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Sample records for gene family evidence

  1. Segregation Analysis of 231 Ashkenazi Jewish Families for Evidence of Additional Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David J. Kaufman; Terri H. Beaty; Jeffery P. Struewing

    2003-01-01

    .... Using segregation analysis, families of cases without BRCA1/2 mutations were studied for statistical evidence of another major breast cancer gene in a community-based sample of Jewish probands tested...

  2. Segregation analysis of 231 Ashkenazi Jewish families for evidence of additional breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David J; Beaty, Terri H; Struewing, Jeffery P

    2003-10-01

    Between 5 and 10% of breast cancer is attributable to inherited cancer susceptibility genes. Mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for two-thirds of hereditary breast cancer cases. Using segregation analysis, families of cases without BRCA1/2 mutations were studied for statistical evidence of another major breast cancer gene in a community-based sample of Jewish probands tested previously for the presence of three BRCA founder mutations. A total of 231 probands with breast cancer, who do not carry a founder mutation, reported complete data on 602 female first-degree relatives of probands over age 20; 78 of these relatives had breast cancer. Segregation analysis was used to evaluate the likelihood of various genetic and nongenetic models. Sporadic, environmental, and general Mendelian genetic models fit the family data poorly and were rejected. A Mendelian recessive model fit better than dominant and codominant models, although none of these could be rejected. Cumulative incidence curves predicted by the recessive and codominant models fit observed incidence among first-degree relatives well. The assumption of Mendelian transmission of a major recessive gene(s) is compatible with the data. The recessive model predicts that 4% of women would carry the high-risk genotype, with 85% of them developing breast cancer by age 70. There was significant heterogeneity between these families and the 114 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families from the same study population, implying that this apparent recessive effect is not because of undetected BRCA1/2 mutations. The study adds support for a major autosomal recessive component to breast cancer susceptibility.

  3. Evidence for susceptibility genes to familial Wilms tumour in addition to WT1, FWT1 and FWT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapley, E A; Barfoot, R; Bonaïti-Pellié, C; Chompret, A; Foulkes, W; Perusinghe, N; Reeve, A; Royer-Pokora, B; Schumacher, V; Shelling, A; Skeen, J; Tourreil, S de; Weirich, A; Pritchard-Jones, K; Stratton, M R; Rahman, N

    2000-01-01

    Three loci have been implicated in familial Wilms tumour: WT1 located on chromosome 11p13, FWT1 on 17q12-q21, and FWT2 on 19q13. Two out of 19 Wilms tumour families evaluated showed strong evidence against linkage at all three loci. Both of these families contained at least three cases of Wilms tumour indicating that they were highly likely to be due to genetic susceptibility and therefore that one or more additional familial Wilms tumour susceptibility genes remain to be found. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901367

  4. Evidence for major gene inheritance of Alzheimer disease in families of patients with and without Apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, V.S.; Auerbach, S.A.; Farrer, L.A. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is the single most important determinant to the common form of Alzheimer disease (AD) yet identified. Several studies show that family history of AD is not entirely accounted for by APOE genotype. Also, there is evidence for an interaction between APOE genotype and gender. We carried out a complex segregation analysis in 636 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands in the Multi-Institutional Research in Alzheimer Genetic Epidemiology study in order to derive models of disease transmission which account for the influences of APOE genotype of the proband and gender. In the total group of families, models postulating sporadic occurrence, no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, and Mendelian inheritance were rejected. Transmission of AD in families of probands with at least one {epsilon}4 allele best fit a dominant model. Moreover, single gene inheritance best explained clustering of the disorder in families of probands lacking E4, but a more complex genetic model or multiple genetic models may ultimately account for risk in this group of families. Our results also suggest that susceptibility to AD differs between men and women regardless of the proband`s APOE status. Assuming a dominant model, AD appears to be completely penetrant in women, whereas only 62%-65% of men with predisposing genotypes develop AD. However, parameter estimates from the arbitrary major gene model suggests that AD is expressed dominantly in women and additively in men. These observations, taken together with epidemiologic data, are consistent with the hypothesis of an interaction between genes and other biological factors affecting disease susceptibility. 76 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Gene Cluster Statistics with Gene Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dannie

    2009-01-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such “gene clusters” is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  6. Further mapping of the properdin deficiency gene in a Tunisian Jewish family--evidence for genetic homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, S; Johnson, C; Shohat, M; Shohat, T; Schlesinger, M

    1994-08-01

    The properdin deficiency gene has been localized to Xp21.1-Xcen; however, it is not clear whether the mutation responsible for the disease co-maps exactly with the structural properdin gene. Based on a recent study on a total of six families, the gene was found linked to DXS255 (theta = 0.00). As only a few families have been studied, it is not known whether the same gene is responsible for the disease in all families. In order to better localize the disease gene in Israel, we studied a Tunisian Jewish family with properdin deficiency for linkage with various X-markers. A maximum lod score of 1.93 at theta = 0.00 was calculated with the DXS7 probe while there was one recombination with DXS255. This study helps to better localize the properdin deficiency gene to Xp11.3-p21.1 proximal to DXS255 locus and confirms that there is no indication of genetic heterogeneity. Whether the properdin structural gene (PFC) and properdin deficiency locus are one and the same await demonstration of mutations in the structural gene in patients with properdin deficiency.

  7. The plant ADH gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strommer, Judith

    2011-04-01

    The structures, evolution and functions of alcohol dehydrogenase gene families and their products have been scrutinized for half a century. Our understanding of the enzyme structure and catalytic activity of plant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-P) is based on the vast amount of information available for its animal counterpart. The probable origins of the enzyme from a simple β-coil and eventual emergence from a glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase have been well described. There is compelling evidence that the small ADH gene families found in plants today are the survivors of multiple rounds of gene expansion and contraction. To the probable original function of their products in the terminal reaction of anaerobic fermentation have been added roles in yeast-like aerobic fermentation and the production of characteristic scents that act to attract animals that serve as pollinators or agents of seed dispersal and to protect against herbivores.

  8. Evidence, from family studies, for linkage disequilibrium between TGFA and a gene for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Hongshu; Lee, A.; Gasser, D.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sassani, R.; Bartlett, S.P. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buetow, K.H. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hecht, J.T. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Malcolm, S.; Winter, R.M.; Vintiner, G.M. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    The inheritance of alleles of the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) locus has been studied in families affected with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), by using the transmission/disequilibrium test described by Spielman and colleagues. Only heterozygous parents with an affected child can be included in this test, but within such families a significantly greater frequency of C2 alleles were transmitted to affected children than would be expected by chance. There was no evidence that the total number of C2 alleles transmitted to affected and unaffected children differed significantly from random segregation. These data provide evidence from within families that a gene for susceptibility to CL/P is in significant linkage disequilibrium with the C2 allele of the TGFA locus. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Evidence of associations between cytokine genes and subjective reports of sleep disturbance in oncology patients and their family caregivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Miaskowski

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to identify distinct latent classes of individuals based on subjective reports of sleep disturbance; to examine differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics between the latent classes; and to evaluate for variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between the latent classes. Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two latent classes. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effect of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on GSDS group membership. Two latent classes were identified: lower sleep disturbance (88.5% and higher sleep disturbance (11.5%. Participants who were younger and had a lower Karnofsky Performance status score were more likely to be in the higher sleep disturbance class. Variation in two cytokine genes (i.e., IL6, NFKB predicted latent class membership. Evidence was found for latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance trajectories. Unique genetic markers in cytokine genes may partially explain the interindividual heterogeneity characterizing these trajectories.

