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Sample records for gene nis interact

  1. hNIS-IRES-eGFP Dual Reporter Gene Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiantu Che

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The human and rodent sodium iodide symporters (NIS have recently been cloned and are being investigated as potential therapeutic and reporter genes. We have extended this effort by constructing an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-linked human NIS (hNIS-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP hybrid reporter gene for both nuclear and optical imaging. A self-inactivating retroviral vector, termed pQCNIG, containing hNIS-IRES-eGFP dual reporter gene, driven by a constitutive CMV promoter, was constructed and used to generate RG2-pQCNIG cells and RG2-pQCNIG tumors. 131I-iodide and 99mTcO4-pertechnetate accumulation studies plus fluorescence microscopy and intensity assays were performed in vitro, and gamma camera imaging studies in RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumor-bearing athymic rats were performed. RG2-pQCNIG cells expressed high levels of hNIS protein and showed high intensity of eGFP fluorescence compared with RG2 wild-type cells. RG2-pQCNIG cells accumulated Na131I and 99mTcO4– to a 50:1 and a 170:1 tissue/medium ratio at 10 min, compared with 0.8:1.2 tissue/medium ratio in wild-type RG2 cells. A significant correlation between radiotracer accumulation and eGFP fluorescence intensity was demonstrated. RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumors were readily differentiated by in vivo gamma camera imaging; radiotracer uptake increased in RG2-pQCNIG but declined in RG2 tumors over the 50-min imaging period. Stomach and thyroid were the major organs of radionuclide accumulation. The IRES-linked hNIS-eGFP dual reporter gene is functional and stable in transduced RG2-pQCNIG cells. Optical and nuclear imaging of tumors produced from these cell lines provides the opportunity to monitor tumor growth and response to therapy. These studies indicate the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter imaging and translation into patient studies using radioisotopes that are currently available for human use for both SPECT and PET imaging.

  2. Preparation of a recombinant adenoviral encoding human NIS gene and its specific expression in cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lihua; Zhang Miao; Guo Rui; Shi Shuo; Li Biao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector containing the human NIS gene with the myosin light chain-2(MLC-2v) gene as the promoter and evaluate its specific expression and feasibility as a reporter gene in cardiomyocytes. Methods: MLC-2v promoter and NIS were subcloned into an adenovirus shuttle vector, and forwarded by homologous recombination in the bacteria BJ5183 containing AdEasy-1 plasmid. Positive recombinant adenovirus vector was selected, packaged and amplified in the HEK293 cells to obtain recombinant adenovirus Ad-MLC-NIS. Ad-cytomegalovirus (CMV)-NIS with cytomegalovirus as the promoter, Ad-MLC without NIS and Ad-NIS without promoter were constructed as the controls. Cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were then infected by the adenovirus. The protein expression was tested by Western blot analysis. The function and features of NIS protein were evaluated by dynamic iodide uptake and NaClO 4 iodine uptake inhibition test in vitro. The viability and proliferation of cardiomyocytes after adenovirus transfection and radioiodine incubation were checked by trypan blue staining. Results: Recombinant NIS adenovirus was successfully constructed. Western blot analysis showed that the NIS protein was highly expressed in cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, and all cells transfected with Ad-CMV-NIS. However, in non-cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, little NIS protein was detected. Dynamic iodine uptake tests showed that the peaks of iodide uptake of the three different cell lines (H9C2, A549, U87 cell) transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS were 5844.0, 833.6 and 846.0 counts · min -1 , respectively. The iodide uptake function of H9C2 was inhibited by NaClO 4 . There was almost no change in cell viability and proliferation when the MOI was 100. Conclusions: Ad-MLC-NIS allows myocardial specific expression of an external gene, and the cardiomyocytes with NIS expression are capable of iodine uptake. Further research of NIS as a reporter gene in

  3. The presence of modifiable residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin is not crucial for precursor nisin interactions with NisB- and NisC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem Khusainov

    Full Text Available Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin-nisin modification enzymes interactions, since it has previously been shown that the construct containing only the nisin leader sequence is not sufficient to pull-down the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. Serines and threonines in the core peptide part are the residues that NisB specifically dehydrates, and cysteines are the residues that NisC stereospecifically couples to the dehydrated amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that increasing the number of negatively charged residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin, which are absent in wild-type nisin, does not abolish binding of precursor nisin to the modification enzymes NisB and NisC, but dramatically decreases the antimicrobial potency of these nisin mutants. An unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all serines and threonines in the core peptide part and an unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all cysteines in the core peptide part still bind the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC, suggesting that these residues are not essential for direct interactions with the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. These results are important for lantibiotic engineering studies.

  4. The construction and identification of hypoxia-regulated recombinant plasmid with reporter gene hNIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qunchao; Wu Jinchang; Zhou Jundong; Gu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To construct pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS recombinant plasmid regulated by hypoxia-responsive element, which can possibly by used to detect the expression of hypoxia induced factor-α (HIF-1α) gene under hypoxia condition. Methods: Artificially synthesize the nucleotide sequences of five copies of hypoxia response elements (HREs) were cloned into pGL3-promoter vector to construct pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector. Human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene cDNA was amplified from human genome by RT-PCR, and subcloned into pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector then was sequenced. After treated with CoCl 2 as hypoxia mimic, HEK293 cells were transfected with recombinant plasmid with hNIS gene, while cells treated with DMSO as the control. Meanwhile, pcDNA3.1-HIF-1α and recombinant hNIS gene vectors were transfected into HEK293 cells at the ratio of 3 to 1, while co-transfection with pcDNA3.1 and pShuttle-NIS vectors cells were taken as the control. NIS mRNA expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR while function of NIS protein was tested by 99m TcO 4 - -uptake. Results: The sequence data of hNIS gene in recombinant plasmid were in accordance with those reported in the literatures. Compared with control groups, HEK293 cells co-transfected with both pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS and HIF-1α gene vectors and CoCl 2 -treated after pShuttle-NIS transfecting presented higher mRNA expressions of NIS and 99m TcO 4 - uptake (P<0.01). Conclusion: HIF-1α can be bound to and activate pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS in cells to accumulate radioactive nuclide 99m TcO 4 - and this technique is potential for detection of expression and activity of HIF-1α, the indicator of cell hypoxia. (authors)

  5. Recovery of NIS expression in thyroid cancer cells by overexpression of Pax8 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Mattei, Tiziana; Scarpelli, Daniela; Tosi, Emanuele; Scipioni, Angela; Celano, Marilena; Gulino, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recovery of iodide uptake in thyroid cancer cells by means of obtaining the functional expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) represents an innovative strategy for the treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. However, the NIS gene expression alone is not always sufficient to restore radioiodine concentration ability in these tumour cells. In this study, the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma ARO cells were stably transfected with a Pax8 gene expression vector. A quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess the thyroid specific gene expression in selected clones. The presence of NIS protein was detected by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence. A iodide uptake assay was also performed to verify the functional effect of NIS induction and differentiation switch. The clones overexpressing Pax8 showed the re-activation of several thyroid specific genes including NIS, Pendrin, Thyroglobulin, TPO and TTF1. In ARO-Pax8 clones NIS protein was also localized both in cell cytoplasm and membrane. Thus, the ability to uptake the radioiodine was partially restored, associated to a high rate of efflux. In addition, ARO cells expressing Pax8 presented a lower rate of cell growth. These finding demonstrate that induction of Pax8 expression may determine a re-differentiation of thyroid cancer cells, including a partial recovery of iodide uptake, fundamental requisite for a radioiodine-based therapeutic approach for thyroid tumours

  6. Cloning of nis gene and Nisin purification from Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purified nisin by chloroform extraction was analyzed on 20% SDS-PAGE and gave sharp band at ~ 3.4 kDa. The 3 dimension structure of the purified Nisin was studied by CPHModels as pdb with chimera program. Keywords: Lactococcus lactis, nis cloning, 16S rRNA, chloroform extraction and SDS-PAGE

  7. Comparison of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression between lentiviral and adenoviral vectors in rat mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirus-mediated delivery systems has not been done. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated stably hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning the hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and Rad-hNIS transduced rMSC (adeno-hNIS-rMSC) was evaluated for the hNIS expression 48 hours post infection at MOI 1, 5, 20, 50, and 100. The hNIS expression in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC was assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry using mono-clonal anti-hNIS antibody revealed that intensity of hNIS immunoreactivity in lenti-hNIS-rMSC was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOl 20 but lower than that at MOl 50. Western blot analysis also showed that lenti-hNIS-rMSC was intermediate between adeno-hNIS-rMSCs at MOl 20 and 50 in hNIS expression. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (297046659 picomole/106 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (61682134 picomole/106 cells). These results suggest that lentivirus mediated hNIS expression is greater in terms of hNIS function but lower in terms of hNIS protein amount than adenovirus mediated hNIS expression 48 hours post infection. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative viral efficiency of transgene expression

  8. 99Tcm pertechnetate uptake by hepatoma cells induced by tissue specific hNIS gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Libo; Luo Quanyong; Yu Yongli; Yuan Zhibin; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen; Guo Lihe

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene could be used both as an ideal reporter gene and promising therapeutic gene. Rather than radioiodine, 99 Tc m pertechnetate has been proven to be a better radiopharmaceutical for tracing and imaging purposes. Herein, the authors investigated the feasibility of monitoring hNIS gene expression in hepatoma cells using 99 Tc m pertechnetate as a tracer. Methods: Hepatoma cells MH3924A were stably transfected with recombinant retroviral vector in which hNIS cDNA was driven by murine albumin enhancer/promoter (mAlb) and coupled to hygromycin resistance gene. The uptake and efflux of 99 Tc m pertechnetate by transfected hepatoma cells were tested with 99 Tc m pertechnetate (74 kBq) solution adulterated into the culture media and counted after media suspension discharge at different intervals. In further tests, 50 μmol/L NaClO 4 and 500 μmol/L Ouabain were added into the media for 99 Tc m inhibition tests. For in vive studies, five ACI rats bearing NIS transfected hepatoma xenografts were injected with 99 Tc m pertechnetate (15.8 MBq) and followed by dynamic acquisition (0.57 1, 2 and 4 h) with small gamma camera to semi-quantitatively analyze the radioactivity distribution. Results: In vitro tests, the peak uptake of 99 Tc m pertechnetate by cultured transfected MH3924A cells was up to 254 folds higher than that by the wild type cells. 99 Tc m uptake by transfected cells were significantly inhibited by NaClO 4 down to 2.44% (P 99 Tc m pertechnetate out of cultured transfected cells became rapid immediately after renewal of culture media (half life 99 Tc m accumulations by hNIS transfected tumor xenografts were obvious in early phases of the acquisition with peak uptake at 12 min and gradually declining later on. Conclusions: hNIS transfected hepatoma cells can avidly uptake 99 Tc m pertechnetate both in vitro and in vive. It is feasible to utilize 99 Tc m pertechnetate for monitoring and even quantitatively analyzing

  9. Study of rNIS as a reporter gene monitoring rBMSC transplanted to rat myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shou; Lan Xiaoli; Cao Wei; Cao Guoxiang; Zhang Guopeng; Zhang Binqing; Wu Tao; Chang Wei; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of rat sodium/iodide symporter (rNIS) as a reporter gene monitoring rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells (rBMSC) transplanted to rat myocardium in vivo. Methods: Recombinated adenovirus vector was constructed by rNIS/enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) (Ad-rNIS/EGFP). rBMSC transfected by Ad-rNIS/EGFP were studied using fluorescence microscope. Fifteen rats were transplanted with rBMSC and randomly divided into three groups: rNIS group (with rNIS transfection), blocked group (with rNIS transfection) by oral intake of perchloric sodium before planar imaging (GE Millennium MPR SPECT), and control group (without rNIS transfection). All rats underwent 99 Tc m -pertechnetate planar imaging. The biological distribution of 99 Tc m -pertechnetate was studied. The expressions of rNIS gene and protein in myocardium were measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot, respectively. The expressions of CD 29 , CD 44 , CD 90 , CD 11 b, CD 34 and CD 45 were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: rBMSC transfected by Ad-rNIS/EGFP showed EGFP expression under fluorescence microscope. The transplanted rat myocardium could be visualized on 99 Tc m -pertechnetate planar imaging in rNIS group. The relative uptake ratio (R heart /R hmb , RUR) was 6.7 ±0.4. RUR in control group (3.0 ±0.2) was lower than that in rNIS group (t =2.78, P=0.03). The percentage injection dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) of the transplanted myocardium was 60.2 ± 20.8 in rNIS group, which was higher than that (2.5 ± 0.4) % ID/g of control group ( t = 7.13, P 29 , CD 44 and CD 90 were positive, CD 45 and CD 45 negative CD 11 b mildly positive in the myocardium transplanted with infective rBMSC. Conclusion: rNIS can efficiently monitor rBMSC transplanted to rat myocardium. (authors)

  10. Comparison of Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter (hNIS) Gene Expressions between Lentiviral and Adenoviral Vectors in Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran [Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirusmediated delivery systems has not been reported. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and transduction efficiency of Rad-hNIS into rMSC evaluated by Rad-GFP was 19.1{+-}4.7%, 54.0{+-}6.4%, 85.7{+-}8.7%, and 98.4{+-}1.3% at MOI 1, 5, 20, and 100, respectively. The hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC were assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC were greater than those in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 20 but lower than at MOI 50. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (29,704{+-}6,659 picomole/10{sup 6} cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (6,168{+-}2,134 picomole/10{sup 6} cells). Despite lower amount of expressed protein, hNIS function in rMSC was greater by lentivirus than by adenovirus mediated expression. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative vector efficiency for transgene expression.

  11. Comparison of Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter (hNIS) Gene Expressions between Lentiviral and Adenoviral Vectors in Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirusmediated delivery systems has not been reported. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and transduction efficiency of Rad-hNIS into rMSC evaluated by Rad-GFP was 19.1±4.7%, 54.0±6.4%, 85.7±8.7%, and 98.4±1.3% at MOI 1, 5, 20, and 100, respectively. The hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC were assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analyses revealed that hNIS expressions in lenti-hNIS-rMSC were greater than those in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 20 but lower than at MOI 50. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (29,704±6,659 picomole/10 6 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (6,168±2,134 picomole/10 6 cells). Despite lower amount of expressed protein, hNIS function in rMSC was greater by lentivirus than by adenovirus mediated expression. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative vector efficiency for transgene expression

  12. Establishment of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes: sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Won Jung; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun

    2007-01-01

    Dual reporter gene imaging has several advantages for more sophisticated molecular imaging studies such as gene therapy monitoring. Herein, we have constructed hepatoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and the functionalities of the genes were evaluated in vivo by nuclear and optical imaging. A pRetro-PN vector was constructed after separating NIS gene from pcDNA-NIS. RSV-EGFP-WPRE fragment separated from pLNRGW was cloned into pRetro-PN vector. The final vector expressing dual reporter genes was named pRetro-PNRGW. A human hepatoma (HepG2) cells were transfected by the retrovirus containing NIS and EGFP gene (HepG2-NE). Expression of NIS gene was confirmed by RT-PCR, radioiodine uptake and efflux studies. Expression of EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscope. The HepG2 and HepG2-NE cells were implanted in shoulder and hindlimb of nude mice, then fluorescence image, gamma camera image and I-124 microPET image were undertaken. The HepG2-NE cell was successfully constructed. RT-PCR showed NIS and EGFP mRNA expression. About 50% of cells showed fluorescence. The iodine uptake of NIS-expressed cells was about 9 times higher than control. In efflux study, T 1/2 of HepG2-NE cells was 9 min. HepG2-NE xenograft showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots and higher iodine-uptake compared to those of HepG2 xenograft. A hepatoma cell line expressing NIS and EGFP dual reporter genes was successfully constructed and could be used as a potential either by therapeutic gene or imaging reporter gene

  13. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

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    Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, You La; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Choi, Chang Ik; Lee, Sang Woo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring.

  14. Growth, nisA Gene Expression, and In Situ Activity of Novel Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Costarter Culture in Commercial Hard Cheese Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsopoulos, Dimitrios; Kakouri, Athanasia; Kartezini, Eleftheria; Pappas, Dimitrios; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Samelis, John

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluated in situ expression of the nisA gene by an indigenous, nisin A-producing (NisA+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris raw milk genotype, represented by strain M78, in traditional Greek Graviera cheeses under real factory-scale manufacturing and ripening conditions. Cheeses were produced with added a mixed thermophilic and mesophilic commercial starter culture (CSC) or with the CSC plus strain M78 (CSC+M78). Cheeses were sampled after curd cooking (day 0), fermentation of the unsalted molds for 24 h (day 1), brining (day 7), and ripening of the brined molds (14 to 15 kg each) for 30 days in a fully controlled industrial room (16.5°C; 91% relative humidity; day 37). Total RNA was directly extracted from the cheese samples, and the expression of nisA gene was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Agar overlay and well diffusion bioassays were correspondingly used for in situ detection of the M78 NisA+ colonies in the cheese agar plates and antilisterial activity in whole-cheese slurry samples, respectively. Agar overlay assays showed good growth (>8 log CFU/g of cheese) of the NisA+ strain M78 in coculture with the CSC and vice versa. The nisA expression was detected in CSC+M78 cheese samples only, with its expression levels being the highest (16-fold increase compared with those of the control gene) on day 1, followed by significant reduction on day 7 and almost negligible expression on day 37. Based on the results, certain intrinsic and mainly implicit hurdle factors appeared to reduce growth prevalence rates and decrease nisA gene expression, as well as the nisin A-mediated antilisterial activities of the NisA+ strain M78 postfermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on quantitative expression of the nisA gene in a Greek cooked hard cheese during commercial manufacturing and ripening conditions by using a novel, rarely isolated, indigenous NisA+ L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype as costarter culture.

  15. Combination therapy and evaluation of therapeutic effect in hepatocellular carcinoma cell using triple reporter genes; containing for NIS, HSV1-sr39tk and GFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You La; Lee, Yong Jin; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To identify therapeutic effect after combine Sodium Iodine Symporter (NIS) and Mutant Herpes-simplex virus type 1 sr39tk (HSV1-sr39tk) expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we transfected triple gene and investigated the properties of these gene ability in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After making vector with gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of HSV1-sr39tk and green florescence protein (GFP), to make triple reporter genes NIS gene was further fused to the vector using IRES vector. The vector expressing triple reporter gene was transfected to the Huh-7 cell line using liposome. Functions of hNIS and HSV1-sr39tk expression were confirmed by radio iodine uptake with and without perchlorate and [3H]-penciclovir (3-H PCV) uptake, respectively. To evaluate therapeutic effect in vitro, GCV and I-131 was treated in Huh-7/NTG cell and dual therapy performed. An animal imaging acquired using Optix and microPET in vivo. I-125 uptake was increased up to 100-fold compare to that of non-transfected cells. The transfected cell accumulated H-3 PCV up to 53 times higher at 2 hour than that of non-transfected cells. With fluorescence microscopy, green fluorescence was detected in the transfected cell. In cytotoxic studies, the cell viability of Huh-7/NTG cell was decreased to 41 % of control cell at 10ug/ml GCV concentrations. The survival rate of the Huh-7/NTG cell treated with I-131 decreased up to 16%. In I-131 and GCV dual therapy, Huh-7/NTG cell survival rate decreased up to 4%. In animal studies, Huh-7/NTG tumors showed higher uptake of 18F-FHBG and I-124 than Huh-7 tumors. GFP signal is also higher in Huh-7/NTG tumor than control. We successfully constructed a vector with delivery two therapeutic genes and one reporter gene and transfected the vector to a Huh-7 cell. The hepatocellular carcinoma cell transfected with the vector can be treated with GCV and I-131. The effect of dual gene therapy could be easily assessed by the optical reporter gene imaging.

  16. Use of the Lactococcal nisA Promoter To Regulate Gene Expression in Gram-Positive Bacteria : Comparison of Induction Level and Promoter Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichenbaum, Zehava; Federle, Michael J.; Marra, Diana; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Scott, June R.

    1998-01-01

    We characterized the regulated activity of the lactococcal nisA promoter in strains of the gram-positive species Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis. nisA promoter activity was dependent on the proteins NisR and

  17. The iodide sym-porter (NIS): new perspectives in nuclear oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourcher, Th.; Lindenthal, S.; Basquin, C.; Ferhat, O.; Marsault, R.; Carrier, P.; Koulibaly, M.; Bussiere, F.; Darcourt, J.

    2005-01-01

    The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS) is the plasma membrane protein that mediates uptake of iodide in the thyroid and other organs such as the stomach and the salivary gland. The cloning of its cDNA allows the targeting of NIS expression into any cell using gene therapy. This enables iodide uptake and thus NIS can be used as reporter imaging for live animals. More intriguingly, this new technique has potential using radio-iodide therapy to selectively destroy tumour cells. These two approaches employ common techniques in nuclear medicine. Many experiments on cultured cells and on animals have been carried out; they established clearly the advantages of this genetically targeted radiotherapy. Recent studies employing this therapy on multiple myeloma cell lines implanted in mice or on hepato-carcinoma-bearing rats, resulted in important tumour remission. However, additional studies on NIS regulation and the use of alternative radioisotopes transported by NIS are required to further develop this promising approach. (author)

  18. Evaluation of transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor with sodium iodide symporter as an imaging reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2006-10-01

    Oestrogen receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors whose activity is modulated either by oestrogens or by an alternative signalling pathway. Oestrogen receptors interact via a specific DNA-binding domain, the oestrogen responsive element (ERE), in the promoter region of sensitive genes. This binding leads to an initiation of gene expression and hormonal effects. To determine the transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor, we developed a molecular imaging system using sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as a reporter gene. The NIS reporter gene was placed under the control of an artificial ERE derived from pERE-TA-SEAP and named as pERE-NIS. pERE-NIS was transferred to MCF-7, human breast cancer cells, which highly expressed oestrogen receptor-alpha with lipofectamine. Stably expressing cells were generated by selection with G418 for 14 days. After treatment of 17beta-oestradiol and tamoxifen with serial doses, the (125)I uptake was measured for the determination of NIS expression. The inhibition of NIS activity was performed with 50 micromol x l(-1) potassium perchlorate. The MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with 17beta-oestradiol accumulated (125)I up to 70-80% higher than did non-treated cells. NIS expression was increased according to increasing doses of 17beta-oestradiol. MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with tamoxifen also accumulated (125)I up to 50% higher than did non-treated cells. Potassium perchlorate completely inhibited (125)I uptake. When MDA-MB231 cells, the oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells, were transfected with pERE-NIS, (125)I uptake of MDA-MB-231/pERE-NIS did not increase. This pERE-NIS reporter system is sufficiently sensitive for monitoring transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor. Therefore, cis-enhancer reporter systems with ERE will be applicable to the development of a novel selective oestrogen receptor modulator with low toxicity and high efficacy.

  19. An extremely high dietary iodide supply forestalls severe hypothyroidism in Na+/I- symporter (NIS) knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandino, Giuseppe; Kaspari, Rachel R; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Boutagy, Nabil E; Sinusas, Albert J; Carrasco, Nancy

    2017-07-13

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active iodide (I - ) accumulation in the thyroid, the first step in thyroid hormone (TH) biosynthesis. Mutations in the SLC5A5 gene encoding NIS that result in a non-functional protein lead to congenital hypothyroidism due to I - transport defect (ITD). ITD is a rare autosomal disorder that, if not treated promptly in infancy, can cause mental retardation, as the TH decrease results in improper development of the nervous system. However, in some patients, hypothyroidism has been ameliorated by unusually large amounts of dietary I - . Here we report the first NIS knockout (KO) mouse model, obtained by targeting exons 6 and 7 of the Slc5a5 gene. In NIS KO mice, in the thyroid, stomach, and salivary gland, NIS is absent, and hence there is no active accumulation of the NIS substrate pertechnetate ( 99m TcO 4 - ). NIS KO mice showed undetectable serum T 4 and very low serum T 3 levels when fed a diet supplying the minimum I - requirement for rodents. These hypothyroid mice displayed oxidative stress in the thyroid, but not in the brown adipose tissue or liver. Feeding the mice a high-I - diet partially rescued TH biosynthesis, demonstrating that, at high I - concentrations, I - enters the thyroid through routes other than NIS.

  20. The potential of 211Astatine for NIS-mediated radionuclide therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhauck, Michael J.; Sharif Samani, Bibi-Rana; Goeke, Burkhard; Wolf, Ingo; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Stark, Hans-Juergen; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Morris, John C.; Spitzweg, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently the induction of selective iodide uptake in prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter-directed sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression that allowed a significant therapeutic effect of 131 I. In the current study, we studied the potential of the high-energy alpha-emitter 211 At, also transported by NIS, as an alternative radionuclide after NIS gene transfer in tumors with limited therapeutic efficacy of 131 I due to rapid iodide efflux. We investigated uptake and therapeutic efficacy of 211 At in LNCaP cells stably expressing NIS under the control of the PSA promoter (NP-1) in vitro and in vivo. NP-1 cells concentrated 211 At in a perchlorate-sensitive manner, which allowed a dramatic therapeutic effect in vitro. After intrapertoneal injection of 211 At (1 MBq), NP-1 tumors accumulated approximately 16% ID/g 211 At (effective half-life 4.6 h), which resulted in a tumor-absorbed dose of 1,580 ± 345 mGy/MBq and a significant tumor volume reduction of up to 82 ± 19%, while control tumors continued their growth exponentially. A significant therapeutic effect of 211 At has been demonstrated in prostate cancer after PSA promoter-directed NIS gene transfer in vitro and in vivo suggesting a potential role for 211 At as an attractive alternative radioisotope for NIS-targeted radionuclide therapy, in particular in smaller tumors with limited radionuclide retention time. (orig.)

  1. FOUNDING OF THE DISTRICT HOSPITAL IN NIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misa Zivic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After the liberation of Nis from the Turks which took place on January 11th, 1878, there were two military hospitals: one was next to The Skull Tower and the other on the road to Leskovac and there was Islahana the civil institution which was not the forerunner of the district hospital in Nis. At first, they founded the military hospital in Nis in 1878 and then they founded The District Hospital on July 17th in 1881. The first director of the District hospital was Anton Zajicek. He is also the first graduated medical doctor in Nis. The District Hospital was situated on the left bank of the Nisava river in a private house.

  2. Training builds organizations in NIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) has been using workshops to train nongovernmental organization (NGOs) managers in the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union over the past year (1994). 7 were held in Ukraine and Moldova (with support from the Counterpart Foundation under an agreement with the US Agency for International Development), that covered skills for effective training and project proposal writing. The managers represented a variety of fields: environment, health, family planning, social services, consumer affairs, youth needs, women's programs, disabilities, education, and culture. Ralph Stone is CEDPA training director. Adrienne Allison, vice president of CEDPA, is a member of the Volunteer Executive Service Team (VEST), which conducts study tours to the area. A collaborative effort of the US government and the US private sector, VEST supports the development of the independent, civil, and services sectors of the new countries. In Washington, CEDPA conducted workshops on women's reproductive health (February and March) and on business policy and regulation (November and December) for Russians involved in family planning and small business development respectively. These were organized in conjunction with the University of California at Riverside and the Academy for Educational Development.

  3. Feasibility of a novel positive feedback effect of 131I-promoted Bac-Egr1-hNIS expression in malignant glioma via baculovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Rui; Tian Lipeng; Han Bing; Xu Haoping; Zhang Miao; Li Biao

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: As intracellular iodine is released rapidly, increased expression of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) is required for effective radioiodine treatment of tumor. As Egr1 promoter is activated by 131 I and may promote human NIS (hNIS) expression, hNIS also induces 131 I uptake and activates Egr1, so the existence of a positive feedback effect of 131 I-promoted Egr1-hNIS expression is possible. Our purpose was to investigate the possible existence of this positive feedback effect through a series of in vitro pioneer studies. Method: Recombinant baculovirus (Bac-Egr1-hNIS) encoding the hNIS gene under the control of a radiation-inducible Egrl promoter was constructed. To test 131 I-promoted hNIS expression, human malignant glioma U87 cells were transfected with Bac-Egr1-hNIS, stimulated with or without 131 I; the expression of hNIS protein was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry test. In addition, the uptake and efflux of 131 I were determined after the incubation of Bac-Egr1-hNIS-transfected U87 cells with or without 131 I. Results: Immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry test showed a higher hNIS protein expression in Bac-Egr1-hNIS-transfected U87 cells with 131 I stimulation than in cells without stimulation. Bac-Egr1-hNIS-transfected U87 cells accumulated up to about 4.05 times of 131 I after 131 I stimulation. The amount of 131 I uptake in both groups showed a baculovirus dose-dependent manner. However, rapid efflux of radioactivity was observed in both groups, with 50% lost during the first 2 min after the 131 I-containing medium had been replaced by a nonradioactive medium. Conclusion: Our results indicated that an improved transgene expression of 131 I-stimulated hNIS in U87 cells using a baculovirus vector containing the Egr1 promoter is possible, and the increased expression of hNIS is responsible for a higher 131 I uptake. It might provide a reference for the existence of a positive feedback effect in 131 I-promoted Bac-Egr1-hNIS

  4. The Main Directions of the Structural Defragmentation of the State Development Strategy of the NIS of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnyk Alexander G.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the scientific-methodical approach to bridging of gaps on the main directions, in systems of mechanisms and instruments of the State strategy for development of the National Innovation Strategy (NIS, caused by breaks in the system of interactions by elements of its organizational, technological, and institutional structure. This situation in the innovation system is defined as fragmentation of the basic structures of the NIS, which is interrelated by fragmentation of multi-level development strategies for development of the NIS. The most fragmented directions of the State strategy for development of the NIS of Ukraine are defined, among which the system of transfer of technologies and absence of corresponding strategic priorities, technological modernization of industry, integration of the research sphere into the world innovation space, creation of the high-tech sector of NIS. The main directions of structural defragmentation of the State Strategy for Development of the NIS are proposed: organization of innovation process, formation of development institutions, clustering of scientific and production sectors of the NIS, formation of environment to achieve technological leadership.

  5. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  6. Imaging of adenovirus-mediated expression of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) by 99mTcO4 scan in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Woo; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. Y.; Jin, J.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) as a reporter gene by 99m TcO 4 scan in vivo. Recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS (Rad-hNIS) gene was introduced to FRO cell. hNIS expression was assessed by western blot and 99m TcO 4 uptake in vitro. 99m TcO 4 scan were obtained in BALB/c mice 48 hrs post injection of Tris buffer, Rad-hNIS (1x10 9 or 2x10 8 pfu), or Rad-LacZ (1x10 9 pfu) via the tail vein (n=5-7 for each group). Biodistribution study and RT-PCR were performed. A series of 99m TcO 4 scans were obtained in 2 mice until 21 days post Rad-hNIS injection. FRO readily expressed hNIS protein and incorporated significantly higher level of 99m TcO 4 in vitro. With 99m TcO 4 scan, prominent hepatic uptake was observed only in the mice with 1x10 9 pfu of Rad-hNIS. Liver/lung ratio was increased in this group from 15 (5.7±2.5) till 60 min(6.7±3.6) (p 99m TcO 4 uptake (22.7±11.2 %ID/g) and hNIS mRNA expression were exclusively noticed in livers of this group. The persistent hepatic uptake was observed for up one week. NaClO 4 inhibited the hepatic uptake of 99m TcO 4 . hNIS holds a promising potential as an effective reporter gene for noninvasive/repeated imaging in combination with 99m TcO 4

  7. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  8. Towards a biochemical and structural characterisation of the sodium-iodide sym-porter (Nis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrouzet, E.; Marcellin, D.; Huc, S.; Quemeneur, E.; Pourcher, T.

    2006-01-01

    Iodide is essential for thyroid hormone biosynthesis in mammals, and therefore for the control of cell metabolism and the development of the central nervous system in the foetus and newborns, but is relatively scarce element in the environment. To ensure its accumulation, the thyroid gland has evolved a remarkably efficient system, the sodium-iodide sym-porter (NIS), that was first characterized at the molecular level 10 years ago (1). NIS is an intrinsic protein mainly located in the basolateral membrane of thyroid follicular cells where it actively transports iodide ions using the sodium gradient as a driving force (2,3). In addition, this transporter has been found in lactating mammary gland, stomach, and salivary glands, and its mRNA was detected in brain, ovaries, testis. To date, the physiological role of NIS in these organs is not yet identified (3,4).The capacity of NIS to mediate the accumulation of radioactive iodide has been exploited for many years in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer as well as for the detection and radiotherapy of derived metastases. Moreover, the presence of NIS in some breast tumours and the possibility to express it by targeted gene therapy in tumour cells where it is not naturally present could also widen its medical application (4-7). In case of accidental contamination, NIS would also be responsible for accumulation of radioisotopes in the thyroid and for their transfer to the milk and the newborn, eventually causing thyroid cancers. This has motivated our research program in the perspective of designing novel specific therapeutics. During the last decade, the gene encoding the thyroid NIS has been identified and sequenced in various species including rat, mouse and human (1, 8). It was also demonstrated that the protein expression and activity are highly regulated both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels (3). A preliminary topological mode could be drawn from the protein sequence. It proposes a general

  9. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  10. SPECT Imaging for in vivo tracking of NIS containing stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Zhenghong

    2013-04-02

    Na+/I- symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter gene (imagene) for non-invasive imaging of infused stem cells distribution and persistence in vivo on small animal models. NIS is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein that mediates active iodide (I-) uptake into normal thyroid follicular cells and other cells. The advantages of using NIS for non-invasive and repeated scintigraphic imaging in this application are: a) NIS is not a foreign gene and thus eliminate the immunoresponse problem; b) radiotracer or substrate for NIS is simply radioiodide (I-125, I- 123, I-124, and I-124) or [Tc-99m]-pertechnetate, no radiosynthesis is needed. It has been shown that NIS gene transfer can induce radioactive iodide uptake in a variety of cells and that xenografts expressing exogenous NIS could be imaged by non-invasive scintigraphic imaging. The specific aims are: 1.Determine the feasibility, stability and physiological effects of human NIS gene expression on human HSCs and MSCs in vitro. 2.Determine the engraftment of human HSC and MSC co-infused in NOD-SCID mice. 3.Transduce both a drug resistance gene and an imagene into bone marrow stem cells, and follow the dynamics of engraftment after selection in real time.

  11. Novel interactions between vertebrate Hox genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooiveld, MHW; Morgan, R; Rieden, PID; Houtzager, E; Pannese, M; Damen, K; Boncinelli, E; Durston, AJ

    1999-01-01

    Understanding why metazoan Hox/HOM-C genes are expressed in spatiotemporal sequences showing colinearity with their genomic sequence is a central challenge in developmental biology. Here, we studied the consequences of ectopically expressing Hox genes to investigate whether Hox-Hox interactions

  12. HCUP National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIS is the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. It contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each...

  13. SMOKING HABITS OF NIS PRESCHOOL CHILDREN'S PARENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Vucic

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The greatest threat for the public health in Serbia is definitively smoking. 1,3 billion of people in the world are smokers and 4,9 million of death at the global level are direct consequences of smoking. If this smoking rhythm continues until 2020. the number of deaths caused by smoking will have been doubled. There are 4000 identified substances in the tobacco smoke, 50 of which have been proven to be carcinogenic. Nowdays, 14000 to 15000 young people in the developed countries and 68000-84000 in the underdeveloped contries begin to smoke. 700 millions of children, the half of the whole children population, are exposed to the passive smoking.The prevalence of smoking in Serbia, although reduced by 6,9% compared to 2000 is still very high and makes 33,6% of the whole population (38,1% of men and 29,9% of women.The aim of this study was to investigate the smoking habits of preschool children's parents, motivated by the fact that the children of that age are highly sensitive and susceptible to the toxic influence of tobacco smoke, but also to check the necessity for an aggressive public health programme implementation in the aimed populations.This research, as a cross-sectional stady, is carried out among preschool children's parents, children being 4 to 6 years old that attend nursery schools in Nis.The prevalence of smoking in preschool children's parents is extremely high, and makes 46% (45,1% of men and 46,9% of women. Having taken into consideration the parental role in upbringing and education of children, as well as the influence of passive smoking, the main conclusion is that the children's health is seriously endangered. Education, making new and maintaining already existing programmes and legal obligations considering smoking are significant steps for reducing smoking and promoting health.

  14. Imaging of adenovirus-mediated expression of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} scan in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. Y.; Jin, J.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, H. [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) as a reporter gene by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} scan in vivo. Recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS (Rad-hNIS) gene was introduced to FRO cell. hNIS expression was assessed by western blot and {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} uptake in vitro. {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} scan were obtained in BALB/c mice 48 hrs post injection of Tris buffer, Rad-hNIS (1x10{sup 9} or 2x10{sup 8} pfu), or Rad-LacZ (1x10{sup 9} pfu) via the tail vein (n=5-7 for each group). Biodistribution study and RT-PCR were performed. A series of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} scans were obtained in 2 mice until 21 days post Rad-hNIS injection. FRO readily expressed hNIS protein and incorporated significantly higher level of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} in vitro. With {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} scan, prominent hepatic uptake was observed only in the mice with 1x10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-hNIS. Liver/lung ratio was increased in this group from 15 (5.7{+-}2.5) till 60 min(6.7{+-}3.6) (p<0.01). Significantly increased {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} uptake (22.7{+-}11.2 %ID/g) and hNIS mRNA expression were exclusively noticed in livers of this group. The persistent hepatic uptake was observed for up one week. NaClO{sub 4} inhibited the hepatic uptake of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}. hNIS holds a promising potential as an effective reporter gene for noninvasive/repeated imaging in combination with {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}.

  15. Gene-based interaction analysis shows GABAergic genes interacting with parenting in adolescent depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assche, Evelien; Moons, Tim; Cinar, Ozan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Verschueren, Karine; Colpin, Hilde; Lambrechts, Diether; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc; Claes, Stephan; van Winkel, Ruud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most gene-environment interaction studies (G × E) have focused on single candidate genes. This approach is criticized for its expectations of large effect sizes and occurrence of spurious results. We describe an approach that accounts for the polygenic nature of most psychiatric

  16. Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Snieder, Harold; Lagou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a complex multifaceted disease resulting from interactions between genetics and lifestyle. The proportion of phenotypic variance ascribed to genetic variance is 0.4 to 0.7 for obesity and recent years have seen considerable success in identifying disease-susceptibility variants. Although with the advent of genome-wide association studies the list of genetic variants predisposing to obesity has significantly increased the identified variants only explain a fraction of disease heritability. Studies of gene-environment interactions can provide more insight into the biological mechanisms involved in obesity despite the challenges associated with such designs. Epigenetic changes that affect gene function without DNA sequence modifications may be a key factor explaining interindividual differences in obesity, with both genetic and environmental factors influencing the epigenome. Disentangling the relative contributions of genetic, environmental and epigenetic marks to the establishment of obesity is a major challenge given the complex interplay between these determinants.

  17. Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L

    2017-01-01

    .36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint  = 1.9 × 10(-5) ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint  = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10...... epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER......) positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) disease. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability (BFDP) was computed to assess the noteworthiness of the results. Four potential gene-environment interactions were identified as noteworthy (BFDP 

  18. Finding gene-environment interactions for Phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2008-01-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G × E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G × Es for phobias. In addition to the careful concep...

  19. Principles of classification of NIS reserves ampersand resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The newly independent states of the former Soviet Union (NIS) control large resources of uranium. These resources have been the subject of substantial debate within several forums of the Western uranium industry because of confusion surrounding the degree of correlation between the Soviet and various Western classification systems. As illustrated in this article, although developed independently of Western systems, the classification system used by the NIS is very definitive and provides a sound basis for resource reporting. In 1981 a new open-quotes System of Classification of Reserves and Resources of Mineral Depositsclose quotes was adopted. This classification system, which is still used today in the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union (NIS), subdivides mineral deposits into seven categories in three major groups, based on the level of exploration performed: (1) Explored Reserves (A, B, C 1 ); (2) Evaluated Reserves (C 2 ); and (3) Predicted Resources (P 1 , P 2 , P 3 )

  20. The distribution of work performed on a NIS junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Jaime Eduardo Vieira da Silva Moutinho; Ribeiro, Pedro; Kirchner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an experimental setup to measure the work performed in a normal-metal/insulator/superconducting (NIS) junction, subjected to a voltage change and in contact with a thermal bath. We compute the performed work and argue that the associated heat release can be measured experimentally. Our...... results are based on an equivalence between the dynamics of the NIS junction and that of an assembly of two-level systems subjected to a circularly polarised field, for which we can determine the work-characteristic function exactly. The average work dissipated by the NIS junction, as well as its...... fluctuations, are determined. From the work characteristic function, we also compute the work probability-distribution and show that it does not have a Gaussian character. Our results allow for a direct experimental test of the Crooks–Tasaki fluctuation relation....

  1. The distribution of work performed on a NIS junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Jaime E; Ribeiro, Pedro; Kirchner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an experimental setup to measure the work performed in a normal-metal/insulator/superconducting (NIS) junction, subjected to a voltage change and in contact with a thermal bath. We compute the performed work and argue that the associated heat release can be measured experimentally. Our results are based on an equivalence between the dynamics of the NIS junction and that of an assembly of two-level systems subjected to a circularly polarised field, for which we can determine the work-characteristic function exactly. The average work dissipated by the NIS junction, as well as its fluctuations, are determined. From the work characteristic function, we also compute the work probability-distribution and show that it does not have a Gaussian character. Our results allow for a direct experimental test of the Crooks–Tasaki fluctuation relation. (paper)

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A SCREENING APPROACH TO DETECT THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS THAT INHIBIT THE HUMAN SODIUM IODIDE SYMPORTER (NIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data pertaining to a NIS-expressing cell line, hNIS-HEK293T-EPA, and its screening capabilities for determining inhibitors of NIS-mediated iodide uptake. This...

  3. Enhanced iodide sequestration by 3-biphenyl-5,6-dihydroimidazo 2,1-b thiazole in sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS)-expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecat-Guillet, N.; Ambroise, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) to take up iodide has long provided the basis for cyto-reductive gene therapy and cancer treatment with radio-iodide. One of the major limitations of this approach is that radio-iodide retention in NIS-expressing cells is not sufficient for their destruction. We identified and characterized a small organic molecule capable of increasing iodide retention in HEK293 cells permanently transfected with human NIS cDNA (hNIS-HEK293) and in the rat thyroid-derived cell line FRTL-5. In the presence of 3-biphenyl-4'-yl-5,6-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b)thiazole (ISA1), the transmembrane iodide concentration gradient was increased up to 4.5-fold. Our experiments indicate that the imidazo-thiazole derivative acts either by inhibiting anion efflux mechanisms, or by promoting the relocation of iodide into subcellular compartments. This new compound is not only an attractive chemical tool to investigate the mechanisms of iodide flux at the cellular level, but also opens promising perspectives in the treatment of cancer after NIS gene transfer. (authors)

  4. Finding gene-environment interactions for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-03-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G x E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G x Es for phobias. In addition to the careful conceptualisation of new studies, it is suggested that data already collected should be re-analysed in light of increased understanding of processes influencing phobias.

  5. Nursing Information System (NIS): A Tool for Qualitative Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing health care cost, nurse shortages, high patient acuity and the need for more accuracy in care create the need for an effective Nursing Information System. This paper therefore highlights the relevance of NIS in enhancing professional growth and efficiency in nursing practice. It also opens up the anticipated ...

  6. Dėl žem. jeĩnis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigmas Zinkevičius

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available CONCERNING SAMOGITIAN jeĩnis SummaryThe pronoun jeĩnis, -ė ʽhe, she’, noticed by V. Grinaveckis in a Samogitian dialect of Lithu­anian, is treated as an emphatic pronoun by the author of this paper. The pronoun originated on the basis of the epenthetic forms Acc. Sg. fem. jeĩnę and Instr. Sg. fem. jéine, used side by side with the regular dialect jeñję, jénje (= Standard Lith. Ją̃ją, ją́ja. The Nom. Sg. fem. jeĩnė (next to jeĩnę : jéine appeared according to the pattern kárvė : karvę : kárve; the Nom. Sg. masc. jeĩnis arose (next to jeĩnė according to the pattern medìnis : medìnė.

  7. Specificity and Application of the Lantibiotic Protease NisP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Montalbán-López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lantibiotics are ribosomally produced and posttranslationally modified peptides containing several lanthionine residues. They exhibit substantial antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including relevant pathogens. The production of the model lantibiotic nisin minimally requires the expression of the modification and export machinery. The last step during nisin maturation is the cleavage of the leader peptide. This liberates the active compound and is catalyzed by the cell wall-anchored protease NisP. Here, we report the production and purification of a soluble variant of NisP. This has enabled us to study its specificity and test its suitability for biotechnological applications. The ability of soluble NisP to cleave leaders from various substrates was tested with two sets of nisin variants. The first set was designed to investigate the influence of amino acid variations in the leader peptide or variations around the cleavage site. The second set was designed to study the influence of the lanthionine ring topology on the proteolytic efficiency. We show that the substrate promiscuity is higher than has previously been suggested. Our results demonstrate the importance of the arginine residue at the end of the leader peptide and the importance of lanthionine rings in the substrate for specific cleavage. Collectively, these data indicate that NisP is a suitable protease for the activation of diverse heterologously expressed lantibiotics, which is required to release active antimicrobial compounds.

  8. Research progress in machine learning methods for gene-gene interaction detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe-Ye; Tang, Zi-Jun; Xie, Min-Zhu

    2018-03-20

    Complex diseases are results of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. However, the detection of high-dimensional gene-gene interactions is computationally challenging. In the last two decades, machine-learning approaches have been developed to detect gene-gene interactions with some successes. In this review, we summarize the progress in research on machine learning methods, as applied to gene-gene interaction detection. It systematically examines the principles and limitations of the current machine learning methods used in genome wide association studies (GWAS) to detect gene-gene interactions, such as neural networks (NN), random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and provides some insights on the future research directions in the field.

  9. Gene-particulate matter-health interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleeberger, Steven R.; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    Inter-individual variation in human responses to air pollutants suggests that some subpopulations are at increased risk to the detrimental effects of pollutant exposure. Extrinsic factors such as previous exposure and nutritional status may influence individual susceptibility. Intrinsic (host) factors that determine susceptibility include age, gender, and pre-existing disease (e.g., asthma), and it is becoming clear that genetic background also contributes to individual susceptibility. Environmental exposures to particulates and genetic factors associated with disease risk likely interact in a complex fashion that varies from one population and one individual to another. The relationships between genetic background and disease risk and severity are often evaluated through traditional family-based linkage studies and positional cloning techniques. However, case-control studies based on association of disease or disease subphenotypes with candidate genes have advantages over family pedigree studies for complex disease phenotypes. This is based in part on continued development of quantitative analysis and the discovery and availability of simple sequence repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Linkage analyses with genetically standardized animal models also provide a useful tool to identify genetic determinants of responses to environmental pollutants. These approaches have identified significant susceptibility quantitative trait loci on mouse chromosomes 1, 6, 11, and 17. Physical mapping and comparative mapping between human and mouse genomes will yield candidate susceptibility genes that may be tested by association studies in human subjects. Human studies and mouse modeling will provide important insight to understanding genetic factors that contribute to differential susceptibility to air pollutants

  10. Gene-gene interactions and gene polymorphisms of VEGFA and EG-VEGF gene systems in recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Tsz; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Chi; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Both vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) systems play major roles in angiogenesis. A body of evidence suggests VEGFs regulate critical processes during pregnancy and have been associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). However, little information is available regarding the interaction of these two major major angiogenesis-related systems in early human pregnancy. This study was conducted to investigate the association of gene polymorphisms and gene-gene interaction among genes in VEGFA and EG-VEGF systems and idiopathic RPL. A total of 98 women with history of idiopathic RPL and 142 controls were included, and 5 functional SNPs selected from VEGFA, KDR, EG-VEGF (PROK1), PROKR1 and PROKR2 were genotyped. We used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis to choose a best model and evaluate gene-gene interactions. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was introduced to explore possible complex interactions. Two receptor gene polymorphisms [KDR (Q472H) and PROKR2 (V331M)] were significantly associated with idiopathic RPL (P<0.01). The MDR test revealed that the KDR (Q472H) polymorphism was the best loci to be associated with RPL (P=0.02). IPA revealed EG-VEGF and VEGFA systems shared several canonical signaling pathways that may contribute to gene-gene interactions, including the Akt, IL-8, EGFR, MAPK, SRC, VHL, HIF-1A and STAT3 signaling pathways. Two receptor gene polymorphisms [KDR (Q472H) and PROKR2 (V331M)] were significantly associated with idiopathic RPL. EG-VEGF and VEGFA systems shared several canonical signaling pathways that may contribute to gene-gene interactions, including the Akt, IL-8, EGFR, MAPK, SRC, VHL, HIF-1A and STAT3.

  11. In situ preparation of NiS2/CoS2 composite electrocatalytic materials on conductive glass substrates with electronic modulation for high-performance counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Faxin; Wang, Jiali; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Yaqiang; Huang, Niu; Sun, Panpan; Fang, Liang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Xiaohua

    2018-04-01

    The electrocatalytic composite materials of honeycomb structure NiS2 nanosheets loaded with metallic CoS2 nanoparticles are in situ prepared on F doped SnO2 conductive glass (FTO) substrates used as counter electrodes of DSSCs through chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sulfidizing process. Single crystalline NiS2 honeycomb structure array lay a foundation for the large surface area of NiS2/CoS2 composite CEs. The formed NiS2/CoS2 nanointerface modulates electronic structure of composite CEs from the synergetic interactions between CoS2 nanoparticles and NiS2 nanosheets, which dramatically improves the electrocatalytic activity of NiS2/CoS2 composite CEs; Metallic CoS2 nanoparticles covering NiS2 nanosheets electrodes adjusts the electrodes' structure and then reduces the series resistance (Rs) and the Nernst diffusion resistance (Zw) of counter electrodes. The improvement of these areas greatly enhances the electrocatalytic performance of CEs and the short circuit current density (Jsc) and Fill factor (FF) of DSSCs. Impressively, the DSSC based on NiS2/CoS2-0.1 CE shows the best photovoltaic performance with photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 8.22%, which is 24.36% higher than that (6.61%) of the DSSC with Pt CE. And the NiS2/CoS2-0.1 CE also displays a good stability in the iodine based electrolyte. This work indicates that rational construction of composite electrocatalytic materials paves an avenue for high-performance counter electrodes of DSSCs.

