employ WGCNA to investigate the relationship underlying molecular and phenotype in this study. METHODS: Gene expression profile of uveal melanoma and patient clinic traits were collected from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database. The gene co-expression is calculated by WGCNA that is the R package software. The package is used to analyze the correlation between pairs of expression levels of genes. The function of the genes were annotated by gene ontology (GO. RESULTS: In this study, we identified four co-expression modules significantly correlated with clinic traits. Module blue positively correlated with radiotherapy treatment. Module purple positively correlates with tumor location (sclera and negatively correlates with patient age. Module red positively correlates with sclera and negatively correlates with thickness of tumor. Module black positively correlates with the largest tumor diameter (LTD. Additionally, we identified the hug gene (top connectivity with other genes in each module. The hub gene RPS15A, PTGDS, CD53 and MSI2 might play a vital role in progress of uveal melanoma. CONCLUSION: From WGCNA analysis and hub gene calculation, we identified RPS15A, PTGDS, CD53 and MSI2 might be target or diagnosis for uveal melanoma.

  6. Mapping and characterization of two relevance networks from SNP and gene levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jiang; Lijie Zhang; Bo Na; Lihong Wang; Jiankai Xu; Xia Li; Yadong Wang; Shaoqi Rao

    2009-01-01

    Variations of gene expression and DNA sequence are genetically associated.The goal of this study was to build genetic networks to map from SNPs to gene expressions and to characterize the two different kinds of networks.We employed mutual information to evaluate the strength of SNP-SNP and gene-gene associations based on SNPs identity by descent (IBD) data and differences of gene expressions.We applied the approach to one dataset of Genetics of Gene Expression in Humans,and discovered that both the SNP relevance network and the gene relevance network approximated the scale-free topology.We also found that 12.09% of SNP-SNP interactions matched 24.49% of gene-gene interactions,which was consistent with that of the previous studies.Finally,we identified 49 hub SNPs and 115 hub genes in their relevance networks,in which 27 hub SNPs were associated with 25 hub genes.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  7. SignS: a parallelized, open-source, freely available, web-based tool for gene selection and molecular signatures for survival and censored data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Uriarte Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Censored data are increasingly common in many microarray studies that attempt to relate gene expression to patient survival. Several new methods have been proposed in the last two years. Most of these methods, however, are not available to biomedical researchers, leading to many re-implementations from scratch of ad-hoc, and suboptimal, approaches with survival data. Results We have developed SignS (Signatures for Survival data, an open-source, freely-available, web-based tool and R package for gene selection, building molecular signatures, and prediction with survival data. SignS implements four methods which, according to existing reviews, perform well and, by being of a very different nature, offer complementary approaches. We use parallel computing via MPI, leading to large decreases in user waiting time. Cross-validation is used to asses predictive performance and stability of solutions, the latter an issue of increasing concern given that there are often several solutions with similar predictive performance. Biological interpretation of results is enhanced because genes and signatures in models can be sent to other freely-available on-line tools for examination of PubMed references, GO terms, and KEGG and Reactome pathways of selected genes. Conclusion SignS is the first web-based tool for survival analysis of expression data, and one of the very few with biomedical researchers as target users. SignS is also one of the few bioinformatics web-based applications to extensively use parallelization, including fault tolerance and crash recovery. Because of its combination of methods implemented, usage of parallel computing, code availability, and links to additional data bases, SignS is a unique tool, and will be of immediate relevance to biomedical researchers, biostatisticians and bioinformaticians.

  8. Gene expression signatures of energetic acclimatisation in the reef building coral Acropora millepora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line K Bay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the mechanisms by which natural populations cope with environmental stress is paramount to predict their persistence in the face of escalating anthropogenic impacts. Reef-building corals are increasingly exposed to local and global stressors that alter nutritional status causing reduced fitness and mortality, however, these responses can vary considerably across species and populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compare the expression of 22 coral host genes in individuals from an inshore and an offshore reef location using quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR over the course of 26 days following translocation into a shaded, filtered seawater environment. Declines in lipid content and PSII activity of the algal endosymbionts (Symbiodinium ITS-1 type C2 over the course of the experiment indicated that heterotrophic uptake and photosynthesis were limited, creating nutritional deprivation conditions. Regulation of coral host genes involved in metabolism, CO2 transport and oxidative stress could be detected already after five days, whereas PSII activity took twice as long to respond. Opposing expression trajectories of Tgl, which releases fatty acids from the triacylglycerol storage, and Dgat1, which catalyses the formation of triglycerides, indicate that the decline in lipid content can be attributed, at least in part, by mobilisation of triacylglycerol stores. Corals from the inshore location had initially higher lipid content and showed consistently elevated expression levels of two genes involved in metabolism (aldehyde dehydrogenase and calcification (carbonic anhydrase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral host gene expression adjusts rapidly upon change in nutritional conditions, and therefore can serve as an early signature of imminent coral stress. Consistent gene expression differences between populations indicate that corals acclimatize and/or adapt to local environments. Our results set the stage

  9. An interferon response gene signature is associated with the therapeutic response of hepatitis C patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M Pfeffer

    Full Text Available Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major cause of chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide, and thus represents a significant public health problem. The type I interferon (IFN, IFNα, has been successful in treating HCV-infected patients, but current IFN-based treatment regimens for HCV have suboptimal efficacy, and relatively little is known about why IFN therapy eliminates the virus in some patients but not in others. Therefore, it is critical to understand the basic mechanisms that underlie the therapeutic resistance to IFN action in HCV-infected individuals, and there is an urgent need to identify those patients most likely to respond to IFN therapy for HCV. To characterize the response of HCV-infected patients to treatment with IFNα, the expression of an IFN-response gene signature comprised of IFN-stimulated genes and genes that play an important role in the innate immune response was examined in liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients enrolled in a clinical trial. In the present study we found that the expression of a subset of IFN-response genes was dysregulated in liver biopsy samples from nonresponsive hepatitis C patients as compared with virologic responders. Based on these findings, a statistical model was developed to help predict the response of patients to IFN therapy, and compared to results obtained to the IL28 mutation model, which is highly predictive of the response to IFN-based therapy in HCV-infected patients. We found that a model incorporating gene expression data can improve predictions of IFN responsiveness compared to IL28 mutation status alone.

  10. From big data to diagnosis and prognosis: gene expression signatures in liver hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-yong; Wen, Dong-yue; Ye, Zhi-hua; Liang, Liang; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Han-lin

    2017-01-01

    Background Liver hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for the overwhelming majority of primary liver cancers and its belated diagnosis and poor prognosis call for novel biomarkers to be discovered, which, in the era of big data, innovative bioinformatics and computational techniques can prove to be highly helpful in. Methods Big data aggregated from The Cancer Genome Atlas and Natural Language Processing were integrated to generate differentially expressed genes. Relevant signaling pathways of differentially expressed genes went through Gene Ontology enrichment analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Panther pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction network. The pathway ranked high in the enrichment analysis was further investigated, and selected genes with top priority were evaluated and assessed in terms of their diagnostic and prognostic values. Results A list of 389 genes was generated by overlapping genes from The Cancer Genome Atlas and Natural Language Processing. Three pathways demonstrated top priorities, and the one with specific associations with cancers, ‘pathways in cancer,’ was analyzed with its four highlighted genes, namely, BIRC5, E2F1, CCNE1, and CDKN2A, which were validated using Oncomine. The detection pool composed of the four genes presented satisfactory diagnostic power with an outstanding integrated AUC of 0.990 (95% CI [0.982–0.998], P big data, featuring the cancer-specific pathway with priority, ‘pathways in cancer.’ The detection pool of the four highlighted genes, namely BIRC5, E2F1, CCNE1 and CDKN2A, should be further investigated given its high evidence level of diagnosis, whereas the prognostic powers of BIRC5 and CCNE1 are equally attractive and worthy of attention.

  11. A biology-driven approach identifies the hypoxia gene signature as a predictor of the outcome of neuroblastoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fardin, P.; Barla, A.; Mosci, S.; Rosasco, L.; Verri, A.; Versteeg, R.; Caron, H.N.; Molenaar, J.J.; Ora, I.; Eva, A.; Puppo, M.; Varesio, L.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a condition of low oxygen tension occurring in the tumor microenvironment and it is related to poor prognosis in human cancer. To examine the relationship between hypoxia and neuroblastoma, we generated and tested an in vitro derived hypoxia gene signature for its ab

  12. Gene expression signatures predict outcome in non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma - a multi-center validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Clinically useful molecular markers predicting the clinical course of patients diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer are needed to improve treatment outcome. Here, we validated four previously reported gene expression signatures for molecular diagnosis of disease stage and ca...

  13. Reduced expression of a gene proliferation signature is associated with enhanced malignancy in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomshoaa, A; Lin, Y-H; Black, M A; McCall, J L; Humar, B; Song, S; Fukuzawa, R; Yoon, H-S; Holzmann, B; Friederichs, J; van Rij, A; Thompson-Fawcett, M; Reeve, A E

    2008-09-16

    The association between cell proliferation and the malignant potential of colon cancer is not well understood. Here, we evaluated this association using a colon-specific gene proliferation signature (GPS). The GPS was derived by combining gene expression data obtained from the analysis of a cancer cell line model and a published colon crypt profile. The GPS was overexpressed in both actively cycling cells in vitro and the proliferate compartment of colon crypts. K-means clustering was used to independantly stratify two cohorts of colon tumours into two groups with high and low GPS expression. Notably, we observed a significant association between reduced GPS expression and an increased likelihood of recurrence (P cancer malignancy and increased proliferation, by applying our GPS to public breast cancer data. In this study, we show that reduced proliferation is a biological feature characterizing the majority of aggressive colon cancers. This contrasts with many other carcinomas such as breast cancer. Investigating the reasons underlying this unusual observation may provide important insight into the biology of colon cancer progression and putative novel therapy options.

  14. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthi Vidya Priyadarsini

    Full Text Available Chlorophyllin (CHL, a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy.

  15. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy.

  16. Detecting robust gene signature through integrated analysis of multiple types of high-throughput data in liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yu ZHANG; Tian-tian LI; Xiang-jun LIU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the robust gene signature in liver cancer, we applied an integrated approach to perform a joint analysis of a highly diverse collection of liver cancer genome-wide datasets, including genomic alterations and transcrip- tion profiles. Methods: 1-class Significance Analysis of Microarrays coupled with ranking score method were used to identify the robust gene signature in liver tumor tissue. Results: In total, 1 625 051 gene expression measurements from 16 public microarrays, 2 pairs of serial analyses of gene expression experiments, and 252 loss of heterozygosity reports obtained from 568 publications were used in this integrated study. The resulting robust gene signatures included 90 genes, which may be of great importance to liver cancer research. A system assessment analysis revealed that our integrative method had an accuracy of 92% and a correlation coefficient value of 0.88. Conclusion: The system assessment results indicated that our method had the ability of integrating the datasets from various types of sources, and eliciting more accurate results, as can be very useful in the study of liver cancer.

  17. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  18. Interferon gene expression signature in rheumatoid arthritis neutrophils correlates with a good response to TNFi therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Helen L; Thomas, Huw B; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) of RA neutrophils to identify pre-therapy gene expression signatures that correlate with disease activity or response to TNF inhibitor (TNFi) therapy. Neutrophils were isolated from the venous blood of RA patients (n = 20) pre-TNFi therapy and from healthy controls (n = 6). RNA was poly(A) selected and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Reads were mapped to the human genome (hg19) using TopHat and differential expression analysis was carried out using edgeR (5% false discovery rate). Signalling pathway analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. IFN signalling was confirmed by western blotting for phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Response to TNFi was measured at 12 weeks using change in the 28-item DAS (DAS28). Pathway analysis with IPA predicted activation of IFN signalling in RA neutrophils, identifying 178 IFN-response genes regulated by IFN-α, IFN-β or IFN-γ (P < 0.01). IPA also predicted activation of STAT1, STAT2 and STAT3 transcription factors in RA neutrophils (P < 0.01), which was confirmed by western blotting. Expression of IFN-response genes was heterogeneous and patients could be categorized as IFN-high or IFN-low. Patients in the IFN-high group achieved a better response to TNFi therapy [ΔDAS28, P = 0.05, odds ratio (OR) 1.4 (95% CI 1.005, 1.950)] than patients in the IFN-low group. The level of expression of IFN-response genes (IFN score) predicted a good response [European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria] to TNFi using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under the curve 0.76). IFN-response genes are significantly up-regulated in RA neutrophils compared with healthy controls. Higher IFN-response gene expression in RA neutrophils correlates with a good response to TNFi therapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  19. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  20. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-08-17

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI.

  1. HOP expression is regulated by p53 and RAS and characteristic of a cancer gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Stacey A; Blatch, Gregory L; Edkins, Adrienne L

    2017-03-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (HOP) is a co-chaperone essential for client protein transfer from Hsp70 to Hsp90 within the Hsp90 chaperone machine. Although HOP is upregulated in various cancers, there is limited information from in vitro studies on how HOP expression is regulated in cancer. The main objective of this study was to identify the HOP promoter and investigate its activity in cancerous cells. Bioinformatic analysis of the -2500 to +16 bp region of the HOP gene identified a large CpG island and a range of putative cis-elements. Many of the cis-elements were potentially bound by transcription factors which are activated by oncogenic pathways. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the upstream region of the HOP gene contains an active promoter in vitro. Truncation of this region suggested that the core HOP promoter region was -855 to +16 bp. HOP promoter activity was highest in Hs578T, HEK293T and SV40- transformed MEF1 cell lines which expressed mutant or inactive p53. In a mutant p53 background, expression of wild-type p53 led to a reduction in promoter activity, while inhibition of wild-type p53 in HeLa cells increased HOP promoter activity. Additionally, in Hs578T and HEK293T cell lines containing inactive p53, expression of HRAS increased HOP promoter activity. However, HRAS activation of the HOP promoter was inhibited by p53 overexpression. These findings suggest for the first time that HOP expression in cancer may be regulated by both RAS activation and p53 inhibition. Taken together, these data suggest that HOP may be part of the cancer gene signature induced by a combination of mutant p53 and mutated RAS that is associated with cellular transformation.

  2. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Evert van den Broek

    Full Text Available Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA and structural variants (SVs. Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes.Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases.In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR 3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis.We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC.

  3. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

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    Morgan Claire C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases.

  4. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY) of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X) vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases. PMID:22788692

  5. Seven-CpG-based prognostic signature coupled with gene expression predicts survival of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Sipeng; Wang, Guanrong; Shi, Qianwen; Zhang, Ruyang; Zhao, Yang; Wei, Yongyue; Chen, Feng; Christiani, David C

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation has started a recent revolution in genomics biology by identifying key biomarkers for multiple cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the most common head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. A multi-stage screening strategy was used to identify DNA-methylation-based signatures for OSCC prognosis. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data as training set which were validated in two independent datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). The correlation between DNA methylation and corresponding gene expression and the prognostic value of the gene expression were explored as well. The seven DNA methylation CpG sites were identified which were significantly associated with OSCC overall survival. Prognostic signature, a weighted linear combination of the seven CpG sites, successfully distinguished the overall survival of OSCC patients and had a moderate predictive ability for survival [training set: hazard ratio (HR) = 3.23, P = 5.52 × 10(-10), area under the curve (AUC) = 0.76; validation set 1: HR = 2.79, P = 0.010, AUC = 0.67; validation set 2: HR = 3.69, P = 0.011, AUC = 0.66]. Stratification analysis by human papillomavirus status, clinical stage, age, gender, smoking status, and grade retained statistical significance. Expression of genes corresponding to candidate CpG sites (AJAP1, SHANK2, FOXA2, MT1A, ZNF570, HOXC4, and HOXB4) was also significantly associated with patient's survival. Signature integrating of DNA methylation, gene expression, and clinical information showed a superior ability for prognostic prediction (AUC = 0.78). Prognostic signature integrated of DNA methylation, gene expression, and clinical information provides a better prognostic prediction value for OSCC patients than that with clinical information only.

  6. Multi-platform whole-genome microarray analyses refine the epigenetic signature of breast cancer metastasis with gene expression and copy number.

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    Joseph Andrews

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously identified genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a cell line model of breast cancer metastasis. These complex epigenetic changes that we observed, along with concurrent karyotype analyses, have led us to hypothesize that complex genomic alterations in cancer cells (deletions, translocations and ploidy are superimposed over promoter-specific methylation events that are responsible for gene-specific expression changes observed in breast cancer metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook simultaneous high-resolution, whole-genome analyses of MDA-MB-468GFP and MDA-MB-468GFP-LN human breast cancer cell lines (an isogenic, paired lymphatic metastasis cell line model using Affymetrix gene expression (U133, promoter (1.0R, and SNP/CNV (SNP 6.0 microarray platforms to correlate data from gene expression, epigenetic (DNA methylation, and combination copy number variant/single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays. Using Partek Software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we integrated datasets from these three platforms and detected multiple hypomethylation and hypermethylation events. Many of these epigenetic alterations correlated with gene expression changes. In addition, gene dosage events correlated with the karyotypic differences observed between the cell lines and were reflected in specific promoter methylation patterns. Gene subsets were identified that correlated hyper (and hypo methylation with the loss (or gain of gene expression and in parallel, with gene dosage losses and gains, respectively. Individual gene targets from these subsets were also validated for their methylation, expression and copy number status, and susceptible gene pathways were identified that may indicate how selective advantage drives the processes of tumourigenesis and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach allows more precisely profiling of functionally relevant epigenetic signatures that are associated with cancer

  7. Protein Sialylation Regulates a Gene Expression Signature that Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnz, Rebecca A; Roberts, Lindsay S; DeTomaso, David; Bideyan, Lara; Yan, Peter; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Goga, Andrei; Yosef, Nir; Nomura, Daniel K

    2016-08-19

    Many mechanisms have been proposed for how heightened aerobic glycolytic metabolism fuels cancer pathogenicity, but there are still many unexplored pathways. Here, we have performed metabolomic profiling to map glucose incorporation into metabolic pathways upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells by 11 commonly mutated human oncogenes. We show that transformation of mammary epithelial cells by oncogenic stimuli commonly shunts glucose-derived carbons into synthesis of sialic acid, a hexosamine pathway metabolite that is converted to CMP-sialic acid by cytidine monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (CMAS) as a precursor to glycoprotein and glycolipid sialylation. We show that CMAS knockdown leads to elevations in intracellular sialic acid levels, a depletion of cellular sialylation, and alterations in the expression of many cancer-relevant genes to impair breast cancer pathogenicity. Our study reveals the heretofore unrecognized role of sialic acid metabolism and protein sialylation in regulating the expression of genes that maintain breast cancer pathogenicity.

  8. Minimising Immunohistochemical False Negative ER Classification Using a Complementary 23 Gene Expression Signature of ER Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiyuan; Eklund, Aron Charles; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul;

    2010-01-01

    subtypes as compared to IHC-based determination has not been systematically evaluated. Here we attempt to reduce the frequency of false negative ER status classification using two gene expression approaches and compare these methods to IHC based ER status in terms of predictive and prognostic concordance......BACKGROUND: Expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) in breast cancer predicts benefit from endocrine therapy. Minimising the frequency of false negative ER status classification is essential to identify all patients with ER positive breast cancers who should be offered endocrine therapies...... in order to improve clinical outcome. In routine oncological practice ER status is determined by semi-quantitative methods such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) or other immunoassays in which the ER expression level is compared to an empirical threshold. The clinical relevance of gene expression-based ER...

  9. Gene expression signatures that predict radiation exposure in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly K Dressman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The capacity to assess environmental inputs to biological phenotypes is limited by methods that can accurately and quantitatively measure these contributions. One such example can be seen in the context of exposure to ionizing radiation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have made use of gene expression analysis of peripheral blood (PB mononuclear cells to develop expression profiles that accurately reflect prior radiation exposure. We demonstrate that expression profiles can be developed that not only predict radiation exposure in mice but also distinguish the level of radiation exposure, ranging from 50 cGy to 1,000 cGy. Likewise, a molecular signature of radiation response developed solely from irradiated human patient samples can predict and distinguish irradiated human PB samples from nonirradiated samples with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 85%, and specificity of 94%. We further demonstrate that a radiation profile developed in the mouse can correctly distinguish PB samples from irradiated and nonirradiated human patients with an accuracy of 77%, sensitivity of 82%, and specificity of 75%. Taken together, these data demonstrate that molecular profiles can be generated that are highly predictive of different levels of radiation exposure in mice and humans. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that this approach, with additional refinement, could provide a method to assess the effects of various environmental inputs into biological phenotypes as well as providing a more practical application of a rapid molecular screening test for the diagnosis of radiation exposure.

  10. Diagnostic value of blood gene expression signatures in active tuberculosis in Thais: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satproedprai, N; Wichukchinda, N; Suphankong, S; Inunchot, W; Kuntima, T; Kumpeerasart, S; Wattanapokayakit, S; Nedsuwan, S; Yanai, H; Higuchi, K; Harada, N; Mahasirimongkol, S

    2015-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem. Routine laboratory tests or newly developed molecular detection are limited to the quality of sputum sample. Here we selected genes specific to TB by a minimum redundancy-maximum relevancy package using publicly available microarray data and determine level of selected genes in blood collected from a Thai TB cohort of 40 active TB patients, 38 healthy controls and 18 previous TB patients using quantitative real-time PCR. FCGR1A, FCGR1B variant 1, FCGR1B variant 2, APOL1, GBP5, PSTPIP2, STAT1, KCNJ15, MAFB and KAZN had significantly higher expression level in active TB individuals as compared with healthy controls and previous TB cases (P<0.01). A mathematical method was applied to calculate TB predictive score, which contains the level of expression of seven genes and this score can identify active TB cases with 82.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity as compared with conventional culture confirmation. In addition, TB predictive scores in active TB patients were reduced to normal after completion of standard short-course therapy, which was mostly in concordant with the disease outcome. These finding suggested that blood gene expression measurement and TB Sick Score could have potential value in terms of diagnosis of TB and anti-TB treatment monitoring.

  11. Genetic regulatory signatures underlying islet gene expression and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Arushi; Scott, Laura J.; Welch, Ryan P.; Erdos, Michael R.; Chines, Peter S.; Narisu, Narisu; Albanus, Ricardo D’O.; Orchard, Peter; Wolford, Brooke N.; Kursawe, Romy; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Cannon, Maren E.; Didion, John P.; Hensley, John; Kirilusha, Anthony; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Taylor, D. Leland; Watanabe, Richard; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Stitzel, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >100 independent SNPs that modulate the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related traits. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of most of these SNPs remain elusive. Here, we examined genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic profiles in human pancreatic islets to understand the links between genetic variation, chromatin landscape, and gene expression in the context of T2D. We first integrated genome and transcriptome variation across 112 islet samples to produce dense cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) maps. Additional integration with chromatin-state maps for islets and other diverse tissue types revealed that cis-eQTLs for islet-specific genes are specifically and significantly enriched in islet stretch enhancers. High-resolution chromatin accessibility profiling using assay for transposase-accessible chromatin sequencing (ATAC-seq) in two islet samples enabled us to identify specific transcription factor (TF) footprints embedded in active regulatory elements, which are highly enriched for islet cis-eQTL. Aggregate allelic bias signatures in TF footprints enabled us de novo to reconstruct TF binding affinities genetically, which support the high-quality nature of the TF footprint predictions. Interestingly, we found that T2D GWAS loci were strikingly and specifically enriched in islet Regulatory Factor X (RFX) footprints. Remarkably, within and across independent loci, T2D risk alleles that overlap with RFX footprints uniformly disrupt the RFX motifs at high-information content positions. Together, these results suggest that common regulatory variations have shaped islet TF footprints and the transcriptome and that a confluent RFX regulatory grammar plays a significant role in the genetic component of T2D predisposition. PMID:28193859

  12. BAC-based sequencing of behaviorally-relevant genes in the prairie vole.

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    Lisa A McGraw

    Full Text Available The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster is an important model organism for the study of social behavior, yet our ability to correlate genes and behavior in this species has been limited due to a lack of genetic and genomic resources. Here we report the BAC-based targeted sequencing of behaviorally-relevant genes and flanking regions in the prairie vole. A total of 6.4 Mb of non-redundant or haplotype-specific sequence assemblies were generated that span the partial or complete sequence of 21 behaviorally-relevant genes as well as an additional 55 flanking genes. Estimates of nucleotide diversity from 13 loci based on alignments of 1.7 Mb of haplotype-specific assemblies revealed an average pair-wise heterozygosity (8.4×10(-3. Comparative analyses of the prairie vole proteins encoded by the behaviorally-relevant genes identified >100 substitutions specific to the prairie vole lineage. Finally, our sequencing data indicate that a duplication of the prairie vole AVPR1A locus likely originated from a recent segmental duplication spanning a minimum of 105 kb. In summary, the results of our study provide the genomic resources necessary for the molecular and genetic characterization of a high-priority set of candidate genes for regulating social behavior in the prairie vole.

  13. Minimum redundancy maximum relevance feature selection approach for temporal gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Milos; Ghalwash, Mohamed; Filipovic, Nenad; Obradovic, Zoran

    2017-01-03

    Feature selection, aiming to identify a subset of features among a possibly large set of features that are relevant for predicting a response, is an important preprocessing step in machine learning. In gene expression studies this is not a trivial task for several reasons, including potential temporal character of data. However, most feature selection approaches developed for microarray data cannot handle multivariate temporal data without previous data flattening, which results in loss of temporal information. We propose a temporal minimum redundancy - maximum relevance (TMRMR) feature selection approach, which is able to handle multivariate temporal data without previous data flattening. In the proposed approach we compute relevance of a gene by averaging F-statistic values calculated across individual time steps, and we compute redundancy between genes by using a dynamical time warping approach. The proposed method is evaluated on three temporal gene expression datasets from human viral challenge studies. Obtained results show that the proposed method outperforms alternatives widely used in gene expression studies. In particular, the proposed method achieved improvement in accuracy in 34 out of 54 experiments, while the other methods outperformed it in no more than 4 experiments. We developed a filter-based feature selection method for temporal gene expression data based on maximum relevance and minimum redundancy criteria. The proposed method incorporates temporal information by combining relevance, which is calculated as an average F-statistic value across different time steps, with redundancy, which is calculated by employing dynamical time warping approach. As evident in our experiments, incorporating the temporal information into the feature selection process leads to selection of more discriminative features.

  14. Discriminating Gene Expression Signature of Radiation-Induced Thyroid Tumors after Either External Exposure or Internal Contamination

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    Sylvie Chevillard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation.

  15. Discriminating gene expression signature of radiation-induced thyroid tumors after either external exposure or internal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Schlumberger, Martin; Hofman, Paul; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-12-21

    Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation.

  16. Estrogen Receptor beta 2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1 alpha in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Prasenjit Dey; Velazquez-Villegas, Laura A.; Michelle Faria; Anthony Turner; Philp Jonsson; Paul Webb; Cecilia Williams; Jan-Åke Gustafsson; Ström, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) beta variant ER beta 2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ER beta 2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ER beta 2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1 alpha protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1 alpha is known to stimulate met...

  17. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Ackermann

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: We have determined the genetic landscape of human α- and β-cells based on chromatin accessibility and transcript levels, which allowed for detection of novel α- and β-cell signature genes not previously known to be expressed in islets. Using fine-mapping of open chromatin, we have identified thousands of potential cis-regulatory elements that operate in an endocrine cell type-specific fashion.

  18. Signatures derived from increase in SHARPIN gene copy number are associated with poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Diane; Seliman, Maryam; Tang, Damu

    2017-12-01

    We report three signatures produced from SHARPIN gene copy number increase (GCN-Increase) and their effects on patients with breast cancer (BC). In the Metabric dataset (n = 2059, cBioPortal), SHARPIN GCN-Increase occurs preferentially or mutual exclusively with mutations in TP53, PIK3CA, and CDH1. These genomic alterations constitute a signature (SigMut) that significantly correlates with reductions in overall survival (OS) in BC patients (n = 1980; p = 1.081e - 6). Additionally, SHARPIN GCN-Increase is associated with 4220 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). These DEGs are enriched in activation of the pathways regulating cell cycle progression, RNA transport, ribosome biosynthesis, DNA replication, and in downregulation of the pathways related to extracellular matrix. These DEGs are thus likely to facilitate the proliferation and metastasis of BC cells. Additionally, through forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) stepwise variate selections among the top 160 downregulated and top 200 upregulated DEGs using the Cox regression model, a 6-gene (SigFWD) and a 50-gene (SigBWD) signature were derived. Both signatures robustly associate with decreases in OS in BC patients within the Curtis (n = 1980; p = 6.16e - 11 for SigFWD; p = 1.06e - 10, for SigBWD) and TCGA cohort (n = 817; p = 4.53e - 4 for SigFWD and p = 0.00525 for SigBWD). After adjusting for known clinical factors, SigMut (HR 1.21, p = 0.0297), SigBWD (HR 1.25, p = 0.0263), and likely SigFWD (HR 1.17, p = 0.062) remain independent risk factors of BC deaths. Furthermore, the proportion of patients positive for these signatures is significantly increased in ER -, Her2-enriched, basal-like, and claudin-low BCs compared to ER + and luminal BCs. Collectively, these SHARPIN GCN-Increase-derived signatures may have clinical applications in management of patients with BC.

  19. Identifying protective host gene expression signatures within the spleen during West Nile virus infection in the collaborative cross model

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    Richard Green

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are hematophagous arthropod-viruses that pose global challenges to human health. Like Zika virus, West Nile Virus (WNV is a flavivirus for which no approved vaccine exists [1]. The role host genetics play in early detection and response to WNV still remains largely unexplained. In order to capture the impact of genetic variation on innate immune responses, we studied gene expression following WNV infection using the collaborative cross (CC. The CC is a mouse genetics resource composed of hundreds of independently bred, octo-parental recombinant inbred mouse lines [2]. To accurately capture the host immune gene expression signatures of West Nile infection, we used the nanostring platform to evaluate expression in spleen tissue isolated from CC mice infected with WNV over a time course of 4, 7, and 12 days' post-infection [3]. Nanostring is a non-amplification based digital method to quantitate gene expression that uses color-coded molecular barcodes to detect hundreds of transcripts in a sample. Using this approach, we identified unique gene signatures in spleen tissue at days 4, 7, and 12 following WNV infection, which delineated distinct differences between asymptomatic and symptomatic CC lines. We also identified novel immune genes. Data was deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE86000.

  20. Validation study of existing gene expression signatures for anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J M Toonen

    Full Text Available So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF, prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non response.

  1. Validation study of existing gene expression signatures for anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Erik J M; Gilissen, Christian; Franke, Barbara; Kievit, Wietske; Eijsbouts, Agnes M; den Broeder, Alfons A; van Reijmersdal, Simon V; Veltman, Joris A; Scheffer, Hans; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Riel, Piet L C M; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J H

    2012-01-01

    So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF), prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non) response.