  10. IS HEMOGLOBIN E GENE WIDELY SPREAD IN THE STATE OF MADHYA PRADESH IN CENTRAL INDIA? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE TYPICAL FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Balgir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell inherited hemoglobin anomalies are commonly encountered in the central region of India. These cause a public health concern due to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and fetal loss in the backward, underprivileged, and vulnerable people. Purpose: To report five typical families of hemoglobin E disorders identified for the first time in the state of Madhya Pradesh from central India. Methods: Out of a total of 445 couples/families (excluding the present study with 1526 persons (848 males and 678 females referred from a tertiary hospital in central India for investigations of anemia/hemoglobinopathies during the period from March 2010 to February 2014, we came across five typical rare couples/families of hemoglobin E disorders worthy of detailed investigations. Laboratory investigations were carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control from time to time. Results: For the first time, we have encountered nine cases of heterozygous hemoglobin E trait, two members with hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia (double heterozygosity, two cases of sickle cell-hemoglobin E disease (double heterozygosity, and none with homozygous hemoglobin E. Cases  of hemoglobin E trait, hemoglobin E-β-thalassemia, sickle cell-β-thalassemia and sickle cell-E disease showed moderate to severe anemia, and target cells, and reduced values of red cell indices like RBC, Hb level, HCT, MCV, MCH and MCHC, representing abnormal hematological profile and clinical manifestations before blood transfusion. Conclusions: Double heterozygosity for hemoglobinopathies such as occurrence of β-thalassemia mutation with structurally abnormal hemoglobins (Hb S and Hb E is a rare entity, but occurs with severe clinical manifestations only in those areas or communities where these are highly prevalent, testifying the migrations and genetic admixture. Distribution of hemoglobin E and β-thalassemia in different districts of Madhya Pradesh

  11. Early evolutionary colocalization of the nuclear ribosomal 5S and 45S gene families in seed plants: evidence from the living fossil gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián, J A; Rosato, M; Rosselló, J A

    2012-06-01

    In seed plants, the colocalization of the 5S loci within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the nuclear 45S tandem units is restricted to the phylogenetically derived Asteraceae family. However, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) colocalization of both multigene families has also been observed in other unrelated seed plant lineages. Previous work has identified colocalization of 45S and 5S loci in Ginkgo biloba using FISH, but these observations have not been confirmed recently by sequencing a 1.8 kb IGS. In this work, we report the presence of the 45S-5S linkage in G. biloba, suggesting that in seed plants the molecular events leading to the restructuring of the ribosomal loci are much older than estimated previously. We obtained a 6.0 kb IGS fragment showing structural features of functional sequences, and a single copy of the 5S gene was inserted in the same direction of transcription as the ribosomal RNA genes. We also obtained a 1.8 kb IGS that was a truncate variant of the 6.0 kb IGS lacking the 5S gene. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the 1.8 kb variants are pseudogenes that are present exclusively on the satellite chromosomes bearing the 45S-5S genes. The presence of ribosomal IGS pseudogenes best reconciles contradictory results concerning the presence or absence of the 45S-5S linkage in Ginkgo. Our finding that both ribosomal gene families have been unified to a single 45S-5S unit in Ginkgo indicates that an accurate reassessment of the organization of rDNA genes in basal seed plants is necessary.

  12. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  13. Evidence for association between Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 gene polymorphisms and autism in Chinese Han population: a family-based association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Yan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 gene is one of the most promising candidate genes for major mental disorders. In a previous study, a Finnish group demonstrated that DISC1 polymorphisms were associated with autism and Asperger syndrome. However, the results were not replicated in Korean population. To determine whether DISC1 is associated with autism in Chinese Han population, we performed a family-based association study between DISC1 polymorphisms and autism. Methods We genotyped seven tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in DISC1, spanning 338 kb, in 367 autism trios (singleton and their biological parents including 1,101 individuals. Single SNP association and haplotype association analysis were performed using the family-based association test (FBAT and Haploview software. Results We found three SNPs showed significant associations with autism (rs4366301: G > C, Z = 2.872, p = 0.004; rs11585959: T > C, Z = 2.199, p = 0.028; rs6668845: A > G, Z = 2.326, p = 0.02. After the Bonferroni correction, SNP rs4366301, which located in the first intron of DISC1, remained significant. When haplotype were constructed with two-markers, three haplotypes displayed significant association with autism. These results were still significant after using the permutation method to obtain empirical p values. Conclusions Our study provided evidence that the DISC1 may be the susceptibility gene of autism. It suggested DISC1 might play a role in the pathogenesis of autism.

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis vast BspA-like gene family: evidence for functional diversity from structural organisation and transcriptomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Noel, CJ; Diaz, N

    2010-01-01

    were characterized by a considerable structural diversity between their TpLRR and other types of repetitive sequences and two subfamilies possessed distinct classic sorting signal motifs for endocytosis. One TvBspA subfamily also shared a glycine-rich protein domain with proteins from Clostridium...... difficile pathogenic strains and C. difficile phages. Consistent with the hypothesis that TvBspA protein structural diversity implies diverse roles, we demonstrated for several TvBspA genes differential expression at the transcript level in different growth conditions. Identified variants of repetitive...... were also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The biased mucosal habitat for microbial species encoding BspA-like proteins, the characterization of a vast structural diversity for the TvBspA proteins, differential expression of a subset of TvBspA genes and the cellular localisation and immunological data...

  15. Linkage of 35S and 5S rRNA genes in Artemisia (family Asteraceae): first evidence from angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sònia; Lim, K Yoong; Chester, Michael; Garnatje, Teresa; Pellicer, Jaume; Vallès, Joan; Leitch, Andrew R; Kovarík, Ales

    2009-02-01

    Typically in plants, the 5S and 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) encoding two major ribosomal RNA species occur at separate loci. However, in some algae, bryophytes and ferns, they are at the same locus (linked arranged). Southern blot hybridisation, polymerase chain reactions (PCR), fluorescent in situ hybridisation, cloning and sequencing were used to reveal 5S and 35S rDNA genomic organisation in Artemisia. We observed thousands of rDNA units at two-three loci containing 5S rDNA in an inverted orientation within the inter-genic spacer (IGS) of 35S rDNA. The sequenced clones of 26-18S IGS from Artemisia absinthium appeared to contain a conserved 5S gene insertion proximal to the 26S gene terminus (5S rDNA-1) and a second less conserved 5S insertion (5S rDNA-2) further downstream. Whilst the 5S rDNA-1 showed all the structural features of a functional gene, the 5S-rDNA-2 had a deletion in the internal promoter and probably represents a pseudogene. The linked arrangement probably evolved before the divergence of Artemisia from the rest of Asteraceae (>10 Myrs). This arrangement may have involved retrotransposons and once formed spread via mechanisms of concerted evolution. Heterogeneity in unit structure may reflect ongoing homogenisation of variant unit types without fixation for any particular variant.

  16. Further Evidence of Mutational Heterogeneity of the XPC Gene in Tunisian Families: A Spectrum of Private and Ethnic Specific Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Ben Rekaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive autosomal cancer prone disease, characterized by UV hypersensitivity and early appearance of cutaneous and ocular malignancies. We investigated four unrelated patients suspected to be XP-C. To confirm linkage to XPC gene, genotyping and direct sequencing of XPC gene were performed. Pathogenic effect of novel mutations was confirmed by reverse Transciptase PCR. Mutation screening revealed the presence of two novel mutations g.18246G>A and g.18810G>T in the XPC gene (NG_011763.1. The first is present in one patient XP50NEF, but the second is present in three unrelated patients (XP16KEB, XP28SFA, and XP45GB. These 3 patients are from three different cities of Southern Tunisia and bear the same haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. Reverse Transciptase PCR revealed the absence of the XPC mRNA. In Tunisia, as observed in an other severe genodermatosis, the mutational spectrum of XP-C group seems to be homogeneous with some clusters of heterogeneity that should be taken into account to improve molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  17. The Insect SNMP Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    B 1 ( b o v ) Clade 3 - SNMPs Clade 2 Clade 1 CD36 Insect (Holometabola) CD36 Gene family Holometabola Phylogeny (11 Orders) Tribolium castaneum...melanogaster genes (see Nichols and Vogt, 2008). Bootstrap support (1000 replicates) is indicated for the major clades. B. Phylogeny of holometabolous...A. aegypti eggs were graciously provided by Mark Brown (University of Georgia, Department of Entomology) and raised on a larval diet (pond fish food

  18. Cardiac Paraganglioma Arising From the Right Atrioventricular Groove in a Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Family Syndrome With Evidence of SDHB Gene Mutation: An Unusual Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Forno, Benedetto; Zingaro, Carlo; Di Palma, Enza; Capestro, Filippo; Rescigno, Giuseppe; Torracca, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Primary cardiac paragangliomas are extremely rare. Recently this neoplasm has been associated with a familiar syndrome as a result of mutation of genes that encode proteins in the mitochondrial complex II. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman having cases of vertebral paraganglioma in her family showing an unusual anatomic and clinical presentation of cardiac paraganglioma and expressing a genetic mutation never associated before with cardiac localization of this neoplasm.

