WorldWideScience

Sample records for gene interaction networks

  1. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  2. Interactive Naive Bayesian network: A new approach of constructing gene-gene interaction network for cancer classification.

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    Tian, Xue W; Lim, Joon S

    2015-01-01

    Naive Bayesian (NB) network classifier is a simple and well-known type of classifier, which can be easily induced from a DNA microarray data set. However, a strong conditional independence assumption of NB network sometimes can lead to weak classification performance. In this paper, we propose a new approach of interactive naive Bayesian (INB) network to weaken the conditional independence of NB network and classify cancers using DNA microarray data set. We selected the differently expressed genes (DEGs) to reduce the dimension of the microarray data set. Then, an interactive parent which has the biggest influence among all DEGs is searched for each DEG. And then we calculate a weight to represent the interactive relationship between a DEG and its parent. Finally, the gene-gene interaction network is constructed. We experimentally test the INB network in terms of classification accuracy using leukemia and colon DNA microarray data sets, then we compare it with the NB network. The INB network can get higher classification accuracies than NB network. And INB network can show the gene-gene interactions visually.

  3. Artificial neural networks modeling gene-environment interaction

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    Günther Frauke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions play an important role in the etiological pathway of complex diseases. An appropriate statistical method for handling a wide variety of complex situations involving interactions between variables is still lacking, especially when continuous variables are involved. The aim of this paper is to explore the ability of neural networks to model different structures of gene-environment interactions. A simulation study is set up to compare neural networks with standard logistic regression models. Eight different structures of gene-environment interactions are investigated. These structures are characterized by penetrance functions that are based on sigmoid functions or on combinations of linear and non-linear effects of a continuous environmental factor and a genetic factor with main effect or with a masking effect only. Results In our simulation study, neural networks are more successful in modeling gene-environment interactions than logistic regression models. This outperfomance is especially pronounced when modeling sigmoid penetrance functions, when distinguishing between linear and nonlinear components, and when modeling masking effects of the genetic factor. Conclusion Our study shows that neural networks are a promising approach for analyzing gene-environment interactions. Especially, if no prior knowledge of the correct nature of the relationship between co-variables and response variable is present, neural networks provide a valuable alternative to regression methods that are limited to the analysis of linearly separable data.

  4. Visualizing Gene - Interactions within the Rice and Maize Network

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    Sampong, A.; Feltus, A.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to design a simpler visualization tool for comparing or viewing gene interaction graphs in systems biology. This visualization tool makes it possible and easier for a researcher to visualize the biological metadata of a plant and interact with the graph on a webpage. Currently available visualization software like Cytoscape and Walrus are difficult to interact with and do not scale effectively for large data sets, limiting the ability to visualize interactions within a biological system. The visualization tool developed is useful for viewing and interpreting the dataset of a gene interaction network. The graph layout drawn by this visualization tool is an improvement from the previous method of comparing lines of genes in two separate data files to, now having the ability to visually see the layout of the gene networks and how the two systems are related. The graph layout presented by the visualization tool draws a graph of the sample rice and maize gene networks, linking the common genes found in both plants and highlighting the functions served by common genes from each plant. The success of this visualization tool will enable Dr. Feltus to continue his investigations and draw conclusions on the biological evolution of the sorghum plant as well. REU Funded by NSF ACI Award 1359223 Vetria L. Byrd, PI

  5. Characterizing gene-gene interactions in a statistical epistasis network of twelve candidate genes for obesity.

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    De, Rishika; Hu, Ting; Moore, Jason H; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have reemphasized the importance of epistasis, or gene-gene interactions, as a contributing factor to the unexplained heritability of obesity. Network-based methods such as statistical epistasis networks (SEN), present an intuitive framework to address the computational challenge of studying pairwise interactions between thousands of genetic variants. In this study, we aimed to analyze pairwise interactions that are associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) between SNPs from twelve genes robustly associated with obesity (BDNF, ETV5, FAIM2, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, MC4R, MTCH2, NEGR1, SEC16B, SH2B1, and TMEM18). We used information gain measures to identify all SNP-SNP interactions among and between these genes that were related to obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) within the Framingham Heart Study Cohort; interactions exceeding a certain threshold were used to build an SEN. We also quantified whether interactions tend to occur more between SNPs from the same gene (dyadicity) or between SNPs from different genes (heterophilicity). We identified a highly connected SEN of 709 SNPs and 1241 SNP-SNP interactions. Combining the SEN framework with dyadicity and heterophilicity analyses, we found 1 dyadic gene (TMEM18, P-value = 0.047) and 3 heterophilic genes (KCTD15, P-value = 0.045; SH2B1, P-value = 0.003; and TMEM18, P-value = 0.001). We also identified a lncRNA SNP (rs4358154) as a key node within the SEN using multiple network measures. This study presents an analytical framework to characterize the global landscape of genetic interactions from genome-wide arrays and also to discover nodes of potential biological significance within the identified network.

  6. MiRTargetLink--miRNAs, Genes and Interaction Networks.

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    Hamberg, Maarten; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Hart, Martin; Meder, Benjamin; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-04-14

    Information on miRNA targeting genes is growing rapidly. For high-throughput experiments, but also for targeted analyses of few genes or miRNAs, easy analysis with concise representation of results facilitates the work of life scientists. We developed miRTargetLink, a tool for automating respective analysis procedures that are frequently applied. Input of the web-based solution is either a single gene or single miRNA, but also sets of genes or miRNAs, can be entered. Validated and predicted targets are extracted from databases and an interaction network is presented. Users can select whether predicted targets, experimentally validated targets with strong or weak evidence, or combinations of those are considered. Central genes or miRNAs are highlighted and users can navigate through the network interactively. To discover the most relevant biochemical processes influenced by the target network, gene set analysis and miRNA set analysis are integrated. As a showcase for miRTargetLink, we analyze targets of five cardiac miRNAs. miRTargetLink is freely available without restrictions at www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/mirtargetlink.

  7. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene-Gene Interaction Network.

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    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host-pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene-gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene-gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene-gene interactions demonstrates that host-pathogen gene-gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically represented. Our

  8. Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology

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    Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

    Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

  9. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

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    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  10. Development and application of an interaction network ontology for literature mining of vaccine-associated gene-gene interactions.

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    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    Literature mining of gene-gene interactions has been enhanced by ontology-based name classifications. However, in biomedical literature mining, interaction keywords have not been carefully studied and used beyond a collection of keywords. In this study, we report the development of a new Interaction Network Ontology (INO) that classifies >800 interaction keywords and incorporates interaction terms from the PSI Molecular Interactions (PSI-MI) and Gene Ontology (GO). Using INO-based literature mining results, a modified Fisher's exact test was established to analyze significantly over- and under-represented enriched gene-gene interaction types within a specific area. Such a strategy was applied to study the vaccine-mediated gene-gene interactions using all PubMed abstracts. The Vaccine Ontology (VO) and INO were used to support the retrieval of vaccine terms and interaction keywords from the literature. INO is aligned with the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) and imports terms from 10 other existing ontologies. Current INO includes 540 terms. In terms of interaction-related terms, INO imports and aligns PSI-MI and GO interaction terms and includes over 100 newly generated ontology terms with 'INO_' prefix. A new annotation property, 'has literature mining keywords', was generated to allow the listing of different keywords mapping to the interaction types in INO. Using all PubMed documents published as of 12/31/2013, approximately 266,000 vaccine-associated documents were identified, and a total of 6,116 gene-pairs were associated with at least one INO term. Out of 78 INO interaction terms associated with at least five gene-pairs of the vaccine-associated sub-network, 14 terms were significantly over-represented (i.e., more frequently used) and 17 under-represented based on our modified Fisher's exact test. These over-represented and under-represented terms share some common top-level terms but are distinct at the bottom levels of the INO hierarchy. The analysis of these

  11. Identification of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks using ontology-based literature mining.

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    Hur, Junguk; Ozgür, Arzucan; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2012-12-20

    Fever is one of the most common adverse events of vaccines. The detailed mechanisms of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks are not fully understood. In the present study, we employed a genome-wide, Centrality and Ontology-based Network Discovery using Literature data (CONDL) approach to analyse the genes and gene interaction networks associated with fever or vaccine-related fever responses. Over 170,000 fever-related articles from PubMed abstracts and titles were retrieved and analysed at the sentence level using natural language processing techniques to identify genes and vaccines (including 186 Vaccine Ontology terms) as well as their interactions. This resulted in a generic fever network consisting of 403 genes and 577 gene interactions. A vaccine-specific fever sub-network consisting of 29 genes and 28 gene interactions was extracted from articles that are related to both fever and vaccines. In addition, gene-vaccine interactions were identified. Vaccines (including 4 specific vaccine names) were found to directly interact with 26 genes. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed using the genes in the generated interaction networks. Moreover, the genes in these networks were prioritized using network centrality metrics. Making scientific discoveries and generating new hypotheses were possible by using network centrality and gene set enrichment analyses. For example, our study found that the genes in the generic fever network were more enriched in cell death and responses to wounding, and the vaccine sub-network had more gene enrichment in leukocyte activation and phosphorylation regulation. The most central genes in the vaccine-specific fever network are predicted to be highly relevant to vaccine-induced fever, whereas genes that are central only in the generic fever network are likely to be highly relevant to generic fever responses. Interestingly, no Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were found in the gene-vaccine interaction network. Since

  12. The use of gene interaction networks to improve the identification of cancer driver genes

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    Emilie Ramsahai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformaticians have implemented different strategies to distinguish cancer driver genes from passenger genes. One of the more recent advances uses a pathway-oriented approach. Methods that employ this strategy are highly dependent on the quality and size of the pathway interaction network employed, and require a powerful statistical environment for analyses. A number of genomic libraries are available in R. DriverNet and DawnRank employ pathway-based methods that use gene interaction graphs in matrix form. We investigated the benefit of combining data from 3 different sources on the prediction outcome of cancer driver genes by DriverNet and DawnRank. An enriched dataset was derived comprising 13,862 genes with 372,250 interactions, which increased its accuracy by 17% and 28%, respectively, compared to their original networks. The study identified 33 new candidate driver genes. Our study highlights the potential of combining networks and weighting edges to provide greater accuracy in the identification of cancer driver genes.

  13. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

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    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  14. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

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    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  15. Gene regulatory network interactions in sea urchin endomesoderm induction.

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    Aditya J Sethi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of contemporary studies of embryonic development is to understand large sets of regulatory changes that accompany the phenomenon of embryonic induction. The highly resolved sea urchin pregastrular endomesoderm-gene regulatory network (EM-GRN provides a unique framework to study the global regulatory interactions underlying endomesoderm induction. Vegetal micromeres of the sea urchin embryo constitute a classic endomesoderm signaling center, whose potential to induce archenteron formation from presumptive ectoderm was demonstrated almost a century ago. In this work, we ectopically activate the primary mesenchyme cell-GRN (PMC-GRN that operates in micromere progeny by misexpressing the micromere determinant Pmar1 and identify the responding EM-GRN that is induced in animal blastomeres. Using localized loss-of -function analyses in conjunction with expression of endo16, the molecular definition of micromere-dependent endomesoderm specification, we show that the TGFbeta cytokine, ActivinB, is an essential component of this induction in blastomeres that emit this signal, as well as in cells that respond to it. We report that normal pregastrular endomesoderm specification requires activation of the Pmar1-inducible subset of the EM-GRN by the same cytokine, strongly suggesting that early micromere-mediated endomesoderm specification, which regulates timely gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo, is also ActivinB dependent. This study unexpectedly uncovers the existence of an additional uncharacterized micromere signal to endomesoderm progenitors, significantly revising existing models. In one of the first network-level characterizations of an intercellular inductive phenomenon, we describe an important in vivo model of the requirement of ActivinB signaling in the earliest steps of embryonic endomesoderm progenitor specification.

  16. Literature-Based Discovery of IFN-γ and Vaccine-Mediated Gene Interaction Networks

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    Arzucan Özgür

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ regulates various immune responses that are often critical for vaccine-induced protection. In order to annotate the IFN-γ-related gene interaction network from a large amount of IFN-γ research reported in the literature, a literature-based discovery approach was applied with a combination of natural language processing (NLP and network centrality analysis. The interaction network of human IFN-γ (Gene symbol: IFNG and its vaccine-specific subnetwork were automatically extracted using abstracts from all articles in PubMed. Four network centrality metrics were further calculated to rank the genes in the constructed networks. The resulting generic IFNG network contains 1060 genes and 26313 interactions among these genes. The vaccine-specific subnetwork contains 102 genes and 154 interactions. Fifty six genes such as TNF, NFKB1, IL2, IL6, and MAPK8 were ranked among the top 25 by at least one of the centrality methods in one or both networks. Gene enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were classified in various immune mechanisms such as response to extracellular stimulus, lymphocyte activation, and regulation of apoptosis. Literature evidence was manually curated for the IFN-γ relatedness of 56 genes and vaccine development relatedness for 52 genes. This study also generated many new hypotheses worth further experimental studies.

  17. Modular reorganization of the global network of gene regulatory interactions during perinatal human brain development

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    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Urrutia, Araxi O.; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Background During early development of the nervous system, gene expression patterns are known to vary widely depending on the specific developmental trajectories of different structures. Observable changes in gene expression profiles throughout development are determined by an underlying network of precise regulatory interactions between individual genes. Elucidating the organizing principles that shape this gene regulatory network is one of the central goals of developmental biology. Whether...

  18. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network

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    Chen Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN. Methods In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs’ GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. Results We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Conclusions Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable

  19. Refining ensembles of predicted gene regulatory networks based on characteristic interaction sets.

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    Lukas Windhager

    Full Text Available Different ensemble voting approaches have been successfully applied for reverse-engineering of gene regulatory networks. They are based on the assumption that a good approximation of true network structure can be derived by considering the frequencies of individual interactions in a large number of predicted networks. Such approximations are typically superior in terms of prediction quality and robustness as compared to considering a single best scoring network only. Nevertheless, ensemble approaches only work well if the predicted gene regulatory networks are sufficiently similar to each other. If the topologies of predicted networks are considerably different, an ensemble of all networks obscures interesting individual characteristics. Instead, networks should be grouped according to local topological similarities and ensemble voting performed for each group separately. We argue that the presence of sets of co-occurring interactions is a suitable indicator for grouping predicted networks. A stepwise bottom-up procedure is proposed, where first mutual dependencies between pairs of interactions are derived from predicted networks. Pairs of co-occurring interactions are subsequently extended to derive characteristic interaction sets that distinguish groups of networks. Finally, ensemble voting is applied separately to the resulting topologically similar groups of networks to create distinct group-ensembles. Ensembles of topologically similar networks constitute distinct hypotheses about the reference network structure. Such group-ensembles are easier to interpret as their characteristic topology becomes clear and dependencies between interactions are known. The availability of distinct hypotheses facilitates the design of further experiments to distinguish between plausible network structures. The proposed procedure is a reasonable refinement step for non-deterministic reverse-engineering applications that produce a large number of candidate

  20. Chemical-gene interaction networks and causal reasoning for ...

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    Evaluating the potential human health and ecological risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures in the environment is one of the main challenges of chemical safety assessment and environmental protection. There is a need for approaches that can help to integrate chemical monitoring and biological effects data to evaluate risks associated with chemicals present in the environment. Here, we used prior knowledge about chemical-gene interactions to develop a knowledge assembly model for detected chemicals at five locations near the North Branch and Chisago wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in the St. Croix River Basin, MN and WI. The assembly model was used to generate hypotheses about the biological impacts of the chemicals at each location. The hypotheses were tested using empirical hepatic gene expression data from fathead minnows exposed for 12 d at each location. Empirical gene expression data were also mapped to the assembly models to evaluate the likelihood of a chemical contributing to the observed biological responses using richness and concordance statistics. The prior knowledge approach was able predict the observed biological pathways impacted at one site but not the other. Atrazine was identified as a potential contributor to the observed gene expression responses at a location upstream of the North Branch WTTP. Four chemicals were identified as contributors to the observed biological responses at the effluent and downstream o

  1. Identification of genes involved in radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by integrating gene ontology and protein-protein interaction networks.

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    Guo, Ya; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Qu, Song; Li, Ling; Su, Fang; Li, Ye; Huang, Shi-Ting; Li, Dan-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Radioresistance remains one of the important factors in relapse and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Thus, it is imperative to identify genes involved in radioresistance and explore the underlying biological processes in the development of radioresistance. In this study, we used cDNA microarrays to select differential genes between radioresistant CNE-2R and parental CNE-2 cell lines. One hundred and eighty-three significantly differentially expressed genes (pgenes were upregulated and 45 genes were downregulated in CNE-2R. We further employed publicly available bioinformatics related software, such as GOEAST and STRING to examine the relationship among differentially expressed genes. The results show that these genes were involved in type I interferon-mediated signaling pathway biological processes; the nodes tended to have high connectivity with the EGFR pathway, IFN-related pathways, NF-κB. The node STAT1 has high connectivity with other nodes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Finally, the reliability of microarray data was validated for selected genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results were consistent with the microarray data. Our study suggests that microarrays combined with gene ontology and protein interaction networks have great value in the identification of genes of radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; genes involved in several biological processes and protein interaction networks may be relevant to NPC radioresistance; in particular, the verified genes CCL5, STAT1-α, STAT2 and GSTP1 may become potential biomarkers for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy.

  2. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

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    Salem, Saeed

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in proteomic and transcriptomic technologies resulted in the accumulation of vast amount of high-throughput data that span multiple biological processes and characteristics in different organisms. Much of the data come in the form of interaction networks and mRNA expression arrays. An important task in systems biology is functional modules discovery where the goal is to uncover well-connected sub-networks (modules). These discovered modules help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the observed biological processes. While most of the existing module discovery methods use only the interaction data, in this work we propose, CLARM, which discovers biological modules by incorporating gene profiles data with protein-protein interaction networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional module discovery methods.

  3. The Genome-Wide Interaction Network of Nutrient Stress Genes in Escherichia coli

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    Jean-Philippe Côtôé

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional efforts to describe essential genes in bacteria have typically emphasized nutrient-rich growth conditions. Of note, however, are the set of genes that become essential when bacteria are grown under nutrient stress. For example, more than 100 genes become indispensable when the model bacterium Escherichia coli is grown on nutrient-limited media, and many of these nutrient stress genes have also been shown to be important for the growth of various bacterial pathogens in vivo. To better understand the genetic network that underpins nutrient stress in E. coli, we performed a genome-scale cross of strains harboring deletions in some 82 nutrient stress genes with the entire E. coli gene deletion collection (Keio to create 315,400 double deletion mutants. An analysis of the growth of the resulting strains on rich microbiological media revealed an average of 23 synthetic sick or lethal genetic interactions for each nutrient stress gene, suggesting that the network defining nutrient stress is surprisingly complex. A vast majority of these interactions involved genes of unknown function or genes of unrelated pathways. The most profound synthetic lethal interactions were between nutrient acquisition and biosynthesis. Further, the interaction map reveals remarkable metabolic robustness in E. coli through pathway redundancies. In all, the genetic interaction network provides a powerful tool to mine and identify missing links in nutrient synthesis and to further characterize genes of unknown function in E. coli. Moreover, understanding of bacterial growth under nutrient stress could aid in the development of novel antibiotic discovery platforms.

  4. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates.

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    Daniel Boloc

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA. The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies.We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space.In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates.

  5. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates

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    Boloc, Daniel; Castillo-Lara, Sergio; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Abril, Josep F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA). The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies. Methodology We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet) by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space. Conclusions In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates. PMID:26267445

  6. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-05-03

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as "indispensable," "neutral," or "dispensable," which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network's control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets.

  7. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-05-17

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

  8. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny.

  9. Enhancing the prioritization of disease-causing genes through tissue specific protein interaction networks.

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    Oded Magger

    Full Text Available The prioritization of candidate disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge in the post-genomic era. Current state of the art methods exploit a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for this task. They are based on the observation that genes causing phenotypically-similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a PPI network. However, to date, these methods have used a static picture of human PPIs, while diseases impact specific tissues in which the PPI networks may be dramatically different. Here, for the first time, we perform a large-scale assessment of the contribution of tissue-specific information to gene prioritization. By integrating tissue-specific gene expression data with PPI information, we construct tissue-specific PPI networks for 60 tissues and investigate their prioritization power. We find that tissue-specific PPI networks considerably improve the prioritization results compared to those obtained using a generic PPI network. Furthermore, they allow predicting novel disease-tissue associations, pointing to sub-clinical tissue effects that may escape early detection.

  10. Relevance of different prior knowledge sources for inferring gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catharina; Bontempi, Gianluca; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    When inferring networks from high-throughput genomic data, one of the main challenges is the subsequent validation of these networks. In the best case scenario, the true network is partially known from previous research results published in structured databases or research articles. Traditionally, inferred networks are validated against these known interactions. Whenever the recovery rate is gauged to be high enough, subsequent high scoring but unknown inferred interactions are deemed good candidates for further experimental validation. Therefore such validation framework strongly depends on the quantity and quality of published interactions and presents serious pitfalls: (1) availability of these known interactions for the studied problem might be sparse; (2) quantitatively comparing different inference algorithms is not trivial; and (3) the use of these known interactions for validation prevents their integration in the inference procedure. The latter is particularly relevant as it has recently been showed that integration of priors during network inference significantly improves the quality of inferred networks. To overcome these problems when validating inferred networks, we recently proposed a data-driven validation framework based on single gene knock-down experiments. Using this framework, we were able to demonstrate the benefits of integrating prior knowledge and expression data. In this paper we used this framework to assess the quality of different sources of prior knowledge on their own and in combination with different genomic data sets in colorectal cancer. We observed that most prior sources lead to significant F-scores. Furthermore, their integration with genomic data leads to a significant increase in F-scores, especially for priors extracted from full text PubMed articles, known co-expression modules and genetic interactions. Lastly, we observed that the results are consistent for three different data sets: experimental knock-down data and two

  11. Protein Interaction Networks Reveal Novel Autism Risk Genes within GWAS Statistical Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) thus far met limited success in the identification of common risk variants, consistent with the notion that variants with small individual effects cannot be detected individually in single SNP analysis. To further capture disease risk gene information from ASD association studies, we applied a network-based strategy to the Autism Genome Project (AGP) and the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange GWAS datasets, combining family-based association data with Human Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) data. Our analysis showed that autism-associated proteins at higher than conventional levels of significance (P<0.1) directly interact more than random expectation and are involved in a limited number of interconnected biological processes, indicating that they are functionally related. The functionally coherent networks generated by this approach contain ASD-relevant disease biology, as demonstrated by an improved positive predictive value and sensitivity in retrieving known ASD candidate genes relative to the top associated genes from either GWAS, as well as a higher gene overlap between the two ASD datasets. Analysis of the intersection between the networks obtained from the two ASD GWAS and six unrelated disease datasets identified fourteen genes exclusively present in the ASD networks. These are mostly novel genes involved in abnormal nervous system phenotypes in animal models, and in fundamental biological processes previously implicated in ASD, such as axon guidance, cell adhesion or cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our results highlighted novel susceptibility genes previously hidden within GWAS statistical “noise” that warrant further analysis for causal variants. PMID:25409314

  12. SNP-SNP interaction network in angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

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    Hui-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer development. The majority of prostate cancer studies focused on individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs while SNP-SNP interactions are suggested having a great impact on unveiling the underlying mechanism of complex disease. Using 1,151 prostate cancer patients in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS dataset, 2,651 SNPs in the angiogenesis genes associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness were evaluated. SNP-SNP interactions were primarily assessed using the two-stage Random Forests plus Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (TRM approach in the CGEMS group, and were then re-evaluated in the Moffitt group with 1,040 patients. For the identified gene pairs, cross-evaluation was applied to evaluate SNP interactions in both study groups. Five SNP-SNP interactions in three gene pairs (MMP16+ ROBO1, MMP16+ CSF1, and MMP16+ EGFR were identified to be associated with aggressive prostate cancer in both groups. Three pairs of SNPs (rs1477908+ rs1387665, rs1467251+ rs7625555, and rs1824717+ rs7625555 were in MMP16 and ROBO1, one pair (rs2176771+ rs333970 in MMP16 and CSF1, and one pair (rs1401862+ rs6964705 in MMP16 and EGFR. The results suggest that MMP16 may play an important role in prostate cancer aggressiveness. By integrating our novel findings and available biomedical literature, a hypothetical gene interaction network was proposed. This network demonstrates that our identified SNP-SNP interactions are biologically relevant and shows that EGFR may be the hub for the interactions. The findings provide valuable information to identify genotype combinations at risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer and improve understanding on the genetic etiology of angiogenesis associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  13. Analysis of genetic interaction networks shows that alternatively spliced genes are highly versatile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Sheoran, Ritika; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing has the potential to increase the diversity of the transcriptome and proteome. Where more than one transcript arises from a gene they are often so different that they are quite unlikely to have the same function. However, it remains unclear if alternative splicing generally leads to a gene being involved in multiple biological processes or whether it alters the function within a single process. Knowing that genetic interactions occur between functionally related genes, we have used them as a proxy for functional versatility, and have analysed the sets of genes of two well-characterised model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Using network analyses we find that few genes are functionally homogenous (only involved in a few functionally-related biological processes). Moreover, there are differences between alternatively spliced genes and genes with a single transcript; specifically, genes with alternatively splicing are, on average, involved in more biological processes. Finally, we suggest that factors other than specific functional classes determine whether a gene is alternatively spliced.

  14. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

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    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1; interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3; interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP; transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2; epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2; epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B; epithelial Ca(+2 signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY; terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2; maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3. The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  15. Identification of T1D susceptibility genes within the MHC region by combining protein interaction networks and SNP genotyping data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Hansen, Kasper Lage;

    2009-01-01

    region were analysed in 1000 affected offspring trios generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). The most associated SNP in each gene was chosen and genes were mapped to ppi networks for identification of interaction partners. The association testing and resulting interacting protein...

  16. Biology-Driven Gene-Gene Interaction Analysis of Age-Related Cataract in the eMERGE Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Molly A; Verma, Shefali S; Wallace, John; Lucas, Anastasia; Berg, Richard L; Connolly, John; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F; Haines, Jonathan L; Harley, John B; Jarvik, Gail P; Kitchner, Terrie; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Larson, Eric B; Carrell, David S; Tromp, Gerard; Vrabec, Tamara R; Pendergrass, Sarah A; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics approaches to examine gene-gene models provide a means to discover interactions between multiple genes that underlie complex disease. Extensive computational demands and adjusting for multiple testing make uncovering genetic interactions a challenge. Here, we address these issues using our knowledge-driven filtering method, Biofilter, to identify putative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interaction models for cataract susceptibility, thereby reducing the number of models for analysis. Models were evaluated in 3,377 European Americans (1,185 controls, 2,192 cases) from the Marshfield Clinic, a study site of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, using logistic regression. All statistically significant models from the Marshfield Clinic were then evaluated in an independent dataset of 4,311 individuals (742 controls, 3,569 cases), using independent samples from additional study sites in the eMERGE Network: Mayo Clinic, Group Health/University of Washington, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Geisinger Health System. Eighty-three SNP-SNP models replicated in the independent dataset at likelihood ratio test P < 0.05. Among the most significant replicating models was rs12597188 (intron of CDH1)–rs11564445 (intron of CTNNB1). These genes are known to be involved in processes that include: cell-to-cell adhesion signaling, cell-cell junction organization, and cell-cell communication. Further Biofilter analysis of all replicating models revealed a number of common functions among the genes harboring the 83 replicating SNP-SNP models, which included signal transduction and PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate the utility of Biofilter as a biology-driven method, applicable for any genome-wide association study dataset. PMID:25982363

  17. The physics of protein-DNA interaction networks in the control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Protein-DNA interaction networks play a central role in many fundamental cellular processes. In gene regulation, physical interactions and reactions among the molecular components together with the physical properties of DNA control how genes are turned on and off. A key player in all these processes is the inherent flexibility of DNA, which provides an avenue for long-range interactions between distal DNA elements through DNA looping. Such versatility enables multiple interactions and results in additional complexity that is remarkably difficult to address with traditional approaches. This topical review considers recent advances in statistical physics methods to study the assembly of protein-DNA complexes with loops, their effects in the control of gene expression, and their explicit application to the prototypical lac operon genetic system of the E. coli bacterium. In the last decade, it has been shown that the underlying physical properties of DNA looping can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including the balance between robustness and sensitivity of the induction process. These physical properties are largely dependent on the free energy of DNA looping, which accounts for DNA bending and twisting effects. These new physical methods have also been used in reverse to uncover the actual in vivo free energy of looping double-stranded DNA in living cells, which was not possible with existing experimental techniques. The results obtained for DNA looping by the lac repressor inside the E. coli bacterium showed a more malleable DNA than expected as a result of the interplay of the simultaneous presence of two distinct conformations of looped DNA.

  18. Prioritization of potential candidate disease genes by topological similarity of protein-protein interaction network and phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Shiyu

    2015-02-01

    Identifying candidate disease genes is important to improve medical care. However, this task is challenging in the post-genomic era. Several computational approaches have been proposed to prioritize potential candidate genes relying on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, the experimental PPI network is usually liable to contain a number of spurious interactions. In this paper, we construct a reliable heterogeneous network by fusing multiple networks, a PPI network reconstructed by topological similarity, a phenotype similarity network and known associations between diseases and genes. We then devise a random walk-based algorithm on the reliable heterogeneous network called RWRHN to prioritize potential candidate genes for inherited diseases. The results of leave-one-out cross-validation experiments show that the RWRHN algorithm has better performance than the RWRH and CIPHER methods in inferring disease genes. Furthermore, RWRHN is used to predict novel causal genes for 16 diseases, including breast cancer, diabetes mellitus type 2, and prostate cancer, as well as to detect disease-related protein complexes. The top predictions are supported by literature evidence.

  19. Systems-level cancer gene identification from protein interaction network topology applied to melanogenesis-related functional genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Tijana; Memisevic, Vesna; Ganesan, Anand K; Przulj, Natasa

    2010-03-06

    Many real-world phenomena have been described in terms of large networks. Networks have been invaluable models for the understanding of biological systems. Since proteins carry out most biological processes, we focus on analysing protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Proteins interact to perform a function. Thus, PPI networks reflect the interconnected nature of biological processes and analysing their structural properties could provide insights into biological function and disease. We have already demonstrated, by using a sensitive graph theoretic method for comparing topologies of node neighbourhoods called 'graphlet degree signatures', that proteins with similar surroundings in PPI networks tend to perform the same functions. Here, we explore whether the involvement of genes in cancer suggests the similarity of their topological 'signatures' as well. By applying a series of clustering methods to proteins' topological signature similarities, we demonstrate that the obtained clusters are significantly enriched with cancer genes. We apply this methodology to identify novel cancer gene candidates, validating 80 per cent of our predictions in the literature. We also validate predictions biologically by identifying cancer-related negative regulators of melanogenesis identified in our siRNA screen. This is encouraging, since we have done this solely from PPI network topology. We provide clear evidence that PPI network structure around cancer genes is different from the structure around non-cancer genes. Understanding the underlying principles of this phenomenon is an open question, with a potential for increasing our understanding of complex diseases.

  20. Relating diseases by integrating gene associations and information flow through protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaneh, Mehdi Bagheri; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Identifying similar diseases could potentially provide deeper understanding of their underlying causes, and may even hint at possible treatments. For this purpose, it is necessary to have a similarity measure that reflects the underpinning molecular interactions and biological pathways. We have thus devised a network-based measure that can partially fulfill this goal. Our method assigns weights to all proteins (and consequently their encoding genes) by using information flow from a disease to the protein interaction network and back. Similarity between two diseases is then defined as the cosine of the angle between their corresponding weight vectors. The proposed method also provides a way to suggest disease-pathway associations by using the weights assigned to the genes to perform enrichment analysis for each disease. By calculating pairwise similarities between 2534 diseases, we show that our disease similarity measure is strongly correlated with the probability of finding the diseases in the same disease family and, more importantly, sharing biological pathways. We have also compared our results to those of MimMiner, a text-mining method that assigns pairwise similarity scores to diseases. We find the results of the two methods to be complementary. It is also shown that clustering diseases based on their similarities and performing enrichment analysis for the cluster centers significantly increases the term association rate, suggesting that the cluster centers are better representatives for biological pathways than the diseases themselves. This lends support to the view that our similarity measure is a good indicator of relatedness of biological processes involved in causing the diseases. Although not needed for understanding this paper, the raw results are available for download for further study at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/qmbpmn/DiseaseRelations/.

  1. Identification of Lung-Cancer-Related Genes with the Shortest Path Approach in a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Qing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. The main types of lung cancer are small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In this work, a computational method was proposed for identifying lung-cancer-related genes with a shortest path approach in a protein-protein interaction (PPI network. Based on the PPI data from STRING, a weighted PPI network was constructed. 54 NSCLC- and 84 SCLC-related genes were retrieved from associated KEGG pathways. Then the shortest paths between each pair of these 54 NSCLC genes and 84 SCLC genes were obtained with Dijkstra’s algorithm. Finally, all the genes on the shortest paths were extracted, and 25 and 38 shortest genes with a permutation P value less than 0.05 for NSCLC and SCLC were selected for further analysis. Some of the shortest path genes have been reported to be related to lung cancer. Intriguingly, the candidate genes we identified from the PPI network contained more cancer genes than those identified from the gene expression profiles. Furthermore, these genes possessed more functional similarity with the known cancer genes than those identified from the gene expression profiles. This study proved the efficiency of the proposed method and showed promising results.

  2. The properties of genome conformation and spatial gene interaction and regulation networks of normal and malignant human cell types.

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    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The spatial conformation of a genome plays an important role in the long-range regulation of genome-wide gene expression and methylation, but has not been extensively studied due to lack of genome conformation data. The recently developed chromosome conformation capturing techniques such as the Hi-C method empowered by next generation sequencing can generate unbiased, large-scale, high-resolution chromosomal interaction (contact data, providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the spatial structure of a genome and its applications in gene regulation, genomics, epigenetics, and cell biology. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale computational analysis of this new stream of genome conformation data generated for three different human leukemia cells or cell lines by the Hi-C technique. We developed and applied a set of bioinformatics methods to reliably generate spatial chromosomal contacts from high-throughput sequencing data and to effectively use them to study the properties of the genome structures in one-dimension (1D and two-dimension (2D. Our analysis demonstrates that Hi-C data can be effectively applied to study tissue-specific genome conformation, chromosome-chromosome interaction, chromosomal translocations, and spatial gene-gene interaction and regulation in a three-dimensional genome of primary tumor cells. Particularly, for the first time, we constructed genome-scale spatial gene-gene interaction network, transcription factor binding site (TFBS - TFBS interaction network, and TFBS-gene interaction network from chromosomal contact information. Remarkably, all these networks possess the properties of scale-free modular networks.

  3. Gene expression profiles of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines define molecular interaction networks governing cell migration processes.

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    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Although there is extensive information on gene expression and molecular interactions in various cell types, integrating those data in a functionally coherent manner remains challenging. This study explores the premise that genes whose expression at the mRNA level is correlated over diverse cell lines are likely to function together in a network of molecular interactions. We previously derived expression-correlated gene clusters from the database of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and associated each cluster with function categories of the Gene Ontology (GO database. From a cluster rich in genes associated with GO categories related to cell migration, we extracted 15 genes that were highly cross-correlated; prominent among them were RRAS, AXL, ADAM9, FN14, and integrin-beta1. We then used those 15 genes as bait to identify other correlated genes in the NCI-60 database. A survey of current literature disclosed, not only that many of the expression-correlated genes engaged in molecular interactions related to migration, invasion, and metastasis, but that highly cross-correlated subsets of those genes engaged in specific cell migration processes. We assembled this information in molecular interaction maps (MIMs that depict networks governing 3 cell migration processes: degradation of extracellular matrix, production of transient focal complexes at the leading edge of the cell, and retraction of the rear part of the cell. Also depicted are interactions controlling the release and effects of calcium ions, which may regulate migration in a spaciotemporal manner in the cell. The MIMs and associated text comprise a detailed and integrated summary of what is currently known or surmised about the role of the expression cross-correlated genes in molecular networks governing those processes.

  4. Construction and analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks based on gene expression profiles of Parkinson's disease.

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    Hindol Rakshit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's Disease (PD is one of the most prevailing neurodegenerative diseases. Improving diagnoses and treatments of this disease is essential, as currently there exists no cure for this disease. Microarray and proteomics data have revealed abnormal expression of several genes and proteins responsible for PD. Nevertheless, few studies have been reported involving PD-specific protein-protein interactions. RESULTS: Microarray based gene expression data and protein-protein interaction (PPI databases were combined to construct the PPI networks of differentially expressed (DE genes in post mortem brain tissue samples of patients with Parkinson's disease. Samples were collected from the substantia nigra and the frontal cerebral cortex. From the microarray data, two sets of DE genes were selected by 2-tailed t-tests and Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM, run separately to construct two Query-Query PPI (QQPPI networks. Several topological properties of these networks were studied. Nodes with High Connectivity (hubs and High Betweenness Low Connectivity (bottlenecks were identified to be the most significant nodes of the networks. Three and four-cliques were identified in the QQPPI networks. These cliques contain most of the topologically significant nodes of the networks which form core functional modules consisting of tightly knitted sub-networks. Hitherto unreported 37 PD disease markers were identified based on their topological significance in the networks. Of these 37 markers, eight were significantly involved in the core functional modules and showed significant change in co-expression levels. Four (ARRB2, STX1A, TFRC and MARCKS out of the 37 markers were found to be associated with several neurotransmitters including dopamine. CONCLUSION: This study represents a novel investigation of the PPI networks for PD, a complex disease. 37 proteins identified in our study can be considered as PD network biomarkers. These network

  5. Prioritizing cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation based on a weighted protein-protein interaction network

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    Lv Jie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As an important epigenetic modification, DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the development of mammals and in the occurrence of complex diseases. Genes that interact directly or indirectly may have the same or similar functions in the biological processes in which they are involved and together contribute to the related disease phenotypes. The complicated relations between genes can be clearly represented using network theory. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network offers a platform from which to systematically identify disease-related genes from the relations between genes with similar functions. Results We constructed a weighted human PPI network (WHPN using DNA methylation correlations based on human protein-protein interactions. WHPN represents the relationships of DNA methylation levels in gene pairs for four cancer types. A cancer-associated subnetwork (CASN was obtained from WHPN by selecting genes associated with seed genes which were known to be methylated in the four cancers. We found that CASN had a more densely connected network community than WHPN, indicating that the genes in CASN were much closer to seed genes. We prioritized 154 potential cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation in CASN by neighborhood-weighting decision rule. A function enrichment analysis for GO and KEGG indicated that the optimized genes were mainly involved in the biological processes of regulating cell apoptosis and programmed cell death. An analysis of expression profiling data revealed that many of the optimized genes were expressed differentially in the four cancers. By examining the PubMed co-citations, we found 43 optimized genes were related with cancers and aberrant methylation, and 10 genes were validated to be methylated aberrantly in cancers. Of 154 optimized genes, 27 were as diagnostic markers and 20 as prognostic markers previously identified in literature for cancers and other complex diseases by searching Pub

  6. Detection of the inferred interaction network in hepatocellular carcinoma from EHCO (Encyclopedia of Hepatocellular Carcinoma genes Online

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    Chen Chang-Han

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant advances in microarray and proteomics analyses have resulted in an exponential increase in potential new targets and have promised to shed light on the identification of disease markers and cellular pathways. We aim to collect and decipher the HCC-related genes at the systems level. Results Here, we build an integrative platform, the Encyclopedia of Hepatocellular Carcinoma genes Online, dubbed EHCO http://ehco.iis.sinica.edu.tw, to systematically collect, organize and compare the pileup of unsorted HCC-related studies by using natural language processing and softbots. Among the eight gene set collections, ranging across PubMed, SAGE, microarray, and proteomics data, there are 2,906 genes in total; however, more than 77% genes are only included once, suggesting that tremendous efforts need to be exerted to characterize the relationship between HCC and these genes. Of these HCC inventories, protein binding represents the largest proportion (~25% from Gene Ontology analysis. In fact, many differentially expressed gene sets in EHCO could form interaction networks (e.g. HBV-associated HCC network by using available human protein-protein interaction datasets. To further highlight the potential new targets in the inferred network from EHCO, we combine comparative genomics and interactomics approaches to analyze 120 evolutionary conserved and overexpressed genes in HCC. 47 out of 120 queries can form a highly interactive network with 18 queries serving as hubs. Conclusion This architectural map may represent the first step toward the attempt to decipher the hepatocarcinogenesis at the systems level. Targeting hubs and/or disruption of the network formation might reveal novel strategy for HCC treatment.