  2. LINCS Canvas Browser: interactive web app to query, browse and interrogate LINCS L1000 gene expression signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiaonan; Flynn, Corey; Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Tan, Christopher M; Chen, Edward Y; Golub, Todd R; Sorger, Peter K; Subramanian, Aravind; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2014-07-01

    For the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project many gene expression signatures using the L1000 technology have been produced. The L1000 technology is a cost-effective method to profile gene expression in large scale. LINCS Canvas Browser (LCB) is an interactive HTML5 web-based software application that facilitates querying, browsing and interrogating many of the currently available LINCS L1000 data. LCB implements two compacted layered canvases, one to visualize clustered L1000 expression data, and the other to display enrichment analysis results using 30 different gene set libraries. Clicking on an experimental condition highlights gene-sets enriched for the differentially expressed genes from the selected experiment. A search interface allows users to input gene lists and query them against over 100 000 conditions to find the top matching experiments. The tool integrates many resources for an unprecedented potential for new discoveries in systems biology and systems pharmacology. The LCB application is available at http://www.maayanlab.net/LINCS/LCB. Customized versions will be made part of the http://lincscloud.org and http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu websites.

  3. Anti-apoptotic signature in thymic squamous cell carcinomas - functional relevance of anti-apoptotic BIRC3 expression in the thymic carcinoma cell line 1889c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei eHuang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of thymomas and thymic carcinomas (TCs is poorly understood and results of adjuvant therapy are unsatisfactory in case of metastatic disease and tumor recurrence. For these clinical settings, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Recently, limited sequencing efforts revealed that a broad spectrum of genes that play key roles in various common cancers are rarely affected in thymomas and thymic carcinomas, suggesting that other oncogenic principles might be important. This made us re-analyze historic expression data obtained in a spectrum of thymomas and thymic squamous cell carcinomas (TSCC with a custom made cDNA microarray. By cluster analysis, different anti-apoptotic signatures were detected in type B3 thymoma and TSCC, including overexpression of BIRC3 in TSCCs. This was confirmed by qRT-PCR in the original and an independent validation set of tumors. In contrast to several other cancer cell lines, the BIRC3-positive TSCC cell line, 1889c showed spontaneous apoptosis after BIRC3 knock-down. Targeting apoptosis genes is worth testing as therapeutic principle in TSCC.

  4. Modeling and analyzing gene co-expression in hepatocellular carcinoma using actor-semiotic networks and centrality signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, David C Y

    2008-01-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Because of its high prevalence in developing nations, there have been numerous efforts made in the molecular characterization of primary HCC. However, a better understanding into the pathology of HCC required software-assisted network modeling and analysis. In this paper, the author presented his first attempt in exploring the biological implication of gene co-expression in HCC using actor-semiotic network modeling and analysis. The network was first constructed by integrating inter-actor relationships, e.g. gene co-expression, microRNA-to-gene, and protein interactions, with semiotic relationships, e.g. gene-to-Gene Ontology Process. Topological features that are highly discriminative of the HCC phenotype were identified by visual inspection. Finally, the author devised a graph signature-based analysis method to supplement the network exploration.

  5. Modeling and Analyzing Gene Co-Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Actor-Semiotic Networks and Centrality Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C.Y. Fung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is currently the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Because of its high prevalence in developing nations, there have been numerous efforts made in the molecular characterization of primary HCC. However, a better understanding into the pathology of HCC required software-assisted network modeling and analysis. In this paper, the author presented his first attempt in exploring the biological implication of gene co-expression in HCC using actor-semiotic network modeling and analysis. The network was first constructed by integrating inter-actor relationships, e.g. gene co-expression, microRNA-to-gene, and protein interactions, with semiotic relationships, e.g. gene-to-Gene Ontology Process. Topological features that are highly discriminative of the HCC phenotype were identified by visual inspection. Finally, the author devised a graph signature- based analysis method to supplement the network exploration.

  6. Large-scale cellular-resolution gene profiling in human neocortex reveals species-specific molecular signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongkui; Shen, Elaine H.; Hohmann, John G.; Oh, Wook Seung; Bernard, Amy; Royall, Joshua J.; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Morris, John A.; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Ebbert, Amanda J.; Swanson, Beryl; Kuan, Leonard; Page, Damon T.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Jones, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although there have been major advances in elucidating the functional biology of the human brain, relatively little is known of its cellular and molecular organization. Here we report a large-scale characterization of the expression of ~1,000 genes important for neural functions, by in situ hybridization with cellular resolution in visual and temporal cortices of adult human brains. These data reveal diverse gene expression patterns and remarkable conservation of each individual gene’s expression among individuals (95%), cortical areas (84%), and between human and mouse (79%). A small but substantial number of genes (21%) exhibited species-differential expression. Distinct molecular signatures, comprised of genes both common between species and unique to each, were identified for each major cortical cell type. The data suggest that gene expression profile changes may contribute to differential cortical function across species, in particular, a shift from corticosubcortical to more predominant corticocortical communications in the human brain. PMID:22500809

  7. MicroRNA gene expression signatures in long-surviving malignant pleural mesothelioma patients

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    Ruby C.Y. Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a tumor originating in the mesothelium, the membrane lining the thoracic cavities, and is induced by exposure to asbestos. Australia suffers one of the world's highest rates of MPM and the incidence is yet to peak. The prognosis for patients with MPM is poor and median survival following diagnosis is 4–18 months. Currently, no or few effective therapies exist for MPM. Trials of targeted agents such as antiangiogenic agents (VEGF, EGFR or ribonuclease inhibitors (ranpirnase largely failed to show efficacy in MPM Tsao et al. (2009 [1]. A recent study, however, showed that cisplatin/pemetrexed + bevacizumab (a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibit VEGF treatment has a survival benefit of 2.7 months Zalcman et al. (2016 [2]. It remains to be seen if this targeted therapy will be accepted as a new standard for MPM. Thus the unmet needs of MPM patients remain very pronounced and almost every patient will be confronted with drug resistance and recurrence of disease. We have identified unique gene signatures associated with prolonged survival in mesothelioma patients undergoing radical surgery (EPP, extrapleural pneumonectomy, as well as patients who underwent palliative surgery (pleurectomy/decortication. In addition to data published in Molecular Oncology, 2015;9:715-26 (GSE59180 Kirschner et al. (2015 , we describe here additional data using a system-based approach that support our previous observations. This data provides a resource to further explore microRNA dynamics in MPM.

  8. Stromal genes add prognostic information to proliferation and histoclinical markers: a basis for the next generation of breast cancer gene signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwain Mefford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: First-generation gene signatures that identify breast cancer patients at risk of recurrence are confined to estrogen-positive cases and are driven by genes involved in the cell cycle and proliferation. Previously we induced sets of stromal genes that are prognostic for both estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative samples. Creating risk-management tools that incorporate these stromal signatures, along with existing proliferation-based signatures and established clinicopathological measures such as lymph node status and tumor size, should better identify women at greatest risk for metastasis and death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the strength and independence of the stromal and proliferation factors in estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative patients we constructed multivariate Cox proportional hazards models along with tree-based partitions of cancer cases for four breast cancer cohorts. Two sets of stromal genes, one consisting of DCN and FBLN1, and the other containing LAMA2, add substantial prognostic value to the proliferation signal and to clinical measures. For estrogen receptor-positive patients, the stromal-decorin set adds prognostic value independent of proliferation for three of the four datasets. For estrogen receptor-negative patients, the stromal-laminin set significantly adds prognostic value in two datasets, and marginally in a third. The stromal sets are most prognostic for the unselected population studies and may depend on the age distribution of the cohorts. CONCLUSION: The addition of stromal genes would measurably improve the performance of proliferation-based first-generation gene signatures, especially for older women. Incorporating indicators of the state of stromal cell types would mark a conceptual shift from epithelial-centric risk assessment to assessment based on the multiple cell types in the cancer-altered tissue.

  9. Signatures of positive selection in Toll-like receptor (TLR genes in mammals

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    Areal Helena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed in the cell surface or membrane compartments of immune and non-immune cells. TLRs are encoded by a multigene family and represent the first line of defense against pathogens by detecting foreigner microbial molecular motifs, the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. TLRs are also important by triggering the adaptive immunity in vertebrates. They are characterized by the presence of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs in the ectodomain, which are associated with the PAMPs recognition. The direct recognition of different pathogens by TLRs might result in different evolutionary adaptations important to understand the dynamics of the host-pathogen interplay. Ten mammal TLR genes, viral (TLR3, 7, 8, 9 and non-viral (TLR1-6, 10, were selected to identify signatures of positive selection that might have been imposed by interacting pathogens and to clarify if viral and non-viral TLRs might display different patterns of molecular evolution. Results By using Maximum Likelihood approaches, evidence of positive selection was found in all the TLRs studied. The number of positively selected codons (PSC ranged between 2-26 codons (0.25%-2.65% with the non-viral TLR4 as the receptor with higher percentage of positively selected codons (2.65%, followed by the viral TLR8 (2.50%. The results indicated that viral and non-viral TLRs are similarly under positive selection. Almost all TLRs have at least one PSC located in the LRR ectodomain which underlies the importance of the pathogen recognition by this region. Conclusions Our results are not in line with previous studies on primates and birds that identified more codons under positive selection in non-viral TLRs. This might be explained by the fact that both primates and birds are homogeneous groups probably being affected by only a restricted number of related viruses with equivalent motifs to be

  10. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher; Aucott, John N; Chiu, Charles Y

    2016-02-12

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the "window period" of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in the United States, and some patients report lingering symptoms lasting months to years despite antibiotic treatment. To better understand the role of the human host response in acute Lyme disease and the

  11. Copy number variation of age-related macular degeneration relevant genes in the Korean population.

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    Jung Hyun Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Studies that analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in various genes have shown that genetic factors are strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD susceptibility. Copy number variation (CNV may be an additional type of genetic variation that contributes to AMD pathogenesis. This study investigated CNV in 4 AMD-relevant genes in Korean AMD patients and control subjects. METHODS: Four CNV candidate regions located in AMD-relevant genes (VEGFA, ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH and VLDLR, were selected based on the outcomes of our previous study which elucidated common CNVs in the Asian populations. Real-time PCR based TaqMan Copy Number Assays were performed on CNV candidates in 273 AMD patients and 257 control subjects. RESULTS: The predicted copy number (PCN, 0, 1, 2 or 3+ of each region was called using the CopyCaller program. All candidate genes except ARMS2/HTRA1 showed CNV in at least one individual, in which losses of VEGFA and VLDLR represent novel findings in the Asian population. When the frequencies of PCN were compared, only the gain in VLDLR showed significant differences between AMD patients and control subjects (p = 0.025. Comparisons of the raw copy values (RCV revealed that 3 of 4 candidate genes showed significant differences (2.03 vs. 1.92 for VEGFA, p<0.01; 2.01 vs. 1.97 for CFH, p<0.01; 1.97 vs. 2.01, p<0.01 for ARMS2/HTRA1. CONCLUSION: CNVs located in AMD-relevant genes may be associated with AMD susceptibility. Further investigations encompassing larger patient cohorts are needed to elucidate the role of CNV in AMD pathogenesis.

  12. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the male-specific lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Philip Philge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. Results We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Conclusions Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  13. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the Male-Specific Lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philge; Pettersson, Fredrik; Stenberg, Per

    2012-03-19

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s) and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL) complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs) and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  14. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection.

  15. Application of affymetrix array and massively parallel signature sequencing for identification of genes involved in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichner Lillian J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affymetrix GeneChip Array and Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS are two high throughput methodologies used to profile transcriptomes. Each method has certain strengths and weaknesses; however, no comparison has been made between the data derived from Affymetrix arrays and MPSS. In this study, two lineage-related prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and C4-2, were used for transcriptome analysis with the aim of identifying genes associated with prostate cancer progression. Methods Affymetrix GeneChip array and MPSS analyses were performed. Data was analyzed with GeneSpring 6.2 and in-house perl scripts. Expression array results were verified with RT-PCR. Results Comparison of the data revealed that both technologies detected genes the other did not. In LNCaP, 3,180 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,169 genes were only detected by MPSS. Similarly, in C4-2, 4,121 genes were only detected by Affymetrix and 1,014 genes were only detected by MPSS. Analysis of the combined transcriptomes identified 66 genes unique to LNCaP cells and 33 genes unique to C4-2 cells. Expression analysis of these genes in prostate cancer specimens showed CA1 to be highly expressed in bone metastasis but not expressed in primary tumor and EPHA7 to be expressed in normal prostate and primary tumor but not bone metastasis. Conclusion Our data indicates that transcriptome profiling with a single methodology will not fully assess the expression of all genes in a cell line. A combination of transcription profiling technologies such as DNA array and MPSS provides a more robust means to assess the expression profile of an RNA sample. Finally, genes that were differentially expressed in cell lines were also differentially expressed in primary prostate cancer and its metastases.

  16. Novel strategies to identify relevant molecular signatures for complex human diseases based on data of identical-by-decent profiles and genomic context%基于IBD谱和基因组结构的复杂疾病相关分子标记识别的新策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传星; 杜磊; 李霞; 宫滨生; 张杰; 饶绍奇

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop novel strategies to identify relevant molecular signatures for complex human diseases based on data of identical-by-decent profiles and genomic context.Methods: In the proposed strategies, we define four relevancy criteria for mapping SNP-phenotype relationships-point-wise IBD mean difference, averaged IBD difference for window, Z curve and averaged slope for window.Results: Application of these criteria and permutation test to 100 simulated replicates for two hypothetical American populations to extract the relevant SNPs for alcoholism based on sib-pair IBD profiles of pedigrees demonstrates that the proposed strategies have successfully identified most of the simulated true loci.Conclusion: The data mining practice implies that IBD statistic and genomic context could be used as the informatics for locating the underlying genes for complex human diseases. Compared with the classical Haseman-Elston sib-pair regression method, the proposed strategies are more efficient for large-scale genomic mining.

  17. SNPs in stress-responsive rice genes: validation, genotyping, functional relevance and population structure

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    Parida Swarup K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP validation and large-scale genotyping are required to maximize the use of DNA sequence variation and determine the functional relevance of candidate genes for complex stress tolerance traits through genetic association in rice. We used the bead array platform-based Illumina GoldenGate assay to validate and genotype SNPs in a select set of stress-responsive genes to understand their functional relevance and study the population structure in rice. Results Of the 384 putative SNPs assayed, we successfully validated and genotyped 362 (94.3%. Of these 325 (84.6% showed polymorphism among the 91 rice genotypes examined. Physical distribution, degree of allele sharing, admixtures and introgression, and amino acid replacement of SNPs in 263 abiotic and 62 biotic stress-responsive genes provided clues for identification and targeted mapping of trait-associated genomic regions. We assessed the functional and adaptive significance of validated SNPs in a set of contrasting drought tolerant upland and sensitive lowland rice genotypes by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence alterations in catalytic domains and three-dimensional secondary protein structure encoded by stress-responsive genes. We found a strong genetic association among SNPs in the nine stress-responsive genes with upland and lowland ecological adaptation. Higher nucleotide diversity was observed in indica accessions compared with other rice sub-populations based on different population genetic parameters. The inferred ancestry of 16% among rice genotypes was derived from admixed populations with the maximum between upland aus and wild Oryza species. Conclusions SNPs validated in biotic and abiotic stress-responsive rice genes can be used in association analyses to identify candidate genes and develop functional markers for stress tolerance in rice.

  18. Clinically relevant known and candidate genes for obesity and their overlap with human infertility and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a growing public health concern now reaching epidemic status worldwide for children and adults due to multiple problems impacting on energy intake and expenditure with influences on human reproduction and infertility. A positive family history and genetic factors are known to play a role in obesity by influencing eating behavior, weight and level of physical activity and also contributing to human reproduction and infertility. Recent advances in genetic technology have led to discoveries of new susceptibility genes for obesity and causation of infertility. The goal of our study was to provide an update of clinically relevant candidate and known genes for obesity and infertility using high resolution chromosome ideograms with gene symbols and tabular form. We used computer-based internet websites including PubMed to search for combinations of key words such as obesity, body mass index, infertility, reproduction, azoospermia, endometriosis, diminished ovarian reserve, estrogen along with genetics, gene mutations or variants to identify evidence for development of a master list of recognized obesity genes in humans and those involved with infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols for known and candidate genes for obesity were plotted on high resolution chromosome ideograms at the 850 band level. Both infertility and obesity genes were listed separately in alphabetical order in tabular form and those highlighted when involved with both conditions. By searching the medical literature and computer generated websites for key words, we found documented evidence for 370 genes playing a role in obesity and 153 genes for human reproduction or infertility. The obesity genes primarily affected common pathways in lipid metabolism, deposition or transport, eating behavior and food selection, physical activity or energy expenditure. Twenty-one of the obesity genes were also associated with human infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols were plotted on high resolution

  19. Baltic salmon activates immune relevant genes in fin tissue when responding to Gyrodactylus salaris infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Larsen, Thomas Bjerre; Ingerslev, Hans C.;

    2007-01-01

    A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection......A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection...

  20. Selection signature analysis in Holstein cattle identified genes known to affect reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using direct comparison of 45,878 SNPs between a group of Holstein cattle unselected since 1964 and contemporary Holsteins that on average take 30 days longer for successful conception than the 1964 Holsteins, we conducted selection signature analyses to identify genomic regions associated with dair...

  1. Identifying genes relevant to specific biological conditions in time course microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nitesh Kumar; Repsilber, Dirk; Liebscher, Volkmar; Taher, Leila; Fuellen, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been useful in understanding various biological processes by allowing the simultaneous study of the expression of thousands of genes. However, the analysis of microarray data is a challenging task. One of the key problems in microarray analysis is the classification of unknown expression profiles. Specifically, the often large number of non-informative genes on the microarray adversely affects the performance and efficiency of classification algorithms. Furthermore, the skewed ratio of sample to variable poses a risk of overfitting. Thus, in this context, feature selection methods become crucial to select relevant genes and, hence, improve classification accuracy. In this study, we investigated feature selection methods based on gene expression profiles and protein interactions. We found that in our setup, the addition of protein interaction information did not contribute to any significant improvement of the classification results. Furthermore, we developed a novel feature selection method that relies exclusively on observed gene expression changes in microarray experiments, which we call "relative Signal-to-Noise ratio" (rSNR). More precisely, the rSNR ranks genes based on their specificity to an experimental condition, by comparing intrinsic variation, i.e. variation in gene expression within an experimental condition, with extrinsic variation, i.e. variation in gene expression across experimental conditions. Genes with low variation within an experimental condition of interest and high variation across experimental conditions are ranked higher, and help in improving classification accuracy. We compared different feature selection methods on two time-series microarray datasets and one static microarray dataset. We found that the rSNR performed generally better than the other methods.

  2. Selection Signatures in Four Lignin Genes from Switchgrass Populations Divergently Selected for In Vitro Dry Matter Digestibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Vogel, Kenneth P.; Casler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Switchgrass is undergoing development as a dedicated cellulosic bioenergy crop. Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol in a bioenergy system or to volatile fatty acids in a livestock production system is strongly and negatively influenced by lignification of cell walls. This study detects specific loci that exhibit selection signatures across switchgrass breeding populations that differ in in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD), ethanol yield, and lignin concentration. Allele frequency changes in candidate genes were used to detect loci under selection. Out of the 183 polymorphisms identified in the four candidate genes, twenty-five loci in the intron regions and four loci in coding regions were found to display a selection signature. All loci in the coding regions are synonymous substitutions. Selection in both directions were observed on polymorphisms that appeared to be under selection. Genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium within the candidate genes were low. The recurrent divergent selection caused excessive moderate allele frequencies in the cycle 3 reduced lignin population as compared to the base population. This study provides valuable insight on genetic changes occurring in short-term selection in the polyploid populations, and discovered potential markers for breeding switchgrass with improved biomass quality. PMID:27893787

  3. Gene expression profiling by high throughput sequencing to determine signatures for the bovine receptive uterus at early gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Van Hoeck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The uterus plays a central role among the reproductive tissues in the context of early embryo-maternal communication and a successful pregnancy depends on a complex series of endometrial molecular and cellular events. The factors responsible for the initial interaction between maternal and embryonic tissues, leading to the establishment of pregnancy, remain poorly understood. In this context, Illumina's next-generation sequencing technology has been used to discover the uterine transcriptome signature that is favourable for ongoing pregnancy. More specifically, the present report documents on a retrospective in vivo study in which data on pregnancy outcome were linked to uterine gene expression signatures on day 6 (bovine model. Using the RNA-Seq method, 14.654 reference genes were effectively analysed for differential expression between pregnant and non-pregnant uterine tissue. Transcriptome data revealed that 216 genes were differently expressed when comparing uterine tissue from pregnant and non-pregnant cows. All read sequences were deposited in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA of the NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra. An overview of the gene expression data has been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO and is accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE65117. This allows the research community to enhance reproducibility and allows for new discoveries by comparing datasets of signatures linked to receptivity and/or pregnancy success. The resulting information can serve as tool to identify valuable and urgently needed biomarkers for scoring maternal receptivity and even for accurate detection of early pregnancy, which is a matter of cross-species interest. Beyond gene expression analysis as a marker tool, the RNA-Seq information on pregnant uterine tissue can be used to gain novel mechanistic insights, such as by identifying alternative splicing events, allele-specific expression, and rare and novel transcripts that might

  4. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

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    Rachinger Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. Methods We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750 in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1 were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Results Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. Conclusion In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies.

  5. Effect of Polypurine Reverse Hoogsteen Hairpins on Relevant Cancer Target Genes in Different Human Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Xenia; Rodríguez, Laura; Solé, Anna; Lliberós, Carolina; Mencia, Núria; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique

    2015-08-01

    We studied the ability of polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs) to silence a variety of relevant cancer-related genes in several human cell lines. PPRHs are hairpins formed by two antiparallel polypurine strands bound by intramolecular Hoogsteen bonds linked by a pentathymidine loop. These hairpins are able to bind to their target DNA sequence through Watson-Crick bonds producing specific silencing of gene expression. We designed PPRHs against the following genes: BCL2, TOP1, mTOR, MDM2, and MYC and tested them for mRNA levels, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in prostate, pancreas, colon, and breast cancer cell lines. Even though all PPRHs were effective, the most remarkable results were obtained with those against BCL2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in decreasing cell survival and mRNA levels and increasing apoptosis in prostate, colon, and pancreatic cancer cells. In the case of TOP1, MDM2, and MYC, their corresponding PPRHs produced a strong effect in decreasing cell viability and mRNA levels and increasing apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Thus, we confirm that the PPRH technology is broadly useful to silence the expression of cancer-related genes as demonstrated using target genes involved in metabolism (DHFR), proliferation (mTOR), DNA topology (TOP1), lifespan and senescence (telomerase), apoptosis (survivin, BCL2), transcription factors (MYC), and proto-oncogenes (MDM2).

  6. Maximum-likelihood approaches reveal signatures of positive selection in IL genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabiana; Abrantes, Joana; Steinke, John W; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-02-01

    ILs are part of the immune system and are involved in multiple biological activities. ILs have been shown to evolve under positive selection; however, little information exists regarding which codons are specifically selected. By using different codon-based maximum-likelihood (ML) approaches, signatures of positive selection in mammalian ILs were searched for. Sequences of 46 ILs were retrieved from publicly available databases of mammalian genomes to detect signatures of positive selection in individual codons. Evolutionary analyses were conducted under two ML frameworks, the HyPhy package implemented in the Data Monkey Web Server and CODEML implemented in PAML. Signatures of positive selection were found in 28 ILs: IL-1A and B; IL-2, IL-4 to IL-10, IL-12A and B; IL-14 to IL-17A and C; IL-18, IL-20 to IL-22, IL-25, IL-26, IL-27B, IL-31, IL-34, IL-36A; and G. Codons under positive selection varied between 1 and 15. No evidence of positive selection was detected in IL-13; IL-17B and F; IL-19, IL-23, IL-24, IL-27A; or IL-29. Most mammalian ILs have sites evolving under positive selection, which may be explained by the multitude of biological processes in which ILs are enrolled. The results obtained raise hypotheses concerning the ILs functions, which should be pursued by using mutagenesis and crystallographic approaches.

  7. Delineating transcriptional networks of prognostic gene signatures refines treatment recommendations for lymph node-negative breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Fiona; Brien, Gerard L; Fan, Yue; Madden, Stephen F; Jerman, Emilia; Maratha, Ashwini; Aloraifi, Fatima; Hokamp, Karsten; Dunne, Eiseart J; Lohan, Amanda J; Flanagan, Louise; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha R; Fridberg, Marie; Jirstrom, Karin; Quinn, Cecily M; Loftus, Brendan; Gallagher, William M; Geraghty, James; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-09-01

    The majority of women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer are unnecessarily treated with damaging chemotherapeutics after surgical resection. This highlights the importance of understanding and more accurately predicting patient prognosis. In the present study, we define the transcriptional networks regulating well-established prognostic gene expression signatures. We find that the same set of transcriptional regulators consistently lie upstream of both 'prognosis' and 'proliferation' gene signatures, suggesting that a central transcriptional network underpins a shared phenotype within these signatures. Strikingly, the master transcriptional regulators within this network predict recurrence risk for lymph node-negative breast cancer better than currently used multigene prognostic assays, particularly in estrogen receptor-positive patients. Simultaneous examination of p16(INK4A) expression, which predicts tumours that have bypassed cellular senescence, revealed that intermediate levels of p16(INK4A) correlate with an intact pRB pathway and improved survival. A combination of these master transcriptional regulators and p16(INK4A), termed the OncoMasTR score, stratifies tumours based on their proliferative and senescence capacity, facilitating a clearer delineation of lymph node-negative breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence, and thus requiring chemotherapy. Furthermore, OncoMasTR accurately classifies over 60% of patients as 'low risk', an improvement on existing prognostic assays, which has the potential to reduce overtreatment in early-stage patients. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the transcriptional regulation of cellular proliferation in breast cancer and provides an opportunity to enhance and streamline methods of predicting breast cancer prognosis.

  8. PhiSiGns: an online tool to identify signature genes in phages and design PCR primers for examining phage diversity

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    Dwivedi Bhakti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages (viruses that infect bacteria have gained significant attention because of their abundance, diversity and important ecological roles. However, the lack of a universal gene shared by all phages presents a challenge for phage identification and characterization, especially in environmental samples where it is difficult to culture phage-host systems. Homologous conserved genes (or "signature genes" present in groups of closely-related phages can be used to explore phage diversity and define evolutionary relationships amongst these phages. Bioinformatic approaches are needed to identify candidate signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify those genes from environmental samples; however, there is currently no existing computational tool that biologists can use for this purpose. Results Here we present PhiSiGns, a web-based and standalone application that performs a pairwise comparison of each gene present in user-selected phage genomes, identifies signature genes, generates alignments of these genes, and designs potential PCR primer pairs. PhiSiGns is available at (http://www.phantome.org/phisigns/; http://phisigns.sourceforge.net/ with a link to the source code. Here we describe the specifications of PhiSiGns and demonstrate its application with a case study. Conclusions PhiSiGns provides phage biologists with a user-friendly tool to identify signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify related genes from uncultured phages in environmental samples. This bioinformatics tool will facilitate the development of novel signature genes for use as molecular markers in studies of phage diversity, phylogeny, and evolution.

  9. Identification of a 251 gene expression signature that can accurately detect M. tuberculosis in patients with and without HIV co-infection.

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    Noor Dawany

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. METHODS: We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. RESULTS: Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%. Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9-94.7% accuracy; 69.2-90% sensitivity and 90.3-100% specificity. We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A 251-gene signature is described to (a detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy.

  10. Different sequence signatures in the upstream regions of plant and animal tRNA genes shape distinct modes of regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong; Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, the transcription of tRNA genes is initiated by the concerted action of transcription factors IIIC (TFIIIC) and IIIB (TFIIIB) which direct the recruitment of polymerase III. While TFIIIC recognizes highly conserved, intragenic promoter elements, TFIIIB binds to the non-coding 5'-upstream regions of the tRNA genes. Using a systematic bioinformatic analysis of 11 multicellular eukaryotic genomes we identified a highly conserved TATA motif followed by a CAA-motif in the tRNA upstream regions of all plant genomes. Strikingly, the 5'-flanking tRNA regions of the animal genomes are highly heterogeneous and lack a common conserved sequence signature. Interestingly, in the animal genomes the tRNA species that read the same codon share conserved motifs in their upstream regions. Deep-sequencing analysis of 16 human tissues revealed multiple splicing variants of two of the TFIIIB subunits, Bdp1 and Brf1, with tissue-specific expression patterns. These multiple forms most likely modulate the TFIIIB-DNA interactions and explain the lack of a uniform signature motif in the tRNA upstream regions of animal genomes. The anticodon-dependent 5'-flanking motifs provide a possible mechanism for independent regulation of the tRNA transcription in various human tissues.

  11. A meta-analysis of caloric restriction gene expression profiles to infer common signatures and regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Michael; Wuttke, Daniel; van Dam, Sipko; Clarke, Susan A; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Caloric restriction, a reduction in calorie intake without malnutrition, retards age-related degeneration and extends lifespan in several organisms. CR induces multiple changes, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, we first performed a meta-analysis of microarray CR studies in mammals and identified genes and processes robustly altered due to CR. Our results reveal a complex array of CR-induced changes and we re-identified several genes and processes previously associated with CR, such as growth hormone signalling, lipid metabolism and immune response. Moreover, our results highlight novel associations with CR, such as retinol metabolism and copper ion detoxification, as well as hint of a strong effect of CR on circadian rhythms that in turn may contribute to metabolic changes. Analyses of our signatures by integrating co-expression data, information on genetic mutants, and transcription factor binding site analysis revealed candidate regulators of transcriptional modules in CR. Our results hint at a transcriptional module involved in sterol metabolism regulated by Srebf1. A putative regulatory role of Ppara was also identified. Overall, our conserved molecular signatures of CR provide a comprehensive picture of CR-induced changes and help understand its regulatory mechanisms.

  12. Genomic signatures of local directional selection in a high gene flow marine organism, the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eg Nielsen, Einar; Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Marine fishes have been shown to display low levels of genetic structuring and associated high levels of gene flow, suggesting shallow evolutionary trajectories and, possibly, limited or lacking adaptive divergence among local populations. We investigated variation in 98 gene...... selection in local demes, or closely linked to loci under selection. Likewise, on a regional south/north transect of central and eastern Atlantic populations, seven loci displayed strongly elevated levels of genetic differentiation. Selection patterns among populations appeared to be relatively widespread...... archived otoliths from a Faeroese population demonstrated stability of the intra-population variation over 24 years. An exploratory landscape genetic analysis was used to elucidate potential effects of the most likely environmental factors responsible for the signatures of local adaptation. We found...