  19. Cloning of human RTEF-1, a transcriptional enhancer factor-1-related gene preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle: evidence for an ancient multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A F; Richard, C W; Suzow, J; Stephan, D; Weremowicz, S; Morton, C C; Adra, C N

    1996-10-01

    Transcriptional Enhancer Factor-1 (TEF-1) is a transcription factor required for cardiac muscle gene activation. Since ablation of TEF-1 does not abolish cardiac gene expression, we sought to identify a human gene related to TEF-1 (RTEF-1) that might also participate in cardiac gene regulation. A human heart cDNA library was screened to obtain a full-length RTEF-1 cDNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned the RTEF-1 gene to chromosome 12p13.2-p13.3. In contrast, PCR screening of human/rodent cell hybrid panels identified TEF-1 on chromosome 11p15.2, between D11S1315 and D11S1334, extending a region of known synteny between human chromosomes 11 and 12 and arguing for an ancient divergence between these two closely related genes. Northern blot analysis revealed a striking similarity in the tissue distribution of RTEF-1 and TEF-1 mRNAs; skeletal muscle showed the highest abundance of both mRNAs, with lower levels detected in pancreas, placenta, and heart. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TEF-1-related proteins identified human RTEF-1 as one of four vertebrate members of this multigene family and further suggests that these genes diverged in the earliest metazoan ancestors.

  20. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  1. Molecular phylogenetics of the family Cyprinidae (Actinopterygii: Cypriniformes) as evidenced by sequence variation in the first intron of S7 ribosomal protein-coding gene: further evidence from a nuclear gene of the systematic chaos in the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shunping; Mayden, Richard L; Wang, Xuzheng; Wang, Wei; Tang, Kevin L; Chen, Wei-Jen; Chen, Yiyu

    2008-03-01

    The family Cyprinidae is the largest freshwater fish group in the world, including over 200 genera and 2100 species. The phylogenetic relationships of major clades within this family are simply poorly understood, largely because of the overwhelming diversity of the group; however, several investigators have advanced different hypotheses of relationships that pre- and post-date the use of shared-derived characters as advocated through phylogenetic systematics. As expected, most previous investigations used morphological characters. Recently, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and combined morphological and mtDNA investigations have been used to explore and advance our understanding of species relationships and test monophyletic groupings. Limitations of these studies include limited taxon sampling and a strict reliance upon maternally inherited mtDNA variation. The present study is the first endeavor to recover the phylogenetic relationships of the 12 previously recognized monophyletic subfamilies within the Cyprinidae using newly sequenced nuclear DNA (nDNA) for over 50 species representing members of the different previously hypothesized subfamily and family groupings within the Cyprinidae and from other cypriniform families as outgroup taxa. Hypothesized phylogenetic relationships are constructed using maximum parsimony and Basyesian analyses of 1042 sites, of which 971 sites were variable and 790 were phylogenetically informative. Using other appropriate cypriniform taxa of the families Catostomidae (Myxocyprinus asiaticus), Gyrinocheilidae (Gyrinocheilus aymonieri), and Balitoridae (Nemacheilus sp. and Beaufortia kweichowensis) as outgroups, the Cyprinidae is resolved as a monophyletic group. Within the family the genera Raiamas, Barilius, Danio, and Rasbora, representing many of the tropical cyprinids, represent basal members of the family. All other species can be classified into variably supported and resolved monophyletic lineages, depending upon analysis

  2. The evolution of mammalian gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery P Demuth

    Full Text Available Gene families are groups of homologous genes that are likely to have highly similar functions. Differences in family size due to lineage-specific gene duplication and gene loss may provide clues to the evolutionary forces that have shaped mammalian genomes. Here we analyze the gene families contained within the whole genomes of human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, and dog. In total we find that more than half of the 9,990 families present in the mammalian common ancestor have either expanded or contracted along at least one lineage. Additionally, we find that a large number of families are completely lost from one or more mammalian genomes, and a similar number of gene families have arisen subsequent to the mammalian common ancestor. Along the lineage leading to modern humans we infer the gain of 689 genes and the loss of 86 genes since the split from chimpanzees, including changes likely driven by adaptive natural selection. Our results imply that humans and chimpanzees differ by at least 6% (1,418 of 22,000 genes in their complement of genes, which stands in stark contrast to the oft-cited 1.5% difference between orthologous nucleotide sequences. This genomic "revolving door" of gene gain and loss represents a large number of genetic differences separating humans from our closest relatives.

  3. Structure and expression of the maize (Zea mays L. SUN-domain protein gene family: evidence for the existence of two divergent classes of SUN proteins in plants

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    Simmons Carl R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear envelope that separates the contents of the nucleus from the cytoplasm provides a surface for chromatin attachment and organization of the cortical nucleoplasm. Proteins associated with it have been well characterized in many eukaryotes but not in plants. SUN (Sad1p/Unc-84 domain proteins reside in the inner nuclear membrane and function with other proteins to form a physical link between the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton. These bridges transfer forces across the nuclear envelope and are increasingly recognized to play roles in nuclear positioning, nuclear migration, cell cycle-dependent breakdown and reformation of the nuclear envelope, telomere-led nuclear reorganization during meiosis, and karyogamy. Results We found and characterized a family of maize SUN-domain proteins, starting with a screen of maize genomic sequence data. We characterized five different maize ZmSUN genes (ZmSUN1-5, which fell into two classes (probably of ancient origin, as they are also found in other monocots, eudicots, and even mosses. The first (ZmSUN1, 2, here designated canonical C-terminal SUN-domain (CCSD, includes structural homologs of the animal and fungal SUN-domain protein genes. The second (ZmSUN3, 4, 5, here designated plant-prevalent mid-SUN 3 transmembrane (PM3, includes a novel but conserved structural variant SUN-domain protein gene class. Mircroarray-based expression analyses revealed an intriguing pollen-preferred expression for ZmSUN5 mRNA but low-level expression (50-200 parts per ten million in multiple tissues for all the others. Cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA for a PM3-type maize gene, ZmSUN4, is described. Peptide antibodies to ZmSUN3, 4 were used in western-blot and cell-staining assays to show that they are expressed and show concentrated staining at the nuclear periphery. Conclusions The maize genome encodes and expresses at least five different SUN-domain proteins, of which the PM3

  4. Teaching evidence based medicine in family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of evidence based medicine (EBM as the integrationof clinical expertise, patient values and the best evidence was introduced by David Sackett in the 1980’s. Scientific literature in medicine is often marked by expansion, acummulation and quick expiration. Reading all important articles to keep in touch with relevant information is impossible. Finding the best evidence that answers a clinical question in general practice (GP in a short time is not easy. Five useful steps are described –represented by the acronym “5A+E”: assess, ask, acquire, appraise, apply and evaluate.The habit of conducting an evidence search “on the spot’’ is proposed. Although students of medicine at University of Split School of Medicine are taught EBM from the first day of their study and in all courses, their experience of evidence-searching and critical appraisal of the evidence, in real time with real patient is inadequate. Teaching the final-year students the practical use of EBM in a GP’s office is different and can have an important role in their professional development. It can positively impact on quality of their future work in family practice (or some other medical specialty by acquiring this habit of constant evidence-checking to ensure that best practice becomes a mechanism for life-long learning. Conclusion. EBM is a foundation stone of every branch of medicine and important part of Family Medicine as scientific and professional discipline. To have an EB answer resulting from GP’s everyday work is becoming a part of everyday practice.

  5. Evidence for schizophrenia susceptibility alleles in the Indian population: An association of neurodevelopmental genes in case-control and familial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajodia, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet; Kumari, Kalpana; Gupta, Meenal; Baghel, Ruchi; Srivastava, Ankit; Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence of ~1% worldwide. A genotyping study was conducted using a custom panel of Illumina 1536 SNPs in 840 schizophrenia cases and 876 controls (351 patients and 385 controls from North India; and 436 patients, 401 controls and 143 familial samples with 53 probands containing 37 complete and 16 incomplete trios from South India). Meta-analysis of this population of Indo-European and Dravidian ancestry identified three strongly associated variants with schizophrenia: STT3A (rs548181, p=1.47×10(-5)), NRG1 (rs17603876, p=8.66×10(-5)) and GRM7 (rs3864075, p=4.06×10(-3)). Finally, a meta-analysis was conducted comparing our data with data from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC-SCZ) that supported rs548181 (p=1.39×10(-7)). In addition, combined analysis of sporadic case-control association and a transmission disequilibrium test in familial samples from South Indian population identified three associations: rs1062613 (p=3.12×10(-3)), a functional promoter variant of HTR3A; rs6710782 (p=3.50×10(-3)), an intronic variant of ERBB4; and rs891903 (p=1.05×10(-2)), an intronic variant of EBF1. The results support the risk variants observed in the earlier published work and suggest a potential role of neurodevelopmental genes in the schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  6. Lineage-specific expansion of IFIT gene family: an insight into coevolution with IFN gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    Full Text Available In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system.