  12. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation; Caracterisation moleculaire et structurale de l'extremite C-Terminale du co-transporteur sodium/iode humain (h N.I.S.): Implication de ce domaine dans la regulation du transporteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, S

    2007-12-15

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  13. A review for detecting gene-gene interactions using machine learning methods in genetic epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ching Lee; Liew, Mei Jing; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Salleh, Abdul Hakim Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learning methods to solve such problems by identifying such susceptibility gene which are neural networks (NNs), support vector machine (SVM), and random forests (RFs) in such common and multifactorial disease. This paper gives an overview on machine learning methods, describing the methodology of each machine learning methods and its application in detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Lastly, this paper discussed each machine learning method and presents the strengths and weaknesses of each machine learning method in detecting gene-gene interactions in complex human disease.

  14. Cloning of nis gene and Nisin purification from Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... dimension structure of the purified Nisin was studied by CPHModels as pdb with chimera program. Key words: ..... tionists the classification of microorganisms, and makes ... towards lipid membrane (Breukink and Kruijff, 1999;.

  15. deNIS IIplus - computer-assisted crisis management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corr, B.

    2007-01-01

    The management of catastrophes, as natural disasters or manmade disasters, will only be effective and successful if all relevant information is available in time for decision-makers. During previous large-scale disasters it became evident that information needed for the disaster management was only partially available and that there were fundamental deficits in regard to the flow of information between federal states (''Laender'') as well as communication problems between disaster response teams in the effected regions. On this account in summer 2001 the Federal Ministry of the Interior has decided to develop the ''German Emergency Preparedness Information System (deNIS)''. The aim of the enhanced version deNIS II plus is to built up a network for the civil and disaster response and to assist as an information and communication system for decision-makers of the Federal Government and the Laender Governments to better co-ordination relief and rescue teams in the event of a natural disaster or technical accident. Correspondingly the primary task of deNIS is to support the decision-making of disaster management authorities. (orig.)

  16. Transfer of the sodium/iodide symporter gene into gliomas for radioiodine therapy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Jian; Li Wei; Liu Xiaohua; Xiao Qian; Jia Qiang; Li Ning

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The most frequent brain tumors are the gliomas. Glioblastomas are largely incurable secondary, to their rapid, aggressive and diffusely infiltrative growth pattern and hypervascularity. This study aimed at investigating the possibility of transecting human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene into human glioma cell lines to facilitate radioactive iodide treatment in vitro. Methods: Transecting hNIS gene into human glioma cell lines U251 was performed by recombinant expression plasmids with lipofectamine 2000-plasmid complexes. The hNIS gene cell lines with stable expression (hNIS-U251) were selected through G418 antibiotic constraint. The hNIS-U251 gene cell lines were then evaluated for their biologic functions, including 125 I uptake assay, 125 I influx-course, 125 I-efflux-course, 131 I inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyhe-trazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometer. Results: We were successful in transecting hNIS gene into human glioma cell lines by recombinant expression plasmids, and were able to obtain hNIS gene cell lines (hNIS-U251) with stable expression. The hNIS-U251 cell lines could intake and bind radioactive iodide by hNIS gene. The uptakes of 125 I were 117 fold higher in hNIS-U251 cell lines than U251 cell lines [(50 469.88 ± 997.29), (432.92 ± 89.28) counts·min -1 , respectively]. And the proliferation index of hNIS-U251 cell lines was lower than U251 cell lines after incubating with 131 I. Conclusion: The hNIS gene with stable gene expression (hNIS- U251) cell lines could be labeled by 131 I with a high efficiency, thereby may function effectively in the treatment of glioma-related brain tumors. (authors)

  17. Animal models of gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Yavuz; Sawa, Akira; Ross, Christopher A; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2009-12-07

    The pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related mental illnesses likely involves multiple interactions between susceptibility genes of small effects and environmental factors. Gene-environment interactions occur across different stages of neurodevelopment to produce heterogeneous clinical and pathological manifestations of the disease. The main obstacle for mechanistic studies of gene-environment interplay has been the paucity of appropriate experimental systems for elucidating the molecular pathways that mediate gene-environment interactions relevant to schizophrenia. Recent advances in psychiatric genetics and a plethora of experimental data from animal studies allow us to suggest a new approach to gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. We propose that animal models based on identified genetic mutations and measurable environment factors will help advance studies of the molecular mechanisms of gene-environment interplay.

  18. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  19. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  20. Development and application of an interaction network ontology for literature mining of vaccine-associated gene-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    Literature mining of gene-gene interactions has been enhanced by ontology-based name classifications. However, in biomedical literature mining, interaction keywords have not been carefully studied and used beyond a collection of keywords. In this study, we report the development of a new Interaction Network Ontology (INO) that classifies >800 interaction keywords and incorporates interaction terms from the PSI Molecular Interactions (PSI-MI) and Gene Ontology (GO). Using INO-based literature mining results, a modified Fisher's exact test was established to analyze significantly over- and under-represented enriched gene-gene interaction types within a specific area. Such a strategy was applied to study the vaccine-mediated gene-gene interactions using all PubMed abstracts. The Vaccine Ontology (VO) and INO were used to support the retrieval of vaccine terms and interaction keywords from the literature. INO is aligned with the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) and imports terms from 10 other existing ontologies. Current INO includes 540 terms. In terms of interaction-related terms, INO imports and aligns PSI-MI and GO interaction terms and includes over 100 newly generated ontology terms with 'INO_' prefix. A new annotation property, 'has literature mining keywords', was generated to allow the listing of different keywords mapping to the interaction types in INO. Using all PubMed documents published as of 12/31/2013, approximately 266,000 vaccine-associated documents were identified, and a total of 6,116 gene-pairs were associated with at least one INO term. Out of 78 INO interaction terms associated with at least five gene-pairs of the vaccine-associated sub-network, 14 terms were significantly over-represented (i.e., more frequently used) and 17 under-represented based on our modified Fisher's exact test. These over-represented and under-represented terms share some common top-level terms but are distinct at the bottom levels of the INO hierarchy. The analysis of these

  1. Genome-wide identification of key modulators of gene-gene interaction networks in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Li-Ju; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chuang, Eric Y; Chen, Yidong

    2017-10-03

    With the advances in high-throughput gene profiling technologies, a large volume of gene interaction maps has been constructed. A higher-level layer of gene-gene interaction, namely modulate gene interaction, is composed of gene pairs of which interaction strengths are modulated by (i.e., dependent on) the expression level of a key modulator gene. Systematic investigations into the modulation by estrogen receptor (ER), the best-known modulator gene, have revealed the functional and prognostic significance in breast cancer. However, a genome-wide identification of key modulator genes that may further unveil the landscape of modulated gene interaction is still lacking. We proposed a systematic workflow to screen for key modulators based on genome-wide gene expression profiles. We designed four modularity parameters to measure the ability of a putative modulator to perturb gene interaction networks. Applying the method to a dataset of 286 breast tumors, we comprehensively characterized the modularity parameters and identified a total of 973 key modulator genes. The modularity of these modulators was verified in three independent breast cancer datasets. ESR1, the encoding gene of ER, appeared in the list, and abundant novel modulators were illuminated. For instance, a prognostic predictor of breast cancer, SFRP1, was found the second modulator. Functional annotation analysis of the 973 modulators revealed involvements in ER-related cellular processes as well as immune- and tumor-associated functions. Here we present, as far as we know, the first comprehensive analysis of key modulator genes on a genome-wide scale. The validity of filtering parameters as well as the conservativity of modulators among cohorts were corroborated. Our data bring new insights into the modulated layer of gene-gene interaction and provide candidates for further biological investigations.

  2. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2...

  3. Screening for interaction effects in gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Castaldi

    Full Text Available Expression quantitative trait (eQTL studies are a powerful tool for identifying genetic variants that affect levels of messenger RNA. Since gene expression is controlled by a complex network of gene-regulating factors, one way to identify these factors is to search for interaction effects between genetic variants and mRNA levels of transcription factors (TFs and their respective target genes. However, identification of interaction effects in gene expression data pose a variety of methodological challenges, and it has become clear that such analyses should be conducted and interpreted with caution. Investigating the validity and interpretability of several interaction tests when screening for eQTL SNPs whose effect on the target gene expression is modified by the expression level of a transcription factor, we characterized two important methodological issues. First, we stress the scale-dependency of interaction effects and highlight that commonly applied transformation of gene expression data can induce or remove interactions, making interpretation of results more challenging. We then demonstrate that, in the setting of moderate to strong interaction effects on the order of what may be reasonably expected for eQTL studies, standard interaction screening can be biased due to heteroscedasticity induced by true interactions. Using simulation and real data analysis, we outline a set of reasonable minimum conditions and sample size requirements for reliable detection of variant-by-environment and variant-by-TF interactions using the heteroscedasticity consistent covariance-based approach.

  4. The role of gene-gene interaction in the prediction of criminal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutwell, Brian B; Menard, Scott; Barnes, J C; Beaver, Kevin M; Armstrong, Todd A; Boisvert, Danielle

    2014-04-01

    A host of research has examined the possibility that environmental risk factors might condition the influence of genes on various outcomes. Less research, however, has been aimed at exploring the possibility that genetic factors might interact to impact the emergence of human traits. Even fewer studies exist examining the interaction of genes in the prediction of behavioral outcomes. The current study expands this body of research by testing the interaction between genes involved in neural transmission. Our findings suggest that certain dopamine genes interact to increase the odds of criminogenic outcomes in a national sample of Americans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in extrathyroidal malignancies: focus on breast and urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micali, Salvatore; Bulotta, Stefania; Puppin, Cinzia; Territo, Angelo; Navarra, Michele; Bianchi, Giampaolo; Damante, Giuseppe; Filetti, Sebastiano; Russo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Expression and function of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is requisite for efficient iodide transport in thyrocytes, and its presence in cancer cells allows the use of radioiodine as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in thyroid neoplasia. Discovery of NIS expression in extrathyroidal tissues, including transformed cells, has opened a novel field of research regarding NIS-expressing extrathyroidal neoplasia. Indeed, expression of NIS may be used as a biomarker for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purposes. Moreover, stimulation of endogenous NIS expression may permit the radioiodine treatment of extrathyroidal lesions by concentrating this radioisotope. This review describes recent findings in NIS research in extrathyroidal malignancies, focusing on breast and urological cancer, emphasizing the most relevant developments that may have clinical impact. Given the recent progress in the study of NIS regulation as molecular basis for new therapeutic approaches in extrathyroidal cancers, particular attention is given to studies regarding the relationship between NIS and clinical-pathological aspects of the tumors and the regulation of NIS expression in the experimental models

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; O'Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Szanda, Istvan; Blower, Philip J.; Banga, Jasvinder Paul; Clarke, Susan E.M.; Ballinger, James R.; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2010-01-01

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123 I-iodide, 131 I-iodide and 99m Tc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18 F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([ 18 F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [ 18 F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF 4 - with [ 18 F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [ 18 F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [ 18 F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  7. IAEA co-ordinated technical support programme to the NIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.; Murakami, K.; Blacker, C.; Sharma, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    With most Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union becoming parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty as Non-Nuclear Weapon States, there has been an acute need in these states for considerable assistance for the establishment of the necessary structure and resources to ensure that their commitments to non-proliferation are fully implemented in a timely manner. A number of IAEA Member States have offered and are now providing assistance to the NIS on a bilateral level to set up an appropriate State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) which includes Import/Export Control and Physical Protection of Nuclear Material in each state. The IAEA and these Member States established the Co-ordinated Technical Support Programme (CTSP) to ensure that the support given to the NIS was done in a co-ordinated and transparent manner and to avoid duplication of effort. The IAEA has played a coordinating role for the past 5 years by helping to identify detailed needs in individual States, by providing a platform for Member States to identify areas where they could provide the optimum support, and in developing and preparing the Co-ordinated Technical Support Plans. The IAEA organises annual meetings in Vienna attended by all donor and recipient countries to review the focus and implementation status of the co-ordinated technical support activities. A position statement is made by each donor and recipient country, and views and experiences are exchanged. The contents of the CTSPs and the role of the Agency in monitoring the progress of the individual tasks are reviewed in this paper. A summary comparing the implementation status of the Programme by each country is presented. (author)

  8. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  9. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactions and single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Amina; Mumtaz, Sadaf; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Aslam, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Arif; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Ahmad, Tausif

    2015-05-15

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in the pro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step in glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrial injury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis in T2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissue plasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins. Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strong environmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic mode of inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been reported as a risk for T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed by unifying results in different studies and wide variations have been reported in various ethnic groups. The inter-ethnic variations can be explained by the fact that gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene, gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. This review highlights the impact of these interactions on determining the role of single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesis of T2DM.

  10. Gene-physical activity interactions and their impact on diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Franks, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    to an equal bout of physical activity. Individuals with specific genetic profiles are also expected to be more responsive to the beneficial effects of physical activity in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Identification of such gene-physical activity interactions could give new insights into the biological...... the reader to the recent advances in the genetics of type 2 diabetes, summarize the current evidence on gene-physical activity interactions in relation to type 2 diabetes, and outline how information on gene-physical activity interactions might help improve the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes....... Finally, we will discuss the existing and emerging strategies that might enhance our ability to identify and exploit gene-physical activity interactions in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  11. Detection of Gene Interactions Based on Syntactic Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and genes are considered essential in the description of biomolecular phenomena, and networks of interactions are applied in a system's biology approach. Recently, many studies have sought to extract information from biomolecular text using natural language processing technology. Previous studies have asserted that linguistic information is useful for improving the detection of gene interactions. In particular, syntactic relations among linguistic information are good for detecting gene interactions. However, previous systems give a reasonably good precision but poor recall. To improve recall without sacrificing precision, this paper proposes a three-phase method for detecting gene interactions based on syntactic relations. In the first phase, we retrieve syntactic encapsulation categories for each candidate agent and target. In the second phase, we construct a verb list that indicates the nature of the interaction between pairs of genes. In the last phase, we determine direction rules to detect which of two genes is the agent or target. Even without biomolecular knowledge, our method performs reasonably well using a small training dataset. While the first phase contributes to improve recall, the second and third phases contribute to improve precision. In the experimental results using ICML 05 Workshop on Learning Language in Logic (LLL05 data, our proposed method gave an F-measure of 67.2% for the test data, significantly outperforming previous methods. We also describe the contribution of each phase to the performance.

  12. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, James

    2011-01-01

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro.

  13. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huc, S.

    2007-12-01

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  14. A Review for Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions Using Machine Learning Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lee Koo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learning methods to solve such problems by identifying such susceptibility gene which are neural networks (NNs, support vector machine (SVM, and random forests (RFs in such common and multifactorial disease. This paper gives an overview on machine learning methods, describing the methodology of each machine learning methods and its application in detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Lastly, this paper discussed each machine learning method and presents the strengths and weaknesses of each machine learning method in detecting gene-gene interactions in complex human disease.

  15. A kernel regression approach to gene-gene interaction detection for case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicholas B; Schaid, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Gene-gene interactions are increasingly being addressed as a potentially important contributor to the variability of complex traits. Consequently, attentions have moved beyond single locus analysis of association to more complex genetic models. Although several single-marker approaches toward interaction analysis have been developed, such methods suffer from very high testing dimensionality and do not take advantage of existing information, notably the definition of genes as functional units. Here, we propose a comprehensive family of gene-level score tests for identifying genetic elements of disease risk, in particular pairwise gene-gene interactions. Using kernel machine methods, we devise score-based variance component tests under a generalized linear mixed model framework. We conducted simulations based upon coalescent genetic models to evaluate the performance of our approach under a variety of disease models. These simulations indicate that our methods are generally higher powered than alternative gene-level approaches and at worst competitive with exhaustive SNP-level (where SNP is single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses. Furthermore, we observe that simulated epistatic effects resulted in significant marginal testing results for the involved genes regardless of whether or not true main effects were present. We detail the benefits of our methods and discuss potential genome-wide analysis strategies for gene-gene interaction analysis in a case-control study design. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Gene × physical activity interactions in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shafqat; Rukh, Gull; Varga, Tibor V

    2013-01-01

    Numerous obesity loci have been identified using genome-wide association studies. A UK study indicated that physical activity may attenuate the cumulative effect of 12 of these loci, but replication studies are lacking. Therefore, we tested whether the aggregate effect of these loci is diminished...... in adults of European ancestry reporting high levels of physical activity. Twelve obesity-susceptibility loci were genotyped or imputed in 111,421 participants. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated by summing the BMI-associated alleles of each genetic variant. Physical activity was assessed using self...... combined using meta-analysis weighted by cohort sample size. The meta-analysis yielded a statistically significant GRS × physical activity interaction effect estimate (Pinteraction  = 0.015). However, a statistically significant interaction effect was only apparent in North American cohorts (n = 39...

  17. Ranking candidate disease genes from gene expression and protein interaction: a Katz-centrality based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Many diseases have complex genetic causes, where a set of alleles can affect the propensity of getting the disease. The identification of such disease genes is important to understand the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of pathogenesis, improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and aid in drug discovery. Current genetic studies typically identify chromosomal regions associated specific diseases. But picking out an unknown disease gene from hundreds of candidates located on the same genomic interval is still challenging. In this study, we propose an approach to prioritize candidate genes by integrating data of gene expression level, protein-protein interaction strength and known disease genes. Our method is based only on two, simple, biologically motivated assumptions--that a gene is a good disease-gene candidate if it is differentially expressed in cases and controls, or that it is close to other disease-gene candidates in its protein interaction network. We tested our method on 40 diseases in 58 gene expression datasets of the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database. On these datasets our method is able to predict unknown disease genes as well as identifying pleiotropic genes involved in the physiological cellular processes of many diseases. Our study not only provides an effective algorithm for prioritizing candidate disease genes but is also a way to discover phenotypic interdependency, cooccurrence and shared pathophysiology between different disorders.

  18. Combining many interaction networks to predict gene function and analyze gene lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sara; Morris, Quaid

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review how interaction networks can be used alone or in combination in an automated fashion to provide insight into gene and protein function. We describe the concept of a "gene-recommender system" that can be applied to any large collection of interaction networks to make predictions about gene or protein function based on a query list of proteins that share a function of interest. We discuss these systems in general and focus on one specific system, GeneMANIA, that has unique features and uses different algorithms from the majority of other systems. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronow Bruce J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN analyses. Results For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method are applied to prioritize disease candidate genes in a training-test schema. Using a list of known disease-related genes from our earlier study as a training set ("seeds", and the rest of the known genes as a test list, we perform large-scale cross validation to rank the candidate genes and also evaluate and compare the performance of our approach. Under appropriate settings – for example, a back probability of 0.3 for PageRank with Priors and HITS with Priors, and step size 6 for K-Step Markov method – the three methods achieved a comparable AUC value, suggesting a similar performance. Conclusion Even though network-based methods are generally not as effective as integrated functional annotation-based methods for disease candidate gene prioritization, in a one-to-one comparison, PPIN-based candidate gene prioritization performs better than all other gene features or annotations. Additionally, we demonstrate that methods used for studying both social and Web networks can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization.

  20. Genes2Networks: connecting lists of gene symbols using mammalian protein interactions databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma'ayan Avi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, mammalian protein-protein interaction network databases have been developed. The interactions in these databases are either extracted manually from low-throughput experimental biomedical research literature, extracted automatically from literature using techniques such as natural language processing (NLP, generated experimentally using high-throughput methods such as yeast-2-hybrid screens, or interactions are predicted using an assortment of computational approaches. Genes or proteins identified as significantly changing in proteomic experiments, or identified as susceptibility disease genes in genomic studies, can be placed in the context of protein interaction networks in order to assign these genes and proteins to pathways and protein complexes. Results Genes2Networks is a software system that integrates the content of ten mammalian interaction network datasets. Filtering techniques to prune low-confidence interactions were implemented. Genes2Networks is delivered as a web-based service using AJAX. The system can be used to extract relevant subnetworks created from "seed" lists of human Entrez gene symbols. The output includes a dynamic linkable three color web-based network map, with a statistical analysis report that identifies significant intermediate nodes used to connect the seed list. Conclusion Genes2Networks is powerful web-based software that can help experimental biologists to interpret lists of genes and proteins such as those commonly produced through genomic and proteomic experiments, as well as lists of genes and proteins associated with disease processes. This system can be used to find relationships between genes and proteins from seed lists, and predict additional genes or proteins that may play key roles in common pathways or protein complexes.

  1. O ténis e a moda

    OpenAIRE

    Morais-Alexandre, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Interagindo com a evolução do vestuário, o desporto em geral e o ténis em particular têm influenciado ao longo dos tempos a Moda, sendo o contrário também verdadeiro. Assim, muitos dos trajes adaptados à prática desportiva vão passando para o traje quotidiano, da mesma forma que algumas das inovações da Moda são incorporadas no vestuário usado para praticar desporto, ao nível da forma, mas também das cores, padrões, ornamentos, etc., sendo ainda possível verificar neste âmbito a influência do...

  2. A Partial Least Square Approach for Modeling Gene-gene and Gene-environment Interactions When Multiple Markers Are Genotyped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ho, Gloria; Ye, Kenny; Strickler, Howard; Elston, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic association studies achieve an unprecedented level of resolution in mapping disease genes by genotyping dense SNPs in a gene region. Meanwhile, these studies require new powerful statistical tools that can optimally handle a large amount of information provided by genotype data. A question that arises is how to model interactions between two genes. Simply modeling all possible interactions between the SNPs in two gene regions is not desirable because a greatly increased number of degrees of freedom can be involved in the test statistic. We introduce an approach to reduce the genotype dimension in modeling interactions. The genotype compression of this approach is built upon the information on both the trait and the cross-locus gametic disequilibrium between SNPs in two interacting genes, in such a way as to parsimoniously model the interactions without loss of useful information in the process of dimension reduction. As a result, it improves power to detect association in the presence of gene-gene interactions. This approach can be similarly applied for modeling gene-environment interactions. We compare this method with other approaches: the corresponding test without modeling any interaction, that based on a saturated interaction model, that based on principal component analysis, and that based on Tukey’s 1-df model. Our simulations suggest that this new approach has superior power to that of the other methods. In an application to endometrial cancer case-control data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), this approach detected AKT1 and AKT2 as being significantly associated with endometrial cancer susceptibility by taking into account their interactions with BMI. PMID:18615621

  3. GESearch: An Interactive GUI Tool for Identifying Gene Expression Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of gene expression data generated by microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies present challenges to exploit their biological meanings. When searching for the coexpression genes, the data mining process is largely affected by selection of algorithms. Thus, it is highly desirable to provide multiple options of algorithms in the user-friendly analytical toolkit to explore the gene expression signatures. For this purpose, we developed GESearch, an interactive graphical user interface (GUI toolkit, which is written in MATLAB and supports a variety of gene expression data files. This analytical toolkit provides four models, including the mean, the regression, the delegate, and the ensemble models, to identify the coexpression genes, and enables the users to filter data and to select gene expression patterns by browsing the display window or by importing knowledge-based genes. Subsequently, the utility of this analytical toolkit is demonstrated by analyzing two sets of real-life microarray datasets from cell-cycle experiments. Overall, we have developed an interactive GUI toolkit that allows for choosing multiple algorithms for analyzing the gene expression signatures.

  4. A deeper look at two concepts of measuring gene-gene interactions: logistic regression and interaction information revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielniczuk, Jan; Teisseyre, Paweł

    2018-03-01

    Detection of gene-gene interactions is one of the most important challenges in genome-wide case-control studies. Besides traditional logistic regression analysis, recently the entropy-based methods attracted a significant attention. Among entropy-based methods, interaction information is one of the most promising measures having many desirable properties. Although both logistic regression and interaction information have been used in several genome-wide association studies, the relationship between them has not been thoroughly investigated theoretically. The present paper attempts to fill this gap. We show that although certain connections between the two methods exist, in general they refer two different concepts of dependence and looking for interactions in those two senses leads to different approaches to interaction detection. We introduce ordering between interaction measures and specify conditions for independent and dependent genes under which interaction information is more discriminative measure than logistic regression. Moreover, we show that for so-called perfect distributions those measures are equivalent. The numerical experiments illustrate the theoretical findings indicating that interaction information and its modified version are more universal tools for detecting various types of interaction than logistic regression and linkage disequilibrium measures. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Insulators form gene loops by interacting with promoters in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Maksim; Davydova, Anna; Kyrchanova, Olga; Parshikov, Alexander; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2011-09-01

    Chromatin insulators are regulatory elements involved in the modulation of enhancer-promoter communication. The 1A2 and Wari insulators are located immediately downstream of the Drosophila yellow and white genes, respectively. Using an assay based on the yeast GAL4 activator, we have found that both insulators are able to interact with their target promoters in transgenic lines, forming gene loops. The existence of an insulator-promoter loop is confirmed by the fact that insulator proteins could be detected on the promoter only in the presence of an insulator in the transgene. The upstream promoter regions, which are required for long-distance stimulation by enhancers, are not essential for promoter-insulator interactions. Both insulators support basal activity of the yellow and white promoters in eyes. Thus, the ability of insulators to interact with promoters might play an important role in the regulation of basal gene transcription.

  6. EIGER: Electromagnetic Interactions GEneRalized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagne, N J; Sharpe, R M; Rockway, J W

    2001-01-01

    The EIGER (Electromagnetic Interactions Generalized) modeling suite is a joint development activity by the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Sandia National Labs, the University of Houston, and the Navy (Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego). The effort endeavors to bring the next generation of hybrid, higher-order, full-wave analysis methods into a single integrated framework. The tools are based upon frequency-domain solutions of Maxwell's equations to model scattering and radiation from complex 2D and 3D structures. The framework employs boundary element solutions of integral equation formulations and finite element solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation. A goal is to use higher-order representations to model both the geometry (using higher-order geometric elements) and numerical methods (using higher-order vector basis functions). In addition, a variety of advanced Green's functions and symmetry operators can be applied to efficiently treat geometries containing such features as layered material regions and periodic structures. Each of these methods can be brought to bear simultaneously, on different portions of a complex structure. HPC implementation issues were addressed during the design of the software architecture, so that the same package runs on platforms ranging from serial desktop workstations through advanced HPC architectures. Our current efforts on higher-order modeling and improved solver libraries will be highlighted

  7. Evidence for plasticity genotypes in a gene-gene-environment interaction : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, E; Bouma, Esther; Riese, Harriette; Laceulle, Odilia; Ormel, J.; Oldehinkel, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to study how functional polymorphisms in the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF val66met) and the serotonin transporter gene linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR) interact with childhood adversities in predicting Effortful Control. Effortful Control refers to the ability to

  8. Gene-Environment Interactions in Severe Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eUher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe mental illness is a broad category that includes schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression. Both genetic disposition and environmental exposures play important roles in the development of severe mental illness. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the roles of genetic and environmental depend on each other. Gene-environment interactions may underlie the paradox of strong environmental factors for highly heritable disorders, the low estimates of shared environmental influences in twin studies of severe mental illness and the heritability gap between twin and molecular heritability estimates. Sons and daughters of parents with severe mental illness are more vulnerable to the effects of prenatal and postnatal environmental exposures, suggesting that the expression of genetic liability depends on environment. In the last decade, gene-environment interactions involving specific molecular variants in candidate genes have been identified. Replicated findings include an interaction between a polymorphism in the AKT1 gene and cannabis use in the development of psychosis and an interaction between the length polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene and childhood maltreatment in the development of persistent depressive disorder. Bipolar disorder has been underinvestigated, with only a single study showing an interaction between a functional polymorphism in BDNF and stressful life events triggering bipolar depressive episodes. The first systematic search for gene-environment interactions has found that a polymorphism in CTNNA3 may sensitise the developing brain to the pathogenic effect of cytomegalovirus in utero, leading to schizophrenia in adulthood. Strategies for genome-wide investigations will likely include coordination between epidemiological and genetic research efforts, systematic assessment of multiple environmental factors in large samples, and prioritization of genetic variants.

  9. Identification of essential amino acid residues in the nisin dehydratase NisB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem eKhusainov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nisin is a posttranslationally-modified antimicrobial peptide that has the ability to induce its own biosynthesis. Serines and threonines in the modifiable core peptide part of precursor nisin are dehydrated to dehydroalanines and dehydrobutyrines by the dehydratase NisB, and subsequently cysteines are coupled to the dehydroamino acids by the cyclase NisC. In this study, we applied extensive site-directed mutagenesis, together with direct binding studies, to investigate the molecular mechanism of the dehydratase NisB. We use a natural nisin-producing strain as a host to probe mutant-NisB functionality. Importantly, we are able to differentiate between intracellular and secreted fully dehydrated precursor nisin, enabling investigation of the NisB properties needed for the release of dehydrated precursor nisin to its devoted secretion system NisT. We report that single amino acid substitutions of conserved residues, i.e. R83A, R83M and R87A result in incomplete dehydration of precursor nisin and prevention of secretion. Single point NisB mutants Y80F and H961A, result in a complete lack of dehydration of precursor nisin, but do not abrogate precursor nisin binding. The data indicate that residues Y80 and H961 are directly involved in catalysis, fitting well with their position in the recently published 3D-structure of NisB. We confirm, by in vivo studies, results that were previously obtained from in vitro experiments and NisB structure elucidation and show that previous findings translate well to effects seen in the original production host.

  10. A Nonlinear Model for Gene-Based Gene-Environment Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of literature has confirmed the role of gene-environment (G×E interaction in the etiology of complex human diseases. Traditional methods are predominantly focused on the analysis of interaction between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and an environmental variable. Given that genes are the functional units, it is crucial to understand how gene effects (rather than single SNP effects are influenced by an environmental variable to affect disease risk. Motivated by the increasing awareness of the power of gene-based association analysis over single variant based approach, in this work, we proposed a sparse principle component regression (sPCR model to understand the gene-based G×E interaction effect on complex disease. We first extracted the sparse principal components for SNPs in a gene, then the effect of each principal component was modeled by a varying-coefficient (VC model. The model can jointly model variants in a gene in which their effects are nonlinearly influenced by an environmental variable. In addition, the varying-coefficient sPCR (VC-sPCR model has nice interpretation property since the sparsity on the principal component loadings can tell the relative importance of the corresponding SNPs in each component. We applied our method to a human birth weight dataset in Thai population. We analyzed 12,005 genes across 22 chromosomes and found one significant interaction effect using the Bonferroni correction method and one suggestive interaction. The model performance was further evaluated through simulation studies. Our model provides a system approach to evaluate gene-based G×E interaction.

  11. Systematic Search for Gene-Gene Interaction Effect on Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Systematic Search for Gene-Gene Interaction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Effect on Prostate Cancer Risk 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0488 5c. PROGRAM...Supported by this grant ) 1. Tao S, Wang Z, Feng J, Hsu FC, Jin G, Kin ST, Zhang Z, Gronberg H, Zheng, SL, Isaacs WB, XU J, Sun J. A Genome-Wide Search for...order interactions among estrogen- metabolism genes in sporadic breast cancer. Am J Hum Genet, 69, 138-47. 48. Marchini, J., Donnelly, P. and Cardon

  12. Radioiodine uptake of undifferentiated thyroid cancer cells by adenovirus-mediated Na+/ I- symporter gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Shin, J. H.; Oh, H. J.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Cho, B. Y. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Seoul National, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. H. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To increase radioiodine uptake on undifferentiated thyroid cancer cell (ARO cells) by adenovirus-mediated human Na+/I- symporter (hNIS) gene transfer. Recombinant adenovirus Ad-hNIS was manufactured successfully. After transfecting Ad-hNIS on ARO cells, in vitro I-125 uptake and efflux studies were performed. For in vivo studies, 1.510'8 p.f.u. (50 1) of Ad-hNIS was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the R thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice (n=12), and same amount of normal saline was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the L thigh. Two, 3, 4 and 6 days after intratumoral injection of Ad-hNIS, I-131 images (3 mice per day) were taken and xenograft tumors on both thighs were all excised. Total RNA was extracted from each tumor tissue and RT-PCR was performed to confirm the hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS injected xenograft ARO tumors. I-125 uptake of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells was increased up to 233 folds at 120 minutes in vitro. I-125 efflux study revealed rapid washout of I-125 from Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells. On dynamic image, I-131 uptake of Ad-hNIS injected ARO tumor was continuously increased until 60 minutes. Mean count ratios of xenograft ARO tumors (R/L) of 60 minutes I-131 images at 2, 3, 4 and 6 days after Ad-hNIS injection were 2.85, 2.54, 2.31, and 2.18, each. On RT-PCR, hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO xenograft tumors was confirmed. Radioiodine uptake was successfully increased in ARO cells by adenovirus-mediated hNIs gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Network graph analysis of gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyoung; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2012-12-01

    Most common complex traits, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cancers, are known to be associated with multiple genes, environmental factors, and their epistasis. Recently, the development of advanced genotyping technologies has allowed us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWASs). For detecting the effects of multiple genes on complex traits, many approaches have been proposed for GWASs. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is one of the powerful and efficient methods for detecting high-order gene-gene (GxG) interactions. However, the biological interpretation of GxG interactions identified by MDR analysis is not easy. In order to aid the interpretation of MDR results, we propose a network graph analysis to elucidate the meaning of identified GxG interactions. The proposed network graph analysis consists of three steps. The first step is for performing GxG interaction analysis using MDR analysis. The second step is to draw the network graph using the MDR result. The third step is to provide biological evidence of the identified GxG interaction using external biological databases. The proposed method was applied to Korean Association Resource (KARE) data, containing 8838 individuals with 327,632 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, in order to perform GxG interaction analysis of body mass index (BMI). Our network graph analysis successfully showed that many identified GxG interactions have known biological evidence related to BMI. We expect that our network graph analysis will be helpful to interpret the biological meaning of GxG interactions.

  14. Power of tests for comparing trend curves with application to national immunization survey (NIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen

    2011-02-28

    To develop statistical tests for comparing trend curves of study outcomes between two socio-demographic strata across consecutive time points, and compare statistical power of the proposed tests under different trend curves data, three statistical tests were proposed. For large sample size with independent normal assumption among strata and across consecutive time points, the Z and Chi-square test statistics were developed, which are functions of outcome estimates and the standard errors at each of the study time points for the two strata. For small sample size with independent normal assumption, the F-test statistic was generated, which is a function of sample size of the two strata and estimated parameters across study period. If two trend curves are approximately parallel, the power of Z-test is consistently higher than that of both Chi-square and F-test. If two trend curves cross at low interaction, the power of Z-test is higher than or equal to the power of both Chi-square and F-test; however, at high interaction, the powers of Chi-square and F-test are higher than that of Z-test. The measurement of interaction of two trend curves was defined. These tests were applied to the comparison of trend curves of vaccination coverage estimates of standard vaccine series with National Immunization Survey (NIS) 2000-2007 data. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. An Interactive Database of Cocaine-Responsive Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard M. Freeman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The postgenomic era of large-scale gene expression studies is inundating drug abuse researchers and many other scientists with findings related to gene expression. This information is distributed across many different journals, and requires laborious literature searches. Here, we present an interactive database that combines existing information related to cocaine-mediated changes in gene expression in an easy-to-use format. The database is limited to statistically significant changes in mRNA or protein expression after cocaine administration. The Flash-based program is integrated into a Web page, and organizes changes in gene expression based on neuroanatomical region, general function, and gene name. Accompanying each gene is a description of the gene, links to the original publications, and a link to the appropriate OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entry. The nature of this review allows for timely modifications and rapid inclusion of new publications, and should help researchers build second-generation hypotheses on the role of gene expression changes in the physiology and behavior of cocaine abuse. Furthermore, this method of organizing large volumes of scientific information can easily be adapted to assist researchers in fields outside of drug abuse.

  16. Inverse gene-for-gene interactions contribute additively to tan spot susceptibility in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Zurn, Jason D; Kariyawasam, Gayan; Faris, Justin D; Shi, Gongjun; Hansen, Jana; Rasmussen, Jack B; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2017-06-01

    Tan spot susceptibility is conferred by multiple interactions of necrotrophic effector and host sensitivity genes. Tan spot of wheat, caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is an important disease in almost all wheat-growing areas of the world. The disease system is known to involve at least three fungal-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) that interact with the corresponding host sensitivity (S) genes in an inverse gene-for-gene manner to induce disease. However, it is unknown if the effects of these NE-S gene interactions contribute additively to the development of tan spot. In this work, we conducted disease evaluations using different races and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in a wheat recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two susceptible genotypes, LMPG-6 and PI 626573. The two parental lines each harbored a single known NE sensitivity gene with LMPG-6 having the Ptr ToxC sensitivity gene Tsc1 and PI 626573 having the Ptr ToxA sensitivity gene Tsn1. Transgressive segregation was observed in the population for all races. QTL mapping revealed that both loci (Tsn1 and Tsc1) were significantly associated with susceptibility to race 1 isolates, which produce both Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, and the two genes contributed additively to tan spot susceptibility. For isolates of races 2 and 3, which produce only Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, only Tsn1 and Tsc1 were associated with tan spot susceptibility, respectively. This work clearly demonstrates that tan spot susceptibility in this population is due primarily to two NE-S interactions. Breeders should remove both sensitivity genes from wheat lines to obtain high levels of tan spot resistance.

  17. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, Hepatobiliary Ctr, U785, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Univ Paris Sud, Fac Med, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [INSERM, U803, F-91400 Orsay (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91400 Orsay (France); Roux, J.; Cales, P. [Univ Angers, UPRES EA 3859, Lab Hemodynam Interact Fibrose et Invas Tumorale H, Angers (France); Clerc, J. [Hop Cochin, AP HP, Dept Nucl Med, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III {alpha}, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of {sup 131}I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. {sup 131}I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  18. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J.; Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Roux, J.; Cales, P.; Clerc, J.

    2008-01-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III α, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of 131 I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. 131 I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  19. Risk score modeling of multiple gene to gene interactions using aggregated-multifactor dimensionality reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Hongying

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR has been widely applied to detect gene-gene (GxG interactions associated with complex diseases. Existing MDR methods summarize disease risk by a dichotomous predisposing model (high-risk/low-risk from one optimal GxG interaction, which does not take the accumulated effects from multiple GxG interactions into account. Results We propose an Aggregated-Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (A-MDR method that exhaustively searches for and detects significant GxG interactions to generate an epistasis enriched gene network. An aggregated epistasis enriched risk score, which takes into account multiple GxG interactions simultaneously, replaces the dichotomous predisposing risk variable and provides higher resolution in the quantification of disease susceptibility. We evaluate this new A-MDR approach in a broad range of simulations. Also, we present the results of an application of the A-MDR method to a data set derived from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis patients treated with methotrexate (MTX that revealed several GxG interactions in the folate pathway that were associated with treatment response. The epistasis enriched risk score that pooled information from 82 significant GxG interactions distinguished MTX responders from non-responders with 82% accuracy. Conclusions The proposed A-MDR is innovative in the MDR framework to investigate aggregated effects among GxG interactions. New measures (pOR, pRR and pChi are proposed to detect multiple GxG interactions.

  20. Experiment study with baculovirus-mediated transfer of the thyroid sodium/iodide symporter gene into thyroid cancer for a targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yifan; Li Biao; Zhao Long; You Bei; Yin Guizhi; Zhu Chengmo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of thyroid cancers for radiotherapy by using baculoviral vector to deliver the NIS gene into the tumor cells. Method: Constructed a recombinant baculovirus encoding the human NIS gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. Using a mouse monoclonal antibody and a FITC-labeled antimouse antibody to confirm expression of the NIS protein of infected tumor cells by immunofluorescence. In vitro iodide uptake experiments were carded out on BacNIS-infected tumor cells to further characterize the BacNIS virus, and cell killing with 131I and clonogenic assay were performed on BacNIS-infected cell to observe the selective killing effect of 1311 on NIS-expressing cells. Results: Infection of thyroidcancer cells (FTC-133, W3) with BacNIS resulted in perchlorate-sensitive 125I uptake by these cells to a higher level than that in noninfected cells. But 1251 uptake of 8505C is very low. Demonstrating that the BacNIS vector can function in tumor cells. In addition, AdNIS-infected tumor cells were selectively killed by exposure to 1311, as revealed by clonogenicassays, higher than that in nontreated tumors. Conclusions: AdNIS is very efficient in triggering iodide uptake by infected tumor cell, outlining the potential of this novel cancer gene therapy approach for a targeted radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  2. Blood lead levels, iron metabolism gene polymorphisms and homocysteine: a gene-environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lee, Mee-Ri; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2017-12-01

    Homocysteine has been causally associated with various adverse health outcomes. Evidence supporting the relationship between lead and homocysteine levels has been accumulating, but most prior studies have not focused on the interaction with genetic polymorphisms. From a community-based prospective cohort, we analysed 386 participants (aged 41-71 years) with information regarding blood lead and plasma homocysteine levels. Blood lead levels were measured between 2001 and 2003, and plasma homocysteine levels were measured in 2007. Interactions of lead levels with 42 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes ( TF , HFE , CBS , BHMT and MTR ) were assessed via a 2-degree of freedom (df) joint test and a 1-df interaction test. In secondary analyses using imputation, we further assessed 58 imputed SNPs in the TF and MTHFR genes. Blood lead concentrations were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels (p=0.0276). Six SNPs in the TF and MTR genes were screened using the 2-df joint test, and among them, three SNPs in the TF gene showed interactions with lead with respect to homocysteine levels through the 1-df interaction test (plead levels. Blood lead levels were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels measured 4-6 years later, and three SNPs in the TF gene modified the association. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. SANITARY ASPECT OF NUTRITION CONTROL IN PUBLIC KITCHEN IN NIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Milutinovic

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to evaluate sanitary condition of food preparation and distribution in the "Public kitchen" in Nis, as well as the meals’ quality in order to assess the health risks. The local inspection of the objects and microbiological analysis of swaps were done according to standard methods. Energetical values and biochemical structure of the meals were assessed by bromatological methods and energetical density was calculated. The study was being conducted from 2002 – 2005. The results show that sanitary conditions in the object were not adequate, because of a high percentage of incorrect samples (13.4% from the total number of samples. Energetical values of meals were usually adequate (1157 – 1564 kcal, 4837 – 6581 kJ, but constantly decreased. The chemical structure of the meals was adequate too, meaning that meals were very well- planed. The energetic density of meals was high (1,18 – 1,42 kcal/g. Our conclusion is that there are no alternatives to continuous health care education of the medical stuff and regular sanitary hygienic control, all with the aim to accomplish complete social function of the public kitchen and to protect the health of its consumers.

  4. Magnetic field measurement in the analyzing magnet of NIS spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramenko, S. A.; Afanas'ev, S. V.; Voloshina, I. G.; Dolgii, S. A.; Yusupov, A. Yu.; Kalmykov, A. V.; Makoveev, V. K.; Nikolaevskii, G. P.; Ostrovskii, I. V.; Perepelkin, E. E.; Peresedov, V. F.; Plyashkevich, S. N.; Rossiiskaya, N. S.; Salmin, R. A.; Spodarets, V. K.; Strokovskii, E. A.; Yudin, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    The main goals of the Nucleon Intrinsic Strangeness experiment (NIS) are the search for the effects of hidden polarized strangeness in the nucleon and the exploration and study of exotic baryons (pentaquarks) in NN reactions. The setup is located in the Laboratory of High Energies at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in channel 4V of the Nuclotron extracted beam with the energy between 1 and 4 GeV. The 1SP-40-4V electromagnet of the spectrometer has the external dimensions 3.20 × 3.26 × 4.48 m and the aperture 2.74 × 0.68 m. The magnetic field measurement was performed using the three-component Hall magnetometer in the computer-controlled automated mode. The volume of measurements was 1.03 × 0.60 × 3.92 m. The description of the measuring equipment and measurement procedure is given. The results of the measurements are used for the Monte Carlo computer modeling of the experiment. These results will be used in the analysis of physical data after their acquisition.

  5. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  6. Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) in fibroadenoma breast--a immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ruchi; Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Tandon, Ashwani; Godbole, Madan M; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Vinita; Dwivedi, Varsha; Pal, Lily

    2011-02-01

    Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), responsible for the active transport of iodine is an integral plasma membrane glycoprotein present in the thyroid cells and extrathyroid tissues like breast and salivary glands. If its functional form is unequivocally shown in benign or malignant breast tissues, then it may serve as a basis for diagnosis and treatment using radioactive iodine. With an aim to analyze the hNIS expression in a distinct benign breast condition of fibroadenoma, biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, normal non-lactating breast tissue and biopsy proven infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues were examined for hNIS expression using immunohistochemistry. Out of 20 biopsy proven fibroadenoma tissues, 19 (95%) showed positivity for hNIS protein and only one was negative. Of these 10% were mildly positive, 50% cases were moderately positive and 35% showed intense positivity. None of the control tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty specimens or normal breast tissues samples (5 cms away from the tumor) were positive, hNIS was also intensely positive in 9 out of 10 (90%) infiltrating duct carcinoma tissues and moderately positive in one case. These preliminary results show that hNIS was present in high frequency as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in fibroadenoma breast.

  7. Association testing to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes in trio data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonok eLee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD occurs more often among males than females in a 4:1 ratio. Among theories used to explain the causes of ASD, the X chromosome and the Y chromosome theories attribute ASD to X-linked mutation and the male-limited gene expressions on the Y chromosome, respectively. Despite the rationale of the theory, studies have failed to attribute the sex-biased ratio to the significant linkage or association on the regions of interest on X chromosome. We further study the gender biased ratio by examining the possible interaction effects between two genes in the sex chromosomes. We propose a logistic regression model with mixed effects to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes. We investigated the power and type I error rates of the approach for a range of minor allele frequencies and varying linkage disequilibrium between markers and QTLs. We also evaluated the robustness of the model to population stratification. We applied the model to a trio-family data set with an ASD affected male child to study gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes.

  8. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Helen M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis, gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Method A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918 assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. Conclusion The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis

  9. The effect of 17-AAG on iodine uptake kinetics of NIS-transfected anaplastic thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renfei; Tan Jian; Li Wei; Meng Zhaowei; Zheng Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG) on iodine uptake kinetics of NIS-transfected anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) cells. Methods: Lipofection was used to transfect the recombinant plasmid, namely pcDNA3.1-NIS, into FRO cells (ATC cell line). A stable cell line NIS-FRO was obtained by G418 resistance selection. 125 I was added into the medium, and influx and efflux experiments were performed. Different time-radioactivity curves were drawn, and further analysis was performed between the non-transfected cells (the control group) and NIS-FRO cells treated with 1 μmol/L 17-AAG for 24 h. Student's t-test was used to analyze the data. Results: The iodine uptake ability of the NIS-FRO cells was significantly higher than that of the FRO cells (about 10.68 times, t=45.329, P<0.001). However, 125 I out-flowed rapidly when removed from the medium, and the retention rate of 125 I in the NIS-FRO cells was only 10.5% of the initial amount after 30 rin. After treatment with 1 μmol/L 17-AAG for 24 h, the 125 I uptake ability of NIS-FRO cells further increased. During the 20-60 min incubation with 125 I, the iodine uptake ability of 17-AAG treated NIS-FRO cells increased significantly with radioactive counts of 31771.8- 54815.5 per minute,which was much higher than that of the control group (24020.3-41293.8 per minute; t=3.096, 4.275, 3.055, 4.292 and 5.496, respectively, all P<0.05). The iodine uptake ability increased about 24.8%-35.5%. Furthermore, 5-30 min after removing the medium, the retention rates of 125 I in the 17-AAG treated NIS-FRO cells were significantly increased compared with those of the control group (32.7%-85.2% vs 10.5%-56.8%; t=22.801, 13.096, 19.631, 38.205, 43.519, 29.322, respectively, all P<0.01), and 125 I efflux was reduced. After 30 min, 125 I retention rate of the treatment group was 32.7%, which was 3.1 times higher than that of the control group. Conclusion: The iodine uptake ability can be

  10. Network Graph Analysis of Gene-Gene Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Study Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyoung Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Most common complex traits, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cancers, are known to be associated with multiple genes, environmental factors, and their epistasis. Recently, the development of advanced genotyping technologies has allowed us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWASs. For detecting the effects of multiple genes on complex traits, many approaches have been proposed for GWASs. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR is one of the powerful and efficient methods for detecting high-order gene-gene (GxG interactions. However, the biological interpretation of GxG interactions identified by MDR analysis is not easy. In order to aid the interpretation of MDR results, we propose a network graph analysis to elucidate the meaning of identified GxG interactions. The proposed network graph analysis consists of three steps. The first step is for performing GxG interaction analysis using MDR analysis. The second step is to draw the network graph using the MDR result. The third step is to provide biological evidence of the identified GxG interaction using external biological databases. The proposed method was applied to Korean Association Resource (KARE data, containing 8838 individuals with 327,632 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, in order to perform GxG interaction analysis of body mass index (BMI. Our network graph analysis successfully showed that many identified GxG interactions have known biological evidence related to BMI. We expect that our network graph analysis will be helpful to interpret the biological meaning of GxG interactions.

  11. Protein Annotation from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Cao D.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precis...

  12. Ultrahigh-dimensional variable selection method for whole-genome gene-gene interaction analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueki Masao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs is an attractive way for identification of genetic components that confers susceptibility of human complex diseases. Individual hypothesis testing for SNP-SNP pairs as in common genome-wide association study (GWAS however involves difficulty in setting overall p-value due to complicated correlation structure, namely, the multiple testing problem that causes unacceptable false negative results. A large number of SNP-SNP pairs than sample size, so-called the large p small n problem, precludes simultaneous analysis using multiple regression. The method that overcomes above issues is thus needed. Results We adopt an up-to-date method for ultrahigh-dimensional variable selection termed the sure independence screening (SIS for appropriate handling of numerous number of SNP-SNP interactions by including them as predictor variables in logistic regression. We propose ranking strategy using promising dummy coding methods and following variable selection procedure in the SIS method suitably modified for gene-gene interaction analysis. We also implemented the procedures in a software program, EPISIS, using the cost-effective GPGPU (General-purpose computing on graphics processing units technology. EPISIS can complete exhaustive search for SNP-SNP interactions in standard GWAS dataset within several hours. The proposed method works successfully in simulation experiments and in application to real WTCCC (Wellcome Trust Case–control Consortium data. Conclusions Based on the machine-learning principle, the proposed method gives powerful and flexible genome-wide search for various patterns of gene-gene interaction.