  13. Diagnostic and prognostic gene expression signatures in 177 soft tissue sarcomas: hypoxia-induced transcription profile signifies metastatic potential

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    Bendahl Pär-Ola

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue sarcoma (STS diagnosis is challenging because of a multitude of histopathological subtypes, different genetic characteristics, and frequent intratumoral pleomorphism. One-third of STS metastasize and current risk-stratification is suboptimal, therefore, novel diagnostic and prognostic markers would be clinically valuable. We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of array-based gene expression profiles using 27 k cDNA microarrays in 177, mainly high-grade, STS of 13 histopathological subtypes. Results Unsupervised analysis resulted in two major clusters – one mainly containing STS characterized by type-specific genetic alterations and the other with a predominance of genetically complex and pleomorphic STS. Synovial sarcomas, myxoid/round-cell liposarcomas, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors clustered tightly within the former cluster and discriminatory signatures for these were characterized by developmental genes from the EGFR, FGFR, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, RAR and KIT signaling pathways. The more pleomorphic STS subtypes, e.g. leiomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma and dedifferentiated/pleomorphic liposarcoma, were part of the latter cluster and were characterized by relatively heterogeneous profiles, although subclusters herein were identified. A prognostic signature partly characterized by hypoxia-related genes was identified among 89 genetically complex pleomorphic primary STS and could, in a multivariate analysis including established prognostic markers, independently predict the risk of metastasis with a hazard ratio of 2.2 (P = 0.04. Conclusion Diagnostic gene expression profiles linking signaling pathways to the different STS subtypes were demonstrated and a hypoxia-induced metastatic profile was identified in the pleomorphic, high-grade STS. These findings verify diagnostic utility and application of expression data for improved selection of high

  14. A biology-driven approach identifies the hypoxia gene signature as a predictor of the outcome of neuroblastoma patients

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    Fardin Paolo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia is a condition of low oxygen tension occurring in the tumor microenvironment and it is related to poor prognosis in human cancer. To examine the relationship between hypoxia and neuroblastoma, we generated and tested an in vitro derived hypoxia gene signature for its ability to predict patients' outcome. Results We obtained the gene expression profile of 11 hypoxic neuroblastoma cell lines and we derived a robust 62 probesets signature (NB-hypo taking advantage of the strong discriminating power of the l1-l2 feature selection technique combined with the analysis of differential gene expression. We profiled gene expression of the tumors of 88 neuroblastoma patients and divided them according to the NB-hypo expression values by K-means clustering. The NB-hypo successfully stratifies the neuroblastoma patients into good and poor prognosis groups. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that the NB-hypo is a significant independent predictor after controlling for commonly used risk factors including the amplification of MYCN oncogene. NB-hypo increases the resolution of the MYCN stratification by dividing patients with MYCN not amplified tumors in good and poor outcome suggesting that hypoxia is associated with the aggressiveness of neuroblastoma tumor independently from MYCN amplification. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the NB-hypo is a novel and independent prognostic factor for neuroblastoma and support the view that hypoxia is negatively correlated with tumors' outcome. We show the power of the biology-driven approach in defining hypoxia as a critical molecular program in neuroblastoma and the potential for improvement in the current criteria for risk stratification.

  15. Gene fusions and gene duplications: relevance to genomic annotation and functional analysis

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    Riley Monica

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli a model organism provides information for annotation of other genomes. Our analysis of its genome has shown that proteins encoded by fused genes need special attention. Such composite (multimodular proteins consist of two or more components (modules encoding distinct functions. Multimodular proteins have been found to complicate both annotation and generation of sequence similar groups. Previous work overstated the number of multimodular proteins in E. coli. This work corrects the identification of modules by including sequence information from proteins in 50 sequenced microbial genomes. Results Multimodular E. coli K-12 proteins were identified from sequence similarities between their component modules and non-fused proteins in 50 genomes and from the literature. We found 109 multimodular proteins in E. coli containing either two or three modules. Most modules had standalone sequence relatives in other genomes. The separated modules together with all the single (un-fused proteins constitute the sum of all unimodular proteins of E. coli. Pairwise sequence relationships among all E. coli unimodular proteins generated 490 sequence similar, paralogous groups. Groups ranged in size from 92 to 2 members and had varying degrees of relatedness among their members. Some E. coli enzyme groups were compared to homologs in other bacterial genomes. Conclusion The deleterious effects of multimodular proteins on annotation and on the formation of groups of paralogs are emphasized. To improve annotation results, all multimodular proteins in an organism should be detected and when known each function should be connected with its location in the sequence of the protein. When transferring functions by sequence similarity, alignment locations must be noted, particularly when alignments cover only part of the sequences, in order to enable transfer of the correct function. Separating multimodular proteins into module units makes

  16. Transcriptome profiling of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci reveals stage-specific gene expression signatures for thiamethoxam resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, N; Xie, W; Jones, C M; Bass, C; Jiao, X; Yang, X; Liu, B; Li, R; Zhang, Y

    2013-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci has developed high levels of resistance to many insecticides including the neonicotinoids and there is strong evidence that for some compounds resistance is stage-specific. To investigate the molecular basis of B. tabaci resistance to the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam we used a custom whitefly microarray to compare gene expression in the egg, nymph and adult stages of a thiamethoxam-resistant strain (TH-R) with a susceptible strain (TH-S). Gene ontology and bioinformatic analyses revealed that in all life stages many of the differentially expressed transcripts encoded enzymes involved in metabolic processes and/or metabolism of xenobiotics. Several of these are candidate resistance genes and include the cytochrome P450 CYP6CM1, which has been shown to confer resistance to several neonicotinoids previously, a P450 belonging to the Cytochrome P450s 4 family and a glutathione S-transferase (GST) belonging to the sigma class. Finally several ATP-binding cassette transporters of the ABCG subfamily were highly over-expressed in the adult stage of the TH-R strain and may play a role in resistance by active efflux. Here, we evaluated both common and stage-specific gene expression signatures and identified several candidate resistance genes that may underlie B. tabaci resistance to thiamethoxam.

  17. A gene expression signature from human breast cancer cells with acquired hormone independence identifies MYC as a mediator of antiestrogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W.; Balko, Justin M.; Ghazoui, Zara; Dunbier, Anita; Anderson, Helen; Dowsett, Mitch; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Miller, William R.; Wu, Huiyun; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although most patients with estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer initially respond to endocrine therapy, many ultimately develop resistance to antiestrogens. However, mechanisms of antiestrogen resistance and biomarkers predictive of such resistance are underdeveloped. Experimental Design We adapted four ER+ human breast cancer cell lines to grow in an estrogen-depleted medium. A gene signature of estrogen independence was developed by comparing expression profiles of long-term estrogen-deprived (LTED) cells to their parental counterparts. We evaluated the ability of the LTED signature to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor, and disease outcome following adjuvant tamoxifen. We utilized Gene Set Analysis (GSA) of LTED cell gene expression profiles and a loss-of-function approach to identify pathways causally associated with resistance to endocrine therapy. Results The LTED gene expression signature was predictive of high tumor cell proliferation following neoadjuvant therapy with anastrozole and letrozole, each in different patient cohorts. This signature was also predictive of poor recurrence-free survival in two studies of patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. Bioinformatic interrogation of expression profiles in LTED cells revealed a signature of MYC activation. The MYC activation signature and high MYC protein levels were both predictive of poor outcome following tamoxifen therapy. Finally, knockdown of MYC inhibited LTED cell growth. Conclusions A gene expression signature derived from ER+ breast cancer cells with acquired hormone independence predicted tumor response to aromatase inhibitors and associated with clinical markers of resistance to tamoxifen. In some cases, activation of the MYC pathway was associated with this resistance. PMID:21346144

  18. A p53-regulated apoptotic gene signature predicts treatment response and outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Bainer RO

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Russell O Bainer,1 Matthew R Trendowski,2 Cheng Cheng,3 Deqing Pei,3 Wenjian Yang,3 Steven W Paugh,4 Kathleen H Goss,5 Andrew D Skol,6 Paul Pavlidis,7 Ching-Hon Pui,4,8 T Conrad Gilliam,1 William E Evans,4,9,* Kenan Onel10–13,* 1Department of Human Genetics, 2Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Biostatistics, 4Hematological Malignancy Program, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 5University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, 6Department of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 7Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 8Department of Oncology, 9Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 10Division of Human Genetics and Genomics, 11Division of Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Cohen Children’s Medical Center, New Hyde Park, 12The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, 13Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gene signatures have been associated with outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and other malignancies. However, determining the molecular drivers of these expression changes remains challenging. In ALL blasts, the p53 tumor suppressor is the primary regulator of the apoptotic response to genotoxic chemotherapy, which is predictive of outcome. Consequently, we hypothesized that the normal p53-regulated apoptotic response to DNA damage would be altered in ALL and that this alteration would influence drug response and treatment outcome. To test this, we first used global expression profiling in related human B-lineage lymphoblastoid cell lines with either wild type or mutant TP53 to characterize the normal p53-mediated transcriptional response to ionizing radiation (IR and identified

  19. A combination of transcriptome and methylation analyses reveals embryologically-relevant candidate genes in MRKH patients

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    Riess Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome is present in at least 1 out of 4,500 female live births and is the second most common cause for primary amenorrhea. It is characterized by vaginal and uterine aplasia in an XX individual with normal secondary characteristics. It has long been considered a sporadic anomaly, but familial clustering occurs. Several candidate genes have been studied although no single factor has yet been identified. Cases of discordant monozygotic twins suggest that the involvement of epigenetic factors is more likely. Methods Differences in gene expression and methylation patterns of uterine tissue between eight MRKH patients and eight controls were identified using whole-genome microarray analyses. Results obtained by expression and methylation arrays were confirmed by qRT-PCR and pyrosequencing. Results We delineated 293 differentially expressed and 194 differentially methylated genes of which nine overlap in both groups. These nine genes are mainly embryologically relevant for the development of the female genital tract. Conclusion Our study used, for the first time, a combined whole-genome expression and methylation approach to reveal the etiology of the MRKH syndrome. The findings suggest that either deficient estrogen receptors or the ectopic expression of certain HOXA genes might lead to abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. In utero exposure to endocrine disruptors or abnormally high maternal hormone levels might cause ectopic expression or anterior transformation of HOXA genes. It is, however, also possible that different factors influence the anti-Mullerian hormone promoter activity during embryological development causing regression of the Müllerian ducts. Thus, our data stimulate new research directions to decipher the pathogenic basis of MRKH syndrome.

  20. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  1. Different Coexpressions of Arthritis-Relevant Genes between Different Body Organs and Different Brain Regions in the Normal Mouse Population

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Yanhong; Huang, Yue; Wang, Lishi; Zhu, JiaQian; Gu, Weikuan

    2012-01-01

    Structural changes in different parts of the brain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have been reported. RA is not regarded as a brain disease. Body organs such as spleen and lung produce RA-relevant genes. We hypothesized that the structural changes in the brain are caused by changes of gene expression in body organs. Changes in different parts of the brain may be affected by altered gene expressions in different body organs. This study explored whether an association between gene expres...

  2. Expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in the liver are differently correlated to different parts of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lishi; Huang, Yue; Jiao, Yan; Chen, Hong; Cao, Yanhong; Bennett, Beth; Wang, Yongjun; Gu, Weikuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether expression profiles of alcoholism-relevant genes in different parts of the brain are correlated differently with those in the liver. Four experiments were conducted. First, we used gene expression profiles from five parts of the brain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and cerebellum) and from liver in a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains to examine the expression association of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Second, we conducted the same association analysis between brain structures and the lung. Third, using five randomly selected, nonalcoholism-relevant genes, we conducted the association analysis between brain and liver. Finally, we compared the expression of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes in hippocampus and cerebellum between an alcohol preference strain and a wild-type control. We observed a difference in correlation patterns in expression levels of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes between different parts of the brain with those of liver. We then examined the association of gene expression between alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh1, Adh2, Adh5, and Adh7) and different parts of the brain. The results were similar to those of the 10 genes. Then, we found that the association of those genes between brain structures and lung was different from that of liver. Next, we found that the association patterns of five alcoholism-nonrelevant genes were different from those of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Finally, we found that the expression level of 10 alcohol-relevant genes is influenced more in hippocampus than in cerebellum in the alcohol preference strain. Our results show that the expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in liver is differently associated with the expression of genes in different parts of the brain. Because different structural changes in different parts of the brain in alcoholism have been reported, it is important to investigate whether those structural differences in

  3. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

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    Vitalis Tania

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed. Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell

  4. Gene and environment interaction: Is the differential susceptibility hypothesis relevant for obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Molle, Roberta; Fatemi, Hajar; Dagher, Alain; Levitan, Robert D; Silveira, Patricia P; Dubé, Laurette

    2017-02-01

    The differential susceptibility model states that a given genetic variant is associated with an increased risk of pathology in negative environments but greater than average resilience in enriched ones. While this theory was first implemented in psychiatric-genetic research, it may also help us to unravel the complex ways that genes and environments interact to influence feeding behavior and obesity. We reviewed evidence on gene vs. environment interactions that influence obesity development, aiming to support the applicability of the differential susceptibility model for this condition, and propose that various environmental "layers" relevant for human development should be considered when bearing the differential susceptibility model in mind. Mother-child relationship, socioeconomic status and individual's response are important modifiers of BMI and food intake when interacting with gene variants, "for better and for worse". While only a few studies to date have investigated obesity outcomes using this approach, we propose that the differential susceptibility hypothesis is in fact highly applicable to the study of genetic and environmental influences on feeding behavior and obesity risk.

  5. Gene Expression Signature TOPFOX Reflecting Chromosomal Instability Refines Prediction of Prognosis in Grade 2 Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szasz, A.; Li, Qiyuan; Sztupinszki, Z.

    2011-01-01

    were diagnosed between 1999–2002 at the Budai MA´ V Hospital. 187 formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples were included in the qPCR-based measurement of expression of AURKA, FOXM1, TOP2A and TPX2 genes. The expression of the genes were correlated to recurrencefree survival (RFS......Purpose: To assess the ability of genes selected from those reflecting chromosomal instability to identify good and poor prognostic subsets of Grade 2 breast carcinomas. Methods: We selected genes for splitting grade 2 tumours into low and high grade type groups by using public databases. Patients...

  6. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Guillaume; Walton, Emma L; Sterlin, Delphine; Hédouin, Sabrine; Nitta, Hirohisa; Ito, Yuya; Fouyssac, Fanny; Mégarbané, André; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Picard, Capucine; Francastel, Claire

    2014-04-17

    Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected relatives. The specific and robust

  7. Genomic and gene expression signature of the pre-invasive testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Ottesen, Anne Marie; Sonne, Si Brask

    2005-01-01

    on the pre-invasive CIS and its possible fetal origin by reviewing recent data originating from DNA microarrays and comparative genomic hybridisations. A comparison of gene expression and genomic aberrations reveal chromosomal "hot spots" with mutual clustering of gene expression and genomic amplification...

  8. Extraction and analysis of signatures from the Gene Expression Omnibus by the crowd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jagodnik, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression data are accumulating exponentially in public repositories. Reanalysis and integration of themed collections from these studies may provide new insights, but requires further human curation. Here we report a crowdsourcing project to annotate and reanalyse a large number of gene ex...

  9. Gene Expression Signature TOPFOX Reflecting Chromosomal Instability Refines Prediction of Prognosis in Grade 2 Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szasz, A.; Li, Qiyuan; Sztupinszki, Z.

    2011-01-01

    were diagnosed between 1999–2002 at the Budai MA´ V Hospital. 187 formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples were included in the qPCR-based measurement of expression of AURKA, FOXM1, TOP2A and TPX2 genes. The expression of the genes were correlated to recurrencefree survival (RFS...

  10. Preferential duplication of intermodular hub genes: an evolutionary signature in eukaryotes genome networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M Ferreira

    Full Text Available Whole genome protein-protein association networks are not random and their topological properties stem from genome evolution mechanisms. In fact, more connected, but less clustered proteins are related to genes that, in general, present more paralogs as compared to other genes, indicating frequent previous gene duplication episodes. On the other hand, genes related to conserved biological functions present few or no paralogs and yield proteins that are highly connected and clustered. These general network characteristics must have an evolutionary explanation. Considering data from STRING database, we present here experimental evidence that, more than not being scale free, protein degree distributions of organisms present an increased probability for high degree nodes. Furthermore, based on this experimental evidence, we propose a simulation model for genome evolution, where genes in a network are either acquired de novo using a preferential attachment rule, or duplicated with a probability that linearly grows with gene degree and decreases with its clustering coefficient. For the first time a model yields results that simultaneously describe different topological distributions. Also, this model correctly predicts that, to produce protein-protein association networks with number of links and number of nodes in the observed range for Eukaryotes, it is necessary 90% of gene duplication and 10% of de novo gene acquisition. This scenario implies a universal mechanism for genome evolution.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  12. Estrogen Receptor β2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1α in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit Dey

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor (ER β variant ERβ2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ERβ2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ERβ2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1α protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1α is known to stimulate metastasis by increasing expression of Twist1 and increasing vascularization by directly activating VEGF expression. We found that ERβ2 interacts with HIF-1α and piggybacks to the HIF-1α response element present on the proximal Twist1 and VEGF promoters. These findings suggest that at least part of the oncogenic effects of ERβ2 is mediated by HIF-1α and that targeting of this ERβ2 - HIF-1α interaction may be a strategy to treat prostate cancer.

  13. Estrogen Receptor β2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1α in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasenjit; Velazquez-Villegas, Laura A.; Faria, Michelle; Turner, Anthony; Jonsson, Philp; Webb, Paul; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ström, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) β variant ERβ2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ERβ2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ERβ2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1α protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1α is known to stimulate metastasis by increasing expression of Twist1 and increasing vascularization by directly activating VEGF expression. We found that ERβ2 interacts with HIF-1α and piggybacks to the HIF-1α response element present on the proximal Twist1 and VEGF promoters. These findings suggest that at least part of the oncogenic effects of ERβ2 is mediated by HIF-1α and that targeting of this ERβ2 – HIF-1α interaction may be a strategy to treat prostate cancer. PMID:26010887

  14. Chronic LSD alters gene expression profiles in the mPFC relevant to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David A; Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Nichols, David E; Nichols, Charles D

    2014-08-01

    Chronic administration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) every other day to rats results in a variety of abnormal behaviors. These build over the 90 day course of treatment and can persist at full strength for at least several months after cessation of treatment. The behaviors are consistent with those observed in animal models of schizophrenia and include hyperactivity, reduced sucrose-preference, and decreased social interaction. In order to elucidate molecular changes that underlie these aberrant behaviors, we chronically treated rats with LSD and performed RNA-sequencing on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an area highly associated with both the actions of LSD and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. We observed widespread changes in the neurogenetic state of treated animals four weeks after cessation of LSD treatment. QPCR was used to validate a subset of gene expression changes observed with RNA-Seq, and confirmed a significant correlation between the two methods. Functional clustering analysis indicates differentially expressed genes are enriched in pathways involving neurotransmission (Drd2, Gabrb1), synaptic plasticity (Nr2a, Krox20), energy metabolism (Atp5d, Ndufa1) and neuropeptide signaling (Npy, Bdnf), among others. Many processes identified as altered by chronic LSD are also implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and genes affected by LSD are enriched with putative schizophrenia genes. Our results provide a relatively comprehensive analysis of mPFC transcriptional regulation in response to chronic LSD, and indicate that the long-term effects of LSD may bear relevance to psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relevance of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance genes in human breast cancer progression and tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agthoven, Ton; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; Look, Maxime P; Smid, Marcel; Veldscholte, Jos; Sleijfer, Stefan; Foekens, John A; Dorssers, Lambert C J

    2009-02-01

    We have previously identified a set of breast cancer antiestrogen resistance (BCAR) genes causing estrogen independence and tamoxifen resistance in vitro using a functional genetic screen. Here, we explored whether these BCAR genes provide predictive value for tamoxifen resistance and prognostic information for tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients. mRNA levels of 10 BCAR genes (AKT1, AKT2, BCAR1, BCAR3, EGFR, ERBB2, GRB7, SRC, TLE3, and TRERF1) were measured in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Normalized mRNA levels were evaluated for association with progression-free survival (PFS) in 242 patients receiving tamoxifen as first-line monotherapy for recurrent disease, and with distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) in 413 lymph node-negative (LNN) primary breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Concerning tamoxifen resistance, BCAR3, ERBB2, GRB7, and TLE3 mRNA levels were predictive for PFS, independent of traditional predictive factors. By combining GRB7 (or ERBB2) and TLE3 mRNA levels, patients could be classified in three subgroups with distinct PFS. For the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness, AKT2, EGFR, and TRERF1 mRNA levels were all significantly associated with MFS, independent of traditional prognostic factors. Using the combined AKT2 and EGFR mRNA status, four prognostic groups were identified with different MFS outcomes. The majority of BCAR genes, which were revealed to confer tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independence in vitro by functional screening, have clinical relevance, and associate with tamoxifen resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer patients.

  16. Shared signatures of social stress and aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Somel, Mehmet; Tung, Jenny

    2014-10-01

    Chronic social stress is a predictor of both aging-related disease and mortality risk. Hence, chronic stress has been hypothesized to directly exacerbate the process of physiological aging. Here, we evaluated this hypothesis at the level of gene regulation. We compared two data sets of genome-wide gene expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs): one that captured aging effects and another that focused on chronic social stress. Overall, we found that the direction, although not necessarily the magnitude, of significant gene expression changes tends to be shared between the two data sets. This overlap was observable at three levels: (i) individual genes; (ii) general functional categories of genes; and (iii) molecular pathways implicated in aging. However, we also found evidence that heterogeneity in PBMC composition limits the power to detect more extensive similarities, suggesting that our findings reflect an underestimate of the degree to which age and social stress influence gene regulation in parallel. Cell type-specific data on gene regulation will be important to overcome this limitation in the future studies.

  17. Immune and inflammatory gene signature in rat cerebrum in subarachnoid hemorrhage with microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chu-I; Chou, An-Kuo; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chou, Chia-Hua; Loh, Joon-Khim; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Wang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been studied in terms of a contraction of the major cerebral arteries, but the effect of cerebrum tissue in SAH is not yet well understood. To gain insight into the biology of SAH-expressing cerebrum, we employed oligonucleotide microarrays to characterize the gene expression profiles of cerebrum tissue at the early stage of SAH. Functional gene expression in the cerebrum was analyzed 2 h following stage 1-hemorrhage in Sprague-Dawley rats. mRNA was investigated by performing microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. In this study, 18 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes displayed at least a 1.5-fold change. Five genes were verified by real-time PCR, including three upregulated genes [prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), CD14 antigen, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)] as well as two downregulated genes [KRAB-zinc finger protein-2 (KZF-2) and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABA B receptor)]. Notably, there were functional implications for the three upregulated genes involved in the inflammatory SAH process. However, the mechanisms leading to decreased KZF-2 and GABA B receptor expression in SAH have never been characterized. We conclude that oligonucleotide microarrays have the potential for use as a method to identify candidate genes associated with SAH and to provide novel investigational targets, including genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response. Furthermore, understanding the regulation of MMP9/TIMP1 during the early stages of SAH may elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms in SAH rats.

  18. Identification of a gene expression core signature for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) via integrative analysis reveals novel potential compounds for treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ichim-Moreno, Norú

    2010-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy and one of the most prevalent genetic disorders of childhood. DMD is characterized by rapid progression of muscle degeneration, and ultimately death. Currently, glucocorticoids are the only available treatment for DMD, but they have been shown to result in serious side effects. The purpose of this research was to define a core signature of gene expression related to DMD via integrative analysis of mouse and human datasets. This core signature was subsequently used to screen for novel potential compounds that antagonistically affect the expression of signature genes. With this approach we were able to identify compounds that are 1) already used to treat DMD, 2) currently under investigation for treatment, and 3) so far unknown but promising candidates. Our study highlights the potential of meta-analyses through the combination of datasets to unravel previously unrecognized associations and reveal new relationships. © IEEE.

  19. Relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with pathological features and prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-De Wang; Xin-Rong Wang; Chao-Yang Wang; Yi-Jun Tang; Ming-Wen Hao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with pathological features and prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma.Methods: A total of 297 patients from July 2009 to May 2013 were chosen as objects.EGFRgene mutation were detected with fluorescence quantitative PCR. Relevance ofEGFR gene mutation with clinical and pathological features was analyzed, and the prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients and that of EGFR- wide type-patients was compared.Results:In 297 patients, 136 (45.79%) showed EGFR gene mutation.EGFR gene mutation had no significant relevance with age, gender, smoking history, family history of cancer and clinical stage (P>0.05); there was significant relevance betweenEGFR gene mutation and blood type, pathologic types, differentiation and diameter of cancer (P<0.05). The difference between prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients and that of EGFR- wide type-patients was statistical significance (P<0.05).Conclusions:EGFR gene mutation has significant relevance with pathological features, the prognosis of EGFR- mutant-patients is better than that of EGFR- wide type-patients.

  20. Different Gene Expression Signatures in Children and Adults with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Palacios, N.; Bodas, A.; Dema, B.; Fernández-Arquero, M.; González-Pérez, B.; Salazar, I.; Núñez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is developed after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. It can appear at any time in life, but some differences are commonly observed between individuals with onset early in life or in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the molecular basis underlying those differences. We collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with CD and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other and with the observed in 13 non-CD controls matched by age. A Bayesian methodology was used to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. We found seven genes with a similarly altered expression in children and adults with CD when compared to controls (C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3). Differences were observed in 13 genes: six genes being altered only in adults (IL1RL1, CD28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); and four genes showing a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106). This is the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with CD. Differences in the expression level of several genes were found between groups, being notorious the higher alteration observed in adults. Further research is needed to evaluate the possible genetic influence underlying these changes and the specific functional consequences of the reported differences. PMID:26859134

  1. A computational approach to identify predictive gene signatures in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nuzzo, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technology has been extensively used to detect patterns in gene expression that stem from regulatory interactions. Seminal studies demonstrated that the synergistic use of microarray-based techniques and bioinformatics analysis of genomic data might not only further the understanding of pathological phenotypes, but also provide lists of genes to dissect a disease into distinct groups, with different diagnostic or prognostic characteristics. Nonetheless, optimism for microarray-base...

  2. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  3. Computational integration of homolog and pathway gene module expression reveals general stemness signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Koeva

    Full Text Available The stemness hypothesis states that all stem cells use common mechanisms to regulate self-renewal and multi-lineage potential. However, gene expression meta-analyses at the single gene level have failed to identify a significant number of genes selectively expressed by a broad range of stem cell types. We hypothesized that stemness may be regulated by modules of homologs. While the expression of any single gene within a module may vary from one stem cell type to the next, it is possible that the expression of the module as a whole is required so that the expression of different, yet functionally-synonymous, homologs is needed in different stem cells. Thus, we developed a computational method to test for stem cell-specific gene expression patterns from a comprehensive collection of 49 murine datasets covering 12 different stem cell types. We identified 40 individual genes and 224 stemness modules with reproducible and specific up-regulation across multiple stem cell types. The stemness modules included families regulating chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and Wnt signaling. Strikingly, the majority of modules represent evolutionarily related homologs. Moreover, a score based on the discovered modules could accurately distinguish stem cell-like populations from other cell types in both normal and cancer tissues. This scoring system revealed that both mouse and human metastatic populations exhibit higher stemness indices than non-metastatic populations, providing further evidence for a stem cell-driven component underlying the transformation to metastatic disease.

  4. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant to breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, P; Campion, L; Joalland, M-P; Millour, M; Dravet, F; Classe, J-M; Delecroix, V; Deporte, R; Fumoleau, P; Ricolleau, G

    2004-01-12

    This study screened large cohorts of node-positive and node-negative breast cancer patients to determine whether the G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is a useful prognostic marker for breast cancer as reported by Bange et al in 2002. Node-positive (n=139) and node-negative (n=95) breast cancer cohorts selected for mutation screening were followed up for median periods of 89 and 87 months, respectively. PCR - RFLP analysis was modified to facilitate molecular screening. Curves for disease-free survival were plotted according to the Kaplan - Meier method, and a log-rank test was used for comparisons between groups. Three other nonparametric linear rank-tests particularly suitable for investigating possible relations between G388R mutation and early cancer progression were also used. Kaplan - Meier analysis based on any of the four nonparametric linear rank tests performed for node-positive and node-negative patients was not indicative of disease-free survival time. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant for breast cancer prognosis.

  5. Cellular Signaling Pathways in Insulin Resistance-Systems Biology Analyses of Microarray Dataset Reveals New Drug Target Gene Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Raza, Waseem; Nguyen, Thanh; Bai, Baogang; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and metabolic disorder affecting large set of population of the world. To widen the scope of understanding of genetic causes of this disease, we performed interactive and toxicogenomic based systems biology study to find potential T2DM related genes after cDNA differential analysis. Methods: From the list of 50-differential expressed genes (p < 0.05), we found 9-T2DM related genes using extensive data mapping. In our constructed gene-network, T2DM-related differentially expressed seeder genes (9-genes) are found to interact with functionally related gene signatures (31-genes). The genetic interaction network of both T2DM-associated seeder as well as signature genes generally relates well with the disease condition based on toxicogenomic and data curation. Results: These networks showed significant enrichment of insulin signaling, insulin secretion and other T2DM-related pathways including JAK-STAT, MAPK, TGF, Toll-like receptor, p53 and mTOR, adipocytokine, FOXO, PPAR, P13-AKT, and triglyceride metabolic pathways. We found some enriched pathways that are common in different conditions. We recognized 11-signaling pathways as a connecting link between gene signatures in insulin resistance and T2DM. Notably, in the drug-gene network, the interacting genes showed significant overlap with 13-FDA approved and few non-approved drugs. This study demonstrates the value of systems genetics for identifying 18 potential genes associated with T2DM that are probable drug targets. Conclusions: This integrative and network based approaches for finding variants in genomic data expect to accelerate identification of new drug target molecules for different diseases and can speed up drug discovery outcomes. PMID:28179884

  6. Gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the determination of ovarian function in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Chiara; Rossetti, Raffaella; Rusconi, Daniela; Recalcati, Maria P.; Cacciatore, Chiara; Beccaria, Elena; Calcaterra, Valeria; Invernizzi, Pietro; Larizza, Daniela; Finelli, Palma; Persani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    array-CGH analysis and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR, including a BMP15 gene duplication at Xp11.22, a deletion interrupting the PAPPA gene at 9q33.1, and an intragenic duplication involving the PDE8A gene at 15q25.3. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION This is a pilot study on a relatively small sample size and confirmation in larger TS cohorts may be required. The ovarian tissue could not be studied in any patients and in a subgroup of patients, the mosaicism was estimated in tissues of different embryonic origin. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The combined determination of X chromosome mosaicism by molecular and molecular-cytogenetic techniques may become useful for the prediction of SM in TS. The detection of CNVs in both X-linked and autosomal ovary-related genes further suggests gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the ovarian phenotype of TS patients. These CNVs may pinpoint novel candidates relevant to female fertility and generate further insights into the mechanisms contributing to ovarian function. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This study was funded by Telethon Foundation (grant no: GGP09126 to L.P.), the Italian Ministry of the University and Research (grant number: 2006065999 to P.F.) and a Ministry of Health grant ‘Ricerca Corrente’ to IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano (grant number: 08C704-2006). The authors have no conflict of interest to declare. PMID:24324027

  7. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periprostatic (PP adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia. Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated. Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis, whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH. Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable

  8. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Catalán, Victoria; Hu, Pingzhao; Cunha, Virgínia; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Fraga, Avelino; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Lobo, Francisco; Morais, António; Silva, Vitor; Sanches-Magalhães, José; Oliveira, Jorge; Pina, Francisco; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-09-25

    Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for prostate cancer progression.