  7. Evolution of the mammalian lysozyme gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biegel Jason M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysozyme c (chicken-type lysozyme has an important role in host defense, and has been extensively studied as a model in molecular biology, enzymology, protein chemistry, and crystallography. Traditionally, lysozyme c has been considered to be part of a small family that includes genes for two other proteins, lactalbumin, which is found only in mammals, and calcium-binding lysozyme, which is found in only a few species of birds and mammals. More recently, additional testes-expressed members of this family have been identified in human and mouse, suggesting that the mammalian lysozyme gene family is larger than previously known. Results Here we characterize the extent and diversity of the lysozyme gene family in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse mammals, and show that this family contains at least eight different genes that likely duplicated prior to the diversification of extant mammals. These duplicated genes have largely been maintained, both in intron-exon structure and in genomic context, throughout mammalian evolution. Conclusions The mammalian lysozyme gene family is much larger than previously appreciated and consists of at least eight distinct genes scattered around the genome. Since the lysozyme c and lactalbumin proteins have acquired very different functions during evolution, it is likely that many of the other members of the lysozyme-like family will also have diverse and unexpected biological properties.

  8. Avocado cellulase: nucleotide sequence of a putative full-length cDNA clone and evidence for a small gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, M L; Durbin, M L; Clegg, M T; Lewis, L N

    1987-05-01

    A cDNA library was prepared from ripe avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill. cv. Hass) and screened for clones hybridizing to a 600 bp cDNA clone (pAV5) coding for avocado fruit cellulase. This screening led to the isolation of a clone (pAV363) containing a 2021 nucleotide transcribed sequence and an approximately 150 nucleotide poly(A) tail. Hybridization of pAV363 to a northern blot shows that the length of the homologous message is approximately 2.2 kb. The nucleotide sequence of this putative full-length mRNA clone contains an open reading frame of 1482 nucleotides which codes for a polypeptide of 54.1 kD. The deduced amino acid composition compares favorably with the amino acid composition of native avocado cellulase determined by amino acid analysis. Southern blot analysis of Hind III and Eco RI endonuclease digested genomic DNA indicates a small family of cellulase genes.

  9. Dynamic Actin Gene Family Evolution in Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liucun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through “birth and death” model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of Acheilognathidae (Cypriniformes: Cyprinoidea) as revealed from evidence of both nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequence variation: evidence for necessary taxonomic revision in the family and the identification of cryptic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Li, Fan; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Morosawa, Takahiro; Kim, Sungmin; Koo, Hyeyoung; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae-Seong; He, Shunping; Smith, Carl; Reichard, Martin; Miya, Masaki; Sado, Tetsuya; Uehara, Kazuhiko; Lavoué, Sébastien; Chen, Wei-Jen; Mayden, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    Bitterlings are relatively small cypriniform species and extremely interesting evolutionarily due to their unusual reproductive behaviors and their coevolutionary relationships with freshwater mussels. As a group, they have attracted a great deal of attention in biological studies. Understanding the origin and evolution of their mating system demands a well-corroborated hypothesis of their evolutionary relationships. In this study, we provide the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of species relationships of the group based on partitioned maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods using DNA sequence variation of nuclear and mitochondrial genes on 41 species, several subspecies and three undescribed species. Our findings support the monophyly of the Acheilognathidae. Two of the three currently recognized genera are not monophyletic and the family can be subdivided into six clades. These clades are further regarded as genera based on both their phylogenetic relationships and a reappraisal of morphological characters. We present a revised classification for the Acheilognathidae with five genera/lineages: Rhodeus, Acheilognathus (new constitution), Tanakia (new constitution), Paratanakia gen. nov., and Pseudorhodeus gen. nov. and an unnamed clade containing five species currently referred to as "Acheilognathus". Gene trees of several bitterling species indicate that the taxa are not monophyletic. This result highlights a potentially dramatic underestimation of species diversity in this family. Using our new phylogenetic framework, we discuss the evolution of the Acheilognathidae relative to classification, taxonomy and biogeography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of the Vertebrate Resistin Gene Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qingda; Tan, Huanran; Irwin, David M

    2015-01-01

    Resistin (encoded by Retn) was previously identified in rodents as a hormone associated with diabetes; however human resistin is instead linked to inflammation. Resistin is a member of a small gene family that includes the resistin-like peptides (encoded by Retnl genes) in mammals. Genomic searches of available genome sequences of diverse vertebrates and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine the size and origin of the resistin-like gene family. Genes encoding peptides similar to resistin were found in Mammalia, Sauria, Amphibia, and Actinistia (coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish), but not in Aves or fish from Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, or Agnatha. Retnl originated by duplication and transposition from Retn on the early mammalian lineage after divergence of the platypus, but before the placental and marsupial mammal divergence. The resistin-like gene family illustrates an instance where the locus of origin of duplicated genes can be identified, with Retn continuing to reside at this location. Mammalian species typically have a single copy Retn gene, but are much more variable in their numbers of Retnl genes, ranging from 0 to 9. Since Retn is located at the locus of origin, thus likely retained the ancestral expression pattern, largely maintained its copy number, and did not display accelerated evolution, we suggest that it is more likely to have maintained an ancestral function, while Retnl, which transposed to a new location, displays accelerated evolution, and shows greater variability in gene number, including gene loss, likely evolved new, but potentially lineage-specific, functions.

  12. Evolution of the Vertebrate Resistin Gene Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingda Hu

    Full Text Available Resistin (encoded by Retn was previously identified in rodents as a hormone associated with diabetes; however human resistin is instead linked to inflammation. Resistin is a member of a small gene family that includes the resistin-like peptides (encoded by Retnl genes in mammals. Genomic searches of available genome sequences of diverse vertebrates and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine the size and origin of the resistin-like gene family. Genes encoding peptides similar to resistin were found in Mammalia, Sauria, Amphibia, and Actinistia (coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish, but not in Aves or fish from Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, or Agnatha. Retnl originated by duplication and transposition from Retn on the early mammalian lineage after divergence of the platypus, but before the placental and marsupial mammal divergence. The resistin-like gene family illustrates an instance where the locus of origin of duplicated genes can be identified, with Retn continuing to reside at this location. Mammalian species typically have a single copy Retn gene, but are much more variable in their numbers of Retnl genes, ranging from 0 to 9. Since Retn is located at the locus of origin, thus likely retained the ancestral expression pattern, largely maintained its copy number, and did not display accelerated evolution, we suggest that it is more likely to have maintained an ancestral function, while Retnl, which transposed to a new location, displays accelerated evolution, and shows greater variability in gene number, including gene loss, likely evolved new, but potentially lineage-specific, functions.

  13. Actin gene family in Branchiostoma belched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein that is found in essentially all eukaryotic cells,which plays a paramount role in several basic functions of the organism, such as the maintenance of cellshape, cell division, cell mobility and muscle contraction. However, little is known about actin gene family inChinese amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri). Here we systemically analyzed the actin genes family inBranchiostoma belched and found that amphioxus contains 33 actin genes. These genes have undergoneextensive expansion through tandem duplications by phylogenetic analysis. In addition, we also providedevidence indicating that actin genes have divergent functions by specializing their EST data in both Bran-chiostoma belched and Branchiostoma florida. Our results provided an alternative explanation for the evolu-tion of actin genes, and gave new insights into their functional roles.

  14. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  15. The Popeye domain-containing gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The Popeye domain-containing gene family has been isolated on the basis of a subtractive screen aiming at the identification of novel genes with a heart-restricted gene expression pattern. The gene family codes for membrane proteins containing three transmembrane domains. The carboxy-terminal part of the protein is localized to the cytoplasm and contains a protein domain with high sequence conservation named the Popeye domain. This domain is involved in protein homo dimerization. The gene family is expressed in heart and skeletal muscle cells as well as smooth muscle cells. In addition, Popdc genes are expressed in other cell types such as neuronal cells in restricted areas of the brain, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia, and in various epithelial cells. Recently, it has been proposed that Popdc proteins may function as a novel family of adhesion proteins. That the expression pattern has been conserved during evolution and is very similar in all vertebrate classes and also in basal chordates suggests that Popdc proteins play an important role in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  16. Inactivation of promoter 1B of APC causes partial gene silencing: evidence for a significant role of the promoter in regulation and causative of familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, A; Engwall, Y; Fritzell, K

    2011-01-01

    of this promoter in the largest family (Family 1) of the Swedish Polyposis Registry. The mutation leads to an imbalance in allele-specific expression of APC, and transcription from promoter 1B was highly impaired in both normal colorectal mucosa and blood from mutation carriers. To establish the significance...... in a panel of 20 various normal tissues examined. In FAP-related tumors, the APC germline mutation is proposed to dictate the second hit. Mutations leaving two or three out of seven 20-amino-acid repeats in the central domain of APC intact seem to be required for tumorigenesis. We examined adenomas from...