  7. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  8. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

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    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  9. Protein-protein interaction and pathway analyses of top schizophrenia genes reveal schizophrenia susceptibility genes converge on common molecular networks and enrichment of nucleosome (chromatin) assembly genes in schizophrenia susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin; Li, Ming; Su, Bing; Zhao, Zhongming; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition, the theoretical and genetic mechanisms underlying the strong genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Using 4 well-defined data sets that contain top schizophrenia susceptibility genes and applying protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, we investigated the interactions among proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We found proteins encoded by top schizophrenia susceptibility genes formed a highly significant interconnected network, and, compared with random networks, these PPI networks are statistically highly significant for both direct connectivity and indirect connectivity. We further validated these results using empirical functional data (transcriptome data from a clinical sample). These highly significant findings indicate that top schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode proteins that significantly directly interacted and formed a densely interconnected network, suggesting perturbations of common underlying molecular processes or pathways that modulate risk to schizophrenia. Our findings that schizophrenia susceptibility genes encode a highly interconnected protein network may also provide a novel explanation for the observed genetic heterogeneity of schizophrenia, ie, mutation in any member of this molecular network will lead to same functional consequences that eventually contribute to risk of schizophrenia.

  10. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  11. Pathway Detection from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Expression Data Using Color-Coding Methods and A* Search Algorithms

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    Cheng-Yu Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the large availability of protein interaction networks and microarray data supported, to identify the linear paths that have biological significance in search of a potential pathway is a challenge issue. We proposed a color-coding method based on the characteristics of biological network topology and applied heuristic search to speed up color-coding method. In the experiments, we tested our methods by applying to two datasets: yeast and human prostate cancer networks and gene expression data set. The comparisons of our method with other existing methods on known yeast MAPK pathways in terms of precision and recall show that we can find maximum number of the proteins and perform comparably well. On the other hand, our method is more efficient than previous ones and detects the paths of length 10 within 40 seconds using CPU Intel 1.73GHz and 1GB main memory running under windows operating system.

  12. Topological and organizational properties of the products of house-keeping and tissue-specific genes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsien; Liu, Wei-Chung; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2009-03-11

    Human cells of various tissue types differ greatly in morphology despite having the same set of genetic information. Some genes are expressed in all cell types to perform house-keeping functions, while some are selectively expressed to perform tissue-specific functions. In this study, we wished to elucidate how proteins encoded by human house-keeping genes and tissue-specific genes are organized in human protein-protein interaction networks. We constructed protein-protein interaction networks for different tissue types using two gene expression datasets and one protein-protein interaction database. We then calculated three network indices of topological importance, the degree, closeness, and betweenness centralities, to measure the network position of proteins encoded by house-keeping and tissue-specific genes, and quantified their local connectivity structure. Compared to a random selection of proteins, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to have a greater number of directly interacting neighbors and occupy network positions in several shortest paths of interaction between protein pairs, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins did not. In addition, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to connect with other house-keeping gene-encoded proteins in all tissue types, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins also tended to connect with other tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins, but only in approximately half of the tissue types examined. Our analysis showed that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tend to occupy important network positions, while those encoded by tissue-specific genes do not. The biological implications of our findings were discussed and we proposed a hypothesis regarding how cells organize their protein tools in protein-protein interaction networks. Our results led us to speculate that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins might form a core in human protein-protein interaction networks, while clusters of tissue-specific gene

  13. Computational analysis of HIV-1 resistance based on gene expression profiles and the virus-host interaction network.

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    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available A very small proportion of people remain negative for HIV infection after repeated HIV-1 viral exposure, which is called HIV-1 resistance. Understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 resistance is important for the development of HIV-1 vaccines and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS therapies. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-resistant individuals and HIV-susceptible individuals. One hundred eighty-five discriminative HIV-1 resistance genes were identified using the Minimum Redundancy-Maximum Relevance (mRMR and Incremental Feature Selection (IFS methods. The virus protein target enrichment analysis of the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes suggested that the HIV-1 protein nef might play an important role in HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we identified 29 infection information exchanger genes from the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes based on a virus-host interaction network analysis. The infection information exchanger genes are located on the shortest paths between virus-targeted proteins and are important for the coordination of virus infection. These proteins may be useful targets for AIDS prevention or therapy, as intervention in these pathways could disrupt communication with virus-targeted proteins and HIV-1 infection.

  14. Meta-analysis of expression signatures of muscle atrophy: gene interaction networks in early and late stages

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    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle mass can be markedly reduced through a process called atrophy, as a consequence of many diseases or critical physiological and environmental situations. Atrophy is characterised by loss of contractile proteins and reduction of fiber volume. Although in the last decade the molecular aspects underlying muscle atrophy have received increased attention, the fine mechanisms controlling muscle degeneration are still incomplete. In this study we applied meta-analysis on gene expression signatures pertaining to different types of muscle atrophy for the identification of novel key regulatory signals implicated in these degenerative processes. Results We found a general down-regulation of genes involved in energy production and carbohydrate metabolism and up-regulation of genes for protein degradation and catabolism. Six functional pathways occupy central positions in the molecular network obtained by the integration of atrophy transcriptome and molecular interaction data. They are TGF-β pathway, apoptosis, membrane trafficking/cytoskeleton organization, NFKB pathways, inflammation and reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Protein degradation pathway is evident only in the network specific for muscle short-term response to atrophy. TGF-β pathway plays a central role with proteins SMAD3/4, MYC, MAX and CDKN1A in the general network, and JUN, MYC, GNB2L1/RACK1 in the short-term muscle response network. Conclusion Our study offers a general overview of the molecular pathways and cellular processes regulating the establishment and maintenance of atrophic state in skeletal muscle, showing also how the different pathways are interconnected. This analysis identifies novel key factors that could be further investigated as potential targets for the development of therapeutic treatments. We suggest that the transcription factors SMAD3/4, GNB2L1/RACK1, MYC, MAX and JUN, whose functions have been extensively studied in

  15. The Integration of Epistasis Network and Functional Interactions in a GWAS Implicates RXR Pathway Genes in the Immune Response to Smallpox Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Brett A.; Lareau, Caleb; Oberg, Ann L.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Although many diseases and traits show large heritability, few genetic variants have been found to strongly separate phenotype groups by genotype. Complex regulatory networks of variants and expression of multiple genes lead to small individual-variant effects and difficulty replicating the effect of any single variant in an affected pathway. Interaction network modeling of GWAS identifies effects ignored by univariate models, but population differences may still cause specific genes to not replicate. Integrative network models may help detect indirect effects of variants in the underlying biological pathway. In this study, we used gene-level functional interaction information from the Integrative Multi-species Prediction (IMP) tool to reveal important genes associated with a complex phenotype through evidence from epistasis networks and pathway enrichment. We test this method for augmenting variant-based network analyses with functional interactions by applying it to a smallpox vaccine immune response GWAS. The integrative analysis spotlights the role of genes related to retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA), which has been implicated in a previous epistasis network analysis of smallpox vaccine. PMID:27513748

  16. The Genome-Wide Interaction Network of Nutrient Stress Genes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Philippe Côtôé; Shawn French; Gehrke, Sebastian S.; MacNair, Craig R.; Mangat, Chand S.; Amrita Bharat; Brown, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conventional efforts to describe essential genes in bacteria have typically emphasized nutrient-rich growth conditions. Of note, however, are the set of genes that become essential when bacteria are grown under nutrient stress. For example, more than 100 genes become indispensable when the model bacterium Escherichia coli is grown on nutrient-limited media, and many of these nutrient stress genes have also been shown to be important for the growth of various bacterial pathogens in vi...

  17. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  18. QSSPN: dynamic simulation of molecular interaction networks describing gene regulation, signalling and whole-cell metabolism in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ciarán P; Plant, Nicholas J; Moore, J Bernadette; Kierzek, Andrzej M

    2013-12-15

    Dynamic simulation of genome-scale molecular interaction networks will enable the mechanistic prediction of genotype-phenotype relationships. Despite advances in quantitative biology, full parameterization of whole-cell models is not yet possible. Simulation methods capable of using available qualitative data are required to develop dynamic whole-cell models through an iterative process of modelling and experimental validation. We formulate quasi-steady state Petri nets (QSSPN), a novel method integrating Petri nets and constraint-based analysis to predict the feasibility of qualitative dynamic behaviours in qualitative models of gene regulation, signalling and whole-cell metabolism. We present the first dynamic simulations including regulatory mechanisms and a genome-scale metabolic network in human cell, using bile acid homeostasis in human hepatocytes as a case study. QSSPN simulations reproduce experimentally determined qualitative dynamic behaviours and permit mechanistic analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships. The model and simulation software implemented in C++ are available in supplementary material and at http://sysbio3.fhms.surrey.ac.uk/qsspn/.

  19. FlyOde - a platform for community curation and interactive visualization of dynamic gene regulatory networks in Drosophila eye development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan A. Koestler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Understanding the regulatory mechanisms governing eye development of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster (D. m. requires structured knowledge of the involved genes and proteins, their interactions, and dynamic expression patterns. Especially the latter information is however to a large extent scattered throughout the literature. Results: FlyOde is an online platform for the systematic assembly of data on D. m. eye development. It consists of data on eye development obtained from the literature, and a web interface for users to interactively display these data as a gene regulatory network. Our manual curation process provides high standard structured data, following a specifically designed ontology. Visualization of gene interactions provides an overview of network topology, and filtering according to user-defined expression patterns makes it a versatile tool for daily tasks, as demonstrated by usage examples. Users are encouraged to submit additional data via a simple online form.

  20. Pathways to decoding the clinical potential of stress response FOXO-interaction networks for Huntington’s disease: of gene prioritization and context dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic eParmentier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The FOXO family of transcription factors is central to the regulation of organismal longevity and cellular survival. Several studies have indicated that FOXO factors lie at the center of a complex network of upstream pathways, cofactors and downstream targets (FOXO-interaction networks, which may have developmental and post-developmental roles in the regulation of chronic-stress response in normal and diseased cells. Noticeably, FOXO factors are important for the regulation of proteotoxicity and neuron survival in several models of neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that FOXO-interaction networks may have therapeutic potential. However, the status of FOXO-interaction networks in neurodegenerative disease remains largely unknown. Systems modeling is anticipated to provide a comprehensive assessment of this question. In particular, interrogating the context-dependent variability of FOXO-interaction networks could predict the clinical potential of cellular-stress response genes and aging regulators for tackling brain and peripheral pathology in neurodegenerative disease. Using published transcriptomic data obtained from murine models of Huntington’s disease and post-mortem brains, blood samples and induced-pluripotent-stem cells from Huntington’s disease carriers as a case example, this review briefly highlights how the biological status and clinical potential of FOXO-interaction networks for Huntington’s disease may be decoded by developing network and entropy based feature selection across heterogeneous datasets.

  1. Towards a systems-level understanding of gene regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic networks in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Hernández-Prieto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are essential primary producers in marine ecosystems, playing an important role in both carbon and nitrogen cycles. In the last decade, various genome sequencing and metagenomic projects have generated large amounts of genetic data for cyanobacteria. This wealth of data provides researchers with a new basis for the study of molecular adaptation, ecology and evolution of cyanobacteria, as well as for developing biotechnological applications. It also facilitates the use of multiplex techniques, i.e., expression profiling by high-throughput technologies such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics. However, exploration and analysis of these data is challenging, and often requires advanced computational methods. Also, they need to be integrated into our existing framework of knowledge to use them to draw reliable biological conclusions. Here, systems biology provides important tools. Especially, the construction and analysis of molecular networks has emerged as a powerful systems-level framework, with which to integrate such data, and to better understand biological relevant processes in these organisms.In this review, we provide an overview of the advances and experimental approaches undertaken using multiplex data from genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, we summarize currently available web-based tools dedicated to cyanobacteria, i.e., CyanoBase, CyanoEXpress, ProPortal, Cyanorak, CyanoBIKE, and CINPER. Finally, we present a case study for the freshwater model cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, to show the power of meta-analysis, and the potential to extrapolate acquired knowledge to the ecologically important marine cyanobacteria genus, Prochlorococcus.

  2. Discovering functional interaction patterns in protein-protein interaction networks

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    Can Tolga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, a considerable amount of research effort has been directed to the analysis of biological networks with the availability of genome-scale networks of genes and/or proteins of an increasing number of organisms. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network is a particular biological network which represents physical interactions between pairs of proteins of an organism. Major research on PPI networks has focused on understanding the topological organization of PPI networks, evolution of PPI networks and identification of conserved subnetworks across different species, discovery of modules of interaction, use of PPI networks for functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins, and improvement of the accuracy of currently available networks. Results In this article, we map known functional annotations of proteins onto a PPI network in order to identify frequently occurring interaction patterns in the functional space. We propose a new frequent pattern identification technique, PPISpan, adapted specifically for PPI networks from a well-known frequent subgraph identification method, gSpan. Existing module discovery techniques either look for specific clique-like highly interacting protein clusters or linear paths of interaction. However, our goal is different; instead of single clusters or pathways, we look for recurring functional interaction patterns in arbitrary topologies. We have applied PPISpan on PPI networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified a number of frequently occurring functional interaction patterns. Conclusion With the help of PPISpan, recurring functional interaction patterns in an organism's PPI network can be identified. Such an analysis offers a new perspective on the modular organization of PPI networks. The complete list of identified functional interaction patterns is available at http://bioserver.ceng.metu.edu.tr/PPISpan/.

  3. Social Interaction in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available from www.springerlink.com. Sloep, P. (2009). Social Interaction in Learning Networks. In R. Koper (Ed.), Learning Network Services for Professional Development (pp 13-15). Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag.

  4. Insights into significant pathways and gene interaction networks in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Using identified DEGs, significantly changed biological processes such as nucleic acid metabolic process and KEGG pathways such as cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction in PBMCs of HCC patients were identified. In addition, several important hub genes, for example, CUL4A, and interleukin (IL 8 were also uncovered.

  5. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

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    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  6. Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  7. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

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    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  8. Crowdsourcing the nodulation gene network discovery environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-26

    The Legumes (Fabaceae) are an economically and ecologically important group of plant species with the conspicuous capacity for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules, specialized plant organs containing symbiotic microbes. With the aim of understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to nodulation, many efforts are underway to identify nodulation-related genes and determine how these genes interact with each other. In order to accurately and efficiently reconstruct nodulation gene network, a crowdsourcing platform, CrowdNodNet, was created. The platform implements the jQuery and vis.js JavaScript libraries, so that users are able to interactively visualize and edit the gene network, and easily access the information about the network, e.g. gene lists, gene interactions and gene functional annotations. In addition, all the gene information is written on MediaWiki pages, enabling users to edit and contribute to the network curation. Utilizing the continuously updated, collaboratively written, and community-reviewed Wikipedia model, the platform could, in a short time, become a comprehensive knowledge base of nodulation-related pathways. The platform could also be used for other biological processes, and thus has great potential for integrating and advancing our understanding of the functional genomics and systems biology of any process for any species. The platform is available at http://crowd.bioops.info/ , and the source code can be openly accessed at https://github.com/bioops/crowdnodnet under MIT License.

  9. Gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Stephen B; McCaffery, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly accessible technologies for typing genetic variation, studies of gene-environment (G×E) interactions have proliferated in psychological research. Among the aims of such studies are testing developmental hypotheses and models of the etiology of behavioral disorders, defining boundaries of genetic and environmental influences, and identifying individuals most susceptible to risk exposures or most amenable to preventive and therapeutic interventions. This research also coincides with the emergence of unanticipated difficulties in detecting genetic variants of direct association with behavioral traits and disorders, which may be obscured if genetic effects are expressed only in predisposing environments. In this essay we consider these and other rationales for positing G×E interactions, review conceptual models meant to inform G×E interpretations from a psychological perspective, discuss points of common critique to which G×E research is vulnerable, and address the role of the environment in G×E interactions.

  10. Inference of Gene Regulatory Network Based on Local Bayesian Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Guo, Wei-Feng; Wei, Ze-Gang; Chen, Luonan

    2016-08-01

    The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from expression data can mine the direct regulations among genes and gain deep insights into biological processes at a network level. During past decades, numerous computational approaches have been introduced for inferring the GRNs. However, many of them still suffer from various problems, e.g., Bayesian network (BN) methods cannot handle large-scale networks due to their high computational complexity, while information theory-based methods cannot identify the directions of regulatory interactions and also suffer from false positive/negative problems. To overcome the limitations, in this work we present a novel algorithm, namely local Bayesian network (LBN), to infer GRNs from gene expression data by using the network decomposition strategy and false-positive edge elimination scheme. Specifically, LBN algorithm first uses conditional mutual information (CMI) to construct an initial network or GRN, which is decomposed into a number of local networks or GRNs. Then, BN method is employed to generate a series of local BNs by selecting the k-nearest neighbors of each gene as its candidate regulatory genes, which significantly reduces the exponential search space from all possible GRN structures. Integrating these local BNs forms a tentative network or GRN by performing CMI, which reduces redundant regulations in the GRN and thus alleviates the false positive problem. The final network or GRN can be obtained by iteratively performing CMI and local BN on the tentative network. In the iterative process, the false or redundant regulations are gradually removed. When tested on the benchmark GRN datasets from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in E.coli, our results suggest that LBN outperforms other state-of-the-art methods (ARACNE, GENIE3 and NARROMI) significantly, with more accurate and robust performance. In particular, the decomposition strategy with local Bayesian networks not only effectively reduce

  11. Networks and Interactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Considine, Mark; Lewis, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The systemic reform of employment services in OECD countries was driven by New Public Management (NPM) and then post-NPM reforms, when first-phase changes such as privatization were amended with `joined up' processes to help manage fragmentation. This article examines the networking strategies...... of `street-level' employment services staff for the impacts of this. Contrary to expectations, networking has generally declined over the last decade. There are signs of path dependence in networking patterns within each country, but also a convergence of patterns for the UK and Australia......, but not The Netherlands. Networking appears to be mediated by policy and regulatory imperatives....

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Robert W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbred mouse strains and a large family of BXD strains that are widely used for systems genetics. Our goal is to provide a key community resource on the genetics of the normative lung transcriptome that can serve as a foundation for experimental analysis and allow predicting genetic predisposition and response to pathogens, allergens, and xenobiotics. Methods Steady-state polyA+ mRNA levels were assayed across a diverse and fully genotyped panel of 57 isogenic strains using the Affymetrix M430 2.0 array. Correlations of expression levels between genes were determined. Global expression QTL (eQTL analysis and network covariance analysis was performed using tools and resources in GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. Results Expression values were highly variable across strains and in many cases exhibited a high heri-tability factor. Several genes which showed a restricted expression to lung tissue were identified. Using correlations between gene expression values across all strains, we defined and extended memberships of several important molecular networks in the lung. Furthermore, we were able to extract signatures of immune cell subpopulations and characterize co-variation and shared genetic modulation. Known QTL regions for respiratory infection susceptibility were investigated and several cis-eQTL genes were identified. Numerous cis- and trans-regulated transcripts and chromosomal intervals with strong regulatory activity were mapped. The Cyp1a1 P

  13. A conserved mammalian protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Pérez-Bercoff

    Full Text Available Physical interactions between proteins mediate a variety of biological functions, including signal transduction, physical structuring of the cell and regulation. While extensive catalogs of such interactions are known from model organisms, their evolutionary histories are difficult to study given the lack of interaction data from phylogenetic outgroups. Using phylogenomic approaches, we infer a upper bound on the time of origin for a large set of human protein-protein interactions, showing that most such interactions appear relatively ancient, dating no later than the radiation of placental mammals. By analyzing paired alignments of orthologous and putatively interacting protein-coding genes from eight mammals, we find evidence for weak but significant co-evolution, as measured by relative selective constraint, between pairs of genes with interacting proteins. However, we find no strong evidence for shared instances of directional selection within an interacting pair. Finally, we use a network approach to show that the distribution of selective constraint across the protein interaction network is non-random, with a clear tendency for interacting proteins to share similar selective constraints. Collectively, the results suggest that, on the whole, protein interactions in mammals are under selective constraint, presumably due to their functional roles.

  14. Integration of biological networks and gene expression data using Cytoscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cline, M.S.; Smoot, M.; Cerami, E.

    2007-01-01

    Cytoscape is a free software package for visualizing, modeling and analyzing molecular and genetic interaction networks. This protocol explains how to use Cytoscape to analyze the results of mRNA expression profiling, and other functional genomics and proteomics experiments, in the context of an ...... and (v) identifying enriched Gene Ontology annotations in the network. These steps provide a broad sample of the types of analyses performed by Cytoscape....... of an interaction network obtained for genes of interest. Five major steps are described: (i) obtaining a gene or protein network, (ii) displaying the network using layout algorithms, (iii) integrating with gene expression and other functional attributes, (iv) identifying putative complexes and functional modules...

  15. Identification of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus Infection-Related Human Genes Based on Shortest Paths in a Virus-Human Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently emerging Influenza A/H7N9 virus is reported to be able to infect humans and cause mortality. However, viral and host factors associated with the infection are poorly understood. It is suggested by the “guilt by association” rule that interacting proteins share the same or similar functions and hence may be involved in the same pathway. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify Influenza A/H7N9 virus infection-related human genes based on this rule from the shortest paths in a virus-human protein interaction network. Finally, we screened out the most significant 20 human genes, which could be the potential infection related genes, providing guidelines for further experimental validation. Analysis of the 20 genes showed that they were enriched in protein binding, saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. We also compared the results with those from human rhinovirus (HRV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by the same method. It was indicated that saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways might be especially associated with the H7N9 infection. These results could shed some light on the understanding of the virus infection mechanism, providing basis for future experimental biology studies and for the development of effective strategies for H7N9 clinical therapies.

  16. Inferring slowly-changing dynamic gene-regulatory networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Ernst C.; Abbruzzo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic gene-regulatory networks are complex since the interaction patterns between their components mean that it is impossible to study parts of the network in separation. This holistic character of gene-regulatory networks poses a real challenge to any type of modelling. Graphical models are a cla

  17. Interactive Network Exploration with Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Štajdohar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis is one of the most widely used techniques in many areas of modern science. Most existing tools for that purpose are limited to drawing networks and computing their basic general characteristics. The user is not able to interactively and graphically manipulate the networks, select and explore subgraphs using other statistical and data mining techniques, add and plot various other data within the graph, and so on. In this paper we present a tool that addresses these challenges, an add-on for exploration of networks within the general component-based environment Orange.

  18. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  19. Overview of methods of reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks: Boolean and Bayesian networks

    OpenAIRE

    Frolova A. O.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks is an intensively studied topic in Systems Biology as it reconstructs regulatory interactions between all genes in the genome in the most complete form. The extreme computational complexity of this problem and lack of thorough reviews on reconstruction methods of gene regulatory network is a significant obstacle to further development of this area. In this article the two most common methods for modeling gene regulatory networks are surveyed: Bo...

  20. Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathway Analyses of Top Schizophrenia Genes Reveal Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes Converge on Common Molecular Networks and Enrichment of Nucleosome (Chromatin) Assembly Genes in Schizophrenia Susceptibility Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Jia, Peilin; Li, Ming; SU, Bing; Zhao, Zhongming; Gan, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many promising schizophrenia candidate genes and demonstrated that common polygenic variation contributes to schizophrenia risk. However, whether these genes represent perturbations to a common but limited set of underlying molecular processes (pathways) that modulate risk to schizophrenia remains elusive, and it is not known whether these genes converge on common biological pathways (networks) or represent different pathways. In addition...

  1. Inference of Gene Regulatory Network Based on Local Bayesian Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs from expression data can mine the direct regulations among genes and gain deep insights into biological processes at a network level. During past decades, numerous computational approaches have been introduced for inferring the GRNs. However, many of them still suffer from various problems, e.g., Bayesian network (BN methods cannot handle large-scale networks due to their high computational complexity, while information theory-based methods cannot identify the directions of regulatory interactions and also suffer from false positive/negative problems. To overcome the limitations, in this work we present a novel algorithm, namely local Bayesian network (LBN, to infer GRNs from gene expression data by using the network decomposition strategy and false-positive edge elimination scheme. Specifically, LBN algorithm first uses conditional mutual information (CMI to construct an initial network or GRN, which is decomposed into a number of local networks or GRNs. Then, BN method is employed to generate a series of local BNs by selecting the k-nearest neighbors of each gene as its candidate regulatory genes, which significantly reduces the exponential search space from all possible GRN structures. Integrating these local BNs forms a tentative network or GRN by performing CMI, which reduces redundant regulations in the GRN and thus alleviates the false positive problem. The final network or GRN can be obtained by iteratively performing CMI and local BN on the tentative network. In the iterative process, the false or redundant regulations are gradually removed. When tested on the benchmark GRN datasets from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in E.coli, our results suggest that LBN outperforms other state-of-the-art methods (ARACNE, GENIE3 and NARROMI significantly, with more accurate and robust performance. In particular, the decomposition strategy with local Bayesian networks not only

  2. Inferring gene regression networks with model trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Ruiz Jesus S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel strategies are required in order to handle the huge amount of data produced by microarray technologies. To infer gene regulatory networks, the first step is to find direct regulatory relationships between genes building the so-called gene co-expression networks. They are typically generated using correlation statistics as pairwise similarity measures. Correlation-based methods are very useful in order to determine whether two genes have a strong global similarity but do not detect local similarities. Results We propose model trees as a method to identify gene interaction networks. While correlation-based methods analyze each pair of genes, in our approach we generate a single regression tree for each gene from the remaining genes. Finally, a graph from all the relationships among output and input genes is built taking into account whether the pair of genes is statistically significant. For this reason we apply a statistical procedure to control the false discovery rate. The performance of our approach, named REGNET, is experimentally tested on two well-known data sets: Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and E.coli data set. First, the biological coherence of the results are tested. Second the E.coli transcriptional network (in the Regulon database is used as control to compare the results to that of a correlation-based method. This experiment shows that REGNET performs more accurately at detecting true gene associations than the Pearson and Spearman zeroth and first-order correlation-based methods. Conclusions REGNET generates gene association networks from gene expression data, and differs from correlation-based methods in that the relationship between one gene and others is calculated simultaneously. Model trees are very useful techniques to estimate the numerical values for the target genes by linear regression functions. They are very often more precise than linear regression models because they can add just different linear

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor-dependent gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Phuc Le

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available While the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid regulation of transcription have been studied in detail, the global networks regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR remain unknown. To address this question, we performed an orthogonal analysis to identify direct targets of the GR. First, we analyzed the expression profile of mouse livers in the presence or absence of exogenous glucocorticoid, resulting in over 1,300 differentially expressed genes. We then executed genome-wide location analysis on chromatin from the same livers, identifying more than 300 promoters that are bound by the GR. Intersecting the two lists yielded 53 genes whose expression is functionally dependent upon the ligand-bound GR. Further network and sequence analysis of the functional targets enabled us to suggest interactions between the GR and other transcription factors at specific target genes. Together, our results further our understanding of the GR and its targets, and provide the basis for more targeted glucocorticoid therapies.

  4. [Analyzed the molecular interaction network of tumor suppressor gene 14-3-3 sigma in lung cancer cell based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ting; Mi, Wei; Li, Min; Cao, Bang-rong; Feng, Lin; Cheng, Shu-jun; Gao, Yan-ning

    2013-08-01

    To analysis the molecular interaction network of 14-3-3 sigma in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Established stable over-expressed 14-3-3 sigma protein PG cells, MTT assay was used to assess the growth rate of PG cells. Though stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and Mass spectrometry (MS) technology, to identify difference expressed proteins caused by over expressed 14-3-3 sigma. The protein expressed >2 or encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG), established the molecular interaction network of tumor suppressor gene 14-3-3 sigma. The growth rate of over-expressed 14-3-3 sigma PG cell was obviously slower down compared to vector PG cells. A database including 147 differential protein was established. And a molecular interaction network of 14-3-3 sigma containing 26 protein was constructed.In this network, the expression of CSNK2A1 (casein kinase II subunit alpha), involved in numerous cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis and transcription, was the most significantly increased. A DNA repair protein, MEN1 (Menin) which functions as a transcriptional regulator was the most significantly decreased. After stable transfected with 14-3-3 sigma gene, growth rate of PG cells was inhibited, the proteins associated with cell cycle, DNA damage repair mechanisms were significantly changed, and constructed the molecular interaction network.

  5. Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun

    In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide

  6. Exhaustive Search for Fuzzy Gene Networks from Microarray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Fitch, J P; Quong, J N; Quong, A A

    2003-07-07

    Recent technological advances in high-throughput data collection allow for the study of increasingly complex systems on the scale of the whole cellular genome and proteome. Gene network models are required to interpret large and complex data sets. Rationally designed system perturbations (e.g. gene knock-outs, metabolite removal, etc) can be used to iteratively refine hypothetical models, leading to a modeling-experiment cycle for high-throughput biological system analysis. We use fuzzy logic gene network models because they have greater resolution than Boolean logic models and do not require the precise parameter measurement needed for chemical kinetics-based modeling. The fuzzy gene network approach is tested by exhaustive search for network models describing cyclin gene interactions in yeast cell cycle microarray data, with preliminary success in recovering interactions predicted by previous biological knowledge and other analysis techniques. Our goal is to further develop this method in combination with experiments we are performing on bacterial regulatory networks.

  7. Compressed Adjacency Matrices: Untangling Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, K; Westenberg, M A; van Wijk, J J

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel technique-Compressed Adjacency Matrices-for visualizing gene regulatory networks. These directed networks have strong structural characteristics: out-degrees with a scale-free distribution, in-degrees bound by a low maximum, and few and small cycles. Standard visualization techniques, such as node-link diagrams and adjacency matrices, are impeded by these network characteristics. The scale-free distribution of out-degrees causes a high number of intersecting edges in node-link diagrams. Adjacency matrices become space-inefficient due to the low in-degrees and the resulting sparse network. Compressed adjacency matrices, however, exploit these structural characteristics. By cutting open and rearranging an adjacency matrix, we achieve a compact and neatly-arranged visualization. Compressed adjacency matrices allow for easy detection of subnetworks with a specific structure, so-called motifs, which provide important knowledge about gene regulatory networks to domain experts. We summarize motifs commonly referred to in the literature, and relate them to network analysis tasks common to the visualization domain. We show that a user can easily find the important motifs in compressed adjacency matrices, and that this is hard in standard adjacency matrix and node-link diagrams. We also demonstrate that interaction techniques for standard adjacency matrices can be used for our compressed variant. These techniques include rearrangement clustering, highlighting, and filtering.

  8. A Network Approach of Gene Co-expression in the Zea mays/Aspergillus flavus Pathosystem to Map Host/Pathogen Interaction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musungu, Bryan M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L; Payne, Gary A; OBrian, Greg; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Geisler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    A gene co-expression network (GEN) was generated using a dual RNA-seq study with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and its plant host Zea mays during the initial 3 days of infection. The analysis deciphered novel pathways and mapped genes of interest in both organisms during the infection. This network revealed a high degree of connectivity in many of the previously recognized pathways in Z. mays such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). For the pathogen A. flavus, a link between aflatoxin production and vesicular transport was identified within the network. There was significant interspecies correlation of expression between Z. mays and A. flavus for a subset of 104 Z. mays, and 1942 A. flavus genes. This resulted in an interspecies subnetwork enriched in multiple Z. mays genes involved in the production of ROS. In addition to the ROS from Z. mays, there was enrichment in the vesicular transport pathways and the aflatoxin pathway for A. flavus. Included in these genes, a key aflatoxin cluster regulator, AflS, was found to be co-regulated with multiple Z. mays ROS producing genes within the network, suggesting AflS may be monitoring host ROS levels. The entire GEN for both host and pathogen, and the subset of interspecies correlations, is presented as a tool for hypothesis generation and discovery for events in the early stages of fungal infection of Z. mays by A. flavus.

  9. Predicting genetic interactions with random walks on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that synthetic lethal genetic interactions between gene mutations provide an indication of functional redundancy between molecular complexes and pathways. These observations help explain the finding that organisms are able to tolerate single gene deletions for a large majority of genes. For example, system-wide gene knockout/knockdown studies in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans revealed non-viable phenotypes for a mere 18% and 10% of the genome, respectively. It has been postulated that the low percentage of essential genes reflects the extensive amount of genetic buffering that occurs within genomes. Consistent with this hypothesis, systematic double-knockout screens in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans show that, on average, 0.5% of tested gene pairs are synthetic sick or synthetic lethal. While knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions provides valuable insight into molecular functionality, testing all combinations of gene pairs represents a daunting task for molecular biologists, as the combinatorial nature of these relationships imposes a large experimental burden. Still, the task of mapping pairwise interactions between genes is essential to discovering functional relationships between molecular complexes and pathways, as they form the basis of genetic robustness. Towards the goal of alleviating the experimental workload, computational techniques that accurately predict genetic interactions can potentially aid in targeting the most likely candidate interactions. Building on previous studies that analyzed properties of network topology to predict genetic interactions, we apply random walks on biological networks to accurately predict pairwise genetic interactions. Furthermore, we incorporate all published non-interactions into our algorithm for measuring the topological relatedness between two genes. We apply our method to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans datasets and, using a decision tree

  10. Brief isoflurane anaesthesia affects differential gene expression, gene ontology and gene networks in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Damon A; Galley, Helen F; Moura, Alessandro P S; Webster, Nigel R

    2017-01-15

    Much is still unknown about the mechanisms of effects of even brief anaesthesia on the brain and previous studies have simply compared differential expression profiles with and without anaesthesia. We hypothesised that network analysis, in addition to the traditional differential gene expression and ontology analysis, would enable identification of the effects of anaesthesia on interactions between genes. Rats (n=10 per group) were randomised to anaesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen or oxygen only for 15min, and 6h later brains were removed. Differential gene expression and gene ontology analysis of microarray data was performed. Standard clustering techniques and principal component analysis with Bayesian rules were used along with social network analysis methods, to quantitatively model and describe the gene networks. Anaesthesia had marked effects on genes in the brain with differential regulation of 416 probe sets by at least 2 fold. Gene ontology analysis showed 23 genes were functionally related to the anaesthesia and of these, 12 were involved with neurotransmitter release, transport and secretion. Gene network analysis revealed much greater connectivity in genes from brains from anaesthetised rats compared to controls. Other importance measures were also altered after anaesthesia; median [range] closeness centrality (shortest path) was lower in anaesthetized animals (0.07 [0-0.30]) than controls (0.39 [0.30-0.53], pgenes after anaesthesia and suggests future targets for investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In silico network topology-based prediction of gene essentiality

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Joao Paulo Muller; Mombach, Jose Carlos Merino; Vieira, Renata; da Silva, Jose Guliherme Camargo; Lemke, Ney; Sinigaglia, Marialva

    2007-01-01

    The identification of genes essential for survival is important for the understanding of the minimal requirements for cellular life and for drug design. As experimental studies with the purpose of building a catalog of essential genes for a given organism are time-consuming and laborious, a computational approach which could predict gene essentiality with high accuracy would be of great value. We present here a novel computational approach, called NTPGE (Network Topology-based Prediction of Gene Essentiality), that relies on network topology features of a gene to estimate its essentiality. The first step of NTPGE is to construct the integrated molecular network for a given organism comprising protein physical, metabolic and transcriptional regulation interactions. The second step consists in training a decision tree-based machine learning algorithm on known essential and non-essential genes of the organism of interest, considering as learning attributes the network topology information for each of these genes...

  12. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  13. Gene Regulatory Network Reconstruction Using Conditional Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory network from expression data is an important area of research that provides insight to the inner workings of a biological system. The relevance-network-based approaches provide a simple and easily-scalable solution to the understanding of interaction between genes. Up until now, most works based on relevance network focus on the discovery of direct regulation using correlation coefficient or mutual information. However, some of the more complicated interactions such as interactive regulation and coregulation are not easily detected. In this work, we propose a relevance network model for gene regulatory network inference which employs both mutual information and conditional mutual information to determine the interactions between genes. For this purpose, we propose a conditional mutual information estimator based on adaptive partitioning which allows us to condition on both discrete and continuous random variables. We provide experimental results that demonstrate that the proposed regulatory network inference algorithm can provide better performance when the target network contains coregulated and interactively regulated genes.

  14. Building a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Maha; Nasraoui, Olfa; Cooper, Nigel G F

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biomedical literature and its underlying knowledge base is rapidly expanding, making it beyond the ability of a single human being to read through all the literature. Several automated methods have been developed to help make sense of this dilemma. The present study reports on the results of a text mining approach to extract gene interactions from the data warehouse of published experimental results which are then used to benchmark an interaction network associated with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, there is, as yet, no glaucoma interaction network derived solely from text mining approaches. The presence of such a network could provide a useful summative knowledge base to complement other forms of clinical information related to this disease. A glaucoma corpus was constructed from PubMed Central and a text mining approach was applied to extract genes and their relations from this corpus. The extracted relations between genes were checked using reference interaction databases and classified generally as known or new relations. The extracted genes and relations were then used to construct a glaucoma interaction network. Analysis of the resulting network indicated that it bears the characteristics of a small world interaction network. Our analysis showed the presence of seven glaucoma linked genes that defined the network modularity. A web-based system for browsing and visualizing the extracted glaucoma related interaction networks is made available at http://neurogene.spd.louisville.edu/GlaucomaINViewer/Form1.aspx. This study has reported the first version of a glaucoma interaction network using a text mining approach. The power of such an approach is in its ability to cover a wide range of glaucoma related studies published over many years. Hence, a bigger picture of the disease can be established. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first glaucoma interaction network to summarize the known literature. The major findings were a set of

  15. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Groppe, Brad; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks. PMID:28272416

  16. Current approaches to gene regulatory network modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazma Alvis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many different approaches have been developed to model and simulate gene regulatory networks. We proposed the following categories for gene regulatory network models: network parts lists, network topology models, network control logic models, and dynamic models. Here we will describe some examples for each of these categories. We will study the topology of gene regulatory networks in yeast in more detail, comparing a direct network derived from transcription factor binding data and an indirect network derived from genome-wide expression data in mutants. Regarding the network dynamics we briefly describe discrete and continuous approaches to network modelling, then describe a hybrid model called Finite State Linear Model and demonstrate that some simple network dynamics can be simulated in this model.

  17. Two-Way Gene Interaction From Microarray Data Based on Correlation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Alavi Majd, Hamid; Talebi, Atefeh; Gilany, Kambiz; Khayyer, Nasibeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Gene networks have generated a massive explosion in the development of high-throughput techniques for monitoring various aspects of gene activity. Networks offer a natural way to model interactions between genes, and extracting gene network information from high-throughput genomic data is an important and difficult task. Objectives The purpose of this study is to construct a two-way gene network based on parametric and nonparametric correlation coefficients. The first step in const...

  18. Disease Gene Prioritization Using Network and Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Gady; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Xu, Jinbo; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia; Börnigen, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying high-confidence candidate genes that are causative for disease phenotypes, from the large lists of variations produced by high-throughput genomics, can be both time-consuming and costly. The development of novel computational approaches, utilizing existing biological knowledge for the prioritization of such candidate genes, can improve the efficiency and accuracy of the biomedical data analysis. It can also reduce the cost of such studies by avoiding experimental validations of irrelevant candidates. In this study, we address this challenge by proposing a novel gene prioritization approach that ranks promising candidate genes that are likely to be involved in a disease or phenotype under study. This algorithm is based on the modified conditional random field (CRF) model that simultaneously makes use of both gene annotations and gene interactions, while preserving their original representation. We validated our approach on two independent disease benchmark studies by ranking candidate genes using network and feature information. Our results showed both high area under the curve (AUC) value (0.86), and more importantly high partial AUC (pAUC) value (0.1296), and revealed higher accuracy and precision at the top predictions as compared with other well-performed gene prioritization tools, such as Endeavour (AUC-0.82, pAUC-0.083) and PINTA (AUC-0.76, pAUC-0.066). We were able to detect more target genes (9/18/19/27) on top positions (1/5/10/20) compared to Endeavour (3/11/14/23) and PINTA (6/10/13/18). To demonstrate its usability, we applied our method to a case study for the prediction of molecular mechanisms contributing to intellectual disability and autism. Our approach was able to correctly recover genes related to both disorders and provide suggestions for possible additional candidates based on their rankings and functional annotations. PMID:25844670

  19. Gene regulatory networks elucidating huanglongbing disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Federico; Reagan, Russell L; Uratsu, Sandra L; Phu, My L; Albrecht, Ute; Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E; Bowman, Kim D; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas), especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein - protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes) would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation), sucrose metabolism (upregulation), and starch biosynthesis (upregulation). In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70) was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur.

  20. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  1. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  2. Differentially expressed genes in major depression reside on the periphery of resilient gene coexpression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eGaiteri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The structure of gene coexpression networks reflects the activation and interaction of multiple cellular systems. Since the pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders is influenced by diverse cellular systems and pathways, we investigated gene coexpression networks in major depression, and searched for putative unifying themes in network connectivity across neuropsychiatric disorders. Specifically, based on the prevalence of the lethality-centrality relationship in disease-related networks, we hypothesized that network changes between control and major depression-related networks would be centered around coexpression hubs, and secondly, that differentially expressed (DE genes would have a characteristic position and connectivity level in those networks. Mathematically, the first hypothesis tests the relationship of differential coexpression to network connectivity, while the second hybrid expression-and-network hypothesis tests the relationship of differential expression to network connectivity. To answer these questions about the potential interaction of coexpression network structure with differential expression, we utilized all available human post-mortem depression-related datasets appropriate for coexpression analysis, which spanned different microarray platforms, cohorts, and brain regions. Similar studies were also performed in an animal model of depression and in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder microarray datasets. We now provide results which consistently support (1 that genes assemble into small-world and scale-free networks in control subjects, (2 that this efficient network topology is largely resilient to changes in depressed subjects, and (3 that DE genes are positioned on the periphery of coexpression networks. Similar results were observed in a mouse model of depression, and in selected bipolar- and schizophrenia-related networks. Finally, we show that baseline expression variability contributes to the propensity of genes to be

  3. Overview of methods of reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks: Boolean and Bayesian networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolova A. O.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks is an intensively studied topic in Systems Biology as it reconstructs regulatory interactions between all genes in the genome in the most complete form. The extreme computational complexity of this problem and lack of thorough reviews on reconstruction methods of gene regulatory network is a significant obstacle to further development of this area. In this article the two most common methods for modeling gene regulatory networks are surveyed: Boolean and Bayesian networks. The mathematical description of each method is given, as well as several algorithmic approaches to modeling gene networks using these methods; the complexity of algorithms and the problems that arise during its implementation are also noted.