  9. Gene expression in the Andes; relevance to neurology at sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenzeller, Otto; Minko, Tamara; Pozharov, Vitaly; Bonfichi, Maurizio; Malcovati, Luca; Gamboa, Jorge; Bernardi, Luciano

    2003-03-15

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a maladaptation syndrome to chronic hypoxia, occurs in the Andes. Gene expression differences in Andeans could explain adaptation and maladaptation to hypoxia, both of which are relevant to neurology at sea level. Expression of genes responsive to cellular oxygen concentration, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), three splicing variants of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 12 Cerro de Pasco (CP) (altitude 4338 m) natives and 15 CMS patients in CP. Thirteen high altitude natives living in Lima and five Lima natives were sea level controls. A CMS score (CMS-sc) was assigned clinically. Expression was related to the clinical assessment. High expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 was found in CMS (P<0.001). Samples from CP had higher expression than those from Lima (P<0.001). Expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 was related to age (P<0.001); adjusting for age did not abolish the group effect. Higher CMS-sc was related to expression independent of age (P<0.001). VEGF-165 and -189 were expressed only in CMS. Birth altitude had no effect on gene expression. pVHL was not quantifiable.HIF-1alpha and VEGF-121 participate in adaptation to hypoxia. The high levels may explain blood vessel proliferation in Andeans and hold lessons for patients at sea level. VEGF-165 expression suggests that it contributes to preservation of neuronal function in human chronic hypoxia. VHL mutations may mark those destined to develop neural crest tumors which are common in the Andes.

  10. Gene expression in the urinary bladder: a common carcinoma in situ gene expression signature exists disregarding histopathological classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær

    2004-01-01

    The presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions in the urinary bladder is associated with a high risk of disease progression to a muscle invasive stage. In this study, we used microarray expression profiling to examine the gene expression patterns in superficial transitional cell carcinoma (s...... urothelium and urothelium with CIS lesions from the same urinary bladder revealed that the gene expression found in sTCC with surrounding CIS is found also in CIS biopsies as well as in histologically normal samples adjacent to the CIS lesions. Furthermore, we also identified similar gene expression changes...

  11. Physical activity-associated gene expression signature in nonhuman primate motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Leak, Rehana K; Garbett, Krassimira; Zigmond, Michael J; Cameron, Judy L; Mirnics, Károly

    2012-03-01

    It has been established that weight gain and weight loss are heavily influenced by activity level. In this study, we hypothesized that the motor cortex exhibits a distinct physical activity-associated gene expression profile, which may underlie changes in weight associated with movement. Using DNA microarrays we profiled gene expression in the motor cortex of a group of 14 female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with a wide range of stable physical activity levels. We found that neuronal growth factor signaling and nutrient sensing transcripts in the brain were highly correlated with physical activity. A follow-up of AKT3 expression changes (a gene at the apex of neuronal survival and nutrient sensing) revealed increased protein levels of total AKT, phosphorylated AKT, and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), one of AKT's main downstream effectors. In addition, we successfully validated three other genes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (cereblon (CRBN), origin recognition complex subunit 4-like, and pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4)). We conclude that these genes are important in the physical activity-associated pathway in the motor cortex, and may be critical for physical activity-associated changes in body weight and neuroprotection.

  12. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  13. Gene expression profiling differentiates germ cell tumors from other cancers and defines subtype-specific signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, Dejan; Sale, Sanja; Hromas, Robert A.; Yu, Ron; Wang, Yan; Duran, George E.; Tibshirani, Robert; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2005-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are the predominant cancer among young men. We analyzed gene expression profiles of 50 GCTs of various subtypes, and we compared them with 443 other common malignant tumors of epithelial, mesenchymal, and lymphoid origins. Significant differences in gene expression were found among major histological subtypes of GCTs, and between them and other malignancies. We identified 511 genes, belonging to several critical functional groups such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, to be significantly differentially expressed in GCTs compared with other tumor types. Sixty-five genes were sufficient for the construction of a GCT class predictor of high predictive accuracy (100% training set, 96% test set), which might be useful in the diagnosis of tumors of unknown primary origin. Previously described diagnostic and prognostic markers were found to be expressed by the appropriate GCT subtype (AFP, POU5F1, POV1, CCND2, and KIT). Several additional differentially expressed genes were identified in teratomas (EGR1 and MMP7), yolk sac tumors (PTPN13 and FN1), and seminomas (NR6A1, DPPA4, and IRX1). Dynamic computation of interaction networks and mapping to existing pathways knowledge databases revealed a potential role of EGR1 in p21-induced cell cycle arrest and intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas. PMID:16306258

  14. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  15. Polymorphism and signatures of selection in the multimammate rat DQB gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    for exon 2 of DQB using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism, cloning, and sequencing. We found 21 different alleles. Four individuals show three alleles implying a duplication event in the history of this gene. Each distinct sequence translates to give a distinct amino acid......In order to test if DQB is a good candidate marker to investigate the relationship between major histocompatibility complex genes and pathogens in natural populations of Mastomys natalensis, we assessed the polymorphism and evolutionary history of this gene. Twenty-four individuals were genotyped...... sequence and there are strong signals of positive selection on peptide binding sites. Signals of recombination were found in the sequences suggesting that recombination has played a role in generating allelic diversity. Although trans-taxon polymorphism is present at the interspecific level in DQB exon 2...

  16. The Iterative Signature Algorithm for the analysis of large scale gene expression data

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, S R; Barkai, N; Bergmann, Sven; Ihmels, Jan; Barkai, Naama

    2003-01-01

    We present a new approach for the analysis of genome-wide expression data. Our method is designed to overcome the limitations of traditional techniques, when applied to large-scale data. Rather than alloting each gene to a single cluster, we assign both genes and conditions to context-dependent and potentially overlapping transcription modules. We provide a rigorous definition of a transcription module as the object to be retrieved from the expression data. An efficient algorithm, that searches for the modules encoded in the data by iteratively refining sets of genes and conditions until they match this definition, is established. Each iteration involves a linear map, induced by the normalized expression matrix, followed by the application of a threshold function. We argue that our method is in fact a generalization of Singular Value Decomposition, which corresponds to the special case where no threshold is applied. We show analytically that for noisy expression data our approach leads to better classificatio...

  17. Identification of Gene and MicroRNA Signatures for Oral Cancer Developed from Oral Leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinic, oral leukoplakia (OLK may develop into oral cancer. However, the mechanism underlying this transformation is still unclear. In this work, we present a new pipeline to identify oral cancer related genes and microRNAs (miRNAs by integrating both gene and miRNA expression profiles. In particular, we find some network modules as well as their miRNA regulators that play important roles in the development of OLK to oral cancer. Among these network modules, 91.67% of genes and 37.5% of miRNAs have been previously reported to be related to oral cancer in literature. The promising results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed approach.

  18. Investigation of a common gene expression signature in gastrointestinal cancers using systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Kaveh; Hosseinkhan, Nazanin; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Zali, M R

    2017-09-04

    According to GLOBOCAN 2012, the incidence and the mortality rate of colorectal, stomach and liver cancers are the highest among the total gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Here we aimed to find the common genes and pathways that are simultaneously deregulated in these three malignancies using systems biology approaches. Here we conducted a differential expression analysis on high-quality gene expression datasets of gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To address the inter gene correlations that were neglected in differential expression studies, we also applied differential co-expression analysis on the understudied datasets. The common significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among the three cancers were used for further regulatory and PPI network construction. In parallel the regulatory roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in the common DEGs were investigated. 23 common DEGs were detected between GC, CRC and HCC. Two cases of potential feed forward loops were identified in the constructed TF-target regulatory network, indicating the probable cross-talk between biological pathways. The result of a vulnerability test on the common PPI network resulted in the finding of three candidates, the simultaneous targeting of which will disintegrate the main parts of the network. The results of the differential co-expression study led to the identification of respectively 7 and 1 common differentially co-expressed pairs of genes between GC and CRC and between CRC and HCC. The results of the differential expression study introduced new common players in CRC, GC and HCC and provided better insights into the molecular characteristics of these GI malignancies. Moreover, we concluded that differential co-expression studies are an essential complement for differential expression studies that just take single differentially expressed genes into account.

  19. Gene expression signature of estrogen receptor α status in breast cancer

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    Baggerly Keith

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens are known to regulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells and to modify their phenotypic properties. Identification of estrogen-regulated genes in human breast tumors is an essential step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action in cancer. To this end we generated and compared the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE profiles of 26 human breast carcinomas based on their estrogen receptor α (ER status. Thus, producing a breast cancer SAGE database of almost 2.5 million tags, representing over 50,000 transcripts. Results We identified 520 transcripts differentially expressed between ERα-positive (+ and ERα-negative (- primary breast tumors (Fold change ≥ 2; p Estrogen Responsive Elements (EREs distributed on the promoter regions of 163 out of the 473 up-modulated genes in ERα (+ breast tumors. In brief, we observed predominantly up-regulation of cell growth related genes, DNA binding and transcription factor activity related genes based on Gene Ontology (GO biological functional annotation. GO terms over-representation analysis showed a statistically significant enrichment of various transcript families including: metal ion binding related transcripts (p = 0.011, calcium ion binding related transcripts (p = 0.033 and steroid hormone receptor activity related transcripts (p = 0.031. SAGE data associated with ERα status was compared with reported information from breast cancer DNA microarrays studies. A significant proportion of ERα associated gene expression changes was validated by this cross-platform comparison. However, our SAGE study also identified novel sets of genes as highly expressed in ERα (+ invasive breast tumors not previously reported. These observations were further validated in an independent set of human breast tumors by means of real time RT-PCR. Conclusion The integration of the breast cancer comparative transcriptome analysis based on ERα status coupled to

  20. Genomic signatures of local directional selection in a high gene flow marine organism; the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua

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    Mittelholzer Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine fishes have been shown to display low levels of genetic structuring and associated high levels of gene flow, suggesting shallow evolutionary trajectories and, possibly, limited or lacking adaptive divergence among local populations. We investigated variation in 98 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for evidence of selection in local populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L. across the species distribution. Results Our global genome scan analysis identified eight outlier gene loci with very high statistical support, likely to be subject to directional selection in local demes, or closely linked to loci under selection. Likewise, on a regional south/north transect of central and eastern Atlantic populations, seven loci displayed strongly elevated levels of genetic differentiation. Selection patterns among populations appeared to be relatively widespread and complex, i.e. outlier loci were generally not only associated with one of a few divergent local populations. Even on a limited geographical scale between the proximate North Sea and Baltic Sea populations four loci displayed evidence of adaptive evolution. Temporal genome scan analysis applied to DNA from archived otoliths from a Faeroese population demonstrated stability of the intra-population variation over 24 years. An exploratory landscape genetic analysis was used to elucidate potential effects of the most likely environmental factors responsible for the signatures of local adaptation. We found that genetic variation at several of the outlier loci was better correlated with temperature and/or salinity conditions at spawning grounds at spawning time than with geographic distance per se. Conclusion These findings illustrate that adaptive population divergence may indeed be prevalent despite seemingly high levels of gene flow, as found in most marine fishes. Thus, results have important implications for our understanding of the interplay of

  1. Triazole induced concentration-related gene signatures in rat whole embryo culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.F.; Tonk, E.C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Piersma, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly used as antifungal agents in agriculture and medicine, triazoles have been shown to cause teratogenicity in a diverse set of animal models. Here, we evaluated the dose-dependent impacts of flusilazole, cyproconazole and triadimefon, on global gene expression in relation to effects on embryo

  2. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis.

  3. Altered gene expression in schizophrenia: findings from transcriptional signatures in fibroblasts and blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cattane

    Full Text Available Whole-genome expression studies in the peripheral tissues of patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ can provide new insight into the molecular basis of the disorder and innovative biomarkers that may be of great utility in clinical practice. Recent evidence suggests that skin fibroblasts could represent a non-neural peripheral model useful for investigating molecular alterations in psychiatric disorders.A microarray expression study was conducted comparing skin fibroblast transcriptomic profiles from 20 SCZ patients and 20 controls. All genes strongly differentially expressed were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR in fibroblasts and analyzed in a sample of peripheral blood cell (PBC RNA from patients (n = 25 and controls (n = 22. To evaluate the specificity for SCZ, alterations in gene expression were tested in additional samples of fibroblasts and PBCs RNA from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD (n = 16; n = 21, respectively and Bipolar Disorder (BD patients (n = 15; n = 20, respectively.Six genes (JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1, TCF4 were significantly upregulated in SCZ compared to control fibroblasts. In blood, an increase in expression levels was confirmed only for EGR1, whereas JUN was downregulated; no significant differences were observed for the other genes. EGR1 upregulation was specific for SCZ compared to MDD and BD.Our study reports the upregulation of JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1 and TCF4 in the fibroblasts of SCZ patients. A significant alteration in EGR1 expression is also present in SCZ PBCs compared to controls and to MDD and BD patients, suggesting that this gene could be a specific biomarker helpful in the differential diagnosis of major psychoses.

  4. Altered Gene Expression in Schizophrenia: Findings from Transcriptional Signatures in Fibroblasts and Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattane, Nadia; Minelli, Alessandra; Milanesi, Elena; Maj, Carlo; Bignotti, Stefano; Bortolomasi, Marco; Chiavetto, Luisella Bocchio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole-genome expression studies in the peripheral tissues of patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ) can provide new insight into the molecular basis of the disorder and innovative biomarkers that may be of great utility in clinical practice. Recent evidence suggests that skin fibroblasts could represent a non-neural peripheral model useful for investigating molecular alterations in psychiatric disorders. Methods A microarray expression study was conducted comparing skin fibroblast transcriptomic profiles from 20 SCZ patients and 20 controls. All genes strongly differentially expressed were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in fibroblasts and analyzed in a sample of peripheral blood cell (PBC) RNA from patients (n = 25) and controls (n = 22). To evaluate the specificity for SCZ, alterations in gene expression were tested in additional samples of fibroblasts and PBCs RNA from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (n = 16; n = 21, respectively) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) patients (n = 15; n = 20, respectively). Results Six genes (JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1, TCF4) were significantly upregulated in SCZ compared to control fibroblasts. In blood, an increase in expression levels was confirmed only for EGR1, whereas JUN was downregulated; no significant differences were observed for the other genes. EGR1 upregulation was specific for SCZ compared to MDD and BD. Conclusions Our study reports the upregulation of JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1 and TCF4 in the fibroblasts of SCZ patients. A significant alteration in EGR1 expression is also present in SCZ PBCs compared to controls and to MDD and BD patients, suggesting that this gene could be a specific biomarker helpful in the differential diagnosis of major psychoses. PMID:25658856

  5. Gene expression profiling of leukemic cells and primary thymocytes predicts a signature for apoptotic sensitivity to glucocorticoids

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    Leiter Edward H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids (GC's play an integral role in treatment strategies designed to combat various forms of hematological malignancies. GCs also are powerful inhibitors of the immune system, through regulation of appropriate cytokines and by causing apoptosis of immature thymocytes. By activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, GCs evoke apoptosis through transcriptional regulation of a complex, interactive gene network over a period of time preceding activation of the apoptotic enzymes. In this study we used microarray technology to determine whether several disparate types of hematologic cells, all sensitive to GC-evoked apoptosis, would identify a common set of regulated genes. We compared gene expression signatures after treatment with two potent synthetic GCs, dexamethasone (Dex and cortivazol (CVZ using a panel of hematologic cells. Pediatric CD4+/CD8+ T-cell leukemia was represented by 3 CEM clones: two sensitive, CEM-C7–14 and CEM-C1–6, and one resistant, CEM-C1–15, to Dex. CEM-C1–15 was also tested when rendered GC-sensitive by several treatments. GC-sensitive pediatric B-cell leukemia was represented by the SUP-B15 line and adult B-cell leukemia by RS4;11 cells. Kasumi-1 cells gave an example of the rare Dex-sensitive acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. To test the generality of the correlations in malignant cell gene sets, we compared with GC effects on mouse non-transformed thymocytes. Results We identified a set of genes regulated by GCs in all GC-sensitive malignant cells. A portion of these were also regulated in the thymocytes. Because we knew that the highly Dex-resistant CEM-C1–15 cells could be killed by CVZ, we tested these cells with the latter steroid and again found that many of the same genes were now regulated as in the inherently GC-sensitive cells. The same result was obtained when we converted the Dex-resistant clone to Dex-sensitive by treatment with forskolin (FSK, to activate the adenyl

  6. Birth weight, working memory and epigenetic signatures in IGF2 and related genes: a MZ twin study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Córdova-Palomera

    Full Text Available Neurodevelopmental disruptions caused by obstetric complications play a role in the etiology of several phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric diseases and cognitive dysfunctions. Importantly, it has been noticed that epigenetic processes occurring early in life may mediate these associations. Here, DNA methylation signatures at IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2 and IGF2BP1-3 (IGF2-binding proteins 1-3 were examined in a sample consisting of 34 adult monozygotic (MZ twins informative for obstetric complications and cognitive performance. Multivariate linear regression analysis of twin data was implemented to test for associations between methylation levels and both birth weight (BW and adult working memory (WM performance. Familial and unique environmental factors underlying these potential relationships were evaluated. A link was detected between DNA methylation levels of two CpG sites in the IGF2BP1 gene and both BW and adult WM performance. The BW-IGF2BP1 methylation association seemed due to non-shared environmental factors influencing BW, whereas the WM-IGF2BP1 methylation relationship seemed mediated by both genes and environment. Our data is in agreement with previous evidence indicating that DNA methylation status may be related to prenatal stress and later neurocognitive phenotypes. While former reports independently detected associations between DNA methylation and either BW or WM, current results suggest that these relationships are not confounded by each other.

  7. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  8. A Novel Gene Selection Method Based on Sparse Representation and Max-Relevance and Min-Redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; He, Xiaoming; Duan, ShaoBin; Deng, YingWei

    2017-01-01

    Gene selection method as an important data preprocessing work has been followed. The criteria Maximum relevance and minimum redundancy (MRMR) has been commonly used for gene selection, which has a satisfactory performance in evaluating the correlation between two genes. However, for viewing genes in isolation, it ignores the influence of other genes. In this study, we propose a new method based on sparse representation and MRMR algorithm (SRCMRM), using the sparse representation coefficient to represent the relevance of genes and correlation between genes and categories. The SRCMRMR algorithm contains two steps. Firstly, the genes irrelevant to the classification target are removed by using sparse representation coefficient. Secondly, sparse representation coefficient is used to calculate the correlation between genes and the most representative gene with the highest evaluation. To validate the performance of the SRCMRM, our method is compared with various algorithms. The proposed method achieves better classification accuracy for all datasets. The effectiveness and stability of our method have been proven through various experiments, which means that our method has practical significance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Different coexpressions of arthritis-relevant genes between different body organs and different brain regions in the normal mouse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanhong; Huang, Yue; Wang, Lishi; Zhu, Jiaqian; Gu, Weikuan

    2013-02-25

    Structural changes in different parts of the brain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have been reported. RA is not regarded as a brain disease. Body organs such as spleen and lung produce RA-relevant genes. We hypothesized that the structural changes in the brain are caused by changes of gene expression in body organs. Changes in different parts of the brain may be affected by altered gene expressions in different body organs. This study explored whether an association between gene expressions of an organ or a body part varies in different brain structures. By examining the association of the 10 most altered genes from a mouse model of spontaneous arthritis in a normal mouse population, we found two groups of gene expression patterns between five brain structures and spleen. The correlation patterns between the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and spleen were similar, while the associations between the other three parts of the brain and spleen showed a different pattern. Among overall patterns of the associations between body organs and brain structures, spleen and lung had a similar pattern, and patterns for kidney and liver were similar. Analysis of the five additional known arthritis-relevant genes produced similar results. Analysis of 10 nonrelevant-arthritis genes did not result in a strong association of gene expression or clearly segregated patterns. Our data suggest that abnormal gene expressions in different diseased body organs may influence structural changes in different brain parts.

  10. Unbiased transcriptome signature of in vivo cell proliferation reveals pro- and antiproliferative gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Meital; Vecsler, Manuela; Liberzon, Arthur; Noach, Meirav; Zlotorynski, Eitan; Tzur, Amit

    2013-09-15

    Different types of mature B-cell lymphocytes are overall highly similar. Nevertheless, some B cells proliferate intensively, while others rarely do. Here, we demonstrate that a simple binary classification of gene expression in proliferating vs. resting B cells can identify, with remarkable selectivity, global in vivo regulators of the mammalian cell cycle, many of which are also post-translationally regulated by the APC/C E3 ligase. Consequently, we discover a novel regulatory network between the APC/C and the E2F transcription factors and discuss its potential impact on the G1-S transition of the cell cycle. In addition, by focusing on genes whose expression inversely correlates with proliferation, we demonstrate the inherent ability of our approach to also identify in vivo regulators of cell differentiation, cell survival, and other antiproliferative processes. Relying on data sets of wt, non-transgenic animals, our approach can be applied to other cell lineages and human data sets.

  11. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    expression profile data from two datasets were screened for differentially expressed (DE) genes between patients with residual disease (RD) and...16), liver (17–22), head and neck (11,23,24), stomach (25), bladder (26), prostate (7), lung (27), brain (28) and bone (29). ADAM12 has not been...examined as a potential biomarker in ovarian cancer. However, ADAM12 was identified in an unbi- ased screen as one of the transmembrane proteins

  12. A distinct gene expression signature characterizes human neuroblastoma cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert A; Walton, Jeanette D; Han, Dan; Guo, Hong-Fen; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-09-01

    Neuroblastoma, a malignancy of multipotent embryonic neural crest cells, is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and most common cancer in infancy. Cellular phenotype has been shown to be an important determinant of the malignant potential in human neuroblastoma cells and tumors. Whereas neuroblastic (N-type) are moderately malignant and nonneuronal (S-type) cells are nonmalignant, I-type stem cells are highly tumorigenic, irrespective of N-myc amplification status. In the present study, we sought to determine which genes were overexpressed in the I-type cells which might characterize and maintain the stem cell state and/or malignancy of human neuroblastoma cancer stem cells. We used a microarray platform to compare the steady-state expression levels of mRNAs from 13 human neuroblastoma cell lines representing the three cellular phenotypes. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses, we identified seven genes whose expression is consistently elevated exclusively in neuroblastoma cancer stem cells: CD133, KIT, NOTCH1, GPRC5C, PIGF2, TRKB, and LNGFR. Moreover, we show that the genes are phenotype specific, as differentiation of I-type BE(2)-C cells to either an N- or S-type morphology results in significantly reduced mRNA expression. Finally, we show that NOTCH1 plays an important role in maintaining the stem cell phenotype. The identification and characterization of these genes, elevated in highly malignant neuroblastoma stem cells, could provide the basis for developing novel therapies for treatment of this lethal childhood cancer.

  13. Signature of balancing selection at the MC1R gene in Kunming dog populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-dong Wang

    Full Text Available Coat color in dog breeds is an excellent character for revealing the power of artificial selection, as it is extremely diverse and likely the result of recent domestication. Coat color is generated by melanocytes, which synthesize pheomelanin (a red or yellow pigment or eumelanin (a black or brown pigment through the pigment type-switching pathway, and is regulated by three genes in dogs: MC1R (melanocortin receptor 1, CBD103 (β-defensin 103, and ASIP (agouti-signaling protein precursor. The genotypes of these three gene loci in dog breeds are associated with coat color pattern. Here, we resequenced these three gene loci in two Kunming dog populations and analyzed these sequences using population genetic approaches to identify evolutionary patterns that have occurred at these loci during the recent domestication and breeding of the Kunming dog. The analysis showed that MC1R undergoes balancing selection in both Kunming dog populations, and that the Fst value for MC1R indicates significant genetic differentiation across the two populations. In contrast, similar results were not observed for CBD103 or ASIP. These results suggest that high heterozygosity and allelic differences at the MC1R locus may explain both the mixed color coat, of yellow and black, and the difference in coat colors in both Kunming dog populations.

  14. A complex selection signature at the human AVPR1B gene

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    Cagliani Rachele

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vasopressin receptor type 1b (AVPR1B is mainly expressed by pituitary corticotropes and it mediates the stimulatory effects of AVP on ACTH release; common AVPR1B haplotypes have been involved in mood and anxiety disorders in humans, while rodents lacking a functional receptor gene display behavioral defects and altered stress responses. Results Here we have analyzed the two exons of the gene and the data we present suggest that AVPR1B has been subjected to natural selection in humans. In particular, analysis of exon 2 strongly suggests the action of balancing selection in African populations and Europeans: the region displays high nucleotide diversity, an excess of intermediate-frequency alleles, a higher level of within-species diversity compared to interspecific divergence and a genealogy with common haplotypes separated by deep branches. This relatively unambiguous situation coexists with unusual features across exon 1, raising the possibility that a nonsynonymous variant (Gly191Arg in this region has been subjected to directional selection. Conclusion Although the underlying selective pressure(s remains to be identified, we consider this to be among the first documented examples of a gene involved in mood disorders and subjected to natural selection in humans; this observation might add support to the long-debated idea that depression/low mood might have played an adaptive role during human evolution.

  15. An ileal Crohn's disease gene signature based on whole human genome expression profiles of disease unaffected ileal mucosal biopsies.

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    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available Previous genome-wide expression studies have highlighted distinct gene expression patterns in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD compared to control samples, but the interpretation of these studies has been limited by sample heterogeneity with respect to disease phenotype, disease activity, and anatomic sites. To further improve molecular classification of inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes we focused on a single anatomic site, the disease unaffected proximal ileal margin of resected ileum, and three phenotypes that were unlikely to overlap: ileal Crohn's disease (ileal CD, ulcerative colitis (UC, and control patients without IBD. Whole human genome (Agilent expression profiling was conducted on two independent sets of disease-unaffected ileal samples collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum. Set 1 (47 ileal CD, 27 UC, and 25 Control non-IBD patients was used as the training set and Set 2 was subsequently collected as an independent test set (10 ileal CD, 10 UC, and 10 control non-IBD patients. We compared the 17 gene signatures selected by four different feature-selection methods to distinguish ileal CD phenotype with non-CD phenotype. The four methods yielded different but overlapping solutions that were highly discriminating. All four of these methods selected FOLH1 as a common feature. This gene is an established biomarker for prostate cancer, but has not previously been associated with Crohn's disease. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed increased expression of FOLH1 in the ileal epithelium. These results provide evidence for convergent molecular abnormalities in the macroscopically disease unaffected proximal margin of resected ileum from ileal CD subjects.

  16. Meta-analysis of expression signatures of muscle atrophy: gene interaction networks in early and late stages

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    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle mass can be markedly reduced through a process called atrophy, as a consequence of many diseases or critical physiological and environmental situations. Atrophy is characterised by loss of contractile proteins and reduction of fiber volume. Although in the last decade the molecular aspects underlying muscle atrophy have received increased attention, the fine mechanisms controlling muscle degeneration are still incomplete. In this study we applied meta-analysis on gene expression signatures pertaining to different types of muscle atrophy for the identification of novel key regulatory signals implicated in these degenerative processes. Results We found a general down-regulation of genes involved in energy production and carbohydrate metabolism and up-regulation of genes for protein degradation and catabolism. Six functional pathways occupy central positions in the molecular network obtained by the integration of atrophy transcriptome and molecular interaction data. They are TGF-β pathway, apoptosis, membrane trafficking/cytoskeleton organization, NFKB pathways, inflammation and reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Protein degradation pathway is evident only in the network specific for muscle short-term response to atrophy. TGF-β pathway plays a central role with proteins SMAD3/4, MYC, MAX and CDKN1A in the general network, and JUN, MYC, GNB2L1/RACK1 in the short-term muscle response network. Conclusion Our study offers a general overview of the molecular pathways and cellular processes regulating the establishment and maintenance of atrophic state in skeletal muscle, showing also how the different pathways are interconnected. This analysis identifies novel key factors that could be further investigated as potential targets for the development of therapeutic treatments. We suggest that the transcription factors SMAD3/4, GNB2L1/RACK1, MYC, MAX and JUN, whose functions have been extensively studied in

  17. A genetic contribution to cooperation: dopamine-relevant genes are associated with social facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Nora T; Markett, Sebastian A; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Social loafing and social facilitation are stable behavioral effects that describe increased or decreased motivation, as well as effort and cooperation in teamwork as opposed to individual working situations. Recent twin studies demonstrate the heritability of cooperative behavior. Brain imaging studies have shown that reciprocity, cooperativeness, and social rewards activate reward processing areas with strong dopaminergic input, such as the ventral striatum. Thus, candidate genes for social behavior are hypothesized to affect dopaminergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we investigated the dopaminergic genetic contribution to social cooperation, especially to social loafing and social facilitation. N = 106 healthy, Caucasian subjects participated in the study and were genotyped for three polymorphisms relevant to the dopaminergic system (COMTval158met, DRD2 c957t, DRD2 rs#2283265). In addition to a main effect indicating an increased performance in teamwork situations, we found a significant interaction between a haplotype block covering both DRD2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs#6277 and rs#2283265), henceforth referred to as the DRD2-haplotype block, and the COMT val158met polymorphism (rs#4680) with social facilitation. Carriers of the DRD2 CT-haplotype block and at least one Val-allele showed a greater increase in performance in teamwork settings when compared with carriers of the CT-haplotype block and the Met/Met-genotype. Our results suggest that epistasis between COMTval158met and the two DRD2 SNPs contributes to individual differences in cooperativeness in teamwork settings.