  17. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-03-01

      Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, alpha 1C subunit (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population.   This study included 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the USA, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9-kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software.   An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15).   Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  19. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  20. Quantification of PKC family genes in sporadic breast cancer by qRT-PCR: evidence that PKCι/λ overexpression is an independent prognostic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadelkarim, Khalid Dafaallah; Callens, Céline; Rossé, Carine; Susini, Aurélie; Vacher, Sophie; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Bièche, Ivan

    2012-12-15

    Drugs targeting protein kinase C (PKC) show promising therapeutic activity. However, little is known about the expression patterns of the 11 PKC genes in human tumors, and the clinical significance of most PKC genes is unknown. We used qRT-PCR assays to quantify mRNA levels of the 11 PKC genes in 458 breast tumors from patients with known clinical/pathological status and long-term outcome. The proportion of tumors in which the expression of the different genes was altered varied widely, from 9.6% for PKN2 to 40.2% for PKCι/λ. In breast tumors, overexpression was the main alteration observed for PKCι/λ (33.4%), PKCδ (29.5%) and PKCζ (9.6%), whereas underexpression was the main alteration observed for PKCα (27.3%), PKCε (11.6%), PKCη (8.7%) and PKN2 (8.1%). Both overexpression and underexpression were observed for PKCβ (underexpression 15.5%, overexpression 13.8%), PKCθ (underexpression 14.8%, overexpression 10.0%) and PKN1 (underexpression 6.6%, overexpression 7.4%). Several links were found between different PKC genes; and also between the expression patterns of PKC genes and several classical pathological and clinical parameters. PKCι/λ alone was found to have prognostic significance (p = 0.043), whereas PKCα showed a trend towards an influence on relapse-free survival (p = 0.052). PKCι/λ retained its prognostic significance in Cox multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.031). These results reveal very complex expression patterns of PKC genes in breast tumors, and suggest that their expression should be considered together when evaluating anti-tumoral drugs. PKCι/λ seems to be the most promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  1. Reg gene family and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Zhang; Liu-Song Ding; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg or REG) family, within the superfamily of C-type lectin, is mainly involved in the liver,pancreatic, gastric and intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation. Considerable attention has focused on Reg family and its structurally related molecules. Over the last 15 years, 17 members of the Reg family have been cloned and sequenced. They have been considered as members of a conserved protein family sharing structural and some functional properties being involved in injury, inflammation,diabetes and carcinogenesis. We previously identified Reg Ⅳ as a strong candidate for a gene that was highly expressed in colorectal adenoma when compared to normal mucosa based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH),reverse Northern blot, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)and Northern blot. In situ hybridization results further support that overexpression of Reg Ⅳ may be an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. We suggest that detection of Reg Ⅳ overexpression might be useful in the early diagnosis of carcinomatous transformation of adenoma.This review summarizes the roles of Reg family in diseases in the literature as well as our recent results of Reg Ⅳ in colorectal cancer. The biological properties of Reg family and its possible roles in human diseases are discussed. We particularly focus on the roles of Reg family as sensitive reactants of tissue injury, prognostic indicators of tumor survival and early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. In addition to our current understanding of Reg gene functions, we postulate that there might be relationships between Reg family and microsatellite instability, apoptosis and cancer with a poor prognosis. Investigation of the correlation between tumor Reg expression and survival rate, and analysis of the Reg gene status in human maliganancies, are required to elucidate the biologic consequences of Reg gene expression, the implications for Reg gene regulation of cell growth, tumorigenesis

  2. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox gene family in legumes: identification, gene duplication and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that are known to play a major role in different aspects of plant growth and development. In the present study, we identified homeobox genes belonging to 14 different classes in five legume species, including chickpea, soybean, Medicago, Lotus and pigeonpea. The characteristic differences within homeodomain sequences among various classes of homeobox gene family were quite evident. Genome-wide expression analysis using publicly available datasets (RNA-seq and microarray) indicated that homeobox genes are differentially expressed in various tissues/developmental stages and under stress conditions in different legumes. We validated the differential expression of selected chickpea homeobox genes via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Genome duplication analysis in soybean indicated that segmental duplication has significantly contributed in the expansion of homeobox gene family. The Ka/Ks ratio of duplicated homeobox genes in soybean showed that several members of this family have undergone purifying selection. Moreover, expression profiling indicated that duplicated genes might have been retained due to sub-functionalization. The genome-wide identification and comprehensive gene expression profiling of homeobox gene family members in legumes will provide opportunities for functional analysis to unravel their exact role in plant growth and development.

  3. Molecular evolution of PKD2 gene family in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chun; Sun, Huan; Guo, Wenhu; Wei, Yuquan; Zhou, Qin

    2009-09-01

    PKD2 gene encodes a critical cation channel protein that plays important roles in various developmental processes and is usually evolutionarily conserved. In the present study, we analyzed the evolutionary patterns of PKD2 and its homologous genes (PKD2L1, PKD2L2) from nine mammalian species. In this study, we demonstrated the orthologs of PKD2 gene family evolved under a dominant purifying selection force. Our results in combination with the reported evidences from functional researches suggested the entire PKD2 gene family are conserved and perform essential biological roles during mammalian evolution. In rodents, PKD2 gene family members appeared to have evolved more rapidly than other mammalian lineages, probably resulting from relaxation of purifying selection. However, positive selection imposed on synonymous sites also potentially contributed to this case. For the paralogs, our results implied that PKD2L2 genes evolved under a weaker purifying selection constraint than PKD2 and PKD2L1 genes. Interestingly, some loop regions of transmembrane domain of PKD2L2 exhibited higher P (N)/P (S) ratios than expected, suggesting these regions are more functional divergent in organisms and worthy of special attention.

  4. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  5. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates-singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein-protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation.

  6. Molecular analysis of the APC gene in 205 families: extended genotype-phenotype correlations in FAP and evidence for the role of APC amino acid changes in colorectal cancer predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, Y.; Morton, D; McKeown, C; Macdonald, F

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—The development of colorectal cancer and a variable range of extracolonic manifestations in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is the result of the dominant inheritance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations. In this study, direct mutation analysis of the APC gene was performed to determine genotype-phenotype correlations for nine extracolonic manifestations and to investigate the incidence of APC mutations in non-FAP colorectal cancer.
METHODS—The APC gene was a...

  7. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  8. No Evidence for Association between Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghandehari Motlagh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited tooth disorder. Despite the fact that up to now, several gene muta­tions in MMP20, ENAM, AMELX and KLK4 genes have been reported to be associated with AI, many other genes sug­gested to be involved. The main objective of this study was to find the mutations in three major candidate genes including MMP20, ENAM and KLK4 responsible for AI from three Iranian families with generalized hypoplastic phenotype in all teeth. "nMethods: All exon/intron boundaries of subjected genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing."nResults: One polymorphisms was identified in KLK4 exon 2, in one family a homozygous mutation was found in the third base of codon 22 for serine (TCG>TCT, but not in other families. Although these base substitutions have been occurred in the signaling domain, they do not seem to influence the activity of KLK4 protein."nConclusion: Our results might support the further evidence for genetic heterogeneity; at least, in some AI cases are not caused by a gene in these reported candidate genes.

  9. The gene for familial Mediterranean fever in both Armenians and non-Ashkenazi Jews is linked to the alpha-globin complex on 16p: evidence for locus homogeneity.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recurrent inflammatory disorder characterized by short episodes of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis. While FMF has been shown to be inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion in both non-Ashkenazi Jews and Armenian families, clinical differences have raised the possibility of genetic heterogeneity. As its pathogenesis is unknown, mapping of the gene for FMF may provide the first objective method for early and accurate diagnosis of this dise...

  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals diverged patterns of codon bias, gene expression, and rates of sequence evolution in picea gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2015-03-05

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms.