  4. Explorers of the Universe: Interactive Electronic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marino C.; Burks, Geoffrey; Busby, Michael R.; Cannon, Tiffani; Sotoohi, Goli; Wade, Montanez

    2000-01-01

    This paper details how the Interactive Electronic Network is being utilized by secondary and postsecondary students, and their teachers and professors, to facilitate learning and understanding. The Interactive Electronic Network is couched within the Explorers of the Universe web site in a restricted portion entitled Gateway.

  5. Synthetic gene networks in plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Astrid; Junker, Björn H

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology methods are routinely applied in the plant field as in other eukaryotic model systems. Several synthetic components have been developed in plants and an increasing number of studies report on the assembly into functional synthetic genetic circuits. This chapter gives an overview of the existing plant genetic networks and describes in detail the application of two systems for inducible gene expression. The ethanol-inducible system relies on the ethanol-responsive interaction of the AlcA transcriptional activator and the AlcR receptor resulting in the transcription of the gene of interest (GOI). In comparison, the translational fusion of GOI and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) domain leads to the dexamethasone-dependent nuclear translocation of the GOI::GR protein. This chapter contains detailed protocols for the application of both systems in the model plants potato and Arabidopsis, respectively.

  6. The yeast noncoding RNA interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panni, Simona; Prakash, Ananth; Bateman, Alex; Orchard, Sandra

    2017-10-01

    This article describes the creation of the first expert manually curated noncoding RNA interaction networks for S. cerevisiae The RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interaction networks have been carefully extracted from the experimental literature and made available through the IntAct database (www.ebi.ac.uk/intact). We provide an initial network analysis and compare their properties to the much larger protein-protein interaction network. We find that the proteins that bind to ncRNAs in the network contain only a small proportion of classical RNA binding domains. We also see an enrichment of WD40 domains suggesting their direct involvement in ncRNA interactions. We discuss the challenges in collecting noncoding RNA interaction data and the opportunities for worldwide collaboration to fill the unmet need for this data. © 2017 Panni et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Effects of a silenced gene in Boolean network models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Haliki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulation and their regulatory networks are one of the most challenging research problems of computational biology and complexity sciences. Gene regulation is formed by indirect interaction between DNA segments which are protein coding genes to configure the expression level of one another. Prevention of expression of any genes in gene regulation at the levels of transcription or translation indicates the gene silencing event. The present study examined what types of results in gene silencing would bring about in the dynamics of Boolean genetic regulatory mechanisms. The analytical study was performed in gene expression variations of Boolean dynamics first, then the related numerical analysis was simulated in real networks in the literature.

  8. Using effective subnetworks to predict selected properties of gene networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemunu H Gunaratne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Difficulties associated with implementing gene therapy are caused by the complexity of the underlying regulatory networks. The forms of interactions between the hundreds of genes, proteins, and metabolites in these networks are not known very accurately. An alternative approach is to limit consideration to genes on the network. Steady state measurements of these influence networks can be obtained from DNA microarray experiments. However, since they contain a large number of nodes, the computation of influence networks requires a prohibitively large set of microarray experiments. Furthermore, error estimates of the network make verifiable predictions impossible. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we propose an alternative approach. Rather than attempting to derive an accurate model of the network, we ask what questions can be addressed using lower dimensional, highly simplified models. More importantly, is it possible to use such robust features in applications? We first identify a small group of genes that can be used to affect changes in other nodes of the network. The reduced effective empirical subnetwork (EES can be computed using steady state measurements on a small number of genetically perturbed systems. We show that the EES can be used to make predictions on expression profiles of other mutants, and to compute how to implement pre-specified changes in the steady state of the underlying biological process. These assertions are verified in a synthetic influence network. We also use previously published experimental data to compute the EES associated with an oxygen deprivation network of E.coli, and use it to predict gene expression levels on a double mutant. The predictions are significantly different from the experimental results for less than of genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The constraints imposed by gene expression levels of mutants can be used to address a selected set of questions about a gene network.

  9. Data Mining on Social Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Atzmueller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Social media and social networks have already woven themselves into the very fabric of everyday life. This results in a dramatic increase of social data capturing various relations between the users and their associated artifacts, both in online networks and the real world using ubiquitous devices. In this work, we consider social interaction networks from a data mining perspective - also with a special focus on real-world face-to-face contact networks: We combine data mining and social netwo...

  10. Evolution of evolvability in gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crombach

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks are perhaps the most important organizational level in the cell where signals from the cell state and the outside environment are integrated in terms of activation and inhibition of genes. For the last decade, the study of such networks has been fueled by large-scale experiments and renewed attention from the theoretical field. Different models have been proposed to, for instance, investigate expression dynamics, explain the network topology we observe in bacteria and yeast, and for the analysis of evolvability and robustness of such networks. Yet how these gene regulatory networks evolve and become evolvable remains an open question. An individual-oriented evolutionary model is used to shed light on this matter. Each individual has a genome from which its gene regulatory network is derived. Mutations, such as gene duplications and deletions, alter the genome, while the resulting network determines the gene expression pattern and hence fitness. With this protocol we let a population of individuals evolve under Darwinian selection in an environment that changes through time. Our work demonstrates that long-term evolution of complex gene regulatory networks in a changing environment can lead to a striking increase in the efficiency of generating beneficial mutations. We show that the population evolves towards genotype-phenotype mappings that allow for an orchestrated network-wide change in the gene expression pattern, requiring only a few specific gene indels. The genes involved are hubs of the networks, or directly influencing the hubs. Moreover, throughout the evolutionary trajectory the networks maintain their mutational robustness. In other words, evolution in an alternating environment leads to a network that is sensitive to a small class of beneficial mutations, while the majority of mutations remain neutral: an example of evolution of evolvability.

  11. The balance of weak and strong interactions in genetic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Poyatos

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions are being quantitatively characterized in a comprehensive way in several model organisms. These data are then globally represented in terms of genetic networks. How are interaction strengths distributed in these networks? And what type of functional organization of the underlying genomic systems is revealed by such distribution patterns? Here, I found that weak interactions are important for the structure of genetic buffering between signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that the strength of the association between two genes correlates with the number of common interactors they exhibit. I also determined that this network includes genetic cascades balancing weak and strong links, and that its hubs act as particularly strong genetic modifiers; both patterns also identified in Saccharomyces cerevisae networks. In yeast, I further showed a relation, although weak, between interaction strengths and some phenotypic/evolutionary features of the corresponding target genes. Overall, this work demonstrates a non-random organization of interaction strengths in genetic networks, a feature common to other complex networks, and that could reflect in this context how genetic variation is eventually influencing the phenotype.

  12. Identifying dysregulated pathways in cancers from pathway interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ke-Qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancers, a group of multifactorial complex diseases, are generally caused by mutation of multiple genes or dysregulation of pathways. Identifying biomarkers that can characterize cancers would help to understand and diagnose cancers. Traditional computational methods that detect genes differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples fail to work due to small sample size and independent assumption among genes. On the other hand, genes work in concert to perform their functions. Therefore, it is expected that dysregulated pathways will serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. Results In this paper, we propose a novel approach to identify dysregulated pathways in cancer based on a pathway interaction network. Our contribution is three-fold. Firstly, we present a new method to construct pathway interaction network based on gene expression, protein-protein interactions and cellular pathways. Secondly, the identification of dysregulated pathways in cancer is treated as a feature selection problem, which is biologically reasonable and easy to interpret. Thirdly, the dysregulated pathways are identified as subnetworks from the pathway interaction networks, where the subnetworks characterize very well the functional dependency or crosstalk between pathways. The benchmarking results on several distinct cancer datasets demonstrate that our method can obtain more reliable and accurate results compared with existing state of the art methods. Further functional analysis and independent literature evidence also confirm that our identified potential pathogenic pathways are biologically reasonable, indicating the effectiveness of our method. Conclusions Dysregulated pathways can serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. In this work, by utilizing pathway interaction networks and gene expression data, we propose a novel approach that effectively identifies dysregulated pathways, which can not only be used

  13. Identifying time-delayed gene regulatory networks via an evolvable hierarchical recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordmahalleh, Mina Moradi; Sefidmazgi, Mohammad Gorji; Harrison, Scott H; Homaifar, Abdollah

    2017-01-01

    The modeling of genetic interactions within a cell is crucial for a basic understanding of physiology and for applied areas such as drug design. Interactions in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) include effects of transcription factors, repressors, small metabolites, and microRNA species. In addition, the effects of regulatory interactions are not always simultaneous, but can occur after a finite time delay, or as a combined outcome of simultaneous and time delayed interactions. Powerful biotechnologies have been rapidly and successfully measuring levels of genetic expression to illuminate different states of biological systems. This has led to an ensuing challenge to improve the identification of specific regulatory mechanisms through regulatory network reconstructions. Solutions to this challenge will ultimately help to spur forward efforts based on the usage of regulatory network reconstructions in systems biology applications. We have developed a hierarchical recurrent neural network (HRNN) that identifies time-delayed gene interactions using time-course data. A customized genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize hierarchical connectivity of regulatory genes and a target gene. The proposed design provides a non-fully connected network with the flexibility of using recurrent connections inside the network. These features and the non-linearity of the HRNN facilitate the process of identifying temporal patterns of a GRN. Our HRNN method was implemented with the Python language. It was first evaluated on simulated data representing linear and nonlinear time-delayed gene-gene interaction models across a range of network sizes and variances of noise. We then further demonstrated the capability of our method in reconstructing GRNs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic network for in vivo benchmarking of reverse-engineering and modeling approaches (IRMA). We compared the performance of our method to TD-ARACNE, HCC-CLINDE, TSNI and ebdbNet across different network

  14. Gene expression patterns combined with network analysis identify hub genes associated with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dongbin; Ning, Hao; Liu, Shuai; Que, Xinxiang; Ding, Kejia

    2015-06-01

    To explore molecular mechanisms of bladder cancer (BC), network strategy was used to find biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between bladder carcinoma patients and normal subjects were screened using empirical Bayes method of the linear models for microarray data package. Co-expression networks were constructed by differentially co-expressed genes and links. Regulatory impact factors (RIF) metric was used to identify critical transcription factors (TFs). The protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed by the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and clusters were obtained through molecular complex detection (MCODE) algorithm. Centralities analyses for complex networks were performed based on degree, stress and betweenness. Enrichment analyses were performed based on Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Co-expression networks and TFs (based on expression data of global DEGs and DEGs in different stages and grades) were identified. Hub genes of complex networks, such as UBE2C, ACTA2, FABP4, CKS2, FN1 and TOP2A, were also obtained according to analysis of degree. In gene enrichment analyses of global DEGs, cell adhesion, proteinaceous extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix structural constituent were top three GO terms. ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, and cell cycle were significant pathways. Our results provide some potential underlying biomarkers of BC. However, further validation is required and deep studies are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of BC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Barrio, Rafael A; Dunbar, Robin; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion, and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and in this sense they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviou...

  16. Inferring latent gene regulatory network kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González, Javier; Vujačić, Ivan; Wit, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks consist of genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) and the genes they activate or repress. Various types of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) have been proposed to model these networks, ranging from linear to Michaelis-Menten approaches. In practice, a serious d

  17. Inferring slowly-changing dynamic gene-regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Ernst C; Abbruzzo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic gene-regulatory networks are complex since the interaction patterns between their components mean that it is impossible to study parts of the network in separation. This holistic character of gene-regulatory networks poses a real challenge to any type of modelling. Graphical models are a class of models that connect the network with a conditional independence relationships between random variables. By interpreting these random variables as gene activities and the conditional independence relationships as functional non-relatedness, graphical models have been used to describe gene-regulatory networks. Whereas the literature has been focused on static networks, most time-course experiments are designed in order to tease out temporal changes in the underlying network. It is typically reasonable to assume that changes in genomic networks are few, because biological systems tend to be stable. We introduce a new model for estimating slow changes in dynamic gene-regulatory networks, which is suitable for high-dimensional data, e.g. time-course microarray data. Our aim is to estimate a dynamically changing genomic network based on temporal activity measurements of the genes in the network. Our method is based on the penalized likelihood with l1-norm, that penalizes conditional dependencies between genes as well as differences between conditional independence elements across time points. We also present a heuristic search strategy to find optimal tuning parameters. We re-write the penalized maximum likelihood problem into a standard convex optimization problem subject to linear equality constraints. We show that our method performs well in simulation studies. Finally, we apply the proposed model to a time-course T-cell dataset.

  18. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches.

  19. Identifying gene regulatory network rewiring using latent differential graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dechao; Gu, Quanquan; Ma, Jian

    2016-09-30

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are highly dynamic among different tissue types. Identifying tissue-specific gene regulation is critically important to understand gene function in a particular cellular context. Graphical models have been used to estimate GRN from gene expression data to distinguish direct interactions from indirect associations. However, most existing methods estimate GRN for a specific cell/tissue type or in a tissue-naive way, or do not specifically focus on network rewiring between different tissues. Here, we describe a new method called Latent Differential Graphical Model (LDGM). The motivation of our method is to estimate the differential network between two tissue types directly without inferring the network for individual tissues, which has the advantage of utilizing much smaller sample size to achieve reliable differential network estimation. Our simulation results demonstrated that LDGM consistently outperforms other Gaussian graphical model based methods. We further evaluated LDGM by applying to the brain and blood gene expression data from the GTEx consortium. We also applied LDGM to identify network rewiring between cancer subtypes using the TCGA breast cancer samples. Our results suggest that LDGM is an effective method to infer differential network using high-throughput gene expression data to identify GRN dynamics among different cellular conditions.

  20. Weighted protein interaction network analysis of frontotemporal dementia\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Lovering, Ruth C.; Hardy, John; Lewis, Patrick A.; Manzoni, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The genetic analysis of complex disorders has undoubtedly led to the identification of a wealth of associations between genes and specific traits. However, moving from genetics to biochemistry one gene at a time has, to date, rather proved inefficient and under-powered to comprehensively explain the molecular basis of phenotypes. Here we present a novel approach, weighted protein−protein\\ud interaction network analysis (W-PPI-NA), to highlight key functional players within relevant biological...

  1. Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu Kwang Kim; Han Bok Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them.RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found.These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancerrelated proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

  2. Modeling of hysteresis in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; Qin, K R; Xiang, C; Lee, T H

    2012-08-01

    Hysteresis, observed in many gene regulatory networks, has a pivotal impact on biological systems, which enhances the robustness of cell functions. In this paper, a general model is proposed to describe the hysteretic gene regulatory network by combining the hysteresis component and the transient dynamics. The Bouc-Wen hysteresis model is modified to describe the hysteresis component in the mammalian gene regulatory networks. Rigorous mathematical analysis on the dynamical properties of the model is presented to ensure the bounded-input-bounded-output (BIBO) stability and demonstrates that the original Bouc-Wen model can only generate a clockwise hysteresis loop while the modified model can describe both clockwise and counter clockwise hysteresis loops. Simulation studies have shown that the hysteresis loops from our model are consistent with the experimental observations in three mammalian gene regulatory networks and two E.coli gene regulatory networks, which demonstrate the ability and accuracy of the mathematical model to emulate natural gene expression behavior with hysteresis. A comparison study has also been conducted to show that this model fits the experiment data significantly better than previous ones in the literature. The successful modeling of the hysteresis in all the five hysteretic gene regulatory networks suggests that the new model has the potential to be a unified framework for modeling hysteresis in gene regulatory networks and provide better understanding of the general mechanism that drives the hysteretic function.

  3. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  4. Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  5. Filtering Genes for Cluster and Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkhomenko Elena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to cluster analysis or genetic network analysis it is customary to filter, or remove genes considered to be irrelevant from the set of genes to be analyzed. Often genes whose variation across samples is less than an arbitrary threshold value are deleted. This can improve interpretability and reduce bias. Results This paper introduces modular models for representing network structure in order to study the relative effects of different filtering methods. We show that cluster analysis and principal components are strongly affected by filtering. Filtering methods intended specifically for cluster and network analysis are introduced and compared by simulating modular networks with known statistical properties. To study more realistic situations, we analyze simulated "real" data based on well-characterized E. coli and S. cerevisiae regulatory networks. Conclusion The methods introduced apply very generally, to any similarity matrix describing gene expression. One of the proposed methods, SUMCOV, performed well for all models simulated.

  6. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  7. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  8. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  9. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovering cancer genes by integrating network and functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis David P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of novel cancer-causing genes is one of the main goals in cancer research. The rapid accumulation of genome-wide protein-protein interaction (PPI data in humans has provided a new basis for studying the topological features of cancer genes in cellular networks. It is important to integrate multiple genomic data sources, including PPI networks, protein domains and Gene Ontology (GO annotations, to facilitate the identification of cancer genes. Methods Topological features of the PPI network, as well as protein domain compositions, enrichment of gene ontology categories, sequence and evolutionary conservation features were extracted and compared between cancer genes and other genes. The predictive power of various classifiers for identification of cancer genes was evaluated by cross validation. Experimental validation of a subset of the prediction results was conducted using siRNA knockdown and viability assays in human colon cancer cell line DLD-1. Results Cross validation demonstrated advantageous performance of classifiers based on support vector machines (SVMs with the inclusion of the topological features from the PPI network, protein domain compositions and GO annotations. We then applied the trained SVM classifier to human genes to prioritize putative cancer genes. siRNA knock-down of several SVM predicted cancer genes displayed greatly reduced cell viability in human colon cancer cell line DLD-1. Conclusion Topological features of PPI networks, protein domain compositions and GO annotations are good predictors of cancer genes. The SVM classifier integrates multiple features and as such is useful for prioritizing candidate cancer genes for experimental validations.

  11. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  12. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Luis Acencio

    Full Text Available Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI. This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved

  13. Yin and Yang of disease genes and death genes between reciprocally scale-free biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun Wook; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Ju Han

    2013-11-01

    Biological networks often show a scale-free topology with node degree following a power-law distribution. Lethal genes tend to form functional hubs, whereas non-lethal disease genes are located at the periphery. Uni-dimensional analyses, however, are flawed. We created and investigated two distinct scale-free networks; a protein-protein interaction (PPI) and a perturbation sensitivity network (PSN). The hubs of both networks exhibit a low molecular evolutionary rate (P genes but not with disease genes, whereas PSN hubs are highly enriched with disease genes and drug targets but not with lethal genes. PPI hub genes are enriched with essential cellular processes, but PSN hub genes are enriched with environmental interaction processes, having more TATA boxes and transcription factor binding sites. It is concluded that biological systems may balance internal growth signaling and external stress signaling by unifying the two opposite scale-free networks that are seemingly opposite to each other but work in concert between death and disease.

  14. Simultaneous clustering of multiple gene expression and physical interaction datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manikandan Narayanan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Many genome-wide datasets are routinely generated to study different aspects of biological systems, but integrating them to obtain a coherent view of the underlying biology remains a challenge. We propose simultaneous clustering of multiple networks as a framework to integrate large-scale datasets on the interactions among and activities of cellular components. Specifically, we develop an algorithm JointCluster that finds sets of genes that cluster well in multiple networks of interest, such as coexpression networks summarizing correlations among the expression profiles of genes and physical networks describing protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions among genes or gene-products. Our algorithm provides an efficient solution to a well-defined problem of jointly clustering networks, using techniques that permit certain theoretical guarantees on the quality of the detected clustering relative to the optimal clustering. These guarantees coupled with an effective scaling heuristic and the flexibility to handle multiple heterogeneous networks make our method JointCluster an advance over earlier approaches. Simulation results showed JointCluster to be more robust than alternate methods in recovering clusters implanted in networks with high false positive rates. In systematic evaluation of JointCluster and some earlier approaches for combined analysis of the yeast physical network and two gene expression datasets under glucose and ethanol growth conditions, JointCluster discovers clusters that are more consistently enriched for various reference classes capturing different aspects of yeast biology or yield better coverage of the analysed genes. These robust clusters, which are supported across multiple genomic datasets and diverse reference classes, agree with known biology of yeast under these growth conditions, elucidate the genetic control of coordinated transcription, and enable functional predictions for a number of uncharacterized genes.

  15. The R package FANet: sparse factor analysis model for high dimensional gene co-expression networks

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Anne; Houee-Bigot, Magalie; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Causeur, David

    2014-01-01

    Inference on gene regulatory networks from high-throughput expression data turns out to be one of the main current challenges in systems biology. Such interaction networks are very insightful for the deep understanding of biological relationships between genes. In particular, a functional characterization of gene modules of highly interacting genes enables the identification of biological processes underlying complex traits as diseases. Inference on this dependence structure shall...

  16. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  17. Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Bialonski

    Full Text Available We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis.

  18. Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis.

  19. Network of tRNA Gene Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fang-ping; LI Sheng; MA Hong-ru

    2008-01-01

    A network of 3719 tRNA gene sequences was constructed using simplest alignment. Its topology, degree distribution and clustering coefficient were studied. The behaviors of the network shift from fluctuated distribution to scale-free distribution when the similarity degree of the tRNA gene sequences increases. The tRNA gene sequences with the same anticodon identity are more self-organized than those with different anticodon identities and form local clusters in the network. Some vertices of the local cluster have a high connection with other local clusters, and the probable reason was given. Moreover, a network constructed by the same number of random tRNA sequences was used to make comparisons. The relationships between the properties of the tRNA similarity network and the characters of tRNA evolutionary history were discussed.

  20. The amidation step of diphthamide biosynthesis in yeast requires DPH6, a gene identified through mining the DPH1-DPH5 interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanow Uthman

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly modified histidine residue in eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2 that is the target for irreversible ADP ribosylation by diphtheria toxin (DT. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the initial steps of diphthamide biosynthesis are well characterized and require the DPH1-DPH5 genes. However, the last pathway step-amidation of the intermediate diphthine to diphthamide-is ill-defined. Here we mine the genetic interaction landscapes of DPH1-DPH5 to identify a candidate gene for the elusive amidase (YLR143w/DPH6 and confirm involvement of a second gene (YBR246w/DPH7 in the amidation step. Like dph1-dph5, dph6 and dph7 mutants maintain eEF2 forms that evade inhibition by DT and sordarin, a diphthamide-dependent antifungal. Moreover, mass spectrometry shows that dph6 and dph7 mutants specifically accumulate diphthine-modified eEF2, demonstrating failure to complete the final amidation step. Consistent with an expected requirement for ATP in diphthine amidation, Dph6 contains an essential adenine nucleotide hydrolase domain and binds to eEF2. Dph6 is therefore a candidate for the elusive amidase, while Dph7 apparently couples diphthine synthase (Dph5 to diphthine amidation. The latter conclusion is based on our observation that dph7 mutants show drastically upregulated interaction between Dph5 and eEF2, indicating that their association is kept in check by Dph7. Physiologically, completion of diphthamide synthesis is required for optimal translational accuracy and cell growth, as indicated by shared traits among the dph mutants including increased ribosomal -1 frameshifting and altered responses to translation inhibitors. Through identification of Dph6 and Dph7 as components required for the amidation step of the diphthamide pathway, our work paves the way for a detailed mechanistic understanding of diphthamide formation.

  1. Synchronization in networks with multiple interaction layers

    CERN Document Server

    del Genio, Charo I; Bonamassa, Ivan; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The structure of many real-world systems is best captured by networks consisting of several interaction layers. Understanding how a multi-layered structure of connections affects the synchronization properties of dynamical systems evolving on top of it is a highly relevant endeavour in mathematics and physics, and has potential applications to several societally relevant topics, such as power grids engineering and neural dynamics. We propose a general framework to assess stability of the synchronized state in networks with multiple interaction layers, deriving a necessary condition that generalizes the Master Stability Function approach. We validate our method applying it to a network of R\\"ossler oscillators with a double layer of interactions, and show that highly rich phenomenology emerges. This includes cases where the stability of synchronization can be induced even if both layers would have individually induced unstable synchrony, an effect genuinely due to the true multi-layer structure of the interact...

  2. Unraveling Spurious Properties of Interaction Networks with Tailored Random Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus; 10.1371/journal.pone.0022826

    2012-01-01

    We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'{e}nyi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way i...

  3. Resistance Genes in Global Crop Breeding Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, K A; Andersen, K F; Asche, F; Bowden, R L; Forbes, G A; Kulakow, P A; Zhou, B

    2017-08-31

    Resistance genes are a major tool for managing crop diseases. The networks of crop breeders who exchange resistance genes and deploy them in varieties help to determine the global landscape of resistance and epidemics, an important system for maintaining food security. These networks function as a complex adaptive system, with associated strengths and vulnerabilities, and implications for policies to support resistance gene deployment strategies. Extensions of epidemic network analysis can be used to evaluate the multilayer agricultural networks that support and influence crop breeding networks. Here, we evaluate the general structure of crop breeding networks for cassava, potato, rice, and wheat. All four are clustered due to phytosanitary and intellectual property regulations, and linked through CGIAR hubs. Cassava networks primarily include public breeding groups, whereas others are more mixed. These systems must adapt to global change in climate and land use, the emergence of new diseases, and disruptive breeding technologies. Research priorities to support policy include how best to maintain both diversity and redundancy in the roles played by individual crop breeding groups (public versus private and global versus local), and how best to manage connectivity to optimize resistance gene deployment while avoiding risks to the useful life of resistance genes. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  4. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance.

  5. The impact of gene expression variation on the robustness and evolvability of a developmental gene regulatory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Garfield

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory interactions buffer development against genetic and environmental perturbations, but adaptation requires phenotypes to change. We investigated the relationship between robustness and evolvability within the gene regulatory network underlying development of the larval skeleton in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We find extensive variation in gene expression in this network throughout development in a natural population, some of which has a heritable genetic basis. Switch-like regulatory interactions predominate during early development, buffer expression variation, and may promote the accumulation of cryptic genetic variation affecting early stages. Regulatory interactions during later development are typically more sensitive (linear, allowing variation in expression to affect downstream target genes. Variation in skeletal morphology is associated primarily with expression variation of a few, primarily structural, genes at terminal positions within the network. These results indicate that the position and properties of gene interactions within a network can have important evolutionary consequences independent of their immediate regulatory role.

  6. A simple model for studying interacting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Jolad, Shivakumar; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

    2011-03-01

    Many specific physical networks (e.g., internet, power grid, interstates), have been characterized in considerable detail, but in isolation from each other. Yet, each of these networks supports the functions of the others, and so far, little is known about how their interactions affect their structure and functionality. To address this issue, we consider two coupled model networks. Each network is relatively simple, with a fixed set of nodes, but dynamically generated set of links which has a preferred degree, κ . In the stationary state, the degree distribution has exponential tails (far from κ), an attribute which we can explain. Next, we consider two such networks with different κ 's, reminiscent of two social groups, e.g., extroverts and introverts. Finally, we let these networks interact by establishing a controllable fraction of cross links. The resulting distribution of links, both within and across the two model networks, is investigated and discussed, along with some potential consequences for real networks. Supported in part by NSF-DMR-0705152 and 1005417.

  7. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1.

  8. A network approach to predict pathogenic genes for Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Liu

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the pathogenic agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB, which is a destructive disease on wheat and barley, thereby causing huge economic loss and health problems to human by contaminating foods. Identifying pathogenic genes can shed light on pathogenesis underlying the interaction between F. graminearum and its plant host. However, it is difficult to detect pathogenic genes for this destructive pathogen by time-consuming and expensive molecular biological experiments in lab. On the other hand, computational methods provide an alternative way to solve this problem. Since pathogenesis is a complicated procedure that involves complex regulations and interactions, the molecular interaction network of F. graminearum can give clues to potential pathogenic genes. Furthermore, the gene expression data of F. graminearum before and after its invasion into plant host can also provide useful information. In this paper, a novel systems biology approach is presented to predict pathogenic genes of F. graminearum based on molecular interaction network and gene expression data. With a small number of known pathogenic genes as seed genes, a subnetwork that consists of potential pathogenic genes is identified from the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN of F. graminearum, where the genes in the subnetwork are further required to be differentially expressed before and after the invasion of the pathogenic fungus. Therefore, the candidate genes in the subnetwork are expected to be involved in the same biological processes as seed genes, which imply that they are potential pathogenic genes. The prediction results show that most of the pathogenic genes of F. graminearum are enriched in two important signal transduction pathways, including G protein coupled receptor pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, which are known related to pathogenesis in other fungi. In addition, several pathogenic genes predicted by our method are verified in other

  9. A Network Approach to Predict Pathogenic Genes for Fusarium graminearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the pathogenic agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease on wheat and barley, thereby causing huge economic loss and health problems to human by contaminating foods. Identifying pathogenic genes can shed light on pathogenesis underlying the interaction between F. graminearum and its plant host. However, it is difficult to detect pathogenic genes for this destructive pathogen by time-consuming and expensive molecular biological experiments in lab. On the other hand, computational methods provide an alternative way to solve this problem. Since pathogenesis is a complicated procedure that involves complex regulations and interactions, the molecular interaction network of F. graminearum can give clues to potential pathogenic genes. Furthermore, the gene expression data of F. graminearum before and after its invasion into plant host can also provide useful information. In this paper, a novel systems biology approach is presented to predict pathogenic genes of F. graminearum based on molecular interaction network and gene expression data. With a small number of known pathogenic genes as seed genes, a subnetwork that consists of potential pathogenic genes is identified from the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) of F. graminearum, where the genes in the subnetwork are further required to be differentially expressed before and after the invasion of the pathogenic fungus. Therefore, the candidate genes in the subnetwork are expected to be involved in the same biological processes as seed genes, which imply that they are potential pathogenic genes. The prediction results show that most of the pathogenic genes of F. graminearum are enriched in two important signal transduction pathways, including G protein coupled receptor pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, which are known related to pathogenesis in other fungi. In addition, several pathogenic genes predicted by our method are verified in other pathogenic fungi, which

  10. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsu Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data.

  11. Modeling gene regulatory networks: A network simplification algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luiz Henrique O.; de Castro, Maria Clicia S.; da Silva, Fabricio A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Boolean networks have been used for some time to model Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs), which describe cell functions. Those models can help biologists to make predictions, prognosis and even specialized treatment when some disturb on the GRN lead to a sick condition. However, the amount of information related to a GRN can be huge, making the task of inferring its boolean network representation quite a challenge. The method shown here takes into account information about the interactome to build a network, where each node represents a protein, and uses the entropy of each node as a key to reduce the size of the network, allowing the further inferring process to focus only on the main protein hubs, the ones with most potential to interfere in overall network behavior.

  12. Testing for gene-gene interaction with AMMI models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhdadi, Amina; Dubé, Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that many common diseases are influenced by multiple genes and their interactions. There is currently a strong interest in testing for association between combinations of these genes and disease, in particular because genes that affect the risk of disease only in the presence of another genetic variant may not be detected in marginal analysis. In this paper we propose the use of additive main effect and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) models to detect and to quantify gene-gene interaction effects for a quantitative trait. The objective of the present research is to demonstrate the practical advantages of these models to describe complex interaction between two unlinked loci. Although gene-gene interactions have often been defined as a deviance from additive genetic effects, the residual term has generally not been appropriately treated. The AMMI models allow for the analysis of a two way factorial data structure and combine the analysis of variance of the two main genotype effects with a principal component analysis of the residual multiplicative interaction. The AMMI models for gene-gene interaction presented here allow for the testing of non additivity between the two loci, and also describe how their interaction structure fits the existing non-additivity. Moreover, these models can be used to identify the specific two genotypes combinations that contribute to the significant gene-gene interaction. We describe the use of the biplot to display the structure of the interaction and evaluate the performance of the AMMI and the special cases of the AMMI previously described by Tukey and Mandel with simulated data sets. Our simulated study showed that the AMMI model is as powerful as general linear models when the interaction is not modeled in the presence of marginal effects. However, in the presence of pure epitasis, i.e. in the absence of marginal effects, the AMMI method was not found to be superior to other tested regression methods.

  13. Gene regulatory networks governing pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, H Efsun; Benitez, Cecil M; Kim, Seung K

    2013-04-15

    Elucidation of cellular and gene regulatory networks (GRNs) governing organ development will accelerate progress toward tissue replacement. Here, we have compiled reference GRNs underlying pancreas development from data mining that integrates multiple approaches, including mutant analysis, lineage tracing, cell purification, gene expression and enhancer analysis, and biochemical studies of gene regulation. Using established computational tools, we integrated and represented these networks in frameworks that should enhance understanding of the surging output of genomic-scale genetic and epigenetic studies of pancreas development and diseases such as diabetes and pancreatic cancer. We envision similar approaches would be useful for understanding the development of other organs.

  14. Research of Gene Regulatory Network with Multi-Time Delay Based on Bayesian Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bei; MENG Fanjiang; LI Yong; LIU Liyan

    2008-01-01

    The gene regulatory network was reconstructed according to time-series microarray data getting from hybridization at different time between gene chips to analyze coordination and restriction between genes. An algorithm for controlling the gene expression regulatory network of the whole cell was designed using Bayesian network which provides an effective aided analysis for gene regulatory network.

  15. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Omholt, Stig W

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network's feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  16. A genome-wide MeSH-based literature mining system predicts implicit gene-to-gene relationships and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Qin, Tingting; Qin, Zhaohui S; He, Yongqun

    2013-10-16

    The large amount of literature in the post-genomics era enables the study of gene interactions and networks using all available articles published for a specific organism. MeSH is a controlled vocabulary of medical and scientific terms that is used by biomedical scientists to manually index articles in the PubMed literature database. We hypothesized that genome-wide gene-MeSH term associations from the PubMed literature database could be used to predict implicit gene-to-gene relationships and networks. While the gene-MeSH associations have been used to detect gene-gene interactions in some studies, different methods have not been well compared, and such a strategy has not been evaluated for a genome-wide literature analysis. Genome-wide literature mining of gene-to-gene interactions allows ranking of the best gene interactions and investigation of comprehensive biological networks at a genome level. The genome-wide GenoMesh literature mining algorithm was developed by sequentially generating a gene-article matrix, a normalized gene-MeSH term matrix, and a gene-gene matrix. The gene-gene matrix relies on the calculation of pairwise gene dissimilarities based on gene-MeSH relationships. An optimized dissimilarity score was identified from six well-studied functions based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Based on the studies with well-studied Escherichia coli and less-studied Brucella spp., GenoMesh was found to accurately identify gene functions using weighted MeSH terms, predict gene-gene interactions not reported in the literature, and cluster all the genes studied from an organism using the MeSH-based gene-gene matrix. A web-based GenoMesh literature mining program is also available at: http://genomesh.hegroup.org. GenoMesh also predicts gene interactions and networks among genes associated with specific MeSH terms or user-selected gene lists. The GenoMesh algorithm and web program provide the first genome-wide, MeSH-based literature mining

  17. Comparison and evaluation of network clustering algorithms applied to genetic interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Wang, Lin; Berg, Arthur; Qian, Minping; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Fangting; Deng, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    The goal of network clustering algorithms detect dense clusters in a network, and provide a first step towards the understanding of large scale biological networks. With numerous recent advances in biotechnologies, large-scale genetic interactions are widely available, but there is a limited understanding of which clustering algorithms may be most effective. In order to address this problem, we conducted a systematic study to compare and evaluate six clustering algorithms in analyzing genetic interaction networks, and investigated influencing factors in choosing algorithms. The algorithms considered in this comparison include hierarchical clustering, topological overlap matrix, bi-clustering, Markov clustering, Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection, and variational Bayes approach to modularity. Both experimentally identified and synthetically constructed networks were used in this comparison. The accuracy of the algorithms is measured by the Jaccard index in comparing predicted gene modules with benchmark gene sets. The results suggest that the choice differs according to the network topology and evaluation criteria. Hierarchical clustering showed to be best at predicting protein complexes; Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection proved best under epistatic miniarray profile (EMAP) datasets; the variational Bayes approach to modularity was noticeably better than the other algorithms in the genome-scale networks.

  18. Learning Gene Regulatory Networks Computationally from Gene Expression Data Using Weighted Consensus

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Chisato

    2015-04-16

    Gene regulatory networks analyze the relationships between genes allowing us to un- derstand the gene regulatory interactions in systems biology. Gene expression data from the microarray experiments is used to obtain the gene regulatory networks. How- ever, the microarray data is discrete, noisy and non-linear which makes learning the networks a challenging problem and existing gene network inference methods do not give consistent results. Current state-of-the-art study uses the average-ranking-based consensus method to combine and average the ranked predictions from individual methods. However each individual method has an equal contribution to the consen- sus prediction. We have developed a linear programming-based consensus approach which uses learned weights from linear programming among individual methods such that the methods have di↵erent weights depending on their performance. Our result reveals that assigning di↵erent weights to individual methods rather than giving them equal weights improves the performance of the consensus. The linear programming- based consensus method is evaluated and it had the best performance on in silico and Saccharomyces cerevisiae networks, and the second best on the Escherichia coli network outperformed by Inferelator Pipeline method which gives inconsistent results across a wide range of microarray data sets.

  19. Associating genes and protein complexes with disease via network propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oron Vanunu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several studies have tackled this challenge via a network-based approach, motivated by the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a network of protein-protein or functional interactions. However, most of these approaches use only local network information in the inference process and are restricted to inferring single gene associations. Here, we provide a global, network-based method for prioritizing disease genes and inferring protein complex associations, which we call PRINCE. The method is based on formulating constraints on the prioritization function that relate to its smoothness over the network and usage of prior information. We exploit this function to predict not only genes but also protein complex associations with a disease of interest. We test our method on gene-disease association data, evaluating both the prioritization achieved and the protein complexes inferred. We show that our method outperforms extant approaches in both tasks. Using data on 1,369 diseases from the OMIM knowledgebase, our method is able (in a cross validation setting to rank the true causal gene first for 34% of the diseases, and infer 139 disease-related complexes that are highly coherent in terms of the function, expression and conservation of their member proteins. Importantly, we apply our method to study three multi-factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PRINCE's predictions for these diseases highly match the known literature, suggesting several novel causal genes and protein complexes for further investigation.

  20. From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciani Davide

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation. However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations, based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud or biological processes (e.g., cell budding of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Response of the mosquito protein interaction network to dengue infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pike Andrew D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two fifths of the world's population is at risk from dengue. The absence of effective drugs and vaccines leaves vector control as the primary intervention tool. Understanding dengue virus (DENV host interactions is essential for the development of novel control strategies. The availability of genome sequences for both human and mosquito host greatly facilitates genome-wide studies of DENV-host interactions. Results We developed the first draft of the mosquito protein interaction network using a computational approach. The weighted network includes 4,214 Aedes aegypti proteins with 10,209 interactions, among which 3,500 proteins are connected into an interconnected scale-free network. We demonstrated the application of this network for the further annotation of mosquito proteins and dissection of pathway crosstalk. Using three datasets based on physical interaction assays, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screens and microarray assays, we identified 714 putative DENV-associated mosquito proteins. An integrated analysis of these proteins in the network highlighted four regions consisting of highly interconnected proteins with closely related functions in each of replication/transcription/translation (RTT, immunity, transport and metabolism. Putative DENV-associated proteins were further selected for validation by RNAi-mediated gene silencing, and dengue viral titer in mosquito midguts was significantly reduced for five out of ten (50.0% randomly selected genes. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of common host requirements for DENV in mosquitoes and humans. We discuss the significance of our findings for pharmacological intervention and genetic modification of mosquitoes for blocking dengue transmission.

  2. Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stehle, Juliette; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2010-01-01

    We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents' behavior at short time scales, in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group, or vice-versa. Different distributions of contact times and inter-contact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e. the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change of state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended, and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information, or spreading of diseases.

  3. Network compression as a quality measure for protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loic Royer

    Full Text Available With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients.