  18. Ketamine and Imipramine Reverse Transcriptional Signatures of Susceptibility and Induce Resilience-Specific Gene Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Vialou, Vincent; Heller, Elizabeth A; Yieh, Lynn; LaBonté, Benoit; Peña, Catherine J; Shen, Li; Wittenberg, Gayle M; Nestler, Eric J

    2017-02-15

    Examining transcriptional regulation by antidepressants in key neural circuits implicated in depression and understanding the relation to transcriptional mechanisms of susceptibility and natural resilience may help in the search for new therapeutic agents. Given the heterogeneity of treatment response in human populations, examining both treatment response and nonresponse is critical. We compared the effects of a conventional monoamine-based tricyclic antidepressant, imipramine, and a rapidly acting, non-monoamine-based antidepressant, ketamine, in mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress, a validated depression model, and used RNA sequencing to analyze transcriptional profiles associated with susceptibility, resilience, and antidepressant response and nonresponse in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and amygdala. We identified similar numbers of responders and nonresponders after ketamine or imipramine treatment. Ketamine induced more expression changes in the hippocampus; imipramine induced more expression changes in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Transcriptional profiles in treatment responders were most similar in the PFC. Nonresponse reflected both the lack of response-associated gene expression changes and unique gene regulation. In responders, both drugs reversed susceptibility-associated transcriptional changes and induced resilience-associated transcription in the PFC. We generated a uniquely large resource of gene expression data in four interconnected limbic brain regions implicated in depression and its treatment with imipramine or ketamine. Our analyses highlight the PFC as a key site of common transcriptional regulation by antidepressant drugs and in both reversing susceptibility- and inducing resilience-associated molecular adaptations. In addition, we found region-specific effects of each drug, suggesting both common and unique effects of imipramine versus ketamine. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological

  19. Systematic analysis of the achaete-scute complex-like gene signature in clinical cancer patients.

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    Wang, Chih-Yang; Shahi, Payam; Huang, John Ting Wei; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Werb, Zena

    2017-01-01

    The achaete-scute complex-like (ASCL) family, also referred to as 'achaete-scute complex homolog' or 'achaete-scute family basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor', is critical for proper development of the nervous system and deregulation of ASCL plays a key role in psychiatric and neurological disorders. The ASCL family consists of five members, namely ASCL1, ASCL2, ASCL3, ASCL4 and ASCL5. The ASCL1 gene serves as a potential oncogene during lung cancer development. There is a correlation between increased ASCL2 expression and colon cancer development. Inhibition of ASCL2 reduced cellular proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft tumor experiments. Although previous studies demonstrated involvement of ASCL1 and ASCL2 in tumor development, little is known on the remaining ASCL family members and their potential effect on tumorigenesis. Therefore, a holistic approach to investigating the expression of ASCL family genes in diverse types of cancer may provide new insights in cancer research. In this study, we utilized a web-based microarray database (Oncomine; www.oncomine.org) to analyze the transcriptional expression of the ASCL family in clinical cancer and normal tissues. Our bioinformatics analysis revealed the potential involvement of multiple ASCL family members during tumor onset and progression in multiple types of cancer. Compared to normal tissue, ASCL1 exhibited a higher expression in cancers of the lung, pancreas, kidney, esophagus and head and neck, whereas ASCL2 exhibited a high expression in cancers of the breast, colon, stomach, lung, head and neck, ovary and testis. ASCL3, however, exhibited a high expression only in breast cancer. Interestingly, ASCL1 expression was downregulated in melanoma and in cancers of the bladder, breast, stomach and colon. ASCL2 exhibited low expression levels in sarcoma, melanoma, brain and prostate cancers. Reduction in the expression of ASCL3 was detected in lymphoma, bladder, cervical, kidney and epithelial

  20. Characteristic Changes in Decidual Gene Expression Signature in Spontaneous Term Parturition

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    Haidy El-Azzamy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The decidua has been implicated in the “terminal pathway” of human term parturition, which is characterized by the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways in gestational tissues. However, the transcriptomic changes in the decidua leading to terminal pathway activation have not been systematically explored. This study aimed to compare the decidual expression of developmental signaling and inflammation-related genes before and after spontaneous term labor in order to reveal their involvement in this process. Methods Chorioamniotic membranes were obtained from normal pregnant women who delivered at term with spontaneous labor (TIL, n = 14 or without labor (TNL, n = 15. Decidual cells were isolated from snap-frozen chorioamniotic membranes with laser microdissection. The expression of 46 genes involved in decidual development, sex steroid and prostaglandin signaling, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, was analyzed using high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Chorioamniotic membrane sections were immunostained and then semi-quantified for five proteins, and immunoassays for three chemokines were performed on maternal plasma samples. Results The genes with the highest expression in the decidua at term gestation included insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1, galectin-1 (LGALS1, and progestogen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP; the expression of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1, homeobox A11 (HOXA11, interleukin 1β (IL1B, IL8, progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2, and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES was higher in TIL than in TNL cases; the expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, CCL5, LGALS1, LGALS3, and PAEP was lower in TIL than in TNL cases; immunostaining confirmed qRT-PCR data for IL-8, CCL2, galectin-1, galectin-3, and PAEP; and no correlations between the decidual gene expression and the maternal plasma protein concentrations of CCL2, CCL5, and

  1. Aberrations in the Iron Regulatory Gene Signature Are Associated with Decreased Survival in Diffuse Infiltrating Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Cody; Klobusicky, Joe; Weston, Jennifer; Connor, James; Toms, Steven A; Marko, Nicholas F

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a tightly regulated micronutrient with no physiologic means of elimination and is necessary for cell division in normal tissue. Recent evidence suggests that dysregulation of iron regulatory proteins may play a role in cancer pathophysiology. We use public data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to study the association between survival and expression levels of 61 genes coding for iron regulatory proteins in patients with World Health Organization Grade II-III gliomas. Using a feature selection algorithm we identified a novel, optimized subset of eight iron regulatory genes (STEAP3, HFE, TMPRSS6, SFXN1, TFRC, UROS, SLC11A2, and STEAP4) whose differential expression defines two phenotypic groups with median survival differences of 52.3 months for patients with grade II gliomas (25.9 vs. 78.2 months, p< 10-3), 43.5 months for patients with grade III gliomas (43.9 vs. 87.4 months, p = 0.025), and 54.0 months when considering both grade II and III gliomas (79.9 vs. 25.9 months, p < 10-5).

  2. Comparative Analysis of Whole-Genome Gene Expression Changes in Cultured Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Response to Low, Clinical Diagnostic Relevant, and High Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Nguyen, Van; Neumann, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure in humans are not comprehensively understood, generating a high degree of controversy in published literature. The earliest stages of human development are known to be among the most sensitive to stress exposures, especially genotoxic stresses. However, the risks stemming from exposure to LDIR, particularly within the clinical diagnostic relevant dose range, have not been directly evaluated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we describe the dynamics of the whole genome transcriptional responses of different hESC lines to both LDIR and, as a reference, high-dose IR (HDIR). We found that even doses as low as 0.05 Gy could trigger statistically significant transient changes in a rather limited subset of genes in all hESCs lines examined. Gene expression signatures of hESCs exposed to IR appear to be highly dose-, time-, and cell line-dependent. We identified 50 genes constituting consensus gene expression signature as an early response to HDIR across all lines of hESC examined. We observed substantial differences in biological pathways affected by either LDIR or HDIR in hESCs, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underpinning the responses of hESC may fundamentally differ depending on radiation doses. PMID:26133243

  3. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios i

  4. Mapping gene clusters within arrayed metagenomic libraries to expand the structural diversity of biomedically relevant natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jeremy G; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Ternei, Melinda A; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Calle, Paula Y; Kim, Jeffrey H; Brady, Sean F

    2013-07-16

    Complex microbial ecosystems contain large reservoirs of unexplored biosynthetic diversity. Here we provide an experimental framework and data analysis tool to facilitate the targeted discovery of natural-product biosynthetic gene clusters from the environment. Multiplex sequencing of barcoded PCR amplicons is followed by sequence similarity directed data parsing to identify sequences bearing close resemblance to biosynthetically or biomedically interesting gene clusters. Amplicons are then mapped onto arrayed metagenomic libraries to guide the recovery of targeted gene clusters. When applied to adenylation- and ketosynthase-domain amplicons derived from saturating soil DNA libraries, our analysis pipeline led to the recovery of biosynthetic clusters predicted to encode for previously uncharacterized glycopeptide- and lipopeptide-like antibiotics; thiocoraline-, azinomycin-, and bleomycin-like antitumor agents; and a rapamycin-like immunosuppressant. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by using recovered eDNA sequences to generate glycopeptide derivatives. The experiments described here constitute a systematic interrogation of a soil metagenome for gene clusters capable of encoding naturally occurring derivatives of biomedically relevant natural products. Our results show that previously undetected biosynthetic gene clusters with potential biomedical relevance are very common in the environment. This general process should permit the routine screening of environmental samples for gene clusters capable of encoding the systematic expansion of the structural diversity seen in biomedically relevant families of natural products.

  5. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals a dysregulation in extra cellular matrix and cell junction associated gene signatures during Dengue virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Abbas, Mohd. Manzar; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Viruses (DENVs) cause one of the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Identification of genes involved in DENV pathogenesis would help in deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease progression. Here, we carried out a meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data of dengue patients and further validated the meta-profile using in-vitro infection in THP-1 cells. Our findings reveal that DENV infection modulates expression of several genes and signalling pathways including interferons, detoxification of ROS and viral assembly. Interestingly, we have identified novel gene signatures comprising of INADL/PATJ and CRTAP (Cartilage Associated Protein), which were significantly down-regulated across all patient data sets as well as in DENV infected THP-1 cells. PATJ and CRTAP genes are involved in maintaining cell junction integrity and collagen assembly (extracellular matrix component) respectively, which together play a crucial role in cell-cell adhesion. Our results categorically reveal that overexpression of CRTAP and PATJ genes restrict DENV infection, thereby suggesting a critical role of these genes in DENV pathogenesis. Conclusively, these findings emphasize the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis and possibly lead towards the development of better therapeutic interventions. PMID:27651116

  6. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Karsten Jürchott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  7. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

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    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  8. Two-gene signature improves the discriminatory power of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification to predict the survival of patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yifeng Sun,1,* Likun Hou,2,* Yu Yang,1 Huikang Xie,2 Yang Yang,1 Zhigang Li,1 Heng Zhao,1 Wen Gao,3 Bo Su4 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 2Department of Pathology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shanghai Huadong Hospital, Fudan University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Central Lab, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In this study, we investigated the contribution of a gene expression–based signature (composed of BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, SH3BGR to survival prediction for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma categorized by the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC/the American Thoracic Society (ATS/the European Respiratory Society (ERS classification. We also aimed to verify whether gene signature improves the risk discrimination of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods: Total RNA was extracted from 93 patients with pathologically confirmed TNM stage Ia and Ib lung adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression levels of ten genes in the signature (BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, and SH3BGR were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Each patient was categorized according to the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by accessing hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides. The corresponding Kaplan–Meier survival analysis by the log-rank statistic, multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, and c-index calculation were conducted using the programming language R (Version 2.15.1 with the “risksetROC” package. Results: The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the risk factor of the ten-gene expression signature can significantly improve the discriminatory

  9. Co-expressed Pathways DataBase for Tomato: a database to predict pathways relevant to a query gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narise, Takafumi; Sakurai, Nozomu; Obayashi, Takeshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2017-06-05

    Gene co-expression, the similarity of gene expression profiles under various experimental conditions, has been used as an indicator of functional relationships between genes, and many co-expression databases have been developed for predicting gene functions. These databases usually provide users with a co-expression network and a list of strongly co-expressed genes for a query gene. Several of these databases also provide functional information on a set of strongly co-expressed genes (i.e., provide biological processes and pathways that are enriched in these strongly co-expressed genes), which is generally analyzed via over-representation analysis (ORA). A limitation of this approach may be that users can predict gene functions only based on the strongly co-expressed genes. In this study, we developed a new co-expression database that enables users to predict the function of tomato genes from the results of functional enrichment analyses of co-expressed genes while considering the genes that are not strongly co-expressed. To achieve this, we used the ORA approach with several thresholds to select co-expressed genes, and performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) applied to a ranked list of genes ordered by the co-expression degree. We found that internal correlation in pathways affected the significance levels of the enrichment analyses. Therefore, we introduced a new measure for evaluating the relationship between the gene and pathway, termed the percentile (p)-score, which enables users to predict functionally relevant pathways without being affected by the internal correlation in pathways. In addition, we evaluated our approaches using receiver operating characteristic curves, which concluded that the p-score could improve the performance of the ORA. We developed a new database, named Co-expressed Pathways DataBase for Tomato, which is available at http://cox-path-db.kazusa.or.jp/tomato . The database allows users to predict pathways that are relevant to a

  10. Occurrence of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene and other Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Microbial Populations at Different Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembach, Norman; Schmid, Ferdinand; Alexander, Johannes; Hiller, Christian; Rogall, Eike T; Schwartz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Seven wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different population equivalents and catchment areas were screened for the prevalence of the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 mediating resistance against last resort antibiotic polymyxin E. The abundance of the plasmid-associated mcr-1 gene in total microbial populations during water treatment processes was quantitatively analyzed by qPCR analyses. The presence of the colistin resistance gene was documented for all of the influent wastewater samples of the seven WWTPs. In some cases the mcr-1 resistance gene was also detected in effluent samples of the WWTPs after conventional treatment reaching the aquatic environment. In addition to the occurrence of mcr-1 gene, CTX-M-32, blaTEM, CTX-M, tetM, CMY-2, and ermB genes coding for clinically relevant antibiotic resistances were quantified in higher abundances in all WWTPs effluents. In parallel, the abundances of Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were quantified via qPCR using specific taxonomic gene markers which were detected in all influent and effluent wastewaters in significant densities. Hence, opportunistic pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes in wastewaters of the analyzed WWTPs bear a risk of dissemination to the aquatic environment. Since many of the antibiotic resistance gene are associated with mobile genetic elements horizontal gene transfer during wastewater treatment can't be excluded.

  11. Occurrence of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene and other Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Microbial Populations at Different Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembach, Norman; Schmid, Ferdinand; Alexander, Johannes; Hiller, Christian; Rogall, Eike T.; Schwartz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Seven wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different population equivalents and catchment areas were screened for the prevalence of the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 mediating resistance against last resort antibiotic polymyxin E. The abundance of the plasmid-associated mcr-1 gene in total microbial populations during water treatment processes was quantitatively analyzed by qPCR analyses. The presence of the colistin resistance gene was documented for all of the influent wastewater samples of the seven WWTPs. In some cases the mcr-1 resistance gene was also detected in effluent samples of the WWTPs after conventional treatment reaching the aquatic environment. In addition to the occurrence of mcr-1 gene, CTX-M-32, blaTEM, CTX-M, tetM, CMY-2, and ermB genes coding for clinically relevant antibiotic resistances were quantified in higher abundances in all WWTPs effluents. In parallel, the abundances of Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were quantified via qPCR using specific taxonomic gene markers which were detected in all influent and effluent wastewaters in significant densities. Hence, opportunistic pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes in wastewaters of the analyzed WWTPs bear a risk of dissemination to the aquatic environment. Since many of the antibiotic resistance gene are associated with mobile genetic elements horizontal gene transfer during wastewater treatment can't be excluded. PMID:28744270

  12. Occurrence of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene and other Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Microbial Populations at Different Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Hembach

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seven wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs with different population equivalents and catchment areas were screened for the prevalence of the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 mediating resistance against last resort antibiotic polymyxin E. The abundance of the plasmid-associated mcr-1 gene in total microbial populations during water treatment processes was quantitatively analyzed by qPCR analyses. The presence of the colistin resistance gene was documented for all of the influent wastewater samples of the seven WWTPs. In some cases the mcr-1 resistance gene was also detected in effluent samples of the WWTPs after conventional treatment reaching the aquatic environment. In addition to the occurrence of mcr-1 gene, CTX-M-32, blaTEM, CTX-M, tetM, CMY-2, and ermB genes coding for clinically relevant antibiotic resistances were quantified in higher abundances in all WWTPs effluents. In parallel, the abundances of Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were quantified via qPCR using specific taxonomic gene markers which were detected in all influent and effluent wastewaters in significant densities. Hence, opportunistic pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes in wastewaters of the analyzed WWTPs bear a risk of dissemination to the aquatic environment. Since many of the antibiotic resistance gene are associated with mobile genetic elements horizontal gene transfer during wastewater treatment can't be excluded.

  13. Butyrate Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Bovine Cells through Targeting Gene Expression relevance to DNA Replication Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using both real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the gene expression relevance to DNA replication apparatus targeted by butyrate. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed the microarray analysis. From the quan...

  14. EpCAM-regulated intramembrane proteolysis induces a cancer stem cell-like gene signature in hepatitis B virus-infected hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Saravana Kumar Kailasam; Zhang, Hao; Diab, Ahmed; Pascuzzi, Pete E.; Lefrançois, Lydie; Fares, Nadim; Bancel, Brigitte; Merle, Philippe; Andrisani, Ourania

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatocytes in which the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is replicating exhibit loss of the chromatin modifying polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), resulting in re-expression of specific, cellular PRC2-repressed genes. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a PRC2-repressed gene, normally expressed in hepatic progenitors, but re-expressed in hepatic cancer stem cells (hCSCs). Herein, we investigated the functional significance of EpCAM re-expression in HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods Employing molecular approaches (transfections, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunoblotting, qRT-PCR), we investigated the role of EpCAM-regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in HBV replicating cells in vitro, and in liver tumors from HBV X/c-myc mice and chronically HBV infected patients. Results EpCAM undergoes RIP in HBV replicating cells, activating canonical Wnt signaling. Transfection of Wnt-responsive plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) identified a GFP + population of HBV replicating cells. These GFP+/Wnt+ cells exhibited cisplatin- and sorafenib-resistant growth resembling hCSCs, and increased expression of pluripotency genes NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, and hCSC markers BAMBI, CD44 and CD133. These genes are referred as EpCAM RIP and Wnt-induced hCSC-like gene signature. Interestingly, this gene signature is also overexpressed in liver tumors of X/c-myc bitransgenic mice. Clinically, a group of HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinomas was identified, exhibiting elevated expression of the hCSC-like gene signature and associated with reduced overall survival post-surgical resection. Conclusions The hCSC-like gene signature offers promise as prognostic tool for classifying subtypes of HBV-induced HCCs. Since EpCAM RIP and Wnt signaling drive expression of this hCSC-like signature, inhibition of these pathways can be explored as therapeutic strategy for this subtype of HBV-associated HCCs. Lay summary In this study, we provide evidence

  15. Relevance of different prior knowledge sources for inferring gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catharina; Bontempi, Gianluca; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    When inferring networks from high-throughput genomic data, one of the main challenges is the subsequent validation of these networks. In the best case scenario, the true network is partially known from previous research results published in structured databases or research articles. Traditionally, inferred networks are validated against these known interactions. Whenever the recovery rate is gauged to be high enough, subsequent high scoring but unknown inferred interactions are deemed good candidates for further experimental validation. Therefore such validation framework strongly depends on the quantity and quality of published interactions and presents serious pitfalls: (1) availability of these known interactions for the studied problem might be sparse; (2) quantitatively comparing different inference algorithms is not trivial; and (3) the use of these known interactions for validation prevents their integration in the inference procedure. The latter is particularly relevant as it has recently been showed that integration of priors during network inference significantly improves the quality of inferred networks. To overcome these problems when validating inferred networks, we recently proposed a data-driven validation framework based on single gene knock-down experiments. Using this framework, we were able to demonstrate the benefits of integrating prior knowledge and expression data. In this paper we used this framework to assess the quality of different sources of prior knowledge on their own and in combination with different genomic data sets in colorectal cancer. We observed that most prior sources lead to significant F-scores. Furthermore, their integration with genomic data leads to a significant increase in F-scores, especially for priors extracted from full text PubMed articles, known co-expression modules and genetic interactions. Lastly, we observed that the results are consistent for three different data sets: experimental knock-down data and two

  16. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Amanda M; Wang, Zhiping; Schug, Jonathan; Naji, Ali; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-03-01

    human α- and β-cells based on chromatin accessibility and transcript levels, which allowed for detection of novel α- and β-cell signature genes not previously known to be expressed in islets. Using fine-mapping of open chromatin, we have identified thousands of potential cis-regulatory elements that operate in an endocrine cell type-specific fashion.

  17. An archaeal genomic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  18. Beta-decay of nuclei around Se-90. Search for signatures of a N=56 sub-shell closure relevant the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, M; Pereira, J; Surman, R; Arndt, O; Baumann, T; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Estrade, A; Galaviz, D; Ginter, T; Hausmann, M; Hennrich, S; Kessler, R; Kratz, K -L; Lorusso, G; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Moller, P; Montes, F; Pfeiffer, B; Portillo, M; Hennrich, S; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Walters, W B; Wohr, A

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear structure plays a significant role on the rapid neutron capture process (r-process) since shapes evolve with the emergence of shells and sub-shells. There was some indication in neighboring nuclei that we might find examples of a new N=56 sub-shell, which may give rise to a doubly magic Se-90 nucleus. Beta-decay half lives of nuclei around Se-90 have been measured to determine if this nucleus has in fact a doubly-magic character. The fragmentation of Xe-136 beam at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University was used to create a cocktail of nuclei in the A=90 region. We have measured the half lives of twenty-two nuclei near the r-process path in the A=90 region. The half lives of As-88 and Se-90 have been measured for the first time. The values were compared with theoretical predictions in the search for nuclear-deformation signatures of a N=56 sub-shell, and its possible role in the emergence of a potential doubly-magic Se-90. The impact of such hypothesis on the sy...

  19. Retrieval of soil erosion relevant parameters in the Western Australian wheat belt region from VNIR-SWIR and TIR spectral signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Eisele; Sabine Chabrillat; I. Lau; Kobayashi, C.; B. Wheaton; Carter, D.; Kashimura, O.; Kato, M.; Ong, C.; R. Hewson; Cudahy, T.; Hermann Kaufmann

    2011-01-01

    With the focus on new available hyperspectral imaging sensors sensitive within the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength region, this study is testing the ability of the TIR in deriving soil erosion relevant parameters (e.g. texture, organic carbon content) from soil spectral measurements with the respect to commonly used VNIR-SWIR spectrometers. Therefore a study site was chosen located within an agricultural area in Western Australia, which is suffering from soil loss through wind erosion proce...

  20. Expression signature based on TP53 target genes doesn't predict response to TP53-MDM2 inhibitor in wild type TP53 tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy

    2015-10-22

    A number of TP53-MDM2 inhibitors are currently under investigation as therapeutic agents in a variety of clinical trials in patients with TP53 wild type tumors. Not all wild type TP53 tumors are sensitive to such inhibitors. In an attempt to improve selection of patients with TP53 wild type tumors, an mRNA expression signature based on 13 TP53 transcriptional target genes was recently developed (Jeay et al. 2015). Careful reanalysis of TP53 status in the study validation data set of cancer cell lines considered to be TP53 wild type detected TP53 inactivating alterations in 23% of cell lines. The subsequent reanalysis of the remaining TP53 wild type cell lines clearly demonstrated that unfortunately the 13-gene signature cannot predict response to TP53-MDM2 inhibitor in TP53 wild type tumors.

  1. Comparative transcriptional network modeling of three PPAR-α/γ co-agonists reveals distinct metabolic gene signatures in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Deehan

    Full Text Available AIMS: To compare the molecular and biologic signatures of a balanced dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α/γ agonist, aleglitazar, with tesaglitazar (a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist or a combination of pioglitazone (Pio; PPAR-γ agonist and fenofibrate (Feno; PPAR-α agonist in human hepatocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Gene expression microarray profiles were obtained from primary human hepatocytes treated with EC(50-aligned low, medium and high concentrations of the three treatments. A systems biology approach, Causal Network Modeling, was used to model the data to infer upstream molecular mechanisms that may explain the observed changes in gene expression. Aleglitazar, tesaglitazar and Pio/Feno each induced unique transcriptional signatures, despite comparable core PPAR signaling. Although all treatments inferred qualitatively similar PPAR-α signaling, aleglitazar was inferred to have greater effects on high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than tesaglitazar and Pio/Feno, due to a greater number of gene expression changes in pathways related to high-density and low-density lipoprotein metabolism. Distinct transcriptional and biologic signatures were also inferred for stress responses, which appeared to be less affected by aleglitazar than the comparators. In particular, Pio/Feno was inferred to increase NFE2L2 activity, a key component of the stress response pathway, while aleglitazar had no significant effect. All treatments were inferred to decrease proliferative signaling. CONCLUSIONS: Aleglitazar induces transcriptional signatures related to lipid parameters and stress responses that are unique from other dual PPAR-α/γ treatments. This may underlie observed favorable changes in lipid profiles in animal and clinical studies with aleglitazar and suggests a differentiated gene profile compared with other dual PPAR-α/γ agonist treatments.

  2. Parathyroid hormone-related protein regulates tumor-relevant genes in breast cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, A.; Vetter, M.; Schunke, D.; Span, P.N.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Thomssen, C.; Dittmer, J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of endogenous parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) on gene expression in breast cancer cells was studied. We suppressed PTHrP expression in MDA-MB-231 cells by RNA interference and analyzed changes in gene expression by microarray analysis. More than 200 genes showed altered

  3. β decay of nuclei around 90Se: Search for signatures of a N=56 subshell closure relevant to the r process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Pereira, J.; Surman, R.; Arndt, O.; Baumann, T.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.; Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lorusso, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pfeiffer, B.; Portillo, M.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Walters, W. B.; Wöhr, A.

    2012-03-01

    Background: Nuclear structure plays a significant role on the rapid neutron capture process (r process) since shapes evolve with the emergence of shells and subshells. There was some indication in neighboring nuclei that we might find examples of a new N=56 subshell, which may give rise to a doubly magic 3490Se56 nucleus.Purpose: β-decay half-lives of nuclei around 90Se have been measured to determine if this nucleus has in fact a doubly magic character.Method: The fragmentation of a 136Xe beam at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University was used to create a cocktail of nuclei in the A=90 region.Results: We have measured the half-lives of 22 nuclei near the r-process path in the A=90 region. The half-lives of 88As and 90Se have been measured for the first time. The values were compared with theoretical predictions in the search for nuclear-deformation signatures of a N=56 subshell, and its possible role in the emergence of a potential doubly magic 90Se. The impact of such hypothesis on the synthesis of heavy nuclei, particularly in the production of Sr, Y, and Zr elements was investigated with a weak r-process network.Conclusions: The new half-lives agree with results obtained from a standard global QRPA model used in r-process calculations, indicating that 90Se has a quadrupole shape incompatible with a closed N=56 subshell in this region. The impact of the measured 90Se half-life in comparison with a former theoretical predication associated with a spherical half-life on the weak r process is shown to be strong.

  4. Gene expression profiling to identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with environmental heavy metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Famulski, Konrad S; Bakheet, Saleh A; Hafez, Mohammed M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Al-Ghadeer, Abdul Rahman M

    2017-02-01

    Heavy metals are the most commonly encountered toxic substances that increase susceptibility to various diseases after prolonged exposure. We have previously shown that healthy volunteers living near a mining area had significant contamination with heavy metals associated with significant changes in the expression of some detoxifying genes, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and DNA repair genes. However, alterations of most of the molecular target genes associated with diseases are still unknown. Thus, the aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the gene expression profile and (b) identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals in mining area using microarray analysis. For this purpose, 40 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a heavy metal-polluted area (Mahd Al-Dhahab city, Saudi Arabia) and 20 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a non-heavy metal-polluted area were included in the study. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood using PAXgene Blood RNA tubes and then reversed transcribed and hybridized to the gene array using the Affymetrix U219 GeneChip. Microarray analysis showed about 2129 genes were identified and differentially altered, among which a shared set of 425 genes was differentially expressed in the heavy metal-exposed groups. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the most altered gene-regulated diseases in heavy metal-exposed groups included hematological and developmental disorders and mostly renal and urological diseases. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction closely matched the microarray data for some genes tested. Importantly, changes in gene-related diseases were attributed to alterations in the genes encoded for protein synthesis. Renal and urological diseases were the diseases that were most frequently associated with the heavy metal-exposed group. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to validate these

  5. Ubiquinol-induced gene expression signatures are translated into altered parameters of erythropoiesis and reduced low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Constance; Niklowitz, Petra; Okun, Jürgen G; Haas, Dorothea; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Studies in vitro and in mice indicate a role for Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) ) in gene expression. To determine this function in relationship to physiological readouts, a 2-week supplementation study with the reduced form of CoQ(10) (ubiquinol, Q(10) H(2) , 150 mg/d) was performed in 53 healthy males. Mean CoQ(10) plasma levels increased 4.8-fold after supplementation. Transcriptomic and bioinformatic approaches identified a gene-gene interaction network in CD14-positive monocytes, which functions in inflammation, cell differentiation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-signaling. These Q(10) H(2) -induced gene expression signatures were also described previously in liver tissues of SAMP1 mice. Biochemical and NMR-based analyses showed a reduction of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol plasma levels after Q(10) H(2) supplementation. This effect was especially pronounced in atherogenic small dense LDL particles (19-21 nm, 1.045 g/L). In agreement with gene expression signatures, Q(10) H(2) reduces the number of erythrocytes but increases the concentration of reticulocytes. In conclusion, Q(10) H(2) induces characteristic gene expression patterns, which are translated into reduced LDL cholesterol levels and altered parameters of erythropoiesis in humans. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stage and gene specific signatures defined by histones H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accompany mammalian retina maturation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Xu, Xuming; DeWan, Andrew T; Salzberg, Anna C; Berg, Arthur; Hoh, Josephine; Zhang, Samuel S; Barnstable, Colin J

    2012-01-01

    The epigenetic contribution to neurogenesis is largely unknown. There is, however, growing evidence that posttranslational modification of histones is a dynamic process that shows many correlations with gene expression. Here we have followed the genome-wide distribution of two important histone H3 modifications, H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 during late mouse retina development. The retina provides an ideal model for these studies because of its well-characterized structure and development and also the extensive studies of the retinal transcriptome and its development. We found that a group of genes expressed only in mature rod photoreceptors have a unique signature consisting of de-novo accumulation of H3K4me2, both at the transcription start site (TSS) and over the whole gene, that correlates with the increase in transcription, but no accumulation of H3K27me3 at any stage. By in silico analysis of this unique signature we have identified a larger group of genes that may be selectively expressed in mature rod photoreceptors. We also found that the distribution of H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 on the genes widely expressed is not always associated with their transcriptional levels. Different histone signatures for retinal genes with the same gene expression pattern suggest the diversities of epigenetic regulation. Genes without H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accumulation at any stage represent a large group of transcripts never expressed in retina. The epigenetic signatures defined by H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 can distinguish cell-type specific genes from widespread transcripts and may be reflective of cell specificity during retina maturation. In addition to the developmental patterns seen in wild type retina, the dramatic changes of histone modification in the retinas of mutant animals lacking rod photoreceptors provide a tool to study the epigenetic changes in other cell types and thus describe a broad range of epigenetic events in a solid tissue in vivo.

  7. Stage and gene specific signatures defined by histones H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accompany mammalian retina maturation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya Y Popova

    Full Text Available The epigenetic contribution to neurogenesis is largely unknown. There is, however, growing evidence that posttranslational modification of histones is a dynamic process that shows many correlations with gene expression. Here we have followed the genome-wide distribution of two important histone H3 modifications, H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 during late mouse retina development. The retina provides an ideal model for these studies because of its well-characterized structure and development and also the extensive studies of the retinal transcriptome and its development. We found that a group of genes expressed only in mature rod photoreceptors have a unique signature consisting of de-novo accumulation of H3K4me2, both at the transcription start site (TSS and over the whole gene, that correlates with the increase in transcription, but no accumulation of H3K27me3 at any stage. By in silico analysis of this unique signature we have identified a larger group of genes that may be selectively expressed in mature rod photoreceptors. We also found that the distribution of H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 on the genes widely expressed is not always associated with their transcriptional levels. Different histone signatures for retinal genes with the same gene expression pattern suggest the diversities of epigenetic regulation. Genes without H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 accumulation at any stage represent a large group of transcripts never expressed in retina. The epigenetic signatures defined by H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 can distinguish cell-type specific genes from widespread transcripts and may be reflective of cell specificity during retina maturation. In addition to the developmental patterns seen in wild type retina, the dramatic changes of histone modification in the retinas of mutant animals lacking rod photoreceptors provide a tool to study the epigenetic changes in other cell types and thus describe a broad range of epigenetic events in a solid tissue in vivo.

  8. A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Identify, Validate and Use Gene Signatures of Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in Prediction of Pathway Activation in the Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors. Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening as well as their involvement in disease states. ...

  9. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Functional Signature Ontology Tool: Triplicate Measurements of Reporter Gene Expression in Response to Individual Genetic and Chemical Perturbations in HCT116 Cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use an eight-gene expression profile to define functional signatures for small molecules and natural products with heretofore undefined mechanism of action. Two genes in the eight gene set are used as internal controls and do not vary across gene expression array data collected from the public domain. The remaining six genes are found to vary independently across a large collection of publically available gene expression array datasets.  Read the abstract

  10. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair...... mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have...