  13. Functional modules by relating protein interaction networks and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Mewes, H W

    2003-11-01

    Genes and proteins are organized on the basis of their particular mutual relations or according to their interactions in cellular and genetic networks. These include metabolic or signaling pathways and protein interaction, regulatory or co-expression networks. Integrating the information from the different types of networks may lead to the notion of a functional network and functional modules. To find these modules, we propose a new technique which is based on collective, multi-body correlations in a genetic network. We calculated the correlation strength of a group of genes (e.g. in the co-expression network) which were identified as members of a module in a different network (e.g. in the protein interaction network) and estimated the probability that this correlation strength was found by chance. Groups of genes with a significant correlation strength in different networks have a high probability that they perform the same function. Here, we propose evaluating the multi-body correlations by applying the superparamagnetic approach. We compare our method to the presently applied mean Pearson correlations and show that our method is more sensitive in revealing functional relationships.

  14. Nuclear legislation in central and eastern europe and the NIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This study presents the current state of legislation and regulations governing the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the central and eastern European countries (CEEC) and the New Independent States (NIS). It also contains information on the national bodies responsible for the regulation and control of nuclear energy. The nuclear energy sector has not escaped from the changes that have affected the political, economic and social climates over the past fifteen years. Under the former socialist regime, activities in this field came within the sole remit of the State administration. In the legal area, it had not been deemed necessary in most of these countries to enact laws guaranteeing democratic control of electronuclear programmes and establishing a clear distinction between activities promoting this source of energy and regulatory control, while ensuring that safety imperatives take priority over all other considerations. With the arrival of new political forces came the will to remedy this situation promptly by creating new regulatory structures and drafting legislative texts based on those used in western countries. This evolution was all the more necessary given that, at the same time, the new policy of accountability had revealed safety defects in numerous nuclear installations in these countries, thus rendering international assistance indispensable. From the legal point of view, the outcome of these years of effort is remarkably positive: almost all countries of Eastern Europe pursuing electronuclear programmes have established institutions capable of exercising efficient control over nuclear power plants and other installations. Accession to the international conventions which form the backbone of nuclear law has become widespread. Modern legislation is henceforth in place in almost all of these states. (author)

  15. Microwave-assisted synthesis of NiS2 nanostructures for supercapacitors and cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Huan; Wei, Chengzhen; Li, Xuexue; Li, Guochang; Ma, Yahui; Li, Sujuan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jiangshan

    2014-01-01

    Uniform NiS2 nanocubes are successfully synthesized with a microwave-assisted method. Interestingly, NiS2 nanocubes, nanospheres and nanoparticles are obtained by controlling microwave reaction time. NiS2 nanomaterials are primarily applied to supercapacitors and cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic H2 production. Different morphologies of NiS2 nanostructures show different electrochemical and cocatalytic enhancing H2 production activities. Benefited novel nanostructures, NiS2 nanocube electrodes show a large specific capacitance (695 F g-1 at 1.25 A g-1) and excellent cycling performance (the retention 93.4% of initial specific capacitance after 3000 cycles). More importantly, NiS2 nanospheres show highly cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic for H2 evolution, in which the photocatalytic H2 production is up to 3400 μmol during 12 hours under irradiation of visible light (λ>420 nm) with an average H2 production rate of 283 μmol h-1.

  16. Gene-Gene Interactions in the Folate Metabolic Pathway and the Risk of Conotruncal Heart Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Lupo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conotruncal and related heart defects (CTRD are common, complex malformations. Although there are few established risk factors, there is evidence that genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway influences CTRD risk. This study was undertaken to assess the association between inherited (i.e., case and maternal gene-gene interactions in this pathway and the risk of CTRD. Case-parent triads (n=727, ascertained from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, were genotyped for ten functional variants of nine folate metabolic genes. Analyses of inherited genotypes were consistent with the previously reported association between MTHFR A1298C and CTRD (adjusted P=.02, but provided no evidence that CTRD was associated with inherited gene-gene interactions. Analyses of the maternal genotypes provided evidence of a MTHFR C677T/CBS 844ins68 interaction and CTRD risk (unadjusted P=.02. This association is consistent with the effects of this genotype combination on folate-homocysteine biochemistry but remains to be confirmed in independent study populations.

  17. Leveraging gene-environment interactions and endotypes for asthma gene discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Ober, Carole

    2016-01-01

    , such as childhood asthma with severe exacerbations, and on relevant exposures that are involved in gene-environment interactions (GEIs), such as rhinovirus infections, will improve detection of asthma genes and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We will discuss the challenges of considering GEIs......Asthma is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that includes subtypes of disease with different underlying causes and disease mechanisms. Asthma is caused by a complex interaction between genes and environmental exposures; early-life exposures in particular play an important role. Asthma is also...... heritable, and a number of susceptibility variants have been discovered in genome-wide association studies, although the known risk alleles explain only a small proportion of the heritability. In this review, we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that focusing on more specific asthma phenotypes...

  18. Gene interactions and genetics for yield and its attributes in grass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. PARIHAR

    explaining the manifestation of complex traits such as yield. ... interactions (i, j, l) contributed towards the inheritance of traits in the given crosses. ... Keywords. grass pea; scaling test; gene interactions; gene effects; heritability; Lathyrus sativus.

  19. GxGrare: gene-gene interaction analysis method for rare variants from high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Minseok; Leem, Sangseob; Yoon, Joon; Park, Taesung

    2018-03-19

    With the rapid advancement of array-based genotyping techniques, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified common genetic variants associated with common complex diseases. However, it has been shown that only a small proportion of the genetic etiology of complex diseases could be explained by the genetic factors identified from GWAS. This missing heritability could possibly be explained by gene-gene interaction (epistasis) and rare variants. There has been an exponential growth of gene-gene interaction analysis for common variants in terms of methodological developments and practical applications. Also, the recent advancement of high-throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to conduct rare variant analysis. However, little progress has been made in gene-gene interaction analysis for rare variants. Here, we propose GxGrare which is a new gene-gene interaction method for the rare variants in the framework of the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis. The proposed method consists of three steps; 1) collapsing the rare variants, 2) MDR analysis for the collapsed rare variants, and 3) detect top candidate interaction pairs. GxGrare can be used for the detection of not only gene-gene interactions, but also interactions within a single gene. The proposed method is illustrated with 1080 whole exome sequencing data of the Korean population in order to identify causal gene-gene interaction for rare variants for type 2 diabetes. The proposed GxGrare performs well for gene-gene interaction detection with collapsing of rare variants. GxGrare is available at http://bibs.snu.ac.kr/software/gxgrare which contains simulation data and documentation. Supported operating systems include Linux and OS X.

  20. Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF for computationally-efficient filtering of gene-gene interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Casey S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies are becoming the de facto standard in the genetic analysis of common human diseases. Given the complexity and robustness of biological networks such diseases are unlikely to be the result of single points of failure but instead likely arise from the joint failure of two or more interacting components. The hope in genome-wide screens is that these points of failure can be linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which confer disease susceptibility. Detecting interacting variants that lead to disease in the absence of single-gene effects is difficult however, and methods to exhaustively analyze sets of these variants for interactions are combinatorial in nature thus making them computationally infeasible. Efficient algorithms which can detect interacting SNPs are needed. ReliefF is one such promising algorithm, although it has low success rate for noisy datasets when the interaction effect is small. ReliefF has been paired with an iterative approach, Tuned ReliefF (TuRF, which improves the estimation of weights in noisy data but does not fundamentally change the underlying ReliefF algorithm. To improve the sensitivity of studies using these methods to detect small effects we introduce Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF. Results SURF's ability to detect interactions in this domain is significantly greater than that of ReliefF. Similarly SURF, in combination with the TuRF strategy significantly outperforms TuRF alone for SNP selection under an epistasis model. It is important to note that this success rate increase does not require an increase in algorithmic complexity and allows for increased success rate, even with the removal of a nuisance parameter from the algorithm. Conclusion Researchers performing genetic association studies and aiming to discover gene-gene interactions associated with increased disease susceptibility should use SURF in place of ReliefF. For instance, SURF should be

  1. Chemical-gene interaction networks and causal reasoning for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating the potential human health and ecological risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures in the environment is one of the main challenges of chemical safety assessment and environmental protection. There is a need for approaches that can help to integrate chemical monitoring and biological effects data to evaluate risks associated with chemicals present in the environment. Here, we used prior knowledge about chemical-gene interactions to develop a knowledge assembly model for detected chemicals at five locations near the North Branch and Chisago wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in the St. Croix River Basin, MN and WI. The assembly model was used to generate hypotheses about the biological impacts of the chemicals at each location. The hypotheses were tested using empirical hepatic gene expression data from fathead minnows exposed for 12 d at each location. Empirical gene expression data were also mapped to the assembly models to evaluate the likelihood of a chemical contributing to the observed biological responses using richness and concordance statistics. The prior knowledge approach was able predict the observed biological pathways impacted at one site but not the other. Atrazine was identified as a potential contributor to the observed gene expression responses at a location upstream of the North Branch WTTP. Four chemicals were identified as contributors to the observed biological responses at the effluent and downstream o

  2. Animal model for schizophrenia that reflects gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Taku; Ibi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric disorder that impairs mental and social functioning and affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Genetic susceptibility factors for schizophrenia have recently been reported, some of which are known to play a role in neurodevelopment; these include neuregulin-1, dysbindin, and disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). Moreover, epidemiologic studies suggest that environmental insults, such as prenatal infection and perinatal complication, are involved in the development of schizophrenia. The possible interaction between environment and genetic susceptibility factors, especially during neurodevelopment, is proposed as a promising disease etiology of schizophrenia. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (polyI : C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that leads to the pronounced but time-limited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Maternal immune activation by polyI : C exposure in rodents is known to precipitate a wide spectrum of behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological abnormalities in adult offspring. Recently, we have reported that neonatal injection of polyI : C in mice results in schizophrenia-like behavioral alterations in adulthood. In this review, we show how gene-environment interactions during neurodevelopment result in phenotypic changes in adulthood by injecting polyI : C into transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative form of human DISC1 (DN-DISC1). Our findings suggest that polyI : C-treated DN-DISC1 mice are a well-validated animal model for schizophrenia that reflects gene-environment interactions.

  3. Modeling Gene-Environment Interactions With Quasi-Natural Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Lauren; Conley, Dalton

    2017-02-01

    This overview develops new empirical models that can effectively document Gene × Environment (G×E) interactions in observational data. Current G×E studies are often unable to support causal inference because they use endogenous measures of the environment or fail to adequately address the nonrandom distribution of genes across environments, confounding estimates. Comprehensive measures of genetic variation are incorporated into quasi-natural experimental designs to exploit exogenous environmental shocks or isolate variation in environmental exposure to avoid potential confounders. In addition, we offer insights from population genetics that improve upon extant approaches to address problems from population stratification. Together, these tools offer a powerful way forward for G×E research on the origin and development of social inequality across the life course. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Exploring Plant Co-Expression and Gene-Gene Interactions with CORNET 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bel, Michiel; Coppens, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Selecting and filtering a reference expression and interaction dataset when studying specific pathways and regulatory interactions can be a very time-consuming and error-prone task. In order to reduce the duplicated efforts required to amass such datasets, we have created the CORNET (CORrelation NETworks) platform which allows for easy access to a wide variety of data types: coexpression data, protein-protein interactions, regulatory interactions, and functional annotations. The CORNET platform outputs its results in either text format or through the Cytoscape framework, which is automatically launched by the CORNET website.CORNET 3.0 is the third iteration of the web platform designed for the user exploration of the coexpression space of plant genomes, with a focus on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we describe the platform: the tools, data, and best practices when using the platform. We indicate how the platform can be used to infer networks from a set of input genes, such as upregulated genes from an expression experiment. By exploring the network, new target and regulator genes can be discovered, allowing for follow-up experiments and more in-depth study. We also indicate how to avoid common pitfalls when evaluating the networks and how to avoid over interpretation of the results.All CORNET versions are available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/cornet/ .

  5. Double-Bottom Chaotic Map Particle Swarm Optimization Based on Chi-Square Test to Determine Gene-Gene Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Gene-gene interaction studies focus on the investigation of the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes for disease susceptibility. Statistical methods are widely used to search for a good model of gene-gene interaction for disease analysis, and the previously determined models have successfully explained the effects between SNPs and diseases. However, the huge numbers of potential combinations of SNP genotypes limit the use of statistical methods for analysing high-order interaction, and finding an available high-order model of gene-gene interaction remains a challenge. In this study, an improved particle swarm optimization with double-bottom chaotic maps (DBM-PSO) was applied to assist statistical methods in the analysis of associated variations to disease susceptibility. A big data set was simulated using the published genotype frequencies of 26 SNPs amongst eight genes for breast cancer. Results showed that the proposed DBM-PSO successfully determined two- to six-order models of gene-gene interaction for the risk association with breast cancer (odds ratio > 1.0; P value <0.05). Analysis results supported that the proposed DBM-PSO can identify good models and provide higher chi-square values than conventional PSO. This study indicates that DBM-PSO is a robust and precise algorithm for determination of gene-gene interaction models for breast cancer. PMID:24895547

  6. Protein annotation from protein interaction networks and Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cao D; Gardiner, Katheleen J; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precision and 60% recall versus 45% and 26% for Majority and 24% and 61% for χ²-statistics, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene-Diet Interaction and Precision Nutrition in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Heianza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid rise of obesity during the past decades has coincided with a profound shift of our living environment, including unhealthy dietary patterns, a sedentary lifestyle, and physical inactivity. Genetic predisposition to obesity may have interacted with such an obesogenic environment in determining the obesity epidemic. Growing studies have found that changes in adiposity and metabolic response to low-calorie weight loss diets might be modified by genetic variants related to obesity, metabolic status and preference to nutrients. This review summarized data from recent studies of gene-diet interactions, and discussed integration of research of metabolomics and gut microbiome, as well as potential application of the findings in precision nutrition.

  8. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  9. You've gotta be lucky: Coverage and the elusive gene-gene interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimherr, Matthew; Nicolae, Dan L

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to a large number of single-SNP association findings, but there has been, so far, no investigation resulting in the discovery of a replicable gene-gene interaction. In this paper, we examine some of the possible explanations for the lack of findings, and argue that coverage of causal variation not only has a large effect on the loss in power, but that the effect is larger than in the single-SNP analyses. We show that the product of linkage disequilibrium measures, r², between causal and tested SNPs offers a good approximation to the loss in efficiency as defined by the ratio of sample sizes that lead to similar power. We also demonstrate that, in addition to the huge search space, the loss in power due to coverage when using commercially available platforms makes the search for gene-gene interactions daunting. © 2010 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  10. Environment-Gene interaction in common complex diseases: New approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Toscano, Jr.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 different environmental chemicals that are in use as high production volume chemicals confront us in our daily lives. Many of the chemicals we encounter are persistent and have long half-lives in the environment and our bodies. These compounds are referred to as Persistent Organic Pollutants, or POPS. The total environment however is broader than just toxic pollutants. It includes social capital, social economic status, and other factors that are not commonly considered in traditional approaches to studying environment-human interactions. The mechanism of action of environmental agents in altering the human phenotype from health to disease is more complex than once thought. The focus in public health has shifted away from the study of single-gene rare diseases and has given way to the study of multifactorial complex diseases that are common in the population. To understand common complex diseases, we need teams of scientists from different fields working together with common aims. We review some approaches for studying the action of the environment by discussing use-inspired research, and transdisciplinary research approaches. The Genomic era has yielded new tools for study of gene-environment interactions, including genomics, epigenomics, and systems biology. We use environmentally-driven diabetes mellitus type two as an example of environmental epigenomics and disease. The aim of this review is to start the conversation of how the application of advances in biomedical science can be used to advance public health.

  11. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L.; Rylander, Lars; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism, but the number of studies is still limited. This type of interaction studies may improve our understanding of normal physiology and help us to identify the risk factors to male reproductive malfunction. We also shortly discuss other aspects of gene-environment interaction specifically associated with the issue of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity in the offspring. PMID:20348940

  12. Influence of SNPs in nutrient-sensitive candidate genes and gene-diet interactions on blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Lena Kirchner; Angquist, Lars; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

    2013-01-01

    Blood lipid response to a given dietary intervention could be determined by the effect of diet, gene variants or gene-diet interactions. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether variants in presumed nutrient-sensitive genes involved in lipid metabolism modified lipid profile ...

  13. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  14. Random regression models for detection of gene by environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meuwissen Theo HE

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two random regression models, where the effect of a putative QTL was regressed on an environmental gradient, are described. The first model estimates the correlation between intercept and slope of the random regression, while the other model restricts this correlation to 1 or -1, which is expected under a bi-allelic QTL model. The random regression models were compared to a model assuming no gene by environment interactions. The comparison was done with regards to the models ability to detect QTL, to position them accurately and to detect possible QTL by environment interactions. A simulation study based on a granddaughter design was conducted, and QTL were assumed, either by assigning an effect independent of the environment or as a linear function of a simulated environmental gradient. It was concluded that the random regression models were suitable for detection of QTL effects, in the presence and absence of interactions with environmental gradients. Fixing the correlation between intercept and slope of the random regression had a positive effect on power when the QTL effects re-ranked between environments.

  15. Genome-wide search for gene-gene interactions in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Jiao

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC risk. However, these susceptibility loci known today explain only a small fraction of the genetic risk. Gene-gene interaction (GxG is considered to be one source of the missing heritability. To address this, we performed a genome-wide search for pair-wise GxG associated with CRC risk using 8,380 cases and 10,558 controls in the discovery phase and 2,527 cases and 2,658 controls in the replication phase. We developed a simple, but powerful method for testing interaction, which we term the Average Risk Due to Interaction (ARDI. With this method, we conducted a genome-wide search to identify SNPs showing evidence for GxG with previously identified CRC susceptibility loci from 14 independent regions. We also conducted a genome-wide search for GxG using the marginal association screening and examining interaction among SNPs that pass the screening threshold (p<10(-4. For the known locus rs10795668 (10p14, we found an interacting SNP rs367615 (5q21 with replication p = 0.01 and combined p = 4.19×10(-8. Among the top marginal SNPs after LD pruning (n = 163, we identified an interaction between rs1571218 (20p12.3 and rs10879357 (12q21.1 (nominal combined p = 2.51×10(-6; Bonferroni adjusted p = 0.03. Our study represents the first comprehensive search for GxG in CRC, and our results may provide new insight into the genetic etiology of CRC.

  16. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, Torrence M. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Federspiel, Mark J. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Morris, John C., E-mail: davis.brian@mayo.edu [Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-11-19

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  17. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  18. [Gene-gene interaction on central obesity in school-aged children in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L W; Zhang, M X; Wu, L J; Gao, L W; Mi, J

    2017-07-10

    Objective: To investigate possible effect of 6 obesity-associated SNPs in contribution to central obesity and examine whether there is an interaction in the 6 SNPs in the cause of central obesity in school-aged children in China. Methods: A total of 3 502 school-aged children who were included in Beijing Child and Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome (BCAMS) Study were selected, and based on the age and sex specific waist circumference (WC) standards in the BCAMS study, 1 196 central obese cases and 2 306 controls were identified. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood white cells using the salt fractionation method. A total of 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms ( FTO rs9939609, MC4R rs17782313, BDNF rs6265, PCSK1 rs6235, SH2B1 rs4788102, and CSK rs1378942) were genotyped by TaqMan allelic discrimination assays with the GeneAmp 7900 sequence detection system (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). Logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between 6 SNPs and central obesity. Gene-gene interactions among 6 polymorphic loci were analyzed by using the Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR) method, and then logistic regression model was constructed to confirm the best combination of loci identified in the GMDR. Results: After adjusting gender, age, Tanner stage, physical activity and family history of obesity, the FTO rs9939609-A, MC4R rs17782313-C and BDNF rs6265-G alleles were associated with central obesity under additive genetic model ( OR =1.24, 95 %CI : 1.06-1.45, P =0.008; OR =1.26, 95 %CI : 1.11-1.43, P =2.98×10(-4); OR =1.18, 95 % CI : 1.06-1.32, P =0.003). GMDR analysis showed a significant gene-gene interaction between MC4R rs17782313 and BDNF rs6265 ( P =0.001). The best two-locus combination showed the cross-validation consistency of 10/10 and testing accuracy of 0.539. This interaction showed the maximum consistency and minimum prediction error among all gene-gene interaction models evaluated. Moreover, the

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [{sup 18}F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; O' Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Szanda, Istvan; Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Banga, Jasvinder Paul [King' s College London, Division of Cell and Gene Based Therapy, London (United Kingdom); Clarke, Susan E.M.; Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Cheng, Sheue-Yann [National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Bethesda (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters {sup 123}I-iodide, {sup 131}I-iodide and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate {sup 18}F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([{sup 18}F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [{sup 18}F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF{sub 4} {sup -} with [{sup 18}F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [{sup 18}F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [{sup 18}F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  20. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN. Methods In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs’ GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. Results We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Conclusions Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable

  1. Identification of essential amino acid residues in the nisin dehydratase NisB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khusainov, Rustem; van Heel, Auke J.; Lubelski, Jacek; Moll, Gert N.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Nisin is a posttranslationally-modified antimicrobial peptide that has the ability to induce its own biosynthesis. Serines and threonines in the modifiable core peptide part of precursor nisin are dehydrated to dehydroalanines and dehydrobutyrines by the dehydratase NisB, and subsequently cysteines

  2. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in prostate, breast and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov

    The incidence of cancer in the western world has increased steeply during the last 50 years. For three of the most prevalent cancer types in Denmark, prostate, breast and colorectal cancer (PC, BC and CRC, respectively), only a small fraction (1-15%) of the incidences are caused by highly penetrant...... in alcohol-related BC in postmenopausal women involving a specific polymorphism in PPARG (coding the peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor (PPARγ)) and its interaction with the aromatase (encoded by CYP19A1) was investigated (Paper V-VI). The Danish prospective “Diet, Cancer and Health” cohort study...... as having strong influence on carcinogenesis. Therefore, very frequent, low effect polymorphisms may have a greater contribution on a population level in combination with environmental factors. Indeed, several dietary and life style factors are now well-established risk factors for different cancer types...

  3. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  4. Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

    Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

  5. Large-scale extraction of gene interactions from full-text literature using DeepDive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Emily K; Zhang, Ce; Ré, Christopher; Altman, Russ B

    2016-01-01

    A complete repository of gene-gene interactions is key for understanding cellular processes, human disease and drug response. These gene-gene interactions include both protein-protein interactions and transcription factor interactions. The majority of known interactions are found in the biomedical literature. Interaction databases, such as BioGRID and ChEA, annotate these gene-gene interactions; however, curation becomes difficult as the literature grows exponentially. DeepDive is a trained system for extracting information from a variety of sources, including text. In this work, we used DeepDive to extract both protein-protein and transcription factor interactions from over 100,000 full-text PLOS articles. We built an extractor for gene-gene interactions that identified candidate gene-gene relations within an input sentence. For each candidate relation, DeepDive computed a probability that the relation was a correct interaction. We evaluated this system against the Database of Interacting Proteins and against randomly curated extractions. Our system achieved 76% precision and 49% recall in extracting direct and indirect interactions involving gene symbols co-occurring in a sentence. For randomly curated extractions, the system achieved between 62% and 83% precision based on direct or indirect interactions, as well as sentence-level and document-level precision. Overall, our system extracted 3356 unique gene pairs using 724 features from over 100,000 full-text articles. Application source code is publicly available at https://github.com/edoughty/deepdive_genegene_app russ.altman@stanford.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Gene-based testing of interactions in association studies of quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    Full Text Available Various methods have been developed for identifying gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most methods focus on individual markers as the testing unit, and the large number of such tests drastically erodes statistical power. In this study, we propose novel interaction tests of quantitative traits that are gene-based and that confer advantage in both statistical power and biological interpretation. The framework of gene-based gene-gene interaction (GGG tests combine marker-based interaction tests between all pairs of markers in two genes to produce a gene-level test for interaction between the two. The tests are based on an analytical formula we derive for the correlation between marker-based interaction tests due to linkage disequilibrium. We propose four GGG tests that extend the following P value combining methods: minimum P value, extended Simes procedure, truncated tail strength, and truncated P value product. Extensive simulations point to correct type I error rates of all tests and show that the two truncated tests are more powerful than the other tests in cases of markers involved in the underlying interaction not being directly genotyped and in cases of multiple underlying interactions. We applied our tests to pairs of genes that exhibit a protein-protein interaction to test for gene-level interactions underlying lipid levels using genotype data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We identified five novel interactions that are not evident from marker-based interaction testing and successfully replicated one of these interactions, between SMAD3 and NEDD9, in an independent sample from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We conclude that our GGG tests show improved power to identify gene-level interactions in existing, as well as emerging, association studies.

  7. Au-controlled enhancement of photoluminescence of NiS nanostructures synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linganiso, Ella Cebisa; Mwakikunga, Bonex Wakufwa; Mhlanga, Sabelo Dalton; Coville, Neil John

    2014-01-01

    Nickel sulphide (NiS) nanostructures decorated with gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. Binary phase NiS (α and β) crystalline nanostructures, bare, and decorated with Au NPs were obtained and confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. TEM analysis revealed that the NiS nanostructures were of various shapes. A quantum confinement effect was confirmed by the blue shift PL emissions and high optical energy band gap observed for the as-synthesized sample. A threefold light emission enhancement due to Au NP coatings was obtained when Au metal NP decoration concentrations was varied from 1% to 10%. These enhancements were attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) excitation of the surface decorated metal NPs which results in an increased rate of spontaneous emission. The PL enhancement factor was observed to vary at different NiS emissions as well as with the size of the Au NPs. The effect of metal NP decoration on the PL emission of NiS is to the best of our knowledge, presented for the first time. - Highlights: • Binary phase NiS decorated with gold nanoparticles. • Quantum confinement effect confirmed by PL analysis. • PL enhancement depending more on particle size distribution. • Effect of gold on NiS PL is to the best of our knowledge reported for the first time

  8. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    networks have been identified, including scale free distribution of the vertex degree, network motifs, and modularity, to name a few. These studies of network organization require the network to be as complete as possible, which given the limitations of experimental techniques is not currently the case. Therefore, experimental procedures for detecting biomolecular interactions should be complemented by computational approaches. The paper by Lees et al provides a review of computational methods, integrating multiple independent sources of data to infer physical and functional protein-protein interaction networks. One of the important aspects of protein interactions that should be accounted for in the prediction of protein interaction networks is that many proteins are composed of distinct domains. Protein domains may mediate protein interactions while proteins and their interaction networks may gain complexity through gene duplication and expansion of existing domain architectures via domain rearrangements. The latter mechanisms have been explored in detail in the paper by Cohen-Gihon et al. Protein-protein interactions are not the only component of the cell's interactome. Regulation of cell activity can be achieved at the level of transcription and involve a transcription factor—DNA binding which typically requires recognition of a specific DNA sequence motif. Chip-Chip and the more recent Chip-Seq technologies allow in vivo identification of DNA binding sites and, together with novel in vitro approaches, provide data necessary for deciphering the corresponding binding motifs. Such information, complemented by structures of protein-DNA complexes and knowledge of the differences in binding sites among homologs, opens the door to constructing predictive binding models. The paper by Persikov and Singh provides an example of such a model in the Cys2His2 zinc finger family. Recent studies have indicated that the presence of such binding motifs is, however, neither necessary

  9. Artificial neural network inference (ANNI: a study on gene-gene interaction for biomarkers in childhood sarcomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ling Tong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To model the potential interaction between previously identified biomarkers in children sarcomas using artificial neural network inference (ANNI. METHOD: To concisely demonstrate the biological interactions between correlated genes in an interaction network map, only 2 types of sarcomas in the children small round blue cell tumors (SRBCTs dataset are discussed in this paper. A backpropagation neural network was used to model the potential interaction between genes. The prediction weights and signal directions were used to model the strengths of the interaction signals and the direction of the interaction link between genes. The ANN model was validated using Monte Carlo cross-validation to minimize the risk of over-fitting and to optimize generalization ability of the model. RESULTS: Strong connection links on certain genes (TNNT1 and FNDC5 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS; FCGRT and OLFM1 in Ewing's sarcoma (EWS suggested their potency as central hubs in the interconnection of genes with different functionalities. The results showed that the RMS patients in this dataset are likely to be congenital and at low risk of cardiomyopathy development. The EWS patients are likely to be complicated by EWS-FLI fusion and deficiency in various signaling pathways, including Wnt, Fas/Rho and intracellular oxygen. CONCLUSIONS: The ANN network inference approach and the examination of identified genes in the published literature within the context of the disease highlights the substantial influence of certain genes in sarcomas.

  10. Comparison of NIS and NHIS/NIPRCS vaccination coverage estimates. National Immunization Survey. National Health Interview Survey/National Immunization Provider Record Check Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D L; Ezzati-Rice, T M; Stokley, S; Zhao, Z

    2001-05-01

    The National Immunization Survey (NIS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) produce national coverage estimates for children aged 19 months to 35 months. The NIS is a cost-effective, random-digit-dialing telephone survey that produces national and state-level vaccination coverage estimates. The National Immunization Provider Record Check Study (NIPRCS) is conducted in conjunction with the annual NHIS, which is a face-to-face household survey. As the NIS is a telephone survey, potential coverage bias exists as the survey excludes children living in nontelephone households. To assess the validity of estimates of vaccine coverage from the NIS, we compared 1995 and 1996 NIS national estimates with results from the NHIS/NIPRCS for the same years. Both the NIS and the NHIS/NIPRCS produce similar results. The NHIS/NIPRCS supports the findings of the NIS.

  11. Music training and speech perception: a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Claims of beneficial side effects of music training are made for many different abilities, including verbal and visuospatial abilities, executive functions, working memory, IQ, and speech perception in particular. Such claims assume that music training causes the associations even though children who take music lessons are likely to differ from other children in music aptitude, which is associated with many aspects of speech perception. Music training in childhood is also associated with cognitive, personality, and demographic variables, and it is well established that IQ and personality are determined largely by genetics. Recent evidence also indicates that the role of genetics in music aptitude and music achievement is much larger than previously thought. In short, music training is an ideal model for the study of gene-environment interactions but far less appropriate as a model for the study of plasticity. Children seek out environments, including those with music lessons, that are consistent with their predispositions; such environments exaggerate preexisting individual differences. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Methodological issues in detecting gene-gene interactions in breast cancer susceptibility: a population-based study in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onay Venus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing evidence that gene-gene interactions are ubiquitous in determining the susceptibility to common human diseases. The investigation of such gene-gene interactions presents new statistical challenges for studies with relatively small sample sizes as the number of potential interactions in the genome can be large. Breast cancer provides a useful paradigm to study genetically complex diseases because commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may additively or synergistically disturb the system-wide communication of the cellular processes leading to cancer development. Methods In this study, we systematically studied SNP-SNP interactions among 19 SNPs from 18 key genes involved in major cancer pathways in a sample of 398 breast cancer cases and 372 controls from Ontario. We discuss the methodological issues associated with the detection of SNP-SNP interactions in this dataset by applying and comparing three commonly used methods: the logistic regression model, classification and regression trees (CART, and the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method. Results Our analyses show evidence for several simple (two-way and complex (multi-way SNP-SNP interactions associated with breast cancer. For example, all three methods identified XPD-[Lys751Gln]*IL10-[G(-1082A] as the most significant two-way interaction. CART and MDR identified the same critical SNPs participating in complex interactions. Our results suggest that the use of multiple statistical approaches (or an integrated approach rather than a single methodology could be the best strategy to elucidate complex gene interactions that have generally very different patterns. Conclusion The strategy used here has the potential to identify complex biological relationships among breast cancer genes and processes. This will lead to the discovery of novel biological information, which will improve breast cancer risk management.

  13. DGIdb 3.0: a redesign and expansion of the drug-gene interaction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto, Kelsy C; Wagner, Alex H; Feng, Yang-Yang; Kiwala, Susanna; Coffman, Adam C; Spies, Gregory; Wollam, Alex; Spies, Nicholas C; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi

    2018-01-04

    The drug-gene interaction database (DGIdb, www.dgidb.org) consolidates, organizes and presents drug-gene interactions and gene druggability information from papers, databases and web resources. DGIdb normalizes content from 30 disparate sources and allows for user-friendly advanced browsing, searching and filtering for ease of access through an intuitive web user interface, application programming interface (API) and public cloud-based server image. DGIdb v3.0 represents a major update of the database. Nine of the previously included 24 sources were updated. Six new resources were added, bringing the total number of sources to 30. These updates and additions of sources have cumulatively resulted in 56 309 interaction claims. This has also substantially expanded the comprehensive catalogue of druggable genes and anti-neoplastic drug-gene interactions included in the DGIdb. Along with these content updates, v3.0 has received a major overhaul of its codebase, including an updated user interface, preset interaction search filters, consolidation of interaction information into interaction groups, greatly improved search response times and upgrading the underlying web application framework. In addition, the expanded API features new endpoints which allow users to extract more detailed information about queried drugs, genes and drug-gene interactions, including listings of PubMed IDs, interaction type and other interaction metadata.

  14. MPC&A training needs of the NIS/Baltics States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, David Franklin; Stoy-McLeod, Carol L.

    2006-07-01

    This report serves to document contract deliverables considered to be of continuing interest associated with two workshops conducted as part of an initial assessment of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) training needs of the Newly Independent and Baltic States (NIS/Baltics). These workshops were held in Kiev, Ukraine, ca. 2003-2004, with the assistance of personnel from the George Kuzmycz Training Center (GKTC) of the Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR). Because of the dominant role Ukraine plays in the region in terms of the nuclear industry, one workshop focused exclusively on Ukrainian training needs, with participants attending from twelve Ukrainian organizations (plus U.S. DOE/NNSA representatives). The second workshop included participation by a further ten countries from the NIS/Baltics region. In addition, the training needs data developed during the workshop were supplemented by the outcomes of surveys and studies conducted by the GKTC.

  15. 'NiNis': Youth in Argentina who Neither Work nor Study. A Social Integration Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia de la Torre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the extent to which vulnerability in household material living conditions affects the institutional integration of young people of Argentina. We worked with a random sample of 4,855 youth aged between 18 and 25. It was observed that 66% of those who neither study nor work live in households having a low or very low socioeconomic status, with 4 out of 10 of these youth residing in shantytowns or slums and with half of them failing to complete high school. Harsh environments create a vicious circle of persistent passivity and isolation. However, the comparison between the NiNis and the working segment allowed us to conclude that similar household levels of socio-economic vulnerability are not necessarily sufficient to explain the situation of social disaffiliation found in these youth NiNis.

  16. Interactive visualization of gene regulatory networks with associated gene expression time series data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, M.A.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Lulko, A.T.; Kuipers, O.P.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Linsen, L.; Hagen, H.; Hamann, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present GENeVis, an application to visualize gene expression time series data in a gene regulatory network context. This is a network of regulator proteins that regulate the expression of their respective target genes. The networks are represented as graphs, in which the nodes represent genes,

  17. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, D.

    2009-07-01

    Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolism-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 14C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the 5G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the -1131T>C in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken. (Author) 31 refs.

  18. Discovery of aryl-tri-fluoroborates as potent sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecat-Guillet, N.; Ambroise, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The structure-based design of sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors identified new active compounds. The organo-tri-fluoroborate shown was found to inhibit iodide uptake with an IC50 value of 0.4 μM on rat-derived thyroid cells. The biological activity is rationalized by the presence of the BF3 - ion as a minimal binding motif for substrate recognition at the iodide binding site. (authors)

  19. Discovery of aryl-tri-fluoroborates as potent sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecat-Guillet, N.; Ambroise, Y. [CEA, DSV, Dept Bioorgan Chem and Isotop Labelling, Inst Biol and Technol, iBiTecS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    The structure-based design of sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors identified new active compounds. The organo-tri-fluoroborate shown was found to inhibit iodide uptake with an IC50 value of 0.4 {mu}M on rat-derived thyroid cells. The biological activity is rationalized by the presence of the BF3{sup -} ion as a minimal binding motif for substrate recognition at the iodide binding site. (authors)

  20. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  1. A partial least-square approach for modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interactions when multiple markers are genotyped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ho, Gloria; Ye, Kenny; Strickler, Howard; Elston, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Genetic association studies achieve an unprecedented level of resolution in mapping disease genes by genotyping dense single nucleotype polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene region. Meanwhile, these studies require new powerful statistical tools that can optimally handle a large amount of information provided by genotype data. A question that arises is how to model interactions between two genes. Simply modeling all possible interactions between the SNPs in two gene regions is not desirable because a greatly increased number of degrees of freedom can be involved in the test statistic. We introduce an approach to reduce the genotype dimension in modeling interactions. The genotype compression of this approach is built upon the information on both the trait and the cross-locus gametic disequilibrium between SNPs in two interacting genes, in such a way as to parsimoniously model the interactions without loss of useful information in the process of dimension reduction. As a result, it improves power to detect association in the presence of gene-gene interactions. This approach can be similarly applied for modeling gene-environment interactions. We compare this method with other approaches, the corresponding test without modeling any interaction, that based on a saturated interaction model, that based on principal component analysis, and that based on Tukey's one-degree-of-freedom model. Our simulations suggest that this new approach has superior power to that of the other methods. In an application to endometrial cancer case-control data from the Women's Health Initiative, this approach detected AKT1 and AKT2 as being significantly associated with endometrial cancer susceptibility by taking into account their interactions with body mass index.

  2. Facile synthesis of NiS anchored carbon nanofibers for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinling; Zhang, Li; Xu, Guancheng; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chi; Ma, Xin; Qi, Chunling; Zhang, Lu; Jia, Dianzeng

    2018-03-01

    Transition metal sulfide compounds with carbon materials are promising for high-performance supercapacitors. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) wrapped with NiS nanoparticles were herein obtained through electrospinning and calcination. NiS nanoparticles in composite nanofibers are covered by a layer of graphitic carbon, which not only increase the conductivity but also provide active regions for nanoparticle growth to prevent aggregation. The CNFs-NiS electrode has high specific capacity of 177.1 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1 (0.41 mAh cm-2 at a current density of 2.3 mA cm-2) and long-term cycling stability, with 88.7% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles. The excellent electrochemical activity may be attributed to the accessible specific surface, unique porous structure of CNFs and high specific capacitance of NiS. In addition, the asymmetric supercapacitor has an enhanced volumetric energy density of 13.32 mWh cm-3 at a volumetric power density of 180 mW cm-3 and high cycling stability, with 89.5% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles. It also successfully lights up a light-emitting diode. The CNFs-NiS composite has significant potential applications in supercapacitor.

  3. Microwave-assisted synthesis of NiS2 nanostructures for supercapacitors and cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Huan; Wei, Chengzhen; Li, Xuexue; Li, Guochang; Ma, Yahui; Li, Sujuan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jiangshan

    2014-01-01

    Uniform NiS2 nanocubes are successfully synthesized with a microwave-assisted method. Interestingly, NiS2 nanocubes, nanospheres and nanoparticles are obtained by controlling microwave reaction time. NiS2 nanomaterials are primarily applied to supercapacitors and cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic H2 production. Different morphologies of NiS2 nanostructures show different electrochemical and cocatalytic enhancing H2 production activities. Benefited novel nanostructures, NiS2 nanocube electrodes show a large specific capacitance (695 F g−1 at 1.25 A g−1) and excellent cycling performance (the retention 93.4% of initial specific capacitance after 3000 cycles). More importantly, NiS2 nanospheres show highly cocatalytic enhancing photocatalytic for H2 evolution, in which the photocatalytic H2 production is up to 3400 μmol during 12 hours under irradiation of visible light (λ>420 nm) with an average H2 production rate of 283 μmol h−1. PMID:24389929

  4. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  5. Interactions of Polyhomeotic with Polycomb Group Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, N. N.; Sinclair, DAR.; Campbell, R. B.; Brock, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Polycomb (Pc) group genes of Drosophila are negative regulators of homeotic genes, but individual loci have pleiotropic phenotypes. It has been suggested that Pc group genes might form a regulatory hierarchy, or might be members of a multimeric complex that obeys the law of mass action. Recently, it was shown that polyhomeotic (ph) immunoprecipitates in a multimeric complex that includes Pc. Here, we show that duplications of ph suppress homeotic transformations of Pc and Pcl, supporting ...

  6. Expression of the Na+/l- symporter (NIS is markedly decreased or absent in gastric cancer and intestinal metaplastic mucosa of Barrett esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wapnir Irene L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates iodide (I- transport in the thyroid, lactating breast, salivary glands, and stomach. Whereas NIS expression and regulation have been extensively investigated in healthy and neoplastic thyroid and breast tissues, little is known about NIS expression and function along the healthy and diseased gastrointestinal tract. Methods Thus, we investigated NIS expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 155 gastrointestinal tissue samples and by immunoblot analysis in 17 gastric tumors from 83 patients. Results Regarding the healthy Gl tract, we observed NIS expression exclusively in the basolateral region of the gastric mucin-producing epithelial cells. In gastritis, positive NIS staining was observed in these cells both in the presence and absence of Helicobacter pylori. Significantly, NIS expression was absent in gastric cancer, independently of its histological type. Only focal faint NIS expression was detected in the direct vicinity of gastric tumors, i.e., in the histologically intact mucosa, the expression becoming gradually stronger and linear farther away from the tumor. Barrett mucosa with junctional and fundic-type columnar metaplasia displayed positive NIS staining, whereas Barrett mucosa with intestinal metaplasia was negative. NIS staining was also absent in intestinalized gastric polyps. Conclusion That NIS expression is markedly decreased or absent in case of intestinalization or malignant transformation of the gastric mucosa suggests that NIS may prove to be a significant tumor marker in the diagnosis and prognosis of gastric malignancies and also precancerous lesions such as Barrett mucosa, thus extending the medical significance of NIS beyond thyroid disease.

  7. Oh, Behave! Behavior as an Interaction between Genes & the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Emily G.; DeNieu, Michael; Gall, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This lesson is designed to teach students that behavior is a trait shaped by both genes and the environment. Students will read a scientific paper, discuss and generate predictions based on the ideas and data therein, and model the relationships between genes, the environment, and behavior. The lesson is targeted to meet the educational goals of…

  8. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We us...

  9. Identification of human disease genes from interactome network using graphlet interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available Identifying genes related to human diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, etc., is an important task in biomedical research because of its applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Interactome networks, especially protein-protein interaction networks, had been used to disease genes identification based on the hypothesis that strong candidate genes tend to closely relate to each other in some kinds of measure on the network. We proposed a new measure to analyze the relationship between network nodes which was called graphlet interaction. The graphlet interaction contained 28 different isomers. The results showed that the numbers of the graphlet interaction isomers between disease genes in interactome networks were significantly larger than random picked genes, while graphlet signatures were not. Then, we designed a new type of score, based on the network properties, to identify disease genes using graphlet interaction. The genes with higher scores were more likely to be disease genes, and all candidate genes were ranked according to their scores. Then the approach was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation. The precision of the current approach achieved 90% at about 10% recall, which was apparently higher than the previous three predominant algorithms, random walk, Endeavour and neighborhood based method. Finally, the approach was applied to predict new disease genes related to 4 common diseases, most of which were identified by other independent experimental researches. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the graphlet interaction is an effective tool to analyze the network properties of disease genes, and the scores calculated by graphlet interaction is more precise in identifying disease genes.

  10. Identification of Human Disease Genes from Interactome Network Using Graphlet Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lun; Wei, Dong-Qing; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes related to human diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, etc., is an important task in biomedical research because of its applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Interactome networks, especially protein-protein interaction networks, had been used to disease genes identification based on the hypothesis that strong candidate genes tend to closely relate to each other in some kinds of measure on the network. We proposed a new measure to analyze the relationship between network nodes which was called graphlet interaction. The graphlet interaction contained 28 different isomers. The results showed that the numbers of the graphlet interaction isomers between disease genes in interactome networks were significantly larger than random picked genes, while graphlet signatures were not. Then, we designed a new type of score, based on the network properties, to identify disease genes using graphlet interaction. The genes with higher scores were more likely to be disease genes, and all candidate genes were ranked according to their scores. Then the approach was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation. The precision of the current approach achieved 90% at about 10% recall, which was apparently higher than the previous three predominant algorithms, random walk, Endeavour and neighborhood based method. Finally, the approach was applied to predict new disease genes related to 4 common diseases, most of which were identified by other independent experimental researches. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the graphlet interaction is an effective tool to analyze the network properties of disease genes, and the scores calculated by graphlet interaction is more precise in identifying disease genes. PMID:24465923

  11. The Cumulative Effect of Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions on the Risk of Prostate Cancer in Chinese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a multifactorial disease involving complex genetic and environmental factors interactions. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions associated with PCa in Chinese men are less studied. We explored the association between 36 SNPs and PCa in 574 subjects from northern China. Body mass index (BMI, smoking, and alcohol consumption were determined through self-administered questionnaires in 134 PCa patients. Then gene-gene and gene-environment interactions among the PCa-associated SNPs were analyzed using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR and logistic regression methods. Allelic and genotypic association analyses showed that six variants were associated with PCa and the cumulative effect suggested men who carried any combination of 1, 2, or ≥3 risk genotypes had a gradually increased PCa risk (odds ratios (ORs = 1.79–4.41. GMDR analysis identified the best gene-gene interaction model with scores of 10 for both the cross-validation consistency and sign tests. For gene-environment interactions, rs6983561 CC and rs16901966 GG in individuals with a BMI ≥ 28 had ORs of 7.66 (p = 0.032 and 5.33 (p = 0.046, respectively. rs7679673 CC + CA and rs12653946 TT in individuals that smoked had ORs of 2.77 (p = 0.007 and 3.11 (p = 0.024, respectively. rs7679673 CC in individuals that consumed alcohol had an OR of 4.37 (p = 0.041. These results suggest that polymorphisms, either individually or by interacting with other genes or environmental factors, contribute to an increased risk of PCa.

  12. FunGeneNet: a web tool to estimate enrichment of functional interactions in experimental gene sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiys, Evgeny S; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Demenkov, Pavel S; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2018-02-09

    Estimation of functional connectivity in gene sets derived from genome-wide or other biological experiments is one of the essential tasks of bioinformatics. A promising approach for solving this problem is to compare gene networks built using experimental gene sets with random networks. One of the resources that make such an analysis possible is CrossTalkZ, which uses the FunCoup database. However, existing methods, including CrossTalkZ, do not take into account individual types of interactions, such as protein/protein interactions, expression regulation, transport regulation, catalytic reactions, etc., but rather work with generalized types characterizing the existence of any connection between network members. We developed the online tool FunGeneNet, which utilizes the ANDSystem and STRING to reconstruct gene networks using experimental gene sets and to estimate their difference from random networks. To compare the reconstructed networks with random ones, the node permutation algorithm implemented in CrossTalkZ was taken as a basis. To study the FunGeneNet applicability, the functional connectivity analysis of networks constructed for gene sets involved in the Gene Ontology biological processes was conducted. We showed that the method sensitivity exceeds 0.8 at a specificity of 0.95. We found that the significance level of the difference between gene networks of biological processes and random networks is determined by the type of connections considered between objects. At the same time, the highest reliability is achieved for the generalized form of connections that takes into account all the individual types of connections. By taking examples of the thyroid cancer networks and the apoptosis network, it is demonstrated that key participants in these processes are involved in the interactions of those types by which these networks differ from random ones. FunGeneNet is a web tool aimed at proving the functionality of networks in a wide range of sizes of

  13. A gene-gene interaction between polymorphisms in the OCT2 and MATE1 genes influences the renal clearance of metformin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between the renal clearance (CL(renal)) of metformin in healthy Caucasian volunteers and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.808G>T (rs316019) in OCT2 as well as the relevance of the gene-gene interactions between this SNP and (a) the ...

  14. Common sources of bias in gene-lifestyle interaction studies of cardiometabolic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    The role of gene x lifestyle interactions in the development of cardiometabolic diseases is often highlighted, but very few robustly replicated examples of interactions exist in the literature. The slow pace of discoveries may largely be due to interaction effects being generally small in magnitude...

  15. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-11

    Aug 11, 2014 ... of chemical measures for the control and management of blast, which are not .... tion of genetic components of variation, epistasis model and gene effects in two .... and environmental variance is estimated from mean variance.

  16. Robust Tests for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction in Case-Control Studies Using Gene-Environment Independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Gang; Lee, Seunggeun; Lee, Alice W

    2018-01-01

    test with case-control data. Our simulation studies suggest that the EB approach uses the gene-environment independence assumption in a data-adaptive way and provides power gain compared to the standard logistic regression analysis and better control of Type I error when compared to the analysis......There have been recent proposals advocating the use of additive gene-environment interaction instead of the widely used multiplicative scale, as a more relevant public health measure. Using gene-environment independence enhances the power for testing multiplicative interaction in case......-control studies. However, under departure from this assumption, substantial bias in the estimates and inflated Type I error in the corresponding tests can occur. This paper extends the empirical Bayes (EB) approach previously developed for multiplicative interaction that trades off between bias and efficiency...

  17. Assessment of gene-by-sex interaction effect on bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Estrada, Karol; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in various bone phenotypes, including bone mineral density (BMD), is widely observed; however, the extent to which genes explain these sex differences is unclear. To identify variants with different effects by sex, we examined gene-by-sex autosomal interactions genome-wide, and ......Sexual dimorphism in various bone phenotypes, including bone mineral density (BMD), is widely observed; however, the extent to which genes explain these sex differences is unclear. To identify variants with different effects by sex, we examined gene-by-sex autosomal interactions genome...