  4. An integrated text mining framework for metabolic interaction network reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patumcharoenpol, Preecha; Doungpan, Narumol; Meechai, Asawin; Shen, Bairong; Chan, Jonathan H; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa

    2016-01-01

    Text mining (TM) in the field of biology is fast becoming a routine analysis for the extraction and curation of biological entities (e.g., genes, proteins, simple chemicals) as well as their relationships. Due to the wide applicability of TM in situations involving complex relationships, it is valuable to apply TM to the extraction of metabolic interactions (i.e., enzyme and metabolite interactions) through metabolic events. Here we present an integrated TM framework containing two modules for the extraction of metabolic events (Metabolic Event Extraction module-MEE) and for the construction of a metabolic interaction network (Metabolic Interaction Network Reconstruction module-MINR). The proposed integrated TM framework performed well based on standard measures of recall, precision and F-score. Evaluation of the MEE module using the constructed Metabolic Entities (ME) corpus yielded F-scores of 59.15% and 48.59% for the detection of metabolic events for production and consumption, respectively. As for the testing of the entity tagger for Gene and Protein (GP) and metabolite with the test corpus, the obtained F-score was greater than 80% for the Superpathway of leucine, valine, and isoleucine biosynthesis. Mapping of enzyme and metabolite interactions through network reconstruction showed a fair performance for the MINR module on the test corpus with F-score >70%. Finally, an application of our integrated TM framework on a big-scale data (i.e., EcoCyc extraction data) for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network showed reasonable precisions at 69.93%, 70.63% and 46.71% for enzyme, metabolite and enzyme-metabolite interaction, respectively. This study presents the first open-source integrated TM framework for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network. This framework can be a powerful tool that helps biologists to extract metabolic events for further reconstruction of a metabolic interaction network. The ME corpus, test corpus, source code, and virtual

  5. An integrated text mining framework for metabolic interaction network reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Patumcharoenpol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Text mining (TM in the field of biology is fast becoming a routine analysis for the extraction and curation of biological entities (e.g., genes, proteins, simple chemicals as well as their relationships. Due to the wide applicability of TM in situations involving complex relationships, it is valuable to apply TM to the extraction of metabolic interactions (i.e., enzyme and metabolite interactions through metabolic events. Here we present an integrated TM framework containing two modules for the extraction of metabolic events (Metabolic Event Extraction module—MEE and for the construction of a metabolic interaction network (Metabolic Interaction Network Reconstruction module—MINR. The proposed integrated TM framework performed well based on standard measures of recall, precision and F-score. Evaluation of the MEE module using the constructed Metabolic Entities (ME corpus yielded F-scores of 59.15% and 48.59% for the detection of metabolic events for production and consumption, respectively. As for the testing of the entity tagger for Gene and Protein (GP and metabolite with the test corpus, the obtained F-score was greater than 80% for the Superpathway of leucine, valine, and isoleucine biosynthesis. Mapping of enzyme and metabolite interactions through network reconstruction showed a fair performance for the MINR module on the test corpus with F-score >70%. Finally, an application of our integrated TM framework on a big-scale data (i.e., EcoCyc extraction data for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network showed reasonable precisions at 69.93%, 70.63% and 46.71% for enzyme, metabolite and enzyme–metabolite interaction, respectively. This study presents the first open-source integrated TM framework for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network. This framework can be a powerful tool that helps biologists to extract metabolic events for further reconstruction of a metabolic interaction network. The ME corpus, test corpus, source

  6. Inferring Phylogenetic Networks from Gene Order Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Anatolievich Morozov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing algorithms allow us to infer phylogenetic networks from sequences (DNA, protein or binary, sets of trees, and distance matrices, but there are no methods to build them using the gene order data as an input. Here we describe several methods to build split networks from the gene order data, perform simulation studies, and use our methods for analyzing and interpreting different real gene order datasets. All proposed methods are based on intermediate data, which can be generated from genome structures under study and used as an input for network construction algorithms. Three intermediates are used: set of jackknife trees, distance matrix, and binary encoding. According to simulations and case studies, the best intermediates are jackknife trees and distance matrix (when used with Neighbor-Net algorithm. Binary encoding can also be useful, but only when the methods mentioned above cannot be used.

  7. Lists2Networks: Integrated analysis of gene/protein lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma'ayan Avi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biologists are faced with the difficultly of analyzing results from large-scale studies that profile the activity of many genes, RNAs and proteins, applied in different experiments, under different conditions, and reported in different publications. To address this challenge it is desirable to compare the results from different related studies such as mRNA expression microarrays, genome-wide ChIP-X, RNAi screens, proteomics and phosphoproteomics experiments in a coherent global framework. In addition, linking high-content multilayered experimental results with prior biological knowledge can be useful for identifying functional themes and form novel hypotheses. Results We present Lists2Networks, a web-based system that allows users to upload lists of mammalian genes/proteins onto a server-based program for integrated analysis. The system includes web-based tools to manipulate lists with different set operations, to expand lists using existing mammalian networks of protein-protein interactions, co-expression correlation, or background knowledge co-annotation correlation, as well as to apply gene-list enrichment analyses against many gene-list libraries of prior biological knowledge such as pathways, gene ontology terms, kinase-substrate, microRNA-mRAN, and protein-protein interactions, metabolites, and protein domains. Such analyses can be applied to several lists at once against many prior knowledge libraries of gene-lists associated with specific annotations. The system also contains features that allow users to export networks and share lists with other users of the system. Conclusions Lists2Networks is a user friendly web-based software system expected to significantly ease the computational analysis process for experimental systems biologists employing high-throughput experiments at multiple layers of regulation. The system is freely available at http://www.lists2networks.org.

  8. Integrative analysis for finding genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Størling, Zenia, Marian; Hansen, Kasper Lage;

    2007-01-01

    identified a number of new protein network modules and novel candidate genes/proteins for type 1 diabetes. We propose this type of integrative analysis as a general method for the elucidation of genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases.......We have developed an integrative analysis method combining genetic interactions, identified using type 1 diabetes genome scan data, and a high-confidence human protein interaction network. Resulting networks were ranked by the significance of the enrichment of proteins from interacting regions. We...

  9. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khammash, Mustafa [UCSB

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  10. Transcriptional delay stabilizes bistable gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional delay can significantly impact the dynamics of gene networks. Here we examine how such delay affects bistable systems. We investigate several stochastic models of bistable gene networks and find that increasing delay dramatically increases the mean residence times near stable states. To explain this, we introduce a non-Markovian, analytically tractable reduced model. The model shows that stabilization is the consequence of an increased number of failed transitions between stable states. Each of the bistable systems that we simulate behaves in this manner. PMID:23952450

  11. Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. Results To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae network in which nodes represent genes (or their protein products and differently colored links represent the aforementioned five biological interaction types. We examined three- and four-node interconnection patterns containing multiple interaction types and found many enriched multi-color network motifs. Furthermore, we showed that most of the motifs form 'network themes' – classes of higher-order recurring interconnection patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs. Network themes can be tied to specific biological phenomena and may represent more fundamental network design principles. Examples of network themes include a pair of protein complexes with many inter-complex genetic interactions – the 'compensatory complexes' theme. Thematic maps – networks rendered in terms of such themes – can simplify an otherwise confusing tangle of biological relationships. We show this by mapping the S. cerevisiae network in terms of two specific network themes. Conclusion Significantly enriched motifs in an integrated S. cerevisiae interaction network are often signatures of network themes, higher-order network structures that correspond to biological phenomena. Representing networks in terms of network themes provides a useful simplification of complex biological relationships.

  12. A Review for Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions Using Machine Learning Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Lee Koo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learning methods to solve such problems by identifying such susceptibility gene which are neural networks (NNs, support vector machine (SVM, and random forests (RFs in such common and multifactorial disease. This paper gives an overview on machine learning methods, describing the methodology of each machine learning methods and its application in detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Lastly, this paper discussed each machine learning method and presents the strengths and weaknesses of each machine learning method in detecting gene-gene interactions in complex human disease.

  13. Gene regulatory network modeling via global optimization of high-order dynamic Bayesian network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Nguyen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic Bayesian network (DBN is among the mainstream approaches for modeling various biological networks, including the gene regulatory network (GRN. Most current methods for learning DBN employ either local search such as hill-climbing, or a meta stochastic global optimization framework such as genetic algorithm or simulated annealing, which are only able to locate sub-optimal solutions. Further, current DBN applications have essentially been limited to small sized networks. Results To overcome the above difficulties, we introduce here a deterministic global optimization based DBN approach for reverse engineering genetic networks from time course gene expression data. For such DBN models that consist only of inter time slice arcs, we show that there exists a polynomial time algorithm for learning the globally optimal network structure. The proposed approach, named GlobalMIT+, employs the recently proposed information theoretic scoring metric named mutual information test (MIT. GlobalMIT+ is able to learn high-order time delayed genetic interactions, which are common to most biological systems. Evaluation of the approach using both synthetic and real data sets, including a 733 cyanobacterial gene expression data set, shows significantly improved performance over other techniques. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that deterministic global optimization approaches can infer large scale genetic networks.

  14. Learning gene regulatory networks from gene expression data using weighted consensus

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Chisato

    2016-08-25

    An accurate determination of the network structure of gene regulatory systems from high-throughput gene expression data is an essential yet challenging step in studying how the expression of endogenous genes is controlled through a complex interaction of gene products and DNA. While numerous methods have been proposed to infer the structure of gene regulatory networks, none of them seem to work consistently over different data sets with high accuracy. A recent study to compare gene network inference methods showed that an average-ranking-based consensus method consistently performs well under various settings. Here, we propose a linear programming-based consensus method for the inference of gene regulatory networks. Unlike the average-ranking-based one, which treats the contribution of each individual method equally, our new consensus method assigns a weight to each method based on its credibility. As a case study, we applied the proposed consensus method on synthetic and real microarray data sets, and compared its performance to that of the average-ranking-based consensus and individual inference methods. Our results show that our weighted consensus method achieves superior performance over the unweighted one, suggesting that assigning weights to different individual methods rather than giving them equal weights improves the accuracy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Linear control theory for gene network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Bleris, Leonidas

    2010-09-16

    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims at understanding complex interactions in cells. Here we demonstrate that linear control theory can provide valuable insight and practical tools for the characterization of complex biological networks. We provide the foundation for such analyses through the study of several case studies including cascade and parallel forms, feedback and feedforward loops. We reproduce experimental results and provide rational analysis of the observed behavior. We demonstrate that methods such as the transfer function (frequency domain) and linear state-space (time domain) can be used to predict reliably the properties and transient behavior of complex network topologies and point to specific design strategies for synthetic networks.

  16. Regulation of flowering in rice: two florigen genes, a complex gene network, and natural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-02-01

    Photoperiodic control of flowering time consists of a complicated network that converges into the generation of a mobile flowering signal called florigen. Recent advances identifying the protein FT/Hd3a as the molecular nature responsible for florigen activity have focused current research on florigen genes as the important output of this complex signaling network. Rice is a model system for short-day plants and recent progress in elucidating the flowering network from rice and Arabidopsis, a long-day plant, provides an evolutionarily comparative view of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. This review summarizes photoperiodic flowering control in rice, including the interaction of complex layers of gene networks contributed from evolutionarily unique factors and the regulatory adaptation of conserved factors.

  17. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A. (JHU); (Maryland)

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  18. CMIP: a software package capable of reconstructing genome-wide regulatory networks using gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guangyong; Xu, Yaochen; Zhang, Xiujun; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-12-23

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) represents interactions of genes inside a cell or tissue, in which vertexes and edges stand for genes and their regulatory interactions respectively. Reconstruction of gene regulatory networks, in particular, genome-scale networks, is essential for comparative exploration of different species and mechanistic investigation of biological processes. Currently, most of network inference methods are computationally intensive, which are usually effective for small-scale tasks (e.g., networks with a few hundred genes), but are difficult to construct GRNs at genome-scale. Here, we present a software package for gene regulatory network reconstruction at a genomic level, in which gene interaction is measured by the conditional mutual information measurement using a parallel computing framework (so the package is named CMIP). The package is a greatly improved implementation of our previous PCA-CMI algorithm. In CMIP, we provide not only an automatic threshold determination method but also an effective parallel computing framework for network inference. Performance tests on benchmark datasets show that the accuracy of CMIP is comparable to most current network inference methods. Moreover, running tests on synthetic datasets demonstrate that CMIP can handle large datasets especially genome-wide datasets within an acceptable time period. In addition, successful application on a real genomic dataset confirms its practical applicability of the package. This new software package provides a powerful tool for genomic network reconstruction to biological community. The software can be accessed at http://www.picb.ac.cn/CMIP/ .

  19. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  20. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E; Lubitz, Steven A; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Chen, Lin Y; Smith, Jonathan D; Van Wagoner, David R; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H; Kors, Jan A; Weiss, Stefan; Völzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H; Dörr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed

  1. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lin (Honghuang); M. Mueller-Nurasyid; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); D.E. Arking (Dan); J. Barnard (John); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); Geelhoed, B. (Bastiaan); S. Trompet (Stella); M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje); T. Kacprowski (Tim); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Klarin, D. (Derek); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); Launer, L.J. (Lenore J.); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed Z.); L. Chen (Lin); J.D. Smith (Jonathan); D.R. van Wagoner (David); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); A.E. Hendricks (Audrey E.); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); N. Verweij (Niek); P. van der Harst (Pim); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); I. Ford (Ian); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Heeringa (Jan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.A. Kors (Jan); Weiss, S. (Stefan); H. Völzke (Henry); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Natarajan, P. (Pradeep); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); S. Kääb (Stefan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); S.A. Rienstra; J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.M. Albert (Christine); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility.

  2. Passing messages between biological networks to refine predicted interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Glass

    Full Text Available Regulatory network reconstruction is a fundamental problem in computational biology. There are significant limitations to such reconstruction using individual datasets, and increasingly people attempt to construct networks using multiple, independent datasets obtained from complementary sources, but methods for this integration are lacking. We developed PANDA (Passing Attributes between Networks for Data Assimilation, a message-passing model using multiple sources of information to predict regulatory relationships, and used it to integrate protein-protein interaction, gene expression, and sequence motif data to reconstruct genome-wide, condition-specific regulatory networks in yeast as a model. The resulting networks were not only more accurate than those produced using individual data sets and other existing methods, but they also captured information regarding specific biological mechanisms and pathways that were missed using other methodologies. PANDA is scalable to higher eukaryotes, applicable to specific tissue or cell type data and conceptually generalizable to include a variety of regulatory, interaction, expression, and other genome-scale data. An implementation of the PANDA algorithm is available at www.sourceforge.net/projects/panda-net.

  3. Passing messages between biological networks to refine predicted interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kimberly; Huttenhower, Curtis; Quackenbush, John; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory network reconstruction is a fundamental problem in computational biology. There are significant limitations to such reconstruction using individual datasets, and increasingly people attempt to construct networks using multiple, independent datasets obtained from complementary sources, but methods for this integration are lacking. We developed PANDA (Passing Attributes between Networks for Data Assimilation), a message-passing model using multiple sources of information to predict regulatory relationships, and used it to integrate protein-protein interaction, gene expression, and sequence motif data to reconstruct genome-wide, condition-specific regulatory networks in yeast as a model. The resulting networks were not only more accurate than those produced using individual data sets and other existing methods, but they also captured information regarding specific biological mechanisms and pathways that were missed using other methodologies. PANDA is scalable to higher eukaryotes, applicable to specific tissue or cell type data and conceptually generalizable to include a variety of regulatory, interaction, expression, and other genome-scale data. An implementation of the PANDA algorithm is available at www.sourceforge.net/projects/panda-net.

  4. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease.

  5. Adding protein context to the human protein-protein interaction network to reveal meaningful interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    Full Text Available Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimer's disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the

  6. Exploring Plant Co-Expression and Gene-Gene Interactions with CORNET 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bel, Michiel; Coppens, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Selecting and filtering a reference expression and interaction dataset when studying specific pathways and regulatory interactions can be a very time-consuming and error-prone task. In order to reduce the duplicated efforts required to amass such datasets, we have created the CORNET (CORrelation NETworks) platform which allows for easy access to a wide variety of data types: coexpression data, protein-protein interactions, regulatory interactions, and functional annotations. The CORNET platform outputs its results in either text format or through the Cytoscape framework, which is automatically launched by the CORNET website.CORNET 3.0 is the third iteration of the web platform designed for the user exploration of the coexpression space of plant genomes, with a focus on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we describe the platform: the tools, data, and best practices when using the platform. We indicate how the platform can be used to infer networks from a set of input genes, such as upregulated genes from an expression experiment. By exploring the network, new target and regulator genes can be discovered, allowing for follow-up experiments and more in-depth study. We also indicate how to avoid common pitfalls when evaluating the networks and how to avoid over interpretation of the results.All CORNET versions are available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/cornet/ .

  7. Network properties of complex human disease genes identified through genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Barrenas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies of network properties of human disease genes have mainly focused on monogenic diseases or cancers and have suffered from discovery bias. Here we investigated the network properties of complex disease genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAs, thereby eliminating discovery bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We derived a network of complex diseases (n = 54 and complex disease genes (n = 349 to explore the shared genetic architecture of complex diseases. We evaluated the centrality measures of complex disease genes in comparison with essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. The complex disease network showed that diseases belonging to the same disease class do not always share common disease genes. A possible explanation could be that the variants with higher minor allele frequency and larger effect size identified using GWAs constitute disjoint parts of the allelic spectra of similar complex diseases. The complex disease gene network showed high modularity with the size of the largest component being smaller than expected from a randomized null-model. This is consistent with limited sharing of genes between diseases. Complex disease genes are less central than the essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. Genes associated with the same disease, compared to genes associated with different diseases, more often tend to share a protein-protein interaction and a Gene Ontology Biological Process. CONCLUSIONS: This indicates that network neighbors of known disease genes form an important class of candidates for identifying novel genes for the same disease.

  8. Network properties of complex human disease genes identified through genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrenas, Fredrik; Chavali, Sreenivas; Holme, Petter; Mobini, Reza; Benson, Mikael

    2009-11-30

    Previous studies of network properties of human disease genes have mainly focused on monogenic diseases or cancers and have suffered from discovery bias. Here we investigated the network properties of complex disease genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAs), thereby eliminating discovery bias. We derived a network of complex diseases (n = 54) and complex disease genes (n = 349) to explore the shared genetic architecture of complex diseases. We evaluated the centrality measures of complex disease genes in comparison with essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. The complex disease network showed that diseases belonging to the same disease class do not always share common disease genes. A possible explanation could be that the variants with higher minor allele frequency and larger effect size identified using GWAs constitute disjoint parts of the allelic spectra of similar complex diseases. The complex disease gene network showed high modularity with the size of the largest component being smaller than expected from a randomized null-model. This is consistent with limited sharing of genes between diseases. Complex disease genes are less central than the essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. Genes associated with the same disease, compared to genes associated with different diseases, more often tend to share a protein-protein interaction and a Gene Ontology Biological Process. This indicates that network neighbors of known disease genes form an important class of candidates for identifying novel genes for the same disease.

  9. Comparison of protein interaction networks reveals species conservation and divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Maikun

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progresses in high-throughput proteomics have provided us with a first chance to characterize protein interaction networks (PINs, but also raised new challenges in interpreting the accumulating data. Results Motivated by the need of analyzing and interpreting the fast-growing data in the field of proteomics, we propose a comparative strategy to carry out global analysis of PINs. We compare two PINs by combining interaction topology and sequence similarity to identify conserved network substructures (CoNSs. Using this approach we perform twenty-one pairwise comparisons among the seven recently available PINs of E.coli, H.pylori, S.cerevisiae, C.elegans, D.melanogaster, M.musculus and H.sapiens. In spite of the incompleteness of data, PIN comparison discloses species conservation at the network level and the identified CoNSs are also functionally conserved and involve in basic cellular functions. We investigate the yeast CoNSs and find that many of them correspond to known complexes. We also find that different species harbor many conserved interaction regions that are topologically identical and these regions can constitute larger interaction regions that are topologically different but similar in framework. Based on the species-to-species difference in CoNSs, we infer potential species divergence. It seems that different species organize orthologs in similar but not necessarily the same topology to achieve similar or the same function. This attributes much to duplication and divergence of genes and their associated interactions. Finally, as the application of CoNSs, we predict 101 protein-protein interactions (PPIs, annotate 339 new protein functions and deduce 170 pairs of orthologs. Conclusion Our result demonstrates that the cross-species comparison strategy we adopt is powerful for the exploration of biological problems from the perspective of networks.

  10. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  11. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the ... in People with Serious Mental Illness Clues for Schizophrenia in Rare Gene Glitch Recognizing Schizophrenia: Seeking Clues to a Difficult ...

  12. Prediction of drug-drug interactions from chemogenomic and gene-gene interactions and analysis of drug-drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between multiple drugs administered to an organism concurrently, whether in the form of synergy or antagonism, are of clinical relevance. Moreover, un-derstanding the mechanisms and nature of drug-drug interactions is of great practical and theoretical interest. Work has previously been done on gene-gene and gene-drug interactions, but the prediction and rationalization of drug-drug interactions from this data is not straightforward. We present a strategy for attacking this p...

  13. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  14. Bagging statistical network inference from large-scale gene expression data.

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo de Matos Simoes; Frank Emmert-Streib

    2012-01-01

    Modern biology and medicine aim at hunting molecular and cellular causes of biological functions and diseases. Gene regulatory networks (GRN) inferred from gene expression data are considered an important aid for this research by providing a map of molecular interactions. Hence, GRNs have the potential enabling and enhancing basic as well as applied research in the life sciences. In this paper, we introduce a new method called BC3NET for inferring causal gene regulatory networks from large-sc...

  15. A semi-supervised method for predicting transcription factor-gene interactions in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Ernst

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While Escherichia coli has one of the most comprehensive datasets of experimentally verified transcriptional regulatory interactions of any organism, it is still far from complete. This presents a problem when trying to combine gene expression and regulatory interactions to model transcriptional regulatory networks. Using the available regulatory interactions to predict new interactions may lead to better coverage and more accurate models. Here, we develop SEREND (SEmi-supervised REgulatory Network Discoverer, a semi-supervised learning method that uses a curated database of verified transcriptional factor-gene interactions, DNA sequence binding motifs, and a compendium of gene expression data in order to make thousands of new predictions about transcription factor-gene interactions, including whether the transcription factor activates or represses the gene. Using genome-wide binding datasets for several transcription factors, we demonstrate that our semi-supervised classification strategy improves the prediction of targets for a given transcription factor. To further demonstrate the utility of our inferred interactions, we generated a new microarray gene expression dataset for the aerobic to anaerobic shift response in E. coli. We used our inferred interactions with the verified interactions to reconstruct a dynamic regulatory network for this response. The network reconstructed when using our inferred interactions was better able to correctly identify known regulators and suggested additional activators and repressors as having important roles during the aerobic-anaerobic shift interface.

  16. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    While the success of electronic music often relies on the uniqueness and quality of selected timbres, many musicians struggle with complicated and expensive equipment and techniques to create their desired sounds. Instead, this paper presents a technique for producing novel timbres that are evolved...... by the musician through interactive evolutionary computation. Each timbre is produced by an oscillator, which is represented by a special type of artificial neural network (ANN) called a compositional pattern producing network (CPPN). While traditional ANNs compute only sigmoid functions at their hidden nodes......, CPPNs can theoretically compute any function and can build on those present in traditional synthesizers (e.g. square, sawtooth, triangle, and sine waves functions) to produce completely novel timbres. Evolved with NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), the aim of this paper is to explore...

  17. An interaction network of mental disorder proteins in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, M J; Adams, H H H; Brandsma, J H; Dekkers, D H W; Akinci, U; Karkampouna, S; Quevedo, M; Kockx, C E M; Ozgür, Z; van IJcken, W F J; Demmers, J; Poot, R A

    2017-04-04

    Mental disorders (MDs) such as intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia have a strong genetic component. Recently, many gene mutations associated with ID, ASD or schizophrenia have been identified by high-throughput sequencing. A substantial fraction of these mutations are in genes encoding transcriptional regulators. Transcriptional regulators associated with different MDs but acting in the same gene regulatory network provide information on the molecular relation between MDs. Physical interaction between transcriptional regulators is a strong predictor for their cooperation in gene regulation. Here, we biochemically purified transcriptional regulators from neural stem cells, identified their interaction partners by mass spectrometry and assembled a protein interaction network containing 206 proteins, including 68 proteins mutated in MD patients and 52 proteins significantly lacking coding variation in humans. Our network shows molecular connections between established MD proteins and provides a discovery tool for novel MD genes. Network proteins preferentially co-localize on the genome and cooperate in disease-relevant gene regulation. Our results suggest that the observed transcriptional regulators associated with ID, ASD or schizophrenia are part of a transcriptional network in neural stem cells. We find that more severe mutations in network proteins are associated with MDs that include lower intelligence quotient (IQ), suggesting that the level of disruption of a shared transcriptional network correlates with cognitive dysfunction.

  18. Engineering stability in gene networks by autoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becskei, Attila; Serrano, Luis

    2000-06-01

    The genetic and biochemical networks which underlie such things as homeostasis in metabolism and the developmental programs of living cells, must withstand considerable variations and random perturbations of biochemical parameters. These occur as transient changes in, for example, transcription, translation, and RNA and protein degradation. The intensity and duration of these perturbations differ between cells in a population. The unique state of cells, and thus the diversity in a population, is owing to the different environmental stimuli the individual cells experience and the inherent stochastic nature of biochemical processes (for example, refs 5 and 6). It has been proposed, but not demonstrated, that autoregulatory, negative feedback loops in gene circuits provide stability, thereby limiting the range over which the concentrations of network components fluctuate. Here we have designed and constructed simple gene circuits consisting of a regulator and transcriptional repressor modules in Escherichia coli and we show the gain of stability produced by negative feedback.

  19. Discovering Study-Specific Gene Regulatory Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This article has been made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund. This article has been made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund. Microarrays are commonly used in biology because of their ability to simultaneously measure thousands of genes under different conditions. Due to their structure, typically containing a high amount of variables but far fewer samples, scalable network analysis techniques are often employed. In particular, consensus appro...

  20. Gene-gene interaction between tuberculosis candidate genes in a South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Erika; van der Merwe, Lize; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2011-02-01

    In a complex disease such as tuberculosis (TB) it is increasingly evident that gene-gene interactions play a far more important role in an individual's susceptibility to develop the disease than single polymorphisms on their own, as one gene can enhance or hinder the expression of another gene. Gene-gene interaction analysis is a new approach to elucidate susceptibility to TB. The possibility of gene-gene interactions was assessed, focusing on 11 polymorphisms in nine genes (DC-SIGN, IFN-γ, IFNGR1, IL-8, IL-1Ra, MBL, NRAMP1, RANTES, and SP-D) that have been associated with TB, some repeatedly. An optimal model, which best describes and predicts TB case-control status, was constructed. Significant interactions were detected between eight pairs of variants. The models fitted the observed data extremely well, with p activation is greatly enhanced by IFN-γ and IFN-γ response elements that are present in the human NRAMP1 promoter region, providing further evidence for their interaction. This study enabled us to test the theory that disease outcome may be due to interaction of several gene effects. With eight instances of statistically significant gene-gene interactions, the importance of epistasis is clearly identifiable in this study. Methods for studying gene-gene interactions are based on a multilocus and multigene approach, consistent with the nature of complex-trait diseases, and may provide the paradigm for future genetic studies of TB.

  1. On an Interactive Network Security Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Huiqiong; WANG Jiahao; ZHAO Qiang

    2004-01-01

    An interactive network security measure and a description of its function as well as its principle are presented.Based on the existing security loopholes and bugsin operating systems,this measure focuses on the restrictive condition of security and the establishment of configuration files.Under the control and administration of the secure management of configuration files,each system module brings much fiexibility,adaptability and high-level security.The security detecting and managing software used in UNIX based on this measure has obtained good results,achieving the goal of automatically detecting and handling inner and outer system-violation and system abuse.

  2. Phytosterols and phytosterolemia: gene-diet interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izar, Maria C; Tegani, Daniela M; Kasmas, Soraia H; Fonseca, Francisco A

    2011-02-01

    Phytosterol intake is recommended as an adjunctive therapy for hypercholesterolemia, and plant sterols/stanols can reduce cholesterol absorption at the intestinal lumen through the Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) transporter pathway by competitive solubilization in mixed micelles. Phytosterol absorption is of less magnitude than cholesterol and is preferably secreted in the intestinal lumen by ABCG5/G8 transporters. Therefore, plasma levels of plant sterols/stanols are negligible compared with cholesterol, under an ordinary diet. The mechanisms of cholesterol and plant sterols absorption and the whole-body pool of sterols are discussed in this chapter. There is controversy about treatment with statins inducing further increase in plasma non-cholesterol sterols raising concerns about the safety of supplementation of plant sterols to such drugs. In addition, increase in plant sterols has also been reported upon consumption of plant sterol-enriched foods, regardless of other treatments. Rare mutations on ABCG5/G8 transporters affecting cholesterol/non-cholesterol extrusion, causing sitosterolemia with xanthomas and premature atheroslerotic disease are now known, and cholesterol/plant sterols absorption inhibitor, ezetimibe, emerges as the drug that reduces phytosterolemia and promotes xanthoma regression. On the other hand, common polymorphisms affecting the NPC1L1 transporter can interfere with the action of ezetimibe. Gene-diet interactions participate in this intricate network modulating the expression of genetic variants on specific phenotypes and can also affect the individual response to the hypolipidemic treatment. These very interesting aspects promoted a great deal of research in the field.

  3. Improving gene regulatory network inference using network topology information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ajay; Chetty, Madhu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-09-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) structure from data is an important problem in computational biology. However, it is a computationally complex problem and approximate methods such as heuristic search techniques, restriction of the maximum-number-of-parents (maxP) for a gene, or an optimal search under special conditions are required. The limitations of a heuristic search are well known but literature on the detailed analysis of the widely used maxP technique is lacking. The optimal search methods require large computational time. We report the theoretical analysis and experimental results of the strengths and limitations of the maxP technique. Further, using an optimal search method, we combine the strengths of the maxP technique and the known GRN topology to propose two novel algorithms. These algorithms are implemented in a Bayesian network framework and tested on biological, realistic, and in silico networks of different sizes and topologies. They overcome the limitations of the maxP technique and show superior computational speed when compared to the current optimal search algorithms.

  4. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-02

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets.

  5. Risk score modeling of multiple gene to gene interactions using aggregated-multifactor dimensionality reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Hongying

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR has been widely applied to detect gene-gene (GxG interactions associated with complex diseases. Existing MDR methods summarize disease risk by a dichotomous predisposing model (high-risk/low-risk from one optimal GxG interaction, which does not take the accumulated effects from multiple GxG interactions into account. Results We propose an Aggregated-Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (A-MDR method that exhaustively searches for and detects significant GxG interactions to generate an epistasis enriched gene network. An aggregated epistasis enriched risk score, which takes into account multiple GxG interactions simultaneously, replaces the dichotomous predisposing risk variable and provides higher resolution in the quantification of disease susceptibility. We evaluate this new A-MDR approach in a broad range of simulations. Also, we present the results of an application of the A-MDR method to a data set derived from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis patients treated with methotrexate (MTX that revealed several GxG interactions in the folate pathway that were associated with treatment response. The epistasis enriched risk score that pooled information from 82 significant GxG interactions distinguished MTX responders from non-responders with 82% accuracy. Conclusions The proposed A-MDR is innovative in the MDR framework to investigate aggregated effects among GxG interactions. New measures (pOR, pRR and pChi are proposed to detect multiple GxG interactions.

  6. Dynamic Response Genes in CD4+ T Cells Reveal a Network of Interactive Proteins that Classifies Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hellberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS and has a varying disease course as well as variable response to treatment. Biomarkers may therefore aid personalized treatment. We tested whether in vitro activation of MS patient-derived CD4+ T cells could reveal potential biomarkers. The dynamic gene expression response to activation was dysregulated in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. By integrating our findings with genome-wide association studies, we constructed a highly connected MS gene module, disclosing cell activation and chemotaxis as central components. Changes in several module genes were associated with differences in protein levels, which were measurable in cerebrospinal fluid and were used to classify patients from control individuals. In addition, these measurements could predict disease activity after 2 years and distinguish low and high responders to treatment in two additional, independent cohorts. While further validation is needed in larger cohorts prior to clinical implementation, we have uncovered a set of potentially promising biomarkers.

  7. Autonomous Boolean modelling of developmental gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xianrui; Sun, Mengyang; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    2013-01-01

    During early embryonic development, a network of regulatory interactions among genes dynamically determines a pattern of differentiated tissues. We show that important timing information associated with the interactions can be faithfully represented in autonomous Boolean models in which binary variables representing expression levels are updated in continuous time, and that such models can provide a direct insight into features that are difficult to extract from ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. As an application, we model the experimentally well-studied network controlling fly body segmentation. The Boolean model successfully generates the patterns formed in normal and genetically perturbed fly embryos, permits the derivation of constraints on the time delay parameters, clarifies the logic associated with different ODE parameter sets and provides a platform for studying connectivity and robustness in parameter space. By elucidating the role of regulatory time delays in pattern formation, the results suggest new types of experimental measurements in early embryonic development. PMID:23034351

  8. Prediction of disease-gene-drug relationships following a differential network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickenrott, S; Angarica, V E; Upadhyaya, B B; del Sol, A

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts are being devoted to get a deeper understanding of disease-related dysregulations, which is central for introducing novel and more effective therapeutics in the clinics. However, most human diseases are highly multifactorial at the molecular level, involving dysregulation of multiple genes and interactions in gene regulatory networks. This issue hinders the elucidation of disease mechanism, including the identification of disease-causing genes and regulatory interactions. Most of current network-based approaches for the study of disease mechanisms do not take into account significant differences in gene regulatory network topology between healthy and disease phenotypes. Moreover, these approaches are not able to efficiently guide database search for connections between drugs, genes and diseases. We propose a differential network-based methodology for identifying candidate target genes and chemical compounds for reverting disease phenotypes. Our method relies on transcriptomics data to reconstruct gene regulatory networks corresponding to healthy and disease states separately. Further, it identifies candidate genes essential for triggering the reversion of the disease phenotype based on network stability determinants underlying differential gene expression. In addition, our method selects and ranks chemical compounds targeting these genes, which could be used as therapeutic interventions for complex diseases.

  9. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  10. A network view on Schizophrenia related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi Chandrasekaran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of a project investigating the molecular determinants of neurological diseases. To account for the systemic nature of these diseases we proceeded from a well established list of 38 schizophrenia-related genes (Allen et al., 2008; Ross et al., 2006 and investigated their closest network environment. The created networks were compared to recently proposed list of 173 schizophrenia related genes (Sun et al., 2009. 115 genes were predicted as potentially related to schizophrenia and subjected to GSEA. The enriched groups of proteins included neuromodulators, neurotransmitters and lipid transport. Over 100 signaling pathways were found significantly involved, signal transduction emerging as the most highly significant biological process. Next, we analyzed two microarray expression datasets derived from olfactory mucosa biopsies of schizophrenic patients and postmortem brain tissue samples from SMRIDB. The systems biology analysis resulted in a number of other genes predicted to be potentially related to schizophrenia, as well as in additional information of interest for elucidating molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  11. JAK/STAT and Hox Dynamic Interactions in an Organogenetic Gene Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro B Pinto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organogenesis is controlled by gene networks activated by upstream selector genes. During development the gene network is activated stepwise, with a sequential deployment of successive transcription factors and signalling molecules that modify the interaction of the elements of the network as the organ forms. Very little is known about the steps leading from the early specification of the cells that form the organ primordium to the moment when a robust gene network is in place. Here we study in detail how a Hox protein induces during early embryogenesis a simple organogenetic cascade that matures into a complex gene network through the activation of feedback and feed forward interaction loops. To address how the network organization changes during development and how the target genes integrate the genetic information it provides, we analyze in Drosophila the induction of posterior spiracle organogenesis by the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B. Initially, Abd-B activates in the spiracle primordium a cascade of transcription factors and signalling molecules including the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. We find that at later stages STAT activity feeds back directly into Abd-B, initiating the transformation of the Hox cascade into a gene-network. Focusing on crumbs, a spiracle downstream target gene of Abd-B, we analyze how a modular cis regulatory element integrates the dynamic network information set by Abd-B and the JAK/STAT signalling pathway during development. We describe how a Hox induced genetic cascade transforms into a robust gene network during organogenesis due to the repeated interaction of Abd-B and one of its targets, the JAK/STAT signalling cascade. Our results show that in this network STAT functions not just as a direct transcription factor, but also acts as a "counter-repressor", uncovering a novel mode for STAT directed transcriptional regulation.

  12. JAK/STAT and Hox Dynamic Interactions in an Organogenetic Gene Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro B.; Espinosa-Vázquez, Jose Manuel; Rivas, María Luísa; Hombría, James Castelli-Gair

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis is controlled by gene networks activated by upstream selector genes. During development the gene network is activated stepwise, with a sequential deployment of successive transcription factors and signalling molecules that modify the interaction of the elements of the network as the organ forms. Very little is known about the steps leading from the early specification of the cells that form the organ primordium to the moment when a robust gene network is in place. Here we study in detail how a Hox protein induces during early embryogenesis a simple organogenetic cascade that matures into a complex gene network through the activation of feedback and feed forward interaction loops. To address how the network organization changes during development and how the target genes integrate the genetic information it provides, we analyze in Drosophila the induction of posterior spiracle organogenesis by the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Initially, Abd-B activates in the spiracle primordium a cascade of transcription factors and signalling molecules including the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. We find that at later stages STAT activity feeds back directly into Abd-B, initiating the transformation of the Hox cascade into a gene-network. Focusing on crumbs, a spiracle downstream target gene of Abd-B, we analyze how a modular cis regulatory element integrates the dynamic network information set by Abd-B and the JAK/STAT signalling pathway during development. We describe how a Hox induced genetic cascade transforms into a robust gene network during organogenesis due to the repeated interaction of Abd-B and one of its targets, the JAK/STAT signalling cascade. Our results show that in this network STAT functions not just as a direct transcription factor, but also acts as a "counter-repressor", uncovering a novel mode for STAT directed transcriptional regulation. PMID:26230388

  13. How difficult is inference of mammalian causal gene regulatory networks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordje Djordjevic

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks (GRNs play a central role in systems biology, especially in the study of mammalian organ development. One key question remains largely unanswered: Is it possible to infer mammalian causal GRNs using observable gene co-expression patterns alone? We assembled two mouse GRN datasets (embryonic tooth and heart and matching microarray gene expression profiles to systematically investigate the difficulties of mammalian causal GRN inference. The GRNs were assembled based on > 2,000 pieces of experimental genetic perturbation evidence from manually reading > 150 primary research articles. Each piece of perturbation evidence records the qualitative change of the expression of one gene following knock-down or over-expression of another gene. Our data have thorough annotation of tissue types and embryonic stages, as well as the type of regulation (activation, inhibition and no effect, which uniquely allows us to estimate both sensitivity and specificity of the inference of tissue specific causal GRN edges. Using these unprecedented datasets, we found that gene co-expression does not reliably distinguish true positive from false positive interactions, making inference of GRN in mammalian development very difficult. Nonetheless, if we have expression profiling data from genetic or molecular perturbation experiments, such as gene knock-out or signalling stimulation, it is possible to use the set of differentially expressed genes to recover causal regulatory relationships with good sensitivity and specificity. Our result supports the importance of using perturbation experimental data in causal network reconstruction. Furthermore, we showed that causal gene regulatory relationship can be highly cell type or developmental stage specific, suggesting the importance of employing expression profiles from homogeneous cell populations. This study provides essential datasets and empirical evidence to guide the development of new GRN inference

  14. How difficult is inference of mammalian causal gene regulatory networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Djordje; Yang, Andrian; Zadoorian, Armella; Rungrugeecharoen, Kevin; Ho, Joshua W K

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in systems biology, especially in the study of mammalian organ development. One key question remains largely unanswered: Is it possible to infer mammalian causal GRNs using observable gene co-expression patterns alone? We assembled two mouse GRN datasets (embryonic tooth and heart) and matching microarray gene expression profiles to systematically investigate the difficulties of mammalian causal GRN inference. The GRNs were assembled based on > 2,000 pieces of experimental genetic perturbation evidence from manually reading > 150 primary research articles. Each piece of perturbation evidence records the qualitative change of the expression of one gene following knock-down or over-expression of another gene. Our data have thorough annotation of tissue types and embryonic stages, as well as the type of regulation (activation, inhibition and no effect), which uniquely allows us to estimate both sensitivity and specificity of the inference of tissue specific causal GRN edges. Using these unprecedented datasets, we found that gene co-expression does not reliably distinguish true positive from false positive interactions, making inference of GRN in mammalian development very difficult. Nonetheless, if we have expression profiling data from genetic or molecular perturbation experiments, such as gene knock-out or signalling stimulation, it is possible to use the set of differentially expressed genes to recover causal regulatory relationships with good sensitivity and specificity. Our result supports the importance of using perturbation experimental data in causal network reconstruction. Furthermore, we showed that causal gene regulatory relationship can be highly cell type or developmental stage specific, suggesting the importance of employing expression profiles from homogeneous cell populations. This study provides essential datasets and empirical evidence to guide the development of new GRN inference methods for

  15. Stochastic signalling rewires the interaction map of a multiple feedback network during yeast evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    During evolution, genetic networks are rewired through strengthening or weakening their interactions to develop new regulatory schemes. In the galactose network, the GAL1/GAL3 paralogues and the GAL2 gene enhance their own expression mediated by the Gal4p transcriptional activator. The wiring strength in these feedback loops is set by the number of Gal4p binding sites. Here we show using synthetic circuits that multiplying the binding sites increases the expression of a gene under the direct ...