  11. Collider signatures of hylogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2015-02-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis—a variant of the antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  12. Collider signatures of Hylogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Demidov, S V; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis --- a variant of antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  13. Relevance of vitamin D receptor target genes for monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of primary human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukić, Maja; Neme, Antonio; Seuter, Sabine; Saksa, Noora; de Mello, Vanessa D F; Nurmi, Tarja; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K; Carlberg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has transcriptome- and genome-wide effects and activates, via the binding of its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR), several hundred target genes. Using samples from a 5-month vitamin D3 intervention study (VitDmet), we recently reported that the expression of 12 VDR target genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as 12 biochemical and clinical parameters of the study participants are significantly triggered by vitamin D3. In this study, we performed a more focused selection of further 12 VDR target genes and demonstrated that changes of their mRNA expression in PBMCs of VitDmet subjects significantly correlate with alterations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels. Network and self-organizing map analysis of these datasets together with that of the other 24 parameters was followed by relevance calculations and identified changes in parathyroid hormone serum levels and the expression of the newly selected genes STS, BCL6, ITGAM, LRRC25, LPGAT1 and TREM1 as well as of the previously reported genes DUSP10 and CD14 as the most relevant parameters for describing vitamin D responsiveness in vivo. Moreover, parameter relevance ranking allowed the segregation of study subjects into high and low responders. Due to the long intervention period the vitamin D response was not too prominent on the level of transcriptional activation. Therefore, we performed in the separate VitDbol trial a short-term but high dose stimulation with a vitamin D3 bolus. In PBMCs of VitDbol subjects we observed direct transcriptional effects on the selected VDR target genes, such as an up to 2.1-fold increase already one day after supplementation onset. In conclusion, both long-term and short-term vitamin D3 supplementation studies allow monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of human individuals and represent new types of human in vivo vitamin D3 investigations.

  14. Data mining reveals a network of early-response genes as a consensus signature of drug-induced in vitro and in vivo toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J D; Berntenis, N; Roth, A; Ebeling, M

    2014-06-01

    Gene signatures of drug-induced toxicity are of broad interest, but they are often identified from small-scale, single-time point experiments, and are therefore of limited applicability. To address this issue, we performed multivariate analysis of gene expression, cell-based assays, and histopathological data in the TG-GATEs (Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation system) database. Data mining highlights four genes-EGR1, ATF3, GDF15 and FGF21-that are induced 2 h after drug administration in human and rat primary hepatocytes poised to eventually undergo cytotoxicity-induced cell death. Modelling and simulation reveals that these early stress-response genes form a functional network with evolutionarily conserved structure and intrinsic dynamics. This is underlined by the fact that early induction of this network in vivo predicts drug-induced liver and kidney pathology with high accuracy. Our findings demonstrate the value of early gene-expression signatures in predicting and understanding compound-induced toxicity. The identified network can empower first-line tests that reduce animal use and costs of safety evaluation.

  15. Are alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB) relevant to assess petroleum bioremediation processes in chronically polluted coastal sediments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisse, Sandrine; Duran, Robert; Goni-Urriza, Marisol [Pau Univ. (France). Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie-UMR IPREM5254; Coulon, Frederic [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Resource Management and Efficiency

    2011-11-15

    The diversity of alkB-related alkane hydroxylase sequences and the relationship between alkB gene expression and the hydrocarbon contamination level have been investigated in the chronically polluted Etang-de-Berre sediments. For this purpose, these sediments were maintained in microcosms and submitted to a controlled oil input miming an oil spill. New degenerated PCR primers targeting alkB-related alkane hydroxylase sequences were designed to explore the diversity and the expression of these genes using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and gene library analyses. Induction of alkB genes was detected immediately after oil addition and their expression detected only during 2 days, although the n-alkane degradation was observed throughout the 14 days of incubation. The alkB gene expression within triplicate microcosms was heterogeneous probably due to the low level of alkB transcripts. Moreover, the alkB gene expression of dominant OTUs has been observed in unoiled microcosms indicating that the expression of this gene cannot be directly related to the oil contamination. Although the dominant alkB genes and transcripts detected were closely related to the alkB of Marinobacter aquaeolei isolated from an oil-producing well, and to alkB genes related to the obligate alkanotroph Alcanivorax borkumensis, no clear relationship between the oil contamination and the expression of the alkB genes could be established. This finding suggests that in such coastal environments, alkB gene expression is not a function relevant enough to monitor bacterial response to oil contamination. (orig.)

  16. Are alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB) relevant to assess petroleum bioremediation processes in chronically polluted coastal sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisse, Sandrine; Duran, Robert; Coulon, Frédéric; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2011-11-01

    The diversity of alkB-related alkane hydroxylase sequences and the relationship between alkB gene expression and the hydrocarbon contamination level have been investigated in the chronically polluted Etang-de-Berre sediments. For this purpose, these sediments were maintained in microcosms and submitted to a controlled oil input miming an oil spill. New degenerated PCR primers targeting alkB-related alkane hydroxylase sequences were designed to explore the diversity and the expression of these genes using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and gene library analyses. Induction of alkB genes was detected immediately after oil addition and their expression detected only during 2 days, although the n-alkane degradation was observed throughout the 14 days of incubation. The alkB gene expression within triplicate microcosms was heterogeneous probably due to the low level of alkB transcripts. Moreover, the alkB gene expression of dominant OTUs has been observed in unoiled microcosms indicating that the expression of this gene cannot be directly related to the oil contamination. Although the dominant alkB genes and transcripts detected were closely related to the alkB of Marinobacter aquaeolei isolated from an oil-producing well, and to alkB genes related to the obligate alkanotroph Alcanivorax borkumensis, no clear relationship between the oil contamination and the expression of the alkB genes could be established. This finding suggests that in such coastal environments, alkB gene expression is not a function relevant enough to monitor bacterial response to oil contamination.

  17. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  18. An evolutionary-game model of tumour-cell interactions: possible relevance to gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Bentzen, Søren; Alsner, Jan

    2001-01-01

    interpretations of gene therapy. Two prototypical strategies for gene therapy are suggested, both of them leading to extinction of the malignant phenotype: one approach would be to reduce the relative proportion of the cooperating malignant cell type below a certain critical value. Another approach would...

  19. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kolvraa, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-05-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond to heat shock. Stress response genes, particularly HSP70, are now the major candidates in the gene-longevity association studies.

  20. Prognostic Relevance of Promoter Hypermethylation of Multiple Genes in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methylation-mediated suppression of detoxification, DNA repair and tumor suppressor genes has been implicated in cancer development. This study was designed to investigate the impact of concurrent methylation of multiple genes in breast tumors on disease prognosis.

  1. Gene regulation and chromatin organization: relevance of cohesin mutations to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrin, Erwan; Kaiser, Frank J; Wendt, Kerstin S

    2016-04-01

    Consistent with the diverse roles of the cohesin complex in chromosome biology, mutations in genes encoding cohesin and its regulators are found in different types of cancer and in developmental disorders such as Cornelia de Lange Syndrome. It is so far considered that the defects caused by these mutations result from altered function of cohesin in regulating gene expression during development. Chromatin conformation analyses have established the importance of cohesin for the architecture of developmental gene clusters and in vivo studies in mouse and zebrafish demonstrated how cohesin defects lead to gene misregulation and to malformations similar to the related human syndromes. Here we present our current knowledge on cohesin's involvement in gene expression, highlighting molecular and mechanistic consequences of pathogenic mutations in the Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

  2. Males are from Mars, and females are from Venus: sex-specific fetal brain gene expression signatures in a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Andrea G; Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Sverdlov, Deanna; Neri, Caterina; Bianchi, Diana W

    2016-05-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children, including autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously identified second-trimester amniotic fluid and term cord blood gene expression patterns suggesting dysregulated brain development in fetuses of obese compared with lean women. We sought to investigate the biological significance of these findings in a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity. We evaluated sex-specific differences in fetal growth, brain gene expression signatures, and associated pathways. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a 60% high-fat diet or 10% fat control diet for 12-14 weeks prior to mating. During pregnancy, obese dams continued on the high-fat diet or transitioned to the control diet. Lean dams stayed on the control diet. On embryonic day 17.5, embryos were weighed and fetal brains were snap frozen. RNA was extracted from male and female forebrains (10 per diet group per sex) and hybridized to whole-genome expression arrays. Significantly differentially expressed genes were identified using a Welch's t test with the Benjamini-Hochberg correction. Functional analyses were performed using ingenuity pathways analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Embryos of dams on the high-fat diet were significantly smaller than controls, with males more severely affected than females (P = .01). Maternal obesity and maternal obesity with dietary change in pregnancy resulted in significantly more dysregulated genes in male vs female fetal brains (386 vs 66, P obesity with and without dietary change in pregnancy was associated with unique brain gene expression signatures for each sex, with an overlap of only 1 gene. Changing obese dams to a control diet in pregnancy resulted in more differentially expressed genes in the fetal brain than maternal obesity alone. Functional analyses identified common dysregulated

  3. Obtaining Relevant Genes by Analysis of Expression Arrays with a Multi-Agent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso GONZÁLEZ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite treatment with chemotherapy, relapses are frequent and response to these treatments is not the same in younger women as in older women. Therefore, the identification of genes that provoke this disease is required, as well as the identification of therapeutic targets.There are currently different hybridization techniques, such as expression ar-rays, which measure the signal expression of both the genomic and tran-scriptomic levels of thousands of genes of a given sample. Probesets of Gene 1.0 ST GeneChip arrays provide the ultimate genome transcript coverage, providing a measurement of the expression level of the sample.This paper proposes a multi-agent system to manage information of expres-sion arrays, with the goal of providing an intuitive system that is also extensible to analyze and interpret the results.The roles of agent integrate different types of techniques, from statistical and data mining techniques that select a set of genes, to search techniques that find pathways in which such genes participate, and information extraction techniques that apply a CBR system to check if these genes are involved in the disease.

  4. DGIdb 2.0: mining clinically relevant drug-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alex H; Coffman, Adam C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Spies, Nicholas C; Skidmore, Zachary L; Campbell, Katie M; Krysiak, Kilannin; Pan, Deng; McMichael, Joshua F; Eldred, James M; Walker, Jason R; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L

    2016-01-01

    The Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGIdb, www.dgidb.org) is a web resource that consolidates disparate data sources describing drug-gene interactions and gene druggability. It provides an intuitive graphical user interface and a documented application programming interface (API) for querying these data. DGIdb was assembled through an extensive manual curation effort, reflecting the combined information of twenty-seven sources. For DGIdb 2.0, substantial updates have been made to increase content and improve its usefulness as a resource for mining clinically actionable drug targets. Specifically, nine new sources of drug-gene interactions have been added, including seven resources specifically focused on interactions linked to clinical trials. These additions have more than doubled the overall count of drug-gene interactions. The total number of druggable gene claims has also increased by 30%. Importantly, a majority of the unrestricted, publicly-accessible sources used in DGIdb are now automatically updated on a weekly basis, providing the most current information for these sources. Finally, a new web view and API have been developed to allow searching for interactions by drug identifiers to complement existing gene-based search functionality. With these updates, DGIdb represents a comprehensive and user friendly tool for mining the druggable genome for precision medicine hypothesis generation.

  5. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  6. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appro......Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond...

  7. Mapping ecologically relevant social behaviours by gene knockout in wild mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfin, Lea; Dayan, Molly; Levy, Dana Rubi; Austad, Steven N; Miller, Richard A; Iraqi, Fuad A; Dulac, Catherine; Kimchi, Tali

    2014-08-05

    The laboratory mouse serves as an important model system for studying gene, brain and behavioural interactions. Powerful methods of gene targeting have helped to decipher gene-function associations in human diseases. Yet, the laboratory mouse, obtained after decades of human-driven artificial selection, inbreeding, and adaptation to captivity, is of limited use for the study of fitness-driven behavioural responses that characterize the ancestral wild house mouse. Here, we demonstrate that the backcrossing of wild mice with knockout mutant laboratory mice retrieves behavioural traits exhibited exclusively by the wild house mouse, thereby unmasking gene functions inaccessible in the domesticated mutant model. Furthermore, we show that domestication had a much greater impact on females than on males, erasing many behavioural traits of the ancestral wild female. Hence, compared with laboratory mice, wild-derived mutant mice constitute an improved model system to gain insights into neuronal mechanisms underlying normal and pathological sexually dimorphic social behaviours.

  8. Isolation and Expression Profile Analysis of Genes Relevant to Chilling Stress During Seed Imbibition in Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Meer.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li-bao; LI Shu-yan; HE Guang-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Germination of soybean seed is always arrested by chilling imbibitional stress,and this phenomenon is widespread in the plant seed kingdom,but has not been studied at molecular level.In this experiment,eDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique was applied to isolate genes relevant to chilling stress (4~C) during soybean seed imbibition.Eight genes were found to be up-regulated and two were down-regulated during chilling stress respectively.Four up-regulated genes were selected to analyze the expression profiles during imbibition under chilling condition.It was demonstrated that the four genes were induced significantly by 4℃ for 24 h,and decreased when the temperature was shifted from 4 to 22℃.GMCHI,a highly chilling stress-induced gene which responded to abseisic acid (ABA),polyethylene glycol (PEG) and NaCl,showed great stress-resistance according to published reports.Cos78 was identified to be induced by PEG.However,Cos66 and Cos36 transcription showed no change to ABA,PEG,and NaCl.From the characteristic of genes isolated from the embryonic axis,we concluded that soybean seeds have different pathways to adapt to various biotic and abiotic stresses by regulating many signal transduction pathways.

  9. Gene expression signatures that predict outcome of tamoxifen-treated estrogen receptor-positive, high-risk, primary breast cancer patients: a DBCG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B Lyng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen significantly improves outcome for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ breast cancer, but the 15-year recurrence rate remains 30%. The aim of this study was to identify gene profiles that accurately predicted the outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients who received adjuvant Tamoxifen mono-therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Post-menopausal breast cancer patients diagnosed no later than 2002, being ER+ as defined by >1% IHC staining and having a frozen tumor sample with >50% tumor content were included. Tumor samples from 108 patients treated with adjuvant Tamoxifen were analyzed for the expression of 59 genes using quantitative-PCR. End-point was clinically verified recurrence to distant organs or ipsilateral breast. Gene profiles were identified using a model building procedure based on conditional logistic regression and leave-one-out cross-validation, followed by a non-parametric bootstrap (1000x re-sampling. The optimal profiles were further examined in 5 previously-reported datasets containing similar patient populations that were either treated with Tamoxifen or left untreated (n = 623. Three gene signatures were identified, the strongest being a 2-gene combination of BCL2-CDKN1A, exhibiting an accuracy of 75% for prediction of outcome. Independent examination using 4 previously-reported microarray datasets of Tamoxifen-treated patient samples (n = 503 confirmed the potential of BCL2-CDKN1A. The predictive value was further determined by comparing the ability of the genes to predict recurrence in an additional, previously-published, cohort consisting of Tamoxifen-treated (n = 58, p = 0.015 and untreated patients (n = 62, p = 0.25. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel gene expression signature predictive of outcome of Tamoxifen-treated patients was identified. The validation suggests that BCL2-CDKN1A exhibit promising predictive potential.

  10. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone induces depression-like behaviours and gene expression changes relevant to major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacova, Natasa; Wes, Paul D; Ondrejcakova, Maria; Flynn, Marianne E; Poundstone, Patricia K; Babic, Stanislav; Murck, Harald; Jezova, Daniela

    2012-03-01

    The potential role of aldosterone in the pathophysiology of depression is unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that prolonged elevation of circulating aldosterone induces depression-like behaviour accompanied by disease-relevant changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Subchronic (2-wk) treatment with aldosterone (2 μg/100 g body weight per day) or vehicle via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps was used to induce hyperaldosteronism in male rats. All rats (n = 20/treatment group) underwent a modified sucrose preference test. Half of the animals from each treatment group were exposed to the forced swim test (FST), which served both as a tool to assess depression-like behaviour and as a stress stimulus. Affymetrix microarray analysis was used to screen the entire rat genome for gene expression changes in the hippocampus. Aldosterone treatment induced an anhedonic state manifested by decreased sucrose preference. In the FST, depressogenic action of aldosterone was manifested by decreased latency to immobility and increased time spent immobile. Aldosterone treatment resulted in transcriptional changes of genes in the hippocampus involved in inflammation, glutamatergic activity, and synaptic and neuritic remodelling. Furthermore, aldosterone-regulated genes substantially overlapped with genes affected by stress in the FST. This study demonstrates the existence of a causal relationship between the hyperaldosteronism and depressive behaviour. In addition, aldosterone treatment induced changes in gene expression that may be relevant to the aetiology of major depressive disorder. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone represents a new animal model of depression, which may contribute to the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression.

  11. An accurate prostate cancer prognosticator using a seven-gene signature plus Gleason score and taking cell type heterogeneity into account.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in the development of prostate cancer prognostic biomarkers is the cellular heterogeneity in tissue samples. We developed an objective Cluster-Correlation (CC analysis to identify gene expression changes in various cell types that are associated with progression. In the Cluster step, samples were clustered (unsupervised based on the expression values of each gene through a mixture model combined with a multiple linear regression model in which cell-type percent data were used for decomposition. In the Correlation step, a Chi-square test was used to select potential prognostic genes. With CC analysis, we identified 324 significantly expressed genes (68 tumor and 256 stroma cell expressed genes which were strongly associated with the observed biochemical relapse status. Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM was then utilized to develop a seven-gene classifier. The Classifier has been validated using two independent Data Sets. The overall prediction accuracy and sensitivity is 71% and 76%, respectively. The inclusion of the Gleason sum to the seven-gene classifier raised the prediction accuracy and sensitivity to 83% and 76% respectively based on independent testing. These results indicated that our prognostic model that includes cell type adjustments and using Gleason score and the seven-gene signature has some utility for predicting outcomes for prostate cancer for individual patients at the time of prognosis. The strategy could have applications for improving marker performance in other cancers and other diseases.

  12. A two-gene signature, SKI and SLAMF1, predicts time-to-treatment in previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen D Schweighofer

    Full Text Available We developed and validated a two-gene signature that predicts prognosis in previously-untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients. Using a 65 sample training set, from a cohort of 131 patients, we identified the best clinical models to predict time-to-treatment (TTT and overall survival (OS. To identify individual genes or combinations in the training set with expression related to prognosis, we cross-validated univariate and multivariate models to predict TTT. We identified four gene sets (5, 6, 12, or 13 genes to construct multivariate prognostic models. By optimizing each gene set on the training set, we constructed 11 models to predict the time from diagnosis to treatment. Each model also predicted OS and added value to the best clinical models. To determine which contributed the most value when added to clinical variables, we applied the Akaike Information Criterion. Two genes were consistently retained in the models with clinical variables: SKI (v-SKI avian sarcoma viral oncogene homolog and SLAMF1 (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1; CD150. We optimized a two-gene model and validated it on an independent test set of 66 samples. This two-gene model predicted prognosis better on the test set than any of the known predictors, including ZAP70 and serum β2-microglobulin.

  13. A Two-Gene Signature, SKI and SLAMF1, Predicts Time-to-Treatment in Previously Untreated Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, Carmen D.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Barron, Lynn L.; Diao, Lixia; Newman, Rachel J.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William G.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Keating, Michael J.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.

    2011-01-01

    We developed and validated a two-gene signature that predicts prognosis in previously-untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. Using a 65 sample training set, from a cohort of 131 patients, we identified the best clinical models to predict time-to-treatment (TTT) and overall survival (OS). To identify individual genes or combinations in the training set with expression related to prognosis, we cross-validated univariate and multivariate models to predict TTT. We identified four gene sets (5, 6, 12, or 13 genes) to construct multivariate prognostic models. By optimizing each gene set on the training set, we constructed 11 models to predict the time from diagnosis to treatment. Each model also predicted OS and added value to the best clinical models. To determine which contributed the most value when added to clinical variables, we applied the Akaike Information Criterion. Two genes were consistently retained in the models with clinical variables: SKI (v-SKI avian sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) and SLAMF1 (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1; CD150). We optimized a two-gene model and validated it on an independent test set of 66 samples. This two-gene model predicted prognosis better on the test set than any of the known predictors, including ZAP70 and serum β2-microglobulin. PMID:22194822

  14. Differential prioritization between relevance and redundancy in correlation-based feature selection techniques for multiclass gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetty Madhu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the large number of genes in a typical microarray dataset, feature selection looks set to play an important role in reducing noise and computational cost in gene expression-based tissue classification while improving accuracy at the same time. Surprisingly, this does not appear to be the case for all multiclass microarray datasets. The reason is that many feature selection techniques applied on microarray datasets are either rank-based and hence do not take into account correlations between genes, or are wrapper-based, which require high computational cost, and often yield difficult-to-reproduce results. In studies where correlations between genes are considered, attempts to establish the merit of the proposed techniques are hampered by evaluation procedures which are less than meticulous, resulting in overly optimistic estimates of accuracy. Results We present two realistically evaluated correlation-based feature selection techniques which incorporate, in addition to the two existing criteria involved in forming a predictor set (relevance and redundancy, a third criterion called the degree of differential prioritization (DDP. DDP functions as a parameter to strike the balance between relevance and redundancy, providing our techniques with the novel ability to differentially prioritize the optimization of relevance against redundancy (and vice versa. This ability proves useful in producing optimal classification accuracy while using reasonably small predictor set sizes for nine well-known multiclass microarray datasets. Conclusion For multiclass microarray datasets, especially the GCM and NCI60 datasets, DDP enables our filter-based techniques to produce accuracies better than those reported in previous studies which employed similarly realistic evaluation procedures.

  15. Robust Selection of Cancer Survival Signatures from High-Throughput Genomic Data Using Two-Fold Subsampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyun; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Lang, Michel; De Preter, Katleen; Mestdagh, Pieter; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L.; Varesio, Luigi; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Schulte, Johannes H.; Fielitz, Kathrin; Schwermer, Melanie; Morik, Katharina; Schramm, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Identifying relevant signatures for clinical patient outcome is a fundamental task in high-throughput studies. Signatures, composed of features such as mRNAs, miRNAs, SNPs or other molecular variables, are often non-overlapping, even though they have been identified from similar experiments considering samples with the same type of disease. The lack of a consensus is mostly due to the fact that sample sizes are far smaller than the numbers of candidate features to be considered, and therefore signature selection suffers from large variation. We propose a robust signature selection method that enhances the selection stability of penalized regression algorithms for predicting survival risk. Our method is based on an aggregation of multiple, possibly unstable, signatures obtained with the preconditioned lasso algorithm applied to random (internal) subsamples of a given cohort data, where the aggregated signature is shrunken by a simple thresholding strategy. The resulting method, RS-PL, is conceptually simple and easy to apply, relying on parameters automatically tuned by cross validation. Robust signature selection using RS-PL operates within an (external) subsampling framework to estimate the selection probabilities of features in multiple trials of RS-PL. These probabilities are used for identifying reliable features to be included in a signature. Our method was evaluated on microarray data sets from neuroblastoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer patients, extracting robust and relevant signatures for predicting survival risk. Signatures obtained by our method achieved high prediction performance and robustness, consistently over the three data sets. Genes with high selection probability in our robust signatures have been reported as cancer-relevant. The ordering of predictor coefficients associated with signatures was well-preserved across multiple trials of RS-PL, demonstrating the capability of our method for identifying a transferable consensus signature

  16. Robust selection of cancer survival signatures from high-throughput genomic data using two-fold subsampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyun Lee

    Full Text Available Identifying relevant signatures for clinical patient outcome is a fundamental task in high-throughput studies. Signatures, composed of features such as mRNAs, miRNAs, SNPs or other molecular variables, are often non-overlapping, even though they have been identified from similar experiments considering samples with the same type of disease. The lack of a consensus is mostly due to the fact that sample sizes are far smaller than the numbers of candidate features to be considered, and therefore signature selection suffers from large variation. We propose a robust signature selection method that enhances the selection stability of penalized regression algorithms for predicting survival risk. Our method is based on an aggregation of multiple, possibly unstable, signatures obtained with the preconditioned lasso algorithm applied to random (internal subsamples of a given cohort data, where the aggregated signature is shrunken by a simple thresholding strategy. The resulting method, RS-PL, is conceptually simple and easy to apply, relying on parameters automatically tuned by cross validation. Robust signature selection using RS-PL operates within an (external subsampling framework to estimate the selection probabilities of features in multiple trials of RS-PL. These probabilities are used for identifying reliable features to be included in a signature. Our method was evaluated on microarray data sets from neuroblastoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer patients, extracting robust and relevant signatures for predicting survival risk. Signatures obtained by our method achieved high prediction performance and robustness, consistently over the three data sets. Genes with high selection probability in our robust signatures have been reported as cancer-relevant. The ordering of predictor coefficients associated with signatures was well-preserved across multiple trials of RS-PL, demonstrating the capability of our method for identifying a transferable

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Relevant to Rhizome Formation in Lotus Root (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libao Cheng

    Full Text Available Lotus root is a popular wetland vegetable which produces edible rhizome. At the molecular level, the regulation of rhizome formation is very complex, which has not been sufficiently addressed in research. In this study, to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs in lotus root, four libraries (L1 library: stolon stage, L2 library: initial swelling stage, L3 library: middle swelling stage, L4: later swelling stage were constructed from the rhizome development stages. High-throughput tag-sequencing technique was used which is based on Solexa Genome Analyzer Platform. Approximately 5.0 million tags were sequenced, and 4542104, 4474755, 4777919, and 4750348 clean tags including 151282, 137476, 215872, and 166005 distinct tags were obtained after removal of low quality tags from each library respectively. More than 43% distinct tags were unambiguous tags mapping to the reference genes, and 40% were unambiguous tag-mapped genes. From L1, L2, L3, and L4, total 20471, 18785, 23448, and 21778 genes were annotated, after mapping their functions in existing databases. Profiling of gene expression in L1/L2, L2/L3, and L3/L4 libraries were different among most of the selected 20 DEGs. Most of the DEGs in L1/L2 libraries were relevant to fiber development and stress response, while in L2/L3 and L3/L4 libraries, major of the DEGs were involved in metabolism of energy and storage. All up-regulated transcriptional factors in four libraries and 14 important rhizome formation-related genes in four libraries were also identified. In addition, the expression of 9 genes from identified DEGs was performed by qRT-PCR method. In a summary, this study provides a comprehensive understanding of gene expression during the rhizome formation in lotus root.

  18. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E. van den; Dijkstra, M.J.; Krijgsman, O.; Sie, D.; Haan, J.C.; Traets, J.J.; Wiel, M.A. van de; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Punt, C.J.A.; Carvalho, B.; Ylstra, B.; Abeln, S.; Meijer, G.A.; Fijneman, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA) and structural variants (SVs). Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on

  19. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Relevant to Development in Bradysia odoriphaga at Three Developmental Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Gao

    Full Text Available Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae is the most important pest of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum in Asia; however, the molecular genetics are poorly understood. To explore the molecular biological mechanism of development, Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly were performed in the third-instar, fourth-instar, and pupal B. odoriphaga. The study resulted in 16.2 Gb of clean data and 47,578 unigenes (≥125 bp contained in 7,632,430 contigs, 46.21% of which were annotated from non-redundant protein (NR, Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG, Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases. It was found that 19.67% of unigenes matched the homologous species mainly, including Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ceratitis capitata, and Anopheles gambiae. According to differentially expressed gene (DEG analysis, 143, 490, and 309 DEGs were annotated as involved in the developmental process in the GO database respectively, in the comparisons of third-instar and fourth-instar larvae, third-instar larvae and pupae, and fourth-instar larvae and pupae. Twenty-five genes were closely related to these processes, including developmental process, reproduction process, and reproductive organs development and programmed cell death (PCD. The information of unigenes assembled in B. odoriphaga through transcriptome and DEG analyses could provide a detailed genetic basis and regulated information for elaborating the developmental mechanism from the larval, pre-pupal to pupal stages of B. odoriphaga.

  20. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically ... See Cwele v S 2012 4 All SA 497 (SCA); Mohlabeng v Minister of Safety and Security ... ZAKZPHC 51 (2 September 2010); Delta Finance, a Division of Wesbank, ...

  1. Biologically relevant effects of mRNA amplification on gene expression profiles

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    Smits Jos FM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression microarray technology permits the analysis of global gene expression profiles. The amount of sample needed limits the use of small excision biopsies and/or needle biopsies from human or animal tissues. Linear amplification techniques have been developed to increase the amount of sample derived cDNA. These amplified samples can be hybridised on microarrays. However, little information is available whether microarrays based on amplified and unamplified material yield comparable results. In the present study we compared microarray data obtained from amplified mRNA derived from biopsies of rat cardiac left ventricle and non-amplified mRNA derived from the same organ. Biopsies were linearly amplified to acquire enough material for a microarray experiment. Both amplified and unamplified samples were hybridized to the Rat Expression Set 230 Array of Affymetrix. Results Analysis of the microarray data showed that unamplified material of two different left ventricles had 99.6% identical gene expression. Gene expression patterns of two biopsies obtained from the same parental organ were 96.3% identical. Similarly, gene expression pattern of two biopsies from dissimilar organs were 92.8% identical to each other. Twenty-one percent of reporters called present in parental left ventricular tissue disappeared after amplification in the biopsies. Those reporters were predominantly seen in the low intensity range. Sequence analysis showed that reporters that disappeared after amplification had a GC-content of 53.7+/-4.0%, while reporters called present in biopsy- and whole LV-samples had an average GC content of 47.8+/-5.5% (P Conclusion This study establishes that the gene expression profile obtained after amplification of mRNA of left ventricular biopsies is representative for the whole left ventricle of the rat heart. However, specific gene transcripts present in parental tissues were undetectable in the minute left

  2. Circularly permuted tRNA genes: their expression and implications for their physiological relevance and development.

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    Akiko eSoma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of genome analyses and searches using programs that focus on the RNA-specific bulge-helix-bulge (BHB motif have uncovered a wide variety of disrupted tRNA genes. The results of these analyses have shown that genetic information encoding functional RNAs is described in the genome cryptically and is retrieved using various strategies. One such strategy is represented by circularly permuted tRNA genes, in which the sequences encoding the 5′-half and 3′-half of the specific tRNA are separated and inverted on the genome. Biochemical analyses have defined a processing pathway in which the termini of tRNA precursors (pre-tRNAs are ligated to form a characteristic circular RNA intermediate, which is then cleaved at the acceptor-stem to generate the typical cloverleaf structure with functional termini. The sequences adjacent to the processing site located between the 3′-half and the 5′-half of pre-tRNAs potentially form a BHB motif, which is the dominant recognition site for the tRNA-intron splicing endonuclease, suggesting that circularization of pre-tRNAs depends on the splicing machinery. Some permuted tRNAs contain a BHB-mediated intron in their 5′- or 3′-half, meaning that removal of an intron, as well as swapping of the 5′- and 3′-halves, are required during maturation of their pre-tRNAs. To date, 34 permuted tRNA genes have been identified from six species of unicellular algae and one archaeon. Although their physiological significance and mechanism of development remain unclear, the splicing system of BHB motifs seems to have played a key role in the formation of permuted tRNA genes. In this review, current knowledge of circularly permuted tRNA genes is presented and some unanswered questions regarding these species are discussed.

  3. Relevance of vitamin D receptor target genes for monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of primary human cells.

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    Maja Vukić

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has transcriptome- and genome-wide effects and activates, via the binding of its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR, several hundred target genes. Using samples from a 5-month vitamin D3 intervention study (VitDmet, we recently reported that the expression of 12 VDR target genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs as well as 12 biochemical and clinical parameters of the study participants are significantly triggered by vitamin D3. In this study, we performed a more focused selection of further 12 VDR target genes and demonstrated that changes of their mRNA expression in PBMCs of VitDmet subjects significantly correlate with alterations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels. Network and self-organizing map analysis of these datasets together with that of the other 24 parameters was followed by relevance calculations and identified changes in parathyroid hormone serum levels and the expression of the newly selected genes STS, BCL6, ITGAM, LRRC25, LPGAT1 and TREM1 as well as of the previously reported genes DUSP10 and CD14 as the most relevant parameters for describing vitamin D responsiveness in vivo. Moreover, parameter relevance ranking allowed the segregation of study subjects into high and low responders. Due to the long intervention period the vitamin D response was not too prominent on the level of transcriptional activation. Therefore, we performed in the separate VitDbol trial a short-term but high dose stimulation with a vitamin D3 bolus. In PBMCs of VitDbol subjects we observed direct transcriptional effects on the selected VDR target genes, such as an up to 2.1-fold increase already one day after supplementation onset. In conclusion, both long-term and short-term vitamin D3 supplementation studies allow monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of human individuals and represent new types of human in vivo vitamin D3 investigations.