  18. Electrochemically induced transformation of NiS nanoparticles into Ni(OH)2 in KOH aqueous solution toward electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Linrui; Yuan Changzhou; Li Diankai; Yang Long; Shen Laifa; Zhang Fang; Zhang Xiaogang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NiS is synthesized by means of the H 2 O/CS 2 interface under hydrothermal treatment. → NiS itself owns poor electrochemical capacitance in 2 M KOH solution. → NiS is electrochemically induced and transformed into electroactive Ni(OH) 2 . → Ni(OH) 2 is responsible for good energy storage of the NiS in the KOH solution. → The new formed Ni(OH) 2 delivers large energy density at high rates. - Abstract: Nickel sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) are first synthesized by virtue of a unique H 2 O/CS 2 interface under mild hydrothermal treatment. Electrochemical data reveals that the as-synthesized NiS NPs themselves own poor supercapacitive behavior at initial cyclic voltammetry (CV) cycles in 2 M KOH solution, while a specific capacitance of 893 F g -1 can be surprisingly obtained at a current density of 5 A g -1 just after continuous 320 CV cycles. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared techniques demonstrate that what is really responsible for the good electrochemical capacitance in the KOH aqueous solution is the new electrochemically formed Ni(OH) 2 phase, rather than NiS NPs themselves. The Ni(OH) 2 is slowly formed during the continuous CV cycling process, in which the electrochemically induced phase transformation from NiS to Ni(OH) 2 phase takes place. Furthermore, the new Ni(OH) 2 phase demonstrates the great ability of delivering large specific capacitance at high rates.

  19. Determination of major sodium iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors in drinking waters using ion chromatography with conductivity detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Bilgin, Ayse Kevser

    2016-02-20

    Goiter is an important health problem all over the world and iodine deficiency is its most common cause. Perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate (called as major NIS inhibitors) are known to competitively inhibit iodide uptake by the thyroid gland and thus, human exposure to major NIS inhibitors is a public health concern. In this study, an ion chromatographic method for the determination of most common NIS inhibitor ions in drinking waters was developed and validated. This is the first study where an analytical method is used for the determination of major NIS inhibitors in drinking water by an ion chromatography system in a single run. Chromatographic separations were achieved with an anion-exchange column and separated ions were identified by a conductivity detector. The method was found to be selective, linear, precise accurate and true for all of interested ions. The limits of the detections (LOD) were estimated at 0.003, 0.004 and 0.025mgL(-1) for perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate, respectively. Possible interference ions in drinking waters were examined for the best separation of NIS inhibitors. The excellent method validation data and proficiency test result (Z-score for nitrate: -0.1) of the FAPAS(®) suggested that the developed method could be applied for determination of NIS inhibitor residues in drinking waters. To evaluate the usefulness of the method, 75 drinking water samples from Antalya/Turkey were analyzed for NIS inhibitors. Perchlorate concentrations in the samples ranged from not detected (less than LOD) to 0.07±0.02mgL(-1) and the range of nitrate concentrations were found to be 3.60±0.01mgL(-1) and 47.42±0.40mgL(-1). No thiocyanate residues were detected in tested drinking water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MDM2 SNP309, gene-gene interaction, and tumor susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in multiple cellular pathways including apoptosis, transcriptional control, and cell cycle regulation. In the last decade it has been demonstrated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at codon 72 of the p53 gene is associated with the risk for development of various neoplasms. MDM2 SNP309 is a single nucleotide T to G polymorphism located in the MDM2 gene promoter. From the time that this well-characterized functional polymorphism was identified, a variety of case-control studies have been published that investigate the possible association between MDM2 SNP309 and cancer risk. However, the results of the published studies, as well as the subsequent meta-analyses, remain contradictory. Methods To investigate whether currently published epidemiological studies can clarify the potential interaction between MDM2 SNP309 and the functional genetic variant in p53 codon72 (Arg72Pro and p53 mutation status, we performed a meta-analysis of the risk estimate on 27,813 cases with various tumor types and 30,295 controls. Results The data we reviewed indicated that variant homozygote 309GG and heterozygote 309TG were associated with a significant increased risk of all tumor types (homozygote comparison: odds ratio (OR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.13-1.37; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17. We also found that the combination of GG and Pro/Pro, TG and Pro/Pro, GG and Arg/Arg significantly increased the risk of cancer (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.77-6.47; OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.26-2.81; OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.01-3.78, respectively. In a stratified analysis by tumor location, we also found a significant increased risk in brain, liver, stomach and uterus cancer (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.06-2.03; OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.57-3.18; OR = 1.54, 95%CI = 1.04-2.29; OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.29, respectively. However, no association was seen between MDM2 SNP309 and tumor susceptibility

  1. Gene by Environment Interaction and Resilience: Effects of Child Maltreatment and Serotonin, Corticotropin Releasing Hormone, Dopamine, and Oxytocin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, gene-environment interaction effects in predicting resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 595) were examined. A multi-component index of resilient functioning was derived and levels of resilient functioning were identified. Variants in four genes, 5-HTTLPR, CRHR1, DRD4 -521C/T, and OXTR, were investigated. In a series of ANCOVAs, child maltreatment demonstrated a strong negative main effect on children’s resilient functioning, whereas no main effects for any of the genotypes of the respective genes were found. However, gene-environment interactions involving genotypes of each of the respective genes and maltreatment status were obtained. For each respective gene, among children with a specific genotype, the relative advantage in resilient functioning of nonmaltreated compared to maltreated children was stronger than was the case for nonmaltreated and maltreated children with other genotypes of the respective gene. Across the four genes, a composite of the genotypes that more strongly differentiated resilient functioning between nonmaltreated and maltreated children provided further evidence of genetic variations influencing resilient functioning in nonmaltreated children, whereas genetic variation had a negligible effect on promoting resilience among maltreated children. Additional effects were observed for children based on the number of subtypes of maltreatment children experienced, as well as for abuse and neglect subgroups. Finally, maltreated and nonmaltreated children with high levels of resilience differed in their average number of differentiating genotypes. These results suggest that differential resilient outcomes are based on the interaction between genes and developmental experiences. PMID:22559122

  2. Gene-gene interactions of IRF5, STAT4, IKZF1 and ETS1 in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, J; Shan, S; Li, J; Zhao, H; Xin, Q; Liu, Y; Bian, X; Liu, Q

    2014-06-01

    Interferon (IFN) activation signaling and T helper 17 (Th17)-cell/B-cell regulation play a critical role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Several studies have provided convincing evidence that polymorphisms in IRF5, STAT4, IKZF1 and ETS1 from these pathways may be involved in SLE by affecting gene expression or epistasis. We analyzed the genetic interaction in known SLE susceptibility loci from the four genes in northern Han Chinese. A total of 946 northern Han Chinese participated in this study (370 unrelated SLE patients and 576 healthy controls). Subjects underwent genotyping for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2004640 in IRF5, rs7574865 in STAT4, rs4917014 in IKZF1 and rs1128334 in ETS1 by use of a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay and direct sequencing. Gene-gene interaction analysis involved direct counting, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and linear regression analysis. SLE patients and controls differed in allele frequencies of rs7574865, rs1128334 (P < 0.001) and rs4917014 (P < 0.01). Direct counting revealed that the frequency of risk homozygote combinations was higher for SLE patients than controls (P < 0.01). Furthermore, 2-, 3- and 4-way gene-gene epistasis in SLE was confirmed by parametric methods and MDR analysis. Gene expression analysis partially supported the findings. Our study confirmed the association of the IFN pathway or Th17/B-cells and the pathogenesis of SLE, and gene-gene interaction in this pathway may increase the risk of SLE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. GBOOST: a GPU-based tool for detecting gene-gene interactions in genome-wide case control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Ling Sing; Yang, Can; Wan, Xiang; Yu, Weichuan

    2011-05-01

    Collecting millions of genetic variations is feasible with the advanced genotyping technology. With a huge amount of genetic variations data in hand, developing efficient algorithms to carry out the gene-gene interaction analysis in a timely manner has become one of the key problems in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Boolean operation-based screening and testing (BOOST), a recent work in GWAS, completes gene-gene interaction analysis in 2.5 days on a desktop computer. Compared with central processing units (CPUs), graphic processing units (GPUs) are highly parallel hardware and provide massive computing resources. We are, therefore, motivated to use GPUs to further speed up the analysis of gene-gene interactions. We implement the BOOST method based on a GPU framework and name it GBOOST. GBOOST achieves a 40-fold speedup compared with BOOST. It completes the analysis of Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium Type 2 Diabetes (WTCCC T2D) genome data within 1.34 h on a desktop computer equipped with Nvidia GeForce GTX 285 display card. GBOOST code is available at http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/BOOST.html#GBOOST.

  4. A combination test for detection of gene-environment interaction in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brandon; Basu, Saonli; McGue, Matt

    2017-07-01

    Identifying gene-environment (G-E) interactions can contribute to a better understanding of disease etiology, which may help researchers develop disease prevention strategies and interventions. One big criticism of studying G-E interaction is the lack of power due to sample size. Studies often restrict the interaction search to the top few hundred hits from a genome-wide association study or focus on potential candidate genes. In this paper, we test interactions between a candidate gene and an environmental factor to improve power by analyzing multiple variants within a gene. We extend recently developed score statistic based genetic association testing approaches to the G-E interaction testing problem. We also propose tests for interaction using gene-based summary measures that pool variants together. Although it has recently been shown that these summary measures can be biased and may lead to inflated type I error, we show that under several realistic scenarios, we can still provide valid tests of interaction. These tests use significantly less degrees of freedom and thus can have much higher power to detect interaction. Additionally, we demonstrate that the iSeq-aSum-min test, which combines a gene-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-G, and an interaction-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-I, provides a powerful alternative to test G-E interaction. We demonstrate the performance of these approaches using simulation studies and illustrate their performance to study interaction between the SNPs in several candidate genes and family climate environment on alcohol consumption using the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research dataset. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  6. Geographical patterns of adaptation within a species' range : Interactions between drift and gene flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleaume-Benharira, M; Pen, IR; Ronce, O

    We use individual-based stochastic simulations and analytical deterministic predictions to investigate the interaction between drift, natural selection and gene flow on the patterns of local adaptation across a fragmented species' range under clinally varying selection. Migration between populations

  7. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed; Alroobi, Rami; Banitaan, Shadi; Seridi, Loqmane; Aljarah, Ibrahim; Brewer, James

    2013-01-01

    networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional

  8. Gene interactions and genetics for yield and its attributes in grass pea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Parihar A. K., Dixit G. P. and Singh D. 2016 Gene interactions and genetics for yield and its attributes .... Biological yield. Seed yield factors. Plant height. Primary branches plant pod ..... indicates that these traits are under the control of several.

  9. Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Complex Diseases: Design and Description of the GLACIER and VIKING Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbasic, Azra; Poveda, Alaitz; Chen, Yan; Agren, Asa; Engberg, Elisabeth; Hu, Frank B; Johansson, Ingegerd; Barroso, Ines; Brändström, Anders; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Franks, Paul W

    2014-12-01

    Most complex diseases have well-established genetic and non-genetic risk factors. In some instances, these risk factors are likely to interact, whereby their joint effects convey a level of risk that is either significantly more or less than the sum of these risks. Characterizing these gene-environment interactions may help elucidate the biology of complex diseases, as well as to guide strategies for their targeted prevention. In most cases, the detection of gene-environment interactions will require sample sizes in excess of those needed to detect the marginal effects of the genetic and environmental risk factors. Although many consortia have been formed, comprising multiple diverse cohorts to detect gene-environment interactions, few robust examples of such interactions have been discovered. This may be because combining data across studies, usually through meta-analysis of summary data from the contributing cohorts, is often a statistically inefficient approach for the detection of gene-environment interactions. Ideally, single, very large and well-genotyped prospective cohorts, with validated measures of environmental risk factor and disease outcomes should be used to study interactions. The presence of strong founder effects within those cohorts might further strengthen the capacity to detect novel genetic effects and gene-environment interactions. Access to accurate genealogical data would also aid in studying the diploid nature of the human genome, such as genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin effects). Here we describe two studies from northern Sweden (the GLACIER and VIKING studies) that fulfill these characteristics.

  10. Gene expression in the tanoak-Phytophthora ramorum interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Hardeep Fai; Brian Knaus; Richard Cronn; Jessica W. Wright

    2012-01-01

    Disease processes are dynamic, involving a suite of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen, all within a single tissue. As such, they lend themselves well to transcriptomic analysis. Here we focus on a generalist invasive pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) and its most susceptible California Floristic Province native host, tanoak (...

  11. Interactions between SNPs affecting inflammatory response genes are associated with multiple myeloma disease risk and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar René; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Steffensen, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    The origin of multiple myeloma depends on interactions with stromal cells in the course of normal B-cell differentiation and evolution of immunity. The concept of the present study is that genes involved in MM pathogenesis, such as immune response genes, can be identified by screening for single......3L1 gene promoters. The occurrence of single polymorphisms, haplotypes and SNP-SNP interactions were statistically analyzed for association with disease risk and outcome following high-dose therapy. Identified genes that carried SNPs or haplotypes that were identified as risk or prognostic factors......= .005). The 'risk genes' were analyzed for expression in normal B-cell subsets (N = 6) from seven healthy donors and we found TNFA and IL-6 expressed both in naïve and in memory B cells when compared to preBI, II, immature and plasma cells. The 'prognosis genes' CHI3L1, IL-6 and IL-10 were differential...

  12. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using {sup 125}I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of {sup 131}I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by {sup 125}I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to {sup 131}I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system.

  13. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June Key

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using 125 I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of 131 I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by 125 I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to 131 I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system

  14. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol, respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones and plant exudates (including ethanol in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF, adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss, to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU. Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization, which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  15. Integration of human adipocyte chromosomal interactions with adipose gene expression prioritizes obesity-related genes from GWAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David Z; Garske, Kristina M; Alvarez, Marcus; Bhagat, Yash V; Boocock, James; Nikkola, Elina; Miao, Zong; Raulerson, Chelsea K; Cantor, Rita M; Civelek, Mete; Glastonbury, Craig A; Small, Kerrin S; Boehnke, Michael; Lusis, Aldons J; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Mohlke, Karen L; Laakso, Markku; Pajukanta, Päivi; Ko, Arthur

    2018-04-17

    Increased adiposity is a hallmark of obesity and overweight, which affect 2.2 billion people world-wide. Understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie obesity-related phenotypes can help to improve treatment options and drug development. Here we perform promoter Capture Hi-C in human adipocytes to investigate interactions between gene promoters and distal elements as a transcription-regulating mechanism contributing to these phenotypes. We find that promoter-interacting elements in human adipocytes are enriched for adipose-related transcription factor motifs, such as PPARG and CEBPB, and contribute to heritability of cis-regulated gene expression. We further intersect these data with published genome-wide association studies for BMI and BMI-related metabolic traits to identify the genes that are under genetic cis regulation in human adipocytes via chromosomal interactions. This integrative genomics approach identifies four cis-eQTL-eGene relationships associated with BMI or obesity-related traits, including rs4776984 and MAP2K5, which we further confirm by EMSA, and highlights 38 additional candidate genes.

  16. [Dopamine and excessive alcohol consumption: how genes interact with their environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Verkes, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: Hereditary factors account for approximately 50% of the risk of developing alcohol dependence. Genes that affect the dopamine function in the brain have been extensively studied as candidate genes. AIM: To present the results of recent Dutch studies on the interaction between

  17. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized…

  18. ToxCast Data Expands Universe of Chemical-Gene Interactions (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets. Thi...

  19. Inferring gene and protein interactions using PubMed citations and consensus Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeter, Anthony; Dalman, Mark; Haddad, Joseph; Duan, Zhong-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The PubMed database offers an extensive set of publication data that can be useful, yet inherently complex to use without automated computational techniques. Data repositories such as the Genomic Data Commons (GDC) and the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) offer experimental data storage and retrieval as well as curated gene expression profiles. Genetic interaction databases, including Reactome and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, offer pathway and experiment data analysis using data curated from these publications and data repositories. We have created a method to generate and analyze consensus networks, inferring potential gene interactions, using large numbers of Bayesian networks generated by data mining publications in the PubMed database. Through the concept of network resolution, these consensus networks can be tailored to represent possible genetic interactions. We designed a set of experiments to confirm that our method is stable across variation in both sample and topological input sizes. Using gene product interactions from the KEGG pathway database and data mining PubMed publication abstracts, we verify that regardless of the network resolution or the inferred consensus network, our method is capable of inferring meaningful gene interactions through consensus Bayesian network generation with multiple, randomized topological orderings. Our method can not only confirm the existence of currently accepted interactions, but has the potential to hypothesize new ones as well. We show our method confirms the existence of known gene interactions such as JAK-STAT-PI3K-AKT-mTOR, infers novel gene interactions such as RAS- Bcl-2 and RAS-AKT, and found significant pathway-pathway interactions between the JAK-STAT signaling and Cardiac Muscle Contraction KEGG pathways.

  20. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook; Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10 7 , 2 x 10 8 or 1 x 10 9 plaque forming units (pfu)] or β-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10 9 pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of 99m TcO 4 - (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of 99m TcO 4 - and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of 99m TcO 4 - was retained in the liver (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle of rats, non-invasively and quantitatively. (orig.)

  1. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook [Department of Internal Medicine (Cardiology), Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, 138-736, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin [Department of Microbiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Won Woo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10{sup 7}, 2 x 10{sup 8} or 1 x 10{sup 9} plaque forming units (pfu)] or {beta}-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} was retained in the liver (p<0.001) and the right muscle (p<0.05), with the highest uptake in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p<0.05), with a positive correlation with the imaging counts (r=0.810, p<0.05) and the biodistribution (r=0.847, p<0.001). Hot spots in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in

  2. Gene-environment interaction: Does fluoride influence the reproductive hormones in male farmers modified by ERα gene polymorphisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Huang, Hui; Sun, Long; Zhou, Tong; Zhu, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xuemin; Duan, Lijv; Li, Zhiyuan; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of endemic fluorosis is derived from high fluoride levels in drinking water and industrial fumes or dust. Reproductive disruption is also a major harm caused by fluoride exposure besides dental and skeletal lesions. However, few studies focus on the mechanism of fluoride exposure on male reproductive function, especially the possible interaction of fluoride exposure and gene polymorphism on male reproductive hormones. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study in rural areas of Henan province in China to explore the interaction between the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene and fluoride exposure on reproductive hormone levels in male farmers living in the endemic fluorosis villages. The results showed that fluoride exposure significantly increased the serum level of estradiol in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis in male farmers. Moreover, the observations indicated that fluoride exposure and genetic markers had an interaction on serum concentration of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol, and the interaction among different loci of the ERα gene could impact the serum testosterone level. Findings in the present work suggest that chronic fluoride exposure in drinking water could modulate the levels of reproductive hormones in males living in endemic fluorosis areas, and the interaction between fluoride exposure and ERα polymorphisms might affect the serum levels of hormones in the HPT axis in male farmers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rice-arsenate interactions in hydroponics: a three-gene model for tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J; Nigar, Meher; Williams, Paul N; Dasgupta, Tapash; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the genetic mapping of the tolerance of root growth to 13.3 muM arsenate [As(V)] using the BalaxAzucena population is improved, and candidate genes for further study are identified. A remarkable three-gene model of tolerance is advanced, which appears to involve epistatic interaction between three major genes, two on chromosome 6 and one on chromosome 10. Any combination of two of these genes inherited from the tolerant parent leads to the plant having tolerance. Lists of potential positional candidate genes are presented. These are then refined using whole genome transcriptomics data and bioinformatics. Physiological evidence is also provided that genes related to phosphate transport are unlikely to be behind the genetic loci conferring tolerance. These results offer testable hypotheses for genes related to As(V) tolerance that might offer strategies for mitigating arsenic (As) accumulation in consumed rice.

  4. Rice–arsenate interactions in hydroponics: a three-gene model for tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J.; Nigar, Meher; Dasgupta, Tapash; Meharg, Andrew A.; Price, Adam H.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the genetic mapping of the tolerance of root growth to 13.3 μM arsenate [As(V)] using the Bala×Azucena population is improved, and candidate genes for further study are identified. A remarkable three-gene model of tolerance is advanced, which appears to involve epistatic interaction between three major genes, two on chromosome 6 and one on chromosome 10. Any combination of two of these genes inherited from the tolerant parent leads to the plant having tolerance. Lists of potential positional candidate genes are presented. These are then refined using whole genome transcriptomics data and bioinformatics. Physiological evidence is also provided that genes related to phosphate transport are unlikely to be behind the genetic loci conferring tolerance. These results offer testable hypotheses for genes related to As(V) tolerance that might offer strategies for mitigating arsenic (As) accumulation in consumed rice. PMID:18453529

  5. Interacting genes in the pine-fusiform rust forest pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.V. Amerson; T.L. Kubisiak; S.A. Garcia; G.C. Kuhlman; C.D. Nelson; S.E. McKeand; T.J. Mullin; B. Li

    2005-01-01

    Fusiform rust (FR) disease of pines, caused by Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme (Cqf), is the most destructive disease in pine plantations of the southern U. S. The NCSU fusiform rust program, in conjunction with the USDA-Forest Service in Saucier, MS and Athens, GA, has research underway to elucidate some of the genetic interactions in this...

  6. Plant interactions with multiple insect herbivores: from community to genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.M.; Kroes, A.; Li, Y.; Gols, R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Poelman, E.H.; Dicke, M.

    2014-01-01

    Every plant is a member of a complex insect community that consists of tens to hundreds of species that belong to different trophic levels. The dynamics of this community are critically influenced by the plant, which mediates interactions between community members that can occur on the plant

  7. Materijalna motivacija kao nosilac uspešne reorganizacije kompanije NIS (Material Motivation as the Holder of a Successful Reorganization on the Example of Company Nis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Stojanović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For successful organization people are the primary development resource. Motivation and satisfaction of employees become the basis of modern organizations. Motivated employees today represent a strategic resource which gain a competitive advantage for the organization. If someone wants to motivate others, must first be able to motivate yourself. That means that if in organization exists motivated staff, there must be a motivated manager who will be able to launch employees. The aim of this paper is to emphasizes the importance of material motivation for successful business of a large company that had in the past significant organizational change. Through unstructured interviews were collected data on which was investigated the hypothesis that the material motivation of the most important holder for successful reorganization on the example of leading Serbian company for exploration, production and refining of oil and gas NIS. From the above it can be concluded that high-quality human resources management involves proper motivation system, that has been based on material incentives. In this paper, attention will be focused on monetary motivation and how a well-established system of material incentives can lead to the great success of the company that had a significant reorganization in the past. It will be shown in detail the system of material incentives and the positive results which obtained by this system, when it comes to the business of the company, which today is the most desirable employer in Serbia and the region. The paper should emphasize the benefits of a fair system of motivation which brings to an organization, but also to encourage further thinking to improve this aspect of motivation, which is a prerequisite for successful business and the basis for all other activities in the HRM. The analysis results indeed show that a system of material incentives in NIS is the holder of a successful reorganization, and the proof is the business

  8. Direct evidence of spin frustration in the fcc antiferromagnet NiS sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, M; Endoh, Y; Hirota, K; Yamada, K

    2002-01-01

    NiS sub 2 is a well-known Mott insulator with anomalous antiferromagnetic long-range order of coexistent type I (Q sub M =(1,0,0), T sub N sub 1 =40 K) and type II (Q sub M =(1/2,1/2,1/2), T sub N sub 2 =30 K). Extensive neutron-scattering measurements reveal that magnetism in NiS sub 2 is governed by geometrical spin frustration, resulting in magnetic diffuse scattering extending along the fcc zone boundary. Although the diffuse scattering exists at temperatures as high as 250 K (6T sub N sub 1), it disappears rapidly below T sub N sub 2 , associated with minor crystal distortion. We observed a clear energy gap in addition to the low-energy spin-wave excitation at significantly below 30 K, and obtain evidence that degeneracy due to the coexistence of the two types of antiferromagnetism is relieved in the ground state via the reduction in symmetry due to distortion. (orig.)

  9. Differential gene expression and Hog1 interaction with osmoresponsive genes in the extremely halotolerant black yeast Hortaea werneckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plemenitaš Ana

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in external salinity force eukaryotic cells to respond by changes in the gene expression of proteins acting in protective biochemical processes, thus counteracting the changing osmotic pressure. The high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG signaling pathway is essential for the efficient up-regulation of the osmoresponsive genes. In this study, the differential gene expression of the extremely halotolerant black yeast Hortaea werneckii was explored. Furthermore, the interaction of mitogen-activated protein kinase HwHog1 and RNA polymerase II with the chromatin in cells adapted to an extremely hypersaline environment was analyzed. Results A cDNA subtraction library was constructed for H. werneckii, adapted to moderate salinity or an extremely hypersaline environment of 4.5 M NaCl. An uncommon osmoresponsive set of 95 differentially expressed genes was identified. The majority of these had not previously been connected with the adaptation of salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae to hypersaline conditions. The transcriptional response in hypersaline-adapted and hypersaline-stressed cells showed that only a subset of the identified genes responded to acute salt-stress, whereas all were differentially expressed in adapted cells. Interaction with HwHog1 was shown for 36 of the 95 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the identified osmoresponsive and HwHog1-dependent genes in H. werneckii have not been previously reported as Hog1-dependent genes in the salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae. The study further demonstrated the co-occupancy of HwHog1 and RNA polymerase II on the chromatin of 17 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated genes in 4.5 M NaCl-adapted H. werneckii cells. Conclusion Extremely halotolerant H. werneckii represents a suitable and highly relevant organism to study cellular responses to environmental salinity. In comparison with the salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae, this yeast shows a different set of genes being expressed at

  10. Dynamic changes in the interchromosomal interaction of early histone gene loci during development of sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masaya; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Hayashi, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takashi; Awazu, Akinori; Sakamoto, Naoaki

    2017-12-15

    The nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics of eukaryotic genes are closely related to the regulation of gene expression, but they have not been well examined during early development, which is accompanied by rapid cell cycle progression and dynamic changes in nuclear organization, such as nuclear size and chromatin constitution. In this study, we focused on the early development of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization of gene loci encoding early histones (one of the types of histone in sea urchin). There are two non-allelic early histone gene loci per sea urchin genome. We found that during the morula stage, when the early histone gene expression levels are at their maximum, interchromosomal interactions were often formed between the early histone gene loci on separate chromosomes and that the gene loci were directed to locate to more interior positions. Furthermore, these interactions were associated with the active transcription of the early histone genes. Thus, such dynamic interchromosomal interactions may contribute to the efficient synthesis of early histone mRNA during the morula stage of sea urchin development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. A rapid NiS bead technique for measurements of picogram concentrations of platinum group elements (PGEs) following neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Shukla, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    To measure picogram amounts of PGEs in terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples we have modified the NiS fire assay technique in conjunction with neutron activation analysis. Os, Ir and Ru are almost quantitatively concentrated in the NiS bead. The method should be applicable to other elements (Pt, Pd, and Rh) but these could not be analyzed because of the short half life of their daughter isotopes. The results also show that the chalcophhile elements like Ag also can be quantitatively estimated using this method. (author)

  12. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    and non-obese women. METHODS: We considered interactions between 11,441 SNPs within 80 candidate genes related to hormone biosynthesis and metabolism and insulin-like growth factors with six hormone-related factors (oral contraceptive use, parity, endometriosis, tubal ligation, hormone replacement therapy...... Future work is needed to develop powerful statistical methods able to detect these complex interactions. IMPACT: Assessment of multifactor interaction is feasible, and, here, suggests that the relationship between genetic variants within candidate genes and hormone-related risk factors may vary EOC...

  13. Bayesian logistic regression in detection of gene-steroid interaction for cancer at PDLIM5 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Owusu, Daniel; Pan, Yue; Xie, Changchun

    2016-06-01

    The PDZ and LIM domain 5 (PDLIM5) gene may play a role in cancer, bipolar disorder, major depression, alcohol dependence and schizophrenia; however, little is known about the interaction effect of steroid and PDLIM5 gene on cancer. This study examined 47 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the PDLIM5 gene in the Marshfield sample with 716 cancer patients (any diagnosed cancer, excluding minor skin cancer) and 2848 noncancer controls. Multiple logistic regression model in PLINK software was used to examine the association of each SNP with cancer. Bayesian logistic regression in PROC GENMOD in SAS statistical software, ver. 9.4 was used to detect gene- steroid interactions influencing cancer. Single marker analysis using PLINK identified 12 SNPs associated with cancer (Plogistic regression in PROC GENMOD showed that both rs6532496 and rs951613 revealed strong gene-steroid interaction effects (OR=2.18, 95% CI=1.31-3.63 with P = 2.9 × 10⁻³ for rs6532496 and OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.24-3.45 with P = 5.43 × 10⁻³ for rs951613, respectively). Results from Bayesian logistic regression showed stronger interaction effects (OR=2.26, 95% CI=1.2-3.38 for rs6532496 and OR=2.14, 95% CI=1.14-3.2 for rs951613, respectively). All the 12 SNPs associated with cancer revealed significant gene-steroid interaction effects (P logistic regression and OR=2.59, 95% CI=1.4-3.97 from Bayesian logistic regression; respectively). This study provides evidence of common genetic variants within the PDLIM5 gene and interactions between PLDIM5 gene polymorphisms and steroid use influencing cancer.

  14. Gene-environment interaction and biological monitoring of occupational exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvonen, Ari

    2005-01-01

    Biological monitoring methods and biological limit values applied in occupational and environmental medicine have been traditionally developed on the assumption that individuals do not differ significantly in their biotransformation capacities. It has become clear, however, that this is not the case, but wide inter-individual differences exist in the metabolism of chemicals. Integration of the data on individual metabolic capacity in biological monitoring studies is therefore anticipated to represent a significant refinement of the currently used methods. We have recently conducted several biological monitoring studies on occupationally exposed subjects, which have included the determination of the workers' genotypes for the metabolic genes of potential importance for a given chemical exposure. The exposure levels have been measured by urine metabolites, adducts in blood macromolecules, and cytogenetic alterations in lymphocytes. Our studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms in metabolic genes may indeed be important modifiers of individual biological monitoring results of, e.g., carbon disulphide and styrene. The information is anticipated to be useful in insuring that the workplace is safe for everyone, including the most sensitive individuals. This knowledge could also be useful to occupational physicians, industrial hygienists, and regulatory bodies in charge of defining acceptable exposure limits for environmental and/or occupational pollutants

  15. Size-dependent and intra-band photoluminescence of NiS2 nano-alloys synthesized by microwave assisted hydrothermal technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Linganiso, C

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of nickel disulfide (NiS2) nano-alloys capped and uncapped with hexadecylamine (HDA) was carried out. A cubic phase NiS2 formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. An average crystallite size of 35 nm was obtained...

  16. The acceleration intermediate phase (NiS and Ni3S2) evolution by nanocrystallization in Li/NiS2 thermal batteries with high specific capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanyu; Zhou, Lingping; Fu, Licai; Zhu, Jiajun; Li, Deyi; Yang, Wulin

    2017-06-01

    The intermediate phase of NiS2 is thought to be a bottleneck currently to improve the overall performance of Li/NiS2 thermal batteries because of its low conductivity and close formation enthalpy between NiS2 and the intermediate phase (NiS, Ni3S2, etc). For improving the discharge performances of Li/NiS2 thermal batteries, the nano NiS2 with an average size of 85 ± 5 nm is designated as a cathode material. The electrochemical measurements show that the specific capacity of nano NiS2 cathode is higher than micro NiS2. The nano NiS2 cathode exhibits excellent electrochemical performances with high specific capacities of 794 and 654 mAh g-1 at current density of 0.1 and 0.5 A cm-2 under a cut-off voltage of 0.5 V, respectively. These results show that the rapid intermediate phase evolution from the nanocrystallization can obviously enhance use efficiency of NiS2 and improve discharge performances of thermal batteries.

  17. MINER: exploratory analysis of gene interaction networks by machine learning from expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivieng Jane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reconstruction of gene regulatory networks from high-throughput "omics" data has become a major goal in the modelling of living systems. Numerous approaches have been proposed, most of which attempt only "one-shot" reconstruction of the whole network with no intervention from the user, or offer only simple correlation analysis to infer gene dependencies. Results We have developed MINER (Microarray Interactive Network Exploration and Representation, an application that combines multivariate non-linear tree learning of individual gene regulatory dependencies, visualisation of these dependencies as both trees and networks, and representation of known biological relationships based on common Gene Ontology annotations. MINER allows biologists to explore the dependencies influencing the expression of individual genes in a gene expression data set in the form of decision, model or regression trees, using their domain knowledge to guide the exploration and formulate hypotheses. Multiple trees can then be summarised in the form of a gene network diagram. MINER is being adopted by several of our collaborators and has already led to the discovery of a new significant regulatory relationship with subsequent experimental validation. Conclusion Unlike most gene regulatory network inference methods, MINER allows the user to start from genes of interest and build the network gene-by-gene, incorporating domain expertise in the process. This approach has been used successfully with RNA microarray data but is applicable to other quantitative data produced by high-throughput technologies such as proteomics and "next generation" DNA sequencing.

  18. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between...... that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...... of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity...

  19. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between...... and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated...... that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...

  20. Gene-lifestyle interaction and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langenberg, Claudia; Sharp, Stephen J; Franks, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    the genetic score and sex, diabetes family history, physical activity, or dietary habits assessed by a Mediterranean diet score. CONCLUSIONS: The relative effect of a T2D genetic risk score is greater in younger and leaner participants. However, this sub-group is at low absolute risk and would......BACKGROUND: Understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has progressed rapidly, but the interactions between common genetic variants and lifestyle risk factors have not been systematically investigated in studies with adequate statistical power. Therefore, we aimed to quantify...

  1. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  2. Prioritization of gene regulatory interactions from large-scale modules in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringas Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of groups of co-regulated genes and their transcription factors, called transcriptional modules, has been a focus of many studies about biological systems. While methods have been developed to derive numerous modules from genome-wide data, individual links between regulatory proteins and target genes still need experimental verification. In this work, we aim to prioritize regulator-target links within transcriptional modules based on three types of large-scale data sources. Results Starting with putative transcriptional modules from ChIP-chip data, we first derive modules in which target genes show both expression and function coherence. The most reliable regulatory links between transcription factors and target genes are established by identifying intersection of target genes in coherent modules for each enriched functional category. Using a combination of genome-wide yeast data in normal growth conditions and two different reference datasets, we show that our method predicts regulatory interactions with significantly higher predictive power than ChIP-chip binding data alone. A comparison with results from other studies highlights that our approach provides a reliable and complementary set of regulatory interactions. Based on our results, we can also identify functionally interacting target genes, for instance, a group of co-regulated proteins related to cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we report novel conserved binding sites of a glycoprotein-encoding gene, CIS3, regulated by Swi6-Swi4 and Ndd1-Fkh2-Mcm1 complexes. Conclusion We provide a simple method to prioritize individual TF-gene interactions from large-scale transcriptional modules. In comparison with other published works, we predict a complementary set of regulatory interactions which yields a similar or higher prediction accuracy at the expense of sensitivity. Therefore, our method can serve as an alternative approach to prioritization for

  3. The interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 gene increases the susceptibility of paranoid schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lin

    Full Text Available The association between BDNF gene functional Val66Met polymorphism rs6265 and the schizophrenia is far from being consistent. In addition to the heterogeneous in schizophrenia per se leading to the inconsistent results, the interaction among multi-genes is probably playing the main role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, but not a single gene. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 is the high-affinity receptor of BDNF, and was reported to be associated with mood disorders, though no literature reported the association with schizophrenia. Thus, in the present study, total 402 patients with paranoid schizophrenia (the most common subtype of schizophrenia and matched 406 healthy controls were recruited to investigate the role of rs6265 in BDNF, three polymorphisms in NTRK2 gene (rs1387923, rs2769605 and rs1565445 and their interaction in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population. We did not observe significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and healthy controls for all four polymorphisms separately. The haplotype analysis also showed no association between haplotype of NTRK2 genes (rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 and paranoid schizophrenia. However, we found the association between the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 with paranoid schizophrenia by using the MDR method followed by conventional statistical analysis. The best gene-gene interaction model was a three-locus model (BDNF rs6265, NTRK2 rs1387923 and NTRK2 rs2769605, in which one low-risk and three high-risk four-locus genotype combinations were identified. Our findings implied that single polymorphism of rs6265 rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 in BDNF and NTRK2 were not associated with the development of paranoid schizophrenia in a Han population, however, the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 genes polymorphisms (BDNF-rs6265, NTRK2-rs1387923 and NTRK2-rs2769605 may be involved in the susceptibility to paranoid

  4. The interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 gene increases the susceptibility of paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng; Su, Yousong; Zhang, Chengfang; Xing, Mengjuan; Ding, Wenhua; Liao, Liwei; Guan, Yangtai; Li, Zezhi; Cui, Donghong

    2013-01-01

    The association between BDNF gene functional Val66Met polymorphism rs6265 and the schizophrenia is far from being consistent. In addition to the heterogeneous in schizophrenia per se leading to the inconsistent results, the interaction among multi-genes is probably playing the main role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, but not a single gene. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2) is the high-affinity receptor of BDNF, and was reported to be associated with mood disorders, though no literature reported the association with schizophrenia. Thus, in the present study, total 402 patients with paranoid schizophrenia (the most common subtype of schizophrenia) and matched 406 healthy controls were recruited to investigate the role of rs6265 in BDNF, three polymorphisms in NTRK2 gene (rs1387923, rs2769605 and rs1565445) and their interaction in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population. We did not observe significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and healthy controls for all four polymorphisms separately. The haplotype analysis also showed no association between haplotype of NTRK2 genes (rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445) and paranoid schizophrenia. However, we found the association between the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 with paranoid schizophrenia by using the MDR method followed by conventional statistical analysis. The best gene-gene interaction model was a three-locus model (BDNF rs6265, NTRK2 rs1387923 and NTRK2 rs2769605), in which one low-risk and three high-risk four-locus genotype combinations were identified. Our findings implied that single polymorphism of rs6265 rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 in BDNF and NTRK2 were not associated with the development of paranoid schizophrenia in a Han population, however, the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 genes polymorphisms (BDNF-rs6265, NTRK2-rs1387923 and NTRK2-rs2769605) may be involved in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia.

  5. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boloc

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA. The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies.We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space.In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates.

  6. Two-Way Gene Interaction From Microarray Data Based on Correlation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi Majd, Hamid; Talebi, Atefeh; Gilany, Kambiz; Khayyer, Nasibeh

    2016-06-01

    Gene networks have generated a massive explosion in the development of high-throughput techniques for monitoring various aspects of gene activity. Networks offer a natural way to model interactions between genes, and extracting gene network information from high-throughput genomic data is an important and difficult task. The purpose of this study is to construct a two-way gene network based on parametric and nonparametric correlation coefficients. The first step in constructing a Gene Co-expression Network is to score all pairs of gene vectors. The second step is to select a score threshold and connect all gene pairs whose scores exceed this value. In the foundation-application study, we constructed two-way gene networks using nonparametric methods, such as Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and Blomqvist's measure, and compared them with Pearson's correlation coefficient. We surveyed six genes of venous thrombosis disease, made a matrix entry representing the score for the corresponding gene pair, and obtained two-way interactions using Pearson's correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, and Blomqvist's coefficient. Finally, these methods were compared with Cytoscape, based on BIND, and Gene Ontology, based on molecular function visual methods; R software version 3.2 and Bioconductor were used to perform these methods. Based on the Pearson and Spearman correlations, the results were the same and were confirmed by Cytoscape and GO visual methods; however, Blomqvist's coefficient was not confirmed by visual methods. Some results of the correlation coefficients are not the same with visualization. The reason may be due to the small number of data.

  7. Clock genes × stress × reward interactions in alcohol and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreau-Lenz, Stéphanie; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Adverse life events and highly stressful environments have deleterious consequences for mental health. Those environmental factors can potentiate alcohol and drug abuse in vulnerable individuals carrying specific genetic risk factors, hence producing the final risk for alcohol- and substance-use disorders development. The nature of these genes remains to be fully determined, but studies indicate their direct or indirect relation to the stress hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and/or reward systems. Over the past decade, clock genes have been revealed to be key-players in influencing acute and chronic alcohol/drug effects. In parallel, the influence of chronic stress and stressful life events in promoting alcohol and substance use and abuse has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the reciprocal interaction of clock genes with various HPA-axis components, as well as the evidence for an implication of clock genes in stress-induced alcohol abuse, have led to the idea that clock genes, and Period genes in particular, may represent key genetic factors to consider when examining gene × environment interaction in the etiology of addiction. The aim of the present review is to summarize findings linking clock genes, stress, and alcohol and substance abuse, and to propose potential underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HSD3B and gene-gene interactions in a pathway-based analysis of genetic susceptibility to bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline S Andrew

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the 4(th most common cancer among men in the U.S. We analyzed variant genotypes hypothesized to modify major biological processes involved in bladder carcinogenesis, including hormone regulation, apoptosis, DNA repair, immune surveillance, metabolism, proliferation, and telomere maintenance. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between genetic variation affecting these processes and susceptibility in 563 genotyped urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 863 controls enrolled in a case-control study of incident bladder cancer conducted in New Hampshire, U.S. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Statistical Epistasis Network analysis. The 3'UTR flanking variant form of the hormone regulation gene HSD3B2 was associated with increased bladder cancer risk in the New Hampshire population (adjusted OR 1.85 95%CI 1.31-2.62. This finding was successfully replicated in the Texas Bladder Cancer Study with 957 controls, 497 cases (adjusted OR 3.66 95%CI 1.06-12.63. The effect of this prevalent SNP was stronger among males (OR 2.13 95%CI 1.40-3.25 than females (OR 1.56 95%CI 0.83-2.95, (SNP-gender interaction P = 0.048. We also identified a SNP-SNP interaction between T-cell activation related genes GATA3 and CD81 (interaction P = 0.0003. The fact that bladder cancer incidence is 3-4 times higher in males suggests the involvement of hormone levels. This biologic process-based analysis suggests candidate susceptibility markers and supports the theory that disrupted hormone regulation plays a role in bladder carcinogenesis.

  9. Feasibility of sodium/iodide symporter gene as a new imaging reporter gene: comparison with HSV1-tk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Kang, Joo Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Chul Woo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes, such as HSV1-tk and D 2 receptor genes, make it possible to visualise gene expression non-invasively and repetitively in vivo. However, these systems require the synthesis of complicated substrates and the availability of expensive PET equipment. Expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene can be easily monitored with radioiodines and technetium-99m using a gamma camera. To evaluate the possibility of using NIS as an imaging reporter gene, we compared its characteristics with those of the conventional HSV1-tk gene. The CM cell line was made by transfecting the HSV1-tk gene into CT-26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line). The CTN and CMN cell lines were then made by transfecting the NIS gene into CT-26 and CM. We measured the uptake of iodine-125 iodovinyldeoxyuridine ([ 125 I]IVDU) and 125 I to evaluate the expression of the HSV1-tk and NIS genes, respectively. Each cell line was injected into four flank sites in Balb/c mice. The biodistribution study was performed after intravenously injecting [ 125 I]IVDU and 131 I, and 131 I scintigraphy was performed for the evaluation of NIS expression. In vitro studies indicated that CTN and CMN had 40- to 79-fold and 150- to 256-fold higher uptake of 125 I than CT-26 and CM, respectively. Furthermore, CM and CMN showed 57- to 69-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. NIS gene expression and 125 I accumulation were found to be directly correlated (R 2 =0.923), as were HSV1-tk gene expression and [ 125 I]IVDU accumulation (R 2 =0.956). Calculated signal per unit NIS and HSV1-tk mRNA expression was 23,240±3,755 cpm and 34,039±5,346 cpm, respectively. In vivo study indicated that CTN and CMN had 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher uptake of 131 I than CT-26 and CM, and 1.8- and 3.5-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. Scintigraphy using 131 I easily visualised CTN and CMN tumours. In conclusion, the NIS gene may be viewed as an imaging

  10. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis. © (2010) Max Planck Society. Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  11. Clustering gene expression data based on predicted differential effects of GV interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Han, Dan-Fu

    2005-02-01

    Microarray has become a popular biotechnology in biological and medical research. However, systematic and stochastic variabilities in microarray data are expected and unavoidable, resulting in the problem that the raw measurements have inherent "noise" within microarray experiments. Currently, logarithmic ratios are usually analyzed by various clustering methods directly, which may introduce bias interpretation in identifying groups of genes or samples. In this paper, a statistical method based on mixed model approaches was proposed for microarray data cluster analysis. The underlying rationale of this method is to partition the observed total gene expression level into various variations caused by different factors using an ANOVA model, and to predict the differential effects of GV (gene by variety) interaction using the adjusted unbiased prediction (AUP) method. The predicted GV interaction effects can then be used as the inputs of cluster analysis. We illustrated the application of our method with a gene expression dataset and elucidated the utility of our approach using an external validation.

  12. The influence of nutrigenetics on the lipid profile: interaction between genes and dietary habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Fabiana M; Bulhões, Andréa C; Maluf, Sharbel W; Schuch, Jaqueline B; Voigt, Francine; Lucatelli, Juliana F; Barros, Alessandra C; Hutz, Mara H

    2010-04-01

    Nutrigenetics is a new field with few studies in Latin America. Our aim is to investigate the way in which different genes related to the lipid profile influence the response to specific dietary habits. Eight polymorphisms on seven genes were investigated in a sample (n = 567) from Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. All the volunteers completed a food diary that was then assessed and classified into nine food groups. A number of nutrigenetic interactions were detected primarily related to the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene. For example, frequent consumption of foods rich in polyunsaturated fat resulted in the beneficial effect of increasing HDL-C only in individuals who were not carriers of the E*4 allele of the APOE gene, whereas variations in eating habits of E*4 carriers did not affect their HDL-C (P = 0.018). Our data demonstrate for the first time nutrigenetic interactions in a Brazilian population.

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs13871...

  14. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153,...

  15. Au-controlled enhancement of photoluminescence of NiS nanostructures synthesized via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Linganiso, EC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available and confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. TEM analysis revealed that the NiS nanostructures were of various shapes. A quantum confinement effect was confirmed by the blue shift PL emissions and high optical energy band gap observed for the as...

  16. Metallic behavior of NiS thin film under the structural, optical, electrical and ab initio investigation frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughalmi, R. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Rahmani, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique (LPC2ME). Département de physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université d' Oran Es-Sénia, Oran (Algeria); Département de physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Oran- Mohamed-Boudiaf, Oran (Algeria); Boukhachem, A., E-mail: abdelwaheb.boukhachem@laposte.net [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Amrani, B.; Driss-Khodja, K. [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique (LPC2ME). Département de physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université d' Oran Es-Sénia, Oran (Algeria); Amlouk, M. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2015-08-01

    Nickel sulfide (NiS) thin films were deposited on the glass substrates by spray pyrolysis at 250 °C using an aqueous solution which contains nickel chloride hexahydrate and thiourea as precursors. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the hexagonal structure is being part of P6{sub 3}/mmc space group of the deposited films with (100) preferred orientation and lattice parameters a = 3.441 Å and c = 5.320 Å. The optical properties, investigated through transmittance and reflectance measurements reveal that the direct band gap energy (Eg) is around 0.55 eV. The electrical study shows a metallic behavior of the current II-VI binary compound. This behavior regarding NiS II-VI binary sulfide was confirmed by numerical studies based on the density functional theory (DFT) were adopted. The ground state quantities, such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative as well as the elastic constants were obtained. The values are consistent with the stability of hexagonal structure. The band structure and the states densities of such material were studied. The results show that there is an agreement between experimental and simulation. - Highlights: • NiS thin films are synthesized by Spray pyrolysis. • NiS is a low band gap compound. • These films have interesting electrical properties showing a metallic behavior. • Computational study confirms the electrical measurements.

  17. Rhenium-188 as an alternative to Iodine-131 for treatment of breast tumors expressing the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadachova, E.; Bouzahzah, B.; Zuckier, L.S.; Pestell, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), which transports iodine into the cell, is expressed in thyroid tissue and was recently found to be expressed in approximately 80% of human breast cancers but not in healthy breast tissue. These findings raised the possibility that therapeutics targeting uptake by NIS may be used for breast cancer treatment. To increase the efficacy of such therapy it would be ideal to identify a radioactive therapy with enhanced local emission. The feasibility of using the powerful beta-emitting radiometal 188 Re in the form of 188 Re-perrhenate was therefore compared with 131 I for treatment of NIS-expressing mammary tumors. In the current studies, using a xenografted breast cancer model induced by the ErbB2 oncogene in nude mice, 188 Re-perrhenate exhibited NIS-dependent uptake into the mammary tumor. Dosimetry calculations in the mammary tumor demonstrate that 188 Re-perrhenate is able to deliver a dose 4.5 times higher than 131 I suggesting it may provide enhanced therapeutic efficacy

  18. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia.

  19. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paula; Stokes, Jennifer; Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John; O'Tuathaigh, Colm

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia.

  20. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  1. GENIE: a software package for gene-gene interaction analysis in genetic association studies using multiple GPU or CPU cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-gene interaction in genetic association studies is computationally intensive when a large number of SNPs are involved. Most of the latest Central Processing Units (CPUs have multiple cores, whereas Graphics Processing Units (GPUs also have hundreds of cores and have been recently used to implement faster scientific software. However, currently there are no genetic analysis software packages that allow users to fully utilize the computing power of these multi-core devices for genetic interaction analysis for binary traits. Findings Here we present a novel software package GENIE, which utilizes the power of multiple GPU or CPU processor cores to parallelize the interaction analysis. GENIE reads an entire genetic association study dataset into memory and partitions the dataset into fragments with non-overlapping sets of SNPs. For each fragment, GENIE analyzes: 1 the interaction of SNPs within it in parallel, and 2 the interaction between the SNPs of the current fragment and other fragments in parallel. We tested GENIE on a large-scale candidate gene study on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphics card, the GPU mode of GENIE achieves a speedup of 27 times over its single-core CPU mode run. Conclusions GENIE is open-source, economical, user-friendly, and scalable. Since the computing power and memory capacity of graphics cards are increasing rapidly while their cost is going down, we anticipate that GENIE will achieve greater speedups with faster GPU cards. Documentation, source code, and precompiled binaries can be downloaded from http://www.cceb.upenn.edu/~mli/software/GENIE/.