  16. Competing dynamical processes on two interacting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Zuzek, L G; Braunstein, L A; Vazquez, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the competition between two different dynamical processes, one for opinion formation and the other for decision making, on two interconnected networks. The networks represent two interacting social groups, the society and the Congress. An opinion formation process takes place on the society, where the opinion S of each individual can take one of four possible values (S=-2,-1,1,2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue, from totally against (S=-2) to totally in favor (S=2). The dynamics is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r, which measures the ratio between the likelihood to become an extremist or a moderate. The dynamics of the Congress is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where congressmen can adopt one of two possible positions, to be either in favor (+) or against (-) the issue. The probability that a congressman changes his decision is proportional to the fraction of interacting neighbors that hold the opposite opinion raised to a power $\\beta$...

  17. The Interaction Network Ontology-supported modeling and mining of complex interactions represented with multiple keywords in biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Arzucan; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) logically represents biological interactions, pathways, and networks. INO has been demonstrated to be valuable in providing a set of structured ontological terms and associated keywords to support literature mining of gene-gene interactions from biomedical literature. However, previous work using INO focused on single keyword matching, while many interactions are represented with two or more interaction keywords used in combination. This paper reports our extension of INO to include combinatory patterns of two or more literature mining keywords co-existing in one sentence to represent specific INO interaction classes. Such keyword combinations and related INO interaction type information could be automatically obtained via SPARQL queries, formatted in Excel format, and used in an INO-supported SciMiner, an in-house literature mining program. We studied the gene interaction sentences from the commonly used benchmark Learning Logic in Language (LLL) dataset and one internally generated vaccine-related dataset to identify and analyze interaction types containing multiple keywords. Patterns obtained from the dependency parse trees of the sentences were used to identify the interaction keywords that are related to each other and collectively represent an interaction type. The INO ontology currently has 575 terms including 202 terms under the interaction branch. The relations between the INO interaction types and associated keywords are represented using the INO annotation relations: 'has literature mining keywords' and 'has keyword dependency pattern'. The keyword dependency patterns were generated via running the Stanford Parser to obtain dependency relation types. Out of the 107 interactions in the LLL dataset represented with two-keyword interaction types, 86 were identified by using the direct dependency relations. The LLL dataset contained 34 gene regulation interaction types, each of which associated with multiple keywords. A

  18. Mapping and characterization of two relevance networks from SNP and gene levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jiang; Lijie Zhang; Bo Na; Lihong Wang; Jiankai Xu; Xia Li; Yadong Wang; Shaoqi Rao

    2009-01-01

    Variations of gene expression and DNA sequence are genetically associated.The goal of this study was to build genetic networks to map from SNPs to gene expressions and to characterize the two different kinds of networks.We employed mutual information to evaluate the strength of SNP-SNP and gene-gene associations based on SNPs identity by descent (IBD) data and differences of gene expressions.We applied the approach to one dataset of Genetics of Gene Expression in Humans,and discovered that both the SNP relevance network and the gene relevance network approximated the scale-free topology.We also found that 12.09% of SNP-SNP interactions matched 24.49% of gene-gene interactions,which was consistent with that of the previous studies.Finally,we identified 49 hub SNPs and 115 hub genes in their relevance networks,in which 27 hub SNPs were associated with 25 hub genes.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  19. A network of cancer genes with co-occurring and anti-co-occurring mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Cui

    Full Text Available Certain cancer genes contribute to tumorigenesis in a manner of either co-occurring or mutually exclusive (anti-co-occurring mutations; however, the global picture of when, where and how these functional interactions occur remains unclear. This study presents a systems biology approach for this purpose. After applying this method to cancer gene mutation data generated from large-scale and whole genome sequencing of cancer samples, a network of cancer genes with co-occurring and anti-co-occurring mutations was constructed. Analysis of this network revealed that genes with co-occurring mutations prefer direct signaling transductions and that the interaction relations among cancer genes in the network are related with their functional similarity. It was also revealed that genes with co-occurring mutations tend to have similar mutation frequencies, whereas genes with anti-co-occurring mutations tend to have different mutation frequencies. Moreover, genes with more exons tend to have more co-occurring mutations with other genes, and genes having lower local coherent network structures tend to have higher mutation frequency. The network showed two complementary modules that have distinct functions and have different roles in tumorigenesis. This study presented a framework for the analysis of cancer genome sequencing outputs. The presented data and uncovered patterns are helpful for understanding the contribution of gene mutations to tumorigenesis and valuable in the identification of key biomarkers and drug targets for cancer.

  20. Comprehensive curation and analysis of global interaction networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botstein David

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of complex biological networks and prediction of gene function has been enabled by high-throughput (HTP methods for detection of genetic and protein interactions. Sparse coverage in HTP datasets may, however, distort network properties and confound predictions. Although a vast number of well substantiated interactions are recorded in the scientific literature, these data have not yet been distilled into networks that enable system-level inference. Results We describe here a comprehensive database of genetic and protein interactions, and associated experimental evidence, for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as manually curated from over 31,793 abstracts and online publications. This literature-curated (LC dataset contains 33,311 interactions, on the order of all extant HTP datasets combined. Surprisingly, HTP protein-interaction datasets currently achieve only around 14% coverage of the interactions in the literature. The LC network nevertheless shares attributes with HTP networks, including scale-free connectivity and correlations between interactions, abundance, localization, and expression. We find that essential genes or proteins are enriched for interactions with other essential genes or proteins, suggesting that the global network may be functionally unified. This interconnectivity is supported by a substantial overlap of protein and genetic interactions in the LC dataset. We show that the LC dataset considerably improves the predictive power of network-analysis approaches. The full LC dataset is available at the BioGRID (http://www.thebiogrid.org and SGD (http://www.yeastgenome.org/ databases. Conclusion Comprehensive datasets of biological interactions derived from the primary literature provide critical benchmarks for HTP methods, augment functional prediction, and reveal system-level attributes of biological networks.

  1. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis and independent validation of key candidate genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prathima Arvind; Shanker Jayashree; Srikarthika Jambunathan; Jiny Nair; Vijay V. Kakkar

    2015-12-01

    Molecular mechanism underlying the patho-physiology of coronary artery disease (CAD) is complex. We used global expression profiling combined with analysis of biological network to dissect out potential genes and pathways associated with CAD in a representative case–control Asian Indian cohort. We initially performed blood transcriptomics profiling in 20 subjects, including 10 CAD patients and 10 healthy controls on the Agilent microarray platform. Data was analysed with Gene Spring Gx12.5, followed by network analysis using David v 6.7 and Reactome databases. The most significant differentially expressed genes from microarray were independently validated by real time PCR in 97 cases and 97 controls. A total of 190 gene transcripts showed significant differential expression (fold change > 2, P < 0.05) between the cases and the controls of which 142 genes were upregulated and 48 genes were downregulated. Genes associated with inflammation, immune response, cell regula- tion, proliferation and apoptotic pathways were enriched, while inflammatory and immune response genes were displayed as hubs in the network, having greater number of interactions with the neighbouring genes. Expression of 1/2/3, 8, 1, 2, 69, , , 4, 42, 58, and 42 genes were independently validated; 1/2/3 and 8 showed >8-fold higher expression in cases relative to the controls implying their important role in CAD. In conclusion, global gene expression profiling combined with network analysis can help in identifying key genes and pathways for CAD.

  2. Reconstructing Generalized Logical Networks of Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse Brain from Temporal Gene Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mingzhou (Joe) [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces; Lewis, Chris K. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces; Lance, Eric [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Kirova, Roumyana [Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research & Development, NJ; Langston, Michael A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bergeson, Susan [Texas Tech University, Lubbock

    2009-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing generalized logical networks to account for temporal dependencies among genes and environmental stimuli from high-throughput transcriptomic data is addressed. A network reconstruction algorithm was developed that uses the statistical significance as a criterion for network selection to avoid false-positive interactions arising from pure chance. Using temporal gene expression data collected from the brains of alcohol-treated mice in an analysis of the molecular response to alcohol, this algorithm identified genes from a major neuronal pathway as putative components of the alcohol response mechanism. Three of these genes have known associations with alcohol in the literature. Several other potentially relevant genes, highlighted and agreeing with independent results from literature mining, may play a role in the response to alcohol. Additional, previously-unknown gene interactions were discovered that, subject to biological verification, may offer new clues in the search for the elusive molecular mechanisms of alcoholism.

  3. Gene by environment interaction in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is highly prevalent in the Western world. It is a genetically complex disease caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors, which may interact. Genetic research has recently incorporated environmental factors to investigate gene by

  4. Gene-Drug Interaction in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Amici

    2011-01-01

    Several polymorphisms have been studied and some have been associated with positive drug-gene interaction on stroke, but the superiority of the genotype-guided approach over the clinical approach has not been proved yet; for this reason, it is not routinely recommended.

  5. Biological Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction (G x E) has been treated as both a statistical phenomenon and a biological reality. It is argued that, although there are important statistical issues that need to be considered, the focus has to be on the biological implications of G x E. Four reports of G x E deriving from the Dunedin longitudinal study are used as…

  6. fabp4 is central to eight obesity associated genes: a functional gene network-based polymorphic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Susmita; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2015-01-07

    Network study on genes and proteins offers functional basics of the complexity of gene and protein, and its interacting partners. The gene fatty acid-binding protein 4 (fabp4) is found to be highly expressed in adipose tissue, and is one of the most abundant proteins in mature adipocytes. Our investigations on functional modules of fabp4 provide useful information on the functional genes interacting with fabp4, their biochemical properties and their regulatory functions. The present study shows that there are eight set of candidate genes: acp1, ext2, insr, lipe, ostf1, sncg, usp15, and vim that are strongly and functionally linked up with fabp4. Gene ontological analysis of network modules of fabp4 provides an explicit idea on the functional aspect of fabp4 and its interacting nodes. The hierarchal mapping on gene ontology indicates gene specific processes and functions as well as their compartmentalization in tissues. The fabp4 along with its interacting genes are involved in lipid metabolic activity and are integrated in multi-cellular processes of tissues and organs. They also have important protein/enzyme binding activity. Our study elucidated disease-associated nsSNP prediction for fabp4 and it is interesting to note that there are four rsID׳s (rs1051231, rs3204631, rs140925685 and rs141169989) with disease allelic variation (T104P, T126P, G27D and G90V respectively). On the whole, our gene network analysis presents a clear insight about the interactions and functions associated with fabp4 gene network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new

  8. Reconstructing Generalized Logical Networks of Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse Brain from Temporal Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression time course data can be used not only to detect differentially expressed genes but also to find temporal associations among genes. The problem of reconstructing generalized logical networks to account for temporal dependencies among genes and environmental stimuli from transcriptomic data is addressed. A network reconstruction algorithm was developed that uses statistical significance as a criterion for network selection to avoid false-positive interactions arising from pure chance. The multinomial hypothesis testing-based network reconstruction allows for explicit specification of the false-positive rate, unique from all extant network inference algorithms. The method is superior to dynamic Bayesian network modeling in a simulation study. Temporal gene expression data from the brains of alcohol-treated mice in an analysis of the molecular response to alcohol are used for modeling. Genes from major neuronal pathways are identified as putative components of the alcohol response mechanism. Nine of these genes have associations with alcohol reported in literature. Several other potentially relevant genes, compatible with independent results from literature mining, may play a role in the response to alcohol. Additional, previously unknown gene interactions were discovered that, subject to biological verification, may offer new clues in the search for the elusive molecular mechanisms of alcoholism.

  9. Reconstructing Generalized Logical Networks of Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse Brain from Temporal Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodowski Kerrie H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression time course data can be used not only to detect differentially expressed genes but also to find temporal associations among genes. The problem of reconstructing generalized logical networks to account for temporal dependencies among genes and environmental stimuli from transcriptomic data is addressed. A network reconstruction algorithm was developed that uses statistical significance as a criterion for network selection to avoid false-positive interactions arising from pure chance. The multinomial hypothesis testing-based network reconstruction allows for explicit specification of the false-positive rate, unique from all extant network inference algorithms. The method is superior to dynamic Bayesian network modeling in a simulation study. Temporal gene expression data from the brains of alcohol-treated mice in an analysis of the molecular response to alcohol are used for modeling. Genes from major neuronal pathways are identified as putative components of the alcohol response mechanism. Nine of these genes have associations with alcohol reported in literature. Several other potentially relevant genes, compatible with independent results from literature mining, may play a role in the response to alcohol. Additional, previously unknown gene interactions were discovered that, subject to biological verification, may offer new clues in the search for the elusive molecular mechanisms of alcoholism.

  10. An Evolutionarily Conserved Synthetic Lethal Interaction Network Identifies FEN1 as a Broad-Spectrum Target for Anticancer Therapeutic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Derek M. van Pel; Barrett, Irene J.; Yoko Shimizu; Sajesh, Babu V.; Brent J Guppy; Tom Pfeifer; McManus, Kirk J.; Philip Hieter

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing genetic differences between cancerous and noncancerous cells offers a strategy for the development of new therapies. Extrapolating from yeast genetic interaction data, we used cultured human cells and siRNA to construct and evaluate a synthetic lethal interaction network comprised of chromosome instability (CIN) genes that are frequently mutated in colorectal cancer. A small number of genes in this network were found to have synthetic lethal interactions with a large number of canc...

  11. Paper-based Synthetic Gene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A.; Ferrante, Tom; Cameron, D. Ewen; DaleyKeyser, Ajay; Yin, Peng; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene networks have wide-ranging uses in reprogramming and rewiring organisms. To date, there has not been a way to harness the vast potential of these networks beyond the constraints of a laboratory or in vivo environment. Here, we present an in vitro paper-based platform that provides a new venue for synthetic biologists to operate, and a much-needed medium for the safe deployment of engineered gene circuits beyond the lab. Commercially available cell-free systems are freeze-dried onto paper, enabling the inexpensive, sterile and abiotic distribution of synthetic biology-based technologies for the clinic, global health, industry, research and education. For field use, we create circuits with colorimetric outputs for detection by eye, and fabricate a low-cost, electronic optical interface. We demonstrate this technology with small molecule and RNA actuation of genetic switches, rapid prototyping of complex gene circuits, and programmable in vitro diagnostics, including glucose sensors and strain-specific Ebola virus sensors. PMID:25417167

  12. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  13. Chaotic motifs in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ye, Weiming; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Zhigang; Huang, Xuhui; Hu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Chaos should occur often in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) which have been widely described by nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, if their dimensions are no less than 3. It is therefore puzzling that chaos has never been reported in GRNs in nature and is also extremely rare in models of GRNs. On the other hand, the topic of motifs has attracted great attention in studying biological networks, and network motifs are suggested to be elementary building blocks that carry out some key functions in the network. In this paper, chaotic motifs (subnetworks with chaos) in GRNs are systematically investigated. The conclusion is that: (i) chaos can only appear through competitions between different oscillatory modes with rivaling intensities. Conditions required for chaotic GRNs are found to be very strict, which make chaotic GRNs extremely rare. (ii) Chaotic motifs are explored as the simplest few-node structures capable of producing chaos, and serve as the intrinsic source of chaos of random few-node GRNs. Several optimal motifs causing chaos with atypically high probability are figured out. (iii) Moreover, we discovered that a number of special oscillators can never produce chaos. These structures bring some advantages on rhythmic functions and may help us understand the robustness of diverse biological rhythms. (iv) The methods of dominant phase-advanced driving (DPAD) and DPAD time fraction are proposed to quantitatively identify chaotic motifs and to explain the origin of chaotic behaviors in GRNs.

  14. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  15. Network analysis identifies common genes associated with obesity in six obesity-related diseases*

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Li-ning; Wang, Yan-bing; Wnag, Chun-guang; Wei, Hui-ping

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been reported to be associated with many diseases. However, common obesity-induced biological processes have not been evaluated across these diseases. We identified genes associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases, and used them to construct protein‒protein interaction networks. We also analyzed gene ontology (GO) in those genes overlapping between obesity and disease. Our work identifies gene modules common to obesity and obesity-related diseases, which can provide a ba...

  16. Phase transitions in the evolution of gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skanata, Antun; Kussell, Edo

    The role of gene regulatory networks is to respond to environmental conditions and optimize growth of the cell. A typical example is found in bacteria, where metabolic genes are activated in response to nutrient availability, and are subsequently turned off to conserve energy when their specific substrates are depleted. However, in fluctuating environmental conditions, regulatory networks could experience strong evolutionary pressures not only to turn the right genes on and off, but also to respond optimally under a wide spectrum of fluctuation timescales. The outcome of evolution is predicted by the long-term growth rate, which differentiates between optimal strategies. Here we present an analytic computation of the long-term growth rate in randomly fluctuating environments, by using mean-field and higher order expansion in the environmental history. We find that optimal strategies correspond to distinct regions in the phase space of fluctuations, separated by first and second order phase transitions. The statistics of environmental randomness are shown to dictate the possible evolutionary modes, which either change the structure of the regulatory network abruptly, or gradually modify and tune the interactions between its components.

  17. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Gyorgy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems.

  18. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems.

  19. Simulated evolution of protein-protein interaction networks with realistic topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G Jack; Pressé, Steve; Peterson, Kristin S; Dill, Ken A

    2012-01-01

    We model the evolution of eukaryotic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In our model, PPI networks evolve by two known biological mechanisms: (1) Gene duplication, which is followed by rapid diversification of duplicate interactions. (2) Neofunctionalization, in which a mutation leads to a new interaction with some other protein. Since many interactions are due to simple surface compatibility, we hypothesize there is an increased likelihood of interacting with other proteins in the target protein's neighborhood. We find good agreement of the model on 10 different network properties compared to high-confidence experimental PPI networks in yeast, fruit flies, and humans. Key findings are: (1) PPI networks evolve modular structures, with no need to invoke particular selection pressures. (2) Proteins in cells have on average about 6 degrees of separation, similar to some social networks, such as human-communication and actor networks. (3) Unlike social networks, which have a shrinking diameter (degree of maximum separation) over time, PPI networks are predicted to grow in diameter. (4) The model indicates that evolutionarily old proteins should have higher connectivities and be more centrally embedded in their networks. This suggests a way in which present-day proteomics data could provide insights into biological evolution.

  20. Hi-C Chromatin Interaction Networks Predict Co-expression in the Mouse Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Babaei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensional conformation of the genome in the cell nucleus influences important biological processes such as gene expression regulation. Recent studies have shown a strong correlation between chromatin interactions and gene co-expression. However, predicting gene co-expression from frequent long-range chromatin interactions remains challenging. We address this by characterizing the topology of the cortical chromatin interaction network using scale-aware topological measures. We demonstrate that based on these characterizations it is possible to accurately predict spatial co-expression between genes in the mouse cortex. Consistent with previous findings, we find that the chromatin interaction profile of a gene-pair is a good predictor of their spatial co-expression. However, the accuracy of the prediction can be substantially improved when chromatin interactions are described using scale-aware topological measures of the multi-resolution chromatin interaction network. We conclude that, for co-expression prediction, it is necessary to take into account different levels of chromatin interactions ranging from direct interaction between genes (i.e. small-scale to chromatin compartment interactions (i.e. large-scale.

  1. Gene network interconnectedness and the generalized topological overlap measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network methods are increasingly used to represent the interactions of genes and/or proteins. Genes or proteins that are directly linked may have a similar biological function or may be part of the same biological pathway. Since the information on the connection (adjacency between 2 nodes may be noisy or incomplete, it can be desirable to consider alternative measures of pairwise interconnectedness. Here we study a class of measures that are proportional to the number of neighbors that a pair of nodes share in common. For example, the topological overlap measure by Ravasz et al. 1 can be interpreted as a measure of agreement between the m = 1 step neighborhoods of 2 nodes. Several studies have shown that two proteins having a higher topological overlap are more likely to belong to the same functional class than proteins having a lower topological overlap. Here we address the question whether a measure of topological overlap based on higher-order neighborhoods could give rise to a more robust and sensitive measure of interconnectedness. Results We generalize the topological overlap measure from m = 1 step neighborhoods to m ≥ 2 step neighborhoods. This allows us to define the m-th order generalized topological overlap measure (GTOM by (i counting the number of m-step neighbors that a pair of nodes share and (ii normalizing it to take a value between 0 and 1. Using theoretical arguments, a yeast co-expression network application, and a fly protein network application, we illustrate the usefulness of the proposed measure for module detection and gene neighborhood analysis. Conclusion Topological overlap can serve as an important filter to counter the effects of spurious or missing connections between network nodes. The m-th order topological overlap measure allows one to trade-off sensitivity versus specificity when it comes to defining pairwise interconnectedness and network modules.

  2. Mining susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes from SNP data by combining network topological properties with support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lin; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Hong; Li, Lin; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Zhi-cheng

    2011-11-21

    Genome-wide association study is a powerful approach to identify disease risk loci. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms for most complex diseases are still not well understood. Therefore, further investigating the interplay between genetic factors and biological networks is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Here, we proposed a novel framework to identify susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes by combining network topological properties with support vector regression from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. We assigned risk SNPs to genes using the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database, and then mapped these genes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The gene modules implicated by hub genes were extracted using the PPI networks and the topological property was analyzed for these gene modules. For each gene module, risk feature genes were determined by topological property analysis and support vector regression. As a result, five shared risk feature genes, CD80, EGFR, FN1, GSK3B and TRAF6 were found and proven to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis by previous reports. Our approach showed a good performance in comparison with other approaches and can be used for prioritizing candidate genes associated with complex diseases.

  3. Computational studies of gene regulatory networks: in numero molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasty, J; McMillen, D; Isaacs, F; Collins, J J

    2001-04-01

    Remarkable progress in genomic research is leading to a complete map of the building blocks of biology. Knowledge of this map is, in turn, setting the stage for a fundamental description of cellular function at the DNA level. Such a description will entail an understanding of gene regulation, in which proteins often regulate their own production or that of other proteins in a complex web of interactions. The implications of the underlying logic of genetic networks are difficult to deduce through experimental techniques alone, and successful approaches will probably involve the union of new experiments and computational modelling techniques.

  4. CARRIE web service: automated transcriptional regulatory network inference and interactive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverty, Peter M; Frith, Martin C; Weng, Zhiping

    2004-07-01

    We present an intuitive and interactive web service for CARRIE (Computational Ascertainment of Regulatory Relationships Inferred from Expression). CARRIE is a computational method that analyzes microarray and promoter sequence data to infer a transcriptional regulatory network from the response to a specific stimulus. This service displays an interactive graph of the inferred network and provides easy access to the evidence for the involvement of each gene in the network. We provide functionality to include network data in KEGG XML (KGML) format in this graph. Our service also provides Gene Ontology annotation to aid the user in forming hypotheses about the role of each gene in the cellular response. The CARRIE web service is freely available at http://zlab.bu.edu/CARRIE-web.

  5. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  6. Game theory in communication networks cooperative resolution of interactive networking scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, Josephina

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical tool for scientists and researchers who work with computer and communication networks, Game Theory in Communication Networks: Cooperative Resolution of Interactive Networking Scenarios addresses the question of how to promote cooperative behavior in interactive situations between heterogeneous entities in communication networking scenarios. It explores network design and management from a theoretical perspective, using game theory and graph theory to analyze strategic situations and demonstrate profitable behaviors of the cooperative entities. The book promotes the use of Game T

  7. iSLIM: a comprehensive approach to mapping and characterizing gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockel, Sylvie; Geertz, Marcel; Hens, Korneel; Deplancke, Bart; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2013-02-01

    Mapping gene regulatory networks is a significant challenge in systems biology, yet only a few methods are currently capable of systems-level identification of transcription factors (TFs) that bind a specific regulatory element. We developed a microfluidic method for integrated systems-level interaction mapping of TF-DNA interactions, generating and interrogating an array of 423 full-length Drosophila TFs. With integrated systems-level interaction mapping, it is now possible to rapidly and quantitatively map gene regulatory networks of higher eukaryotes.

  8. Evolution of biomolecular networks: lessons from metabolic and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer

    2009-11-01

    Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein-protein interactions or enzyme-enzyme interactions through shared metabolites in the case of metabolic networks. Evolutionary analysis has revealed that changes in the nodes and links in protein-protein interaction and metabolic networks are subject to different selection pressures owing to distinct topological features. However, many evolutionary constraints can be uncovered only if temporal and spatial aspects are included in the network analysis.

  9. Multiple Tipping Points and Optimal Repairing in Interacting Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Curme, Chester; Vodenska, Irena; Levy-Carciente, Sary; Stanley, H Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Systems that comprise many interacting dynamical networks, such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters, often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. To understand the collective behavior of these systems, we investigate a model of interacting networks exhibiting the fundamental processes of failure, damage spread, and recovery. We find a very rich phase diagram that becomes exponentially more complex as the number of networks is increased. In the simplest example of $n=2$ interacting networks we find two critical points, 4 triple points, 10 allowed transitions, and two "forbidden" transitions, as well as a manifold of metastable regions represented by complex hysteresis. Knowing and understanding the phase diagram have an immediate practical implication; it enables us to find the optimal strategy for repairing partially or fully damaged interconnected networks. To support our model, we analyze an example of real interacting financial net...

  10. Predicting Variabilities in Cardiac Gene Expression with a Boolean Network Incorporating Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Melanie; Burkovski, Andre; Sträng, J Eric; Kraus, Johann M; Groß, Alexander; Palm, Günther; Kühl, Michael; Kestler, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    Gene interactions in cells can be represented by gene regulatory networks. A Boolean network models gene interactions according to rules where gene expression is represented by binary values (on / off or {1, 0}). In reality, however, the gene's state can have multiple values due to biological properties. Furthermore, the noisy nature of the experimental design results in uncertainty about a state of the gene. Here we present a new Boolean network paradigm to allow intermediate values on the interval [0, 1]. As in the Boolean network, fixed points or attractors of such a model correspond to biological phenotypes or states. We use our new extension of the Boolean network paradigm to model gene expression in first and second heart field lineages which are cardiac progenitor cell populations involved in early vertebrate heart development. By this we are able to predict additional biological phenotypes that the Boolean model alone is not able to identify without utilizing additional biological knowledge. The additional phenotypes predicted by the model were confirmed by published biological experiments. Furthermore, the new method predicts gene expression propensities for modelled but yet to be analyzed genes.

  11. Reconstruction of large-scale gene regulatory networks using Bayesian model averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haseong; Gelenbe, Erol

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory networks provide the systematic view of molecular interactions in a complex living system. However, constructing large-scale gene regulatory networks is one of the most challenging problems in systems biology. Also large burst sets of biological data require a proper integration technique for reliable gene regulatory network construction. Here we present a new reverse engineering approach based on Bayesian model averaging which attempts to combine all the appropriate models describing interactions among genes. This Bayesian approach with a prior based on the Gibbs distribution provides an efficient means to integrate multiple sources of biological data. In a simulation study with maximum of 2000 genes, our method shows better sensitivity than previous elastic-net and Gaussian graphical models, with a fixed specificity of 0.99. The study also shows that the proposed method outperforms the other standard methods for a DREAM dataset generated by nonlinear stochastic models. In brain tumor data analysis, three large-scale networks consisting of 4422 genes were built using the gene expression of non-tumor, low and high grade tumor mRNA expression samples, along with DNA-protein binding affinity information. We found that genes having a large variation of degree distribution among the three tumor networks are the ones that see most involved in regulatory and developmental processes, which possibly gives a novel insight concerning conventional differentially expressed gene analysis.

  12. Long-term oil contamination alters the molecular ecological networks of soil microbial functional genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting eLiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001. Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential keystone genes, defined as either hubs or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions.

  13. Multiple tipping points and optimal repairing in interacting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Curme, Chester; Vodenska, Irena; Levy-Carciente, Sary; Eugene Stanley, H.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-03-01

    Systems composed of many interacting dynamical networks--such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters--often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find a very rich phase diagram that becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions and two `forbidden' transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyse an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model.

  14. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  15. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wuttke

    Full Text Available Dietary restriction (DR, limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/. To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2 had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of

  16. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  17. Inference of gene regulatory networks with sparse structural equation models exploiting genetic perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Cai

    Full Text Available Integrating genetic perturbations with gene expression data not only improves accuracy of regulatory network topology inference, but also enables learning of causal regulatory relations between genes. Although a number of methods have been developed to integrate both types of data, the desiderata of efficient and powerful algorithms still remains. In this paper, sparse structural equation models (SEMs are employed to integrate both gene expression data and cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL, for modeling gene regulatory networks in accordance with biological evidence about genes regulating or being regulated by a small number of genes. A systematic inference method named sparsity-aware maximum likelihood (SML is developed for SEM estimation. Using simulated directed acyclic or cyclic networks, the SML performance is compared with that of two state-of-the-art algorithms: the adaptive Lasso (AL based scheme, and the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG method. Computer simulations demonstrate that the novel SML algorithm offers significantly better performance than the AL-based and QDG algorithms across all sample sizes from 100 to 1,000, in terms of detection power and false discovery rate, in all the cases tested that include acyclic or cyclic networks of 10, 30 and 300 genes. The SML method is further applied to infer a network of 39 human genes that are related to the immune function and are chosen to have a reliable eQTL per gene. The resulting network consists of 9 genes and 13 edges. Most of the edges represent interactions reasonably expected from experimental evidence, while the remaining may just indicate the emergence of new interactions. The sparse SEM and efficient SML algorithm provide an effective means of exploiting both gene expression and perturbation data to infer gene regulatory networks. An open-source computer program implementing the SML algorithm is freely available upon request.

  18. Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have revealed the...15-Apr-2009 14-Apr-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila The...Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Report Title Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have

  19. Enhancing the functional content of eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Pandey

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks are a promising type of data for studying complex biological systems. However, despite the rich information embedded in these networks, these networks face important data quality challenges of noise and incompleteness that adversely affect the results obtained from their analysis. Here, we apply a robust measure of local network structure called common neighborhood similarity (CNS to address these challenges. Although several CNS measures have been proposed in the literature, an understanding of their relative efficacies for the analysis of interaction networks has been lacking. We follow the framework of graph transformation to convert the given interaction network into a transformed network corresponding to a variety of CNS measures evaluated. The effectiveness of each measure is then estimated by comparing the quality of protein function predictions obtained from its corresponding transformed network with those from the original network. Using a large set of human and fly protein interactions, and a set of over 100 GO terms for both, we find that several of the transformed networks produce more accurate predictions than those obtained from the original network. In particular, the HC.cont measure and other continuous CNS measures perform well this task, especially for large networks. Further investigation reveals that the two major factors contributing to this improvement are the abilities of CNS measures to prune out noisy edges and enhance functional coherence in the transformed networks.

  20. A consensus network of gene regulatory factors in the human frontal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eBerto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID or autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies.

  1. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies.

  2. Finding gene-environment interactions for Phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-01-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G × E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G × Es for phobias. In addition to the careful concep...

  3. Cancer classification based on gene expression using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H P; Niu, Z J; Bai, Y P; Tan, X H

    2015-12-21

    Based on gene expression, we have classified 53 colon cancer patients with UICC II into two groups: relapse and no relapse. Samples were taken from each patient, and gene information was extracted. Of the 53 samples examined, 500 genes were considered proper through analyses by S-Kohonen, BP, and SVM neural networks. Classification accuracy obtained by S-Kohonen neural network reaches 91%, which was more accurate than classification by BP and SVM neural networks. The results show that S-Kohonen neural network is more plausible for classification and has a certain feasibility and validity as compared with BP and SVM neural networks.

  4. Pareto evolution of gene networks: an algorithm to optimize multiple fitness objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmflash, Aryeh; Francois, Paul; Siggia, Eric D

    2012-10-01

    The computational evolution of gene networks functions like a forward genetic screen to generate, without preconceptions, all networks that can be assembled from a defined list of parts to implement a given function. Frequently networks are subject to multiple design criteria that cannot all be optimized simultaneously. To explore how these tradeoffs interact with evolution, we implement Pareto optimization in the context of gene network evolution. In response to a temporal pulse of a signal, we evolve networks whose output turns on slowly after the pulse begins, and shuts down rapidly when the pulse terminates. The best performing networks under our conditions do not fall into categories such as feed forward and negative feedback that also encode the input-output relation we used for selection. Pareto evolution can more efficiently search the space of networks than optimization based on a single ad hoc combination of the design criteria.

  5. Reconstructing direct and indirect interactions in networked public goods game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2016-07-01

    Network reconstruction is a fundamental problem for understanding many complex systems with unknown interaction structures. In many complex systems, there are indirect interactions between two individuals without immediate connection but with common neighbors. Despite recent advances in network reconstruction, we continue to lack an approach for reconstructing complex networks with indirect interactions. Here we introduce a two-step strategy to resolve the reconstruction problem, where in the first step, we recover both direct and indirect interactions by employing the Lasso to solve a sparse signal reconstruction problem, and in the second step, we use matrix transformation and optimization to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. The network structure corresponding to direct interactions can be fully uncovered. We exploit the public goods game occurring on complex networks as a paradigm for characterizing indirect interactions and test our reconstruction approach. We find that high reconstruction accuracy can be achieved for both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, and a number of empirical networks in spite of insufficient data measurement contaminated by noise. Although a general framework for reconstructing complex networks with arbitrary types of indirect interactions is yet lacking, our approach opens new routes to separate direct and indirect interactions in a representative complex system.

  6. Reconstructing direct and indirect interactions in networked public goods game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2016-07-22

    Network reconstruction is a fundamental problem for understanding many complex systems with unknown interaction structures. In many complex systems, there are indirect interactions between two individuals without immediate connection but with common neighbors. Despite recent advances in network reconstruction, we continue to lack an approach for reconstructing complex networks with indirect interactions. Here we introduce a two-step strategy to resolve the reconstruction problem, where in the first step, we recover both direct and indirect interactions by employing the Lasso to solve a sparse signal reconstruction problem, and in the second step, we use matrix transformation and optimization to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. The network structure corresponding to direct interactions can be fully uncovered. We exploit the public goods game occurring on complex networks as a paradigm for characterizing indirect interactions and test our reconstruction approach. We find that high reconstruction accuracy can be achieved for both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, and a number of empirical networks in spite of insufficient data measurement contaminated by noise. Although a general framework for reconstructing complex networks with arbitrary types of indirect interactions is yet lacking, our approach opens new routes to separate direct and indirect interactions in a representative complex system.

  7. Netter: re-ranking gene network inference predictions using structural network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyssinck, Joeri; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2016-02-09

    Many algorithms have been developed to infer the topology of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. These methods typically produce a ranking of links between genes with associated confidence scores, after which a certain threshold is chosen to produce the inferred topology. However, the structural properties of the predicted network do not resemble those typical for a gene regulatory network, as most algorithms only take into account connections found in the data and do not include known graph properties in their inference process. This lowers the prediction accuracy of these methods, limiting their usability in practice. We propose a post-processing algorithm which is applicable to any confidence ranking of regulatory interactions obtained from a network inference method which can use, inter alia, graphlets and several graph-invariant properties to re-rank the links into a more accurate prediction. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, we re-rank predictions of six different state-of-the-art algorithms using three simple network properties as optimization criteria and show that Netter can improve the predictions made on both artificially generated data as well as the DREAM4 and DREAM5 benchmarks. Additionally, the DREAM5 E.coli. community prediction inferred from real expression data is further improved. Furthermore, Netter compares favorably to other post-processing algorithms and is not restricted to correlation-like predictions. Lastly, we demonstrate that the performance increase is robust for a wide range of parameter settings. Netter is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be. Network inference from high-throughput data is a long-standing challenge. In this work, we present Netter, which can further refine network predictions based on a set of user-defined graph properties. Netter is a flexible system which can be applied in unison with any method producing a ranking from omics data. It can be tailored to specific prior

  8. New insight into genes in association with asthma: literature-based mining and network centrality analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Rui; WANG Lei; WANG Gang

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is a heterogeneous disease for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established.Until now no studies have been undertaken to systemically explore the network of asthma-related genes using an internally developed literature-based discovery approach.This study was to explore asthma-related genes by using literaturebased mining and network centrality analysis.Methods Literature involving asthma-related genes were searched in PubMed from 2001 to 2011.Integration of natural language processing with network centrality analysis was used to identify asthma susceptibility genes and their interaction network.Asthma susceptibility genes were classified into three functional groups by gene ontology (GO) analysis and the key genes were confirmed by establishing asthma-related networks and pathways.Results Three hundred and twenty-six genes related with asthma such as IGHE (IgE),interleukin (IL)-4,5,6,10,13,17A,and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were identified.GO analysis indicated some biological processes (developmental processes,signal transduction,death,etc.),cellular components (non-structural extracellular,plasma membrane and extracellular matrix),and molecular functions (signal transduction activity) that were involved in asthma.Furthermore,22 asthma-related pathways such as the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway,hematopoietic cell lineage,JAK-STAT signaling pathway,chemokine signaling pathway,and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction,and 17 hub genes,such as JAK3,CCR1-3,CCR5-7,CCR8,were found.Conclusions Our study provides a remarkably detailed and comprehensive picture of asthma susceptibility genes and their interacting network.Further identification of these genes and molecular pathways may play a prominent role in establishing rational therapeutic approaches for asthma.

  9. A global network of RNA and protein interactions in Fronto Temporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eFontana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fronto Temporal Dementia (FTD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of the fronto temporal lobes and abnormal protein inclusions. It exhibits a broad clinicopathological spectrum and has been linked to mutations in seven different genes. We will provide a picture, which connects the products of these genes, albeit diverse in nature and function, in a network. Despite the paucity of information available for some of these genes, we believe that RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression might constitute a common theme in the network. Recent studies have unraveled the role of mutations affecting the functions of RNA binding proteins and regulation of microRNAs. This review will combine all the recent findings on genes involved in the pathogenesis of FTD, highlighting the importance of a common network of interactions in order to study and decipher the heterogeneous clinical manifestations associated with FTD. This approach could be helpful for the research of potential therapeutic strategies.

  10. Mining minimal motif pair sets maximally covering interactions in a protein-protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, P.; Neven, F.; Valentim, F.L.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated motif covering (CMC) is the problem of finding a set of motif pairs, i.e., pairs of patterns, in the sequences of proteins from a protein-protein interaction network (PPI-network) that describe the interactions in the network as concisely as possible. In other words, a perfect solution fo

  11. A Semiquantitative Framework for Gene Regulatory Networks: Increasing the Time and Quantitative Resolution of Boolean Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Geris, Liesbet

    2015-01-01

    Boolean models have been instrumental in predicting general features of gene networks and more recently also as explorative tools in specific biological applications. In this study we introduce a basic quantitative and a limited time resolution to a discrete (Boolean) framework. Quantitative resolution is improved through the employ of normalized variables in unison with an additive approach. Increased time resolution stems from the introduction of two distinct priority classes. Through the implementation of a previously published chondrocyte network and T helper cell network, we show that this addition of quantitative and time resolution broadens the scope of biological behaviour that can be captured by the models. Specifically, the quantitative resolution readily allows models to discern qualitative differences in dosage response to growth factors. The limited time resolution, in turn, can influence the reachability of attractors, delineating the likely long term system behaviour. Importantly, the information required for implementation of these features, such as the nature of an interaction, is typically obtainable from the literature. Nonetheless, a trade-off is always present between additional computational cost of this approach and the likelihood of extending the model’s scope. Indeed, in some cases the inclusion of these features does not yield additional insight. This framework, incorporating increased and readily available time and semi-quantitative resolution, can help in substantiating the litmus test of dynamics for gene networks, firstly by excluding unlikely dynamics and secondly by refining falsifiable predictions on qualitative behaviour. PMID:26067297

  12. Relative stability of network states in Boolean network models of gene regulation in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Joseph Xu; Samal, Areejit; d'Hérouël, Aymeric Fouquier; Price, Nathan D; Huang, Sui

    2016-01-01

    Progress in cell type reprogramming has revived the interest in Waddington's concept of the epigenetic landscape. Recently researchers developed the quasi-potential theory to represent the Waddington's landscape. The Quasi-potential U(x), derived from interactions in the gene regulatory network (GRN) of a cell, quantifies the relative stability of network states, which determine the effort required for state transitions in a multi-stable dynamical system. However, quasi-potential landscapes, originally developed for continuous systems, are not suitable for discrete-valued networks which are important tools to study complex systems. In this paper, we provide a framework to quantify the landscape for discrete Boolean networks (BNs). We apply our framework to study pancreas cell differentiation where an ensemble of BN models is considered based on the structure of a minimal GRN for pancreas development. We impose biologically motivated structural constraints (corresponding to specific type of Boolean functions) and dynamical constraints (corresponding to stable attractor states) to limit the space of BN models for pancreas development. In addition, we enforce a novel functional constraint corresponding to the relative ordering of attractor states in BN models to restrict the space of BN models to the biological relevant class. We find that BNs with canalyzing/sign-compatible Boolean functions best capture the dynamics of pancreas cell differentiation. This framework can also determine the genes' influence on cell state transitions, and thus can facilitate the rational design of cell reprogramming protocols.

  13. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  14. Gene coexpression network analysis as a source of functional annotation for rice genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Childs

    Full Text Available With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional

  15. Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnér, Jesper; Yeung, M. K. Stephen; Hasty, Jeff; Collins, James J.