  4. CERTIFICATELESS SIGNATURE AND BLIND SIGNATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Zhang Futai

    2008-01-01

    Certificateless public key cryptography is a new paradigm introduced by AI-Riyami and Paterson. It eliminates the need of the certificates in traditional public key cryptosystems and the key escrow problem in IDentity-based Public Key Cryptography (ID-PKC). Due to the advantages of the certificateless public key cryptography,a new efficient certificateless pairing-based signature scheme is presented,which has some advantages over previous constructions in computational cost. Based on this new signature scheme,a certificateless blind signature scheme is proposed. The security of our schemes is proven based on the hardness of computational Diffie-Hellman problem.

  5. Expression of CXCL6 and BBS5 that may be glaucoma relevant genes is regulated by PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzeni, Hamidreza; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Yazdani, Shahin; Elahi, Elahe

    2016-11-15

    The transcription factor PITX2 is implicated in glaucoma pathology. In an earlier study we had used microarray analysis to identify genes in the trabecular meshwork (TM) that are affected by knock down of PITX2. Here, those studies were pursued to identify genes that are direct targets of PITX2 and that may be relevant to glaucoma. Initially, bioinformatics tools were used to select among the genes that had been affected by PITX2 knock down those that have PITX2 binding sites and that may be involved in glaucoma related functions. Subsequently, the effect of PITX2 was tested using the dual luciferase assay in four cell cultures including two primary TM cultures co-transfected with vectors containing promoter fragments of six candidate genes upstream of a luciferase gene and a vector that expressed PITX2. Finally, the effect of PITX2 on endogenous expression of two genes was assessed by over expression and knock down of PITX2 in TM cells. Thirty four genes were found to contain PITX2 binding sites in their putative promoter regions, and 16 were found to be associated with TM-specific and/or glaucoma associated functions. Results of dual luciferase assays confirmed that two of six genes tested were directly targeted by PITX2. The two genes were CXCL6 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 6) and BBS5 (Bardet-Biedl syndrome 5). Over expression and knock down of PITX2 showed that this transcription factor affects endogenous expression of these two genes in TM cells. CXCL6 encodes a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and many studies have suggested that cytokines and other immune system functions are involved in glaucoma pathogenesis. BBS5 is a member of the BBS family of genes that affect ciliary functions, and ciliary bodies in the anterior chamber of the eye produce the aqueous fluid that affects intraocular pressure. Immune related functions and intraocular pressure are both important components of glaucoma pathology. The role of PITX2 in glaucoma may be mediated partly by

  6. Gene expression profiling to identify potentially relevant disease outcomes and support human health risk assessment for carbon black nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Moffat, Ivy; White, Paul A; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-07

    New approaches are urgently needed to evaluate potential hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials. Gene expression profiling provides information on potential modes of action and human relevance, and tools have recently become available for pathway-based quantitative risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use toxicogenomics in the context of human health risk assessment. We explore the utility of toxicogenomics in risk assessment, using published gene expression data from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 18, 54 and 162 μg Printex 90 carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP). Analysis of CBNP-perturbed pathways, networks and transcription factors revealed concomitant changes in predicted phenotypes (e.g., pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity), that correlated with dose and time. Benchmark doses (BMDs) for apical endpoints were comparable to minimum BMDs for relevant pathway-specific expression changes. Comparison to inflammatory lung disease models (i.e., allergic airway inflammation, bacterial infection and tissue injury and fibrosis) and human disease profiles revealed that induced gene expression changes in Printex 90 exposed mice were similar to those typical for pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Very similar fibrotic pathways were perturbed in CBNP-exposed mice and human fibrosis disease models. Our synthesis demonstrates how toxicogenomic profiles may be used in human health risk assessment of nanoparticles and constitutes an important step forward in the ultimate recognition of toxicogenomic endpoints in human health risk. As our knowledge of molecular pathways, dose-response characteristics and relevance to human disease continues to grow, we anticipate that toxicogenomics will become increasingly useful in assessing chemical toxicities and in human health risk assessment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymorphism in ion channel genes of Dirofilaria immitis: Relevant knowledge for future anthelmintic drug design

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    Thangadurai Mani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria immitis, a filarial parasite, causes cardiopulmonary dirofilariasis in dogs, cats and wild canids. The macrocyclic lactone (ML class of drugs has been used to prevent heartworm infection. There is confirmed ML resistance in D. immitis and thus there is an urgent need to find new anthelmintics that could prevent and/or control the disease. Targeting ion channels of D. immitis for drug design has obvious advantages. These channels, present in the nematode nervous system, control movement, feeding, mating and respond to environmental cues which are necessary for survival of the parasite. Any new drug that targets these ion channels is likely to have a motility phenotype and should act to clear the worms from the host. Many of the successful anthelmintics in the past have targeted these ion channels and receptors. Knowledge about genetic variability of the ion channel and receptor genes should be useful information for drug design as receptor polymorphism may affect responses to a drug. Such information may also be useful for anticipation of possible resistance development. A total of 224 ion channel genes/subunits have been identified in the genome of D. immitis. Whole genome sequencing data of parasites from eight different geographical locations, four from ML-susceptible populations and the other four from ML-loss of efficacy (LOE populations, were used for polymorphism analysis. We identified 1762 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP sites (1508 intronic and 126 exonic in these 224 ion channel genes/subunits with an overall polymorphic rate of 0.18%. Of the SNPs found in the exon regions, 129 of them caused a non-synonymous type of polymorphism. Fourteen of the exonic SNPs caused a change in predicted secondary structure. A few of the SNPs identified may have an effect on gene expression, function of the protein and resistance selection processes.

  8. Relevance Study on Cerebral Infarction and Resistin Gene Polymorphism in Chinese Han Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aijuan; Cai, Gaoyu; Fu, Ningzhen; Feng, Yulan; Sun, Jialan; Maimaiti, Yiming; Zhou, Weijun; Fu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on genome-wide associations has implicated that the serum resistin level and its gene polymorphism are associated with cerebral infarction (CI) morbidity and prognosis, and could thereby regulate CI. This study aimed to investigate the association between the resistin single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the susceptibility to CI in the Chinese Han population. A total of 550 CI patients and 313 healthy controls were genotyped. Nine SNPs of the resistin gene previously shown were sequenced and assessed for an association with CI. The numbers of GG genotype carriers of rs3219175 and rs3486119 in the CI group were significantly higher than those in the control group among the middle-aged group (aged 45-65), at 76% vs 67.9% (P=0.025) and 75.5% vs 67.9% (P=0.031). rs3219175 and rs34861192 were associated with CI in the dominant and superdominant models according to the genetic model analysis (P<0.05). Meanwhile, there was strong linkage disequilibrium among the rs34124816, rs3219175, rs34861192, rs1862513, rs3745367, 180C/G and rs3745369 sites. In a haplotype analysis, the occurrence rate of the haplotype AGGCAGC was 1.97 times (P<0.05) higher in the patient group than in the control group. In addition, the numbers of GG genotype carriers of rs3219175 and rs3486119 in the middle-aged male CI patients and the middle-aged small artery occlusion (SAO) CI patients were higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). In the Chinese Han middle-aged population, the GG gene type carriers of the resistin gene sites rs3219175 and rs34861192 had a high risk for CI onset, especially in middle-aged male patients and SAO CI in all middle-aged patients. PMID:27699082

  9. Pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus and its clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈占国

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the accuracy and clinical application of pyrosequencing for detection of drug resistant relevant mutation in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus(HBV).Methods Compared with Sanger sequencing,the accuracy and sensitivity of pyrosequencing were assessed.Pyrosequencing was used to determine the serum of 1 164 patients with chronic Hepatitis B and its re-sults were analyzed.Results The sensitivity of pyrosequencing was 1×103KIU/L,the same as Sanger sequencing.But

  10. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew E.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Coles, Victoria J.; Crump, Byron C.; Doherty, Mary; Foster, Rachel A.; Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga R.; Hood, Raleigh R.; McCrow, John P.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Satinsky, Brandon M.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Yager, Patricia L.; Paul, John H.

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon River has the largest discharge of all rivers on Earth, and its complex plume system fuels a wide array of biogeochemical processes, across a large area of the western tropical North Atlantic. The plume thus stimulates microbial processes affecting carbon sequestration and nutrient cycles at a global scale. Chromosomal gene expression patterns of the 2.0 to 156 μm size-fraction eukaryotic microbial community were investigated in the Amazon River Plume, generating a robust dataset (more than 100 million mRNA sequences) that depicts the metabolic capabilities and interactions among the eukaryotic microbes. Combining classical oceanographic field measurements with metatranscriptomics yielded characterization of the hydrographic conditions simultaneous with a quantification of transcriptional activity and identity of the community. We highlight the patterns of eukaryotic gene expression for 31 biogeochemically significant gene targets hypothesized to be valuable within forecasting models. An advantage to this targeted approach is that the database of reference sequences used to identify the target genes was selectively constructed and highly curated optimizing taxonomic coverage, throughput, and the accuracy of annotations. A coastal diatom bloom highly expressed nitrate transporters and carbonic anhydrase presumably to support high growth rates and enhance uptake of low levels of dissolved nitrate and CO2. Diatom-diazotroph association (DDA: diatoms with nitrogen fixing symbionts) blooms were common when surface salinity was mesohaline and dissolved nitrate concentrations were below detection, and hence did not show evidence of nitrate utilization, suggesting they relied on ammonium transporters to aquire recently fixed nitrogen. These DDA blooms in the outer plume had rapid turnover of the photosystem D1 protein presumably caused by photodegradation under increased light penetration in clearer waters, and increased expression of silicon transporters as

  11. Experimentally-derived fibroblast gene signatures identify molecular pathways associated with distinct subsets of systemic sclerosis patients in three independent cohorts.

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    Michael E Johnson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc has identified four 'intrinsic' subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like, each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFNα signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGFβ signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-κB. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGFβ and TNFα. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFNα is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGFβ signaling.

  12. Gene overexpression and biochemical characterization of the biotechnologically relevant chlorogenic acid hydrolase from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Asther, Michèle; Bourne, Yves; Navarro, David; Canaan, Stéphane; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Herweijer, Marga; Coutinho, Pedro M; Asther, Marcel; Record, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The full-length gene that encodes the chlorogenic acid hydrolase from Aspergillus niger CIRM BRFM 131 was cloned by PCR based on the genome of the strain A. niger CBS 513.88. The complete gene consists of 1,715 bp and codes for a deduced protein of 512 amino acids with a molecular mass of 55,264 Da and an acidic pI of 4.6. The gene was successfully cloned and overexpressed in A. niger to yield 1.25 g liter(-1), i.e., 330-fold higher than the production of wild-type strain A. niger CIRM BRFM131. The histidine-tagged recombinant ChlE protein was purified to homogeneity via a single chromatography step, and its main biochemical properties were characterized. The molecular size of the protein checked by mass spectroscopy was 74,553 Da, suggesting the presence of glycosylation. ChlE is assembled in a tetrameric form with several acidic isoforms with pIs of around 4.55 and 5.2. Other characteristics, such as optimal pH and temperature, were found to be similar to those determined for the previously characterized chlorogenic acid hydrolase of A. niger CIRM BRFM 131. However, there was a significant temperature stability difference in favor of the recombinant protein. ChlE exhibits a catalytic efficiency of 12.5 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) toward chlorogenic acid (CGA), and its ability to release caffeic acid from CGA present in agricultural by-products such as apple marc and coffee pulp was clearly demonstrated, confirming the high potential of this enzyme.

  13. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-02-15

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK's effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  14. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function. PMID:28212278

  15. Characterization of the miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy transcriptome and development of immune-relevant genes and molecular markers.

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    Rongbo Che

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy is an important species of marine fish that supports capture fisheries and aquaculture. At present commercial scale aquaculture of this species is limited due to diseases caused by pathogens and parasites which restrict production and limit commercial value. The lack of transcriptomic and genomic information for the miiuy croaker limits the ability of researchers to study the pathogenesis and immune system of this species. In this study we constructed a cDNA library from liver, spleen and kidney which was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing to enable gene discovery and molecular marker development. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our study, a total of 69,071 unigenes with an average length of 572 bp were obtained. Of these, 45,676 (66.13% were successfully annotated in public databases. The unigenes were also annotated with Gene Ontology, Clusters of Orthologous Groups and KEGG pathways. Additionally, 498 immune-relevant genes were identified and classified. Furthermore, 14,885 putative simple sequence repeats (cSSRs and 8,510 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified from the 69,071 unigenes. CONCLUSION: The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy transcriptome data provides a large resource to identify new genes involved in many processes including those involved in the response to pathogens and diseases. Furthermore, the thousands of potential cSSR and SNP markers found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of molecular marker assisted breeding programs for the miiuy croaker.

  16. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

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    Loren Pickart

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue, increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  17. Immunoregulatory network and cancer-associated genes: molecular links and relevance to aging

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    Robi Tacutu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Although different aspects of cancer immunity are a subject of intensive investigation, an integrative view on the possible molecular links between immunoregulators and cancer-associated genes has not yet been fully considered. In an attempt to get more insights on the problem, we analyzed these links from a network perspective. We showed that the immunoregulators could be organized into a miRNA-regulated PPI network-the immunoregulatory network. This network has numerous links with cancer, including (i cancerassociated immunoregulators, (ii direct and indirect protein-protein interactions (through the common protein partners, and (iii common miRNAs. These links may largely determine the interactions between the host's immunity and cancer, supporting the possibility for co-expression and post-transcriptional co-regulation of immunoregulatory and cancer genes. In addition, the connection between immunoregulation and cancer may lie within the realm of cancer-predisposing conditions, such as chronic inflammation and fibroproliferative repair. A gradual, age-related deterioration of the integrity and functionality of the immunoregulaory network could contribute to impaired immunity and generation of cancer-predisposing conditions.

  18. Digital Gene Expression Analysis to Screen Disease Resistance-Relevant Genes from Leaves of Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. Infected by Botrytis cinerea.

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    Saijie Gong

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. is a well-known traditional flower in China and is widely used for landscaping and garden greening due to its high ornamental value. However, disease spots usually appear after the flowering of the plant and may result in the withering of the plant in severe cases. This study examined the disease incidence in an herbaceous peony field in the Yangzhou region, Jiangsu Province. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, the disease in this area was identified as a gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Based on previously obtained transcriptome data, eight libraries generated from two herbaceous peony cultivars 'Zifengyu' and 'Dafugui' with different susceptibilities to the disease were then analyzed using digital gene expression profiling (DGE. Thousands of differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by comparing the eight samples, and these genes were annotated using the Gene ontology (GO and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG database. The pathways related to plant-pathogen interaction, secondary metabolism synthesis and antioxidant system were concentrated, and 51, 76, and 13 disease resistance-relevant candidate genes were identified, respectively. The expression patterns of these candidate genes differed between the two cultivars: their expression of the disease-resistant cultivar 'Zifengyu' sharply increased during the early stages of infection, while it was relatively subdued in the disease-sensitive cultivar 'Dafugui'. A selection of ten candidate genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR to validate the DGE data. These results revealed the transcriptional changes that took place during the interaction of herbaceous peony with B. cinerea, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of host resistance to gray mold.

  19. Significance analysis of prognostic signatures.

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    Andrew H Beck

    Full Text Available A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that "random" gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically

  20. Do genes and environment meet to regulate cerebrospinal fluid dynamics? Relevance for schizophrenia.

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    Joana A Palha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopment disorder in which the interplay of genes and environment contributes to disease onset and establishment. The most consistent pathological feature in schizophrenic patients is an enlargement of the brain ventricles. Yet, so far, no study has related this finding with dysfunction of the choroid plexus, the epithelial cell monolayer located within the brain ventricles that is responsible for the production of most of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Enlarged brain ventricles are already present at the time of disease onset (young adulthood and, of notice, isolated mild ventriculomegaly detected in utero is associated with subsequent mild neurodevelopmental abnormalities similar to those observed in children at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Here we propose that an altered choroid plexus/CSF dynamics during neurodevelopment may be considered as a risk, causative and/or participating-key factor for development of schizophrenia.

  1. How the FMR1 gene became relevant to female fertility and reproductive medicine

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    Norbert eGleicher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the 6-year evolution of our center’s research into ovarian functions of the FMR1 gene, which led to the identification of a new normal CGGn range of 26-34. This new normal range, in turn, led to definitions of different alleles (haplotypes based on whether no, one or both alleles are within range. Specific alleles then were demonstrated to represent distinct ovarian aging patterns, suggesting an important FMR1 function in follicle recruitment and ovarian depletion of follicles. So called low alleles, characterized by CGGn34 alleles. Because low FMR1 alleles present in approximately 25% of all females, FMR1 testing at young ages may offer an opportunity for earlier diagnosis of OPOI than current practice allows. Earlier diagnosis of OPOI, in turn, would give young women the options of reassessing their reproductive schedules and/or pursue fertility preservation via oocyte cryopreservation when most effective.

  2. PAMP INDUCED EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE RELEVANT GENES IN HEAD KIDNEY LEUKOCYTES OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Kania, Per Walter

    Host immune responses elicited by invading pathogens depend on recognition of the pathogen by specific receptors present on phagocytic cells. However, the response to viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal pathogens vary according to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the surface...... of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus...... moderate reactions. In contrast, IFN-¿ expression was significantly higher in the poly I:C stimulated group compared to LPS group. When head kidney cells were exposed to zymosan or ß-glucan, genes encoding IL-1ß, TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-10 became up-regulated. Their level of up-regulation was comparable to LPS...

  3. Elucidation of Relevant Neuroinflammation Mechanisms Using Gene Expression Profiling in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Chul; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Do-Young; Kim, Myung-Sun; Yu, Ji Hea; Seo, Jung Hwa; Kim, MinGi; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kang, Seong-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by damage of motor neurons. Recent reports indicate that inflammatory responses occurring within the central nervous system contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. We aimed to investigate disease-specific gene expression associated with neuroinflammation by conducting transcriptome analysis on fibroblasts from three patients with sporadic ALS and three normal controls. Several pathways were found to be upregulated in patients with ALS, among which the toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling pathways are related to the immune response. Genes—toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP), mitogen-activated protein kinase 9 (MAPK9), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1)—related to these two pathways were validated using western blotting. This study validated the genes that are associated with TLR and NLR signaling pathways from different types of patient-derived cells. Not only fibroblasts but also induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural rosettes from the same origins showed similar expression patterns. Furthermore, expression of TOLLIP, a regulator of TLR signaling pathway, decreased with cellular aging as judged by changes in its expression through multiple passages. TOLLIP expression was downregulated in ALS cells under conditions of inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. Our data suggest that the TLR and NLR signaling pathways are involved in pathological innate immunity and neuroinflammation associated with ALS and that TOLLIP, MAPK9, IL-1β, IL-8, and CXCL1 play a role in ALS-specific immune responses. Moreover, changes of TOLLIP expression might be associated with progression of ALS. PMID:27812125

  4. MGMT-independent temozolomide resistance in pediatric glioblastoma cells associated with a PI3-kinase-mediated HOX/stem cell gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Nathalie; Marshall, Lynley; Perryman, Lara; Bax, Dorine A; Little, Suzanne E; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Sharp, Swee Y; Vassal, Gilles; Pearson, Andrew D J; Reis, Rui M; Hargrave, Darren; Workman, Paul; Jones, Chris

    2010-11-15

    Sensitivity to temozolomide is restricted to a subset of glioblastoma patients, with the major determinant of resistance being a lack of promoter methylation of the gene encoding the repair protein DNA methyltransferase MGMT, although other mechanisms are thought to be active. There are, however, limited preclinical data in model systems derived from pediatric glioma patients. We screened a series of cell lines for temozolomide efficacy in vitro, and investigated the differential mechanisms of resistance involved. In the majority of cell lines, a lack of MGMT promoter methylation and subsequent protein overexpression were linked to temozolomide resistance. An exception was the pediatric glioblastoma line KNS42. Expression profiling data revealed a coordinated upregulation of HOX gene expression in resistant lines, especially KNS42, which was reversed by phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway inhibition. High levels of HOXA9/HOXA10 gene expression were associated with a shorter survival in pediatric high-grade glioma patient samples. Combination treatment in vitro of pathway inhibition and temozolomide resulted in a highly synergistic interaction in KNS42 cells. The resistance gene signature further included contiguous genes within the 12q13-q14 amplicon, including the Akt enhancer PIKE, significantly overexpressed in the KNS42 line. These cells were also highly enriched for CD133 and other stem cell markers. We have thus shown an in vitro link between phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated HOXA9/HOXA10 expression, and a drug-resistant, progenitor cell phenotype in MGMT-independent pediatric glioblastoma.

  5. Comparative genomics study of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA and ectoine relevant genes from Halomonas sp. TD01 revealed extensive horizontal gene transfer events and co-evolutionary relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halophilic bacteria have shown their significance in industrial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA and are gaining more attention for genetic engineering modification. Yet, little information on the genomics and PHA related genes from halophilic bacteria have been disclosed so far. Results The draft genome of moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas sp. TD01, a strain of great potential for industrial production of short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA, was analyzed through computational methods to reveal the osmoregulation mechanism and the evolutionary relationship of the enzymes relevant to PHA and ectoine syntheses. Genes involved in the metabolism of PHA and osmolytes were annotated and studied in silico. Although PHA synthase, depolymerase, regulator/repressor and phasin were all involved in PHA metabolic pathways, they demonstrated different horizontal gene transfer (HGT events between the genomes of different strains. In contrast, co-occurrence of ectoine genes in the same genome was more frequently observed, and ectoine genes were more likely under coincidental horizontal gene transfer than PHA related genes. In addition, the adjacent organization of the homologues of PHA synthase phaC1 and PHA granule binding protein phaP was conserved in the strain TD01, which was also observed in some halophiles and non-halophiles exclusively from γ-proteobacteria. In contrast to haloarchaea, the proteome of Halomonas sp. TD01 did not show obvious inclination towards acidity relative to non-halophilic Escherichia coli MG1655, which signified that Halomonas sp. TD01 preferred the accumulation of organic osmolytes to ions in order to balance the intracellular osmotic pressure with the environment. Conclusions The accessibility of genome information would facilitate research on the genetic engineering of halophilic bacteria including Halomonas sp. TD01.

  6. Understanding the Dynamics of Gene Regulatory Systems; Characterisation and Clinical Relevance of cis-Regulatory Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Cowie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern genetic analysis has shown that most polymorphisms associated with human disease are non-coding. Much of the functional information contained in the non-coding genome consists of cis-regulatory sequences (CRSs that are required to respond to signal transduction cues that direct cell specific gene expression. It has been hypothesised that many diseases may be due to polymorphisms within CRSs that alter their responses to signal transduction cues. However, identification of CRSs, and the effects of allelic variation on their ability to respond to signal transduction cues, is still at an early stage. In the current review we describe the use of comparative genomics and experimental techniques that allow for the identification of CRSs building on recent advances by the ENCODE consortium. In addition we describe techniques that allow for the analysis of the effects of allelic variation and epigenetic modification on CRS responses to signal transduction cues. Using specific examples we show that the interactions driving these elements are highly complex and the effects of disease associated polymorphisms often subtle. It is clear that gaining an understanding of the functions of CRSs, and how they are affected by SNPs and epigenetic modification, is essential to understanding the genetic basis of human disease and stratification whilst providing novel directions for the development of personalised medicine.

  7. Growth and expression of relevant metabolic genes of Clostridium thermocellum cultured on lignocellulosic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Vanessa O; Noronha, Eliane F; Camargo, Brenda R; Hamann, Pedro R V; Steindorff, Andrei S; Quirino, Betania F; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Felix, Carlos R

    2017-06-01

    The plant cell wall is a source of fermentable sugars in second-generation bioethanol production. However, cellulosic biomass hydrolysis remains an obstacle to bioethanol production in an efficient and low-cost process. Clostridium thermocellum has been studied as a model organism able to produce enzymatic blends that efficiently degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and also as a fermentative microorganism in a consolidated process for the conversion of lignocellulose to bioethanol. In this study, a C. thermocellum strain (designated B8) isolated from goat rumen was characterized for its ability to grow on sugarcane straw and cotton waste, and to produce cellulosomes. We also evaluated C. thermocellum gene expression control in the presence of complex lignocellulosic biomasses. This isolate is capable of growing in the presence of microcrystalline cellulose, sugarcane straw and cotton waste as carbon sources, producing free enzymes and residual substrate-bound proteins (RSBP). The highest growth rate and cellulase/xylanase production were detected at pH 7.0 and 60 °C, after 48 h. Moreover, this strain showed different expression levels of transcripts encoding cellulosomal proteins and proteins with a role in fermentation and catabolic repression.

  8. PAMP induced expression of immune relevant genes in head kidney leukocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Raida, Martin Kristian; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Host immune responses elicited by invading pathogens depend on recognition of the pathogen by specific receptors present on phagocytic cells. However, the reactions to viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal pathogens vary according to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the surf......Host immune responses elicited by invading pathogens depend on recognition of the pathogen by specific receptors present on phagocytic cells. However, the reactions to viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal pathogens vary according to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs......) on the surface of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout...... merely moderate reactions. In contrast, IFN-¿ expression was significantly higher in the poly I:C stimulated group compared to the LPS group. When head kidney cells were exposed to zymosan or ß-glucan, genes encoding IL-1ß, TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-10 became up-regulated. Their level of up...

  9. Transcriptional profiling of whole blood identifies a unique 5-gene signature for myelofibrosis and imminent myelofibrosis transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Stauffer Larsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    selectively and highly deregulated in myelofibrosis patients. Gene expression microarray studies have been performed on whole blood from 69 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Amongst the top-20 of the most upregulated genes in PMF compared to controls, we identified 5 genes (DEFA4, ELA2, OLFM4, CTSG...

  10. A metagenome for lacustrine Cladophora (Cladophorales) reveals remarkable diversity of eukaryotic epibionts and genes relevant to materials cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Linda E; Knack, Jennifer J; Graham, Melissa E; Graham, James M; Zulkifly, Shahrizim

    2015-06-01

    Periphyton dominated by the cellulose-rich filamentous green alga Cladophora forms conspicuous growths along rocky marine and freshwater shorelines worldwide, providing habitat for diverse epibionts. Bacterial epibionts have been inferred to display diverse functions of biogeochemical significance: N-fixation and other redox reactions, phosphorus accumulation, and organic degradation. Here, we report taxonomic diversity of eukaryotic and prokaryotic epibionts and diversity of genes associated with materials cycling in a Cladophora metagenome sampled from Lake Mendota, Dane Co., WI, USA, during the growing season of 2012. A total of 1,060 distinct 16S, 173 18S, and 351 28S rRNA operational taxonomic units, from which >220 genera or species of bacteria (~60), protists (~80), fungi (6), and microscopic metazoa (~80), were distinguished with the use of reference databases. We inferred the presence of several algal taxa generally associated with marine systems and detected Jaoa, a freshwater periphytic ulvophyte previously thought endemic to China. We identified six distinct nifH gene sequences marking nitrogen fixation, >25 bacterial and eukaryotic cellulases relevant to sedimentary C-cycling and technological applications, and genes encoding enzymes in aerobic and anaerobic pathways for vitamin B12 biosynthesis. These results emphasize the importance of Cladophora in providing habitat for microscopic metazoa, fungi, protists, and bacteria that are often inconspicuous, yet play important roles in ecosystem biogeochemistry.

  11. Identification of a novel gene signature of ES cells self-renewal fluctuation through system-wide analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cerulo

    Full Text Available Embryonic Stem cells (ESCs can be differentiated into ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives, producing the majority of cell types. In regular culture conditions, ESCs' self-renewal is maintained through molecules that inhibit spontaneous differentiation enabling long-term cellular expansion. This undifferentiating condition is characterized by multiple metastable states that fluctuate between self-renewal and differentiation balance. Here, we aim to characterize the high-pluripotent ESC metastate marked by the expression of Zscan4 through a supervised machine learning framework based on an ensemble of support vector machine (SVM classifiers. Our study revealed a leukaemia inhibitor factor (Lif dependent not-canonical pluripotency signature (AF067063, BC061212, Dub1, Eif1a, Gm12794, Gm13871, Gm4340, Gm4850, Tcstv1/3, and Zfp352, that specifically marks Zscan4 ESCs' fluctuation. This novel ESC metastate is enhanced by high-pluripotency culture conditions obtained through Extracellular signal Regulated-Kinase (ERK and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (Gsk-3 signaling inhibition (2i. Significantly, we reported that the conditional ablation of the novel ESC metastate marked by the expression of Gm12794 is required for ESCs self-renewal maintenance. In conclusion, we extend the comprehension of ESCs biology through the identification of a novel molecular signature associated to pluripotency programming.

  12. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Pont

    Full Text Available Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers.

  13. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed.

  14. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, M J; Honders, M W; Kremer, A N; van Kooten, C; Out, C; Hiemstra, P S; de Boer, H C; Jager, M J; Schmelzer, E; Vries, R G; Al Hinai, A S; Kroes, W G; Monajemi, R; Goeman, J J; Böhringer, S; Marijt, W A F; Falkenburg, J H F; Griffioen, M

    2016-01-01

    Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage)-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers.

  15. Analysis of Gene Expression Signatures for Osteogenic 3D Perfusion-Bioreactor Cell Cultures Based on a Multifactorial DoE Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Papantoniou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of multifactorial design of experiments (DoE in tissue engineering bioprocess development will contribute to the robust manufacturing of tissue engineered constructs by linking their quality characteristics to bioprocess operating parameters. In this work, perfusion bioreactors were used for the in vitro culture and osteogenic differentiation of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs seeded on three-dimensional titanium (Ti alloy scaffolds. A CaP-supplemented medium was used to induce differentiation of the cultured hPDCs. A two-level, three-factor fractional factorial design was employed to evaluate a range of bioreactor operating conditions by changing the levels of the following parameters: flow rate (0.5–2 mL/min, cell culture duration (7–21 days and cell seeding density (1.5 × 103–3 × 103 cells/cm2. This approach allowed for evaluating the individual impact of the aforementioned process parameters upon a range of genes that are related to the osteogenic lineage, such as collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, osterix, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Furthermore, by overlaying gene-specific response surfaces, an integrated operating process space was highlighted within which predetermined values of the six genes of interest (i.e., gene signature could be minimally met over the course of the bioreactor culture time.