  11. Tumor suppressor genes in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghifar, Nahal; Farrokhi, Naser; Naji, Tahereh; Zali, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is mostly due to a series of genetic alterations that are being greatly under the influence of the environmental factors. These changes, mutational or epigenetic modifications at transcriptional forefront and/or post-transcriptional effects via miRNAs, include inactivation and the conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Here, a thorough review was carried out on the role of TSGs with the focus on the APC as the master regulator, mutated genes and mal-/dysfunctional pathways that lead to one type of hereditary form of the CRC; namely familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). This review provides a venue towards defining candidate genes that can be used as new PCR-based markers for early diagnosis of FAP. In addition to diagnosis, defining the modes of genetic alterations will open door towards genome editing to either suppress the disease or reduce its progression during the course of action.

  12. The Pax gene family: Highlights from cephalopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratte, Sébastien; Andouche, Aude; Bonnaud-Ponticelli, Laure

    2017-01-01

    Pax genes play important roles in Metazoan development. Their evolution has been extensively studied but Lophotrochozoa are usually omitted. We addressed the question of Pax paralog diversity in Lophotrochozoa by a thorough review of available databases. The existence of six Pax families (Pax1/9, Pax2/5/8, Pax3/7, Pax4/6, Paxβ, PoxNeuro) was confirmed and the lophotrochozoan Paxβ subfamily was further characterized. Contrary to the pattern reported in chordates, the Pax2/5/8 family is devoid of homeodomain in Lophotrochozoa. Expression patterns of the three main pax classes (pax2/5/8, pax3/7, pax4/6) during Sepia officinalis development showed that Pax roles taken as ancestral and common in metazoans are modified in S. officinalis, most likely due to either the morphological specificities of cephalopods or to their direct development. Some expected expression patterns were missing (e.g. pax6 in the developing retina), and some expressions in unexpected tissues have been found (e.g. pax2/5/8 in dermal tissue and in gills). This study underlines the diversity and functional plasticity of Pax genes and illustrates the difficulty of using probable gene homology as strict indicator of homology between biological structures. PMID:28253300

  13. Familial Hypercholesterolemia: The Lipids or the Genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemer Georges M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH is a common cause of premature cardiovascular disease and is often undiagnosed in young people. Although the disease is diagnosed clinically by high LDL cholesterol levels and family history, to date there are no single internationally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of FH. Several genes have been shown to be involved in FH; yet determining the implications of the different mutations on the phenotype remains a hard task. The polygenetic nature of FH is being enhanced by the discovery of new genes that serve as modifiers. Nevertheless, the picture is still unclear and many unknown genes contributing to the phenotype are most likely involved. Because of this evolving polygenetic nature, the diagnosis of FH by genetic testing is hampered by its cost and effectiveness. In this review, we reconsider the clinical versus genetic nomenclature of FH in the literature. After we describe each of the genetic causes of FH, we summarize the known correlation with phenotypic measures so far for each genetic defect. We then discuss studies from different populations on the genetic and clinical diagnoses of FH to draw helpful conclusions on cost-effectiveness and suggestions for diagnosis.

  14. The gene for familial Mediterranean fever in both Armenians and non-Ashkenzai Jews is linked to the [alpha]-globin complex on 16p: Evidence for locus homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shohat, M.; Shohat, T.; Magal, N.; Danon, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Xiangdong Bu; Fischel-Ghodsian, N.; Schwabe, A.D.; Rotter, J.I. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Nakamura, Yusuke (Cancer Inst., Tokyo (Japan)); Schlezinger, M. (Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon (Israel))

    1992-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recurrent inflammatory disorder characterized by short episodes of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis. While FMF has been shown to be inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion in both non-Ashkenazi Jews and Armenian families, clinical differences have raised the possibility of genetic heterogeneity. As its pathogenesis is unknown, mapping of the gene for FMF may provide the first objective method for early and accurate diagnosis of this disease. After excluding 45% of the entire human genome, the authors studied 14 Armenian and 9 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families with FMF and tested linkage with the [alpha]-globin locus on chromosome 16. Analysis of the PvuII length polymorphism of the 3[prime] HVR (hypervariable region) probe showed significant linkage with the FMF gene (maximum lod score [lod[sub max

  15. PRODH gene is associated with executive function in schizophrenic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaohong; Hu, Xun; Wang, Yingcheng; Yan, Chengying; Meng, Huaqing; Liu, Xiehe; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A

    2008-07-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in the PRODH and COMT genes and selected neurocognitive functions. Six SNPs in PRODH and two SNPs in COMT were genotyped in 167 first-episode schizophrenic families who had been assessed by a set of 14 neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological measures were selected as quantitative traits for association analysis. The haplotype of SNPs PRODH 1945T/C and PRODH 1852G/A was associated with impaired performance on the Tower of Hanoi, a problem-solving task mainly reflecting planning capacity. There was no significant evidence for association with any other neuropsychological traits for other SNPs or haplotypes of paired SNPs in the two genes. This study takes previous findings of association between PRODH and schizophrenia further by associating variation within the gene with performance on a neurocognitive trait characteristic of the illness. It fails to confirm previous reports of an association between COMT and cognitive function.

  16. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-10-18

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P[Formula: see text]) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P [Formula: see text]). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects.

  17. Differential gene regulation by the SRC family of coactivators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaZhang; XiaYi; Xiaojingsun; NaYin; BinShi; HuijianWu; DanWang; GeWu; YongfengShang

    2005-01-01

    SRCs (steroid receptor coactivatorsl are required for nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and are also implicated in the transcription initiation by other transcription factors, such as STATs and NFKB. Despite phenotypic manifestations in gene knockout mice for SRC-1, GRIP1, and AIB1 of the SRC (Steroid Receptor Coactivator) family indicating their differential roles in animal physiology, there is no clear evidence, at the molecular level, to support a functional specificity for these proteins. We demonstrated in this report that two species of SRC coactivators, either as AIBI:GRIP1 or as AIBI:SRC-1 are recruited, possibly through heterodimerization, on the promoter of genes that contain a classical hormone responsive element (HRE). In contrast, on non-HRE-containing gene promoters, on which steroid receptors bind indirectly, either GRIP1 orSRC-1 is recruited as a monomer, depending on the cellular abundance of the protein. Typically, non-HRE-containing genes are early genes activated by steroid receptors, whereas HRE-containing genes are activated later. Our results also showed that SRC proteins contribute to the temporal regulation of gene transcription. In addition, our experiments revealed a positive correlation between AIB1/c-myc overexpression in ER+ breast carcinoma samples, suggesting a possible mechanism for AIB1/n breast cancer carcinogenesis.

  18. Familial adenomatous polyposis associated APC gene mutation - A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Bardia1, Santosh K. Tiwari1, Sandeep K. Vishwakarma1, Md. Aejaz Habeeb1, Pratibha Nallari2, Aleem A. Khan1

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by diffuse intestinal polyposis, specific gene mutation, and predisposition for developing colon cancer. Left untreated, patients with FAP will develop colorectal carcinoma during early adulthood. Hence, early detection and surgical intervention are of the utmost importance. Colectomy is required and may include an ileal pouch with ileo-anal anastomosis, which eli-minates the colon and rectal disease while preserving fecal continence and avoidance of a permanent ileostomy. We report a case of colorectal cancer along with FAP showed features consistent with adenomatous polyposis coli and no evidence of malignancy was seen after the surgery.

  19. The mammalian PYHIN gene family: Phylogeny, evolution and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cridland Jasmyn A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of the mammalian PYHIN (IFI200/HIN-200 family are involved in defence against infection through recognition of foreign DNA. The family member absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 binds cytosolic DNA via its HIN domain and initiates inflammasome formation via its pyrin domain. AIM2 lies within a cluster of related genes, many of which are uncharacterised in mouse. To better understand the evolution, orthology and function of these genes, we have documented the range of PYHIN genes present in representative mammalian species, and undertaken phylogenetic and expression analyses. Results No PYHIN genes are evident in non-mammals or monotremes, with a single member found in each of three marsupial genomes. Placental mammals show variable family expansions, from one gene in cow to four in human and 14 in mouse. A single HIN domain appears to have evolved in the common ancestor of marsupials and placental mammals, and duplicated to give rise to three distinct forms (HIN-A, -B and -C in the placental mammal ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses showed that AIM2 HIN-C and pyrin domains clearly diverge from the rest of the family, and it is the only PYHIN protein with orthology across many species. Interestingly, although AIM2 is important in defence against some bacteria and viruses in mice, AIM2 is a pseudogene in cow, sheep, llama, dolphin, dog and elephant. The other 13 mouse genes have arisen by duplication and rearrangement within the lineage, which has allowed some diversification in expression patterns. Conclusions The role of AIM2 in forming the inflammasome is relatively well understood, but molecular interactions of other PYHIN proteins involved in defence against foreign DNA remain to be defined. The non-AIM2 PYHIN protein sequences are very distinct from AIM2, suggesting they vary in effector mechanism in response to foreign DNA, and may bind different DNA structures. The PYHIN family has highly varied gene composition between

  20. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Hanyun; Liu, Ying; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong; Shu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome-wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high-throughput sequencing-data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA-seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome-wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula. PMID:27049397

  1. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen‐activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome‐wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high‐throughput sequencing‐data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA‐seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome‐wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula.