    2003-01-01

    While the fundamental building blocks of biology are being tabulated by the various genome projects, microarray technology is setting the stage for the task of deducing the connectivity of large-scale gene networks. We show how the perturbation of carefully chosen genes in a microarray experiment can be used in conjunction with a reverse engineering algorithm to reveal the architecture of an underlying gene regulatory network. Our iterative scheme identifies the network topology by analyzing the steady-state changes in gene expression resulting from the systematic perturbation of a particular node in the network. We highlight the validity of our reverse engineering approach through the successful deduction of the topology of a linear in numero gene network and a recently reported model for the segmentation polarity network in Drosophila melanogaster. Our method may prove useful in identifying and validating specific drug targets and in deconvolving the effects of chemical compounds. PMID:12730377

  16. Laplacian Spectrum and Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Anirban

    2007-01-01

    From the spectral plot of the (normalized) graph Laplacian, the essential qualitative properties of a network can be simultaneously deduced. Given a class of empirical networks, reconstruction schemes for elucidating the evolutionary dynamics leading to those particular data can then be developed. This method is exemplified for protein-protein interaction networks. Traces of their evolutionary history of duplication and divergence processes are identified. In particular, we can identify typical specific features that robustly distinguish protein-protein interaction networks from other classes of networks, in spite of possible statistical fluctuations of the underlying data.

  17. Data Integration for Microarrays: Enhanced Inference for Gene Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sîrbu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies have been the basis of numerous important findings regarding gene expression in the few last decades. Studies have generated large amounts of data describing various processes, which, due to the existence of public databases, are widely available for further analysis. Given their lower cost and higher maturity compared to newer sequencing technologies, these data continue to be produced, even though data quality has been the subject of some debate. However, given the large volume of data generated, integration can help overcome some issues related, e.g., to noise or reduced time resolution, while providing additional insight on features not directly addressed by sequencing methods. Here, we present an integration test case based on public Drosophila melanogaster datasets (gene expression, binding site affinities, known interactions. Using an evolutionary computation framework, we show how integration can enhance the ability to recover transcriptional gene regulatory networks from these data, as well as indicating which data types are more important for quantitative and qualitative network inference. Our results show a clear improvement in performance when multiple datasets are integrated, indicating that microarray data will remain a valuable and viable resource for some time to come.

  18. Choline metabolites: gene by diet interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Tangi; Allayee, Hooman; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    The review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between genetic polymorphisms in genes that metabolize choline and the dietary requirements of choline and how these interactions relate to human health and disease. The importance of choline as an essential nutrient has been well established, but our appreciation of the interaction between our underlying genetic architecture and dietary choline requirements is only beginning. It has been shown in both human and animal studies that choline deficiencies contribute to diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and various neurodegenerative diseases. An adequate supply of dietary choline is important for optimum development, highlighted by the increased maternal requirements during fetal development and in breast-fed infants. We discuss recent studies investigating variants in PEMT and MTHFR1 that are associated with a variety of birth defects. In addition to genetic interactions, we discuss several recent studies that uncover changes in fetal global methylation patterns in response to maternal dietary choline intake that result in changes in gene expression in the offspring. In contrast to the developmental role of adequate choline, there is now an appreciation of the role choline has in cardiovascular disease through the gut microbiota-mediated metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide. This pathway highlights some of our understanding of how the microbiome affects nutrient processing and bioavailability. Finally, to better characterize the genetic architecture regulating choline requirements, we discuss recent results focused on identifying polymorphisms that regulate choline and its derivative products. Here we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of how specific alleles in key choline metabolism genes are related to dietary choline requirements and human disease.

  19. A swarm intelligence framework for reconstructing gene networks: searching for biologically plausible architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzoglanakis, Kyriakos; Poole, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of reverse engineering the topology of gene regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data. We adopt a computational intelligence approach comprising swarm intelligence techniques, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) and ant colony optimization (ACO). In addition, the recurrent neural network (RNN) formalism is employed for modeling the dynamical behavior of gene regulatory systems. More specifically, ACO is used for searching the discrete space of network architectures and PSO for searching the corresponding continuous space of RNN model parameters. We propose a novel solution construction process in the context of ACO for generating biologically plausible candidate architectures. The objective is to concentrate the search effort into areas of the structure space that contain architectures which are feasible in terms of their topological resemblance to real-world networks. The proposed framework is initially applied to the reconstruction of a small artificial network that has previously been studied in the context of gene network reverse engineering. Subsequently, we consider an artificial data set with added noise for reconstructing a subnetwork of the genetic interaction network of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Finally, the framework is applied to a real-world data set for reverse engineering the SOS response system of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Results demonstrate the relative advantage of utilizing problem-specific knowledge regarding biologically plausible structural properties of gene networks over conducting a problem-agnostic search in the vast space of network architectures.

  20. Influence of degree correlations on network structure and stability in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmer Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of negative correlations between degrees of interacting proteins is being discussed since such negative degree correlations were found for the large-scale yeast protein-protein interaction (PPI network of Ito et al. More recent studies observed no such negative correlations for high-confidence interaction sets. In this article, we analyzed a range of experimentally derived interaction networks to understand the role and prevalence of degree correlations in PPI networks. We investigated how degree correlations influence the structure of networks and their tolerance against perturbations such as the targeted deletion of hubs. Results For each PPI network, we simulated uncorrelated, positively and negatively correlated reference networks. Here, a simple model was developed which can create different types of degree correlations in a network without changing the degree distribution. Differences in static properties associated with degree correlations were compared by analyzing the network characteristics of the original PPI and reference networks. Dynamics were compared by simulating the effect of a selective deletion of hubs in all networks. Conclusion Considerable differences between the network types were found for the number of components in the original networks. Negatively correlated networks are fragmented into significantly less components than observed for positively correlated networks. On the other hand, the selective deletion of hubs showed an increased structural tolerance to these deletions for the positively correlated networks. This results in a lower rate of interaction loss in these networks compared to the negatively correlated networks and a decreased disintegration rate. Interestingly, real PPI networks are most similar to the randomly correlated references with respect to all properties analyzed. Thus, although structural properties of networks can be modified considerably by degree

  1. QuIN: A Web Server for Querying and Visualizing Chromatin Interaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Thibodeau

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the human genome have indicated that regulatory elements (e.g. promoters and enhancers at distal genomic locations can interact with each other via chromatin folding and affect gene expression levels. Genomic technologies for mapping interactions between DNA regions, e.g., ChIA-PET and HiC, can generate genome-wide maps of interactions between regulatory elements. These interaction datasets are important resources to infer distal gene targets of non-coding regulatory elements and to facilitate prioritization of critical loci for important cellular functions. With the increasing diversity and complexity of genomic information and public ontologies, making sense of these datasets demands integrative and easy-to-use software tools. Moreover, network representation of chromatin interaction maps enables effective data visualization, integration, and mining. Currently, there is no software that can take full advantage of network theory approaches for the analysis of chromatin interaction datasets. To fill this gap, we developed a web-based application, QuIN, which enables: 1 building and visualizing chromatin interaction networks, 2 annotating networks with user-provided private and publicly available functional genomics and interaction datasets, 3 querying network components based on gene name or chromosome location, and 4 utilizing network based measures to identify and prioritize critical regulatory targets and their direct and indirect interactions.QuIN's web server is available at http://quin.jax.org QuIN is developed in Java and JavaScript, utilizing an Apache Tomcat web server and MySQL database and the source code is available under the GPLV3 license available on GitHub: https://github.com/UcarLab/QuIN/.

  2. Network-based gene prediction for Plasmodium falciparum malaria towards genetics-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is the most deadly parasitic infectious disease. Existing drug treatments have limited efficacy in malaria elimination, and the complex pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. Detecting novel malaria-associated genes not only contributes in revealing the disease pathogenesis, but also facilitates discovering new targets for anti-malaria drugs. In this study, we developed a network-based approach to predict malaria-associated genes. We constructed a cross-species network to integrate human-human, parasite-parasite and human-parasite protein interactions. Then we extended the random walk algorithm on this network, and used known malaria genes as the seeds to find novel candidate genes for malaria. We validated our algorithms using 77 known malaria genes: 14 human genes and 63 parasite genes were ranked averagely within top 2% and top 4%, respectively among human and parasite genomes. We also evaluated our method for predicting novel malaria genes using a set of 27 genes with literature supporting evidence. Our approach ranked 12 genes within top 1% and 24 genes within top 5%. In addition, we demonstrated that top-ranked candied genes were enriched for drug targets, and identified commonalities underlying top-ranked malaria genes through pathway analysis. In summary, the candidate malaria-associated genes predicted by our data-driven approach have the potential to guide genetics-based anti-malaria drug discovery.

  3. Identification of oral cancer related candidate genes by integrating protein-protein interactions, gene ontology, pathway analysis and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Dash, Rupesh; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-05-30

    In the recent years, bioinformatics methods have been reported with a high degree of success for candidate gene identification. In this milieu, we have used an integrated bioinformatics approach assimilating information from gene ontologies (GO), protein-protein interaction (PPI) and network analysis to predict candidate genes related to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A total of 40973 PPIs were considered for 4704 cancer-related genes to construct human cancer gene network (HCGN). The importance of each node was measured in HCGN by ten different centrality measures. We have shown that the top ranking genes are related to a significantly higher number of diseases as compared to other genes in HCGN. A total of 39 candidate oral cancer target genes were predicted by combining top ranked genes and the genes corresponding to significantly enriched oral cancer related GO terms. Initial verification using literature and available experimental data indicated that 29 genes were related with OSCC. A detailed pathway analysis led us to propose a role for the selected candidate genes in the invasion and metastasis in OSCC. We further validated our predictions using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and found that the gene FLNA was upregulated while the genes ARRB1 and HTT were downregulated in the OSCC tissue samples.

  4. Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins within a molecular network are expected to be subject to different selective pressures depending on their relative hierarchical positions. However, it is not obvious what genes within a network should be more likely to evolve under positive selection. On one hand, only mutations at genes with a relatively high degree of control over adaptive phenotypes (such as those encoding highly connected proteins are expected to be “seen” by natural selection. On the other hand, a high degree of pleiotropy at these genes is expected to hinder adaptation. Previous analyses of the human protein-protein interaction network have shown that genes under long-term, recurrent positive selection (as inferred from interspecific comparisons tend to act at the periphery of the network. It is unknown, however, whether these trends apply to other organisms. Here, we show that long-term positive selection has preferentially targeted the periphery of the yeast interactome. Conversely, in flies, genes under positive selection encode significantly more connected and central proteins. These observations are not due to covariation of genes’ adaptability and centrality with confounding factors. Therefore, the distribution of proteins encoded by genes under recurrent positive selection across protein-protein interaction networks varies from one species to another.

  5. Novel recurrent neural network for modelling biological networks: oscillatory p53 interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hong; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the control of cellular networks consisting of gene and protein interactions and their emergent properties is a central activity of Systems Biology research. For this, continuous, discrete, hybrid, and stochastic methods have been proposed. Currently, the most common approach to modelling accurate temporal dynamics of networks is ordinary differential equations (ODE). However, critical limitations of ODE models are difficulty in kinetic parameter estimation and numerical solution of a large number of equations, making them more suited to smaller systems. In this article, we introduce a novel recurrent artificial neural network (RNN) that addresses above limitations and produces a continuous model that easily estimates parameters from data, can handle a large number of molecular interactions and quantifies temporal dynamics and emergent systems properties. This RNN is based on a system of ODEs representing molecular interactions in a signalling network. Each neuron represents concentration change of one molecule represented by an ODE. Weights of the RNN correspond to kinetic parameters in the system and can be adjusted incrementally during network training. The method is applied to the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system - a crucial component of the DNA damage response pathways activated by a damage signal. Simulation results indicate that the proposed RNN can successfully represent the behaviour of the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system and solve the parameter estimation problem with high accuracy. Furthermore, we presented a modified form of the RNN that estimates parameters and captures systems dynamics from sparse data collected over relatively large time steps. We also investigate the robustness of the p53-Mdm2 system using the trained RNN under various levels of parameter perturbation to gain a greater understanding of the control of the p53-Mdm2 system. Its outcomes on robustness are consistent with the current biological knowledge of this system. As more

  6. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    ) metabolizes caffeine; thus, gene polymorphisms in ADORA2A and CYP1A2 may influence the effect coffee consumption has on PD risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study (PASIDA) in Denmark (1,556 PD patients and 1,606 birth year- and gender-matched controls), we assessed interactions between...... interactions for ADORA2A rs5760423 and heavy vs. light coffee consumption in incident (OR interaction = 0.66 [95% CI 0.46-0.94], p = 0.02) but not prevalent PD. We did not observe interactions for CYP1A2 rs762551 and rs2472304 in incident or prevalent PD. In meta-analyses, PD associations with daily coffee...... consumption were strongest among carriers of variant alleles in both ADORA2A and CYP1A2. CONCLUSION: We corroborated results from a previous report that described interactions between ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms and coffee consumption. Our results also suggest that survivor bias may affect results...

  7. NetDiff - Bayesian model selection for differential gene regulatory network inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Thomas

    2016-12-16

    Differential networks allow us to better understand the changes in cellular processes that are exhibited in conditions of interest, identifying variations in gene regulation or protein interaction between, for example, cases and controls, or in response to external stimuli. Here we present a novel methodology for the inference of differential gene regulatory networks from gene expression microarray data. Specifically we apply a Bayesian model selection approach to compare models of conserved and varying network structure, and use Gaussian graphical models to represent the network structures. We apply a variational inference approach to the learning of Gaussian graphical models of gene regulatory networks, that enables us to perform Bayesian model selection that is significantly more computationally efficient than Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches. Our method is demonstrated to be more robust than independent analysis of data from multiple conditions when applied to synthetic network data, generating fewer false positive predictions of differential edges. We demonstrate the utility of our approach on real world gene expression microarray data by applying it to existing data from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with and without mutations in C9orf72, and controls, where we are able to identify differential network interactions for further investigation.

  8. Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a Bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate Bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more natu...

  9. Inferring gene regulatory networks via nonlinear state-space models and exploiting sparsity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Amina; Serpedin, Erchin; Nounou, Mohamed; Nounou, Hazem N

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of learning the structure of gene regulatory networks from gene expression time series data. A more realistic scenario when the state space model representing a gene network evolves nonlinearly is considered while a linear model is assumed for the microarray data. To capture the nonlinearity, a particle filter-based state estimation algorithm is considered instead of the contemporary linear approximation-based approaches. The parameters characterizing the regulatory relations among various genes are estimated online using a Kalman filter. Since a particular gene interacts with a few other genes only, the parameter vector is expected to be sparse. The state estimates delivered by the particle filter and the observed microarray data are then subjected to a LASSO-based least squares regression operation which yields a parsimonious and efficient description of the regulatory network by setting the irrelevant coefficients to zero. The performance of the aforementioned algorithm is compared with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) employing the Mean Square Error (MSE) as the fidelity criterion in recovering the parameters of gene regulatory networks from synthetic data and real biological data. Extensive computer simulations illustrate that the proposed particle filter-based network inference algorithm outperforms EKF and UKF, and therefore, it can serve as a natural framework for modeling gene regulatory networks with nonlinear and sparse structure.

  10. LEGO: a novel method for gene set over-representation analysis by incorporating network-based gene weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinran; Hao, Yun; Wang, Xiao; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-11

    Pathway or gene set over-representation analysis (ORA) has become a routine task in functional genomics studies. However, currently widely used ORA tools employ statistical methods such as Fisher's exact test that reduce a pathway into a list of genes, ignoring the constitutive functional non-equivalent roles of genes and the complex gene-gene interactions. Here, we develop a novel method named LEGO (functional Link Enrichment of Gene Ontology or gene sets) that takes into consideration these two types of information by incorporating network-based gene weights in ORA analysis. In three benchmarks, LEGO achieves better performance than Fisher and three other network-based methods. To further evaluate LEGO's usefulness, we compare LEGO with five gene expression-based and three pathway topology-based methods using a benchmark of 34 disease gene expression datasets compiled by a recent publication, and show that LEGO is among the top-ranked methods in terms of both sensitivity and prioritization for detecting target KEGG pathways. In addition, we develop a cluster-and-filter approach to reduce the redundancy among the enriched gene sets, making the results more interpretable to biologists. Finally, we apply LEGO to two lists of autism genes, and identify relevant gene sets to autism that could not be found by Fisher.

  11. Inference of gene pathways using mixture Bayesian networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Younhee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inference of gene networks typically relies on measurements across a wide range of conditions or treatments. Although one network structure is predicted, the relationship between genes could vary across conditions. A comprehensive approach to infer general and condition-dependent gene networks was evaluated. This approach integrated Bayesian network and Gaussian mixture models to describe continuous microarray gene expression measurements, and three gene networks were predicted. Results The first reconstructions of a circadian rhythm pathway in honey bees and an adherens junction pathway in mouse embryos were obtained. In addition, general and condition-specific gene relationships, some unexpected, were detected in these two pathways and in a yeast cell-cycle pathway. The mixture Bayesian network approach identified all (honey bee circadian rhythm and mouse adherens junction pathways or the vast majority (yeast cell-cycle pathway of the gene relationships reported in empirical studies. Findings across the three pathways and data sets indicate that the mixture Bayesian network approach is well-suited to infer gene pathways based on microarray data. Furthermore, the interpretation of model estimates provided a broader understanding of the relationships between genes. The mixture models offered a comprehensive description of the relationships among genes in complex biological processes or across a wide range of conditions. The mixture parameter estimates and corresponding odds that the gene network inferred for a sample pertained to each mixture component allowed the uncovering of both general and condition-dependent gene relationships and patterns of expression. Conclusion This study demonstrated the two main benefits of learning gene pathways using mixture Bayesian networks. First, the identification of the optimal number of mixture components supported by the data offered a robust approach to infer gene relationships and

  12. Discovery of time-delayed gene regulatory networks based on temporal gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is one of the ultimate goals for modern biological research to fully elucidate the intricate interplays and the regulations of the molecular determinants that propel and characterize the progression of versatile life phenomena, to name a few, cell cycling, developmental biology, aging, and the progressive and recurrent pathogenesis of complex diseases. The vast amount of large-scale and genome-wide time-resolved data is becoming increasing available, which provides the golden opportunity to unravel the challenging reverse-engineering problem of time-delayed gene regulatory networks. Results In particular, this methodological paper aims to reconstruct regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data by using delayed correlations between genes, i.e., pairwise overlaps of expression levels shifted in time relative each other. We have thus developed a novel model-free computational toolbox termed TdGRN (Time-delayed Gene Regulatory Network to address the underlying regulations of genes that can span any unit(s of time intervals. This bioinformatics toolbox has provided a unified approach to uncovering time trends of gene regulations through decision analysis of the newly designed time-delayed gene expression matrix. We have applied the proposed method to yeast cell cycling and human HeLa cell cycling and have discovered most of the underlying time-delayed regulations that are supported by multiple lines of experimental evidence and that are remarkably consistent with the current knowledge on phase characteristics for the cell cyclings. Conclusion We established a usable and powerful model-free approach to dissecting high-order dynamic trends of gene-gene interactions. We have carefully validated the proposed algorithm by applying it to two publicly available cell cycling datasets. In addition to uncovering the time trends of gene regulations for cell cycling, this unified approach can also be used to study the complex

  13. Regulatory network analysis of microRNAs and genes in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ismael; Gharbi, Hanen; Hassine, Islem Ben; Bouguerra, Ghada; Douzi, Kais; Teber, Mouheb; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2016-09-16

    Targeted therapy in the form of selective breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR/ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib mesylate) has successfully been introduced in the treatment of the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance against imatinib mesylate (IM) has been reported in nearly half of patients and has been recognized as major issue in clinical practice. Multiple resistance genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to be involved in the IM resistance process. These resistance genes and miRNAs tend to interact with each other through a regulatory network. Therefore, it is crucial to study the impact of these interactions in the IM resistance process. The present study focused on miRNA and gene network analysis in order to elucidate the role of interacting elements and to understand their functional contribution in therapeutic failure. Unlike previous studies which were centered only on genes or miRNAs, the prime focus of the present study was on relationships. To this end, three regulatory networks including differentially expressed, related, and global networks were constructed and analyzed in search of similarities and differences. Regulatory associations between miRNAs and their target genes, transcription factors and miRNAs, as well as miRNAs and their host genes were also macroscopically investigated. Certain key pathways in the three networks, especially in the differentially expressed network, were featured. The differentially expressed network emerged as a fault map of IM-resistant CML. Theoretically, the IM resistance process could be prevented by correcting the included errors. The present network-based approach to study resistance miRNAs and genes might help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of IM resistance in CML as well as in the improvement of CML therapy.

  14. The architecture of functional interaction networks in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-02-23

    Sensory information is represented in the brain by the joint activity of large groups of neurons. Recent studies have shown that, although the number of possible activity patterns and underlying interactions is exponentially large, pairwise-based models give a surprisingly accurate description of neural population activity patterns. We explored the architecture of maximum entropy models of the functional interaction networks underlying the response of large populations of retinal ganglion cells, in adult tiger salamander retina, responding to natural and artificial stimuli. We found that we can further simplify these pairwise models by neglecting weak interaction terms or by relying on a small set of interaction strengths. Comparing network interactions under different visual stimuli, we show the existence of local network motifs in the interaction map of the retina. Our results demonstrate that the underlying interaction map of the retina is sparse and dominated by local overlapping interaction modules.

  15. The computational power of interactive recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabessa, Jérémie; Siegelmann, Hava T

    2012-04-01

    In classical computation, rational- and real-weighted recurrent neural networks were shown to be respectively equivalent to and strictly more powerful than the standard Turing machine model. Here, we study the computational power of recurrent neural networks in a more biologically oriented computational framework, capturing the aspects of sequential interactivity and persistence of memory. In this context, we prove that so-called interactive rational- and real-weighted neural networks show the same computational powers as interactive Turing machines and interactive Turing machines with advice, respectively. A mathematical characterization of each of these computational powers is also provided. It follows from these results that interactive real-weighted neural networks can perform uncountably many more translations of information than interactive Turing machines, making them capable of super-Turing capabilities.

  16. Compensatory evolution for a gene deletion is not limited to its immediate functional network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bull JJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic disruption of an important phenotype should favor compensatory mutations that restore the phenotype. If the genetic basis of the phenotype is modular, with a network of interacting genes whose functions are specific to that phenotype, compensatory mutations are expected among the genes of the affected network. This perspective was tested in the bacteriophage T3 using a genome deleted of its DNA ligase gene, disrupting DNA metabolism. Results In two replicate, long-term adaptations, phage compensatory evolution accommodated the low ligase level provided by the host without reinventing its own ligase. In both lines, fitness increased substantially but remained well below that of the intact genome. Each line accumulated over a dozen compensating mutations during long-term adaptation, and as expected, many of the compensatory changes were within the DNA metabolism network. However, several compensatory changes were outside the network and defy any role in DNA metabolism or biochemical connection to the disruption. In one line, these extra-network changes were essential to the recovery. The genes experiencing compensatory changes were moderately conserved between T3 and its relative T7 (25% diverged, but the involvement of extra-network changes was greater in T3. Conclusion Compensatory evolution was only partly limited to the known functionally interacting partners of the deleted gene. Thus gene interactions contributing to fitness were more extensive than suggested by the functional properties currently ascribed to the genes. Compensatory evolution offers an easy method of discovering genome interactions among specific elements that does not rest on an a priori knowledge of those elements or their interactions.

  17. Analysis of regulatory networks constructed based on gene coexpression in pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Diao, Bo; Yao, Guo Jie; Liu, Ying; Xu, Guo Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Gene coexpression patterns can reveal gene collections with functional consistency. This study systematically constructs regulatory networks for pituitary tumours by integrating gene coexpression, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Through network analysis, we elaborate the incidence mechanism of pituitary adenoma. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was utilized to calculate the level of gene coexpression. By comparing pituitary adenoma samples with normal samples, pituitary adenoma-specific gene coexpression patterns were identified. For pituitary adenoma-specific coexpressed genes, we integrated transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) regulation to construct a complex regulatory network from the transcriptional and posttranscriptional perspectives. Network module analysis identified the synergistic regulation of genes by miRNAs and TFs in pituitary adenoma. We identified 142 pituitary adenoma-specific active genes, including 43 TFs and 99 target genes of TFs. Functional enrichment of these 142 genes revealed that the occurrence of pituitary adenoma induced abnormalities in intracellular metabolism and angiogenesis process. These 142 genes were also significantly enriched in adenoma pathway. Module analysis of the systematic regulatory network found that three modules contained elements that were closely related to pituitary adenoma, such as FGF2 and SP1, as well as transcription factors and miRNAs involved in the tumourigenesis. These results show that in the occurrence of pituitary adenoma, miRNA, TF and genes interact with each other. Based on gene expression, the proposed method integrates interaction information from different levels and systematically explains the occurrence of pituitary tumours. It facilitates the tracing of the origin of the disease and can provide basis for early diagnosis of complex diseases or cancer without obvious symptoms.

  18. Analysis of regulatory networks constructed based on gene coexpression in pituitary adenoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jie Gong; Bo Diao; Guo Jie Yao; Ying Liu; Guo Zheng Xu

    2013-12-01

    Gene coexpression patterns can reveal gene collections with functional consistency. This study systematically constructs regulatory networks for pituitary tumours by integrating gene coexpression, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Through network analysis, we elaborate the incidence mechanism of pituitary adenoma. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was utilized to calculate the level of gene coexpression. By comparing pituitary adenoma samples with normal samples, pituitary adenoma-specific gene coexpression patterns were identified. For pituitary adenoma-specific coexpressed genes, we integrated transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) regulation to construct a complex regulatory network from the transcriptional and posttranscriptional perspectives. Network module analysis identified the synergistic regulation of genes by miRNAs and TFs in pituitary adenoma. We identified 142 pituitary adenoma-specific active genes, including 43 TFs and 99 target genes of TFs. Functional enrichment of these 142 genes revealed that the occurrence of pituitary adenoma induced abnormalities in intracellular metabolism and angiogenesis process. These 142 genes were also significantly enriched in adenoma pathway. Module analysis of the systematic regulatory network found that three modules contained elements that were closely related to pituitary adenoma, such as FGF2 and SP1, as well as transcription factors and miRNAs involved in the tumourigenesis. These results show that in the occurrence of pituitary adenoma, miRNA, TF and genes interact with each other. Based on gene expression, the proposed method integrates interaction information from different levels and systematically explains the occurrence of pituitary tumours. It facilitates the tracing of the origin of the disease and can provide basis for early diagnosis of complex diseases or cancer without obvious symptoms.

  19. Nodes with high centrality in protein interaction networks are responsible for driving signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Abedi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of huge efforts, chronic diseases remain an unresolved problem in medicine. Systems biology could assist to develop more efficient therapies through providing quantitative holistic sights to these complex disorders. In this study, we have re-analyzed a microarray dataset to identify critical signaling pathways related to diabetic nephropathy. GSE1009 dataset was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database and the gene expression profile of glomeruli from diabetic nephropathy patients and those from healthy individuals were compared. The protein-protein interaction network for differentially expressed genes was constructed and enriched. In addition, topology of the network was analyzed to identify the genes with high centrality parameters and then pathway enrichment analysis was performed. We found 49 genes to be variably expressed between the two groups. The network of these genes had few interactions so it was enriched and a network with 137 nodes was constructed. Based on different parameters, 34 nodes were considered to have high centrality in this network. Pathway enrichment analysis with these central genes identified 62 inter-connected signaling pathways related to diabetic nephropathy. Interestingly, the central nodes were more informative for pathway enrichment analysis compared to all network nodes and also 49 differentially expressed genes. In conclusion, we here show that central nodes in protein interaction networks tend to be present in pathways that co-occur in a biological state. Also, this study suggests a computational method for inferring underlying mechanisms of complex disorders from raw high-throughput data.

  20. Using the clustered circular layout as an informative method for visualizing protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, David C Y; Wilkins, Marc R; Hart, David; Hong, Seok-Hee

    2010-07-01

    The force-directed layout is commonly used in computer-generated visualizations of protein-protein interaction networks. While it is good for providing a visual outline of the protein complexes and their interactions, it has two limitations when used as a visual analysis method. The first is poor reproducibility. Repeated running of the algorithm does not necessarily generate the same layout, therefore, demanding cognitive readaptation on the investigator's part. The second limitation is that it does not explicitly display complementary biological information, e.g. Gene Ontology, other than the protein names or gene symbols. Here, we present an alternative layout called the clustered circular layout. Using the human DNA replication protein-protein interaction network as a case study, we compared the two network layouts for their merits and limitations in supporting visual analysis.

  1. Finding gene-environment interactions for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-03-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G x E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G x Es for phobias. In addition to the careful conceptualisation of new studies, it is suggested that data already collected should be re-analysed in light of increased understanding of processes influencing phobias.

  2. Missing and spurious interactions and the reconstruction of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guimera, R; 10.1073/pnas.0908366106

    2010-01-01

    Network analysis is currently used in a myriad of contexts: from identifying potential drug targets to predicting the spread of epidemics and designing vaccination strategies, and from finding friends to uncovering criminal activity. Despite the promise of the network approach, the reliability of network data is a source of great concern in all fields where complex networks are studied. Here, we present a general mathematical and computational framework to deal with the problem of data reliability in complex networks. In particular, we are able to reliably identify both missing and spurious interactions in noisy network observations. Remarkably, our approach also enables us to obtain, from those noisy observations, network reconstructions that yield estimates of the true network properties that are more accurate than those provided by the observations themselves. Our approach has the potential to guide experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries.

  3. An integer optimization algorithm for robust identification of non-linear gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemmangattuvalappil Nishanth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse engineering gene networks and identifying regulatory interactions are integral to understanding cellular decision making processes. Advancement in high throughput experimental techniques has initiated innovative data driven analysis of gene regulatory networks. However, inherent noise associated with biological systems requires numerous experimental replicates for reliable conclusions. Furthermore, evidence of robust algorithms directly exploiting basic biological traits are few. Such algorithms are expected to be efficient in their performance and robust in their prediction. Results We have developed a network identification algorithm to accurately infer both the topology and strength of regulatory interactions from time series gene expression data in the presence of significant experimental noise and non-linear behavior. In this novel formulism, we have addressed data variability in biological systems by integrating network identification with the bootstrap resampling technique, hence predicting robust interactions from limited experimental replicates subjected to noise. Furthermore, we have incorporated non-linearity in gene dynamics using the S-system formulation. The basic network identification formulation exploits the trait of sparsity of biological interactions. Towards that, the identification algorithm is formulated as an integer-programming problem by introducing binary variables for each network component. The objective function is targeted to minimize the network connections subjected to the constraint of maximal agreement between the experimental and predicted gene dynamics. The developed algorithm is validated using both in silico and experimental data-sets. These studies show that the algorithm can accurately predict the topology and connection strength of the in silico networks, as quantified by high precision and recall, and small discrepancy between the actual and predicted kinetic parameters

  4. Efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortutay, Csaba; Vihinen, Mauno

    2008-04-22

    Details of the mechanisms and selection pressures that shape the emergence and development of complex biological systems, such as the human immune system, are poorly understood. A recent definition of a reference set of proteins essential for the human immunome, combined with information about protein interaction networks for these proteins, facilitates evolutionary study of this biological machinery. Here, we present a detailed study of the development of the immunome protein interaction network during eight evolutionary steps from Bilateria ancestors to human. New nodes show preferential attachment to high degree proteins. The efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during the evolutionary steps, whereas the vulnerability of the network decreases. Our results shed light on selective forces acting on the emergence of biological networks. It is likely that the high efficiency and low vulnerability are intrinsic properties of many biological networks, which arise from the effects of evolutionary processes yet to be uncovered.

  5. Interactogeneous: disease gene prioritization using heterogeneous networks and full topology scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Disease gene prioritization aims to suggest potential implications of genes in disease susceptibility. Often accomplished in a guilt-by-association scheme, promising candidates are sorted according to their relatedness to known disease genes. Network-based methods have been successfully exploiting this concept by capturing the interaction of genes or proteins into a score. Nonetheless, most current approaches yield at least some of the following limitations: (1 networks comprise only curated physical interactions leading to poor genome coverage and density, and bias toward a particular source; (2 scores focus on adjacencies (direct links or the most direct paths (shortest paths within a constrained neighborhood around the disease genes, ignoring potentially informative indirect paths; (3 global clustering is widely applied to partition the network in an unsupervised manner, attributing little importance to prior knowledge; (4 confidence weights and their contribution to edge differentiation and ranking reliability are often disregarded. We hypothesize that network-based prioritization related to local clustering on graphs and considering full topology of weighted gene association networks integrating heterogeneous sources should overcome the above challenges. We term such a strategy Interactogeneous. We conducted cross-validation tests to assess the impact of network sources, alternative path inclusion and confidence weights on the prioritization of putative genes for 29 diseases. Heat diffusion ranking proved the best prioritization method overall, increasing the gap to neighborhood and shortest paths scores mostly on single source networks. Heterogeneous associations consistently delivered superior performance over single source data across the majority of methods. Results on the contribution of confidence weights were inconclusive. Finally, the best Interactogeneous strategy, heat diffusion ranking and associations from the STRING database

  6. Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA: a method for investigating complex gene-gene interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanock Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of common diseases is likely determined by the complex interplay between environmental and genetic factors, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Traditional methods of data analysis are poorly suited for detecting complex interactions due to sparseness of data in high dimensions, which often occurs when data are available for a large number of SNPs for a relatively small number of samples. Validation of associations observed using multiple methods should be implemented to minimize likelihood of false-positive associations. Moreover, high-throughput genotyping methods allow investigators to genotype thousands of SNPs at one time. Investigating associations for each individual SNP or interactions between SNPs using traditional approaches is inefficient and prone to false positives. Results We developed the Polymorphism Interaction Analysis tool (PIA version 2.0 to include different approaches for ranking and scoring SNP combinations, to account for imbalances between case and control ratios, stratify on particular factors, and examine associations of user-defined pathways (based on SNP or gene with case status. PIA v. 2.0 detected 2-SNP interactions as the highest ranking model 77% of the time, using simulated data sets of genetic models of interaction (minor allele frequency = 0.2; heritability = 0.01; N = 1600 generated previously [Velez DR, White BC, Motsinger AA, Bush WS, Ritchie MD, Williams SM, Moore JH: A balanced accuracy function for epistasis modeling in imbalanced datasets using multifactor dimensionality reduction. Genet Epidemiol 2007, 31:306–315.]. Interacting SNPs were detected in both balanced (20 SNPs and imbalanced data (case:control 1:2 and 1:4, 10 SNPs in the context of non-interacting SNPs. Conclusion PIA v. 2.0 is a useful tool for exploring gene*gene or gene*environment interactions and identifying a small number of putative associations which may be investigated further using other

  7. Stochastic signalling rewires the interaction map of a multiple feedback network during yeast evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chieh; Scherrer, Simone; Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ratna, Prasuna; Pizzolato, Julia; Jaquet, Vincent; Becskei, Attila

    2012-01-01

    During evolution, genetic networks are rewired through strengthening or weakening their interactions to develop new regulatory schemes. In the galactose network, the GAL1/GAL3 paralogues and the GAL2 gene enhance their own expression mediated by the Gal4p transcriptional activator. The wiring strength in these feedback loops is set by the number of Gal4p binding sites. Here we show using synthetic circuits that multiplying the binding sites increases the expression of a gene under the direct control of an activator, but this enhancement is not fed back in the circuit. The feedback loops are rather activated by genes that have frequent stochastic bursts and fast RNA decay rates. In this way, rapid adaptation to galactose can be triggered even by weakly expressed genes. Our results indicate that nonlinear stochastic transcriptional responses enable feedback loops to function autonomously, or contrary to what is dictated by the strength of interactions enclosing the circuit. PMID:22353713

  8. An exploration of alternative visualisations of the basic helix-loop-helix protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoutzias Grigoris D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative representations of biochemical networks emphasise different aspects of the data and contribute to the understanding of complex biological systems. In this study we present a variety of automated methods for visualisation of a protein-protein interaction network, using the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors as an example. Results Network representations that arrange nodes (proteins according to either continuous or discrete information are investigated, revealing the existence of protein sub-families and the retention of interactions following gene duplication events. Methods of network visualisation in conjunction with a phylogenetic tree are presented, highlighting the evolutionary relationships between proteins, and clarifying the context of network hubs and interaction clusters. Finally, an optimisation technique is used to create a three-dimensional layout of the phylogenetic tree upon which the protein-protein interactions may be projected. Conclusion We show that by incorporating secondary genomic, functional or phylogenetic information into network visualisation, it is possible to move beyond simple layout algorithms based on network topology towards more biologically meaningful representations. These new visualisations can give structure to complex networks and will greatly help in interpreting their evolutionary origins and functional implications. Three open source software packages (InterView, TVi and OptiMage implementing our methods are available.

  9. Investigating physics learning with layered student interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Traxler, Adrienne

    Centrality in student interaction networks (SINs) can be linked to variables like grades [1], persistence [2], and participation [3]. Recent efforts in the field of network science have been done to investigate layered - or multiplex - networks as mathematical objects [4]. These networks can be e......, this study investigates how target entropy [5,1] and pagerank [6,7] are affected when we take time and modes of interaction into account. We present our preliminary models and results and outline our future work in this area....

  10. Prediction of key genes in ovarian cancer treated with decitabine based on network strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Zhen; Qiu, Sheng-Chun

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to predict key genes in ovarian cancer before and after treatment with decitabine utilizing a network approach and to reveal the molecular mechanism. Pathogenic networks of ovarian cancer before and after treatment were identified based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected by Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) method. A weight was assigned to each gene in the pathogenic network and then candidate genes were evaluated. Topological properties (degree, betweenness, closeness and stress) of candidate genes were analyzed to investigate more confident pathogenic genes. Pathway enrichment analysis for candidate and seed genes were conducted. Validation of candidate gene expression in ovarian cancer was performed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. There were 73 nodes and 147 interactions in the pathogenic network before treatment, while 47 nodes and 66 interactions after treatment. A total of 32 candidate genes were identified in the before treatment group of ovarian cancer, of which 16 were rightly candidate genes after treatment and the others were silenced. We obtained 5 key genes (PIK3R2, CCNB1, IL2, IL1B and CDC6) for decitabine treatment that were validated by RT-PCR. In conclusion, we successfully identified 5 key genes (PIK3R2, CCNB1, IL2, IL1B and CDC6) and validated them, which provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of decitabine treatment and may be potential pathogenic biomarkers for the therapy of ovarian cancer.

  11. Noise reduction facilitated by dosage compensation in gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weilin; Song, Ruijie; Acar, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Genetic noise together with genome duplication and volume changes during cell cycle are significant contributors to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. How can cells buffer the effects of these unavoidable epigenetic and genetic variations on phenotypes that are sensitive to such variations? Here we show that a simple network motif that is essential for network-dosage compensation can reduce the effects of extrinsic noise on the network output. Using natural and synthetic gene networks with and without the network motif, we measure gene network activity in single yeast cells and find that the activity of the compensated network is significantly lower in noise compared with the non-compensated network. A mathematical analysis provides intuitive insights into these results and a novel stochastic model tracking cell-volume and cell-cycle predicts the experimental results. Our work implies that noise is a selectable trait tunable by evolution. PMID:27694830

  12. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  13. Pathogenic Network Analysis Predicts Candidate Genes for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of our study was to predicate candidate genes in cervical cancer (CC using a network-based strategy and to understand the pathogenic process of CC. Methods. A pathogenic network of CC was extracted based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes and differentially expressed genes (DEGs between CC and normal controls. Subsequently, cluster analysis was performed to identify the subnetworks in the pathogenic network using ClusterONE. Each gene in the pathogenic network was assigned a weight value, and then candidate genes were obtained based on the weight distribution. Eventually, pathway enrichment analysis for candidate genes was performed. Results. In this work, a total of 330 DEGs were identified between CC and normal controls. From the pathogenic network, 2 intensely connected clusters were extracted, and a total of 52 candidate genes were detected under the weight values greater than 0.10. Among these candidate genes, VIM had the highest weight value. Moreover, candidate genes MMP1, CDC45, and CAT were, respectively, enriched in pathway in cancer, cell cycle, and methane metabolism. Conclusion. Candidate pathogenic genes including MMP1, CDC45, CAT, and VIM might be involved in the pathogenesis of CC. We believe that our results can provide theoretical guidelines for future clinical application.

  14. Detection of gene communities in multi-networks reveals cancer drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Laura; Medico, Enzo; Fortunato, Santo; Caselle, Michele

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new multi-network-based strategy to integrate different layers of genomic information and use them in a coordinate way to identify driving cancer genes. The multi-networks that we consider combine transcription factor co-targeting, microRNA co-targeting, protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression networks. The rationale behind this choice is that gene co-expression and protein-protein interactions require a tight coregulation of the partners and that such a fine tuned regulation can be obtained only combining both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional layers of regulation. To extract the relevant biological information from the multi-network we studied its partition into communities. To this end we applied a consensus clustering algorithm based on state of art community detection methods. Even if our procedure is valid in principle for any pathology in this work we concentrate on gastric, lung, pancreas and colorectal cancer and identified from the enrichment analysis of the multi-network communities a set of candidate driver cancer genes. Some of them were already known oncogenes while a few are new. The combination of the different layers of information allowed us to extract from the multi-network indications on the regulatory pattern and functional role of both the already known and the new candidate driver genes.