  2. Comparison of information-theoretic to statistical methods for gene-gene interactions in the presence of genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheston Lara

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifactorial diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases are caused by the complex interplay between genes and environment. The detection of these interactions remains challenging due to computational limitations. Information theoretic approaches use computationally efficient directed search strategies and thus provide a feasible solution to this problem. However, the power of information theoretic methods for interaction analysis has not been systematically evaluated. In this work, we compare power and Type I error of an information-theoretic approach to existing interaction analysis methods. Methods The k-way interaction information (KWII metric for identifying variable combinations involved in gene-gene interactions (GGI was assessed using several simulated data sets under models of genetic heterogeneity driven by susceptibility increasing loci with varying allele frequency, penetrance values and heritability. The power and proportion of false positives of the KWII was compared to multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, restricted partitioning method (RPM and logistic regression. Results The power of the KWII was considerably greater than MDR on all six simulation models examined. For a given disease prevalence at high values of heritability, the power of both RPM and KWII was greater than 95%. For models with low heritability and/or genetic heterogeneity, the power of the KWII was consistently greater than RPM; the improvements in power for the KWII over RPM ranged from 4.7% to 14.2% at for α = 0.001 in the three models at the lowest heritability values examined. KWII performed similar to logistic regression. Conclusions Information theoretic models are flexible and have excellent power to detect GGI under a variety of conditions that characterize complex diseases.

  3. Synergistic interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Ianina; McLeod, Anne M; Colbourne, John K; Yan, Norman D; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the response of organisms to multiple stressors is critical for predicting if populations can adapt to rapid environmental change. Natural and anthropogenic stressors often interact, complicating general predictions. In this study, we examined the interactive and cumulative effects of two common environmental stressors, lowered calcium concentration, an anthropogenic stressor, and predator presence, a natural stressor, on the water flea Daphnia pulex. We analyzed expression changes of five genes involved in calcium homeostasis - cuticle proteins (Cutie, Icp2), calbindin (Calb), and calcium pump and channel (Serca and Ip3R) - using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in a full factorial experiment. We observed strong synergistic interactions between low calcium concentration and predator presence. While the Ip3R gene was not affected by the stressors, the other four genes were affected in their transcriptional levels by the combination of the stressors. Transcriptional patterns of genes that code for cuticle proteins (Cutie and Icp2) and a sarcoplasmic calcium pump (Serca) only responded to the combination of stressors, changing their relative expression levels in a synergistic response, while a calcium-binding protein (Calb) responded to low calcium stress and the combination of both stressors. The expression pattern of these genes (Cutie, Icp2, and Serca) were nonlinear, yet they were dose dependent across the calcium gradient. Multiple stressors can have complex, often unexpected effects on ecosystems. This study demonstrates that the dominant interaction for the set of tested genes appears to be synergism. We argue that gene expression patterns can be used to understand and predict the type of interaction expected when organisms are exposed simultaneously to natural and anthropogenic stressors.

  4. Differential reconstructed gene interaction networks for deriving toxicity threshold in chemical risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi; Maxwell, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Nan; Perkins, Edward J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Gong, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathway alterations reflected as changes in gene expression regulation and gene interaction can result from cellular exposure to toxicants. Such information is often used to elucidate toxicological modes of action. From a risk assessment perspective, alterations in biological pathways are a rich resource for setting toxicant thresholds, which may be more sensitive and mechanism-informed than traditional toxicity endpoints. Here we developed a novel differential networks (DNs) appro...

  5. Antisocial peer affiliation and externalizing disorders: Evidence for Gene × Environment × Development interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R; Hicks, Brian M; Keyes, Margaret A; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2017-02-01

    Gene × Environment interaction contributes to externalizing disorders in childhood and adolescence, but little is known about whether such effects are long lasting or present in adulthood. We examined gene-environment interplay in the concurrent and prospective associations between antisocial peer affiliation and externalizing disorders (antisocial behavior and substance use disorders) at ages 17, 20, 24, and 29. The sample included 1,382 same-sex twin pairs participating in the Minnesota Twin Family Study. We detected a Gene × Environment interaction at age 17, such that additive genetic influences on antisocial behavior and substance use disorders were greater in the context of greater antisocial peer affiliation. This Gene × Environment interaction was not present for antisocial behavior symptoms after age 17, but it was for substance use disorder symptoms through age 29 (though effect sizes were largest at age 17). The results suggest adolescence is a critical period for the development of externalizing disorders wherein exposure to greater environmental adversity is associated with a greater expression of genetic risk. This form of Gene × Environment interaction may persist through young adulthood for substance use disorders, but it appears to be limited to adolescence for antisocial behavior.

  6. Antisocial Peer Affiliation and Externalizing Disorders: Evidence for Gene × Environment × Development Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R.; Hicks, Brian M.; Keyes, Margaret A.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Gene × environment interaction contributes to externalizing disorders in adolescence, but little is known about whether such effects are long-lasting or present in adulthood. We examined gene-environment interplay in the concurrent and prospective associations between antisocial peer affiliation and externalizing disorders (antisocial behavior and substance use disorders) at ages 17, 20, 24, and 29. The sample included 1,382 same-sex twin pairs participating in the Minnesota Twin Family Study. We detected a gene × environment interaction at age 17, such that additive genetic influences on antisocial behavior and substance use disorders were greater in the context of greater antisocial peer affiliation. This gene × environment interaction was not present for antisocial behavior symptoms after age 17, but was for substance use disorder symptoms through age 29 (though effect sizes were largest at age 17). Results suggest adolescence is a critical period for the development of externalizing disorders wherein exposure to greater environmental adversity is associated with a greater expression of genetic risk. This form of gene × environment interaction may persist through young adulthood for substance use disorders, but is limited to adolescence for antisocial behavior. PMID:27580681

  7. Global map of physical interactions among differentially expressed genes in multiple sclerosis relapses and remissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, Tamir; Atar, Shimshi; Ruppin, Eytan; Gurevich, Michael; Achiron, Anat

    2011-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system autoimmune inflammatory T-cell-mediated disease with a relapsing-remitting course in the majority of patients. In this study, we performed a high-resolution systems biology analysis of gene expression and physical interactions in MS relapse and remission. To this end, we integrated 164 large-scale measurements of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients in relapse or remission and healthy subjects, with large-scale information about the physical interactions between these genes obtained from public databases. These data were analyzed with a variety of computational methods. We find that there is a clear and significant global network-level signal that is related to the changes in gene expression of MS patients in comparison to healthy subjects. However, despite the clear differences in the clinical symptoms of MS patients in relapse versus remission, the network level signal is weaker when comparing patients in these two stages of the disease. This result suggests that most of the genes have relatively similar expression levels in the two stages of the disease. In accordance with previous studies, we found that the pathways related to regulation of cell death, chemotaxis and inflammatory response are differentially expressed in the disease in comparison to healthy subjects, while pathways related to cell adhesion, cell migration and cell-cell signaling are activated in relapse in comparison to remission. However, the current study includes a detailed report of the exact set of genes involved in these pathways and the interactions between them. For example, we found that the genes TP53 and IL1 are 'network-hub' that interacts with many of the differentially expressed genes in MS patients versus healthy subjects, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a 'network-hub' in the case of MS patients with relapse versus remission. The statistical approaches employed in this study enabled us

  8. [Tooth pathology analysis of osteological material from the Medieval locality of Saint Pantelejmon church in Nis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, Nadica; Mitić, Aleksandar; Crnoglavac, Vesna; Vlak, Dejana; Nikolić, Marija

    2008-01-01

    Medieval necropolis at the porch of St. Panteleimon church in Nis, from 12th century represents a typical Serbian necropolis, which has its analogies in several areas in Serbia. Preservation of the skeletal remains belongs to category of good and medium preservation. The aim of the work was to study the skeletal remains for the prevalence of tooth caries, localization of caries lesions, presence of abrasion, supragingival tartar and resorption of alveolar bone as the indicator of periodontal disease. The analyses included 42 skeletal remains. The anthropological analyses involved paleopathological findings on 954 teeth of 22 men and 20 women. The pathological changes of teeth were determined by inspection, dental probe, dental mirror and x-ray examination. Epidemiological research was done using average caries index. The antropological tooth pathology research of osteological material from the medieval localization of St. Pantaleimon Church in Nis showed the presence of caries in 7.86% cases, 9.93% women and 6.07% men. In 76% caries were localized on the approximal surfaces of teeth. Abrasion of the second and third degree was registered on the side and front teeth with transformation of contact points into contact surfaces and the creation of approximal, interstitial, scolded surfaces. A large quantity of supragingival tartar was found in all individuals aged over 25 years. Expressed alveolar bone resorption is the indicator of generalized periodontal disease. The prevalence of caries in the studied medieval population from the 12th century was sporadic, with localization on secondary predilection places. The abrasion of the second and third degree was present, and the resorption of the alveolar bone was registered in all the examined skeletal remains, which was the indicator of spread periodontal disease in this period.

  9. Gene-environment interaction between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and parenting behaviour on children's theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mark; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is the ability to interpret and understand human behaviour by representing the mental states of others. Like many human capacities, ToM is thought to develop through both complex biological and socialization mechanisms. However, no study has examined the joint effect of genetic and environmental influences on ToM. This study examined how variability in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and parenting behavior--two widely studied factors in ToM development-interacted to predict ToM in pre-school-aged children. Participants were 301 children who were part of an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study. ToM was assessed at age 4.5 using a previously validated scale. Parenting was assessed through observations of mothers' cognitively sensitive behaviours. Using a family-based association design, it was suggestive that a particular variant (rs11131149) interacted with maternal cognitive sensitivity on children's ToM (P = 0.019). More copies of the major allele were associated with higher ToM as a function of increasing cognitive sensitivity. A sizeable 26% of the variability in ToM was accounted for by this interaction. This study provides the first empirical evidence of gene-environment interactions on ToM, supporting the notion that genetic factors may be modulated by potent environmental influences early in development. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Differential reconstructed gene interaction networks for deriving toxicity threshold in chemical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Maxwell, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Nan; Perkins, Edward J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Gong, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Pathway alterations reflected as changes in gene expression regulation and gene interaction can result from cellular exposure to toxicants. Such information is often used to elucidate toxicological modes of action. From a risk assessment perspective, alterations in biological pathways are a rich resource for setting toxicant thresholds, which may be more sensitive and mechanism-informed than traditional toxicity endpoints. Here we developed a novel differential networks (DNs) approach to connect pathway perturbation with toxicity threshold setting. Our DNs approach consists of 6 steps: time-series gene expression data collection, identification of altered genes, gene interaction network reconstruction, differential edge inference, mapping of genes with differential edges to pathways, and establishment of causal relationships between chemical concentration and perturbed pathways. A one-sample Gaussian process model and a linear regression model were used to identify genes that exhibited significant profile changes across an entire time course and between treatments, respectively. Interaction networks of differentially expressed (DE) genes were reconstructed for different treatments using a state space model and then compared to infer differential edges/interactions. DE genes possessing differential edges were mapped to biological pathways in databases such as KEGG pathways. Using the DNs approach, we analyzed a time-series Escherichia coli live cell gene expression dataset consisting of 4 treatments (control, 10, 100, 1000 mg/L naphthenic acids, NAs) and 18 time points. Through comparison of reconstructed networks and construction of differential networks, 80 genes were identified as DE genes with a significant number of differential edges, and 22 KEGG pathways were altered in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these pathways were perturbed to a degree as high as 70% even at the lowest exposure concentration, implying a high sensitivity of our DNs approach

  11. Discovering disease-associated genes in weighted protein-protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Cai, Meng; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-04-01

    Although there have been many network-based attempts to discover disease-associated genes, most of them have not taken edge weight - which quantifies their relative strength - into consideration. We use connection weights in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to locate disease-related genes. We analyze the topological properties of both weighted and unweighted PPI networks and design an improved random forest classifier to distinguish disease genes from non-disease genes. We use a cross-validation test to confirm that weighted networks are better able to discover disease-associated genes than unweighted networks, which indicates that including link weight in the analysis of network properties provides a better model of complex genotype-phenotype associations.

  12. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H.A. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  13. Genomewide Expression and Functional Interactions of Genes under Drought Stress in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nepolean Thirunavukkarasu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A genomewide transcriptome assay of two subtropical genotypes of maize was used to observe the expression of genes at seedling stage of drought stress. The number of genes expressed differentially was greater in HKI1532 (a drought tolerant genotype than in PC3 (a drought sensitive genotype, indicating primary differences at the transcriptional level in stress tolerance. The global coexpression networks of the two genotypes differed significantly with respect to the number of modules and the coexpression pattern within the modules. A total of 174 drought-responsive genes were selected from HKI1532, and their coexpression network revealed key correlations between different adaptive pathways, each cluster of the network representing a specific biological function. Transcription factors related to ABA-dependent stomatal closure, signalling, and phosphoprotein cascades work in concert to compensate for reduced photosynthesis. Under stress, water balance was maintained by coexpression of the genes involved in osmotic adjustments and transporter proteins. Metabolism was maintained by the coexpression of genes involved in cell wall modification and protein and lipid metabolism. The interaction of genes involved in crucial biological functions during stress was identified and the results will be useful in targeting important gene interactions to understand drought tolerance in greater detail.

  14. Radioresistance related genes screened by protein-protein interaction network analysis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaodong; Guo Ya; Qu Song; Li Ling; Huang Shiting; Li Danrong; Zhang Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover radioresistance associated molecular biomarkers and its mechanism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by protein-protein interaction network analysis. Methods: Whole genome expression microarray was applied to screen out differentially expressed genes in two cell lines CNE-2R and CNE-2 with different radiosensitivity. Four differentially expressed genes were randomly selected for further verification by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis with self-designed primers. The common differentially expressed genes from two experiments were analyzed with the SNOW online database in order to find out the central node related to the biomarkers of nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance. The expression of STAT1 in CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells was measured by Western blot. Results: Compared with CNE-2 cells, 374 genes in CNE-2R cells were differentially expressed while 197 genes showed significant differences. Four randomly selected differentially expressed genes were verified by RT-PCR and had same change trend in consistent with the results of chip assay. Analysis with the SNOW database demonstrated that those 197 genes could form a complicated interaction network where STAT1 and JUN might be two key nodes. Indeed, the STAT1-α expression in CNE-2R was higher than that in CNE-2 (t=4.96, P<0.05). Conclusions: The key nodes of STAT1 and JUN may be the molecular biomarkers leading to radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and STAT1-α might have close relationship with radioresistance. (authors)

  15. Representing virus-host interactions and other multi-organism processes in the Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, R E; Osumi-Sutherland, D; McIntosh, B K; Hulo, C; Masson, P; Poux, S; Le Mercier, P; Lomax, J

    2015-07-28

    The Gene Ontology project is a collaborative effort to provide descriptions of gene products in a consistent and computable language, and in a species-independent manner. The Gene Ontology is designed to be applicable to all organisms but up to now has been largely under-utilized for prokaryotes and viruses, in part because of a lack of appropriate ontology terms. To address this issue, we have developed a set of Gene Ontology classes that are applicable to microbes and their hosts, improving both coverage and quality in this area of the Gene Ontology. Describing microbial and viral gene products brings with it the additional challenge of capturing both the host and the microbe. Recognising this, we have worked closely with annotation groups to test and optimize the GO classes, and we describe here a set of annotation guidelines that allow the controlled description of two interacting organisms. Building on the microbial resources already in existence such as ViralZone, UniProtKB keywords and MeGO, this project provides an integrated ontology to describe interactions between microbial species and their hosts, with mappings to the external resources above. Housing this information within the freely-accessible Gene Ontology project allows the classes and annotation structure to be utilized by a large community of biologists and users.

  16. Association of HS6ST3 gene polymorphisms with obesity and triglycerides: gene x gender interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xuefeng; Zeng, Min

    2013-12-01

    The heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3 (HS6ST3) gene is involved in heparan sulphate and heparin metabolism, and has been reported to be associated with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes.We hypothesized that HS6ST3 gene polymorphisms might play an important role in obesity and related phenotypes (such as triglycerides). We examined genetic associations of 117 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the HS6ST3 gene with obesity and triglycerides using two Caucasian samples: the Marshfield sample (1442 obesity cases and 2122 controls), and the Health aging and body composition (Health ABC) sample (305 cases and 1336 controls). Logistic regression analysis of obesity as a binary trait and linear regression analysis of triglycerides as a continuous trait, adjusted for age and sex, were performed using PLINK. Single marker analysis showed that six SNPs in the Marshfield sample and one SNP in the Health ABC sample were associated with obesity (P triglycerides in the Marshfield sample (P triglycerides in the Marshfield sample. These findings contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of obesity and triglycerides and demonstrate the importance of gender differences in the aetiology.

  17. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in proteomic and transcriptomic technologies resulted in the accumulation of vast amount of high-throughput data that span multiple biological processes and characteristics in different organisms. Much of the data come in the form of interaction networks and mRNA expression arrays. An important task in systems biology is functional modules discovery where the goal is to uncover well-connected sub-networks (modules). These discovered modules help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the observed biological processes. While most of the existing module discovery methods use only the interaction data, in this work we propose, CLARM, which discovers biological modules by incorporating gene profiles data with protein-protein interaction networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional module discovery methods.

  18. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  19. Evidence of gene-gene interaction and age-at-diagnosis effects in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M M; Cooper, Jason D; Smyth, Deborah J

    2012-01-01

    The common genetic loci that independently influence the risk of type 1 diabetes have largely been determined. Their interactions with age-at-diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, sex, or the major susceptibility locus, HLA class II, remain mostly unexplored. A large collection of more than 14,866 type 1...

  20. Hippocampal gene expression patterns in oxytocin male knockout mice are related to impaired social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Virginia Meneghini; Zimmermann-Peruzatto, Josi Maria; Agnes, Grasiela; Becker, Roberta Oriques; de Moura, Ana Carolina; Almeida, Silvana; Guedes, Renata Padilha; Giovenardi, Marcia

    2017-11-02

    Social interaction between animals is crucial for the survival and life in groups. It is well demonstrated that oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) play critical roles in the regulation of social behaviors in mammals, however, other neurotransmitters and hormones are involved in the brain circuitry related to these behaviors. The present study aimed to investigate the gene expression of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain of OT knockout (OTKO) male mice. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of the OT receptor (Oxtr), AVP receptors 1a and 1b (Avpr1a; Avpr1b), dopamine receptor 2 (Drd2), and the estrogen receptors alpha and beta (Esr1; Esr2) genes in the hippocampus (HPC), olfactory bulb (OB), hypothalamus (HPT) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). AVP gene (Avp) expression was analyzed in the HPT. Gene expression results were discussed regarding to social interaction and sexual behavior findings. Additionally, we analyzed the influence of OT absence on the Avp mRNA expression levels in the HPT. RNA extraction and cDNAs synthesis followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed for gene expression determination. Results were calculated with the 2 -ΔΔCt method. Our main finding was that HPC is more susceptible to gene expression changes due to the lack of OT. OTKOs exhibited decreased expression of Drd2 and Avpr1b, but increased expression of Oxtr in the HPC. In the PFC, Esr2 was increased. In the HPT, there was a reduced Avp expression in the OTKO group. No differences were detected in the OB and HPT. Despite these changes in gene expression, sexual behavior was not affected. However, OTKO showed higher social investigation and lower aggressive performance than wild-type mice. Our data highlight the importance of OT for proper gene expression of neurotransmitter receptors related to the regulation of social interaction in male mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  2. Inference of gene-phenotype associations via protein-protein interaction and orthology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwen Wang

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental goals of genetics is to understand gene functions and their associated phenotypes. To achieve this goal, in this study we developed a computational algorithm that uses orthology and protein-protein interaction information to infer gene-phenotype associations for multiple species. Furthermore, we developed a web server that provides genome-wide phenotype inference for six species: fly, human, mouse, worm, yeast, and zebrafish. We evaluated our inference method by comparing the inferred results with known gene-phenotype associations. The high Area Under the Curve values suggest a significant performance of our method. By applying our method to two human representative diseases, Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer, we demonstrated that our method is able to identify related Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The web server can be used to infer functions and putative phenotypes of a gene along with the candidate genes of a phenotype, and thus aids in disease candidate gene discovery. Our web server is available at http://jjwanglab.org/PhenoPPIOrth.

  3. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Preeclampsia: Focus on Gene–Gene Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. Luizon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, but only about half of patients on antihypertensive therapy achieve blood pressure control. Preeclampsia is defined as pregnancy-induced hypertension and proteinuria, and is associated with increased maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Similarly, a large number of patients with preeclampsia are non-responsive to antihypertensive therapy. Pharmacogenomics may help to guide the personalized treatment for non-responsive hypertensive patients. There is evidence for the association of genetic variants with variable response to the most commonly used antihypertensive drugs. However, further replication is needed to confirm these associations in different populations. The failure to replicate findings from single-locus association studies has prompted the search for novel statistical methods for data analysis, which are required to detect the complex effects from multiple genes to drug response phenotypes. Notably, gene–gene interaction analyses have been applied to pharmacogenetic studies, including antihypertensive drug response. In this perspective article, we present advances of considering the interactions among genetic polymorphisms of different candidate genes within pathways relevant to antihypertensive drug response, and we highlight recent findings related to gene–gene interactions on pharmacogenetics of hypertension and preeclampsia. Finally, we discuss the future directions that are needed to unravel additional genes and variants involved in the responsiveness to antihypertensive drugs.

  4. Interactions of renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and antihypertensive effect of benazepril in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Yu, Can-Qing; Tang, Xun; Chen, Da-Fang; Tian, Jun; Cao, Yang; Fan, Wen-Yi; Cao, Wei-Hua; Zhan, Si-Yan; Lv, Jun; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Yong-Hua; Lee, Li-Ming

    2011-05-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are widely used antihypertensive drugs with individual response variation. We studied whether interactions of AGT, AGTR1 and ACE2 gene polymorphisms affect this response. Our study is based on a 3-year field trial with 1831 hypertensive patients prescribed benazepril. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction was used to explore interaction models and logistic regressions were used to confirm them. A two-locus model involving the AGT and ACE2 genes was found in males, the sensitive genotypes showed an odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% CI: 1.3-2.8) when compared with nonsensitive genotypes. Two AGT-AGTR1 models were found in females, with an OR of 3.5 (95% CI: 2.0-5.9) and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.8-5.3). Gender-specific gene-gene interactions of the AGT, AGTR1 and ACE2 genes were associated with individual variation of response to benazepril. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  5. Nutrition-gene interactions (post-genomics). Changes in gene expression through nutritional manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, G.S.; Lehnert, S.A.; Greenwood, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of severe nutritional restriction, both pre- and post-weaning, on development of skeletal muscle in food animals. Given recent predictions about growth in demand for muscle-foods in developing countries, the global community will need to face the food-feed dilemma, and balance efficiency of production against the quality-of-life aspects of local livestock husbandry. It is likely that production animals will be grown in successively more marginal environments and at higher stocking rates on unimproved pastures. Understanding the nutritional limits to animal growth at the level of muscle gene networks will help us find optima for nutrition, growth rate and meat yield. Genomic approaches give us unprecedented capacity to map the networks of control under nutritionally restricted conditions, though the challenges remain of identifying steps that regulate substrate flux. The paper describes some approaches currently being taken to understanding muscle development, and concludes that the genes contributing to two ruminant phenotypes should be mapped and characterized. These are: the capacity to depress metabolic rate in response to nutritional restriction; and the capacity to exhibit compensatory growth after restriction is relieved. (author)

  6. Childhood temperament: passive gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interaction, and the hidden importance of the family environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Kao, Karen; Swann, Gregory; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2013-02-01

    Biological parents pass on genotypes to their children, as well as provide home environments that correlate with their genotypes; thus, the association between the home environment and children's temperament can be genetically (i.e., passive gene-environment correlation) or environmentally mediated. Furthermore, family environments may suppress or facilitate the heritability of children's temperament (i.e., gene-environment interaction). The sample comprised 807 twin pairs (mean age = 7.93 years) from the longitudinal Wisconsin Twin Project. Important passive gene-environment correlations emerged, such that home environments were less chaotic for children with high effortful control, and this association was genetically mediated. Children with high extraversion/surgency experienced more chaotic home environments, and this correlation was also genetically mediated. In addition, heritability of children's temperament was moderated by home environments, such that effortful control and extraversion/surgency were more heritable in chaotic homes, and negative affectivity was more heritable under crowded or unsafe home conditions. Modeling multiple types of gene-environment interplay uncovered the complex role of genetic factors and the hidden importance of the family environment for children's temperament and development more generally.

  7. Gene-diet-interactions in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism modify colon cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Amy Y; Scherer, Dominique; Poole, Elizabeth; Potter, John D; Curtin, Karen; Makar, Karen; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-04-01

    The importance of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) in colorectal carcinogenesis is emphasized by observations that high dietary folate intake is associated with decreased risk of colon cancer (CC) and its precursors. Additionally, polymorphisms in FOCM-related genes have been repeatedly associated with risk, supporting a causal relationship between folate and colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated ten candidate polymorphisms with defined or probable functional impact in eight FOCM-related genes (SHMT1, DHFR, DNMT1, MTHFD1, MTHFR, MTRR, TCN2, and TDG) in 1609 CC cases and 1974 controls for association with CC risk and for interaction with dietary factors. No polymorphism was statistically significantly associated with overall risk of CC. However, statistically significant interactions modifying CC risk were observed for DNMT1 I311V with dietary folate, methionine, vitamin B2 , and vitamin B12 intake and for MTRR I22M with dietary folate, a predefined one-carbon dietary pattern, and vitamin B6 intake. We observed statistically significant gene-diet interactions with five additional polymorphisms. Our results provide evidence that FOCM-related dietary intakes modify the association between CC risk and FOCM allelic variants. These findings add to observations showing that folate-related gene-nutrient interactions play an important role in modifying the risk of CC. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. How Gene-Environment Interaction Affects Children's Anxious and Fearful Behavior. Science Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction in Predicting Behavioral Inhibition in Middle Childhood" (N. A. Fox, K E. Nichols, H. A. Henderson, K. Rubin, L. Schmidt, D. Hamer, M. Ernst, and D. S.…

  9. Learning Motivation Mediates Gene-by-Socioeconomic Status Interaction on Mathematics Achievement in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Harden, K. Paige

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that genetic influences on achievement are more pronounced among children living in higher socioeconomic status homes, and that these gene-by-environment interactions occur prior to children's entry into formal schooling. We hypothesized that one pathway through which socioeconomic status promotes genetic influences…

  10. Interaction between LRP5 and periostin gene polymorphisms on serum periostin levels and cortical bone microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, J; Bonnet, N; Herrmann, F R; Biver, E; Rizzoli, R; Chevalley, T; Ferrari, S L

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the interaction between periostin SNPs and the SNPs of the genes assumed to modulate serum periostin levels and bone microstructure in a cohort of postmenopausal women. We identified an interaction between LRP5 SNP rs648438 and periostin SNP rs9547970 on serum periostin levels and on radial cortical porosity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction between periostin gene polymorphisms (SNPs) and other genes potentially responsible for modulating serum periostin levels and bone microstructure in a cohort of postmenopausal women. In 648 postmenopausal women from the Geneva Retirees Cohort, we analyzed 6 periostin SNPs and another 149 SNPs in 14 genes, namely BMP2, CTNNB1, ESR1, ESR2, LRP5, LRP6, PTH, SPTBN1, SOST, TGFb1, TNFRSF11A, TNFSF11, TNFRSF11B and WNT16. Volumetric BMD and bone microstructure were measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal radius and tibia. Serum periostin levels were associated with radial cortical porosity, including after adjustment for age, BMI, and years since menopause (p = 0.036). Sixteen SNPs in the ESR1, LRP5, TNFRSF11A, SOST, SPTBN1, TNFRSF11B and TNFSF11 genes were associated with serum periostin levels (p range 0.03-0.001) whereas 26 SNPs in 9 genes were associated with cortical porosity at the radius and/or at the tibia. WNT 16 was the gene with the highest number of SNPs associated with both trabecular and cortical microstructure. The periostin SNP rs9547970 was also associated with cortical porosity (p = 0.04). In particular, SNPs in LRP5, ESR1 and near the TNFRSF11A gene were associated with both cortical porosity and serum periostin levels. Eventually, we identified an interaction between LRP5 SNP rs648438 and periostin SNP rs9547970 on serum periostin levels (interaction p = 0.01) and on radial cortical porosity (interaction p = 0.005). These results suggest that periostin expression is genetically modulated, particularly by polymorphisms

  11. Understanding Epistatic Interactions between Genes Targeted by Non-coding Regulatory Elements in Complex Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have proven the highly polygenic architecture of complex diseases or traits; therefore, single-locus-based methods are usually unable to detect all involved loci, especially when individual loci exert small effects. Moreover, the majority of associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms resides in non-coding regions, making it difficult to understand their phenotypic contribution. In this work, we studied epistatic interactions associated with three common diseases using Korea Association Resource (KARE data: type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension (HT, and coronary artery disease (CAD. We showed that epistatic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were enriched in enhancers, as well as in DNase I footprints (the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements [ENCODE] Project Consortium 2012, which suggested that the disruption of the regulatory regions where transcription factors bind may be involved in the disease mechanism. Accordingly, to identify the genes affected by the SNPs, we employed whole-genome multiple-cell-type enhancer data which discovered using DNase I profiles and Cap Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE. Assigned genes were significantly enriched in known disease associated gene sets, which were explored based on the literature, suggesting that this approach is useful for detecting relevant affected genes. In our knowledge-based epistatic network, the three diseases share many associated genes and are also closely related with each other through many epistatic interactions. These findings elucidate the genetic basis of the close relationship between DM, HT, and CAD.

  12. Prediction of the Ebola Virus Infection Related Human Genes Using Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    OpenAIRE

    Taye H Hamza; Honglei Chen; Erin M Hill-Burns; Shannon L Rhodes; Jennifer Montimurro; Denise M Kay; Albert Tenesa; Victoria I Kusel; Patricia Sheehan; Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth; Dora Yearout; Ali Samii; John W Roberts; Pinky Agarwal; Yvette Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal compo...

  14. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Dezfulian

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  15. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Multiple genetic interaction experiments provide complementary information useful for gene function prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Michaut

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions help map biological processes and their functional relationships. A genetic interaction is defined as a deviation from the expected phenotype when combining multiple genetic mutations. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most genetic interactions are measured under a single phenotype - growth rate in standard laboratory conditions. Recently genetic interactions have been collected under different phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions. How different are these networks and what can we learn from their differences? We conducted a systematic analysis of quantitative genetic interaction networks in yeast performed under different experimental conditions. We find that networks obtained using different phenotypic readouts, in different conditions and from different laboratories overlap less than expected and provide significant unique information. To exploit this information, we develop a novel method to combine individual genetic interaction data sets and show that the resulting network improves gene function prediction performance, demonstrating that individual networks provide complementary information. Our results support the notion that using diverse phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions will substantially increase the amount of gene function information produced by genetic interaction screens.

  17. Multiple Gene-Environment Interactions on the Angiogenesis Gene-Pathway Impact Rectal Cancer Risk and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Sharafeldin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of gene-environment interactions (GEIs in cancer is limited. We aimed at identifying GEIs in rectal cancer focusing on a relevant biologic process involving the angiogenesis pathway and relevant environmental exposures: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and animal protein intake. We analyzed data from 747 rectal cancer cases and 956 controls from the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Rectal Cancer study. We applied a 3-step analysis approach: first, we searched for interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms on the pathway genes; second, we searched for interactions among the genes, both steps using Logic regression; third, we examined the GEIs significant at the 5% level using logistic regression for cancer risk and Cox proportional hazards models for survival. Permutation-based test was used for multiple testing adjustment. We identified 8 significant GEIs associated with risk among 6 genes adjusting for multiple testing: TNF (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.11, TLR4 (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.38, 3.98, and EGR2 (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.04, 4.78 with smoking; IGF1R (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.72, TLR4 (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.60 and EGR2 (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.46 with alcohol; and PDGFB (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.92 and MMP1 (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.24, 4.81 with protein. Five GEIs were associated with survival at the 5% significance level but not after multiple testing adjustment: CXCR1 (HR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.75 with smoking; and KDR (HR = 4.36, 95% CI: 1.62, 11.73, TLR2 (HR = 9.06, 95% CI: 1.14, 72.11, EGR2 (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.42, 4.22, and EGFR (HR = 6.33, 95% CI: 1.95, 20.54 with protein. GEIs between angiogenesis genes and smoking, alcohol, and animal protein impact rectal cancer risk. Our results support the importance of considering the biologic hypothesis to characterize GEIs associated with cancer outcomes.

  18. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A.; Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges; Martin-Duque, Pilar; Vieja, Antonio de la; Briat, Arnaud; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  20. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Gmach, Philipp; Winter, Jan; Kranz, Dominique; Boutros, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Signaling pathway modules are often encoded by several closely related paralogous genes that can have redundant roles and are therefore difficult to analyze by loss-of-function analysis. A typical example is the Wnt signaling pathway, which in mammals is mediated by 19 Wnt ligands that can bind to 10 Frizzled (FZD) receptors. Although significant progress in understanding Wnt-FZD receptor interactions has been made in recent years, tools to generate systematic interaction maps have been largely lacking. Here we generated cell lines with multiplex mutant alleles of FZD1 , FZD2 , and FZD7 and demonstrate that these cells are unresponsive to canonical Wnt ligands. Subsequently, we performed genetic rescue experiments with combinations of FZDs and canonical Wnts to create a functional ligand-receptor interaction map. These experiments showed that whereas several Wnt ligands, such as Wnt3a, induce signaling through a broad spectrum of FZD receptors, others, such as Wnt8a, act through a restricted set of FZD genes. Together, our results map functional interactions of FZDs and 10 Wnt ligands and demonstrate how multiplex targeting by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 can be used to systematically elucidate the functions of multigene families.-Voloshanenko, O., Gmach, P., Winter, J., Kranz, D., Boutros, M. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families. © The Author(s).

  1. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A.; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping – a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene – by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  2. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of nonsyndromic cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect with a complex and heterogeneous etiology involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 550 case-parent trios, ascertained through a CP case collected in an international...... consortium. Family-based association tests of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and three common maternal exposures (maternal smoking, alcohol consumption, and multivitamin supplementation) were used in a combined 2 df test for gene (G) and gene-environment (G × E) interaction simultaneously, plus...... multiple SNPs associated with higher risk of CP in the presence of maternal smoking. Additional evidence of reduced risk due to G × E interaction in the presence of multivitamin supplementation was observed for SNPs in BAALC on chr. 8. These results emphasize the need to consider G × E interaction when...

  3. Interactions between the FTO and GNB3 genes contribute to varied clinical phenotypes in hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    Full Text Available The genes FTO and GNB3 are implicated in essential hypertension but their interaction remains to be explored. This study investigates the role of interaction between the two genes in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension.In a case-control study comprising 750 controls and 550 patients, interaction between the polymorphisms of FTO and GNB3 was examined using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR. The influence of interaction on clinical phenotypes like systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and body mass index was also investigated. The 3-locus MDR model comprising FTO rs8050136C/A and GNB3 rs1129649T/C and rs5443C/T emerged as the best disease conferring model. Moreover, the interacted-genotypes having either 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 risk alleles correlated with linearly increasing odds ratios of 1.91 (P = 0.027; 3.93 (P = 2.08E-06; 4.51 (P = 7.63E-07; 7.44 (P = 3.66E-08 and 11.57 (P = 1.18E-05, respectively, when compared with interacted-genotypes devoid of risk alleles. Furthermore, interactions among haplotypes of FTO (H1-9 and GNB3 (Ha-d differed by >1.5-fold for protective-haplotypes, CTGGC+TC [H2+Ha] and CTGAC+TC [H4+Ha] (OR = 0.39, P = 0.003; OR = 0.22, P = 6.86E-05, respectively and risk-haplotypes, AAAGC+CT [H3+Hc] and AAAGC+TT [H3+Hd] (OR = 2.91, P = 9.98E-06; OR = 2.50, P = 0.004, respectively compared to individual haplotypes. Moreover, the effectiveness of gene-gene interaction was further corroborated with a 1.29-, 1.25- and 1.38-fold higher SBP, MAP and BMI, respectively, in patients having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hc and 2.48-fold higher SBP having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hd compared to individual haplotypes.Interactions between genetic variants of FTO and GNB3 influence clinical parameters to augment hypertension.

  4. Hox gene function and interaction in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus (Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, David R; Liu, Paul Z; Hughes, Cynthia L; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2005-11-15

    Studies in genetic model organisms such as Drosophila have demonstrated that the homeotic complex (Hox) genes impart segmental identity during embryogenesis. Comparative studies in a wide range of other insect taxa have shown that the Hox genes are expressed in largely conserved domains along the anterior-posterior body axis, but whether they are performing the same functions in different insects is an open question. Most of the Hox genes have been studied functionally in only a few holometabolous insects that undergo metamorphosis. Thus, it is unclear how the Hox genes are functioning in the majority of direct-developing insects and other arthropods. To address this question, we used a combination of RNAi and in situ hybridization to reveal the expression, functions, and regulatory interactions of the Hox genes in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. Our results reveal many similarities and some interesting differences compared to Drosophila. We find that the gene Antennapedia is required for the identity of all three thoracic segments, while Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B cooperate to pattern the abdomen. The three abdominal genes exhibit posterior prevalence like in Drosophila, but apparently via some post-transcriptional mechanism. The functions of the head genes proboscipedia, Deformed, and Sex combs reduced were shown previously, and here we find that the complex temporal expression of pb in the labium is like that of other insects, but its regulatory relationship with Scr is unique. Overall, our data reveal that the evolution of insect Hox genes has included many small changes within general conservation of expression and function, and that the milkweed bug provides a useful model for understanding the roles of Hox genes in a direct-developing insect.

  5. A novel test for gene-ancestry interactions in genome-wide association data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L Davies

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association study (GWAS data on a disease are increasingly available from multiple related populations. In this scenario, meta-analyses can improve power to detect homogeneous genetic associations, but if there exist ancestry-specific effects, via interactions on genetic background or with a causal effect that co-varies with genetic background, then these will typically be obscured. To address this issue, we have developed a robust statistical method for detecting susceptibility gene-ancestry interactions in multi-cohort GWAS based on closely-related populations. We use the leading principal components of the empirical genotype matrix to cluster individuals into "ancestry groups" and then look for evidence of heterogeneous genetic associations with disease or other trait across these clusters. Robustness is improved when there are multiple cohorts, as the signal from true gene-ancestry interactions can then be distinguished from gene-collection artefacts by comparing the observed interaction effect sizes in collection groups relative to ancestry groups. When applied to colorectal cancer, we identified a missense polymorphism in iron-absorption gene CYBRD1 that associated with disease in individuals of English, but not Scottish, ancestry. The association replicated in two additional, independently-collected data sets. Our method can be used to detect associations between genetic variants and disease that have been obscured by population genetic heterogeneity. It can be readily extended to the identification of genetic interactions on other covariates such as measured environmental exposures. We envisage our methodology being of particular interest to researchers with existing GWAS data, as ancestry groups can be easily defined and thus tested for interactions.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of E. coli cell-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, S; Cambray, G

    2017-11-23

    The pursuit of standardization and reliability in synthetic biology has achieved, in recent years, a number of advances in the design of more predictable genetic parts for biological circuits. However, even with the development of high-throughput screening methods and whole-cell models, it is still not possible to predict reliably how a synthetic genetic construct interacts with all cellular endogenous systems. This study presents a genome-wide analysis of how the expression of synthetic genes is affected by systematic perturbations of cellular functions. We found that most perturbations modulate expression indirectly through an effect on cell size, putting forward the existence of a generic Size-Expression interaction in the model prokaryote Escherichia coli. The Size-Expression interaction was quantified by inserting a dual fluorescent reporter gene construct into each of the 3822 single-gene deletion strains comprised in the KEIO collection. Cellular size was measured for single cells via flow cytometry. Regression analyses were used to discriminate between expression-specific and gene-specific effects. Functions of the deleted genes broadly mapped onto three systems with distinct primary influence on the Size-Expression map. Perturbations in the Division and Biosynthesis (DB) system led to a large-cell and high-expression phenotype. In contrast, disruptions of the Membrane and Motility (MM) system caused small-cell and low-expression phenotypes. The Energy, Protein synthesis and Ribosome (EPR) system was predominantly associated with smaller cells and positive feedback on ribosome function. Feedback between cell growth and gene expression is widespread across cell systems. Even though most gene disruptions proximally affect one component of the Size-Expression interaction, the effect therefore ultimately propagates to both. More specifically, we describe the dual impact of growth on cell size and gene expression through cell division and ribosomal content

  7. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-κB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-κB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  8. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corella, Dolores

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolim-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 514C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and the 75G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the 1131TC in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken.Las recomendaciones dietéticas actuales referentes al consumo de grasas en la dieta han sido realizadas sin tener en cuenta las posibles diferencias genéticas de las personas que podrían ser las responsables de las diferentes respuestas interindividuales que frecuentemente se observan ante la misma dieta. La presencia de variabilidad genética ha sido puesta de manifiesto para todos los genes relacionados con el metabolismo lipídico, por lo que existe un ingente número de genes y de variantes genéticas para ser incluidas en los estudios sobre interacciones dieta-genotipo en el ámbito específico del consumo de grasas y aceites. Se revisarán algunos ejemplos sobre interacciones grasa

  9. An Efficient Test for Gene-Environment Interaction in Generalized Linear Mixed Models with Family Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo Lopera, Mauricio A; Coombes, Brandon J; de Andrade, Mariza

    2017-09-27

    Gene-environment (GE) interaction has important implications in the etiology of complex diseases that are caused by a combination of genetic factors and environment variables. Several authors have developed GE analysis in the context of independent subjects or longitudinal data using a gene-set. In this paper, we propose to analyze GE interaction for discrete and continuous phenotypes in family studies by incorporating the relatedness among the relatives for each family into a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) and by using a gene-based variance component test. In addition, we deal with collinearity problems arising from linkage disequilibrium among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by considering their coefficients as random effects under the null model estimation. We show that the best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP) of such random effects in the GLMM is equivalent to the ridge regression estimator. This equivalence provides a simple method to estimate the ridge penalty parameter in comparison to other computationally-demanding estimation approaches based on cross-validation schemes. We evaluated the proposed test using simulation studies and applied it to real data from the Baependi Heart Study consisting of 76 families. Using our approach, we identified an interaction between BMI and the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma ( PPARG ) gene associated with diabetes.

  10. Banana ethylene response factors are involved in fruit ripening through their interactions with ethylene biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun-yi; Chen, Jian-ye; Kuang, Jiang-fei; Shan, Wei; Xie, Hui; Jiang, Yue-ming; Lu, Wang-jin

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor (TF) in the transcriptional regulation of ethylene biosynthesis genes during fruit ripening remains largely unclear. In this study, 15 ERF genes, designated as MaERF1-MaERF15, were isolated and characterized from banana fruit. These MaERFs were classified into seven of the 12 known ERF families. Subcellular localization showed that MaERF proteins of five different subfamilies preferentially localized to the nucleus. The 15 MaERF genes displayed differential expression patterns and levels in peel and pulp of banana fruit, in association with four different ripening treatments caused by natural, ethylene-induced, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-delayed, and combined 1-MCP and ethylene treatments. MaERF9 was upregulated while MaERF11 was downregulated in peel and pulp of banana fruit during ripening or after treatment with ethylene. Furthermore, yeast-one hybrid (Y1H) and transient expression assays showed that the potential repressor MaERF11 bound to MaACS1 and MaACO1 promoters to suppress their activities and that MaERF9 activated MaACO1 promoter activity. Interestingly, protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that MaERF9 and -11 physically interacted with MaACO1. Taken together, these results suggest that MaERFs are involved in banana fruit ripening via transcriptional regulation of or interaction with ethylene biosynthesis genes.

  11. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  12. Identification and comprehensive evaluation of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of host gene-expression in Brassica juncea-aphid interaction using microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chet; Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2017-07-01

    Brassica juncea is a chief oil yielding crop in many parts of the world including India. With advancement of molecular techniques, RT-qPCR based study of gene-expression has become an integral part of experimentations in crop breeding. In RT-qPCR, use of appropriate reference gene(s) is pivotal. The virtue of the reference genes, being constant in expression throughout the experimental treatments, needs to be validated case by case. Appropriate reference gene(s) for normalization of gene-expression data in B. juncea during the biotic stress of aphid infestation is not known. In the present investigation, 11 reference genes identified from microarray database of Arabidopsis-aphid interaction at a cut off FDR ≤0.1, along with two known reference genes of B. juncea, were analyzed for their expression stability upon aphid infestation. These included 6 frequently used and 5 newly identified reference genes. Ranking orders of the reference genes in terms of expression stability were calculated using advanced statistical approaches such as geNorm, NormFinder, delta Ct and BestKeeper. The analysis suggested CAC, TUA and DUF179 as the most suitable reference genes. Further, normalization of the gene-expression data of STP4 and PR1 by the most and the least stable reference gene, respectively has demonstrated importance and applicability of the recommended reference genes in aphid infested samples of B. juncea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction of two photoreceptors in the regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Sebastian; Haberzettl, Kerstin; Frühwirth, Sebastian; Teich, Kristin; Hasewinkel, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-07-01

    The expression of photosynthesis genes in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the oxygen tension and by light quantity. Two photoreceptor proteins, AppA and CryB, have been identified in the past, which are involved in this regulation. AppA senses light by its N-terminal BLUF domain, its C-terminal part binds heme and is redox-responsive. Through its interaction to the transcriptional repressor PpsR the AppA photoreceptor controls expression of photosynthesis genes. The cryptochrome-like protein CryB was shown to affect regulation of photosynthesis genes, but the underlying signal chain remained unknown. Here we show that CryB interacts with the C-terminal domain of AppA and modulates the binding of AppA to the transcriptional repressor PpsR in a light-dependent manner. Consequently, binding of the transcription factor PpsR to its DNA target is affected by CryB. In agreement with this, all genes of the PpsR regulon showed altered expression levels in a CryB deletion strain after blue-light illumination. These results elucidate for the first time how a bacterial cryptochrome affects gene expression.

  14. Gene Environment Interactions and Predictors of Colorectal Cancer in Family-Based, Multi-Ethnic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pamela K. Shiao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the personalization of polygenic/omics-based health care, the purpose of this study was to examine the gene–environment interactions and predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC by including five key genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathways. In this proof-of-concept study, we included a total of 54 families and 108 participants, 54 CRC cases and 54 matched family friends representing four major racial ethnic groups in southern California (White, Asian, Hispanics, and Black. We used three phases of data analytics, including exploratory, family-based analyses adjusting for the dependence within the family for sharing genetic heritage, the ensemble method, and generalized regression models for predictive modeling with a machine learning validation procedure to validate the results for enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results revealed that despite the family members sharing genetic heritage, the CRC group had greater combined gene polymorphism rates than the family controls (p < 0.05, on MTHFR C677T, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, and DHFR 19 bp except MTHFR A1298C. Four racial groups presented different polymorphism rates for four genes (all p < 0.05 except MTHFR A1298C. Following the ensemble method, the most influential factors were identified, and the best predictive models were generated by using the generalized regression models, with Akaike’s information criterion and leave-one-out cross validation methods. Body mass index (BMI and gender were consistent predictors of CRC for both models when individual genes versus total polymorphism counts were used, and alcohol use was interactive with BMI status. Body mass index status was also interactive with both gender and MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism, and the exposure to environmental pollutants was an additional predictor. These results point to the important roles of environmental and modifiable factors in relation to gene–environment interactions in the prevention of CRC.

  15. Community Structure Analysis of Gene Interaction Networks in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

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    Tejaswini Narayanan

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is an important pathology associated with the human skeletal muscle and has been studied extensively. Gene expression measurements on skeletal muscle of patients afflicted with DMD provides the opportunity to understand the underlying mechanisms that lead to the pathology. Community structure analysis is a useful computational technique for understanding and modeling genetic interaction networks. In this paper, we leverage this technique in combination with gene expression measurements from normal and DMD patient skeletal muscle tissue to study the structure of genetic interactions in the context of DMD. We define a novel framework for transforming a raw dataset of gene expression measurements into an interaction network, and subsequently apply algorithms for community structure analysis for the extraction of topological communities. The emergent communities are analyzed from a biological standpoint in terms of their constituent biological pathways, and an interpretation that draws correlations between functional and structural organization of the genetic interactions is presented. We also compare these communities and associated functions in pathology against those in normal human skeletal muscle. In particular, differential enhancements are observed in the following pathways between pathological and normal cases: Metabolic, Focal adhesion, Regulation of actin cytoskeleton and Cell adhesion, and implication of these mechanisms are supported by prior work. Furthermore, our study also includes a gene-level analysis to identify genes that are involved in the coupling between the pathways of interest. We believe that our results serve to highlight important distinguishing features in the structural/functional organization of constituent biological pathways, as it relates to normal and DMD cases, and provide the mechanistic basis for further biological investigations into specific pathways differently regulated

  16. A modifier screen for Bazooka/PAR-3 interacting genes in the Drosophila embryo epithelium.

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    Wei Shao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms depends on sheets of epithelial cells. Bazooka (Baz; PAR-3 localizes to the apical circumference of epithelial cells and is a key hub in the protein interaction network regulating epithelial structure. We sought to identify additional proteins that function with Baz to regulate epithelial structure in the Drosophila embryo.The baz zygotic mutant cuticle phenotype could be dominantly enhanced by loss of known interaction partners. To identify additional enhancers, we screened molecularly defined chromosome 2 and 3 deficiencies. 37 deficiencies acted as strong dominant enhancers. Using deficiency mapping, bioinformatics, and available single gene mutations, we identified 17 interacting genes encoding known and predicted polarity, cytoskeletal, transmembrane, trafficking and signaling proteins. For each gene, their loss of function enhanced adherens junction defects in zygotic baz mutants during early embryogenesis. To further evaluate involvement in epithelial polarity, we generated GFP fusion proteins for 15 of the genes which had not been found to localize to the apical domain previously. We found that GFP fusion proteins for Drosophila ASAP, Arf79F, CG11210, Septin 5 and Sds22 could be recruited to the apical circumference of epithelial cells. Nine of the other proteins showed various intracellular distributions, and one was not detected.Our enhancer screen identified 17 genes that function with Baz to regulate epithelial structure in the Drosophila embryo. Our secondary localization screen indicated that some of the proteins may affect epithelial cell polarity by acting at the apical cell cortex while others may act through intracellular processes. For 13 of the 17 genes, this is the first report of a link to baz or the regulation of epithelial structure.