  2. The tomato cis-prenyltransferase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Tariq A; Matsuba, Yuki; Schauvinhold, Ines; Yu, Geng; Lees, Hazel A; Klein, Samuel E; Pichersky, Eran

    2013-02-01

    cis-prenyltransferases (CPTs) are predicted to be involved in the synthesis of long-chain polyisoprenoids, all with five or more isoprene (C5) units. Recently, we identified a short-chain CPT, neryl diphosphate synthase (NDPS1), in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Here, we searched the tomato genome and identified and characterized its entire CPT gene family, which comprises seven members (SlCPT1-7, with NDPS1 designated as SlCPT1). Six of the SlCPT genes encode proteins with N-terminal targeting sequences, which, when fused to GFP, mediated GFP transport to the plastids of Arabidopsis protoplasts. The SlCPT3-GFP fusion protein was localized to the cytosol. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant SlCPT proteins demonstrated that SlCPT6 produces Z,Z-FPP, and SlCPT2 catalyzes the formation of nerylneryl diphosphate while SlCPT4, SlCPT5 and SlCPT7 synthesize longer-chain products (C25-C55). Although no in vitro activity was demonstrated for SlCPT3, its expression in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dolichol biosynthesis mutant (rer2) complemented the temperature-sensitive growth defect. Transcripts of SlCPT2, SlCPT4, SlCPT5 and SlCPT7 are present at low levels in multiple tissues, SlCPT6 is exclusively expressed in red fruit and roots, and SlCPT1, SlCPT3 and SlCPT7 are highly expressed in trichomes. RNAi-mediated suppression of NDPS1 led to a large decrease in β-phellandrene (which is produced from neryl diphosphate), with greater reductions achieved with the general 35S promoter compared to the trichome-specific MKS1 promoter. Phylogenetic analysis revealed CPT gene families in both eudicots and monocots, and showed that all the short-chain CPT genes from tomato (SlCPT1, SlCPT2 and SlCPT6) are closely linked to terpene synthase gene clusters.

  3. Mutation screening of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xu Liu; Yu Li; Xue-Dong Jiang; Hong-Nian Yin; Lin Zhang; Yu Wang; Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To shed light on the possible role of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer (FEC).METHODS: A total of 66 members from 10 families suggestive of a genetic predisposition to hereditary esophageal cancer were screened for germline mutations in Mlh3 with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a newly developed method of comparative sequencing based on heteroduplex detection. For all samples exhibiting abnormal DHPLC profiles,sequence changes were evaluated by cycle sequencing.For any mutation in family members, we conducted a segregation study to compare its prevalence in sporadic esophageal cancer patients and normal controls.RESULTS: Exons of Mlh3 in all samples were successfully examined. Overall, 4 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were identified in 4 families. Mlh3 missense mutations in families 9 and 10 might be pathogenic, but had a reduced penetrance. While in families 1 and 7,there was no sufficient evidence supporting the monogenic explanations of esophageal cancers in families.The mutations were found in 33% of high-risk families and 50% of low-risk families.CONCLUSION: Mlh3 is a high risk gene with a reduced penetrance in some families. However, it acts as a low risk gene for esophageal cancer in most families. Mutations of Mlh3 may work together with other genes in an accumulated manner and result in an increased risk of esophageal tumor. DHPLC is a robust and sensitive technique for screening gene mutations.

  4. The roles of gene duplication, gene conversion and positive selection in rodent Esp and Mup pheromone gene families with comparison to the Abp family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Three proteinaceous pheromone families, the androgen-binding proteins (ABPs), the exocrine-gland secreting peptides (ESPs) and the major urinary proteins (MUPs) are encoded by large gene families in the genomes of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. We studied the evolutionary histories of the Mup and Esp genes and compared them with what is known about the Abp genes. Apparently gene conversion has played little if any role in the expansion of the mouse Class A and Class B Mup genes and pseudogenes, and the rat Mups. By contrast, we found evidence of extensive gene conversion in many Esp genes although not in all of them. Our studies of selection identified at least two amino acid sites in β-sheets as having evolved under positive selection in the mouse Class A and Class B MUPs and in rat MUPs. We show that selection may have acted on the ESPs by determining K(a)/K(s) for Exon 3 sequences with and without the converted sequence segment. While it appears that purifying selection acted on the ESP signal peptides, the secreted portions of the ESPs probably have undergone much more rapid evolution. When the inner gene converted fragment sequences were removed, eleven Esp paralogs were present in two or more pairs with K(a)/K(s) >1.0 and thus we propose that positive selection is detectable by this means in at least some mouse Esp paralogs. We compare and contrast the evolutionary histories of all three mouse pheromone gene families in light of their proposed functions in mouse communication.

  5. The child health/family income gradient: Evidence from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Alison; Shields, Michael A; Price, Stephen Wheatley

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies using Canadian and US data have documented a positive relationship between family income and child health, with the slope of the gradient being larger for older than younger children [Case, A., Lubotsky, D., Paxson, C., 2002. Economic status and health in childhood: the origins of the gradient. American Economic Review 92, 1308-1334; Currie, J., Stabile, M., 2003. Socioeconomic status and child health: why is the relationship stronger for older children? American Economic Review 93, 1813-1823]. In this paper we explore whether or not these findings hold for England, analysing a sample of over 13,000 children (and their parents) drawn from the Health Survey for England. While we find consistent and robust evidence of a significant family income gradient in child health, using the subjective general health status measure, the slope of the gradient is very small. Moreover, we find no evidence that the slope of the gradient increases with child age. Furthermore, we find no evidence of such a gradient with more objective measures, based on nurse examinations and blood test results. Together these results suggest that family income is not a major determinant of child health in England. Finally, we provide some evidence that nutrition and family lifestyle choices have an important role in determining child health and that child health is highly correlated within the family.

  6. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  7. Success of Family Company: Critical Evidence from the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Petlina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article The purpose of the paper is to define the point of family company’s success. The object of research is family business as an economical phenomenon. There is a double subject of this study: firstly, to find out the main resources, from which information about successful companies can be detected and, secondly, to analyze one big family company as case study for identification its key success factors. Methodology/methods The article was prepared on the basis of general theoretical scientific methods, in particular analysis, synthesis, analogy, comparison, generalizations, deduction and methods of expert estimates. In the first phase secondary research of scientific literature and electronic resources about the paper topic was conducted. On the base of that result, the primary research was conduct, which is based on analysis of family company E. & J. Gallo Winery. Based on the received information, the key success factors were identified. The sources of the research are internet web-pages of the company, articles about company in famous Czech business magazines and scientific journals form Emerald database, reports of company and financial data from Amadeus database and The Global Family Business Index. Scientific aim The aim of scientific research is to improve the understanding of family company’s success from the perspective of difficulties faced by family company. Findings The results of this study allowed the finding of a main point for the family company’s success based on review of key sources about successful family companies. In addition, activity of E. & J. Gallo Winery was analyzed as the case study for critical evidence that phenomenon. Conclusions This study has contributed to the theoretical body of family business research providing an important first step to gaining insights into the family company’s success and its key factors which influence effective functioning of family company.

  8. Generalizability of the NAMI Family-to-Family Education Program: Evidence From an Efficacy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Micaela; Fuss, Ashley Ann; Sawano, Nanaho; Gensemer, Alexandra; Brennan, Wendy; McManus, Kinsey; Dixon, Lisa B; Haselden, Morgan; Cleek, Andrew F

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies conducted in Maryland of the Family-to-Family (FTF) education program of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) found that FTF reduced subjective burden and distress and improved empowerment, mental health knowledge, self-care, and family functioning, establishing it as an evidence-based practice. In the study reported here, the FTF program of NAMI-NYC Metro was evaluated. Participants (N=83) completed assessments at baseline and at completion of FTF. Participants had improved family empowerment, family functioning, engagement in self-care activities, self-perception of mental health knowledge, and emotional acceptance as a form of coping. Scores for emotional support and positive reframing also improved significantly. Displeasure in caring for the family member, a measure of subjective burden, significantly declined. Despite the lack of a control group and the limited sample size, this study further supports the efficacy of FTF with a diverse urban population.