  15. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Po; Hsiao, Yu-Ting; Hwang, Wei-Che

    2014-01-16

    To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel computational framework, high

  16. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. Results This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Conclusions Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel

  17. Analysis of protein interaction networks related to core transcription factors target genes in embryonic stem cells%胚胎干细胞核心转录因子靶基因集蛋白互作网络特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左长清; 汪宗桂; 吴铁; 崔燎

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells, through transduction of some core transcription factors, into pluripotent stem cells (iPS) that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. At present, the complex mechanism is not yet fully understood.OBJECTIVE: To study the protein interaction networks related to core transcription factors target genes in embryonic stem cells and to obtain regulatory mechanism controlled "stemness".METHODS: Non-redundant protein interaction data (NRPD) were obtained after removal of redundant data in BioGRID database.Protein interaction pairs, formed by the target genes, were extracted by perl program and the largest continuous protein interaction networks were obtained through searching NRPD using breadth-first search algorithm. At the same time, 1 000 random networks were analyzed and compared. At last, network visualization was analyzed through the Cytoscape software and network characteristics were explained using complex scale-free network model of Barabasi-Albert.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : More protein interaction pairs and larger continuous protein network, statistically significant difference compared with random genes, were formed by core transcription factor target genes. The continuous protein network is scale-free characteristics of complex networks. This study has suggested that target genes may regulate synergistically "stemness" characteristics of embryonic stem cells through close interaction and forming a network module.%背景:外源性核心转录因子导入终末分化细胞能产生具有与胚胎干细胞特性相似的诱导多潜能干细胞,其复杂机制目前尚未完全阐明.目的:分析核心转录因子靶基因集蛋白互作网络特征,获得其影响"干性"特征的调控机制.方法:去除BioGRID数据库中的冗余数据,获得非冗余蛋白互作数据库.perl程序搜索靶基因集组成的蛋白互作对,广度优先算法搜索非冗余蛋白互作数

  18. Do networks of social interactions reflect patterns of kinship?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joah R. MADDEN; Johanna F. NIEL SEN; Tim H. CLUTTON-BROCK

    2012-01-01

    The underlying kin structure of groups of animals may be glimpsed from patterns of spatial position or temporal association between individuals,and is presumed to facilitate inclusive fitness benefits.Such structure may be evident at a finer,behavioural,scale with individuals preferentially interacting with kin.We tested whether kin structure within groups of meerkats Suricata suricatta matched three forms of social interaction networks:grooming,dominance or foraging competitions.Networks of dominance interactions were positively related to networks of kinship,with close relatives engaging in dominance interactions with each other.This relationship persisted even after excluding the breeding dominant pair and when we restricted the kinship network to only include links between first order kin,which are most likely to be able to discern kin through simple rules of thumb.Conversely,we found no relationship between kinship networks and either grooming networks or networks of foraging competitions.This is surprising because a positive association between kin in a grooming network,or a negative association between kin in a network of foraging competitions offers opportunities for inclusive fitness benefits.Indeed,the positive association between kin in a network of dominance interactions that we did detect does not offer clear inclusive fitness benefits to group members.We conclude that kin structure in behavioural interactions in meerkats may be driven by factors other than indirect fitness benefits,and that networks of cooperative behaviours such as grooming may be driven by direct benefits accruing to individuals perhaps through mutualism or manipulation [Current Zoology 58 (2):319-328,2012].

  19. Do networks of social interactions reflect patterns of kinship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joah R. MADDEN, Johanna F. NIELSEN, Tim H. CLUTTON-BROCK

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The underlying kin structure of groups of animals may be glimpsed from patterns of spatial position or temporal association between individuals, and is presumed to facilitate inclusive fitness benefits. Such structure may be evident at a finer, behavioural, scale with individuals preferentially interacting with kin. We tested whether kin structure within groups of meerkats Suricata suricatta matched three forms of social interaction networks: grooming, dominance or foraging competitions. Networks of dominance interactions were positively related to networks of kinship, with close relatives engaging in dominance interactions with each other. This relationship persisted even after excluding the breeding dominant pair and when we restricted the kinship network to only include links between first order kin, which are most likely to be able to discern kin through simple rules of thumb. Conversely, we found no relationship between kinship networks and either grooming networks or networks of foraging competitions. This is surprising because a positive association between kin in a grooming network, or a negative association between kin in a network of foraging competitions offers opportunities for inclusive fitness benefits. Indeed, the positive association between kin in a network of dominance interactions that we did detect does not offer clear inclusive fitness benefits to group members. We conclude that kin structure in behavioural interactions in meerkats may be driven by factors other than indirect fitness benefits, and that networks of cooperative behaviours such as grooming may be driven by direct benefits accruing to individuals perhaps through mutualism or manipulation [Current Zoology 58 (2: 319-328, 2012].

  20. Detection of gene x gene interactions in genome-wide association studies of human population data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musani, Solomon K; Shriner, Daniel; Liu, Nianjun; Feng, Rui; Coffey, Christopher S; Yi, Nengjun; Tiwari, Hemant K; Allison, David B

    2007-01-01

    Empirical evidence supporting the commonality of gene x gene interactions, coupled with frequent failure to replicate results from previous association studies, has prompted statisticians to develop...

  1. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  2. Extending pathways and processes using molecular interaction networks to analyse cancer genome data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnogor Natalio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular processes and pathways, whose deregulation may contribute to the development of cancers, are often represented as cascades of proteins transmitting a signal from the cell surface to the nucleus. However, recent functional genomic experiments have identified thousands of interactions for the signalling canonical proteins, challenging the traditional view of pathways as independent functional entities. Combining information from pathway databases and interaction networks obtained from functional genomic experiments is therefore a promising strategy to obtain more robust pathway and process representations, facilitating the study of cancer-related pathways. Results We present a methodology for extending pre-defined protein sets representing cellular pathways and processes by mapping them onto a protein-protein interaction network, and extending them to include densely interconnected interaction partners. The added proteins display distinctive network topological features and molecular function annotations, and can be proposed as putative new components, and/or as regulators of the communication between the different cellular processes. Finally, these extended pathways and processes are used to analyse their enrichment in pancreatic mutated genes. Significant associations between mutated genes and certain processes are identified, enabling an analysis of the influence of previously non-annotated cancer mutated genes. Conclusions The proposed method for extending cellular pathways helps to explain the functions of cancer mutated genes by exploiting the synergies of canonical knowledge and large-scale interaction data.

  3. Predicting gene ontology annotations of orphan GWAS genes using protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppuswamy, Usha; Ananthasubramanian, Seshan; Wang, Yanli; Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K

    2014-04-03

    The number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has increased rapidly in the past couple of years, resulting in the identification of genes associated with different diseases. The next step in translating these findings into biomedically useful information is to find out the mechanism of the action of these genes. However, GWAS studies often implicate genes whose functions are currently unknown; for example, MYEOV, ANKLE1, TMEM45B and ORAOV1 are found to be associated with breast cancer, but their molecular function is unknown. We carried out Bayesian inference of Gene Ontology (GO) term annotations of genes by employing the directed acyclic graph structure of GO and the network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The approach is designed based on the fact that two proteins that interact biophysically would be in physical proximity of each other, would possess complementary molecular function, and play role in related biological processes. Predicted GO terms were ranked according to their relative association scores and the approach was evaluated quantitatively by plotting the precision versus recall values and F-scores (the harmonic mean of precision and recall) versus varying thresholds. Precisions of ~58% and ~ 40% for localization and functions respectively of proteins were determined at a threshold of ~30 (top 30 GO terms in the ranked list). Comparison with function prediction based on semantic similarity among nodes in an ontology and incorporation of those similarities in a k-nearest neighbor classifier confirmed that our results compared favorably. This approach was applied to predict the cellular component and molecular function GO terms of all human proteins that have interacting partners possessing at least one known GO annotation. The list of predictions is available at http://severus.dbmi.pitt.edu/engo/GOPRED.html. We present the algorithm, evaluations and the results of the computational predictions, especially for genes identified in

  4. Evolvability and hierarchy in rewired bacterial gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isalan, Mark; Lemerle, Caroline; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Beltrao, Pedro; Horn, Carsten; Raineri, Emanuele; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Serrano, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing DNA from several organisms has revealed that duplication and drift of existing genes have primarily molded the contents of a given genome. Though the effect of knocking out or over-expressing a particular gene has been studied in many organisms, no study has systematically explored the effect of adding new links in a biological network. To explore network evolvability, we constructed 598 recombinations of promoters (including regulatory regions) with different transcription or σ-factor genes in Escherichia coli, added over a wild-type genetic background. Here we show that ~95% of new networks are tolerated by the bacteria, that very few alter growth, and that expression level correlates with factor position in the wild-type network hierarchy. Most importantly, we find that certain networks consistently survive over the wild-type under various selection pressures. Therefore new links in the network are rarely a barrier for evolution and can even confer a fitness advantage. PMID:18421347

  5. NetworkAnalyst for statistical, visual and network-based meta-analysis of gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianguo; Gill, Erin E; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-06-01

    Meta-analysis of gene expression data sets is increasingly performed to help identify robust molecular signatures and to gain insights into underlying biological processes. The complicated nature of such analyses requires both advanced statistics and innovative visualization strategies to support efficient data comparison, interpretation and hypothesis generation. NetworkAnalyst (http://www.networkanalyst.ca) is a comprehensive web-based tool designed to allow bench researchers to perform various common and complex meta-analyses of gene expression data via an intuitive web interface. By coupling well-established statistical procedures with state-of-the-art data visualization techniques, NetworkAnalyst allows researchers to easily navigate large complex gene expression data sets to determine important features, patterns, functions and connections, thus leading to the generation of new biological hypotheses. This protocol provides a step-wise description of how to effectively use NetworkAnalyst to perform network analysis and visualization from gene lists; to perform meta-analysis on gene expression data while taking into account multiple metadata parameters; and, finally, to perform a meta-analysis of multiple gene expression data sets. NetworkAnalyst is designed to be accessible to biologists rather than to specialist bioinformaticians. The complete protocol can be executed in ∼1.5 h. Compared with other similar web-based tools, NetworkAnalyst offers a unique visual analytics experience that enables data analysis within the context of protein-protein interaction networks, heatmaps or chord diagrams. All of these analysis methods provide the user with supporting statistical and functional evidence.

  6. Multiple genetic interaction experiments provide complementary information useful for gene function prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Michaut

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions help map biological processes and their functional relationships. A genetic interaction is defined as a deviation from the expected phenotype when combining multiple genetic mutations. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most genetic interactions are measured under a single phenotype - growth rate in standard laboratory conditions. Recently genetic interactions have been collected under different phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions. How different are these networks and what can we learn from their differences? We conducted a systematic analysis of quantitative genetic interaction networks in yeast performed under different experimental conditions. We find that networks obtained using different phenotypic readouts, in different conditions and from different laboratories overlap less than expected and provide significant unique information. To exploit this information, we develop a novel method to combine individual genetic interaction data sets and show that the resulting network improves gene function prediction performance, demonstrating that individual networks provide complementary information. Our results support the notion that using diverse phenotypic readouts and experimental conditions will substantially increase the amount of gene function information produced by genetic interaction screens.

  7. Network-Based Method for Identifying Co- Regeneration Genes in Bone, Dentin, Nerve and Vessel Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Pan, Hongying; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Feng, Kaiyan; Kong, XiangYin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-02

    Bone and dental diseases are serious public health problems. Most current clinical treatments for these diseases can produce side effects. Regeneration is a promising therapy for bone and dental diseases, yielding natural tissue recovery with few side effects. Because soft tissues inside the bone and dentin are densely populated with nerves and vessels, the study of bone and dentin regeneration should also consider the co-regeneration of nerves and vessels. In this study, a network-based method to identify co-regeneration genes for bone, dentin, nerve and vessel was constructed based on an extensive network of protein-protein interactions. Three procedures were applied in the network-based method. The first procedure, searching, sought the shortest paths connecting regeneration genes of one tissue type with regeneration genes of other tissues, thereby extracting possible co-regeneration genes. The second procedure, testing, employed a permutation test to evaluate whether possible genes were false discoveries; these genes were excluded by the testing procedure. The last procedure, screening, employed two rules, the betweenness ratio rule and interaction score rule, to select the most essential genes. A total of seventeen genes were inferred by the method, which were deemed to contribute to co-regeneration of at least two tissues. All these seventeen genes were extensively discussed to validate the utility of the method.

  8. Laplacian Spectrum and Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anirban; Jost, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    From the spectral plot of the (normalized) graph Laplacian, the essential qualitative properties of a network can be simultaneously deduced. Given a class of empirical networks, reconstruction schemes for elucidating the evolutionary dynamics leading to those particular data can then be developed. This method is exemplified for protein-protein interaction networks. Traces of their evolutionary history of duplication and divergence processes are identified. In particular, we can identify typic...

  9. The networks as a new forms of international interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dorosh, Lesya

    2013-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of modern treatments of the system of international relations, attention is paid to its network measurement. It’s analyzed the types of international networks and shown tendencies of transformation of the international interactions from the international anarchy with the priority of the state sovereignty to the horizontal cooperation on the branch self-government. It’s identified that the network of the international relations causes the changes of th...

  10. Analysis of protein-protein interaction network in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y P; Shi, Y H; Gu, W C

    2014-10-31

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The purpose of our study was to uncover biomarkers and explore its pathogenic mechanisms at the molecular level. The gene expression profiles of COPD samples and normal controls were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Matlab was used for data preprocessing and SAM4.0 was applied to determine the differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Furthermore, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed by mapping the DEGs into PPI data, and functional analysis of the network was conducted with BiNGO. A total of 348 DEGs and 765 interactive genes were identified. The hub genes were mainly involved in metabolic processes and ribosome biogenesis. Several genes related to COPD in the PPI network were found, including CAMK1D, ALB, KIT, and DDX3Y. In conclusion, CAMK1D, ALB, KIT, and DDX3Y were chosen as candidate genes, which have the potential to be biomarkers or candidate target molecules to apply in clinical diagnosis and treatment of COPD.

  11. Identification of neuron-related genes for cell therapy of neurological disorders by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Ning; Song, Xiao-Qing; Wei, Hui-Ping; Yin, Hai-Feng

    Bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) differentiated into neurons have been widely proposed for use in cell therapy of many neurological disorders. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this differentiation. We screened differentially expressed genes between immature neural tissues and untreated BMSCs to identify the genes responsible for neuronal differentiation from BMSCs. GSE68243 gene microarray data of rat BMSCs and GSE18860 gene microarray data of rat neurons were received from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Transcriptome Analysis Console software showed that 1248 genes were up-regulated and 1273 were down-regulated in neurons compared with BMSCs. Gene Ontology functional enrichment, protein-protein interaction networks, functional modules, and hub genes were analyzed using DAVID, STRING 10, BiNGO tool, and Network Analyzer software, revealing that nine hub genes, Nrcam, Sema3a, Mapk8, Dlg4, Slit1, Creb1, Ntrk2, Cntn2, and Pax6, may play a pivotal role in neuronal differentiation from BMSCs. Seven genes, Dcx, Nrcam, sema3a, Cntn2, Slit1, Ephb1, and Pax6, were shown to be hub nodes within the neuronal development network, while six genes, Fgf2, Tgfβ1, Vegfa, Serpine1, Il6, and Stat1, appeared to play an important role in suppressing neuronal differentiation. However, additional studies are required to confirm these results.

  12. Development of Attention Networks and Their Interactions in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelos, Joan P.; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M.; Castillo, Alejandro; Fuentes, Luis J.; Rueda, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated developmental trajectories of alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks and their interactions over childhood. Two cross-sectional experiments were conducted with different samples of 6-to 12-year-old children using modified versions of the attention network task (ANT). In Experiment 1 (N = 106),…

  13. Guidelines to foster interaction in online communities for Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Rusman, Ellen; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available from www.springerlink.com. Berlanga, A., Rusman, E., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., & Sloep, P. B. (2009). Guidelines to foster interaction in online communities for Learning Networks. In R. Koper (Ed.), Learning Network Services for Professional Development (pp. 27-42).

  14. Interacting Social Processes on Interconnected Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Zuzek, Lucila G.; La Rocca, Cristian E.; Vazquez, Federico; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the interplay between two different dynamical processes –one for opinion formation and the other for decision making– on two interconnected networks A and B. The opinion dynamics on network A corresponds to that of the M-model, where the state of each agent can take one of four possible values (S = −2,−1, 1, 2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue. The likelihood to become an extremist (S = ±2) or a moderate (S = ±1) is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r ≥ 0. The decision making dynamics on network B is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where agents can be either in favor (S = +1) or against (S = −1) the issue. The probability that an agent changes its state is proportional to the fraction of neighbors that hold the opposite state raised to a power β. Starting from a polarized case scenario in which all agents of network A hold positive orientations while all agents of network B have a negative orientation, we explore the conditions under which one of the dynamics prevails over the other, imposing its initial orientation. We find that, for a given value of β, the two-network system reaches a consensus in the positive state (initial state of network A) when the reinforcement overcomes a crossover value r*(β), while a negative consensus happens for r βc. We develop an analytical mean-field approach that gives an insight into these regimes and shows that both dynamics are equivalent along the crossover line (r*, β*). PMID:27689698

  15. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease.

  16. Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF for computationally-efficient filtering of gene-gene interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Casey S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies are becoming the de facto standard in the genetic analysis of common human diseases. Given the complexity and robustness of biological networks such diseases are unlikely to be the result of single points of failure but instead likely arise from the joint failure of two or more interacting components. The hope in genome-wide screens is that these points of failure can be linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which confer disease susceptibility. Detecting interacting variants that lead to disease in the absence of single-gene effects is difficult however, and methods to exhaustively analyze sets of these variants for interactions are combinatorial in nature thus making them computationally infeasible. Efficient algorithms which can detect interacting SNPs are needed. ReliefF is one such promising algorithm, although it has low success rate for noisy datasets when the interaction effect is small. ReliefF has been paired with an iterative approach, Tuned ReliefF (TuRF, which improves the estimation of weights in noisy data but does not fundamentally change the underlying ReliefF algorithm. To improve the sensitivity of studies using these methods to detect small effects we introduce Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF. Results SURF's ability to detect interactions in this domain is significantly greater than that of ReliefF. Similarly SURF, in combination with the TuRF strategy significantly outperforms TuRF alone for SNP selection under an epistasis model. It is important to note that this success rate increase does not require an increase in algorithmic complexity and allows for increased success rate, even with the removal of a nuisance parameter from the algorithm. Conclusion Researchers performing genetic association studies and aiming to discover gene-gene interactions associated with increased disease susceptibility should use SURF in place of ReliefF. For instance, SURF should be

  17. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

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    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  18. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  19. Specialization for resistance in wild host-pathogen interaction networks

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    Luke eBarrett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Properties encompassed by host-pathogen interaction networks have potential to give valuable insight into the evolution of specialization and coevolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen interactions. However, network approaches have been rarely utilized in previous studies of host and pathogen phenotypic variation. Here we applied quantitative analyses to eight networks derived from spatially and temporally segregated host (Linum marginale and pathogen (Melampsora lini populations. First, we found that resistance strategies are highly variable within and among networks, corresponding to a spectrum of specialist and generalist resistance types being maintained within all networks. At the individual level, specialization was strongly linked to partial resistance, such that partial resistance was effective against a greater number of pathogens compared to full resistance. Second, we found that all networks were significantly nested. There was little support for the hypothesis that temporal evolutionary dynamics may lead to the development of nestedness in host-pathogen infection networks. Rather, the common patterns observed in terms of nestedness suggests a universal driver (or multiple drivers that may be independent of spatial and temporal structure. Third, we found that resistance networks were significantly modular in two spatial networks, clearly reflecting spatial and ecological structure within one of the networks. We conclude that (1 overall patterns of specialization in the networks we studied mirror evolutionary trade-offs with the strength of resistance; (2 that specific network architecture can emerge under different evolutionary scenarios; and (3 network approaches offer great utility as a tool for probing the evolutionary and ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions.

  20. Inference of gene regulatory networks with the strong-inhibition Boolean model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Qinzhi; Liu Lulu; Ye Weiming; Hu Gang, E-mail: ganghu@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is an important topic in biology. In this paper, a logic-based algorithm that infers the strong-inhibition Boolean genetic regulatory networks (where regulation by any single repressor can definitely suppress the expression of the gene regulated) from time series is discussed. By properly ordering various computation steps, we derive for the first time explicit formulae for the probabilities at which different interactions can be inferred given a certain number of data. With the formulae, we can predict the precision of reconstructions of regulation networks when the data are insufficient. Numerical simulations coincide well with the analytical results. The method and results are expected to be applicable to a wide range of general dynamic networks, where logic algorithms play essential roles in the network dynamics and the probabilities of various logics can be estimated well.

  1. Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O. C.; Krzywicki, A.; Zagorski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Living cells can maintain their internal states, react to changing environments, grow, differentiate, divide, etc. All these processes are tightly controlled by what can be called a regulatory program. The logic of the underlying control can sometimes be guessed at by examining the network of influences amongst genetic components. Some associated gene regulatory networks have been studied in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, unveiling various structural features ranging from broad distributions of out-degrees to recurrent "motifs", that is small subgraphs having a specific pattern of interactions. To understand what factors may be driving such structuring, a number of groups have introduced frameworks to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. In that context, we review here such in silico approaches and show how selection for phenotypes, i.e., network function, can shape network structure.

  2. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C

    2016-04-04

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development.

  3. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development.

  4. Stable evolutionary signal in a Yeast protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdig Michael T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently emerged protein interaction network paradigm can provide novel and important insights into the innerworkings of a cell. Yet, the heavy burden of both false positive and false negative protein-protein interaction data casts doubt on the broader usefulness of these interaction sets. Approaches focusing on one-protein-at-a-time have been powerfully employed to demonstrate the high degree of conservation of proteins participating in numerous interactions; here, we expand his 'node' focused paradigm to investigate the relative persistence of 'link' based evolutionary signals in a protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae and point out the value of this relatively untapped source of information. Results The trend for highly connected proteins to be preferably conserved in evolution is stable, even in the context of tremendous noise in the underlying protein interactions as well as in the assignment of orthology among five higher eukaryotes. We find that local clustering around interactions correlates with preferred evolutionary conservation of the participating proteins; furthermore the correlation between high local clustering and evolutionary conservation is accompanied by a stable elevated degree of coexpression of the interacting proteins. We use this conserved interaction data, combined with P. falciparum /Yeast orthologs, as proof-of-principle that high-order network topology can be used comparatively to deduce local network structure in non-model organisms. Conclusion High local clustering is a criterion for the reliability of an interaction and coincides with preferred evolutionary conservation and significant coexpression. These strong and stable correlations indicate that evolutionary units go beyond a single protein to include the interactions among them. In particular, the stability of these signals in the face of extreme noise suggests that empirical protein interaction data can be integrated with

  5. Gene regulatory network inference using fused LASSO on multiple data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omranian, Nooshin; Eloundou-Mbebi, Jeanne M O; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-02-11

    Devising computational methods to accurately reconstruct gene regulatory networks given gene expression data is key to systems biology applications. Here we propose a method for reconstructing gene regulatory networks by simultaneous consideration of data sets from different perturbation experiments and corresponding controls. The method imposes three biologically meaningful constraints: (1) expression levels of each gene should be explained by the expression levels of a small number of transcription factor coding genes, (2) networks inferred from different data sets should be similar with respect to the type and number of regulatory interactions, and (3) relationships between genes which exhibit similar differential behavior over the considered perturbations should be favored. We demonstrate that these constraints can be transformed in a fused LASSO formulation for the proposed method. The comparative analysis on transcriptomics time-series data from prokaryotic species, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as well as a eukaryotic species, mouse, demonstrated that the proposed method has the advantages of the most recent approaches for regulatory network inference, while obtaining better performance and assigning higher scores to the true regulatory links. The study indicates that the combination of sparse regression techniques with other biologically meaningful constraints is a promising framework for gene regulatory network reconstructions.

  6. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  7. Structural principles within the human-virus protein-protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Xia, Yu

    2011-01-01

    General properties of the antagonistic biomolecular interactions between viruses and their hosts (exogenous interactions) remain poorly understood, and may differ significantly from known principles governing the cooperative interactions within the host (endogenous interactions). Systems biology approaches have been applied to study the combined interaction networks of virus and human proteins, but such efforts have so far revealed only low-resolution patterns of host-virus interaction. Here, we layer curated and predicted 3D structural models of human-virus and human-human protein complexes on top of traditional interaction networks to reconstruct the human-virus structural interaction network. This approach reveals atomic resolution, mechanistic patterns of host-virus interaction, and facilitates systematic comparison with the host’s endogenous interactions. We find that exogenous interfaces tend to overlap with and mimic endogenous interfaces, thereby competing with endogenous binding partners. The endogenous interfaces mimicked by viral proteins tend to participate in multiple endogenous interactions which are transient and regulatory in nature. While interface overlap in the endogenous network results largely from gene duplication followed by divergent evolution, viral proteins frequently achieve interface mimicry without any sequence or structural similarity to an endogenous binding partner. Finally, while endogenous interfaces tend to evolve more slowly than the rest of the protein surface, exogenous interfaces—including many sites of endogenous-exogenous overlap—tend to evolve faster, consistent with an evolutionary “arms race” between host and pathogen. These significant biophysical, functional, and evolutionary differences between host-pathogen and within-host protein-protein interactions highlight the distinct consequences of antagonism versus cooperation in biological networks. PMID:21680884

  8. Motif Participation by Genes in E. coli Transcriptional Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMayo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Motifs are patterns of recurring connections among the genes of genetic networks that occur more frequently than would be expected from randomized networks with the same degree sequence. Although the abundance of certain three-node motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, is positively correlated with a networks’ ability to tolerate moderate disruptions to gene expression, little is known regarding the connectivity of individual genes participating in multiple motifs. Using the transcriptional network of the bacterium Escherichia coli, we investigate this feature by reconstructing the distribution of genes participating in feed-forward loop motifs from its largest connected network component. We contrast these motif participation distributions with those obtained from model networks built using the preferential attachment mechanism employed by many biological and man-made networks. We report that, although some of these model networks support a motif participation distribution that appears qualitatively similar to that obtained from the bacterium Escherichia coli, the probability for a node to support a feed-forward loop motif may instead be strongly influenced by only a few master transcriptional regulators within the network. From these analyses we conclude that such master regulators may be a crucial ingredient to describe coupling among feed-forward loop motifs in transcriptional regulatory networks.

  9. CoryneRegNet 4.0 – A reference database for corynebacterial gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumbach Jan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information on DNA-binding transcription factors (the key players in the regulation of gene expression and on transcriptional regulatory interactions of microorganisms deduced from literature-derived knowledge, computer predictions and global DNA microarray hybridization experiments, has opened the way for the genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks. The large-scale reconstruction of these networks allows the in silico analysis of cell behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. We previously published CoryneRegNet, an ontology-based data warehouse of corynebacterial transcription factors and regulatory networks. Initially, it was designed to provide methods for the analysis and visualization of the gene regulatory network of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Now we introduce CoryneRegNet release 4.0, which integrates data on the gene regulatory networks of 4 corynebacteria, 2 mycobacteria and the model organism Escherichia coli K12. As the previous versions, CoryneRegNet provides a web-based user interface to access the database content, to allow various queries, and to support the reconstruction, analysis and visualization of regulatory networks at different hierarchical levels. In this article, we present the further improved database content of CoryneRegNet along with novel analysis features. The network visualization feature GraphVis now allows the inter-species comparisons of reconstructed gene regulatory networks and the projection of gene expression levels onto that networks. Therefore, we added stimulon data directly into the database, but also provide Web Service access to the DNA microarray analysis platform EMMA. Additionally, CoryneRegNet now provides a SOAP based Web Service server, which can easily be consumed by other bioinformatics software systems. Stimulons (imported from the database, or uploaded by the user can be analyzed in the context of known

  10. Gene duplication models for directed networks with limits on growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, Jakob; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-11-01

    Background: Duplication of genes is important for evolution of molecular networks. Many authors have therefore considered gene duplication as a driving force in shaping the topology of molecular networks. In particular it has been noted that growth via duplication would act as an implicit means of preferential attachment, and thereby provide the observed broad degree distributions of molecular networks. Results: We extend current models of gene duplication and rewiring by including directions and the fact that molecular networks are not a result of unidirectional growth. We introduce upstream sites and downstream shapes to quantify potential links during duplication and rewiring. We find that this in itself generates the observed scaling of transcription factors for genome sites in prokaryotes. The dynamical model can generate a scale-free degree distribution, p(k)\\propto 1/k^{\\gamma } , with exponent γ = 1 in the non-growing case, and with γ>1 when the network is growing. Conclusions: We find that duplication of genes followed by substantial recombination of upstream regions could generate features of genetic regulatory networks. Our steady state degree distribution is however too broad to be consistent with data, thereby suggesting that selective pruning acts as a main additional constraint on duplicated genes. Our analysis shows that gene duplication can only be a main cause for the observed broad degree distributions if there are also substantial recombinations between upstream regions of genes.

  11. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. II. Feed-forward interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M; Tkacik, Gasper; Bialek, William

    2010-04-01

    Central to the functioning of a living cell is its ability to control the readout or expression of information encoded in the genome. In many cases, a single transcription factor protein activates or represses the expression of many genes. As the concentration of the transcription factor varies, the target genes thus undergo correlated changes, and this redundancy limits the ability of the cell to transmit information about input signals. We explore how interactions among the target genes can reduce this redundancy and optimize information transmission. Our discussion builds on recent work [Tkacik, Phys. Rev. E 80, 031920 (2009)], and there are connections to much earlier work on the role of lateral inhibition in enhancing the efficiency of information transmission in neural circuits; for simplicity we consider here the case where the interactions have a feed forward structure, with no loops. Even with this limitation, the networks that optimize information transmission have a structure reminiscent of the networks found in real biological systems.

  12. The Relationship between Gene Network Structure and Expression Variation among Individuals and Species.

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    Karen E Sears

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Variation among individuals is a prerequisite of evolution by natural selection. As such, identifying the origins of variation is a fundamental goal of biology. We investigated the link between gene interactions and variation in gene expression among individuals and species using the mammalian limb as a model system. We first built interaction networks for key genes regulating early (outgrowth; E9.5-11 and late (expansion and elongation; E11-13 limb development in mouse. This resulted in an Early (ESN and Late (LSN Stage Network. Computational perturbations of these networks suggest that the ESN is more robust. We then quantified levels of the same key genes among mouse individuals and found that they vary less at earlier limb stages and that variation in gene expression is heritable. Finally, we quantified variation in gene expression levels among four mammals with divergent limbs (bat, opossum, mouse and pig and found that levels vary less among species at earlier limb stages. We also found that variation in gene expression levels among individuals and species are correlated for earlier and later limb development. In conclusion, results are consistent with the robustness of the ESN buffering among-individual variation in gene expression levels early in mammalian limb development, and constraining the evolution of early limb development among mammalian species.

  13. Identifying the interactions in a colored dynamical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴召艳; 弓晓利

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of a colored dynamical network play a great role in its dynamical behaviour and are denoted by outer and inner coupling matrices. In this paper, the outer and inner coupling matrices are assumed to be unknown and need to be identified. A corresponding network estimator is designed for identifying the unknown interactions by adopting proper adaptive laws. Based on the Lyapunov function method and Barbalat’s lemma, the obtained result is analytically proved. A colored network coupled with chaotic Lorenz, Chen, and L ¨u systems is considered as a numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Gene regulatory network inference using out of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, Arndt

    2008-08-01

    Spatiotemporal control of gene expression is fundamental to multicellular life. Despite prodigious efforts, the encoding of gene expression regulation in eukaryotes is not understood. Gene expression analyses nourish the hope to reverse engineer effector-target gene networks using inference techniques. Inference from noisy and circumstantial data relies on using robust models with few parameters for the underlying mechanisms. However, a systematic path to gene regulatory network reverse engineering from functional genomics data is still impeded by fundamental problems. Recently, Johannes Berg from the Theoretical Physics Institute of Cologne University has made two remarkable contributions that significantly advance the gene regulatory network inference problem. Berg, who uses gene expression data from yeast, has demonstrated a nonequilibrium regime for mRNA concentration dynamics and was able to map the gene regulatory process upon simple stochastic systems driven out of equilibrium. The impact of his demonstration is twofold, affecting both the understanding of the operational constraints under which transcription occurs and the capacity to extract relevant information from highly time-resolved expression data. Berg has used his observation to predict target genes of selected transcription factors, and thereby, in principle, demonstrated applicability of his out of equilibrium statistical mechanics approach to the gene network inference problem.

  15. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  16. The Max-Min High-Order Dynamic Bayesian Network for Learning Gene Regulatory Networks with Time-Delayed Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Haifen; Zheng, Jie; Ngom, Alioune

    2016-01-01

    Accurately reconstructing gene regulatory network (GRN) from gene expression data is a challenging task in systems biology. Although some progresses have been made, the performance of GRN reconstruction still has much room for improvement. Because many regulatory events are asynchronous, learning gene interactions with multiple time delays is an effective way to improve the accuracy of GRN reconstruction. Here, we propose a new approach, called Max-Min high-order dynamic Bayesian network (MMHO-DBN) by extending the Max-Min hill-climbing Bayesian network technique originally devised for learning a Bayesian network's structure from static data. Our MMHO-DBN can explicitly model the time lags between regulators and targets in an efficient manner. It first uses constraint-based ideas to limit the space of potential structures, and then applies search-and-score ideas to search for an optimal HO-DBN structure. The performance of MMHO-DBN to GRN reconstruction was evaluated using both synthetic and real gene expression time-series data. Results show that MMHO-DBN is more accurate than current time-delayed GRN learning methods, and has an intermediate computing performance. Furthermore, it is able to learn long time-delayed relationships between genes. We applied sensitivity analysis on our model to study the performance variation along different parameter settings. The result provides hints on the setting of parameters of MMHO-DBN.

  17. Gene Expression Network Reconstruction by LEP Method Using Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na You

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression network reconstruction using microarray data is widely studied aiming to investigate the behavior of a gene cluster simultaneously. Under the Gaussian assumption, the conditional dependence between genes in the network is fully described by the partial correlation coefficient matrix. Due to the high dimensionality and sparsity, we utilize the LEP method to estimate it in this paper. Compared to the existing methods, the LEP reaches the highest PPV with the sensitivity controlled at the satisfactory level. A set of gene expression data from the HapMap project is analyzed for illustration.

  18. Mean field interaction in biochemical reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Tembine, Hamidou

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we establish a relationship between chemical dynamics and mean field game dynamics. We show that chemical reaction networks can be studied using noisy mean field limits. We provide deterministic, noisy and switching mean field limits and illustrate them with numerical examples. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  20. Exploitation of genetic interaction network topology for the prediction of epistatic behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2013-10-01

    Genetic interaction (GI) detection impacts the understanding of human disease and the ability to design personalized treatment. The mapping of every GI in most organisms is far from complete due to the combinatorial amount of gene deletions and knockdowns required. Computational techniques to predict new interactions based only on network topology have been developed in network science but never applied to GI networks.We show that topological prediction of GIs is possible with high precision and propose a graph dissimilarity index that is able to provide robust prediction in both dense and sparse networks.Computational prediction of GIs is a strong tool to aid high-throughput GI determination. The dissimilarity index we propose in this article is able to attain precise predictions that reduce the universe of candidate GIs to test in the lab. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Exploitation of genetic interaction network topology for the prediction of epistatic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    Genetic interaction (GI) detection impacts the understanding of human disease and the ability to design personalized treatment. The mapping of every GI in most organisms is far from complete due to the combinatorial amount of gene deletions and knockdowns required. Computational techniques to predict new interactions based only on network topology have been developed in network science but never applied to GI networks. We show that topological prediction of GIs is possible with high precision and propose a graph dissimilarity index that is able to provide robust prediction in both dense and sparse networks. Computational prediction of GIs is a strong tool to aid high-throughput GI determination. The dissimilarity index we propose in this article is able to attain precise predictions that reduce the universe of candidate GIs to test in the lab.

  2. A study on the regulatory network with promoter analysis for Arabidopsis DREB-genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazegari, Sima; Niazi, Ali; Ahmadi, Farajolah Shahriary

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration response element binding factors (DREBs) are one of the principal plant transcription factor subfamilies that regulate the expression of many abiotic stress-inducible genes. This sub-family belongs to AP2 transcription factor family and plays a considerable role in improving abiotic stresses tolerance in plants. Therefore, it is of interest to identify critical cis-acting elements involved in abiotic stress responses. In this study, we survey promoter cis-elements for ATDREBs genes (Arabidopsis thaliana DREBs). Regulatory networks based on ATDREB candidate genes were also generated to find other genes that are functionally similar to DREBs. The study was conducted on all 20 Arabidopsis thaliana non redundant DREB genes stored in RefSeq database. Promoter analysis and regulatory network prediction was accomplished by use of Plant CARE program and GeneMANIA web tool, respectively. The results indicated that among all genes, DREB1A, DREB1C, DREB2C, DREB2G and DEAR3 have the most type of diverse motifs involved in abiotic stress responses. It is implied that co-operation of abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate signaling is crucial for the regulation of the expression of drought and cold responses through DREB transcription factors. Gene network analysis showed different co-expressed but functionally similar genes that had physical and functional interactions with candidate DREB genes. PMID:25848171

  3. Development of attention networks and their interactions in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelos, Joan P; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Castillo, Alejandro; Fuentes, Luis J; Rueda, M Rosario

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated developmental trajectories of alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks and their interactions over childhood. Two cross-sectional experiments were conducted with different samples of 6- to 12-year-old children using modified versions of the attention network task (ANT). In Experiment 1 (N = 106), alerting and orienting cues were independently manipulated, thus allowing examination of interactions between these 2 networks, as well as between them and the executive attention network. In Experiment 2 (N = 159), additional changes were made to the task in order to foster exogenous orienting cues. Results from both studies consistently revealed separate developmental trajectories for each attention network. Children younger than 7 years exhibited stronger benefits from having an alerting auditory signal prior to the target presentation. Developmental changes in orienting were mostly observed on response accuracy between middle and late childhood, whereas executive attention showed increases in efficiency between 7 years and older ages, and further improvements in late childhood. Of importance, across both experiments, significant interactions between alerting and orienting, as well as between each of these and the executive attention network, were observed. Alerting cues led to speeding shifts of attention and enhancing orienting processes. Also, both alerting and orienting cues modulated the magnitude of the flanker interference effect. These findings inform current theoretical models of human attention and its development, characterizing for the first time, the age-related course of attention networks interactions that, present in adults, stem from further refinements over childhood.

  4. Cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions during anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Shiogai

    Full Text Available General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX and pentobarbital (PB. We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used.

  5. Evolutionary pressure on the topology of protein interface interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Margaret E; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-10-24

    The densely connected structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks reflects the functional need of proteins to cooperate in cellular processes. However, PPI networks do not adequately capture the competition in protein binding. By contrast, the interface interaction network (IIN) studied here resolves the modular character of protein-protein binding and distinguishes between simultaneous and exclusive interactions that underlie both cooperation and competition. We show that the topology of the IIN is under evolutionary pressure, and we connect topological features of the IIN to specific biological functions. To reveal the forces shaping the network topology, we use a sequence-based computational model of interface binding along with network analysis. We find that the more fragmented structure of IINs, in contrast to the dense PPI networks, arises in large part from the competition between specific and nonspecific binding. The need to minimize nonspecific binding favors specific network motifs, including a minimal number of cliques (i.e., fully connected subgraphs) and many disconnected fragments. Validating the model, we find that these network characteristics are closely mirrored in the IIN of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Features unexpected on the basis of our motif analysis are found to indicate either exceptional binding selectivity or important regulatory functions.

  6. End of Interactive Emailing from the Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    According to the CNIC Security Policy for Control Systems (EDMS #584092), interactive emailing on PCs (and other devices) connected to the Technical Network is prohibited. Please note that from November 6th, neither reading emails nor sending emails interactively using e.g. Outlook or Pine mail clients on PCs connected to the Technical Network will be possible anymore. However, automatically generated emails will not be blocked and can still be sent off using CERNMX.CERN.CH as mail server. These restrictions DO NOT apply to PCs connected to any other network, like the General Purpose (or office) network. If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Uwe Epting, Pierre Charrue or Stefan Lueders (Technical-Network.Administrator@cern.ch). Your CNIC Working Group

  7. iRegulon: from a gene list to a gene regulatory network using large motif and track collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekin's Janky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying master regulators of biological processes and mapping their downstream gene networks are key challenges in systems biology. We developed a computational method, called iRegulon, to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory network underlying a co-expressed gene set using cis-regulatory sequence analysis. iRegulon implements a genome-wide ranking-and-recovery approach to detect enriched transcription factor motifs and their optimal sets of direct targets. We increase the accuracy of network inference by using very large motif collections of up to ten thousand position weight matrices collected from various species, and linking these to candidate human TFs via a motif2TF procedure. We validate iRegulon on gene sets derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data with increasing levels of noise, and we compare iRegulon with existing motif discovery methods. Next, we use iRegulon on more challenging types of gene lists, including microRNA target sets, protein-protein interaction networks, and genetic perturbation data. In particular, we over-activate p53 in breast cancer cells, followed by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, and could identify an extensive up-regulated network controlled directly by p53. Similarly we map a repressive network with no indication of direct p53 regulation but rather an indirect effect via E2F and NFY. Finally, we generalize our computational framework to include regulatory tracks such as ChIP-seq data and show how motif and track discovery can be combined to map functional regulatory interactions among co-expressed genes. iRegulon is available as a Cytoscape plugin from http://iregulon.aertslab.org.