  16. Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia Species to Genus Level by 16S rRNA Gene PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Frederic J.; Provost, Frederique; Boiron, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Two regions of the gene coding for 16S rRNA in Nocardia species were selected as genus-specific primer sequences for a PCR assay. The PCR protocol was tested with 60 strains of clinically relevant Nocardia isolates and type strains. It gave positive results for all strains tested. Conversely, the PCR assay was negative for all tested species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Dietzia, Gordona, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella. Besides, unlike the latter group of isolates, all Nocardia strains exhibited one MlnI recognition site but no SacI restriction site. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to chemotaxonomic methods for the identification of Nocardia spp. isolated from pathogenic samples. PMID:9854071

  17. Expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in differentgrades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore and analyze expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in different grades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues. Methods: 52 cases of patients with brain glioma treated in our hospital from December 2013 to December 2014, and 50 cases of normal brain-tissue patients with intracranial hypertension were selected, and proceeding test to the surgical resection of brain tissue of the above patients to determine its MGMT and XRCC1 protein content, sequentially to record the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 of both groups. Grading of tumors to brain glioma after operation was carried out, and the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in brain tissues of different patients was analyzed and compared;finally the contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1and MGMT. Results:Positive rate of MGMT expression in normal brain tissue was 2%,while positive rate of MGMT expression in brain glioma was 46.2%,which was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues (χ2=26.85, P0.05), which had no statistical significance. There were 12 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was positive and XRCC1 protein expression was positive; there were 18 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was negative and XRCC1 protein expression was negative. Contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1 and MGMT, which indicated that the expression of XRCCI and MGMT in brain glioma had no correlation (r=0.9%, P=0.353), relevancy of both was r=0.9%. Conclusions: Positive rate of the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 in brain glioma was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues, but the distribution of different grades of brain glioma had no obvious difference, and MGMT and XRCC1 expression had no obvious correlation, which needed further research.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Bacterium Moritella sp. JT01 and Identification of Biotechnologically Relevant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Robert Cardoso de; Odisi, Estácio Jussie; Kato, Chiaki; da Silva, Marcus Adonai Castro; Lima, André Oliveira de Souza

    2017-07-22

    Deep-sea bacteria can produce various biotechnologically relevant enzymes due to their adaptations to high pressures and low temperatures. To identify such enzymes, we have sequenced the genome of the polycaprolactone-degrading bacterium Moritella sp. JT01, isolated from sediment samples from Japan Trench (6957 m depth), using a Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencer (12.1 million paired-end reads) and CLC Genomics Workbench (version 6.5.1) for the assembly, resulting in a 4.83-Mb genome (42 scaffolds). The genome was annotated using Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST), Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine V 2.0 (PHYRE2), and BLAST2Go, revealing 4439 protein coding sequences and 101 RNAs. Gene products with industrial relevance, such as lipases (three) and esterases (four), were identified and are related to bacterium's ability to degrade polycaprolactone. The annotation revealed proteins related to deep-sea survival, such as cold-shock proteins (six) and desaturases (three). The presence of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters suggests that this bacterium could produce nonribosomal peptides, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and bacteriocins. To demonstrate the potential of this genome, a lipase was cloned an introduced into Escherichia coli. The lipase was purified and characterized, showing activity over a wide temperature range (over 50% at 20-60 °C) and pH range (over 80% at pH 6.3 to 9). This enzyme has tolerance to the surfactant action of sodium dodecyl sulfate and shows 30% increased activity when subjected to a working pressure of 200 MPa. The genomic characterization of Moritella sp. JT01 reveals traits associated with survival in the deep-sea and their potential uses in biotechnology, as exemplified by the characterized lipase.

  19. Physiological responses and gene expression changes in the western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) exposed to progesterone at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liping; Xu, Hongyan; Ying, Guangguo; Yang, Yang; Shu, Hu; Zhao, Jianliang; Cheng, Xuemei

    2017-09-14

    Progesterone (P4) is a natural and synthetic steroid, widely distributed in the aquatic environments. It can lead to adverse effects on the endocrine system in aquatic organisms. This study investigated the toxicological effects of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations (4, 44, and 410ng/L) of progesterone for 42 d on adult female mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis. We performed morphological and histological analyses on gonads, anal fins, liver, and gills after the exposure of mosquito fish to P4. The expression levels of genes (vtg, er, and ar isoforms) related to fish reproduction and detoxification (cyp1a) in the liver were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the progesterone exposure induced slight masculinization in female mosquitofish, influenced the oocyte maturation as revealed by histology of the ovaries, and caused severe damages to the liver and gills of adult female mosquitofish. It also suppressed the mRNAs expression of vtg, er, cyp1a, and significantly enhanced the expression of ar mRNA in the liver. This study reveals the molecular and physiological effects of progesterone at environmentally relevant concentrations, which might further be translated to alterations in the reproduction of mosquitofish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Classification of signature-only signature models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO ZhengJun; LIU MuLan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a set of criterions for classifying signature-only signature models. By the criterions, we classify signature models into 5 basic types and 69 general classes. Theoretically, 21141 kinds of signature models can be derived by appro-priately combining different general classes. The result comprises almost existing signature models. It will be helpful for exploring new signature models. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time for investigation of the problem of classifica-tion of signature-only signature models.

  1. Current smoking-specific gene expression signature in normal bronchial epithelium is enhanced in squamous cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, Mirjam C.; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Geerlings, Marie; de Jong, Wouter K.; te Meerman, Gerard J; Sietsma, Hannie; Timens, Winn; Postma, Dirkje S.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for the development of squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC). However, the smoking-related molecular changes in SCC have not been studied. Gene expression studies in both histologically normal bronchial epithelium and SCC epithelial samples identified genes dif

  2. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is now well-established that cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor growth and that the cancer gene, c-Myc, plays a critical role in converting cells to CSCs. However, little is known about the genes that are induced and regulated by c-Myc to generate tumors, and, in particular, tumors of the live...

  3. Human imprinted retrogenes exhibit non-canonical imprint chromatin signatures and reside in non-imprinted host genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David; Arnaud, Philippe; Frost, Jennifer M.; Wood, Andrew J.; Cowley, Michael; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Iglesias Platas, Isabel; Camprubi, Cristina; Bourc’his, Deborah; Feil, Robert; Moore, Gudrun E.; Oakey, Rebecca J.

    2011-01-01

    Imprinted retrotransposed genes share a common genomic organization including a promoter-associated differentially methylated region (DMR) and a position within the intron of a multi-exonic ‘host’ gene. In the mouse, at least one transcript of the host gene is also subject to genomic imprinting. Human retrogene orthologues are imprinted and we reveal that human host genes are not imprinted. This coincides with genomic rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution, which increase the separation between the retrogene DMRs and the host genes. To address the mechanisms governing imprinted retrogene expression, histone modifications were assayed at the DMRs. For the mouse retrogenes, the active mark H3K4me2 was associated with the unmethylated paternal allele, while the methylated maternal allele was enriched in repressive marks including H3K9me3 and H4K20me3. Two human retrogenes showed monoallelic enrichment of active, but not of repressive marks suggesting a partial uncoupling of the relationship between DNA methylation and repressive histone methylation, possibly due to the smaller size and lower CpG density of these DMRs. Finally, we show that the genes immediately flanking the host genes in mouse and human are biallelically expressed in a range of tissues, suggesting that these loci are distinct from large imprinted clusters. PMID:21300645

  4. Somatic polyploidy is associated with the upregulation of c-MYC interacting genes and EMT-like signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Anatskaya, Olga V; Giuliani, Alessandro; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Huang, Sui; Salmina, Kristine; Inashkina, Inna; Huna, Anda; Nikolsky, Nikolai N; Vinogradov, Alexander E

    2016-11-15

    The dependence of cancer on overexpressed c-MYC and its predisposition for polyploidy represents a double puzzle. We address this conundrum by cross-species transcription analysis of c-MYC interacting genes in polyploid vs. diploid tissues and cells, including human vs. mouse heart, mouse vs. human liver and purified 4n vs. 2n mouse decidua cells. Gene-by-gene transcriptome comparison and principal component analysis indicated that c-MYC interactants are significantly overrepresented among ploidy-associated genes. Protein interaction networks and gene module analysis revealed that the most upregulated genes relate to growth, stress response, proliferation, stemness and unicellularity, as well as to the pathways of cancer supported by MAPK and RAS coordinated pathways. A surprising feature was the up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) modules embodied by the N-cadherin pathway and EMT regulators from SNAIL and TWIST families. Metabolic pathway analysis also revealed the EMT-linked features, such as global proteome remodeling, oxidative stress, DNA repair and Warburg-like energy metabolism. Genes associated with apoptosis, immunity, energy demand and tumour suppression were mostly down-regulated. Noteworthy, despite the association between polyploidy and ample features of cancer, polyploidy does not trigger it. Possibly it occurs because normal polyploidy does not go that far in embryonalisation and linked genome destabilisation. In general, the analysis of polyploid transcriptome explained the evolutionary relation of c-MYC and polyploidy to cancer.

  5. Genomic signature and toxicogenomics comparison of polycationic gene delivery nanosystems in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Barar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Of the gene delivery systems, non-viral polycationic gene delivery nanosystems have been alternatively exploited as a relatively safe delivery reagents compared to viral vectors. However, little is known about the genomic impacts of these delivery systems in target cells/tissues. In this study, the toxicogenomics and genotoxicity potential of some selected polycationic lipid/polymer based nanostructures (i.e., Oligofectamine® (OF, starburst polyamidoamine Polyfect® (PF and diaminobutane (DAB dendrimers were investigated in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. "nMethods: To study the nature and the ontology of the gene expression changes in A549 cells upon treatment with polycationic nanostructures, MTT assay and microarray gene expression profiling methodology were employed. For microarray analysis, cyanine (Cy3/Cy5 labeled cDNA samples from treated and untreated cells were hybridized on target arrays housing 200 genes. "nResults and major conclusions: The polycationic nanosystems induced significant gene expression changes belonging to different genomic ontologies such as cell defence and apoptosis pathways. These data suggest that polycationic nanosystems can elicit multiple gene expression changes in A549 cells upon their chemical structures and interactions with cellular/subcellular components. Such impacts may interfere with the main goals of the desired genemedicine.

  6. Signatures of functional constraint at aye-aye opsin genes: the potential of adaptive color vision in a nocturnal primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H; Martin, Robert D; Verrelli, Brian C

    2007-09-01

    While color vision perception is thought to be adaptively correlated with foraging efficiency for diurnal mammals, those that forage exclusively at night may not need color vision nor have the capacity for it. Indeed, although the basic condition for mammals is dichromacy, diverse nocturnal mammals have only monochromatic vision, resulting from functional loss of the short-wavelength sensitive opsin gene. However, many nocturnal primates maintain intact two opsin genes and thus have dichromatic capacity. The evolutionary significance of this surprising observation has not yet been elucidated. We used a molecular population genetics approach to test evolutionary hypotheses for the two intact opsin genes of the fully nocturnal aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a highly unusual and endangered Madagascar primate. No evidence of gene degradation in either opsin gene was observed for any of 8 aye-aye individuals examined. Furthermore, levels of nucleotide diversity for opsin gene functional sites were lower than those for 15 neutrally evolving intergenic regions (>25 kb in total), which is consistent with a history of purifying selection on aye-aye opsin genes. The most likely explanation for these findings is that dichromacy is advantageous for aye-ayes despite their nocturnal activity pattern. We speculate that dichromatic nocturnal primates may be able to perceive color while foraging under moonlight conditions, and suggest that behavioral and ecological comparisons among dichromatic and monochromatic nocturnal primates will help to elucidate the specific activities for which color vision perception is advantageous.

  7. Derivation of marker gene signatures from human skin and their use in the interpretation of the transcriptional changes associated with dermatological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Barbara B; Nirmal, Ajit J; Headon, Denis J; Akbar, Arne N; Mabbott, Neil A; Freeman, Tom C

    2017-04-01

    Numerous studies have explored the altered transcriptional landscape associated with skin diseases to understand the nature of these disorders. However, data interpretation represents a significant challenge due to a lack of good maker sets for many of the specialized cell types that make up this tissue, whose composition may fundamentally alter during disease. Here we have sought to derive expression signatures that define the various cell types and structures that make up human skin, and demonstrate how they can be used to aid the interpretation of transcriptomic data derived from this organ. Two large normal skin transcriptomic datasets were identified, one RNA-seq (n = 578), the other microarray (n = 165), quality controlled and subjected separately to network-based analyses to identify clusters of robustly co-expressed genes. The biological significance of these clusters was then assigned using a combination of bioinformatics analyses, literature, and expert review. After cross comparison between analyses, 20 gene signatures were defined. These included expression signatures for hair follicles, glands (sebaceous, sweat, apocrine), keratinocytes, melanocytes, endothelia, muscle, adipocytes, immune cells, and a number of pathway systems. Collectively, we have named this resource SkinSig. SkinSig was then used in the analysis of transcriptomic datasets for 18 skin conditions, providing in-context interpretation of these data. For instance, conventional analysis has shown there to be a decrease in keratinization and fatty metabolism with age; we more accurately define these changes to be due to loss of hair follicles and sebaceous glands. SkinSig also highlighted the over-/under-representation of various cell types in skin diseases, reflecting an influx in immune cells in inflammatory disorders and a relative reduction in other cell types. Overall, our analyses demonstrate the value of this new resource in defining the functional profile of skin cell types and

  8. Huntington’s disease blood and brain show a common gene expression pattern and share an immune signature with Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensman Moss, Davina J.; Flower, Michael D.; Lo, Kitty K.; Miller, James R. C.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; ’t Hoen, Peter A. C.; Stone, Timothy C.; Guinee, Amelia; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Jones, Lesley; Plagnol, Vincent; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Holmans, Peter; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    There is widespread transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington’s disease (HD) brain, but analysis is inevitably limited by advanced disease and postmortem changes. However, mutant HTT is ubiquitously expressed and acts systemically, meaning blood, which is readily available and contains cells that are dysfunctional in HD, could act as a surrogate for brain tissue. We conducted an RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis using whole blood from two HD cohorts, and performed gene set enrichment analysis using public databases and weighted correlation network analysis modules from HD and control brain datasets. We identified dysregulated gene sets in blood that replicated in the independent cohorts, correlated with disease severity, corresponded to the most significantly dysregulated modules in the HD caudate, the most prominently affected brain region, and significantly overlapped with the transcriptional signature of HD myeloid cells. High-throughput sequencing technologies and use of gene sets likely surmounted the limitations of previously inconsistent HD blood expression studies. Our results suggest transcription is disrupted in peripheral cells in HD through mechanisms that parallel those in brain. Immune upregulation in HD overlapped with Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism involving macrophage phagocytosis and microglial synaptic pruning, and raises the potential for shared therapeutic approaches. PMID:28322270

  9. Molecular signatures of trauma-hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury: hemorrhage- and injury-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A; Aris, Virginie; Chu, Hung B; Abungu, Billy; Caputo, Francis J; Galante, Anthony; Xu, DaZhong; Lu, Qi; Colorado, Iriana; Streck, Deanna; Dermody, James; Soteropoulos, Patricia

    2007-09-01

    The etiology of trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS)-induced acute lung injury has been difficult to elucidate because of, at least in part, the inability of in vivo studies to separate the noninjurious pulmonary effects of trauma-hemorrhage from the tissue-injurious ones. To circumvent this in vivo limitation, we used a model of T/HS in which T/HS lung injury was abrogated by dividing the mesenteric lymph duct. In this way, it was possible to separate the pulmonary injurious response from the noninjurious systemic response to T/HS by comparing the pulmonary molecular responses of rats subjected to T/HS, which did and did not develop lung injury, with those of nonshocked rats. Using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and treatment group comparisons of whole lung tissue collected at 3 h after the end of the shock or sham-shock period, 139 of 8,799 assessed genes were identified by significant analysis of microarrays. Hemorrhage without the secondary effects of lung injury modulated the expression of 21 genes such as interleukin 1beta, metallothionein-2, and myeloctomatosis oncogene (c-myc). In response to injury, 42 genes were identified to be differentially expressed. Upregulated genes included the L1 retroposon and guanine deaminase, whereas downregulated genes included catalase and superoxide dismutase 1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the differential expression for selected genes. PathwayAssist analysis identified interleukin 1beta as a central regulator of two subpathways of stress response-related genes (c-myc and superoxide dismutase 1/catalase) as well as several unrelated genes such as lipoprotein lipase. Our model system provided a unique opportunity to distinguish the molecular changes associated with T/HS-induced acute lung injury from the systemic molecular response to T/HS.

  10. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    SMART -seq 2 protocol to prepare cDNA libraries . Sequencing of these libraries is currently in progress. 2g. Cells will be sorted using population...cell capture and library preparation system to improve reproducibility in the generation of gene expression profiles from individual fMaSC. These...each predicted a higher likelihood of response, while stromal and luminal features predicted a lower response rate. D) The list of genes in the fMaSC

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Robert W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbred mouse strains and a large family of BXD strains that are widely used for systems genetics. Our goal is to provide a key community resource on the genetics of the normative lung transcriptome that can serve as a foundation for experimental analysis and allow predicting genetic predisposition and response to pathogens, allergens, and xenobiotics. Methods Steady-state polyA+ mRNA levels were assayed across a diverse and fully genotyped panel of 57 isogenic strains using the Affymetrix M430 2.0 array. Correlations of expression levels between genes were determined. Global expression QTL (eQTL analysis and network covariance analysis was performed using tools and resources in GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. Results Expression values were highly variable across strains and in many cases exhibited a high heri-tability factor. Several genes which showed a restricted expression to lung tissue were identified. Using correlations between gene expression values across all strains, we defined and extended memberships of several important molecular networks in the lung. Furthermore, we were able to extract signatures of immune cell subpopulations and characterize co-variation and shared genetic modulation. Known QTL regions for respiratory infection susceptibility were investigated and several cis-eQTL genes were identified. Numerous cis- and trans-regulated transcripts and chromosomal intervals with strong regulatory activity were mapped. The Cyp1a1 P

  12. The Correlation-Base-Selection Algorithm for Diagnostic Schizophrenia Based on Blood-Based Gene Expression Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Xie, Ziyang; Yang, Yuwen; Zhao, Yizhen

    2017-01-01

    Microarray analysis of gene expression is often used to diagnose different types of disease. Many studies report remarkable achievements in nervous system disease. Clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia (SCZ) still depends on doctors' experience, which is unreliable and needs to be more objective and quantified. To solve this problem, we collected whole blood gene expression data from four studies, including 152 individuals with schizophrenia (SCZ) and 138 normal controls in different regions. The correlation-based feature selection (CFS, one of the machine learning methods) algorithm was applied in this study, and 103 significantly differentially expressed genes between patients and controls, called “feature genes,” were selected; then, a model for SCZ diagnosis was built. The samples were subdivided into 10 groups, and cross-validation showed that the model we constructed achieved nearly 100% classification accuracy. Mathematical evaluation of the datasets before and after data processing proved the effectiveness of our algorithm. Feature genes were enriched in Parkinson's disease, oxidative phosphorylation, and TGF-beta signaling pathways, which were previously reported to be associated with SCZ. These results suggest that the analysis of gene expression in whole blood by our model could be a useful tool for diagnosing SCZ. PMID:28280741

  13. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A; Chávez, Francisco P; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host-pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  14. Microbiological quality of ready-to-eat salads: an underestimated vehicle of bacteria and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Joana; Mourão, Joana; Pestana, Nazaré; Peixe, Luísa; Novais, Carla; Antunes, Patrícia

    2013-09-16

    The increase demand for fresh vegetables is causing an expansion of the market for minimally processed vegetables along with new recognized food safety problems. To gain further insight on this topic we analyzed the microbiological quality of Portuguese ready-to-eat salads (RTS) and their role in the spread of bacteria carrying acquired antibiotic resistance genes, food products scarcely considered in surveillance studies. A total of 50 RTS (7 brands; split or mixed leaves, carrot, corn) were collected in 5 national supermarket chains in Porto region (2010). They were tested for aerobic mesophilic counts, coliforms and Escherichia coli counts as well as for the presence of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were also plated in different selective media with/without antibiotics before and after enrichment. The E. coli, other coliforms and Enterococcus recovered were characterized for antibiotic resistance profiles and clonality with phenotypic and genetic approaches. A high number of RTS presented poor microbiological quality (86%--aerobic mesophilic counts, 74%--coliforms, 4%--E. coli), despite the absence of screened pathogens. In addition, a high diversity of bacteria (species and clones) and antibiotic resistance backgrounds (phenotypes and genotypes) were observed, mostly with enrichment and antibiotic selective media. E. coli was detected in 13 samples (n=78; all types and 4 brands; phylogenetic groups A, B1 and D; none STEC) with resistance to tetracycline [72%; tet(A) and/or tet(B)], streptomycin (58%; aadA and/or strA-strB), sulfamethoxazole (50%; sul1 and/or sul2), trimethoprim (50%; dfrA1 or dfrA12), ampicillin (49%; blaTEM), nalidixic acid (36%), ciprofloxacin (5%) or chloramphenicol (3%; catA). E. coli clones, including the widespread group D/ST69, were detected in different samples from the same brand or different brands pointing out to a potential cross-contamination. Other clinically relevant resistance genes were detected in 2 Raoultella

  15. Signatures of selection and host-adapted gene expression of the Phytophthora infestans RNA silencing suppressor PSR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sophie; von Dahlen, Janina K; Uhlmann, Constanze; Schnake, Anika; Kloesges, Thorsten; Rose, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is a devastating pathogen in agricultural systems. Recently, an RNA silencing suppressor (PSR2, 'Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2') has been described in P. infestans. PSR2 has been shown to increase the virulence of Phytophthora pathogens on their hosts. This gene is one of the few effectors present in many economically important Phytophthora species. In this study, we investigated: (i) the evolutionary history of PSR2 within and between species of Phytophthora; and (ii) the interaction between sequence variation, gene expression and virulence. In P. infestans, the highest PiPSR2 expression was correlated with decreased symptom expression. The highest gene expression was observed in the biotrophic phase of the pathogen, suggesting that PSR2 is important during early infection. Protein sequence conservation was negatively correlated with host range, suggesting host range as a driver of PSR2 evolution. Within species, we detected elevated amino acid variation, as observed for other effectors; however, the frequency spectrum of the mutations was inconsistent with strong balancing selection. This evolutionary pattern may be related to the conservation of the host target(s) of PSR2 and the absence of known corresponding R genes. In summary, our study indicates that PSR2 is a conserved effector that acts as a master switch to modify plant gene regulation early during infection for the pathogen's benefit. The conservation of PSR2 and its important role in virulence make it a promising target for pathogen management.

  16. GOexpress: an R/Bioconductor package for the identification and visualisation of robust gene ontology signatures through supervised learning of gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; McGettigan, Paul A; Hernández, Belinda; Nalpas, Nicolas C; Magee, David A; Parnell, Andrew C; Gordon, Stephen V; MacHugh, David E

    2016-03-11

    Identification of gene expression profiles that differentiate experimental groups is critical for discovery and analysis of key molecular pathways and also for selection of robust diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. While integration of differential expression statistics has been used to refine gene set enrichment analyses, such approaches are typically limited to single gene lists resulting from simple two-group comparisons or time-series analyses. In contrast, functional class scoring and machine learning approaches provide powerful alternative methods to leverage molecular measurements for pathway analyses, and to compare continuous and multi-level categorical factors. We introduce GOexpress, a software package for scoring and summarising the capacity of gene ontology features to simultaneously classify samples from multiple experimental groups. GOexpress integrates normalised gene expression data (e.g., from microarray and RNA-seq experiments) and phenotypic information of individual samples with gene ontology annotations to derive a ranking of genes and gene ontology terms using a supervised learning approach. The default random forest algorithm allows interactions between all experimental factors, and competitive scoring of expressed genes to evaluate their relative importance in classifying predefined groups of samples. GOexpress enables rapid identification and visualisation of ontology-related gene panels that robustly classify groups of samples and supports both categorical (e.g., infection status, treatment) and continuous (e.g., time-series, drug concentrations) experimental factors. The use of standard Bioconductor extension packages and publicly available gene ontology annotations facilitates straightforward integration of GOexpress within existing computational biology pipelines.

  17. MYC/BCL2 protein coexpression contributes to the inferior survival of activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates high-risk gene expression signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Shimin; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Tzankov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is stratified into prognostically favorable germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like and unfavorable activated B-cell (ABC)-like subtypes based on gene expression signatures. In this study, we analyzed 893 de novo DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclo...

  18. Genome wide transcriptional analysis of resting and IL2 activated human natural killer cells: gene expression signatures indicative of novel molecular signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Alexander

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human natural killer (NK cells are the key contributors of innate immune response and the effector functions of these cells are enhanced by cytokines such as interleukine 2 (IL2. We utilized genome-wide transcriptional profiling to identify gene expression signatures and pathways in resting and IL2 activated NK cell isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results Gene expression profiling of resting NK cells showed high expression of a number of cytotoxic factors, cytokines, chemokines and inhibitory and activating surface NK receptors. Resting NK cells expressed many genes associated with cellular quiescence and also appeared to have an active TGFβ (TGFB1 signaling pathway. IL2 stimulation induced rapid downregulation of quiescence associated genes and upregulation of genes associated with cell cycle progression and proliferation. Numerous genes that may enhance immune function and responsiveness including activating receptors (DNAM1, KLRC1 and KLRC3, death receptor ligand (TNFSF6 (FASL and TRAIL, chemokine receptors (CX3CR1, CCR5 and CCR7, interleukin receptors (IL2RG, IL18RAB and IL27RA and members of secretory pathways (DEGS1, FKBP11, SSR3, SEC61G and SLC3A2 were upregulated. The expression profile suggested PI3K/AKT activation and NF-κB activation through multiple pathways (TLR/IL1R, TNF receptor induced and TCR-like possibly involving BCL10. Activation of NFAT signaling was supported by increased expression of many pathway members and downstream target genes. The transcription factor GATA3 was expressed in resting cells while T-BET was upregulated on activation concurrent with the change in cytokine expression profile. The importance of NK cells in innate immune response was also reflected by late increased expression of inflammatory chemotactic factors and receptors and molecules involved in adhesion and lymphocyte trafficking or migration. Conclusion This analysis allowed us to identify genes implicated in

  19. RNA Sequencing Reveals Upregulation of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 Gene Signatures in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuquan Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, therapies targeted at the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathways, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, have been developed to treat clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. However, the majority of patients will eventually show resistance to antiangiogenesis therapies. The purpose of our study was to identify novel pathways that could be potentially used as targets for new therapies. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq was conducted on eight matched tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples. A novel RUNX1-RUNX1T1 pathway was identified which was upregulated in ccRCC through gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. We also confirmed the findings based on previously published gene expression microarray data. Our data shows that upregulated of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene set maybe an important factor contributing to the etiology of ccRCC.

  20. WDR5 Supports an N-Myc Transcriptional Complex That Drives a Protumorigenic Gene Expression Signature in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuting; Bell, Jessica L; Carter, Daniel; Gherardi, Samuele; Poulos, Rebecca C; Milazzo, Giorgio; Wong, Jason W H; Al-Awar, Rima; Tee, Andrew E; Liu, Pei Y; Liu, Bing; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Wong, Matthew; Trahair, Toby; Zhao, Quan; Shohet, Jason M; Haupt, Ygal; Schulte, Johannes H; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Vedadi, Masoud; MacKenzie, Karen L; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Perini, Giovanni; Marshall, Glenn M; Braithwaite, Antony; Liu, Tao

    2015-12-01

    MYCN gene amplification in neuroblastoma drives a gene expression program that correlates strongly with aggressive disease. Mechanistically, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) at target gene promoters is a strict prerequisite for this transcriptional program to be enacted. WDR5 is a histone H3K4 presenter that has been found to have an essential role in H3K4 trimethylation. For this reason, in this study, we investigated the relationship between WDR5-mediated H3K4 trimethylation and N-Myc transcriptional programs in neuroblastoma cells. N-Myc upregulated WDR5 expression in neuroblastoma cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that WDR5 target genes included those with MYC-binding elements at promoters such as MDM2. We showed that WDR5 could form a protein complex at the MDM2 promoter with N-Myc, but not p53, leading to histone H3K4 trimethylation and activation of MDM2 transcription. RNAi-mediated attenuation of WDR5 upregulated expression of wild-type but not mutant p53, an effect associated with growth inhibition and apoptosis. Similarly, a small-molecule antagonist of WDR5 reduced N-Myc/WDR5 complex formation, N-Myc target gene expression, and cell growth in neuroblastoma cells. In MYCN-transgenic mice, WDR5 was overexpressed in precancerous ganglion and neuroblastoma cells compared with normal ganglion cells. Clinically, elevated levels of WDR5 in neuroblastoma specimens were an independent predictor of poor overall survival. Overall, our results identify WDR5 as a key cofactor for N-Myc-regulated transcriptional activation and tumorigenesis and as a novel therapeutic target for MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas.

  1. RNA-Seq reveals common and unique PXR- and CAR-target gene signatures in the mouse liver transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are well-known xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors with overlapping functions. However, there lacks a quantitative characterization to distinguish between the PXR and CAR target genes and signaling pathways in the liver. The present study performed a transcriptomic comparison of the PXR- and CAR-targets using RNA-Seq in livers of adult wild-type mice that were treated with the prototypical PXR ligand PCN (200mg/kg, i.p. once daily for 4days in corn oil) or the prototypical CAR ligand TCPOBOP (3mg/kg, i.p., once daily for 4days in corn oil). At the given doses, TCPOBOP differentially regulated many more genes (2125) than PCN (212), and 147 of the same genes were differentially regulated by both chemicals. As expected, the top pathways differentially regulated by both PCN and TCPOBOP were involved in xenobiotic metabolism, and they also up-regulated genes involved in retinoid metabolism, but down-regulated genes involved in inflammation and iron homeostasis. Regarding unique pathways, PXR activation appeared to overlap with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, whereas CAR activation appeared to overlap with the farnesoid X receptor signaling, acute-phase response, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The mRNAs of differentially regulated drug-processing genes (DPGs) partitioned into three patterns, namely TCPOBOP-induced, PCN-induced, as well as TCPOBOP-suppressed gene clusters. The cumulative mRNAs of the differentially regulated DPGs, phase-I and -II enzymes, as well as efflux transporters were all up-regulated by both PCN and TCPOBOPOP, whereas the cumulative mRNAs of the uptake transporters were down-regulated only by TCPOBOP. The absolute mRNA abundance in control and receptor-activated conditions was examined in each DPG category to predict the contribution of specific DPG genes in the PXR/CAR-mediated pharmacokinetic responses. The preferable differential regulation by TCPOBOP in the

  2. T lymphocytes from chronic HCV-infected patients are primed for activation-induced apoptosis and express unique pro-apoptotic gene signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Bin Zhao

    Full Text Available Although extensive studies have demonstrated the functional impairment of antigen-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, the functional status of global CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells remains unclear. In this report, we recruited 42 long-term (~20 years treatment-naïve chronic HCV (CHC patients and 15 healthy donors (HDs to investigate differences in global CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells function. We show that CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells from CHC patients underwent increased apoptosis after TCR stimulation. Furthermore, IFN-γ, IL-9 and IP-10 were elevated in CHC patients' plasma and promoted activation-induced T-cells death. Global CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells also showed unique transcriptional profiles in the expression of apoptosis-related genes. We identified BCL2, PMAIP1, and CASP1 in CD4(+ T-cells and IER3 and BCL2A1 in CD8(+ T-cells from CHC patients as HCV-specific gene signatures. Importantly, the gene expression patterns of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells from CHC patients differ from those in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 or hepatitis B virus (HBV infected individuals. Our results indicate that chronic HCV infection causes a systemic change in cytokine levels that primes T-cells for activation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, HCV infection programs unique apoptosis-related gene expression profiles in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells, leading to their enhanced activation-induced apoptosis. These results provide novel insights to the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection.

  3. Validation