  17. Gene-Diet Interactions in Type 2 Diabetes: The Chicken and Egg Debate

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    Ortega, Ángeles; Berná, Genoveva; Rojas, Anabel; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat

    2017-01-01

    Consistent evidence from both experimental and human studies indicates that Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex disease resulting from the interaction of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Nutrients and dietary patterns are important environmental factors to consider in the prevention, development and treatment of this disease. Nutritional genomics focuses on the interaction between bioactive food components and the genome and includes studies of nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetic modifications caused by nutrients. There is evidence supporting the existence of nutrient-gene and T2DM interactions coming from animal studies and family-based intervention studies. Moreover, many case-control, cohort, cross-sectional cohort studies and clinical trials have identified relationships between individual genetic load, diet and T2DM. Some of these studies were on a large scale. In addition, studies with animal models and human observational studies, in different countries over periods of time, support a causative relationship between adverse nutritional conditions during in utero development, persistent epigenetic changes and T2DM. This review provides comprehensive information on the current state of nutrient-gene interactions and their role in T2DM pathogenesis, the relationship between individual genetic load and diet, and the importance of epigenetic factors in influencing gene expression and defining the individual risk of T2DM. PMID:28574454

  18. Interactions between Bmp-4 and Msx-1 act to restrict gene expression to odontogenic mesenchyme.

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    Tucker, A S; Al Khamis, A; Sharpe, P T

    1998-08-01

    Tooth development is regulated by a reciprocal series of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Bmp4 has been identified as a candidate signalling molecule in these interactions, initially as an epithelial signal and then later at the bud stage as a mesenchymal signal (Vainio et al. [1993] Cell 75:45-58). A target gene for Bmp4 signalling is the homeobox gene Msx-1, identified by the ability of recombinant Bmp4 protein to induce expression in mesenchyme. There is, however, no evidence that Bmp4 is the endogenous inducer of Msx-1 expression. Msx-1 and Bmp-4 show dynamic, interactive patterns of expression in oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. In this study, we compare the temporal and spatial expression of these two genes to determine whether the changing expression patterns of these genes are consistent with interactions between the two molecules. We show that changes in Bmp-4 expression precede changes in Msx-1 expression. At embryonic day (E)10.5-E11.0, expression patterns are consistent with BMP4 from the epithelium, inducing or maintaining Msx-1 in underlying mesenchyme. At E11.5, Bmp-4 expression shifts from epithelium to mesenchyme and is rapidly followed by localised up-regulation of Msx-1 expression at the sites of Bmp-4 expression. Using cultured explants of developing mandibles, we confirm that exogenous BMP4 is capable of replacing the endogenous source in epithelium and inducing Msx-1 gene expression in mesenchyme. By using noggin, a BMP inhibitor, we show that endogenous Msx-1 expression can be inhibited at E10.5 and E11.5, providing the first evidence that endogenous Bmp-4 from the epithelium is responsible for regulating the early spatial expression of Msx-1. We also show that the mesenchymal shift in Bmp-4 is responsible for up-regulating Msx-1 specifically at the sites of future tooth formation. Thus, we establish that a reciprocal series of interactions act to restrict expression of both genes to future

  19. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

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    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  20. The genetic interacting landscape of 63 candidate genes in Major Depressive Disorder: an explorative study.

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    Lekman, Magnus; Hössjer, Ola; Andrews, Peter; Källberg, Henrik; Uvehag, Daniel; Charney, Dennis; Manji, Husseini; Rush, John A; McMahon, Francis J; Moore, Jason H; Kockum, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Genetic contributions to major depressive disorder (MDD) are thought to result from multiple genes interacting with each other. Different procedures have been proposed to detect such interactions. Which approach is best for explaining the risk of developing disease is unclear. This study sought to elucidate the genetic interaction landscape in candidate genes for MDD by conducting a SNP-SNP interaction analysis using an exhaustive search through 3,704 SNP-markers in 1,732 cases and 1,783 controls provided from the GAIN MDD study. We used three different methods to detect interactions, two logistic regressions models (multiplicative and additive) and one data mining and machine learning (MDR) approach. Although none of the interaction survived correction for multiple comparisons, the results provide important information for future genetic interaction studies in complex disorders. Among the 0.5% most significant observations, none had been reported previously for risk to MDD. Within this group of interactions, less than 0.03% would have been detectable based on main effect approach or an a priori algorithm. We evaluated correlations among the three different models and conclude that all three algorithms detected the same interactions to a low degree. Although the top interactions had a surprisingly large effect size for MDD (e.g. additive dominant model Puncorrected = 9.10E-9 with attributable proportion (AP) value = 0.58 and multiplicative recessive model with Puncorrected = 6.95E-5 with odds ratio (OR estimated from β3) value = 4.99) the area under the curve (AUC) estimates were low (< 0.54). Moreover, the population attributable fraction (PAF) estimates were also low (< 0.15). We conclude that the top interactions on their own did not explain much of the genetic variance of MDD. The different statistical interaction methods we used in the present study did not identify the same pairs of interacting markers. Genetic interaction studies may uncover previously

  1. GENE X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIPOLAR DISORDER:EVIDENCE FROM NEUROIMAGING

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    Pierre Alexis Geoffroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schizophrenia (SZ and Bipolar disorder (BD are considered as severe multifactorial diseases, stemming from genetic and environmental influences. Growing evidence supports gene x environment (GxE interactions in these disorders and neuroimaging studies can help us to understand how those factors mechanistically interact. No reviews synthesized the existing data of neuroimaging studies in these issues.Methods: We conduct a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies exploring GxE interactions relative to SZ or BD in PubMed.Results: First results of the influence of genetic and environmental risks on brain structures came from monozygotic twin pairs concordant and discordant for SZ or BD. Few structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI studies have explored the GxE interactions. No other imaging methods were found. Two main GxE interactions on brain volumes have arisen. First, an interaction between genetic liability to SZ and obstetric complications on gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampal volumes. Second, cannabis use and genetic liability interaction effects on cortical thickness and white matter volumes.Conclusion: Combining GxE interactions and neuroimaging domains is a promising approach. Genetic risk and environmental exposures such as cannabis or obstetrical complications seem to interact leading to specific neuroimaging cerebral alterations in SZ. They are suggestive of GxE interactions that confer phenotypic abnormalities in SZ and possibly BD. We need further, larger neuroimaging studies of GxE interactions for which we may propose a framework focusing on GxE interactions data already known to have a clinical effect such as infections, early stress, urbanicity and substance abuse.

  2. Genetic interaction motif finding by expectation maximization – a novel statistical model for inferring gene modules from synthetic lethality

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    Ye Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic lethality experiments identify pairs of genes with complementary function. More direct functional associations (for example greater probability of membership in a single protein complex may be inferred between genes that share synthetic lethal interaction partners than genes that are directly synthetic lethal. Probabilistic algorithms that identify gene modules based on motif discovery are highly appropriate for the analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interaction data and have great potential in integrative analysis of heterogeneous datasets. Results We have developed Genetic Interaction Motif Finding (GIMF, an algorithm for unsupervised motif discovery from synthetic lethal interaction data. Interaction motifs are characterized by position weight matrices and optimized through expectation maximization. Given a seed gene, GIMF performs a nonlinear transform on the input genetic interaction data and automatically assigns genes to the motif or non-motif category. We demonstrate the capacity to extract known and novel pathways for Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast. Annotations suggested for several uncharacterized genes are supported by recent experimental evidence. GIMF is efficient in computation, requires no training and automatically down-weights promiscuous genes with high degrees. Conclusion GIMF effectively identifies pathways from synthetic lethality data with several unique features. It is mostly suitable for building gene modules around seed genes. Optimal choice of one single model parameter allows construction of gene networks with different levels of confidence. The impact of hub genes the generic probabilistic framework of GIMF may be used to group other types of biological entities such as proteins based on stochastic motifs. Analysis of the strongest motifs discovered by the algorithm indicates that synthetic lethal interactions are depleted between genes within a motif, suggesting that synthetic

  3. Thermo-Regulation of Genes Mediating Motility and Plant Interactions in Pseudomonas syringae

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    Hockett, Kevin L.; Burch, Adrien Y.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30°C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin) and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis) were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30°C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30°C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated. PMID:23527276

  4. Differential gene expression in foxtail millet during incompatible interaction with Uromyces setariae-italicae.

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    Zhi Yong Li

    Full Text Available Foxtail millet (Setaria italica is an important food and fodder grain crop that is grown for human consumption. Production of this species is affected by several plant diseases, such as rust. The cultivar Shilixiang has been identified as resistant to the foxtail millet rust pathogen, Uromyces setariae-italicae. In order to identify signaling pathways and genes related to the plant's defense mechanisms against rust, the Shilixiang cultivar was used to construct a digital gene expression (DGE library during the interaction of foxtail millet with U. setariae-italicae. In this study, we determined the most abundant differentially expressed signaling pathways of up-regulated genes in foxtail millet and identified significantly up-regulated genes. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis was used to analyze the expression of nine selected genes, and the patterns observed agreed well with DGE analysis. Expression levels of the genes were also compared between a resistant cultivar Shilixiang and a susceptible cultivar Yugu-1, and the result indicated that expression level of Shilixiang is higher than that of Yugu-1. This study reveals the relatively comprehensive mechanisms of rust-responsive transcription in foxtail millet.

  5. Consistency of the national realization of dew-point temperature using NIS standard humidity generators

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    El-Galil Doaa Abd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of two standard humidity generators (two-temperature (2-T and one-temperature (1-T generators that are developed by the National Institute for Standards (NIS has been performed using a transfer standard chilled-mirror hygrometer and measurement procedures to realize dew-point temperature Td in the range from −50 °C to 0 °C. The main objective of this comparison was to compare the realizations of dew-point temperature and to establish the level of consistency between the two generators. For a level of consistency between two measurements, it is expressed by the difference between the measured values, m1 − m2, and the expanded pair uncertainty of this difference Up [1]. The comparison measurements revealed dew-point temperature differences of 0.02 °C and 0.07 °C with expanded pair uncertainties of ±0.09 °C and ±0.15 °C.

  6. Formation of Multiple-Phase Catalysts for the Hydrogen Storage of Mg Nanoparticles by Adding Flowerlike NiS.

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    Xie, Xiubo; Ma, Xiujuan; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Li, Xingguo; Liu, Tong

    2017-02-22

    In order to enhance the hydrogen storage properties of Mg, flowerlike NiS particles have been successfully prepared by solvothermal reaction method, and are subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) to fabricate Mg-5 wt % NiS nanocomposite. The nanocomposite displays Mg/NiS core/shell structure. The NiS shell decomposes into Ni, MgS and Mg 2 Ni multiple-phases, decorating on the surface of the Mg NPs after the first hydrogen absorption and desorption cycle at 673 K. The Mg-MgS-Mg 2 Ni-Ni nanocomposite shows enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation rates: it can quickly uptake 3.5 wt % H 2 within 10 min at 423 K and release 3.1 wt % H 2 within 10 min at 573 K. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies are decreased to 45.45 and 64.71 kJ mol -1 . The enhanced sorption kinetics of the nanocomposite is attributed to the synergistic catalytic effects of the in situ formed MgS, Ni and Mg 2 Ni multiple-phase catalysts during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process, the porthole effects for the volume expansion and microstrain of the phase transformation of Mg 2 Ni and Mg 2 NiH 4 and the reduced hydrogen diffusion distance caused by nanosized Mg. This novel method of in situ producing multiple-phase catalysts gives a new horizon for designing high performance hydrogen storage material.

  7. Genome-wide diet-gene interaction analyses for risk of colorectal cancer.

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    Jane C Figueiredo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary factors, including meat, fruits, vegetables and fiber, are associated with colorectal cancer; however, there is limited information as to whether these dietary factors interact with genetic variants to modify risk of colorectal cancer. We tested interactions between these dietary factors and approximately 2.7 million genetic variants for colorectal cancer risk among 9,287 cases and 9,117 controls from ten studies. We used logistic regression to investigate multiplicative gene-diet interactions, as well as our recently developed Cocktail method that involves a screening step based on marginal associations and gene-diet correlations and a testing step for multiplicative interactions, while correcting for multiple testing using weighted hypothesis testing. Per quartile increment in the intake of red and processed meat were associated with statistically significant increased risks of colorectal cancer and vegetable, fruit and fiber intake with lower risks. From the case-control analysis, we detected a significant interaction between rs4143094 (10p14/near GATA3 and processed meat consumption (OR = 1.17; p = 8.7E-09, which was consistently observed across studies (p heterogeneity = 0.78. The risk of colorectal cancer associated with processed meat was increased among individuals with the rs4143094-TG and -TT genotypes (OR = 1.20 and OR = 1.39, respectively and null among those with the GG genotype (OR = 1.03. Our results identify a novel gene-diet interaction with processed meat for colorectal cancer, highlighting that diet may modify the effect of genetic variants on disease risk, which may have important implications for prevention.

  8. Relationships among estrogen receptor, oxytocin and vasopressin gene expression and social interaction in male mice.

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    Murakami, G; Hunter, R G; Fontaine, C; Ribeiro, A; Pfaff, D

    2011-08-01

    The incidence of social disorders such as autism and schizophrenia is significantly higher in males, and the presentation more severe, than in females. This suggests the possible contribution of sex hormones to the development of these psychiatric disorders. There is also evidence that these disorders are highly heritable. To contribute toward our understanding of the mechanisms underlying social behaviors, particularly social interaction, we assessed the relationship of social interaction with gene expression for two neuropeptides, oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), using adult male mice. Social interaction was positively correlated with: oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor (V1aR) mRNA expression in the medial amygdala; and OT and AVP mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). When mice representing extremes of social interaction were compared, all of these mRNAs were more highly expressed in high social interaction mice than in low social interaction mice. OTR and V1aR mRNAs were highly correlated with estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA in the medial amygdala, and OT and AVP mRNAs with estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA in the PVN, indicating that OT and AVP systems are tightly regulated by estrogen receptors. A significant difference in the level of ERα mRNA in the medial amygdala between high and low social interaction mice was also observed. These results support the hypothesis that variations of estrogen receptor levels are associated with differences in social interaction through the OT and AVP systems, by upregulating gene expression for those peptides and their receptors. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

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    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  10. Gene-gene interaction between MSX1 and TP63 in Asian case-parent trios with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

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    Liu, Dongjing; Schwender, Holger; Wang, Mengying; Wang, Hong; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Hongping; Zhou, Zhibo; Li, Jing; Wu, Tao; Beaty, Terri H

    2018-03-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modification, also known as sumoylation, is a crucial post-translational regulatory mechanisms involved in development of the lip and palate. Recent studies reported two sumoylation target genes, MSX1 and TP63, to have achieved genome-wide level significance in tests of association with nonsyndromic clefts. Here, we performed a candidate gene analysis considering gene-gene and gene-environment interaction for SUMO1, MSX1, and TP63 to further explore the etiology of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P). A total of 130 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near SUMO1, MSX1, and TP63 was analyzed among 1,038 Asian NSCL/P trios ascertained through an international consortium. Conditional logistic regression models were used to explore gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interaction involving maternal environmental tobacco smoke and multivitamin supplementation. Bonferroni correction was used for G × E analysis and permutation tests were used for G × G analysis. While transmission disequilibrium tests and gene-environment interaction analysis showed no significant results, we did find signals of gene-gene interaction between SNPs near MSX1 and TP63. Three pairwise interactions yielded significant p values in permutation tests (rs884690 and rs9290890 with p = 9.34 × 10 -5 and empirical p = 1.00 × 10 -4 , rs1022136 and rs4687098 with p = 2.41 × 10 -4 and empirical p = 2.95 × 10 -4 , rs6819546 and rs9681004 with p = 5.15 × 10 -4 and empirical p = 3.02 × 10 -4 ). Gene-gene interaction between MSX1 and TP63 may influence the risk of NSCL/P in Asian populations. Our study provided additional understanding of the genetic etiology of NSCL/P and underlined the importance of considering gene-gene interaction in the etiology of this common craniofacial malformation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neuroplasticity of selective attention: Research foundations and preliminary evidence for a gene by intervention interaction

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    Stevens, Courtney; Pakulak, Eric; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore A.; Neville, Helen J.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the trajectory of our research program on selective attention, which has moved from basic research on the neural processes underlying selective attention to translational studies using selective attention as a neurobiological target for evidence-based interventions. We use this background to present a promising preliminary investigation of how genetic and experiential factors interact during development (i.e., gene × intervention interactions). Our findings provide evidence on how exposure to a family-based training can modify the associations between genotype (5-HTTLPR) and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschool children from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds. PMID:28819066

  12. Neuroplasticity of selective attention: Research foundations and preliminary evidence for a gene by intervention interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Elif; Stevens, Courtney; Pakulak, Eric; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore A; Neville, Helen J

    2017-08-29

    This article reviews the trajectory of our research program on selective attention, which has moved from basic research on the neural processes underlying selective attention to translational studies using selective attention as a neurobiological target for evidence-based interventions. We use this background to present a promising preliminary investigation of how genetic and experiential factors interact during development (i.e., gene × intervention interactions). Our findings provide evidence on how exposure to a family-based training can modify the associations between genotype (5-HTTLPR) and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschool children from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds.

  13. Media portrayals and health inequalities: a case study of characterizations of Gene x Environment interactions.

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    Horwitz, Allan V

    2005-10-01

    This article examines how genetic and environmental interactions associated with health inequalities are constructed and framed in the presentation of scientific research. It uses the example of a major article about depression in a longitudinal study of young adults that appeared in Science in 2003. This portrayal of findings related to health inequalities uses a genetic lens that privileges genetic influences and diminishes environmental ones. The emphasis on the genetic side of Gene x Environment interactions can serve to deflect attention away from the important impact of social inequalities on health.

  14. Microsatellite polymorphisms associated with human behavioural and psychological phenotypes including a gene-environment interaction.

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    Bagshaw, Andrew T M; Horwood, L John; Fergusson, David M; Gemmell, Neil J; Kennedy, Martin A

    2017-02-03

    The genetic and environmental influences on human personality and behaviour are a complex matter of ongoing debate. Accumulating evidence indicates that short tandem repeats (STRs) in regulatory regions are good candidates to explain heritability not accessed by genome-wide association studies. We tested for associations between the genotypes of four selected repeats and 18 traits relating to personality, behaviour, cognitive ability and mental health in a well-studied longitudinal birth cohort (n = 458-589) using one way analysis of variance. The repeats were a highly conserved poly-AC microsatellite in the upstream promoter region of the T-box brain 1 (TBR1) gene and three previously studied STRs in the activating enhancer-binding protein 2-beta (AP2-β) and androgen receptor (AR) genes. Where significance was found we used multiple regression to assess the influence of confounding factors. Carriers of the shorter, most common, allele of the AR gene's GGN microsatellite polymorphism had fewer anxiety-related symptoms, which was consistent with previous studies, but in our study this was not significant following Bonferroni correction. No associations with two repeats in the AP2-β gene withstood this correction. A novel finding was that carriers of the minor allele of the TBR1 AC microsatellite were at higher risk of conduct problems in childhood at age 7-9 (p = 0.0007, which did pass Bonferroni correction). Including maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) in models controlling for potentially confounding influences showed that an interaction between TBR1 genotype and MSDP was a significant predictor of conduct problems in childhood and adolescence (p behaviour up to age 25 years (p ≤ 0.02). This interaction remained significant after controlling for possible confounders including maternal age at birth, socio-economic status and education, and offspring birth weight. The potential functional importance of the TBR1 gene's promoter microsatellite

  15. Enrichr: interactive and collaborative HTML5 gene list enrichment analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward Y; Tan, Christopher M; Kou, Yan; Duan, Qiaonan; Wang, Zichen; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Clark, Neil R; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2013-04-15

    System-wide profiling of genes and proteins in mammalian cells produce lists of differentially expressed genes/proteins that need to be further analyzed for their collective functions in order to extract new knowledge. Once unbiased lists of genes or proteins are generated from such experiments, these lists are used as input for computing enrichment with existing lists created from prior knowledge organized into gene-set libraries. While many enrichment analysis tools and gene-set libraries databases have been developed, there is still room for improvement. Here, we present Enrichr, an integrative web-based and mobile software application that includes new gene-set libraries, an alternative approach to rank enriched terms, and various interactive visualization approaches to display enrichment results using the JavaScript library, Data Driven Documents (D3). The software can also be embedded into any tool that performs gene list analysis. We applied Enrichr to analyze nine cancer cell lines by comparing their enrichment signatures to the enrichment signatures of matched normal tissues. We observed a common pattern of up regulation of the polycomb group PRC2 and enrichment for the histone mark H3K27me3 in many cancer cell lines, as well as alterations in Toll-like receptor and interlukin signaling in K562 cells when compared with normal myeloid CD33+ cells. Such analyses provide global visualization of critical differences between normal tissues and cancer cell lines but can be applied to many other scenarios. Enrichr is an easy to use intuitive enrichment analysis web-based tool providing various types of visualization summaries of collective functions of gene lists. Enrichr is open source and freely available online at: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/Enrichr.

  16. The Interaction of TXNIP and AFq1 Genes Increases the Susceptibility of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yousong; Ding, Wenhua; Xing, Mengjuan; Qi, Dake; Li, Zezhi; Cui, Donghong

    2017-08-01

    Although previous studies showed the reduced risk of cancer in patients with schizophrenia, whether patients with schizophrenia possess genetic factors that also contribute to tumor suppressor is still unknown. In the present study, based on our previous microarray data, we focused on the tumor suppressor genes TXNIP and AF1q, which differentially expressed in patients with schizophrenia. A total of 413 patients and 578 healthy controls were recruited. We found no significant differences in genotype, allele, or haplotype frequencies at the selected five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs2236566 and rs7211 in TXNIP gene; rs10749659, rs2140709, and rs3738481 in AF1q gene) between patients with schizophrenia and controls. However, we found the association between the interaction of TXNIP and AF1q with schizophrenia by using the MDR method followed by traditional statistical analysis. The best gene-gene interaction model identified was a three-locus model TXNIP (rs2236566, rs7211)-AF1q (rs2140709). After traditional statistical analysis, we found the high-risk genotype combination was rs2236566 (GG)-rs7211(CC)-rs2140709(CC) (OR = 1.35 [1.03-1.76]). The low-risk genotype combination was rs2236566 (GT)-rs7211(CC)-rs2140709(CC) (OR = 0.67 [0.49-0.91]). Our finding suggested statistically significant role of interaction of TXNIP and AF1q polymorphisms (TXNIP-rs2236566, TXNIP-rs7211, and AF1q-rs2769605) in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  17. Association of apolipoprotein e gene polymorphisms with blood lipids and their interaction with dietary factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Ellahi, Basma

    2018-01-01

    of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at LPL, seven tagging SNPs at the APOE gene, and a common APOE haplotype (two SNPs) with blood lipids, and examined the interaction of these SNPs with dietary factors. Methods: The population studied for this investigation included 660 individuals from...... the Prevention of Cancer by Intervention with Selenium (PRECISE) study who supplied baseline data. The findings of the PRECISE study were further replicated using 1238 individuals from the Caerphilly Prospective cohort (CaPS). Dietary intake was assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ......Background: Several candidate genes have been identified in relation to lipid metabolism, and among these, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene polymorphisms are major sources of genetically determined variation in lipid concentrations. This study investigated the association...

  18. Overview of diet-gene interactions and the example of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of diet-gene interaction and the role of dietary factors in human health and disease. Human master control genes that regulate processes of fundamental importance, such as cell proliferation and the immune response, are introduced and their modulation by nutraceuticals, produced by plants and photosynthetic microbes, is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids as regulators of master control genes. Furthermore, a case study is presented on xanthophylls, a group of carotenoids with multiple health benefits in the protection against eye disease and other chronic diseases, as well as the synergism between xanthophylls and other dietary factors. Lastly, dietary sources of the xanthophylls zeaxanthin and lutein are reviewed and their enhancement via genetic engineering is discussed.

  19. Interaction between alcohol dehydrogenase II gene, alcohol consumption, and risk for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    St?rmer, T; Wang-Gohrke, S; Arndt, V; Boeing, H; Kong, X; Kreienberg, R; Brenner, H

    2002-01-01

    MaeIII Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism in exon 3 of the alcohol dehydrogenase II was assessed in serum from 467 randomly selected German women and 278 women with invasive breast cancer to evaluate the interaction between a polymorphism of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene, alcohol consumption and risk for breast cancer. In both groups, usual consumption of different alcoholic beverages was asked for using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. We used multivariable logistic ...

  20. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-04-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit.

  1. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  2. Daf-2, Daf-16 and Daf-23: Genetically Interacting Genes Controlling Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, S.; Ruvkun, G.

    1994-01-01

    Under conditions of high population density and low food, Caenorhabditis elegans forms an alternative third larval stage, called the dauer stage, which is resistant to desiccation and harsh environments. Genetic analysis of some dauer constitutive (Daf-c) and dauer defective (Daf-d) mutants has revealed a complex pathway that is likely to function in particular neurons and/or responding tissues. Here we analyze the genetic interactions between three genes which comprise a branch of the dauer ...

  3. A Fast Multiple-Kernel Method With Applications to Detect Gene-Environment Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Rachel; Lu, Wenbin; Holloway, Shannon; Sale, Michèle M; Worrall, Bradford B; Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    Kernel machine (KM) models are a powerful tool for exploring associations between sets of genetic variants and complex traits. Although most KM methods use a single kernel function to assess the marginal effect of a variable set, KM analyses involving multiple kernels have become increasingly popular. Multikernel analysis allows researchers to study more complex problems, such as assessing gene-gene or gene-environment interactions, incorporating variance-component based methods for population substructure into rare-variant association testing, and assessing the conditional effects of a variable set adjusting for other variable sets. The KM framework is robust, powerful, and provides efficient dimension reduction for multifactor analyses, but requires the estimation of high dimensional nuisance parameters. Traditional estimation techniques, including regularization and the "expectation-maximization (EM)" algorithm, have a large computational cost and are not scalable to large sample sizes needed for rare variant analysis. Therefore, under the context of gene-environment interaction, we propose a computationally efficient and statistically rigorous "fastKM" algorithm for multikernel analysis that is based on a low-rank approximation to the nuisance effect kernel matrices. Our algorithm is applicable to various trait types (e.g., continuous, binary, and survival traits) and can be implemented using any existing single-kernel analysis software. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our algorithm has similar performance to an EM-based KM approach for quantitative traits while running much faster. We also apply our method to the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, examining gene-by-vitamin effects on recurrent stroke risk and gene-by-age effects on change in homocysteine level. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Dairy Product Consumption Interacts with Glucokinase (GCK Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine S. Da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dairy product intake and a person’s genetic background have been reported to be associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The objective of this study was to examine the interaction between dairy products and genes related to T2D on glucose-insulin homeostasis parameters. A validated food frequency questionnaire, fasting blood samples, and glucokinase (GCK genotypes were analyzed in 210 healthy participants. An interaction between rs1799884 in GCK and dairy intake on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was identified. Secondly, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 were grown in a high-glucose medium and incubated with either 1-dairy proteins: whey, caseins, and a mixture of whey and casein; and 2-four amino acids (AA or mixtures of AA. The expression of GCK-related genes insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and fatty acid synthase (FASN was increased with whey protein isolate or hydrolysate. Individually, leucine increased IRS-1 expression, whereas isoleucine and valine decreased FASN expression. A branched-chain AA mixture decreased IRS-1 and FASN expression. In conclusion, carriers of the A allele for rs1799884 in the GCK gene may benefit from a higher intake of dairy products to maintain optimal insulin sensitivity. Moreover, the results show that whey proteins affect the expression of genes related to glucose metabolism.

  5. Gene Environment Interactions and Predictors of Colorectal Cancer in Family-Based, Multi-Ethnic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, S Pamela K; Grayson, James; Yu, Chong Ho; Wasek, Brandi; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2018-02-16

    For the personalization of polygenic/omics-based health care, the purpose of this study was to examine the gene-environment interactions and predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) by including five key genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathways. In this proof-of-concept study, we included a total of 54 families and 108 participants, 54 CRC cases and 54 matched family friends representing four major racial ethnic groups in southern California (White, Asian, Hispanics, and Black). We used three phases of data analytics, including exploratory, family-based analyses adjusting for the dependence within the family for sharing genetic heritage, the ensemble method, and generalized regression models for predictive modeling with a machine learning validation procedure to validate the results for enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results revealed that despite the family members sharing genetic heritage, the CRC group had greater combined gene polymorphism rates than the family controls ( p relation to gene-environment interactions in the prevention of CRC.

  6. Gene-environment interaction in Major Depression: focus on experience-dependent biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eLopizzo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is a multifactorial and polygenic disorder, where multiple and partially overlapping sets of susceptibility genes interact each other and with the environment, predisposing individuals to the development of the illness. Thus, MDD results from a complex interplay of vulnerability genes and environmental factors that act cumulatively throughout individual's lifetime. Among these environmental factors, stressful life experiences, especially those occurring early in life, have been suggested to exert a crucial impact on brain development, leading to permanent functional changes that may contribute to life long risk for mental health outcomes. In this review we will discuss how genetic variants (polymorphisms, SNPs within genes operating in neurobiological systems that mediate stress response and synaptic plasticity, can impact, by themselves, the vulnerability risk for MDD; we will also consider how this MDD risk can be further modulated when gene X environment interaction is taken into account. Finally, we will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms, and in particular of DNA methylation and miRNAs expression changes, in mediating the effect of the stress on the vulnerability risk to develop MDD. Taken together, in this review we aim to underlie the role of genetic and epigenetic processes involved in stress and neuroplasticity related biological systems on development of MDD after exposure to early life stress, thereby building the basis for future research and clinical interventions.

  7. Gene-environment interaction and behavioral disorders: a developmental perspective based on endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco; Marino, Cecilia; Maziade, Michel; Molteni, Massimo; D'Amato, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    It has been observed that 'No aspect of human behavioral genetics has caused more confusion and generated more obscurantism than the analysis and interpretation of various types of non-additivity and non-independence of gene and environmental action and interaction' (Eaves LJ et al 1977 Br J Math Stat Psychol 30:1-42). On the other hand, a bulk of newly published studies appear to speak in favour of common and frequent interplay--and possibly interaction--between identified genetic polymorphisms and specified environmental variables in shaping behavior and behavioral disorders. Considerable interest has arisen from the introduction of putative functional 'endophenotypes' which would represent a more proximate biological link to genes, as well as an obligatory intermediate of behavior. While explicit criteria to identify valid endophenotypes have been offered, a number of new 'alternative phenotypes' are now being proposed as possible 'endophenotypes' for behavioral and psychiatric genetics research, sometimes with less than optimal stringency. Nonetheless, we suggest that some endophenotypes can be helpful in investigating several instances of gene-environment interactions and be employed as additional tools to reduce the risk for spurious results in this controversial area.

  8. Gene environment interaction studies in depression and suicidal behavior: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Laura; Serretti, Alessandro

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence supports the involvement of both heritable and environmental risk factors in major depression (MD) and suicidal behavior (SB). Studies investigating gene-environment interaction (G × E) may be useful for elucidating the role of biological mechanisms in the risk for mental disorders. In the present paper, we review the literature regarding the interaction between genes modulating brain functions and stressful life events in the etiology of MD and SB and discuss their potential added benefit compared to genetic studies only. Within the context of G × E investigation, thus far, only a few reliable results have been obtained, although some genes have consistently shown interactive effects with environmental risk in MD and, to a lesser extent, in SB. Further investigation is required to disentangle the direct and mediated effects that are common or specific to MD and SB. Since traditional G × E studies overall suffer from important methodological limitations, further effort is required to develop novel methodological strategies with an interdisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between the RGS6 gene and psychosocial stress on obesity-related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Min, Jin-Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2017-03-31

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases and arises from the interactions between environmental factors and multiple genes. Psychosocial stress may affect the risk for obesity, modifying food intake and choice. A recent study suggested regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) as a novel candidate gene for obesity in terms of reward-related feeding under stress. In this study, we tried to verify the unidentified connection between RGS6 and human obesity with psychosocial stress in a Korean population. A total of 1,462 adult subjects, who participated in the Korean Association Resource cohort project, were included for this analysis. Obesity-related traits including waist circumference, body mass index, and visceral adipose tissue were recorded. A total of 4 intronic SNPs for the RGS6 gene were used for this study. We found that interactions between SNP rs2239219 and psychosocial stress are significantly associated with abdominal obesity (p = 0.007). As risk allele of this SNP increased, prevalence of abdominal obesity under high-stress conditions gradually increased (p = 0.013). However, we found no SNPs-by-stress interaction effect on other adiposity phenotypes. This study suggests that RGS6 is closely linked to stress-induced abdominal obesity in Korean adults.

  10. Attachment style and oxytocin receptor gene variation interact in influencing social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Domschke, K; Holitschke, K; Ziegler, C; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Reif, A; Deckert, J; Zwanzger, P

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety has been suggested to be promoted by an insecure attachment style. Oxytocin is discussed as a mediator of trust and social bonding as well as a modulator of social anxiety. Applying a gene-environment (G × E) interaction approach, in the present pilot study the main and interactive effects of attachment styles and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variation were probed in a combined risk factor model of social anxiety in healthy probands. Participants (N = 388; 219 females, 169 males; age 24.7 ± 4.7 years) were assessed for anxiety in social situations (Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory) depending on attachment style (Adult Attachment Scale, AAS) and OXTR rs53576 A/G genotype. A less secure attachment style was significantly associated with higher social anxiety. This association was partly modulated by OXTR genotype, with a stronger negative influence of a less secure attachment style on social anxiety in A allele carriers as compared to GG homozygotes. The present pilot data point to a strong association of less secure attachment and social anxiety as well as to a gene-environment interaction effect of OXTR rs53576 genotype and attachment style on social anxiety possibly constituting a targetable combined risk marker of social anxiety disorder.

  11. A simulation study of gene-by-environment interactions in GWAS implies ample hidden effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigorta, Urko M.; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The switch to a modern lifestyle in recent decades has coincided with a rapid increase in prevalence of obesity and other diseases. These shifts in prevalence could be explained by the release of genetic susceptibility for disease in the form of gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions. Yet, the detection of interaction effects requires large sample sizes, little replication has been reported, and a few studies have demonstrated environmental effects only after summing the risk of GWAS alleles into genetic risk scores (GRSxE). We performed extensive simulations of a quantitative trait controlled by 2500 causal variants to inspect the feasibility to detect gene-by-environment interactions in the context of GWAS. The simulated individuals were assigned either to an ancestral or a modern setting that alters the phenotype by increasing the effect size by 1.05–2-fold at a varying fraction of perturbed SNPs (from 1 to 20%). We report two main results. First, for a wide range of realistic scenarios, highly significant GRSxE is detected despite the absence of individual genotype GxE evidence at the contributing loci. Second, an increase in phenotypic variance after environmental perturbation reduces the power to discover susceptibility variants by GWAS in mixed cohorts with individuals from both ancestral and modern environments. We conclude that a pervasive presence of gene-by-environment effects can remain hidden even though it contributes to the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:25101110

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions Prediction Based on Iterative Clique Extension with Gene Ontology Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cliques (maximal complete subnets in protein-protein interaction (PPI network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  13. Gene-diet interaction effects on BMI levels in the Singapore Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xuling; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Sun, Ye; Han, Yi; Wang, Ling; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Sim, Xueling; Tai, E-Shyong; Liu, Jianjun; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay; van Dam, Rob M; Friedlander, Yechiel; Heng, Chew-Kiat

    2018-02-24

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 97 body-mass index (BMI) associated loci. We aimed to evaluate if dietary intake modifies BMI associations at these loci in the Singapore Chinese population. We utilized GWAS information from six data subsets from two adult Chinese population (N = 7817). Seventy-eight genotyped or imputed index BMI single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that passed quality control procedures were available in all datasets. Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010 score and ten nutrient variables were evaluated. Linear regression analyses between z score transformed BMI (Z-BMI) and dietary factors were performed. Interaction analyses were performed by introducing the interaction term (diet x SNP) in the same regression model. Analysis was carried out in each cohort individually and subsequently meta-analyzed using the inverse-variance weighted method. Analyses were also evaluated with a weighted gene-risk score (wGRS) contructed by BMI index SNPs from recent large-scale GWAS studies. Nominal associations between Z-BMI and AHEI-2010 and some dietary factors were identified (P = 0.047-0.010). The BMI wGRS was robustly associated with Z-BMI (P = 1.55 × 10 - 15 ) but not with any dietary variables. Dietary variables did not significantly interact with the wGRS to modify BMI associations. When interaction analyses were repeated using individual SNPs, a significant association between cholesterol intake and rs4740619 (CCDC171) was identified (β = 0.077, adjP interaction  = 0.043). The CCDC171 gene locus may interact with cholesterol intake to increase BMI in the Singaporean Chinese population, however most known obesity risk loci were not associated with dietary intake and did not interact with diet to modify BMI levels.

  14. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  15. A mental retardation gene, motopsin/prss12, modulates cell morphology by interaction with seizure-related gene 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Shinichi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Furihata, Mutsuo; Osako, Yoji; Yuri, Kazunari

    2013-07-12

    A serine protease, motopsin (prss12), plays a significant role in cognitive function and the development of the brain, since the loss of motopsin function causes severe mental retardation in humans and enhances social behavior in mice. Motopsin is activity-dependently secreted from neuronal cells, is captured around the synaptic cleft, and cleaves a proteoglycan, agrin. The multi-domain structure of motopsin, consisting of a signal peptide, a proline-rich domain, a kringle domain, three scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, and a protease domain at the C-terminal, suggests the interaction with other molecules through these domains. To identify a protein interacting with motopsin, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and found that seizure-related gene 6 (sez-6), a transmembrane protein on the plasma membrane of neuronal cells, bound to the proline-rich/kringle domain of motopsin. Pull-down and immunoprecipitation analyses indicated the interaction between these proteins. Immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical analyses suggested the co-localization of motopsin and sez-6 at neuronal cells in the developmental mouse brain and at motor neurons in the anterior horn of human spinal cords. Transient expression of motopsin in neuro2a cells increased the number and length of neurites as well as the level of neurite branching. Interestingly, co-expression of sez-6 with motopsin restored the effect of motopsin at the basal level, while sez-6 expression alone showed no effects on cell morphology. Our results suggest that the interaction of motopsin and sez-6 modulates the neuronal cell morphology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease: Coffee, ADORA2A, and CYP1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina F; Bertram, Lars; Greene, Naomi; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Ritz, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2) metabolizes caffeine; thus, gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. In a population-based case-control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and gender-matched controls), we assessed interactions between lifetime coffee consumption and 3 polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 for all subjects, and incident and prevalent PD cases separately using logistic regression models. We also conducted a meta-analysis combining our results with those from previous studies. We estimated statistically significant interactions for ADORA2A rs5760423 and heavy vs. light coffee consumption in incident (OR interaction = 0.66 [95% CI 0.46-0.94], p = 0.02) but not prevalent PD. We did not observe interactions for CYP1A2 rs762551 and rs2472304 in incident or prevalent PD. In meta-analyses, PD associations with daily coffee consumption were strongest among carriers of variant alleles in both ADORA2A and CYP1A2. We corroborated results from a previous report that described interactions between ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms and coffee consumption. Our results also suggest that survivor bias may affect results of studies that enroll prevalent PD cases. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Comparison of weighting approaches for genetic risk scores in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Krämer, Ursula; Carlsten, Christopher; Schikowski, Tamara; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger

    2017-12-16

    Weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are statistically powerful for detection gene-environment (GxE) interactions. To assign weights, the gold standard is to use external weights from an independent study. However, appropriate external weights are not always available. In such situations and in the presence of predominant marginal genetic effects, we have shown in a previous study that GRS with internal weights from marginal genetic effects ("GRS-marginal-internal") are a powerful and reliable alternative to single SNP approaches or the use of unweighted GRS. However, this approach might not be appropriate for detecting predominant interactions, i.e. interactions showing an effect stronger than the marginal genetic effect. In this paper, we present a weighting approach for such predominant interactions ("GRS-interaction-training") in which parts of the data are used to estimate the weights from the interaction terms and the remaining data are used to determine the GRS. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions in which we evaluated power, type I error and sign-misspecification. We compared this new weighting approach to the GRS-marginal-internal approach and to GRS with external weights. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of external weights and with predominant interaction effects, the highest power was reached with the GRS-interaction-training approach. If marginal genetic effects were predominant, the GRS-marginal-internal approach was more appropriate. Furthermore, the power to detect interactions reached by the GRS-interaction-training approach was only slightly lower than the power achieved by GRS with external weights. The power of the GRS-interaction-training approach was confirmed in a real data application to the Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study (N = 4465 observations). When appropriate external weights are unavailable, we

  18. The ASK1 gene regulates development and interacts with the UFO gene to control floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yang, M; Solava, J; Ma, H

    1999-09-01

    Normal flower development likely requires both specific and general regulators. We have isolated an Arabidopsis mutant ask1-1 (for -Arabidopsis skp1-like1-1), which exhibits defects in both vegetative and reproductive development. In the ask1-1mutant, rosette leaf growth is reduced, resulting in smaller than normal rosette leaves, and internodes in the floral stem are shorter than normal. Examination of cell sizes in these organs indicates that cell expansion is normal in the mutant, but cell number is reduced. In the mutant, the numbers of petals and stamens are reduced, and many flowers have one or more petals with a reduced size. In addition, all mutant flowers have short stamen filaments. Furthermore, petal/stamen chimeric organs are found in many flowers. These results indicate that the ASK1 gene affects the size of vegetative and floral organs. The ask1 floral phenotype resembles somewhat that of the Arabidopsis ufo mutants in that both genes affect whorls 2 and 3. We therefore tested for possible interactions between ASK1 and UFO by analyzing the phenotypes of ufo-2 ask1-1 double mutant plants. In these plants, vegetative development is similar to that of the ask1-1 single mutant, whereas the floral defects are more severe than those in either single mutant. Interior to the first whorl, the double mutant flowers have more sepals or sepal-like organs than are found in ufo-2, and less petals than ask1-1. Our results suggest that ASK1 interacts with UFO to control floral organ identity in whorls 2 and 3. This is very intriguing because ASK1 is very similar in sequence to the yeast SKP1 protein and UFO contains an F-box, a motif known to interact with SKP1 in yeast. Although the precise mechanism of ASK1 and UFO action is unknown, our results support the hypothesis that these two proteins physically interact in vivo. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

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    Yoomi Choi

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase. Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  20. Assessing the joint effect of population stratification and sample selection in studies of gene-gene (environment interactions

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    Cheng KF

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that the presence of population stratification (PS may cause the usual test in case-control studies to produce spurious gene-disease associations. However, the impact of the PS and sample selection (SS is less known. In this paper, we provide a systematic study of the joint effect of PS and SS under a more general risk model containing genetic and environmental factors. We provide simulation results to show the magnitude of the bias and its impact on type I error rate of the usual chi-square test under a wide range of PS level and selection bias. Results The biases to the estimation of main and interaction effect are quantified and then their bounds derived. The estimated bounds can be used to compute conservative p-values for the association test. If the conservative p-value is smaller than the significance level, we can safely claim that the association test is significant regardless of the presence of PS or not, or if there is any selection bias. We also identify conditions for the null bias. The bias depends on the allele frequencies, exposure rates, gene-environment odds ratios and disease risks across subpopulations and the sampling of the cases and controls. Conclusion Our results show that the bias cannot be ignored even the case and control data were matched in ethnicity. A real example is given to illustrate application of the conservative p-value. These results are useful to the genetic association studies of main and interaction effects.

  1. Interaction Effects of Season of Birth and Cytokine Genes on Schizotypal Traits in the General Population

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    Margarita V. Alfimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature suggests that the effect of winter birth on vulnerability to schizophrenia might be mediated by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines due to prenatal infection and its inadequate regulation by anti-inflammatory factors. As the response of the immune system depends on genotype, this study assessed the interaction effects of cytokine genes and season of birth (SOB on schizotypy measured with the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ-74. We searched for associations of IL1B rs16944, IL4 rs2243250, and IL-1RN VNTR polymorphisms, SOB, and their interactions with the SPQ-74 total score in a sample of 278 healthy individuals. A significant effect of the IL4 X SOB interaction was found, p=0.007 and η2=0.028. We confirmed this effect using an extended sample of 373 individuals. Homozygotes CC born in winter showed the highest SPQ total score and differed significantly from winter-born T allele carriers, p=0.049. This difference was demonstrated for cognitive-perceptual and disorganized but not interpersonal dimensions. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the cytokine genes by SOB interaction can influence variability of schizotypal traits in the general population. The IL4 T allele appeared to have a protective effect against the development of positive and disorganized schizotypal traits in winter-born individuals.

  2. Interaction Effects of Season of Birth and Cytokine Genes on Schizotypal Traits in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimova, Margarita V; Korovaitseva, Galina I; Lezheiko, Tatyana V; Golimbet, Vera E

    2017-01-01

    Literature suggests that the effect of winter birth on vulnerability to schizophrenia might be mediated by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines due to prenatal infection and its inadequate regulation by anti-inflammatory factors. As the response of the immune system depends on genotype, this study assessed the interaction effects of cytokine genes and season of birth (SOB) on schizotypy measured with the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ-74). We searched for associations of IL1B rs16944, IL4 rs2243250, and IL-1RN VNTR polymorphisms, SOB, and their interactions with the SPQ-74 total score in a sample of 278 healthy individuals. A significant effect of the IL4 X SOB interaction was found, p = 0.007 and η 2 = 0.028. We confirmed this effect using an extended sample of 373 individuals. Homozygotes CC born in winter showed the highest SPQ total score and differed significantly from winter-born T allele carriers, p = 0.049. This difference was demonstrated for cognitive-perceptual and disorganized but not interpersonal dimensions. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the cytokine genes by SOB interaction can influence variability of schizotypal traits in the general population. The IL4 T allele appeared to have a protective effect against the development of positive and disorganized schizotypal traits in winter-born individuals.

  3. A methodology to establish a database to study gene environment interactions for childhood asthma

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    McCormick Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are likely to explain some of the heterogeneity in childhood asthma. Here, we describe the methodology and experiences in establishing a database for childhood asthma designed to study gene-environment interactions (PAGES - Paediatric Asthma Gene Environment Study. Methods Children with asthma and under the care of a respiratory paediatrician are being recruited from 15 hospitals between 2008 and 2011. An asthma questionnaire is completed and returned by post. At a routine clinic visit saliva is collected for DNA extraction. Detailed phenotyping in a proportion of children includes spirometry, bronchodilator response (BDR, skin prick reactivity, exhaled nitric oxide and salivary cotinine. Dietary and quality of life questionnaires are completed. Data are entered onto a purpose-built database. Results To date 1045 children have been invited to participate and data collected in 501 (48%. The mean age (SD of participants is 8.6 (3.9 years, 57% male. DNA has been collected in 436 children. Spirometry has been obtained in 172 children, mean % predicted (SD FEV1 97% (15 and median (IQR BDR is 5% (2, 9. There were differences in age, socioeconomic status, severity and %FEV1 between the different centres (p≤0.024. Reasons for non-participation included parents not having time to take part, children not attending clinics and, in a small proportion, refusal to take part. Conclusions It is feasible to establish a national database to study gene-environment interactions within an asthmatic paediatric population; there are barriers to participation and some different characteristics in individuals recruited from different centres. Recruitment to our study continues and is anticipated to extend current understanding of asthma heterogeneity.

  4. 17β-Estradiol-induced interaction of ERα with NPPA regulates gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Pham, Thi Hang; Kuehne, Arne; Fielitz, Britta; Dworatzek, Elke; Kararigas, Georgios; Petrov, George; Davidson, Mercy M; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera

    2012-12-01

    17β-Oestradiol (E2) and its receptors (ERα and ERβ) are important regulators of physiological and pathological processes in the cardiovascular system. ER act in concert with other regulatory factors mediating oestrogenic effects. However, the underlying mechanisms modulating ER transcriptional activity are not fully elucidated. To gain better understanding of E2-induced ERα action in the human heart, we aimed to identify and functionally analyse interaction partners of ERα. Using yeast two-hybrid assays with a human heart cDNA library, we identified atrial natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA), a well-known cardiac hypertrophy marker, as a novel ERα interaction partner interacting in an E2-dependent manner. Mutation analyses and immunofluorescence data indicated that the LXXLL motif within NPPA is necessary for its E2-induced interaction with ERα, its action as a co-repressor of ERα, and its translocation into the nucleus of human and rat cardiomyocytes. Expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in a human left ventricular cardiomyocyte cell line, AC16, showed that NPPA interacts with E2/ERα, suppressing the transcriptional activity of ERα on E2-target genes, such as NPPA, connexin43, αactinin-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, and collagens I and III. We characterize for the first time an E2-regulated interaction of NPPA with ERα in cardiomyocytes, that may be crucial in physiological and/or pathological cardiac processes, thereby representing a potential therapeutic target.