  8. iRegulon: from a gene list to a gene regulatory network using large motif and track collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekin's Janky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying master regulators of biological processes and mapping their downstream gene networks are key challenges in systems biology. We developed a computational method, called iRegulon, to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory network underlying a co-expressed gene set using cis-regulatory sequence analysis. iRegulon implements a genome-wide ranking-and-recovery approach to detect enriched transcription factor motifs and their optimal sets of direct targets. We increase the accuracy of network inference by using very large motif collections of up to ten thousand position weight matrices collected from various species, and linking these to candidate human TFs via a motif2TF procedure. We validate iRegulon on gene sets derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data with increasing levels of noise, and we compare iRegulon with existing motif discovery methods. Next, we use iRegulon on more challenging types of gene lists, including microRNA target sets, protein-protein interaction networks, and genetic perturbation data. In particular, we over-activate p53 in breast cancer cells, followed by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, and could identify an extensive up-regulated network controlled directly by p53. Similarly we map a repressive network with no indication of direct p53 regulation but rather an indirect effect via E2F and NFY. Finally, we generalize our computational framework to include regulatory tracks such as ChIP-seq data and show how motif and track discovery can be combined to map functional regulatory interactions among co-expressed genes. iRegulon is available as a Cytoscape plugin from http://iregulon.aertslab.org.

  9. iRegulon: from a gene list to a gene regulatory network using large motif and track collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janky, Rekin's; Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichová, Hana; Van de Sande, Bram; Standaert, Laura; Christiaens, Valerie; Hulselmans, Gert; Herten, Koen; Naval Sanchez, Marina; Potier, Delphine; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Fiers, Mark; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2014-07-01

    Identifying master regulators of biological processes and mapping their downstream gene networks are key challenges in systems biology. We developed a computational method, called iRegulon, to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory network underlying a co-expressed gene set using cis-regulatory sequence analysis. iRegulon implements a genome-wide ranking-and-recovery approach to detect enriched transcription factor motifs and their optimal sets of direct targets. We increase the accuracy of network inference by using very large motif collections of up to ten thousand position weight matrices collected from various species, and linking these to candidate human TFs via a motif2TF procedure. We validate iRegulon on gene sets derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data with increasing levels of noise, and we compare iRegulon with existing motif discovery methods. Next, we use iRegulon on more challenging types of gene lists, including microRNA target sets, protein-protein interaction networks, and genetic perturbation data. In particular, we over-activate p53 in breast cancer cells, followed by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, and could identify an extensive up-regulated network controlled directly by p53. Similarly we map a repressive network with no indication of direct p53 regulation but rather an indirect effect via E2F and NFY. Finally, we generalize our computational framework to include regulatory tracks such as ChIP-seq data and show how motif and track discovery can be combined to map functional regulatory interactions among co-expressed genes. iRegulon is available as a Cytoscape plugin from http://iregulon.aertslab.org.

  10. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  11. Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  12. Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Raducanu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  13. Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks

    CERN Document Server

    Marceau, Vincent; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. Exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytic approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g. the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

  14. Aberrant intra-salience network dynamic functional connectivity impairs large-scale network interactions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Wenwen; Sun, Yujing; Hu, Min; Chen, Antao

    2016-12-01

    Aberrant functional interactions between several large-scale networks, especially the central executive network (CEN), the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN), have been postulated as core pathophysiologic features of schizophrenia; however, the attributing factors of which remain unclear. The study employed resting-state fMRI with 77 participants (42 patients and 35 controls). We performed dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) and functional connectivity (FC) analyses to explore the connectivity patterns of these networks. Furthermore, we performed a structural equation model (SEM) analysis to explore the possible role of the SN in modulating network interactions. The results were as follows: (1) The inter-network connectivity showed decreased connectivity strength and increased time-varying instability in schizophrenia; (2) The SN manifested schizophrenic intra-network dysfunctions in both the FC and DFC patterns; (3) The connectivity properties of the SN were effective in discriminating controls from patients; (4) In patients, the dynamic intra-SN connectivity negatively predicted the inter-network FC, and this effect was mediated by intra-SN connectivity strength. These findings suggest that schizophrenia show systematic deficits in temporal stability of large-scale network connectivity. Furthermore, aberrant network interactions in schizophrenia could be attributed to instable intra-SN connectivity and the dysfunction of the SN may be an intrinsic biomarker of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Distinct configurations of protein complexes and biochemical pathways revealed by epistatic interaction network motifs

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Fergal

    2011-08-22

    Abstract Background Gene and protein interactions are commonly represented as networks, with the genes or proteins comprising the nodes and the relationship between them as edges. Motifs, or small local configurations of edges and nodes that arise repeatedly, can be used to simplify the interpretation of networks. Results We examined triplet motifs in a network of quantitative epistatic genetic relationships, and found a non-random distribution of particular motif classes. Individual motif classes were found to be associated with different functional properties, suggestive of an underlying biological significance. These associations were apparent not only for motif classes, but for individual positions within the motifs. As expected, NNN (all negative) motifs were strongly associated with previously reported genetic (i.e. synthetic lethal) interactions, while PPP (all positive) motifs were associated with protein complexes. The two other motif classes (NNP: a positive interaction spanned by two negative interactions, and NPP: a negative spanned by two positives) showed very distinct functional associations, with physical interactions dominating for the former but alternative enrichments, typical of biochemical pathways, dominating for the latter. Conclusion We present a model showing how NNP motifs can be used to recognize supportive relationships between protein complexes, while NPP motifs often identify opposing or regulatory behaviour between a gene and an associated pathway. The ability to use motifs to point toward underlying biological organizational themes is likely to be increasingly important as more extensive epistasis mapping projects in higher organisms begin.

  16. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. © The Author 2015. Published by

  17. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  18. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  19. Predicting protein interactions via parsimonious network history inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Rob; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-07-01

    Reconstruction of the network-level evolutionary history of protein-protein interactions provides a principled way to relate interactions in several present-day networks. Here, we present a general framework for inferring such histories and demonstrate how it can be used to determine what interactions existed in the ancestral networks, which present-day interactions we might expect to exist based on evolutionary evidence and what information extant networks contain about the order of ancestral protein duplications. Our framework characterizes the space of likely parsimonious network histories. It results in a structure that can be used to find probabilities for a number of events associated with the histories. The framework is based on a directed hypergraph formulation of dynamic programming that we extend to enumerate many optimal and near-optimal solutions. The algorithm is applied to reconstructing ancestral interactions among bZIP transcription factors, imputing missing present-day interactions among the bZIPs and among proteins from five herpes viruses, and determining relative protein duplication order in the bZIP family. Our approach more accurately reconstructs ancestral interactions than existing approaches. In cross-validation tests, we find that our approach ranks the majority of the left-out present-day interactions among the top 2 and 17% of possible edges for the bZIP and herpes networks, respectively, making it a competitive approach for edge imputation. It also estimates relative bZIP protein duplication orders, using only interaction data and phylogenetic tree topology, which are significantly correlated with sequence-based estimates. The algorithm is implemented in C++, is open source and is available at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/ckingsf/software/parana2. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Topological, functional, and dynamic properties of the protein interaction networks rewired by benzo(a)pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ba, Qian [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Li, Junyang; Huang, Chao [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Jingquan; Chu, Ruiai [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: huiwang@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene is a common environmental and foodborne pollutant that has been identified as a human carcinogen. Although the carcinogenicity of benzo(a)pyrene has been extensively reported, its precise molecular mechanisms and the influence on system-level protein networks are not well understood. To investigate the system-level influence of benzo(a)pyrene on protein interactions and regulatory networks, a benzo(a)pyrene-rewired protein interaction network was constructed based on 769 key proteins derived from more than 500 literature reports. The protein interaction network rewired by benzo(a)pyrene was a scale-free, highly-connected biological system. Ten modules were identified, and 25 signaling pathways were enriched, most of which belong to the human diseases category, especially cancer and infectious disease. In addition, two lung-specific and two liver-specific pathways were identified. Three pathways were specific in short and medium-term networks (< 48 h), and five pathways were enriched only in the medium-term network (6 h–48 h). Finally, the expression of linker genes in the network was validated by Western blotting. These findings establish the overall, tissue- and time-specific benzo(a)pyrene-rewired protein interaction networks and provide insights into the biological effects and molecular mechanisms of action of benzo(a)pyrene. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene induced scale-free, highly-connected protein interaction networks. • 25 signaling pathways were enriched through modular analysis. • Tissue- and time-specific pathways were identified.

  1. CPL:Detecting Protein Complexes by Propagating Labels on Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代启国; 郭茂祖; 刘晓燕; 滕志霞; 王春宇

    2014-01-01

    Proteins usually bind together to form complexes, which play an important role in cellular activities. Many graph clustering methods have been proposed to identify protein complexes by finding dense regions in protein-protein interaction networks. We present a novel framework (CPL) that detects protein complexes by propagating labels through interactions in a network, in which labels denote complex identifiers. With proper propagation in CPL, proteins in the same complex will be assigned with the same labels. CPL does not make any strong assumptions about the topological structures of the complexes, as in previous methods. The CPL algorithm is tested on several publicly available yeast protein-protein interaction networks and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results suggest that CPL performs better than the existing methods. An analysis of the functional homogeneity based on a gene ontology analysis shows that the detected complexes of CPL are highly biologically relevant.

  2. Influence of homology and node age on the growth of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Gherardi, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Proteins participating in a protein-protein interaction network can be grouped into homology classes following their common ancestry. Proteins added to the network correspond to genes added to the classes, so the dynamics of the two objects are intrinsically linked. Here we first introduce a statistical model describing the joint growth of the network and the partitioning of nodes into classes, which is studied through a combined mean-field and simulation approach. We then employ this unified framework to address the specific issue of the age dependence of protein interactions through the definition of three different node wiring or divergence schemes. A comparison with empirical data indicates that an age-dependent divergence move is necessary in order to reproduce the basic topological observables together with the age correlation between interacting nodes visible in empirical data. We also discuss the possibility of nontrivial joint partition and topology observables.

  3. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  4. Genetic interaction network of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 1 phosphatase Glc7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neszt Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases and phosphatases regulate protein phosphorylation, a critical means of modulating protein function, stability and localization. The identification of functional networks for protein phosphatases has been slow due to their redundant nature and the lack of large-scale analyses. We hypothesized that a genome-scale analysis of genetic interactions using the Synthetic Genetic Array could reveal protein phosphatase functional networks. We apply this approach to the conserved type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7, which regulates numerous cellular processes in budding yeast. Results We created a novel glc7 catalytic mutant (glc7-E101Q. Phenotypic analysis indicates that this novel allele exhibits slow growth and defects in glucose metabolism but normal cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. This suggests that glc7-E101Q is a hypomorphic glc7 mutant. Synthetic Genetic Array analysis of glc7-E101Q revealed a broad network of 245 synthetic sick/lethal interactions reflecting that many processes are required when Glc7 function is compromised such as histone modification, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, nutrient sensing and DNA damage. In addition, mitochondrial activity and inheritance and lipid metabolism were identified as new processes involved in buffering Glc7 function. An interaction network among 95 genes genetically interacting with GLC7 was constructed by integration of genetic and physical interaction data. The obtained network has a modular architecture, and the interconnection among the modules reflects the cooperation of the processes buffering Glc7 function. Conclusion We found 245 genes required for the normal growth of the glc7-E101Q mutant. Functional grouping of these genes and analysis of their physical and genetic interaction patterns bring new information on Glc7-regulated processes.

  5. A global test for gene-gene interactions based on random matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, H Robert; Amos, Christopher I; Moore, Jason H

    2016-12-01

    Statistical interactions between markers of genetic variation, or gene-gene interactions, are believed to play an important role in the etiology of many multifactorial diseases and other complex phenotypes. Unfortunately, detecting gene-gene interactions is extremely challenging due to the large number of potential interactions and ambiguity regarding marker coding and interaction scale. For many data sets, there is insufficient statistical power to evaluate all candidate gene-gene interactions. In these cases, a global test for gene-gene interactions may be the best option. Global tests have much greater power relative to multiple individual interaction tests and can be used on subsets of the markers as an initial filter prior to testing for specific interactions. In this paper, we describe a novel global test for gene-gene interactions, the global epistasis test (GET), that is based on results from random matrix theory. As we show via simulation studies based on previously proposed models for common diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer, our proposed GET method has superior performance characteristics relative to existing global gene-gene interaction tests. A glaucoma GWAS data set is used to demonstrate the practical utility of the GET method.

  6. CIDeR: multifactorial interaction networks in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Martin; Höhn, Veit; Brauner, Barbara; Dunger, Irmtraud; Fobo, Gisela; Frishman, Goar; Montrone, Corinna; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Waegele, Brigitte; Ruepp, Andreas

    2012-07-18

    The pathobiology of common diseases is influenced by heterogeneous factors interacting in complex networks. CIDeR http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/cider/ is a publicly available, manually curated, integrative database of metabolic and neurological disorders. The resource provides structured information on 18,813 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors extracted from the scientific literature. Systematic annotation and interactive graphical representation of disease networks make CIDeR a versatile knowledge base for biologists, analysis of large-scale data and systems biology approaches.

  7. Interaction Network, State Space and Control in Social Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aydogdu, Aylin; McQuade, Sean; Piccoli, Benedetto; Duteil, Nastassia Pouradier; Rossi, Francesco; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    In the present chapter we study the emergence of global patterns in large groups in first and second-order multi-agent systems, focusing on two ingredients that influence the dynamics: the interaction network and the state space. The state space determines the types of equilibrium that can be reached by the system. Meanwhile, convergence to specific equilibria depends on the connectivity of the interaction network and on the interaction potential. When the system does not satisfy the necessary conditions for convergence to the desired equilibrium, control can be exerted, both on finite-dimensional systems and on their mean-field limit.

  8. Gene perturbation and intervention in context-sensitive stochastic Boolean networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In a gene regulatory network (GRN), gene expressions are affected by noise, and stochastic fluctuations exist in the interactions among genes. These stochastic interactions are context dependent, thus it becomes important to consider noise in a context-sensitive manner in a network model. As a logical model, context-sensitive probabilistic Boolean networks (CSPBNs) account for molecular and genetic noise in the temporal context of gene functions. In a CSPBN with n genes and k contexts, however, a computational complexity of O(nk222n ) (or O(nk2 n )) is required for an accurate (or approximate) computation of the state transition matrix (STM) of the size (2 n ∙ k) × (2 n ∙ k) (or 2 n × 2 n ). The evaluation of a steady state distribution (SSD) is more challenging. Recently, stochastic Boolean networks (SBNs) have been proposed as an efficient implementation of an instantaneous PBN. Results The notion of stochastic Boolean networks (SBNs) is extended for the general model of PBNs, i.e., CSPBNs. This yields a novel structure of context-sensitive SBNs (CSSBNs) for modeling the stochasticity in a GRN. A CSSBN enables an efficient simulation of a CSPBN with a complexity of O(nLk2 n ) for computing the state transition matrix, where L is a factor related to the required sequence length in CSSBN for achieving a desired accuracy. A time-frame expanded CSSBN can further efficiently simulate the stationary behavior of a CSPBN and allow for a tunable tradeoff between accuracy and efficiency. The CSSBN approach is more efficient than an analytical method and more accurate than an approximate analysis. Conclusions Context-sensitive stochastic Boolean networks (CSSBNs) are proposed as an efficient approach to modeling the effects of gene perturbation and intervention in gene regulatory networks. A CSSBN analysis provides biologically meaningful insights into the oscillatory dynamics of the p53-Mdm2 network in a context-switching environment. It is shown that

  9. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Kuchaiev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H, tandem affinity purification (TAP and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  10. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; Cho, Michael H; Mancini, John D; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Beaty, Terri H; Hersh, Craig P; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A; Rennard, Stephen I; Perrella, Mark A; Choi, Augustine M K; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis.

  11. A Global Protein Kinase and Phosphatase Interaction Network in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Choi, Hyungwon; Sharom, Jeffrey R.; Boucher, Lorrie; Neduva, Victor; Larsen, Brett; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Stark, Chris; Liu, Guomin; Ahn, Jessica; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Reguly, Teresa; Tang, Xiaojing; Almeida, Ricardo; Qin, Zhaohui Steve; Pawson, Tony; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of protein kinases and phosphatases with their regulatory subunits and substrates underpin cellular regulation. We identified a kinase and phosphatase interaction (KPI) network of 1844 interactions in budding yeast by mass spectrometric analysis of protein complexes. The KPI network contained many dense local regions of interactions that suggested new functions. Notably, the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc14 associated with multiple kinases that revealed roles for Cdc14 in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, the DNA damage response, and metabolism, whereas interactions of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) uncovered new effector kinases in nitrogen and carbon metabolism. An extensive backbone of kinase-kinase interactions cross-connects the proteome and may serve to coordinate diverse cellular responses. PMID:20489023

  12. Pairwise interaction pattern in the weighted communication network

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiao-Ke; Wu, Ye; Small, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although recent studies show that both topological structures and human dynamics can strongly affect information spreading on social networks, the complicated interplay of the two significant factors has not yet been clearly described. In this work, we find a strong pairwise interaction based on analyzing the weighted network generated by the short message communication dataset within a Chinese tele-communication provider. The pairwise interaction bridges the network topological structure and human interaction dynamics, which can promote local information spreading between pairs of communication partners and in contrast can also suppress global information (e.g., rumor) cascade and spreading. In addition, the pairwise interaction is the basic pattern of group conversations and it can greatly reduce the waiting time of communication events between a pair of intimate friends. Our findings are also helpful for communication operators to design novel tariff strategies and optimize their communication services.

  13. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  14. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  15. A Study of Feature Interactions in Intelligent Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Plain Old Telephone Services (POTS) are used to establish the voice connection between two telephone users; and supplementary services such as call waiting, call forwarding, and call completion to busy subscribers, provide additional functions to POTS. In order to facilitate the communication between users, telecommunication networks should provide new services to end users in a quick way. However, the introduction of new telecommunication services into the existing network may interfere with the existing services, thus causing feature interactions. In many cases, feature interactions bring the unwanted or undesired system behavior to end users, decreasing the service quality. Although new technology like Intelligent Networks (IN) enables the quick introduction of new telecommunication services, but owing to the feature interaction, and the vast effort has to be put into checking the compatibility between telecommunication services. Feature interactions has become the bottle-neck problem to the development of new telecommunication services.

  16. How people interact in evolving online affiliation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gallos, Lazaros K; Liljeros, Fredrik; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernan A

    2011-01-01

    The study of human interactions is of central importance for understanding the behavior of individuals, groups and societies. Here, we observe the formation and evolution of networks by monitoring the addition of all new links and we analyze quantitatively the tendencies used to create ties in these evolving online affiliation networks. We first show that an accurate estimation of these probabilistic tendencies can only be achieved by following the time evolution of the network. For example, actions that are attributed to the usual friend of a friend mechanism through a static snapshot of the network are overestimated by a factor of two. A detailed analysis of the dynamic network evolution shows that half of those triangles were generated through other mechanisms, in spite of the characteristic static pattern. We start by characterizing every single link when the tie was established in the network. This allows us to describe the probabilistic tendencies of tie formation and extract sociological conclusions as...

  17. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Delprato

    Full Text Available Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  18. A scalable algorithm for structure identification of complex gene regulatory network from temporal expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shupeng; Rice, Andrew P; Chen, Rui; Wu, Liang; Liu, Ji; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-01-31

    Gene regulatory interactions are of fundamental importance to various biological functions and processes. However, only a few previous computational studies have claimed success in revealing genome-wide regulatory landscapes from temporal gene expression data, especially for complex eukaryotes like human. Moreover, recent work suggests that these methods still suffer from the curse of dimensionality if a network size increases to 100 or higher. Here we present a novel scalable algorithm for identifying genome-wide gene regulatory network (GRN) structures, and we have verified the algorithm performances by extensive simulation studies based on the DREAM challenge benchmark data. The highlight of our method is that its superior performance does not degenerate even for a network size on the order of 10(4), and is thus readily applicable to large-scale complex networks. Such a breakthrough is achieved by considering both prior biological knowledge and multiple topological properties (i.e., sparsity and hub gene structure) of complex networks in the regularized formulation. We also validate and illustrate the application of our algorithm in practice using the time-course gene expression data from a study on human respiratory epithelial cells in response to influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as well as the CHIP-seq data from ENCODE on transcription factor (TF) and target gene interactions. An interesting finding, owing to the proposed algorithm, is that the biggest hub structures (e.g., top ten) in the GRN all center at some transcription factors in the context of epithelial cell infection by IAV. The proposed algorithm is the first scalable method for large complex network structure identification. The GRN structure identified by our algorithm could reveal possible biological links and help researchers to choose which gene functions to investigate in a biological event. The algorithm described in this article is implemented in MATLAB (Ⓡ) , and the source code is

  19. Identification of the key regulating genes of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) by network and gene ontology analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaiasl, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is one of the reasons for infertility that not only affects both older and young women. Ovarian reserve assessment can be used as a new prognostic tool for infertility treatment decision making. Here, up- and down-regulated gene expression profiles of granulosa cells were analysed to generate a putative interaction map of the involved genes. In addition, gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to get insight intol the biological processes and molecular functions of involved proteins in DOR. Eleven up-regulated genes and nine down-regulated genes were identified and assessed by constructing interaction networks based on their biological processes. PTGS2, CTGF, LHCGR, CITED, SOCS2, STAR and FSTL3 were the key nodes in the up-regulated networks, while the IGF2, AMH, GREM, and FOXC1 proteins were key in the down-regulated networks. MIRN101-1, MIRN153-1 and MIRN194-1 inhibited the expression of SOCS2, while CSH1 and BMP2 positively regulated IGF1 and IGF2. Ossification, ovarian follicle development, vasculogenesis, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and golgi apparatus are the major differential groups between up-regulated and down-regulated genes in DOR. Meta-analysis of publicly available transcriptomic data highlighted the high coexpression of CTGF, connective tissue growth factor, with the other key regulators of DOR. CTGF is involved in organ senescence and focal adhesion pathway according to GO analysis. These findings provide a comprehensive system biology based insight into the aetiology of DOR through network and gene ontology analyses.

  20. Protein interaction networks--more than mere modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pinkert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that the modular organization of cellular function is reflected in a modular structure of molecular networks. A common view is that a "module" in a network is a cohesively linked group of nodes, densely connected internally and sparsely interacting with the rest of the network. Many algorithms try to identify functional modules in protein-interaction networks (PIN by searching for such cohesive groups of proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach independent of any prior definition of what actually constitutes a "module". In a self-consistent manner, proteins are grouped into "functional roles" if they interact in similar ways with other proteins according to their functional roles. Such grouping may well result in cohesive modules again, but only if the network structure actually supports this. We applied our method to the PIN from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD and found that a representation of the network in terms of cohesive modules, at least on a global scale, does not optimally represent the network's structure because it focuses on finding independent groups of proteins. In contrast, a decomposition into functional roles is able to depict the structure much better as it also takes into account the interdependencies between roles and even allows groupings based on the absence of interactions between proteins in the same functional role. This, for example, is the case for transmembrane proteins, which could never be recognized as a cohesive group of nodes in a PIN. When mapping experimental methods onto the groups, we identified profound differences in the coverage suggesting that our method is able to capture experimental bias in the data, too. For example yeast-two-hybrid data were highly overrepresented in one particular group. Thus, there is more structure in protein-interaction networks than cohesive modules alone and we believe this finding can significantly improve automated function

  1. Large-scale modeling of condition-specific gene regulatory networks by information integration and inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwanger, Daniel Christian; Leonhardt, Jörn Florian; Mewes, Hans-Werner

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how regulatory networks globally coordinate the response of a cell to changing conditions, such as perturbations by shifting environments, is an elementary challenge in systems biology which has yet to be met. Genome-wide gene expression measurements are high dimensional as these are reflecting the condition-specific interplay of thousands of cellular components. The integration of prior biological knowledge into the modeling process of systems-wide gene regulation enables the large-scale interpretation of gene expression signals in the context of known regulatory relations. We developed COGERE (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/cogere), a method for the inference of condition-specific gene regulatory networks in human and mouse. We integrated existing knowledge of regulatory interactions from multiple sources to a comprehensive model of prior information. COGERE infers condition-specific regulation by evaluating the mutual dependency between regulator (transcription factor or miRNA) and target gene expression using prior information. This dependency is scored by the non-parametric, nonlinear correlation coefficient η(2) (eta squared) that is derived by a two-way analysis of variance. We show that COGERE significantly outperforms alternative methods in predicting condition-specific gene regulatory networks on simulated data sets. Furthermore, by inferring the cancer-specific gene regulatory network from the NCI-60 expression study, we demonstrate the utility of COGERE to promote hypothesis-driven clinical research.

  2. Optimal finite horizon control in gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2013-06-01

    As a paradigm for modeling gene regulatory networks, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) form a subclass of Markov genetic regulatory networks. To date, many different stochastic optimal control approaches have been developed to find therapeutic intervention strategies for PBNs. A PBN is essentially a collection of constituent Boolean networks via a probability structure. Most of the existing works assume that the probability structure for Boolean networks selection is known. Such an assumption cannot be satisfied in practice since the presence of noise prevents the probability structure from being accurately determined. In this paper, we treat a case in which we lack the governing probability structure for Boolean network selection. Specifically, in the framework of PBNs, the theory of finite horizon Markov decision process is employed to find optimal constituent Boolean networks with respect to the defined objective functions. In order to illustrate the validity of our proposed approach, an example is also displayed.

  3. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  4. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Global Geometric Affinity for Revealing High Fidelity Protein Interaction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Benjamin, William; Sun, Mengtian; Ramani, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis presents an essential role in understanding the functional relationship among proteins in a living biological system. Despite the success of current approaches for understanding the PPI network, the large fraction of missing and spurious PPIs and a low coverage of complete PPI network are the sources of major concern. In this paper, based on the diffusion process, we propose a new concept of global geometric affinity and an accompanying computational scheme to filter the uncertain PPIs, namely, reduce the spurious PPIs and recover the missing PPIs in the network. The main concept defines a diffusion process in which all proteins simultaneously participate to define a similarity metric (global geometric affinity (GGA)) to robustly reflect the internal connectivity among proteins. The robustness of the GGA is attributed to propagating the local connectivity to a global representation of similarity among proteins in a diffusion process. The propagation process is extremely fast as only simple matrix products are required in this computation process and thus our method is geared toward applications in high-throughput PPI networks. Furthermore, we proposed two new approaches that determine the optimal geometric scale of the PPI network and the optimal threshold for assigning the PPI from the GGA matrix. Our approach is tested with three protein-protein interaction networks and performs well with significant random noises of deletions and insertions in true PPIs. Our approach has the potential to benefit biological experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries. PMID:21559288

  6. Indeterminacy of reverse engineering of Gene Regulatory Networks: the curse of gene elasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Krishnan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs have become a major focus of interest in recent years. A number of reverse engineering approaches have been developed to help uncover the regulatory networks giving rise to the observed gene expression profiles. However, this is an overspecified problem due to the fact that more than one genotype (network wiring can give rise to the same phenotype. We refer to this phenomenon as "gene elasticity." In this work, we study the effect of this particular problem on the pure, data-driven inference of gene regulatory networks. METHODOLOGY: We simulated a four-gene network in order to produce "data" (protein levels that we use in lieu of real experimental data. We then optimized the network connections between the four genes with a view to obtain the original network that gave rise to the data. We did this for two different cases: one in which only the network connections were optimized and the other in which both the network connections as well as the kinetic parameters (given as reaction probabilities in our case were estimated. We observed that multiple genotypes gave rise to very similar protein levels. Statistical experimentation indicates that it is impossible to differentiate between the different networks on the basis of both equilibrium as well as dynamic data. CONCLUSIONS: We show explicitly that reverse engineering of GRNs from pure expression data is an indeterminate problem. Our results suggest the unsuitability of an inferential, purely data-driven approach for the reverse engineering transcriptional networks in the case of gene regulatory networks displaying a certain level of complexity.

  7. Protein-protein interactions prediction based on iterative clique extension with gene ontology filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Cliques (maximal complete subnets) in protein-protein interaction (PPI) network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO) annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions Prediction Based on Iterative Clique Extension with Gene Ontology Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cliques (maximal complete subnets in protein-protein interaction (PPI network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  9. Global analysis of phase locking in gene expression during cell cycle: the potential in network modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessner Martin J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nonlinear dynamic systems, synchrony through oscillation and frequency modulation is a general control strategy to coordinate multiple modules in response to external signals. Conversely, the synchrony information can be utilized to infer interaction. Increasing evidence suggests that frequency modulation is also common in transcription regulation. Results In this study, we investigate the potential of phase locking analysis, a technique to study the synchrony patterns, in the transcription network modeling of time course gene expression data. Using the yeast cell cycle data, we show that significant phase locking exists between transcription factors and their targets, between gene pairs with prior evidence of physical or genetic interactions, and among cell cycle genes. When compared with simple correlation we found that the phase locking metric can identify gene pairs that interact with each other more efficiently. In addition, it can automatically address issues of arbitrary time lags or different dynamic time scales in different genes, without the need for alignment. Interestingly, many of the phase locked gene pairs exhibit higher order than 1:1 locking, and significant phase lags with respect to each other. Based on these findings we propose a new phase locking metric for network reconstruction using time course gene expression data. We show that it is efficient at identifying network modules of focused biological themes that are important to cell cycle regulation. Conclusions Our result demonstrates the potential of phase locking analysis in transcription network modeling. It also suggests the importance of understanding the dynamics underlying the gene expression patterns.

  10. CyTargetLinker: a cytoscape app to integrate regulatory interactions in network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kutmon

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The high complexity and dynamic nature of the regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein activity pose a challenge to fully understand the cellular machinery. By deciphering the role of important players, including transcription factors, microRNAs, or small molecules, a better understanding of key regulatory processes can be obtained. Various databases contain information on the interactions of regulators with their targets for different organisms, data recently being extended with the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project. A systems biology approach integrating our understanding on different regulators is essential in interpreting the regulation of molecular biological processes. IMPLEMENTATION: We developed CyTargetLinker (http://projects.bigcat.unimaas.nl/cytargetlinker, a Cytoscape app, for integrating regulatory interactions in network analysis. Recently we released CyTargetLinker as one of the first apps for Cytoscape 3. It provides a user-friendly and flexible interface to extend biological networks with regulatory interactions, such as microRNA-target, transcription factor-target and/or drug-target. Importantly, CyTargetLinker employs identifier mapping to combine various interaction data resources that use different types of identifiers. RESULTS: Three case studies demonstrate the strength and broad applicability of CyTargetLinker, (i extending a mouse molecular interaction network, containing genes linked to diabetes mellitus, with validated and predicted microRNAs, (ii enriching a molecular interaction network, containing DNA repair genes, with ENCODE transcription factor and (iii building a regulatory meta-network in which a biological process is extended with information on transcription factor, microRNA and drug regulation. CONCLUSIONS: CyTargetLinker provides a simple and extensible framework for biologists and bioinformaticians to integrate different regulatory interactions

  11. NEXT-GENERATION ANALYSIS OF CATARACTS: DETERMINING KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS USING BIOFILTER, AND GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS USING THE PHENX TOOLKIT*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Verma, Shefali S.; Holzinger, Emily R.; Moore, Carrie B.; Wallace, John; Dudek, Scott M.; Huggins, Wayne; Kitchner, Terrie; Waudby, Carol; Berg, Richard; McCarty, Catherine A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the association between biobank derived genomic data and the information of linked electronic health records (EHRs) is an emerging area of research for dissecting the architecture of complex human traits, where cases and controls for study are defined through the use of electronic phenotyping algorithms deployed in large EHR systems. For our study, 2580 cataract cases and 1367 controls were identified within the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) Biobank and linked EHR, which is a member of the NHGRI-funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network. Our goal was to explore potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within these data for 529,431 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency > 1%, in order to explore higher level associations with cataract risk beyond investigations of single SNP-phenotype associations. To build our SNP-SNP interaction models we utilized a prior-knowledge driven filtering method called Biofilter to minimize the multiple testing burden of exploring the vast array of interaction models possible from our extensive number of SNPs. Using the Biofilter, we developed 57,376 prior-knowledge directed SNP-SNP models to test for association with cataract status. We selected models that required 6 sources of external domain knowledge. We identified 5 statistically significant models with an interaction term with p-value < 0.05, as well as an overall model with p-value < 0.05 associated with cataract status. We also conducted gene-environment interaction analyses for all GWAS SNPs and a set of environmental factors from the PhenX Toolkit: smoking, UV exposure, and alcohol use; these environmental factors have been previously associated with the formation of cataracts. We found a total of 288 models that exhibit an interaction term with a p-value ≤ 1×10−4 associated with cataract status. Our results show these approaches enable advanced searches for epistasis

  12. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Recep; Moser, Flavia; Chu, Jeffrey Shih-Chieh; Schönhuth, Alexander; Chen, Nansheng; Ester, Martin

    2010-10-25

    Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules) from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustively annotated organisms. It has been well established, when analyzing these two data sources jointly, modules are often reflected by highly interconnected (dense) regions in the interaction networks whose participating genes are co-expressed. However, the tractability of the problem had remained unclear and methods by which to exhaustively search for such constellations had not been presented. We provide an algorithmic framework, referred to as Densely Connected Biclustering (DECOB), by which the aforementioned search problem becomes tractable. To benchmark the predictive power inherent to the approach, we computed all co-expressed, dense regions in physical protein and genetic interaction networks from human and yeast. An automatized filtering procedure reduces our output which results in smaller collections of modules, comparable to state-of-the-art approaches. Our results performed favorably in a fair benchmarking competition which adheres to standard criteria. We demonstrate the usefulness of an exhaustive module search, by using the unreduced output to more quickly perform GO term related function prediction tasks. We point out the advantages of our exhaustive output by predicting functional relationships using two examples. We demonstrate that the computation of all densely connected and co-expressed regions in interaction networks is an approach to module discovery of considerable value. Beyond confirming the well settled hypothesis that such co-expressed, densely connected interaction network regions reflect functional modules, we open up novel computational ways to comprehensively analyze the modular organization of an organism based on prevalent and largely available large

  13. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Colak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustively annotated organisms. It has been well established, when analyzing these two data sources jointly, modules are often reflected by highly interconnected (dense regions in the interaction networks whose participating genes are co-expressed. However, the tractability of the problem had remained unclear and methods by which to exhaustively search for such constellations had not been presented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provide an algorithmic framework, referred to as Densely Connected Biclustering (DECOB, by which the aforementioned search problem becomes tractable. To benchmark the predictive power inherent to the approach, we computed all co-expressed, dense regions in physical protein and genetic interaction networks from human and yeast. An automatized filtering procedure reduces our output which results in smaller collections of modules, comparable to state-of-the-art approaches. Our results performed favorably in a fair benchmarking competition which adheres to standard criteria. We demonstrate the usefulness of an exhaustive module search, by using the unreduced output to more quickly perform GO term related function prediction tasks. We point out the advantages of our exhaustive output by predicting functional relationships using two examples. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the computation of all densely connected and co-expressed regions in interaction networks is an approach to module discovery of considerable value. Beyond confirming the well settled hypothesis that such co-expressed, densely connected interaction network regions reflect functional modules, we open up novel computational ways to comprehensively analyze

  14. Validation of Gene Regulatory Network Inference Based on Controllability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eDougherty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are two distinct issues regarding network validation: (1 Does an inferred network provide good predictions relative to experimental data? (2 Does a network inference algorithm applied within a certain network model framework yield networks that are accurate relative to some criterion of goodness? The first issue concerns scientific validation and the second concerns algorithm validation. In this paper we consider inferential validation relative to controllability; that is, if an inference procedure is applied to synthetic data generated from a gene regulatory network and an intervention procedure is designed on the inferred network, how well does it perform on the true network? The reasoning behind such a criterion is that, if our purpose is to use gene regulatory networks to design therapeutic intervention strategies, then we are not concerned with network fidelity, per se, but only with our ability to design effective interventions based on the inferred network. We will consider the problem from the perspectives of stationary control, which involves designing a control policy to be applied over time based on the current state of the network, with the decision procedure itself being time independent. {The objective of a control policy is to optimally reduce the total steady-state probability mass of the undesirable states (phenotypes, which is equivalent to optimally increasing the total steady-state mass of the desirable states. Based on this criterion we compare several proposed network inference procedures. We will see that inference procedure psi may perform poorer than inference procedure xi relative to inferring the full network structure but perform better than xi relative to controllability. Hence, when one is aiming at a specific application, it may be wise to use an objective-based measure of inference validity.

  15. Gene-based and semantic structure of the Gene Ontology as a complex network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronnello, Claudia; Tumminello, Michele; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The last decade has seen the advent and consolidation of ontology based tools for the identification and biological interpretation of classes of genes, such as the Gene Ontology. The Gene Ontology (GO) is constantly evolving over time. The information accumulated time-by-time and included in the GO is encoded in the definition of terms and in the setting up of semantic relations amongst terms. Here we investigate the Gene Ontology from a complex network perspective. We consider the semantic network of terms naturally associated with the semantic relationships provided by the Gene Ontology consortium. Moreover, the GO is a natural example of bipartite network of terms and genes. Here we are interested in studying the properties of the projected network of terms, i.e. a gene-based weighted network of GO terms, in which a link between any two terms is set if at least one gene is annotated in both terms. One aim of the present paper is to compare the structural properties of the semantic and the gene-based network. The relative importance of terms is very similar in the two networks, but the community structure changes. We show that in some cases GO terms that appear to be distinct from a semantic point of view are instead connected, and appear in the same community when considering their gene content. The identification of such gene-based communities of terms might therefore be the basis of a simple protocol aiming at improving the semantic structure of GO. Information about terms that share large gene content might also be important from a biomedical point of view, as it might reveal how genes over-expressed in a certain term also affect other biological processes, molecular functions and cellular components not directly linked according to GO semantics.

  16. Disease-aging network reveals significant roles of aging genes in connecting genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Shihua; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-09-01

    One of the challenging problems in biology and medicine is exploring the underlying mechanisms of genetic diseases. Recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic diseases and the aging process is important in understanding the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Although some intricate associations have been investigated for a long time, the studies are still in their early stages. In this paper, we construct a human disease-aging network to study the relationship among aging genes and genetic disease genes. Specifically, we integrate human protein-protein interactions (PPIs), disease-gene associations, aging-gene associations, and physiological system-based genetic disease classification information in a single graph-theoretic framework and find that (1) human disease genes are much closer to aging genes than expected by chance; and (2) diseases can be categorized into two types according to their relationships with aging. Type I diseases have their genes significantly close to aging genes, while type II diseases do not. Furthermore, we examine the topological characters of the disease-aging network from a systems perspective. Theoretical results reveal that the genes of type I diseases are in a central position of a PPI network while type II are not; (3) more importantly, we define an asymmetric closeness based on the PPI network to describe relationships between diseases, and find that aging genes make a significant contribution to associations among diseases, especially among type I diseases. In conclusion, the network-based study provides not only evidence for the intricate relationship between the aging process and genetic diseases, but also biological implications for prying into the nature of human diseases.

  17. Identification of the BRD1 interaction network and its impact on mental disorder risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fryland, Tue; Christensen, Jane H.; Pallesen, Jonatan;

    2016-01-01

    interactions of the BRD1 isoforms, BRD1-S and BRD1-L. Methods: Stable human cell lines expressing epitope tagged BRD1-S and BRD1-L were generated and used as discovery systems for identifying protein and chromatin interactions. Protein-protein interactions were identified using co-immunoprecipitation followed...... and regulates expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved with brain development and susceptibility to mental disorders. Our findings indicate that BRD1 acts as a regulatory hub in a comprehensive schizophrenia risk network which plays a role in many brain regions throughout life, implicating e...

  18. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simonyan, Kristina; Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce...

  19. Developmental evolution in social insects: regulatory networks from genes to societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linksvayer, Timothy A; Fewell, Jennifer H; Gadau, Jürgen; Laubichler, Manfred D

    2012-05-01

    The evolution and development of complex phenotypes in social insect colonies, such as queen-worker dimorphism or division of labor, can, in our opinion, only be fully understood within an expanded mechanistic framework of Developmental Evolution. Conversely, social insects offer a fertile research area in which fundamental questions of Developmental Evolution can be addressed empirically. We review the concept of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that aims to fully describe the battery of interacting genomic modules that are differentially expressed during the development of individual organisms. We discuss how distinct types of network models have been used to study different levels of biological organization in social insects, from GRNs to social networks. We propose that these hierarchical networks spanning different organizational levels from genes to societies should be integrated and incorporated into full GRN models to elucidate the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms underlying social insect phenotypes. Finally, we discuss prospects and approaches to achieve such an integration.

  20. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  1. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  2. Dissecting regulatory networks in host-pathogen interaction using chIP-on-chip technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Claudia; Grainger, David C; Cole, Stewart T

    2009-05-08

    Understanding host-microbe interactions has been greatly enhanced by our broadening knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms at the heart of pathogenesis. The "transcriptomics" approach of measuring global gene expression has identified genes involved in bacteria