  5. Feasibility of baculovirus-mediated reporter gene delivery for efficient monitoring of islet transplantation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuai; Pan, Yu; Lv, Jing; Wu, Haifei; Tian, Jingyan; Zhang, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of baculovirus vector-mediated sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene delivery to monitor islet transplantation. Methods: Baculovirus vectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or NIS (Bac-GFP and Bac-NIS) were established using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The GFP expression of Bac-GFP-infected rat islets was observed in vitro by fluorescence microscopy. Iodine uptake and inhibition of iodine uptake by NaClO 4 in Bac-NIS-infected islets were dynamically monitored in vitro. Bac-GFP- or Bac-NIS-infected islets were implanted into the left axillary cavity of NOD-SCID mice, and fluorescence imaging and 125 I NanoSPECT/CT imaging were subsequently performed in vivo. Results: Bac-GFP efficiently infected rat islets (over 95% infected at MOI = 40), and the expression of GFP lasted approximately two weeks. NaClO 4 could inhibit iodine uptake by Bac-NIS-infected islets. In vivo imaging revealed that the fluorescence intensity of the transplant sites in Bac-GFP-infected groups was significantly higher than in the non-infected group. Grafts could be clearly observed by 125 I NanoSPECT/CT imaging for up to 8 h. Conclusion: Baculovirus vectors are powerful vehicles for studying rat islets in gene delivery. It is feasible to use a baculovirus vector to delivery an NIS gene for non-invasive monitoring transplanted islets in vivo by the expression of the target gene

  6. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sung, Y.J. (Yun Ju); T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); A.K. Manning (Alisa); H. Aschard (Hugues); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); M.R. Brown; A.C. Morrison (Alanna); M. Fornage (Myriam); L.-A. Lin (Li-An); Richard, M. (Melissa); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Polasek (Ozren); J. Marten (Jonathan); I. Rudan (Igor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A. Kraja (Aldi); M.A. Province (Mike); Deng, X. (Xuan); Fisher, V.A. (Virginia A.); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); B.H. Smith (Blair); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); Y. Liu (YongMei); Lohman, K. (Kurt); C. Bouchard (Claude); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); Rice, T.K. (Treva K.); D.K. Arnett (Donna); K. Schwander; X. Guo (Xiuqing); W. Palmas (Walter); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); Alfred, T. (Tamuno); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); N. Amin (Najaf); O.H. Franco (Oscar); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); D. Vojinovic (Dina); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.M. Ridker (Paul); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); X. Zhu (Xiaofeng); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); Gauderman, W.J. (W. James); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractStudying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions

  7. Correlates of HPV vaccine initiation and provider recommendation among male adolescents, 2014 NIS-Teen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Kathryn; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Gaydos, Laura M

    2018-05-08

    Vaccination is a safe and effective way to prevent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and related cancers; however, HPV vaccine uptake remains low in the US. After the 2011 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendation for routine HPV vaccination of adolescent males, several studies have examined predictors for initiating the vaccine series in this population of interest, particularly with regard to provider recommendations. This study examined racial and ethnic differences for HPV vaccine initiation and provider recommendation in male adolescents. Based on prior HPV vaccine uptake estimates and healthcare utilization data, we hypothesized that minority adolescents would be more likely to initiate HPV vaccines, but less likely to receive a provider recommendation compared to white counterparts. We analyzed the 2014 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen), which included 10,753 male adolescents with provider-verified vaccination data in 50 US states, using multivariate logistic regression models to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in HPV vaccine initiation and provider recommendation. The odds of HPV vaccine initiation were 76 percent higher for Hispanic adolescents and 43 percent higher for non-Hispanic Other or Multiple race adolescents compared to white adolescents. Approximately half of parents reported receiving a provider recommendation for vaccination, with no significant difference in the odds of receiving a provider recommendation across racial/ethnic groups. Despite similar frequency of recommendations across racial and ethnic groups, male adolescents who are racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to initiate vaccination. Future research should focus on developing tailored interventions to increase HPV vaccine receipt among males of all racial/ethnic groups. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 5C analysis of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex locus reveals distinct chromatin interaction networks between gene-rich and gene-poor TADs in skin epithelial cells.

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    Krzysztof Poterlowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes contain several dozens of large (>0.5 Mbp lineage-specific gene loci harbouring functionally related genes. However, spatial chromatin folding, organization of the enhancer-promoter networks and their relevance to Topologically Associating Domains (TADs in these loci remain poorly understood. TADs are principle units of the genome folding and represents the DNA regions within which DNA interacts more frequently and less frequently across the TAD boundary. Here, we used Chromatin Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C technology to characterize spatial chromatin interaction network in the 3.1 Mb Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC locus harbouring 61 functionally related genes that show lineage-specific activation during terminal keratinocyte differentiation in the epidermis. 5C data validated by 3D-FISH demonstrate that the EDC locus is organized into several TADs showing distinct lineage-specific chromatin interaction networks based on their transcription activity and the gene-rich or gene-poor status. Correlation of the 5C results with genome-wide studies for enhancer-specific histone modifications (H3K4me1 and H3K27ac revealed that the majority of spatial chromatin interactions that involves the gene-rich TADs at the EDC locus in keratinocytes include both intra- and inter-TAD interaction networks, connecting gene promoters and enhancers. Compared to thymocytes in which the EDC locus is mostly transcriptionally inactive, these interactions were found to be keratinocyte-specific. In keratinocytes, the promoter-enhancer anchoring regions in the gene-rich transcriptionally active TADs are enriched for the binding of chromatin architectural proteins CTCF, Rad21 and chromatin remodeler Brg1. In contrast to gene-rich TADs, gene-poor TADs show preferential spatial contacts with each other, do not contain active enhancers and show decreased binding of CTCF, Rad21 and Brg1 in keratinocytes. Thus, spatial interactions between gene

  9. The interaction of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene and early life stress on emotional empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Simone; Wirth, Katharina; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Gärtner, Matti; Feeser, Melanie; Dziobek, Isabel; Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine

    2017-06-30

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for depression, changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system and structural and functional changes in hippocampus. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene interact with ELS to predict depression, cognitive functions and hippocampal activity. Social cognition has been related to hippocampal function and might be crucial for maintaining mental health. However, the interaction of CRHR1 gene variation and ELS on social cognition has not been investigated yet. We assessed social cognition in 502 healthy subjects to test effects of ELS and the CRHR1 gene. Participants were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924. ELS was assessed by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, social cognition was measured via Multifaceted Empathy Test and Empathy Quotient. Severity of ELS was associated with decreased emotional, but not cognitive empathy. Subjects with the common homozygous GG GG genotype showed decreased implicit emotional empathy after ELS exposure regardless of its severity. The results reveal that specific CRHR1 polymorphisms moderate the effect of ELS on emotional empathy. Exposure to ELS in combination with a vulnerable genotype results in impaired emotional empathy in adulthood, which might represent an early marker of increased vulnerability after ELS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome mining of Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 reveals symbiotic features including genes related to plant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Luna, Stefany Daniela; Cruz Vázquez, Angélica Patricia; Jiménez Suárez, Verónica; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.; Sánchez, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are wide-spread and associated with plant physiological benefits, yet their genomes and secondary metabolites remain largely unidentified. In this study, we explored the genome of the endophyte Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 for discovery of potential novel molecules as well as genes and metabolites involved in host interactions. The complete genomes of seven Streptomyces and three other more distantly related bacteria were used to define the functional landscape of this unique microbe. The S. scabrisporus NF3 genome is larger than the average Streptomyces genome and not structured for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle; this and the fact that can grow in R2YE media implies that it could include a soil-living stage. The genome displays an enrichment of genes associated with amino acid production, protein secretion, secondary metabolite and antioxidants production and xenobiotic degradation, indicating that S. scabrisporus NF3 could contribute to the metabolic enrichment of soil microbial communities and of its hosts. Importantly, besides its metabolic advantages, the genome showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification of plant interaction molecules, including genes for the production of plant hormones, stress resistance molecules, chitinases, antibiotics and siderophores. Given the diversity of S. scabrisporus mechanisms for host upkeep, we propose that these strategies were necessary for its adaptation to plant hosts and to face changes in environmental conditions. PMID:29447216

  11. Genome mining of Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 reveals symbiotic features including genes related to plant interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Diana Ceapă

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria are wide-spread and associated with plant physiological benefits, yet their genomes and secondary metabolites remain largely unidentified. In this study, we explored the genome of the endophyte Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 for discovery of potential novel molecules as well as genes and metabolites involved in host interactions. The complete genomes of seven Streptomyces and three other more distantly related bacteria were used to define the functional landscape of this unique microbe. The S. scabrisporus NF3 genome is larger than the average Streptomyces genome and not structured for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle; this and the fact that can grow in R2YE media implies that it could include a soil-living stage. The genome displays an enrichment of genes associated with amino acid production, protein secretion, secondary metabolite and antioxidants production and xenobiotic degradation, indicating that S. scabrisporus NF3 could contribute to the metabolic enrichment of soil microbial communities and of its hosts. Importantly, besides its metabolic advantages, the genome showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification of plant interaction molecules, including genes for the production of plant hormones, stress resistance molecules, chitinases, antibiotics and siderophores. Given the diversity of S. scabrisporus mechanisms for host upkeep, we propose that these strategies were necessary for its adaptation to plant hosts and to face changes in environmental conditions.

  12. Genotet: An Interactive Web-based Visual Exploration Framework to Support Validation of Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bowen; Doraiswamy, Harish; Chen, Xi; Miraldi, Emily; Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario Luis; Hafemeister, Christoph; Madar, Aviv; Bonneau, Richard; Silva, Cláudio T

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) is a fundamental goal in biology, and one of the most important components of TRNs are transcription factors (TFs), proteins that specifically bind to gene promoter and enhancer regions to alter target gene expression patterns. Advances in genomic technologies as well as advances in computational biology have led to multiple large regulatory network models (directed networks) each with a large corpus of supporting data and gene-annotation. There are multiple possible biological motivations for exploring large regulatory network models, including: validating TF-target gene relationships, figuring out co-regulation patterns, and exploring the coordination of cell processes in response to changes in cell state or environment. Here we focus on queries aimed at validating regulatory network models, and on coordinating visualization of primary data and directed weighted gene regulatory networks. The large size of both the network models and the primary data can make such coordinated queries cumbersome with existing tools and, in particular, inhibits the sharing of results between collaborators. In this work, we develop and demonstrate a web-based framework for coordinating visualization and exploration of expression data (RNA-seq, microarray), network models and gene-binding data (ChIP-seq). Using specialized data structures and multiple coordinated views, we design an efficient querying model to support interactive analysis of the data. Finally, we show the effectiveness of our framework through case studies for the mouse immune system (a dataset focused on a subset of key cellular functions) and a model bacteria (a small genome with high data-completeness).

  13. Coordinated rates of evolution between interacting plastid and nuclear genes in Geraniaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal; Blazier, J Chris; Jansen, Robert K

    2015-03-01

    Although gene coevolution has been widely observed within individuals and between different organisms, rarely has this phenomenon been investigated within a phylogenetic framework. The Geraniaceae is an attractive system in which to study plastid-nuclear genome coevolution due to the highly elevated evolutionary rates in plastid genomes. In plants, the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) is a protein complex composed of subunits encoded by both plastid (rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2) and nuclear genes (sig1-6). We used transcriptome and genomic data for 27 species of Geraniales in a systematic evaluation of coevolution between genes encoding subunits of the PEP holoenzyme. We detected strong correlations of dN (nonsynonymous substitutions) but not dS (synonymous substitutions) within rpoB/sig1 and rpoC2/sig2, but not for other plastid/nuclear gene pairs, and identified the correlation of dN/dS ratio between rpoB/C1/C2 and sig1/5/6, rpoC1/C2 and sig2, and rpoB/C2 and sig3 genes. Correlated rates between interacting plastid and nuclear sequences across the Geraniales could result from plastid-nuclear genome coevolution. Analyses of coevolved amino acid positions suggest that structurally mediated coevolution is not the major driver of plastid-nuclear coevolution. The detection of strong correlation of evolutionary rates between SIG and RNAP genes suggests a plausible explanation for plastome-genome incompatibility in Geraniaceae. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactive effects of antioxidant genes and air pollution on respiratory function and airway disease: a HuGE review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Cosetta; Wei, Igor; Sagoo, Gurdeep; Jarvis, Debbie; Shaheen, Seif; Burney, Peter

    2011-03-15

    Susceptibility to the respiratory effects of air pollution varies between individuals. Although some evidence suggests higher susceptibility for subjects carrying variants of antioxidant genes, findings from gene-pollution interaction studies conflict in terms of the presence and direction of interactions. The authors conducted a systematic review on antioxidant gene-pollution interactions which included 15 studies, with 12 supporting the presence of interactions. For the glutathione S-transferase M1 gene (GSTM1) (n=10 studies), only 1 study found interaction with the null genotype alone, although 5 observed interactions when GSTM1 was evaluated jointly with other genes (mainly NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1)). All studies on the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val polymorphism (n=11) provided some evidence of interaction, but findings conflicted in terms of risk allele. Results were negative for glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) (n=3) and positive for heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX-1) (n=2). Meta-analysis could not be performed because there were insufficient data available for any specific gene-pollutant-outcome combination. Overall the evidence supports the presence of gene-pollution interactions, although which pollutant interacts with which gene is unclear. However, issues regarding multiple testing, selective reporting, and publication bias raise the possibility of false-positive findings. Larger studies with greater accuracy of pollution assessment and improved quality of conduct and reporting are required. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  15. Influenza NA and PB1 Gene Segments Interact during the Formation of Viral Progeny: Localization of the Binding Region within the PB1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Gilbertson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus genome comprises eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs that form individual ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. In order to incorporate a complete set of each of these vRNAs, the virus uses a selective packaging mechanism that facilitates co-packaging of specific gene segments but whose molecular basis is still not fully understood. Recently, we used a competitive transfection model where plasmids encoding the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 and A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn PB1 gene segments were competed to show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment is preferentially co-packaged into progeny virions with the Udorn NA gene segment. Here we created chimeric PB1 genes combining both Udorn and PR8 PB1 sequences to further define the location within the Udorn PB1 gene that drives co-segregation of these genes and show that nucleotides 1776–2070 of the PB1 gene are crucial for preferential selection. In vitro assays examining specific interactions between Udorn NA vRNA and purified vRNAs transcribed from chimeric PB1 genes also supported the importance of this region in the PB1-NA interaction. Hence, this work identifies an association between viral genes that are co-selected during packaging. It also reveals a region potentially important in the RNP-RNP interactions within the supramolecular complex that is predicted to form prior to budding to allow one of each segment to be packaged in the viral progeny. Our study lays the foundation to understand the co-selection of specific genes, which may be critical to the emergence of new viruses with pandemic potential.

  16. Bioinformatics, interaction network analysis, and neural networks to characterize gene expression of radicular cyst and periapical granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswar, Fabiano de Oliveira; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Fraga, Carlos Alberto de Carvalho; Bambirra, Wilson; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Souza; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; D'Angelo, Marcos Flávio Silveira Vasconcelos; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena

    2015-06-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important tool to analyze the large amount of data generated by research in different diseases. In this study, gene expression for radicular cysts (RCs) and periapical granulomas (PGs) was characterized based on a leader gene approach. A validated bioinformatics algorithm was applied to identify leader genes for RCs and PGs. Genes related to RCs and PGs were first identified in PubMed, GenBank, GeneAtlas, and GeneCards databases. The Web-available STRING software (The European Molecular Biology Laboratory [EMBL], Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany) was used in order to build the interaction map among the identified genes by a significance score named weighted number of links. Based on the weighted number of links, genes were clustered using k-means. The genes in the highest cluster were considered leader genes. Multilayer perceptron neural network analysis was used as a complementary supplement for gene classification. For RCs, the suggested leader genes were TP53 and EP300, whereas PGs were associated with IL2RG, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 genes. Our data revealed different gene expression for RCs and PGs, suggesting that not only the inflammatory nature but also other biological processes might differentiate RCs and PGs. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Omics Dashboard for interactive exploration of gene-expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Suzanne; Parker, Karen; Spaulding, Aaron; Tomb, Jean-Francois; O'Maille, Paul; Karp, Peter D

    2017-12-01

    The Omics Dashboard is a software tool for interactive exploration and analysis of gene-expression datasets. The Omics Dashboard is organized as a hierarchy of cellular systems. At the highest level of the hierarchy the Dashboard contains graphical panels depicting systems such as biosynthesis, energy metabolism, regulation and central dogma. Each of those panels contains a series of X-Y plots depicting expression levels of subsystems of that panel, e.g. subsystems within the central dogma panel include transcription, translation and protein maturation and folding. The Dashboard presents a visual read-out of the expression status of cellular systems to facilitate a rapid top-down user survey of how all cellular systems are responding to a given stimulus, and to enable the user to quickly view the responses of genes within specific systems of interest. Although the Dashboard is complementary to traditional statistical methods for analysis of gene-expression data, we show how it can detect changes in gene expression that statistical techniques may overlook. We present the capabilities of the Dashboard using two case studies: the analysis of lipid production for the marine alga Thalassiosira pseudonana, and an investigation of a shift from anaerobic to aerobic growth for the bacterium Escherichia coli. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. In vivo protein-DNA interactions at the β-globin gene locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohru Ikuta; Yuet Wai Kan

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated in vivo protein-DNA interactions in the β-globin gene locus by dimethyl sulfate (DMS) footprinting in K562 cells, which express var-epsilon- and γ-globin but not β-globin. In the locus control region, hypersensitive site 2 (HS-2) exhibited footprints in several putative protein binding motifs. HS-3 was not footprinted. The β promoter was also not footprinted, while extensive footprints were observed in the promoter of the active γ-globin gene. No footprints were seen in the A γ and β3' enhancers. With several motifs, additional protein interactions and alterations in binding patterns occurred with hemin induction. In HeLa cells, some footprints were observed in some of the motifs in HS-2, compatible with the finding that HS-2 has some enhancer function in HeLa cells, albeit much weaker than its activity in K562 cells. No footprint was seen in B lymphocytes. In vivo footprinting is a useful method for studying relevant protein-DNA interactions in erythroid cells

  19. Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yunming; Zhao, Lifeng; Niu, Baixiao; Su, Jing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuanling; Zhang, Qunyu; Guo, Jingxin; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Mei, Mantong; Xia, Jixing; Wang, Lan; Wu, Haibin; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2008-12-02

    Sterility is common in hybrids between divergent populations, such as the indica and japonica subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles of the loci interact at the molecular level. Here we show that a locus for indica-japonica hybrid male sterility, Sa, comprises two adjacent genes, SaM and SaF, encoding a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase-like protein and an F-box protein, respectively. Most indica cultivars contain a haplotype SaM(+)SaF(+), whereas all japonica cultivars have SaM(-)SaF(-) that diverged by nucleotide variations in wild rice. Male semi-sterility in this heterozygous complex locus is caused by abortion of pollen carrying SaM(-). This allele-specific gamete elimination results from a selective interaction of SaF(+) with SaM(-), a truncated protein, but not with SaM(+) because of the presence of an inhibitory domain, although SaM(+) is required for this male sterility. Lack of any one of the three alleles in recombinant plants does not produce male sterility. We propose a two-gene/three-component interaction model for this hybrid male sterility system. The findings have implications for overcoming male sterility in inter-subspecific hybrid rice breeding.

  20. Interaction Effects of BDNF and COMT Genes on Resting-State Brain Activity and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Chunhui; Xia, Mingrui; Wu, Karen; Chen, Chuansheng; He, Qinghua; Xue, Gui; Wang, Wenjing; He, Yong; Dong, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes have been found to interactively influence working memory (WM) as well as brain activation during WM tasks. However, whether the two genes have interactive effects on resting-state activities of the brain and whether these spontaneous activations correlate with WM are still unknown. This study included behavioral data from WM tasks and genetic data (COMT rs4680 and BDNF Val66Met) from 417 healthy Chinese adults and resting-state fMRI data from 298 of them. Significant interactive effects of BDNF and COMT were found for WM performance as well as for resting-state regional homogeneity (ReHo) in WM-related brain areas, including the left medial frontal gyrus (lMeFG), left superior frontal gyrus (lSFG), right superior and medial frontal gyrus (rSMFG), right medial orbitofrontal gyrus (rMOFG), right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG), precuneus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, left superior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule. Simple effects analyses showed that compared to other genotypes, subjects with COMT-VV/BDNF-VV had higher WM and lower ReHo in all five frontal brain areas. The results supported the hypothesis that COMT and BDNF polymorphisms influence WM performance and spontaneous brain activity (i.e., ReHo). PMID:27853425

  1. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A high-resolution gene expression atlas of epistasis between gene-specific transcription factors exposes potential mechanisms for genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameith, Katrin; Amini, Saman; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; van Leenen, Dik; Brok, Mariel; Brabers, Nathalie; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Hooff, Sander R; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Snel, Berend; Holstege, Frank C P; Kemmeren, Patrick

    2015-12-23

    Genetic interactions, or non-additive effects between genes, play a crucial role in many cellular processes and disease. Which mechanisms underlie these genetic interactions has hardly been characterized. Understanding the molecular basis of genetic interactions is crucial in deciphering pathway organization and understanding the relationship between genotype, phenotype and disease. To investigate the nature of genetic interactions between gene-specific transcription factors (GSTFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we systematically analyzed 72 GSTF pairs by gene expression profiling double and single deletion mutants. These pairs were selected through previously published growth-based genetic interactions as well as through similarity in DNA binding properties. The result is a high-resolution atlas of gene expression-based genetic interactions that provides systems-level insight into GSTF epistasis. The atlas confirms known genetic interactions and exposes new ones. Importantly, the data can be used to investigate mechanisms that underlie individual genetic interactions. Two molecular mechanisms are proposed, "buffering by induced dependency" and "alleviation by derepression". These mechanisms indicate how negative genetic interactions can occur between seemingly unrelated parallel pathways and how positive genetic interactions can indirectly expose parallel rather than same-pathway relationships. The focus on GSTFs is important for understanding the transcription regulatory network of yeast as it uncovers details behind many redundancy relationships, some of which are completely new. In addition, the study provides general insight into the complex nature of epistasis and proposes mechanistic models for genetic interactions, the majority of which do not fall into easily recognizable within- or between-pathway relationships.

  3. The genetics of music accomplishment: evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick, David Z; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2015-02-01

    Theories of skilled performance that emphasize training history, such as K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues' deliberate-practice theory, have received a great deal of recent attention in both the scientific literature and the popular press. Twin studies, however, have demonstrated evidence for moderate-to-strong genetic influences on skilled performance. Focusing on musical accomplishment in a sample of over 800 pairs of twins, we found evidence for gene-environment correlation, in the form of a genetic effect on music practice. However, only about one quarter of the genetic effect on music accomplishment was explained by this genetic effect on music practice, suggesting that genetically influenced factors other than practice contribute to individual differences in music accomplishment. We also found evidence for gene-environment interaction, such that genetic effects on music accomplishment were most pronounced among those engaging in music practice, suggesting that genetic potentials for skilled performance are most fully expressed and fostered by practice.

  4. Multiple interactions between maternally-activated signalling pathways control Xenopus nodal-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, Maria; Hilton, Emma; Old, Robert

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the induction of the six Xenopus nodal-related genes, Xnr1-Xnr6, by maternal determinants. The beta-catenin pathway was modelled by stimulation using Xwnt8, activin-like signalling was modelled by activin, and VegT action was studied by overexpression in animal cap explants. Combinations of factors were examined, and previously unrecognised interactions were revealed in animal caps and whole embryos. For the induction of Xnr5 and Xnr6 in whole embryos, using a beta-catenin antisense morpholino oligonucleotide or a dominant negative XTcf3, we have demonstrated an absolute permissive requirement for the beta-catenin/Tcf pathway, in addition to the requirement for VegT action. In animal caps Xnr5 and Xnr6 are induced in response to VegT overexpression, and this induction is dependent upon the concomitant activation of the beta-catenin pathway that VegT initiates in animal caps. For the induction of Xnr3, VegT interacts negatively so as to inhibit the induction otherwise observed with wnt-signalling alone. The negative effect of VegT is not the result of a general inhibition of wnt-signalling, and does not result from an inhibition of wnt-induced siamois expression. A 294 bp proximal promoter fragment of the Xnr3 gene is sufficient to mediate the negative effect of VegT. Further experiments, employing cycloheximide to examine the dependence of Xnr gene expression upon proteins translated after the mid-blastula stage, demonstrated that Xnrs 4, 5 and 6 are 'primary' Xnr genes whose expression in the late blastula is solely dependent upon factors present before the mid-blastula stage.

  5. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Murdoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  6. The Ethics of Translational Science: Imagining Public Benefit in Gene-Environment Interaction Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Ackerman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical research is increasingly informed by expectations of “translation,” which call for the production of scientific knowledge that can be used to create services and products that improve health outcomes. In this paper, we ask how translation, in particular the idea of social responsibility, is understood and enacted in the post-genomic life sciences. Drawing on theories examining what constitutes “good science,” and interviews with 35 investigators who study the role of gene-environment interactions in the etiology of cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, we describe the dynamic and unsettled ethics of translational science through which the expected social value of scientific knowledge about complex disease causation is negotiated. To describe how this ethics is formed, we first discuss the politics of knowledge production in interdisciplinary research collectives. Researchers described a commitment to working across disciplines to examine a wide range of possible causes of disease, but they also pointed to persistent disciplinary and ontological divisions that rest on the dominance of molecular conceptions of disease risk. The privileging of molecular-level causation shapes and constrains the kinds of knowledge that can be created about gene-environment interactions. We then turn to scientists’ ideas about how this knowledge should be used, including personalized prevention strategies, targeted therapeutics, and public policy interventions. Consensus about the relative value of these anticipated translations was elusive, and many scientists agreed that gene-environment interaction research is part of a shift in biomedical research away from considering important social, economic, political and historical causes of disease and disease disparities. We conclude by urging more explicit engagement with questions about the ethics of translational science in the post-genomic life sciences. This would include a consideration

  7. Interactions of adolescent social experiences and dopamine genes to predict physical intimate partner violence perpetration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Schwab-Reese

    Full Text Available We examined the interactions between three dopamine gene alleles (DAT1, DRD2, DRD4 previously associated with violent behavior and two components of the adolescent environment (exposure to violence, school social environment to predict adulthood physical intimate partner violence (IPV perpetration among white men and women.We used data from Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a cohort study following individuals from adolescence to adulthood. Based on the prior literature, we categorized participants as at risk for each of the three dopamine genes using this coding scheme: two 10-R alleles for DAT1; at least one A-1 allele for DRD2; at least one 7-R or 8-R allele for DRD4. Adolescent exposure to violence and school social environment was measured in 1994 and 1995 when participants were in high school or middle school. Intimate partner violence perpetration was measured in 2008 when participants were 24 to 32 years old. We used simple and multivariable logistic regression models, including interactions of genes and the adolescent environments for the analysis.Presence of risk alleles was not independently associated with IPV perpetration but increasing exposure to violence and disconnection from the school social environment was associated with physical IPV perpetration. The effects of these adolescent experiences on physical IPV perpetration varied by dopamine risk allele status. Among individuals with non-risk dopamine alleles, increased exposure to violence during adolescence and perception of disconnection from the school environment were significantly associated with increased odds of physical IPV perpetration, but individuals with high risk alleles, overall, did not experience the same increase.Our results suggested the effects of adolescent environment on adulthood physical IPV perpetration varied by genetic factors. This analysis did not find a direct link between risk alleles and violence, but

  8. Adult onset asthma and interaction between genes and active tobacco smoking: The GABRIEL consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J M Vonk

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have identified novel genetic associations for asthma, but without taking into account the role of active tobacco smoking. This study aimed to identify novel genes that interact with ever active tobacco smoking in adult onset asthma.We performed a genome-wide interaction analysis in six studies participating in the GABRIEL consortium following two meta-analyses approaches based on 1 the overall interaction effect and 2 the genetic effect in subjects with and without smoking exposure. We performed a discovery meta-analysis including 4,057 subjects of European descent and replicated our findings in an independent cohort (LifeLines Cohort Study, including 12,475 subjects.First approach: 50 SNPs were selected based on an overall interaction effect at p<10-4. The most pronounced interaction effect was observed for rs9969775 on chromosome 9 (discovery meta-analysis: ORint = 0.50, p = 7.63*10-5, replication: ORint = 0.65, p = 0.02. Second approach: 35 SNPs were selected based on the overall genetic effect in exposed subjects (p <10-4. The most pronounced genetic effect was observed for rs5011804 on chromosome 12 (discovery meta-analysis ORint = 1.50, p = 1.21*10-4; replication: ORint = 1.40, p = 0.03.Using two genome-wide interaction approaches, we identified novel polymorphisms in non-annotated intergenic regions on chromosomes 9 and 12, that showed suggestive evidence for interaction with active tobacco smoking in the onset of adult asthma.

  9. Variable Persister Gene Interactions with (pppGpp for Persister Formation in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Persisters comprise a group of phenotypically heterogeneous metabolically quiescent bacteria with multidrug tolerance and contribute to the recalcitrance of chronic infections. Although recent work has shown that toxin-antitoxin (TA system HipAB depends on stringent response effector (pppGppin persister formation, whether other persister pathways are also dependent on stringent response has not been explored. Here we examined the relationship of (pppGpp with 15 common persister genes (dnaK, clpB, rpoS, pspF, tnaA, sucB, ssrA, smpB, recA, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ using Escherichia coli as a model. By comparing the persister levels of wild type with their single gene knockout and double knockout mutants with relA, we divided their interactions into five types, namely A “dependent” (dnaK, recA, B “positive reinforcement” (rpoS, pspF, ssrA, recA, C “antagonistic” (clpB, sucB, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ, D “epistasis” (clpB, rpoS, tnaA, ssrA, smpB, hipA, and E “irrelevant” (dnaK, clpB, rpoS, tnaA, sucB, smpB, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ. We found that the persister gene interactions are intimately dependent on bacterial culture age, cell concentrations (diluted versus undiluted culture, and drug classifications, where the same gene may belong to different groups with varying antibiotics, culture age or cell concentrations. Together, this study represents the first attempt to systematically characterize the intricate relationships among the different mechanisms of persistence and as such provide new insights into the complexity of the persistence phenomenon at the level of persister gene network interactions.

  10. Interaction of two photoreceptors in the regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, Sebastian; Haberzettl, Kerstin; Frühwirth, Sebastian; Teich, Kristin; Hasewinkel, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The expression of photosynthesis genes in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the oxygen tension and by light quantity. Two photoreceptor proteins, AppA and CryB, have been identified in the past, which are involved in this regulation. AppA senses light by its N-terminal BLUF domain, its C-terminal part binds heme and is redox-responsive. Through its interaction to the transcriptional repressor PpsR the AppA photoreceptor controls expression of ...

  11. GeneWiz browser: An Interactive Tool for Visualizing Sequenced Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Rotenberg, Eva

    2009-01-01

    , standard atlases are pre-generated for all prokaryotic genomes available in GenBank, providing a fast overview of all available genomes, including recently deposited genome sequences. The tool is available online from http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/gwBrowser. [Supplemental material including interactive...... atlases is available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/gwBrowser/suppl/]....... readability and increased functionality compared to other browsers. The tool allows the user to select the display of various genomic features, color setting and data ranges. Custom numerical data can be added to the plot, allowing for example visualization of gene expression and regulation data. Further...

  12. Implementation of multiple intelligences theory in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakić-Mirić, Natasa

    2010-01-01

    Theory of multiple intelligences (MI) is considered an innovation in learning the English language because it helps students develop all eight intelligences that, on the other hand, represent ways people understand the world around them, solve problems and learn. They are: verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial, bodily/kinaesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, intrapersonal and naturalist. Also, by focusing on the problem-solving activities, teachers, by implementing theory of multiple intelligences, encourage students not only to build their existing language knowledge but also learn new content and skills. The objective of this study has been to determine the importance of implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School. Ways in which the theory of multiple intelligences has been implemented in the English language course syllabus particularly in one lecture for junior year students of pharmacy in the University of Nis Medical School. The English language final exam results from February 2009 when compared with the final exam results from June 2007 prior to the implementation of MI theory showed the following: out of 80 junior year students of pharmacy, 40 obtained grade 10 (outstanding), 16 obtained grade 9 (excellent), 11 obtained grade 8 (very good), 4 obtained grade 7 (good) and 9 obtained grade 6 (pass). No student failed. The implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School has had a positive impact on learning the English language and has increased students' interest in language learning. Genarally speaking, this theory offers better understanding of students' intelligence and greater appreciation of their strengths. It provides numerous opportunities for students to use and develop all eight intelligences not just the few they excel in prior to enrolling in a

  13. The assessment of different models to predict solar module temperature, output power and efficiency for Nis, Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantic, Lana S.; Pavlović, Tomislav M.; Milosavljević, Dragana D.; Radonjic, Ivana S.; Radovic, Miodrag K.; Sazhko, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Five different models for calculating solar module temperature, output power and efficiency for sunny days with different solar radiation intensities and ambient temperatures are assessed in this paper. Thereafter, modeled values are compared to the experimentally obtained values for the horizontal solar module in Nis, Serbia. The criterion for determining the best model was based on the statistical analysis and the agreement between the calculated and the experimental values. The calculated values of solar module temperature are in good agreement with the experimentally obtained ones, with some variations over and under the measured values. The best agreement between calculated and experimentally obtained values was for summer months with high solar radiation intensity. The nonlinear model for calculating the output power is much better than the linear model and at the same time predicts better the total electrical energy generated by the solar module during the day. The nonlinear model for calculating the solar module efficiency predicts the efficiency higher than the STC (Standard Test Conditions) value of solar module efficiency for all conditions, while the linear model predicts the solar module efficiency very well. This paper provides a simple and efficient guideline to estimate relevant parameters of a monocrystalline silicon solar module under the moderate-continental climate conditions. - Highlights: • Linear model for solar module temperature gives accurate predictions for August. • The nonlinear model better predicts the solar module power than the linear model. • For calculating solar module power for Nis we propose the nonlinear model. • For calculating solar model efficiency for Nis we propose adoption of linear model. • The adopted models can be used for calculations throughout the year.

  14. Chemical-Gene Interactions from ToxCast Bioactivity Data Expands Universe of Literature Network-Based Associations (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in the literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets....

  15. Environmental and gene-environment interactions and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Deane, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors including hormones, dietary factors, infections and exposure to tobacco smoke as well as gene-environment interactions have been associated with increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Importantly, the growing understanding of the prolonged period prior to the first onset of symptoms of RA suggests that these environmental and genetic factors are likely acting to drive the development of RA-related autoimmunity long before the appearance of the first joint symptoms and clinical findings that are characteristic of RA. Herein we will review these factors and interactions, especially those that have been investigated in a prospective fashion prior to the symptomatic onset of RA. We will also discuss how these factors may be explored in future study to further the understanding of the pathogenesis of RA, and ultimately perhaps develop preventive measures for this disease. PMID:22819092

  16. Comparison of NiS2 and α-NiS hollow spheres for supercapacitors, non-enzymatic glucose sensors and water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengzhen; Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Yanyan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yazhou; Du, Weimin; Pang, Huan

    2015-10-21

    NiS2 hollow spheres are successfully prepared by a one-step template free method. Meanwhile, α-NiS hollow spheres can also be synthesized via the calcination of the pre-obtained NiS2 hollow spheres at 400 °C for 1 h in air. The electrochemical performances of the as-prepared NiS2 and α-NiS hollow sphere products are evaluated. When used for supercapacitors, compared with NiS2 hollow spheres, the α-NiS hollow sphere electrode shows a large specific capacitance of 717.3 F g(-1) at 0.6 A g(-1) and a good cycle life. Furthermore, NiS2 and α-NiS hollow spheres are successfully applied to fabricate non-enzymatic glucose sensors. In particular, the α-NiS hollow spheres exhibit good catalytic activity for the oxidation of glucose, a fast amperometric response time of less than 5 s, and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.08 μM. More importantly, compared with other normally co-existing interfering species, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine, the electrode modified with α-NiS hollow spheres shows good selectivity. Moreover, the α-NiS hollow spheres also present good capacity to remove Congo red organic pollutants from wastewater by their surface adsorption ability.

  17. L-cysteine-assisted synthesis of hierarchical NiS2 hollow spheres supported carbon nitride as photocatalysts with enhanced lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhang; Jiang, Zhifeng; Chen, Linlin; Qian, Kun; Xie, Jimin

    2017-03-01

    Novel hierarchical NiS2 hollow spheres modified by graphite-like carbon nitride were prepared using a facile L-cysteine-assisted solvothermal route. The NiS2/g-C3N4 composites exhibited excellent photocatalytic efficiency in rhodamine B, methyl orange and ciprofloxacin degradation as compared to single g-C3N4 and NiS2, which could be due to the synergistic effects of the unique hollow sphere-like structure, strong visible-light absorption and increased separation rate of the photoinduced electron-hole pairs at the intimate interface of heterojunctions. A suitable combination of g-C3N4 with NiS2 showed the best photocatalytic performance. In addition, an electron spin resonance and trapping experiment demonstrated that the photogenerated hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals were the two main photoactive species in photocatalysis. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of NiS2/g-C3N4 composites under visible light irradiation is also proposed. The strategy presented here can be extended to a general strategy for constructing 3D/2D heterostructured photocatalysts for broad applications in photocatalysis.

  18. Melanopsin gene variations interact with season to predict sleep onset and chronotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wong, Patricia M; Franzen, Peter L; Hasler, Brant P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Miller, Megan A; Kepreos, Kyle M; Ferrell, Robert E; Manuck, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    The human melanopsin gene has been reported to mediate risk for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is hypothesized to be caused by decreased photic input during winter when light levels fall below threshold, resulting in differences in circadian phase and/or sleep. However, it is unclear if melanopsin increases risk of SAD by causing differences in sleep or circadian phase, or if those differences are symptoms of the mood disorder. To determine if melanopsin sequence variations are associated with differences in sleep-wake behavior among those not suffering from a mood disorder, the authors tested associations between melanopsin gene polymorphisms and self-reported sleep timing (sleep onset and wake time) in a community sample (N = 234) of non-Hispanic Caucasian participants (age 30-54 yrs) with no history of psychological, neurological, or sleep disorders. The authors also tested the effect of melanopsin variations on differences in preferred sleep and activity timing (i.e., chronotype), which may reflect differences in circadian phase, sleep homeostasis, or both. Daylength on the day of assessment was measured and included in analyses. DNA samples were genotyped for melanopsin gene polymorphisms using fluorescence polarization. P10L genotype interacted with daylength to predict self-reported sleep onset (interaction p sleep onset among those with the TT genotype was later in the day when individuals were assessed on longer days and earlier in the day on shorter days, whereas individuals in the other genotype groups (i.e., CC and CT) did not show this interaction effect. P10L genotype also interacted in an analogous way with daylength to predict self-reported morningness (interaction p sleep onset and chronotype as a function of daylength, whereas other genotypes at P10L do not seem to have effects that vary by daylength. A better understanding of how melanopsin confers heightened responsivity to daylength may improve our understanding of a broad range of

  19. An environmental analysis of genes associated with schizophrenia: hypoxia and vascular factors as interacting elements in the neurodevelopmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; van Os, J; Esquivel, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F

    2012-12-01

    Investigating and understanding gene-environment interaction (G × E) in a neurodevelopmentally and biologically plausible manner is a major challenge for schizophrenia research. Hypoxia during neurodevelopment is one of several environmental factors related to the risk of schizophrenia, and links between schizophrenia candidate genes and hypoxia regulation or vascular expression have been proposed. Given the availability of a wealth of complex genetic information on schizophrenia in the literature without knowledge on the connections to environmental factors, we now systematically collected genes from candidate studies (using SzGene), genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses, and then applied four criteria to test for a (theoretical) link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. In all, 55% of the schizophrenia candidate genes (n=42 genes) met the criteria for a link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. Genes associated with schizophrenia showed a significant, threefold enrichment among genes that were derived from microarray studies of the ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) in the brain. Thus, the finding of a considerable match between genes associated with the risk of schizophrenia and IHR and/or vascular factors is reproducible. An additional survey of genes identified by GWAS and CNV analyses suggested novel genes that match the criteria. Findings for interactions between specific variants of genes proposed to be IHR and/or vascular factors with obstetric complications in patients with schizophrenia have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the extended gene set defined here may form a reasonable and evidence-based starting point for hypothesis-based testing of G × E interactions in clinical genetic and translational neuroscience studies.

  20. ReliefSeq: a gene-wise adaptive-K nearest-neighbor feature selection tool for finding gene-gene interactions and main effects in mRNA-Seq gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    Full Text Available Relief-F is a nonparametric, nearest-neighbor machine learning method that has been successfully used to identify relevant variables that may interact in complex multivariate models to explain phenotypic variation. While several tools have been developed for assessing differential expression in sequence-based transcriptomics, the detection of statistical interactions between transcripts has received less attention in the area of RNA-seq analysis. We describe a new extension and assessment of Relief-F for feature selection in RNA-seq data. The ReliefSeq implementation adapts the number of nearest neighbors (k for each gene to optimize the Relief-F test statistics (importance scores for finding both main effects and interactions. We compare this gene-wise adaptive-k (gwak Relief-F method with standard RNA-seq feature selection tools, such as DESeq and edgeR, and with the popular machine learning method Random Forests. We demonstrate performance on a panel of simulated data that have a range of distributional properties reflected in real mRNA-seq data including multiple transcripts with varying sizes of main effects and interaction effects. For simulated main effects, gwak-Relief-F feature selection performs comparably to standard tools DESeq and edgeR for ranking relevant transcripts. For gene-gene interactions, gwak-Relief-F outperforms all comparison methods at ranking relevant genes in all but the highest fold change/highest signal situations where it performs similarly. The gwak-Relief-F algorithm outperforms Random Forests for detecting relevant genes in all simulation experiments. In addition, Relief-F is comparable to the other methods based on computational time. We also apply ReliefSeq to an RNA-Seq study of smallpox vaccine to identify gene expression changes between vaccinia virus-stimulated and unstimulated samples. ReliefSeq is an attractive tool for inclusion in the suite of tools used for analysis of mRNA-Seq data; it has power to

  1. Effect of Gene and Physical Activity Interaction on Trunk Fat Percentage Among the Newfoundland Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Payne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of FTO gene and physical activity interaction on trunk fat percentage. Design and Methods Subjects are 3,004 individuals from Newfoundland and Labrador whose trunk fat percentage and physical activity were recorded, and who were genotyped for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the FTO gene. Subjects were stratified by gender. Multiple tests and multiple regressions were used to analyze the effects of physical activity, variants of FTO , age, and their interactions on trunk fat percentage. Dietary information and other environmental factors were not considered. Results Higher levels of physical activity tend to reduce trunk fat percentage in all individuals. Furthermore, in males, rs9939609 and rs1421085 were significant (α = 0.05 in explaining central body fat, but no SNPs were significant in females. For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity. The other SNPs examined were not significant in explaining trunk fat percentage. Conclusions Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles. The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

  2. Gene-Environment Interaction Research and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chouliaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD remains largely unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that gene-environment interactions (GxE may play a crucial role in its development and progression. Whereas various susceptibility loci have been identified, like the apolipoprotein E4 allele, these cannot fully explain the increasing prevalence of AD observed with aging. In addition to such genetic risk factors, various environmental factors have been proposed to alter the risk of developing AD as well as to affect the rate of cognitive decline in AD patients. Nevertheless, aside from the independent effects of genetic and environmental risk factors, their synergistic participation in increasing the risk of developing AD has been sparsely investigated, even though evidence points towards such a direction. Advances in the genetic manipulation of mice, modeling various aspects of the AD pathology, have provided an excellent tool to dissect the effects of genes, environment, and their interactions. In this paper we present several environmental factors implicated in the etiology of AD that have been tested in transgenic animal models of the disease. The focus lies on the concept of GxE and its importance in a multifactorial disease like AD. Additionally, possible mediating mechanisms and future challenges are discussed.

  3. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  4. The dopamine D2 receptor gene, perceived parental support, and adolescent loneliness : longitudinal evidence for gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods:

  5. The feasibility of using a baculovirus vector to deliver the sodium-iodide symporter gene as a reporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiang; Li Biao; Wang Jun; Yin Hongyan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang Yifan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025 (China)], E-mail: zhangyifan1992@yahoo.com.cn

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of baculovirus vectors in transducing FTC-133 cells and to examine the feasibility of using baculovirus vectors for the delivery of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter through co-transduction to monitor the expression of the target gene. Method: Two recombinant baculoviruses were constructed to express NIS and green fluorescent protein (GFP) respectively. FTC-133, 8050C, SW1116, A549 cells, were infected with Bac-GFP. The infection efficiency of Bac-GFP and the intensity of fluorescence, in either the presence or absence of sodium butyrate, were monitored by flow cytometry. The iodine uptake by FTC-133 cells infected with Bac-NIS was measured using a {gamma} counter. FTC-133 cells were infected with a mixture of equal amounts of Bac-NIS and Bac-GFP at different setting of multiplicity of infection (MOI). The changes of GFP fluorescence intensity and iodine uptake were monitored 24 h after infection in the coinfected cells. Results: We have successfully constructed recombinant baculoviruses carrying NIS and GFP under the control of the cytomegalovirus IE-1 promoter. We found that transduced efficiency of baculovirus in 8505C, SW1116, A549 cells are low in absence of sodium butyrate. Yet Bac-GFP infects FTC-133 cells at a high efficiency, 77.67%, 85.57% and 93.23% with MOI of 100, 200 and 400, respectively. The fluorescence intensity of the Bac-GFP infected tumor cells correlated positively with the MOI of the virus. Sodium butyrate induction increased both the infection efficiency and the fluorescence intensity, but increase of infection efficiency was insignificant in FTC-133 cells. Reporter gene (GFP) expression in FTC-133 is stable within 7 days after infection. The radioactivity incorporated by the tumor cells infected with Bac-NIS correlated positively with the MOI of Bac-NIS as well. In tumor cells co-infected with Bac-NIS and Bac-GFP, the amount of radioactivity incorporated significantly correlated with

  6. Developmental and genetic modulation of arsenic biotransformation: A gene by environment interaction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza, Mercedes; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2007-01-01

    The complexity of arsenic toxicology has confounded the identification of specific pathways of disease causation. One focal point of arsenic research is aimed at fully characterizing arsenic biotransformation in humans, a process that appears to be quite variable, producing a mixture of several arsenic species with greatly differing toxic potencies. In an effort to characterize genetic determinants of variability in arsenic biotransformation, a genetic association study of 135 subjects in western Sonora, Mexico was performed by testing 23 polymorphic sites in three arsenic biotransformation candidate genes. One gene, arsenic 3 methyltransferase (AS3MT), was strongly associated with the ratio of urinary dimethylarsinic acid to monomethylarsonic acid (D/M) in children (7-11 years) but not in adults (18-79 years). Subsequent analyses revealed that the high D/M values associated with variant AS3MT alleles were primarily due to lower levels of monomethylarsonic acid as percent of total urinary arsenic (%MMA5). In light of several reports of arsenic-induced disease being associated with relatively high %MMA5 levels, these findings raise the possibility that variant AS3MT individuals may suffer less risk from arsenic exposure than non-variant individuals. These analyses also provide evidence that, in this population, regardless of AS3MT variant status, children tend to have lower %MMA5 values than adults, suggesting that the global developmental regulation of arsenic biotransformation may interact with genetic variants in metabolic genes to result in novel genetic effects such as those in this report

  7. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Miyake, Katsuhide, E-mail: miyake@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Iijima, Shinji [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  8. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  9. Computational modeling identifies key gene regulatory interactions underlying phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Unterberger, Elif B.; Goodman, Jay I.; Schwarz, Michael; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory interactions underlying the early stages of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we have identified key candidate regulators of phenobarbital (PB)-mediated mouse liver tumorigenesis, a well-characterized model of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis, by applying a new computational modeling approach to a comprehensive collection of in vivo gene expression studies. We have combined our previously developed motif activity response analysis (MARA), which models gene expression patterns in terms of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites with singular value decomposition (SVD) of the inferred motif activities, to disentangle the roles that different transcriptional regulators play in specific biological pathways of tumor promotion. Furthermore, transgenic mouse models enabled us to identify which of these regulatory activities was downstream of constitutive androstane receptor and β-catenin signaling, both crucial components of PB-mediated liver tumorigenesis. We propose novel roles for E2F and ZFP161 in PB-mediated hepatocyte proliferation and suggest that PB-mediated suppression of ESR1 activity contributes to the development of a tumor-prone environment. Our study shows that combining MARA with SVD allows for automated identification of independent transcription regulatory programs within a complex in vivo tissue environment and provides novel mechanistic insights into PB-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24464994

  10. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora; Chiș, Adina; Vulturar, Romana; Dobrean, Anca; Cândea, Diana Mirela; Miu, Andrei C

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people's preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR) on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology.

  11. False positive reduction in protein-protein interaction predictions using gene ontology annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yen-Han

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many crucial cellular operations such as metabolism, signalling, and regulations are based on protein-protein interactions. However, the lack of robust protein-protein interaction information is a challenge. One reason for the lack of solid protein-protein interaction information is poor agreement between experimental findings and computational sets that, in turn, comes from huge false positive predictions in computational approaches. Reduction of false positive predictions and enhancing true positive fraction of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction datasets based on highly confident experimental results has not been adequately investigated. Results Gene Ontology (GO annotations were used to reduce false positive protein-protein interactions (PPI pairs resulting from computational predictions. Using experimentally obtained PPI pairs as a training dataset, eight top-ranking keywords were extracted from GO molecular function annotations. The sensitivity of these keywords is 64.21% in the yeast experimental dataset and 80.83% in the worm experimental dataset. The specificities, a measure of recovery power, of these keywords applied to four predicted PPI datasets for each studied organisms, are 48.32% and 46.49% (by average of four datasets in yeast and worm, respectively. Based on eight top-ranking keywords and co-localization of interacting proteins a set of two knowledge rules were deduced and applied to remove false positive protein pairs. The 'strength', a measure of improvement provided by the rules was defined based on the signal-to-noise ratio and implemented to measure the applicability of knowledge rules applying to the predicted PPI datasets. Depending on the employed PPI-predicting methods, the strength varies between two and ten-fold of randomly removing protein pairs from the datasets. Conclusion Gene Ontology annotations along with the deduced knowledge rules could be implemented to partially

  12. Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study Identifies Glutamate Receptor Gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's Disease Modifier Gene via Interaction with Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H.; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M.; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I.; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W.; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K.; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P2df = 10−6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10−7) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that “Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers” was confirmed: ORReplication = 0.59, PReplication = 10−3; ORPooled = 0.51, PPooled = 7×10−8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10−3), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10−13). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P2dfcoffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify genes that

  13. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Taye H; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Rhodes, Shannon L; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df) = 10(-6), GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10(-7)) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication) = 0.59, P(Replication) = 10(-3); OR(Pooled) = 0.51, P(Pooled) = 7×10(-8). Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10(-3)), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10(-13)). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df)coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify

  14. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taye H Hamza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD. We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC, and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS, testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df = 10(-6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR = 0.43; P = 6×10(-7 but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication = 0.59, P(Replication = 10(-3; OR(Pooled = 0.51, P(Pooled = 7×10(-8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P = 3×10(-3, whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P = 6×10(-13. Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df<5×10(-8 in GWAIS, and OR = 0.41, P = 3×10(-8 in heavy coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of

  15. APOA2, dietary fat and body mass index: replication of a gene-diet interaction in three independent populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Nutrigenetics studies the role of genetic variation on interactions between diet and health aimed at providing more personalized dietary advice. However, replication has been very low and our aim was to study the interaction between a functional polymorphism of the APOA2 gene, food intak...

  16. Identifying genes involved in the interaction of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with Maillard reaction products (MRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaha, Raniah Abdulmohsen

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycelemcomitcrns is a gram-negative bacterium that is a facultative anaerobe which can grow in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The bacteria cause localized aggressive periodontitis that can result in the loss of teeth and endocarditis, which is an infection of the heart valves. A rich medium is an essential requirement for its growth. There arc some difficulties associated with growing the bacteria as they easily switch from the rough to smooth phenotype under no specific conditions. The bacteria start to lose viability after about 19 hours of growth in broth or about three days on plates. Colonies in the dense part of the streak on plates die earlier. It was shown that acid secreted by the colonies is responsible for the loss of viability as the bacteria are extremely sensitive to low pH. Autoclaving the growth medium for A. actinomycetemcomitans causes the bacteria to grow slowly because of the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). A method has been developed to make the A. actinomycetemcomitans growth medium using the microwave instead of the autoclave. This method produces much less of the inhibitory product since the heating time is only six minutes, compared to more than an hour when using the autoclave. Two approaches were sought in this research. The first approach was the identification of genes responsible for the interaction between the MRP and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The gene responsible for this interaction was found to be a Lys M protein which is found in many genes responsible for the cell wall integrity. The second approach was to develop a new drug made of glucose and lysine with a minimum inhibitory concentration as 75mM.

  17. Gene-environment interactions linking air pollution and inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Lill, Christina M; Bertram, Lars; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate

    2016-11-01

    Both air pollution exposure and systemic inflammation have been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). In the PASIDA study, 408 incident cases of PD diagnosed in 2006-2009 and their 495 population controls were interviewed and provided DNA samples. Markers of long term traffic related air pollution measures were derived from geographic information systems (GIS)-based modeling. Furthermore, we genotyped functional polymorphisms in genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines, namely rs1800629 in TNFα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) and rs16944 in IL1B (interleukin-1β). In logistic regression models, long-term exposure to NO 2 increased PD risk overall (odds ratio (OR)=1.06 per 2.94μg/m 3 increase, 95% CI=1.00-1.13). The OR for PD in individuals with high NO 2 exposure (≧75th percentile) and the AA genotype of IL1B rs16944 was 3.10 (95% CI=1.14-8.38) compared with individuals with lower NO 2 exposure (<75th percentile) and the GG genotype. The interaction term was nominally significant on the multiplicative scale (p=0.01). We did not find significant gene-environment interactions with TNF rs1800629. Our finds may provide suggestive evidence that a combination of traffic-related air pollution and genetic variation in the proinflammatory cytokine gene IL1B contribute to risk of developing PD. However, as statistical evidence was only modest in this large sample we cannot rule out that these results represent a chance finding, and additional replication efforts are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms and gene-gene interactions with the lipoprotein(a)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解惠坚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of 10 singlenucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPARs)gene with lipoprotein(a)level,and to investigate if there is gene-gene interaction among the SNPs on lipoprotein(a)level.Methods Totally 644 subjects(234 men and 410 women)were enrolled from Prevention of Multiple Metabolic Disorders and Metabolic Syndrome Study Cohort,which was an urban community survey study conducted in Jiangsu province.Ten SNPs in PPARα(rs135539,rs4253778,

  19. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo, E-mail: libochen888@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo Guoying [Xinyuan Institute of Medicine and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe [Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated {sup 125}I{sup -} up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T{sub 1/2eff} of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or {sup 131}I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%{+-}2.5%, 43.4%{+-}2.8% and 8.6%{+-}1.2% after exposure to {sup 131}I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  20. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Libo; Guo Guoying; Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe; Zhu Ruisen

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated 125 I - up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T 1/2eff of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or 131 I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%±2.5%, 43.4%±2.8% and 8.6%±1.2% after exposure to 131 I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  1. RINT-1 interacts with MSP58 within nucleoli and plays a role in ribosomal gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chuan-Pin; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Chiang, Chi-Wu; Wang, Ju-Ming; Hsu, Che-Chia

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is the cellular site of ribosomal (r)DNA transcription and ribosome biogenesis. The 58-kDa microspherule protein (MSP58) is a nucleolar protein involved in rDNA transcription and cell proliferation. However, regulation of MSP58-mediated rDNA transcription remains unknown. Using a yeast two-hybrid system with MSP58 as bait, we isolated complementary (c)DNA encoding Rad50-interacting protein 1 (RINT-1), as a MSP58-binding protein. RINT-1 was implicated in the cell cycle checkpoint, membrane trafficking, Golgi apparatus and centrosome dynamic integrity, and telomere length control. Both in vitro and in vivo interaction assays showed that MSP58 directly interacts with RINT-1. Interestingly, microscopic studies revealed the co-localization of MSP58, RINT-1, and the upstream binding factor (UBF), a rRNA transcription factor, in the nucleolus. We showed that ectopic expression of MSP58 or RINT-1 resulted in decreased rRNA expression and rDNA promoter activity, whereas knockdown of MSP58 or RINT-1 by siRNA exerted the opposite effect. Coexpression of MSP58 and RINT-1 robustly decreased rRNA synthesis compared to overexpression of either protein alone, whereas depletion of RINT-1 from MSP58-transfected cells enhanced rRNA synthesis. We also found that MSP58, RINT-1, and the UBF were associated with the rDNA promoter using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Because aberrant ribosome biogenesis contributes to neoplastic transformation, our results revealed a novel protein complex involved in the regulation of rRNA gene expression, suggesting a role for MSP58 and RINT-1 in cancer development. - Highlights: • RINT-1 is a novel MSP58-interacting protein. • RINT-1 is a nucleolar protein that suppresses ribosomal RNA gene transcription. • RINT-1 and MSP58 cooperate to suppress ribosomal RNA gene transcription. • RINT-1, MSP58, and UBF form a complex on the rDNA promoter.

  2. Identification of T1D susceptibility genes within the MHC region by combining protein interaction networks and SNP genotyping data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2009-01-01

    genes. We have developed a novel method that combines single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping data with protein-protein interaction (ppi) networks to identify disease-associated network modules enriched for proteins encoded from the MHC region. Approximately 2500 SNPs located in the 4 Mb MHC......To develop novel methods for identifying new genes that contribute to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6, independently of the known linkage disequilibrium (LD) between human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1...... region were analysed in 1000 affected offspring trios generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). The most associated SNP in each gene was chosen and genes were mapped to ppi networks for identification of interaction partners. The association testing and resulting interacting protein...

  3. Size-dependent and intra-band photoluminescence of NiS2 nano-alloys synthesized by microwave assisted hydrothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linganiso, Ella Cebisa; Mhlanga, Sabelo Dalton; Coville, Neil John; Mwakikunga, Bonex Wakufwa

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Unexpected ultra-violet (UV) emission as well as near infra-red (IR) emissions were attributed to intra-band energy state transitions that occur as a result of the porous structure of the material. Enhanced UV and near IR PL emissions due to the smaller crystallite size of the capped NiS 2 nanostructures was also observed. Band energy and local density of states calculation for NiS 2 were used to support the experimentally observed luminescence results. The luminescence features at wavelengths of 400 nm (3.10 eV), 428 nm (2.90 eV), 447 nm (2.77 eV) and 464 nm (2.67) can be attributed to some of those electrons de-exciting from S (3p) levels down to the Ni (3d) (blue to UV emission) whereas those features at wavelengths of 710 nm (1.75 eV), 751 nm (1.65 eV), 754 nm (1.64 eV) [NiS 2 /HDA-capped NiS 2 ] and 784 nm (1.58 eV) respectively seem to result from de-excitations between either Ni(3d) or S (3s, 3p) levels and Ni–S hybridization levels (red to near IR emission). Highlights: ► Rapid solid state alloying of Ni and S from their liquid state precursor by microwaves. ► New photoluminescence data of NiS 2 system. ► Unexpected luminescence in the UV–Visible and near IR ranges for such a metal matrix alloy. ► Explanation of NiS 2 photoluminescence from ab initio calculations by electronic energy band structure and density of states. -- Abstract: Synthesis of nickel disulfide (NiS 2 ) nano-alloys capped and uncapped with hexadecylamine (HDA) was carried out. A cubic phase NiS 2 formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. An average crystallite size of 35 nm was obtained for the uncapped nanostructures and 9 nm was obtained for the capped nanostructures estimated using the Scherrer equation. Unexpected ultra-violet (UV) emission as well as near infrared (IR) emissions were attributed to intra-band energy state transitions that occur as a result of the porous structure of the material. Enhanced UV and near IR PL emissions

  4. Lack of evidence for intermolecular epistatic interactions between adiponectin and resistin gene polymorphisms in Malaysian male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cia-Hin Lau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epistasis (gene-gene interaction is a ubiquitous component of the genetic architecture of complex traits such as susceptibility to common human diseases. Given the strong negative correlation between circulating adiponectin and resistin levels, the potential intermolecular epistatic interactions between ADIPOQ (SNP+45T > G, SNP+276G > T, SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G and RETN (SNP-420C > G and SNP+299G > A gene polymorphisms in the genetic risk underlying type 2 diabetes (T2DM and metabolic syndrome (MS were assessed. The potential mutual influence of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels was also examined. The rare homozygous genotype (risk alleles of SNP-420C > G at the RETN locus tended to be co-inherited together with the common homozygous genotypes (protective alleles of SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G at the ADIPOQ locus. Despite the close structural relationship between the ADIPOQ and RETN genes, there was no evidence of an intermolecular epistatic interaction between these genes. There was also no reciprocal effect of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels, i.e., ADIPOQ did not affect resistin levels nor did RETN affect adiponectin levels. The possible influence of the ADIPOQ gene on RETN expression warrants further investigation.

  5. Interactions Between Variation in Candidate Genes and Environmental Factors in the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Stramecki, Filip; Gawęda, Łukasz; Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Frydecka, Dorota

    2017-08-18

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) are complex and multidimensional disorders with high heritability rates. The contribution of genetic factors to the etiology of these disorders is increasingly being recognized as the action of multiple risk variants with small effect sizes, which might explain only a minor part of susceptibility. On the other site, numerous environmental factors have been found to play an important role in their causality. Therefore, in recent years, several studies focused on gene × environment interactions that are believed to bridge the gap between genetic underpinnings and environmental insults. In this article, we performed a systematic review of studies investigating gene × environment interactions in BD and schizophrenia spectrum phenotypes. In the majority of studies from this field, interacting effects of variation in genes encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5) have been explored. Almost consistently, these studies revealed that polymorphisms in COMT, BDNF, and FKBP5 genes might interact with early life stress and cannabis abuse or dependence, influencing various outcomes of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and BD. Other interactions still require further replication in larger clinical and non-clinical samples. In addition, future studies should address the direction of causality and potential mechanisms of the relationship between gene × environment interactions and various categories of outcomes in schizophrenia and BD.

  6. Synergistic interactions between Drosophila orthologues of genes spanned by de novo human CNVs support multiple-hit models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Stuart J; Liu, Ji-Long; Webber, Caleb

    2015-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable and characterised by deficits in social interaction and communication, as well as restricted and repetitive behaviours. Although a number of highly penetrant ASD gene variants have been identified, there is growing evidence to support a causal role for combinatorial effects arising from the contributions of multiple loci. By examining synaptic and circadian neurological phenotypes resulting from the dosage variants of unique human:fly orthologues in Drosophila, we observe numerous synergistic interactions between pairs of informatically-identified candidate genes whose orthologues are jointly affected by large de novo copy number variants (CNVs). These CNVs were found in the genomes of individuals with autism, including a patient carrying a 22q11.2 deletion. We first demonstrate that dosage alterations of the unique Drosophila orthologues of candidate genes from de novo CNVs that harbour only a single candidate gene display neurological defects similar to those previously reported in Drosophila models of ASD-associated variants. We then considered pairwise dosage changes within the set of orthologues of candidate genes that were affected by the same single human de novo CNV. For three of four CNVs with complete orthologous relationships, we observed significant synergistic effects following the simultaneous dosage change of gene pairs drawn from a single CNV. The phenotypic variation observed at the Drosophila synapse that results from these interacting genetic variants supports a concordant phenotypic outcome across all interacting gene pairs following the direction of human gene copy number change. We observe both specificity and transitivity between interactors, both within and between CNV candidate gene sets, supporting shared and distinct genetic aetiologies. We then show that different interactions affect divergent synaptic processes, demonstrating distinct molecular aetiologies. Our study illustrates

  7. HAEdb: a novel interactive, locus-specific mutation database for the C1 inhibitor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Lajos; Hegedüs, Tamás; Farkas, Henriette; Nagy, Melinda; Tordai, Attila

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by episodic local subcutaneous and submucosal edema and is caused by the deficiency of the activated C1 esterase inhibitor protein (C1-INH or C1INH; approved gene symbol SERPING1). Published C1-INH mutations are represented in large universal databases (e.g., OMIM, HGMD), but these databases update their data rather infrequently, they are not interactive, and they do not allow searches according to different criteria. The HAEdb, a C1-INH gene mutation database (http://hae.biomembrane.hu) was created to contribute to the following expectations: 1) help the comprehensive collection of information on genetic alterations of the C1-INH gene; 2) create a database in which data can be searched and compared according to several flexible criteria; and 3) provide additional help in new mutation identification. The website uses MySQL, an open-source, multithreaded, relational database management system. The user-friendly graphical interface was written in the PHP web programming language. The website consists of two main parts, the freely browsable search function, and the password-protected data deposition function. Mutations of the C1-INH gene are divided in two parts: gross mutations involving DNA fragments >1 kb, and micro mutations encompassing all non-gross mutations. Several attributes (e.g., affected exon, molecular consequence, family history) are collected for each mutation in a standardized form. This database may facilitate future comprehensive analyses of C1-INH mutations and also provide regular help for molecular diagnostic testing of HAE patients in different centers.

  8. Regulation of disease-responsive genes mediated by epigenetic factors: interaction of Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-La-Peña, Clelia; Rangel-Cano, Alicia; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2012-05-01

    Genes in eukaryotic organisms function within the context of chromatin, and the mechanisms that modulate the structure of chromatin are defined as epigenetic. In Arabidopsis, pathogen infection induces the expression of at least one histone deacetylase, suggesting that histone acetylation/deacetylation has an important role in the pathogenic response in plants. How/whether histone methylation affects gene response to pathogen infection is unknown. To gain a better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms regulating the interaction between Pseudomonas syringae and Arabidopsis thaliana, we analysed three different Arabidopsis ash1-related (absent, small or homeotic discs 1) mutants. We found that the loss of function of ASHH2 and ASHR1 resulted in faster hypersensitive responses (HRs) to both mutant (hrpA) and pathogenic (DC3000) strains of P. syringae, whereas control (Col-0) and ashr3 mutants appeared to be more resistant to the infection after 2 days. Furthermore, we showed that, in the ashr3 background, the PR1 gene (PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE 1) displayed the highest expression levels on infection with DC3000, correlating with increased resistance against this pathogen. Our results show that, in both the ashr1 and ashh2 backgrounds, the histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) levels decreased at the promoter region of PR1 on infection with the DC3000 strain, suggesting that an epigenetically regulated PR1 expression is involved in the plant defence. Our results suggest that histone methylation in response to pathogen infection may be a critical component in the signalling and defence processes occurring between plants and microbes. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  9. DISC1 mouse models as a tool to decipher gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler eCash-Padgett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available DISC1 was discovered in a Scottish pedigree in which a chromosomal translocation that breaks this gene segregates with psychiatric disorders, mainly depression and schizophrenia. Linkage and association studies in diverse populations support DISC1 as a susceptibility gene to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many Disc1 mouse models have been generated to study its neuronal functions. These mouse models display variable phenotypes, some of them relevant to schizophrenia, others to depression.The Disc1 mouse models are popular genetic models for studying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. Five different Disc1 models have been combined with environmental factors. The environmental stressors employed can be classified as either early immune activation or later social paradigms. These studies cover major time points along the neurodevelopmental trajectory: prenatal, early postnatal, adolescence, and adulthood. Various combinations of molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods have been used to assess the outcomes. Additionally, three of the studies sought to rescue the resulting abnormalities.Here we provide background on the environmental paradigms used, summarize the results of these studies combining Disc1 mouse models with environmental stressors and discuss what we can learn and how to proceed. A major question is how the genetic and environmental factors determine which psychiatric disorder will be clinically manifested. To address this we can take advantage of the many Disc1 models available and expose them to the same environmental stressor. The complementary experiment would be to expose the same model to different environmental stressors. DISC1 is an ideal gene for this approach, since in the Scottish pedigree the same chromosomal translocation results in different psychiatric conditions.

  10. An interaction map of circulating metabolites, immune gene networks, and their genetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Artika P; Ritchie, Scott C; Byars, Sean G; Fearnley, Liam G; Havulinna, Aki S; Joensuu, Anni; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Wennerström, Annika; Milani, Lili; Metspalu, Andres; Männistö, Satu; Würtz, Peter; Kettunen, Johannes; Raitoharju, Emma; Kähönen, Mika; Juonala, Markus; Palotie, Aarno; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Ripatti, Samuli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Abraham, Gad; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Perola, Markus; Inouye, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Immunometabolism plays a central role in many cardiometabolic diseases. However, a robust map of immune-related gene networks in circulating human cells, their interactions with metabolites, and their genetic control is still lacking. Here, we integrate blood transcriptomic, metabolomic, and genomic profiles from two population-based cohorts (total N = 2168), including a subset of individuals with matched multi-omic data at 7-year follow-up. We identify topologically replicable gene networks enriched for diverse immune functions including cytotoxicity, viral response, B cell, platelet, neutrophil, and mast cell/basophil activity. These immune gene modules show complex patterns of association with 158 circulating metabolites, including lipoprotein subclasses, lipids, fatty acids, amino acids, small molecules, and CRP. Genome-wide scans for module expression quantitative trait loci (mQTLs) reveal five modules with mQTLs that have both cis and trans effects. The strongest mQTL is in ARHGEF3 (rs1354034) and affects a module enriched for platelet function, independent of platelet counts. Modules of mast cell/basophil and neutrophil function show temporally stable metabolite associations over 7-year follow-up, providing evidence that these modules and their constituent gene products may play central roles in metabolic inflammation. Furthermore, the strongest mQTL in ARHGEF3 also displays clear temporal stability, supporting widespread trans effects at this locus. This study provides a detailed map of natural variation at the blood immunometabolic interface and its genetic basis, and may facilitate subsequent studies to explain inter-individual variation in cardiometabolic disease.

  11. Interactions between the otitis media gene, Fbxo11, and p53 in the mouse embryonic lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateossian, Hilda; Morse, Susan; Simon, Michelle M; Dean, Charlotte H; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, and tympanostomy (ear tube insertion) to alleviate the condition remains the commonest surgical intervention in children in the developed world. Chronic and recurrent forms of otitis media (OM) are known to have a very substantial genetic component; however, until recently, little was known of the underlying genes involved. The Jeff mouse mutant carries a mutation in the Fbxo11 gene, a member of the F-box family, and develops deafness due to a chronic proliferative OM. We previously reported that Fbxo11 is involved in the regulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling by regulating the levels of phospho-Smad2 in the epithelial cells of palatal shelves, eyelids and airways of the lungs. It has been proposed that FBXO11 regulates the cell's response to TGF-β through the ubiquitination of CDT2. Additional substrates for FBXO11 have been identified, including p53. Here, we have studied both the genetic and biochemical interactions between FBXO11 and p53 in order to better understand the function of FBXO11 in epithelial development and its potential role in OM. In mice, we show that p53 (also known as Tp53) homozygous mutants and double heterozygous mutants (Jf/+ p53/+) exhibit similar epithelial developmental defects to Fbxo11 homozygotes. FBXO11 and p53 interact in the embryonic lung, and mutation in Fbxo11 prevents the interaction with p53. Both p53 and double mutants show raised levels of pSMAD2, recapitulating that seen in Fbxo11 homozygotes. Overall, our results support the conclusion that FBXO11 regulates the TGF-β pathway in the embryonic lung via cross-talk with p53. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. The interaction between aggrecan gene VNTR polymorphism and obesity in predicting incident symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Zhu, Yue; Pang, Hao; Guanjun, T U

    2014-01-01

    An association between aggrecan gene variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism (VNTR) and symptomatic lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has been reported in Chinese Han of Northern China, and obesity had previously been suspected of causing severe LDH. However, the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH has not been well studied. To examine the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in the susceptibility of symptomatic LDH, 259 participants participated in this study and donated a blood sample. The disease group comprised 61 patients already diagnosed with symptomatic LDH. The control group consisted of 198 healthy blood donors without symptoms of LDH who were not diagnosed with LDH. The aggrecan gene VNTR region was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. The data indicated that between the two groups, participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were non-obese people showed a 1.057-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.895, changing the number of repeat alleles to 25 repeats who were obese people showed an 1.061-fold higher risk (p = 0.885, adding obesity to the mix alone did not demonstrably increase the risk of LDH), while participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were obese people showed a 4.667-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.0003, adding obesity plus changing the repeat allele number significantly increased the risk of LDH by 4.667). Overall, the findings suggest an underlying interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH.

  13. Interaction of maternal atopy, CTLA-4 gene polymorphism and gender on antenatal immunoglobulin E production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K D; Ou, C-Y; Hsu, T-Y; Chang, J-C; Chuang, H; Liu, C-A; Liang, H-M; Kuo, H-C; Chen, R-F; Huang, E-Y

    2007-05-01

    Genetic heritability and maternal atopy have been correlated to antenatal IgE production, but very few studies have studied gene-maternal atopy interaction on antenatal IgE production. This study investigated the interaction of CTLA-4 polymorphism with prenatal factors on the elevation of cord blood IgE (CBIgE). Pregnant women were antenatally recruited for collection of prenatal environmental factors by a questionnaire. Umbilical cord blood samples were collected for CBIgE detection by fluorescence-linked enzyme assay and CTLA-4 polymorphism measurement by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A total of 1104 pregnant women initially participated in this cohort study, and 898 of them completed cord blood collection. 21.4% of the newborns had elevation of CBIgE (>or=0.5 kU/L). The CTLA-4+49A allele (P=0.021), maternal atopy (Ppaternal atopy, were significantly correlated with the CBIgE elevation in multivariate analysis. A dichotomous analysis of gene-maternal atopy interactions identified maternal atopy and CTLA-4+49A allele had an additive effect on the CBIgE elevation, especially prominent in male newborns; and in the absence of maternal atopy, CTLA-4+49GG genotype had a protective effect on CBIgE elevation in female newborns. Maternal but not paternal atopy has significant impacts on CBIgE elevation depending on gender and CTLA-4+49A/G polymorphism of newborns. Control of maternal atopy and modulation of CTLA-4 expression in the prenatal stage may be a target for the early prevention of perinatal allergy sensitization.

  14. Glutathione S-transferase genes and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: Role of sexual dimorphism, gene-gene and gene-smoking interactions in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarova, Iuliia; Bushueva, Olga; Konoplya, Alexander; Polonikov, Alexey

    2018-05-01

    Compromised defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); therefore, genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes may contribute to disease susceptibility. This study investigated whether polymorphisms in genes encoding glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), T1 (GSTT1), and P1 (GSTP1) jointly contribute to the risk of T2DM. In all, 1120 unrelated Russian subjects (600 T2DM patients, 520 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects), were recruited to the study. Genotyping was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR; del/del polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1) and TaqMan-based PCR (polymorphisms I105V and A114V of GSTP1). Plasma ROS and glutathione levels in study subjects were analyzed by fluorometric and colorimetric assays, respectively. Genotype del/del GSTT1 was significantly associated with the risk of T2DM (odds ratio [OR] 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-2.21, P = 0.003). Gender-stratified analysis showed that the deletion genotypes of GSTM1 (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.30-3.05; P = 0.0002, Q = 0.016) and GSTT1 (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.22-4.09; P = 0.008, Q = 0.0216), as well as genotype 114A/V of GSTP1 (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.44-5.62; P = 0.005, Q = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of T2DM exclusively in males. Three genotype combinations (i.e. GSTM1+ × GSTT1+, GSTM1+ × GSTP1 114A/A and GSTT1+ × GSTP1 114A/A) showed significant associations with a decreased risk of T2DM in males. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that genes encoding glutathione S-transferases jointly contribute to the risk of T2DM, and that their effects on disease susceptibility are gender specific. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  16. Interaction of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlereth, Tanja; Schukraft, Jonas; Krämer-Best, Heidrun H; Geber, Christian; Ackermann, Tatiana; Birklein, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) are neuropeptides that are simultaneously released from nociceptive C-fibers. CGRP is a potent vasodilator, inducing a long-lasting increase in superficial skin blood flow, whereas SP induces only a brief vasodilation but a significant plasma extravasation. CGRP and SP may play important roles in the pathophysiology of various pain states but little is known about their interaction. Different concentrations of SP (ranging from 10 -5 M to 10 -9 M) were applied to the volar forearm of 24 healthy subjects via dermal microdialysis. SP was applied either alone or in combination with CGRP10 -9 M and CGRP 10 -6 M. As expected, SP induced a transient increase in skin blood flow that decayed shortly after application. This transient blood flow peak was blunted with co-application of CGRP 10 -9 M and inhibited with co-application of CGRP10 -6 M. SP alone induced plasma protein extravasation (PPE). However, when CGRP10 -6 M was added, the PPE significantly increased. Our results demonstrate a complex interaction of the neuropeptides CGRP and SP. CGRP10 -6 M prevented SP-induced early vasodilation but augmented SP-induced PPE. These interactions might explain why vascular symptoms in chronic pain can differ strikingly between individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Annotating activation/inhibition relationships to protein-protein interactions using gene ontology relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Soorin; Yu, Hasun; Jang, Dongjin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-04-11

    Signaling pathways can be reconstructed by identifying 'effect types' (i.e. activation/inhibition) of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Effect types are composed of 'directions' (i.e. upstream/downstream) and 'signs' (i.e. positive/negative), thereby requiring directions as well as signs of PPIs to predict signaling events from PPI networks. Here, we propose a computational method for systemically annotating effect types to PPIs using relations between functional information of proteins. We used regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in Gene Ontology (GO) to predict directions and signs of PPIs. These relations indicate both directions and signs between GO terms so that we can project directions and signs between relevant GO terms to PPIs. Independent test results showed that our method is effective for predicting both directions and signs of PPIs. Moreover, our method outperformed a previous GO-based method that did not consider the relations between GO terms. We annotated effect types to human PPIs and validated several highly confident effect types against literature. The annotated human PPIs are available in Additional file 2 to aid signaling pathway reconstruction and network biology research. We annotated effect types to PPIs by using regulates, positively regulates, and negatively regulates relations in GO. We demonstrated that those relations are effective for predicting not only signs, but also directions of PPIs. The usefulness of those relations suggests their potential applications to other types of interactions such as protein-DNA interactions.

  18. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  19. Global gene expression analysis of the zoonotic parasite Trichinella spiralis revealed novel genes in host parasite interaction.

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    Xiaolei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trichinellosis is a typical food-borne zoonotic disease which is epidemic worldwide and the nematode Trichinella spiralis is the main pathogen. The life cycle of T. spiralis contains three developmental stages, i.e. adult worms, new borne larva (new borne L1 larva and muscular larva (infective L1 larva. Stage-specific gene expression in the parasites has been investigated with various immunological and cDNA cloning approaches, whereas the genome-wide transcriptome and expression features of the parasite have been largely unknown. The availability of the genome sequence information of T. spiralis has made it possible to deeply dissect parasite biology in association with global gene expression and pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed the global gene expression patterns in the three developmental stages of T. spiralis using digital gene expression (DGE analysis. Almost 15 million sequence tags were generated with the Illumina RNA-seq technology, producing expression data for more than 9,000 genes, covering 65% of the genome. The transcriptome analysis revealed thousands of differentially expressed genes within the genome, and importantly, a panel of genes encoding functional proteins associated with parasite invasion and immuno-modulation were identified. More than 45% of the genes were found to be transcribed from both strands, indicating the importance of RNA-mediated gene regulation in the development of the parasite. Further, based on gene ontological analysis, over 3000 genes were functionally categorized and biological pathways in the three life cycle stage were elucidated. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The global transcriptome of T. spiralis in three developmental stages has been profiled, and most gene activity in the genome was found to be developmentally regulated. Many metabolic and biological pathways have been revealed. The findings of the differential expression of several protein

  20. Trends in gastrectomy and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes in Japanese alcoholic men and their gene-gastrectomy, gene-gene and gene-age interactions for risk of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    The life-time drinking profiles of Japanese alcoholics have shown that gastrectomy increases susceptibility to alcoholism. We investigated the trends in gastrectomy and alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) genotypes and their interactions in alcoholics. This survey was conducted on 4879 Japanese alcoholic men 40 years of age or older who underwent routine gastrointestinal endoscopic screening during the period 1996-2010. ADH1B/ALDH2 genotyping was performed in 3702 patients. A history of gastrectomy was found in 508 (10.4%) patients. The reason for the gastrectomy was peptic ulcer in 317 patients and gastric cancer in 187 patients. The frequency of gastrectomy had gradually decreased from 13.3% in 1996-2000 to 10.5% in 2001-2005 and to 7.8% in 2006-2010 (P alcoholism-susceptibility genotypes, ADH1B*1/*1 and ALDH2*1/*1, modestly but significantly tended not to occur in the same individual (P = 0.026). The frequency of ADH1B*1/*1 decreased with ascending age groups. The high frequency of history of gastrectomy suggested that gastrectomy is still a risk factor for alcoholism, although the percentage decreased during the period. The alcoholism-susceptibility genotype ADH1B*1/*1 was less frequent in the gastrectomy group, suggesting a competitive gene-gastrectomy interaction for alcoholism. A gene-gene interaction and gene-age interactions regarding the ADH1B genotype were observed.

  1. The properties of genome conformation and spatial gene interaction and regulation networks of normal and malignant human cell types.

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    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The spatial conformation of a genome plays an important role in the long-range regulation of genome-wide gene expression and methylation, but has not been extensively studied due to lack of genome conformation data. The recently developed chromosome conformation capturing techniques such as the Hi-C method empowered by next generation sequencing can generate unbiased, large-scale, high-resolution chromosomal interaction (contact data, providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the spatial structure of a genome and its applications in gene regulation, genomics, epigenetics, and cell biology. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale computational analysis of this new stream of genome conformation data generated for three different human leukemia cells or cell lines by the Hi-C technique. We developed and applied a set of bioinformatics methods to reliably generate spatial chromosomal contacts from high-throughput sequencing data and to effectively use them to study the properties of the genome structures in one-dimension (1D and two-dimension (2D. Our analysis demonstrates that Hi-C data can be effectively applied to study tissue-specific genome conformation, chromosome-chromosome interaction, chromosomal translocations, and spatial gene-gene interaction and regulation in a three-dimensional genome of primary tumor cells. Particularly, for the first time, we constructed genome-scale spatial gene-gene interaction network, transcription factor binding site (TFBS - TFBS interaction network, and TFBS-gene interaction network from chromosomal contact information. Remarkably, all these networks possess the properties of scale-free modular networks.

  2. Feedback regulation of an Agrobacterium catalase gene katA involved in Agrobacterium-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X Q; Li, L P; Pan, S Q

    2001-11-01

    Catalases are known to detoxify H2O2, a major component of oxidative stress imposed on a cell. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens catalase encoded by a chromosomal gene katA has been implicated as an important virulence factor as it is involved in detoxification of H2O2 released during Agrobacterium-plant interaction. In this paper, we report a feedback regulation pathway that controls the expression of katA in A. tumefaciens cells. We observed that katA could be induced by plant tissue sections and by acidic pH on a minimal medium, which resembles the plant environment that the bacteria encounter during the course of infection. This represents a new regulatory factor for catalase induction in bacteria. More importantly, a feedback regulation was observed when the katA-gfp expression was studied in different genetic backgrounds. We found that introduction of a wild-type katA gene encoding a functional catalase into A. tumefaciens cells could repress the katA-gfp expression over 60-fold. The katA gene could be induced by H2O2 and the encoded catalase could detoxify H2O2. In addition, the katA-gfp expression of one bacterial cell could be repressed by other surrounding catalase-proficient bacterial cells. Furthermore, mutation at katA caused a 10-fold increase of the intracellular H2O2 concentration in the bacteria grown on an acidic pH medium. These results suggest that the endogenous H2O2 generated during A. tumefaciens cell growth could serve as the intracellular and intercellular inducer for the katA gene expression and that the acidic pH could pose an oxidative stress on the bacteria. Surprisingly, one mutated KatA protein, exhibiting no significant catalase activity as a result of the alteration of two important residues at the putative active site, could partially repress the katA-gfp expression. The feedback regulation of the katA gene by both catalase activity and KatA protein could presumably maintain an appropriated level of catalase activity and H2O2 inside A

  3. Conformation and activity alteration of horseradish peroxidase induced by the interaction with gene carrier polyethyleneimines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aimin; Wei, Bangzhi; Mo, Junyong; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has long been considered as "golden standard" for polymeric gene delivery carriers. However the molecular basis of the cytotoxicity of PEI is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy were conducted to investigate the influence of PEI of average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa (denoted as PEI25k, PEI10k and PEI1.8k) on the conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its catalytic efficiency. Zeta-potential measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to reveal the mechanism of the interaction between PEIs and HRP. PEIs were found to bind onto the surface of HRP predominantly via hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond or van der Waals interaction. The complex formation between HRP and PEI induced a more compact conformation of the enzyme and an increased hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding heme pocket. The conformational change of HRP had little impact on the affinity towards H2O2 and phenol. However, the increase in the non-planarity of porphyrin ring in the heme group led to an increase in the exposure degree of the active center and thus an enhancement of catalytic efficiency of HRP in the presence of high molecular weight PEIs (PEI25k and PEI10k). The polymer size played an important role in PEI-HRP interaction. PEI of low molecular weight (PEI1.8k) was less efficient to alter the conformation and catalytic activity of HRP in aqueous solutions.

  4. Using phylogenetically-informed annotation (PIA) to search for light-interacting genes in transcriptomes from non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Daniel I; Pankey, M Sabrina; Zaharoff, Alexander K; Battelle, Barbara A; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D; Breinholt, Jesse W; Bybee, Seth M; Cronin, Thomas W; Garm, Anders; Lindgren, Annie R; Patel, Nipam H; Porter, Megan L; Protas, Meredith E; Rivera, Ajna S; Serb, Jeanne M; Zigler, Kirk S; Crandall, Keith A; Oakley, Todd H

    2014-11-19

    Tools for high throughput sequencing and de novo assembly make the analysis of transcriptomes (i.e. the suite of genes expressed in a tissue) feasible for almost any organism. Yet a challenge for biologists is that it can be difficult to assign identities to gene sequences, especially from non-model organisms. Phylogenetic analyses are one useful method for assigning identities to these sequences, but such methods tend to be time-consuming because of the need to re-calculate trees for every gene of interest and each time a new data set is analyzed. In response, we employed existing tools for phylogenetic analysis to produce a computationally efficient, tree-based approach for annotating transcriptomes or new genomes that we term Phylogenetically-Informed Annotation (PIA), which places uncharacterized genes into pre-calculated phylogenies of gene families. We generated maximum likelihood trees for 109 genes from a Light Interaction Toolkit (LIT), a collection of genes that underlie the function or development of light-interacting structures in metazoans. To do so, we searched protein sequences predicted from 29 fully-sequenced genomes and built trees using tools for phylogenetic analysis in the Osiris package of Galaxy (an open-source workflow management system). Next, to rapidly annotate transcriptomes from organisms that lack sequenced genomes, we repurposed a maximum likelihood-based Evolutionary Placement Algorithm (implemented in RAxML) to place sequences of potential LIT genes on to our pre-calculated gene trees. Finally, we implemented PIA in Galaxy and used it to search for LIT genes in 28 newly-sequenced transcriptomes from the light-interacting tissues of a range of cephalopod mollusks, arthropods, and cubozoan cnidarians. Our new trees for LIT genes are available on the Bitbucket public repository ( http://bitbucket.org/osiris_phylogenetics/pia/ ) and we demonstrate PIA on a publicly-accessible web server ( http://galaxy-dev.cnsi.ucsb.edu/pia/ ). Our new

  5. Gene interactions in the DNA damage-response pathway identified by genome-wide RNA-interference analysis of synthetic lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Vastenhouw, Nadine L; Nollen, Ellen A A; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Here, we describe a systematic search for synthetic gene interactions in a multicellular organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We established a high-throughput method to determine synthetic gene interactions by genome-wide RNA interference and identified genes that are required to protect

  6. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  7. Parental divorce and disordered eating: an investigation of a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suisman, Jessica L; Burt, S Alexandra; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G; Klump, Kelly L

    2011-03-01

    We investigated gene-environment interactions (GxE) for associations between parental divorce and disordered eating (DE). Participants were 1,810 female twins from the Michigan State University Twin Registry and the Minnesota Twin Family Study. The Minnesota Eating Behaviors Survey was used to assess DE. We tested for GxE by comparing the heritability of DE in twins from divorced versus intact families. It was hypothesized that divorce would moderate the heritability of DE, in that heritability would be higher in twins from divorced than twins from intact families. As expected, the heritability of body dissatisfaction was significantly higher in twins from divorced than intact families. However, genetic influences were equal in twins from divorced and intact families for all other forms of DE. Although divorce did not moderate heritability of most DE symptoms, future research should replicate GxEs for body dissatisfaction and identify factors underlying this unique relationship. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Animal models of gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia: A dimensional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Yavuz; McFarland, Ross; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia has long been considered as a disorder with multifactorial origins. Recent discoveries have advanced our understanding of the genetic architecture of the disease. However, even with the increase of identified risk variants, heritability estimates suggest an important contribution of non-genetic factors. Various environmental risk factors have been proposed to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. These include season of birth, maternal infections, obstetric complications, adverse events at early childhood, and drug abuse. Despite the progress in identification of genetic and environmental risk factors, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms whereby gene-environment interactions (G × E) operate in schizophrenia and psychoses at large. In this review we provide a critical analysis of current animal models of G × E relevant to psychotic disorders and propose that dimensional perspective will advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms of these disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Animal models of gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia: a dimensional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Yavuz; McFarland, Ross; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia has long been considered as a disorder with multifactorial origins. Recent discoveries have advanced our understanding of the genetic architecture of the disease. However, even with the increase of identified risk variants, heritability estimates suggest an important contribution of non-genetic factors. Various environmental risk factors have been proposed to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. These include season of birth, maternal infections, obstetric complications, adverse events at early childhood, and drug abuse. Despite the progress in identification of genetic and environmental risk factors, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms whereby gene-environment interactions (GxE) operate in schizophrenia and psychoses at large. In this review we provide a critical analysis of current animal models of GxE relevant to psychotic disorders and propose that dimensional perspective will advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms of these disorders. PMID:26510407

  10. A database and tool, IM Browser, for exploring and integrating emerging gene and protein interaction data for Drosophila

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    Parrish Jodi R

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological processes are mediated by networks of interacting genes and proteins. Efforts to map and understand these networks are resulting in the proliferation of interaction data derived from both experimental and computational techniques for a number of organisms. The volume of this data combined with the variety of specific forms it can take has created a need for comprehensive databases that include all of the available data sets, and for exploration tools to facilitate data integration and analysis. One powerful paradigm for the navigation and analysis of interaction data is an interaction graph or map that represents proteins or genes as nodes linked by interactions. Several programs have been developed for graphical representation and analysis of interaction data, yet there remains a need for alternative programs that can provide casual users with rapid easy access to many existing and emerging data sets. Description Here we describe a comprehensive database of Drosophila gene and protein interactions collected from a variety of sources, including low and high throughput screens, genetic interactions, and computational predictions. We also present a program for exploring multiple interaction data sets and for combining data from different sources. The program, referred to as the Interaction Map (IM Browser, is a web-based application for searching and visualizing interaction data stored in a relational database system. Use of the application requires no downloads and minimal user configuration or training, thereby enabling rapid initial access to interaction data. IM Browser was designed to readily accommodate and integrate new types of interaction data as it becomes available. Moreover, all information associated with interaction measurements or predictions and the genes or proteins involved are accessible to the user. This allows combined searches and analyses based on either common or technique-specific attributes

  11. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  12. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  13. Light response and potential interacting proteins of a grape flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Run-Ze; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Duan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), a member of cytochrome P450 protein family, introduces B-ring hydroxyl group in the 3' position of the flavonoid. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a F3'H gene (VviF3'H), which contains an open reading frame of 1530 bp encoding a polypeptide of 509 amino acids, was cloned and characterized from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. VviF3'H showed high homology to known F3'H genes, especially F3'Hs from the V. vinifera reference genome (Pinot Noir) and lotus. Expression profiling analysis using real-time PCR revealed that VviF3'H was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues including berries, leaves, flowers, roots, stems and tendrils, suggesting its important physiological role in plant growth and development. Moreover, the transcript level of VviF3'H gene in grape berries was relatively higher at early developmental stages and gradually decreased during véraison, and then increased in the mature phase. In addition, the promoter of VviF3'H was isolated by using TAIL-PCR. Yeast one-hybrid screening of the Cabernet Sauvignon cDNA library and subsequent in vivo/vitro validations revealed the interaction between VviF3'H promoter and several transcription factors, including members of HD-Zip, NAC, MYB and EIN families. A transcriptional regulation mechanism of VviF3'H expression is proposed for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Plastid-Nuclear Interaction and Accelerated Coevolution in Plastid Ribosomal Genes in Geraniaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-06-27

    Plastids and mitochondria have many protein complexes that include subunits encoded by organelle and nuclear genomes. In animal cells, compensatory evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits was identified and the high mitochondrial mutation rates were hypothesized to drive compensatory evolution in nuclear genomes. In plant cells, compensatory evolution between plastid and nucleus has rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic framework. To investigate plastid-nuclear coevolution, we focused on plastid ribosomal protein genes that are encoded by plastid and nuclear genomes from 27 Geraniales species. Substitution rates were compared for five sets of genes representing plastid- and nuclear-encoded ribosomal subunit proteins targeted to the cytosol or the plastid as well as nonribosomal protein controls. We found that nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) and the ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) were accelerated in both plastid- (CpRP) and nuclear-encoded subunits (NuCpRP) of the plastid ribosome relative to control sequences. Our analyses revealed strong signals of cytonuclear coevolution between plastid- and nuclear-encoded subunits, in which nonsynonymous substitutions in CpRP and NuCpRP tend to occur along the same branches in the Geraniaceae phylogeny. This coevolution pattern cannot be explained by physical interaction between amino acid residues. The forces driving accelerated coevolution varied with cellular compartment of the sequence. Increased ω in CpRP was mainly due to intensified positive selection whereas increased ω in NuCpRP was caused by relaxed purifying selection. In addition, the many indels identified in plastid rRNA genes in Geraniaceae may have contributed to changes in plastid subunits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Plastid–Nuclear Interaction and Accelerated Coevolution in Plastid Ribosomal Genes in Geraniaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Plastids and mitochondria have many protein complexes that include subunits encoded by organelle and nuclear genomes. In animal cells, compensatory evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits was identified and the high mitochondrial mutation rates were hypothesized to drive compensatory evolution in nuclear genomes. In plant cells, compensatory evolution between plastid and nucleus has rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic framework. To investigate plastid–nuclear coevolution, we focused on plastid ribosomal protein genes that are encoded by plastid and nuclear genomes from 27 Geraniales species. Substitution rates were compared for five sets of genes representing plastid- and nuclear-encoded ribosomal subunit proteins targeted to the cytosol or the plastid as well as nonribosomal protein controls. We found that nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) and the ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) were accelerated in both plastid- (CpRP) and nuclear-encoded subunits (NuCpRP) of the plastid ribosome relative to control sequences. Our analyses revealed strong signals of cytonuclear coevolution between plastid- and nuclear-encoded subunits, in which nonsynonymous substitutions in CpRP and NuCpRP tend to occur along the same branches in the Geraniaceae phylogeny. This coevolution pattern cannot be explained by physical interaction between amino acid residues. The forces driving accelerated coevolution varied with cellular compartment of the sequence. Increased ω in CpRP was mainly due to intensified positive selection whereas increased ω in NuCpRP was caused by relaxed purifying selection. In addition, the many indels identified in plastid rRNA genes in Geraniaceae may have contributed to changes in plastid subunits. PMID:27190001

  16. Bifidobacterium breve - HT-29 cell line interaction: modulation of TNF-α induced gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, R J; Schuren, F H J; Willemsen, L E M; Vriesema, A; Knol, J; De Vos, W M

    2011-06-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory conditions, the responsiveness to TNF-α was compared in T84, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. The highest TNF-α response was observed in HT-29 cells and this cell line was selected for exposure to the B. breve strains M-16V, NR246 and UCC2003. After one hour of bacterial pre-incubation followed by two hours of additional TNF-α stimulation, B. breve M-16V (86%), but to a much lesser extent strains NR246 (50%) or UCC2003 (32%), showed a strain-specific reduction of the HT-29 transcriptional response to the inflammatory treatment. The most important functional groups of genes that were transcriptionally suppressed by the presence of B. breve M-16V, were found to be involved in immune regulation and apoptotic processes. About 54% of the TNF-α induced genes were solely suppressed by the presence of B. breve M-16V. These included apoptosis-related cysteine protease caspase 7 (CASP7), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), amyloid beta (A4) precursor proteinbinding family A member 1 (APBA1), NADPH oxidase (NOX5), and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). The extracellular IL-8 concentration was determined by an immunological assay but did not change significantly, indicating that B. breve M-16V only partially modulates the TNF-α pathway. In conclusion, this study shows that B. breve strains modulate gene expression in HT-29 cells under inflammatory conditions in a strain-specific way.

  17. Social Integration and Sleep Disturbance: A Gene-Environment Interaction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Sbarra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Low levels of perceived social integration, or loneliness, are associated with increased risk for a range of poor health outcomes. Sleep disturbance plays a central role in the evolutionary theory of loneliness, which provides a mechanistic account of how low levels of social integration may negatively impact health. No studies, however, have examined whether the association between social integration and sleep disturbance is consistent with a causal effect after accounting for genes that are common to both variables.  Method: Using twin data ('N' = 905 twin pairs from the nationally-representative Midlife in the United States (MIDUS survey, I evaluated a series of bivariate twin models exploring whether the phenotypic association between low social integration and sleep disturbance can be explained by shared genetics. In addition, the current study specified a series of quantitative models for studying gene x environment (G X E interactions to determine whether the genetic and environmental influences on sleep disturbance differ as a function of social integration. Results: The phenotypic association between social integration and sleep disturbance was fully accounted for by genes that are common between the two variables, suggesting that within-twin pair differences in social integration do not exert a causal influence on sleep disturbance. Social integration, however, moderated the non-shared environmental influence on sleep disturbances, with the greatest environmental influences observed at the lowest levels of social integration. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that an essential feature of the evolutionary model of loneliness may need refinement or elaboration. The moderation findings are discussed in terms of the fit with a stress-buffering model of social support in which environmental influences on sleep disturbance are strongest when social resources are low.

  18. Gene X Environment Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Role of Epigenetic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eTordjman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies support currently the hypothesis that autism etiology is based on a polygenic and epistatic model. However, despite advances in epidemiological, molecular and clinical genetics, the genetic risk factors remain difficult to identify, with the exception of a few chromosomal disorders and several single gene disorders associated with an increased risk for autism. Furthermore, several studies suggest a role of environmental factors in autism spectrum disorders (ASD. First, arguments for a genetic contribution to autism, based on updated family and twin studies, are examined. Second, a review of possible prenatal, perinatal and postnatal environmental risk factors for ASD are presented. Then, the hypotheses are discussed concerning the underlying mechanisms related to a role of environmental factors in the development of ASD in association with genetic factors. In particular, epigenetics as a candidate biological mechanism for gene X environment interactions is considered and the possible role of epigenetic mechanisms reported in genetic disorders associated with ASD is discussed. Furthermore, the example of in utero exposure to valproate provides a good illustration of epigenetic mechanisms involved in ASD and innovative therapeutic strategies. Epigenetic remodeling by environmental factors opens new perspectives for a better understanding, prevention and early therapeutic intervention of ASD.

  19. Gene interaction at seed-awning loci in the genetic background of wild rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Mai; Otsuka, Mitsuharu; Thanh, Pham Thien; Phan, Phuong Dang Thai; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ishii, Takashige

    2017-09-12

    Seed awning is one of the important traits for successful propagation in wild rice. During the domestication of rice by ancient humans, plants with awnless seeds may have been selected because long awns hindered collection and handling activities. To investigate domestication of awnless rice, QTL analysis for seed awning was first carried out using backcross recombinant inbred lines between Oryza sativa Nipponbare (recurrent parent) and O. rufipogon W630 (donor parent). Two strong QTLs were detected in the same regions as known major seed-awning loci, An-1 and RAE2. Subsequent causal mutation surveying and fine mapping confirmed that O. rufipogon W630 has functional alleles at both loci. The gene effects and interactions at these loci were examined using two backcross populations with reciprocal genetic backgrounds of O. sativa Nipponbare and O. rufipogon W630. As awn length in wild rice varied among seeds even in the same plant, awn length was measured based on spikelet position. In the genetic background of cultivated rice, the wild alleles at An-1 and RAE2 had awning effects, and plants having both wild homozygous alleles produced awns whose length was about 70% of those of the wild parent. On the other hand, in the genetic background of wild rice, the substitution of cultivated alleles at An-1 and RAE2 contributed little to awn length reduction. These results indicate that the domestication process of awnless seeds was complicated because many genes are involved in awn formation in wild rice.

  20. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Simpson, Angela; Palmer, Colin N A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an int......BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether...... there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites) in relation to the development of eczema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort...... in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379), FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p...