  9. Complexity of the MSG gene family of Pneumocystis carinii

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    Stringer James R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between the parasitic fungus Pneumocystis carinii and its host, the laboratory rat, presumably involves features that allow the fungus to circumvent attacks by the immune system. It is hypothesized that the major surface glycoprotein (MSG gene family endows Pneumocystis with the capacity to vary its surface. This gene family is comprised of approximately 80 genes, which each are approximately 3 kb long. Expression of the MSG gene family is regulated by a cis-dependent mechanism that involves a unique telomeric site in the genome called the expression site. Only the MSG gene adjacent to the expression site is represented by messenger RNA. Several P. carinii MSG genes have been sequenced, which showed that genes in the family can encode distinct isoforms of MSG. The vast majority of family members have not been characterized at the sequence level. Results The first 300 basepairs of MSG genes were subjected to analysis herein. Analysis of 581 MSG sequence reads from P. carinii genomic DNA yielded 281 different sequences. However, many of the sequence reads differed from others at only one site, a degree of variation consistent with that expected to be caused by error. Accounting for error reduced the number of truly distinct sequences observed to 158, roughly twice the number expected if the gene family contains 80 members. The size of the gene family was verified by PCR. The excess of distinct sequences appeared to be due to allelic variation. Discounting alleles, there were 73 different MSG genes observed. The 73 genes differed by 19% on average. Variable regions were rich in nucleotide differences that changed the encoded protein. The genes shared three regions in which at least 16 consecutive basepairs were invariant. There were numerous cases where two different genes were identical within a region that was variable among family members as a whole, suggesting recombination among family members. Conclusion A

  10. Exclusion of known gene for enamel development in two Brazilian families with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria C L G; Hart, P Suzanne; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Kanno, Cláudia M; Hart, Thomas C; Line, Sergio R P

    2007-01-31

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in defective development of tooth enamel. Mutations in several enamel proteins and proteinases have been associated with AI. The object of this study was to evaluate evidence of etiology for the six major candidate gene loci in two Brazilian families with AI. Genomic DNA was obtained from family members and all exons and exon-intron boundaries of the ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, MMP20, KLK4 and Amelotin gene were amplified and sequenced. Each family was also evaluated for linkage to chromosome regions known to contain genes important in enamel development. The present study indicates that the AI in these two families is not caused by any of the known loci for AI or any of the major candidate genes proposed in the literature. These findings indicate extensive genetic heterogeneity for non-syndromic AI.

  11. Exclusion of known gene for enamel development in two Brazilian families with amelogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that result in defective development of tooth enamel. Mutations in several enamel proteins and proteinases have been associated with AI. The object of this study was to evaluate evidence of etiology for the six major candidate gene loci in two Brazilian families with AI. Genomic DNA was obtained from family members and all exons and exon-intron boundaries of the ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, MMP20, KLK4 and Amelotin gene were amplified and sequenced. Each family was also evaluated for linkage to chromosome regions known to contain genes important in enamel development. The present study indicates that the AI in these two families is not caused by any of the known loci for AI or any of the major candidate genes proposed in the literature. These findings indicate extensive genetic heterogeneity for non-syndromic AI.

  12. Genomewide identification, classification and analysis of NAC type gene family in maize

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaojian Peng; Yang Zhao; Xiaoming Li; Min Wu; Wenbo Chai; Lei Sheng; Yu Wang; Qing Dong; Haiyang Jiang; Beijiu Cheng

    2015-09-01

    NAC transcription factors comprise a large plant-specific gene family. Increasing evidence suggests that members of this family have diverse functions in plant growth and development. In this study, we performed a genomewide survey of NAC type genes in maize (Zea mays L.). A complete set of 148 nonredundant NAC genes (ZmNAC1–ZmNAC148) were identified in the maize genome using Blast search tools, and divided into 12 groups (a–l) based on phylogeny. Chromosomal location of these genes revealed that they are distributed unevenly across all 10 chromosomes. Segmental and tandem duplication contributed largely to the expansion of the maize NAC gene family. The a/s ratio suggested that the duplicated genes of maize NAC family mainly experienced purifying selection, with limited functional divergence after duplication events. Microarray analysis indicated most of the maize NAC genes were expressed across different developmental stages. Moreover, 19 maize NAC genes grouped with published stress-responsive genes from other plants were found to contain putative stress-responsive cis-elements in their promoter regions. All these stress-responsive genes belonged to the group d (stress-related). Further, these genes showed differential expression patterns over time in response to drought treatments by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Our results reveal a comprehensive overview of the maize NAC, and form the foundation for future functional research to uncover their roles in maize growth and development.

  13. The SLEEPER genes: a transposase-derived angiosperm-specific gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knip Marijn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAYSLEEPER encodes a domesticated transposase from the hAT-superfamily, which is essential for development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Little is known about the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in other species, or how and when it was domesticated. We studied the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in plants and propose a model for the domestication of the ancestral DAYSLEEPER gene in angiosperms. Results Using specific BLAST searches in genomic and EST libraries, we found that DAYSLEEPER-like genes (hereafter called SLEEPER genes are unique to angiosperms. Basal angiosperms as well as grasses (Poaceae and dicotyledonous plants possess such putative orthologous genes, but SLEEPER-family genes were not found in gymnosperms, mosses and algae. Most species contain more than one SLEEPER gene. All SLEEPERs contain a C2H2 type BED-zinc finger domain and a hATC dimerization domain. We designated 3 motifs, partly overlapping the BED-zinc finger and dimerization domain, which are hallmark features in the SLEEPER family. Although SLEEPER genes are structurally conserved between species, constructs with SLEEPER genes from grapevine and rice did not complement the daysleeper phenotype in Arabidopsis, when expressed under control of the DAYSLEEPER promoter. However these constructs did cause a dominant phenotype when expressed in Arabidopsis. Rice plant lines with an insertion in the RICESLEEPER1 or 2 locus displayed phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that these genes are functional and important for normal development in rice. We suggest a model in which we hypothesize that an ancestral hAT transposase was retrocopied and stably integrated in the genome during early angiosperm evolution. Evidence is also presented for more recent retroposition events of SLEEPER genes, such as an event in the rice genome, which gave rise to the RICESLEEPER1 and 2 genes. Conclusions We propose the ancestral SLEEPER gene was formed after a process of retro

  14. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  15. Gene recruitment--a common mechanism in the evolution of transfer RNA gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of alloacceptor transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been traditionally thought to occur vertically and reflect the evolution of the genetic code. Yet there have been several indications that a tRNA gene could evolve horizontally, from a copy of an alloacceptor tRNA gene in the same genome. Earlier, we provided the first unambiguous evidence for the occurrence of such "tRNA gene recruitment" in nature--in the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the demosponge Axinella corrugata. Yet the extent and the pattern of this process in the evolution of tRNA gene families remained unclear. Here we analyzed tRNA genes from 21 mt genomes of demosponges as well as nuclear genomes of rhesus macaque, chimpanzee and human. We found four new cases of alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment in mt genomes and eleven cases in the nuclear genomes. In most of these cases we observed a single nucleotide substitution at the middle position of the anticodon, which resulted in the change of not only the tRNA's amino-acid identity but also the class of the amino-acyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) involved in amino-acylation. We hypothesize that the switch to a different class of aaRSs may have prevented the conflict between anticodon and amino-acid identities of recruited tRNAs. Overall our results suggest that gene recruitment is a common phenomenon in tRNA multigene family evolution and should be taken into consideration when tRNA evolutionary history is reconstructed.

  16. Msx homeobox gene family and craniofacial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SYLVIA ALAPPAT; ZUN YI ZHANG; YI PING CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are unlinked,homeobox-containing genes that bear homology to the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox gene.These genes are expressed at multiple sites of tissue-tissue interactions during vertebrate embryonic development.Inductive interactions mediated by the Msx genes are essential for normal craniofacial,limb and ectodermal organ morphogenesis,and are also essential to survival in mice,as manifested by the phenotypic abnormalities shown in knockout mice and in humans.This review summarizes studies on the expression,regulation,and functional analysis of Msx genes that bear relevance to craniofacial development in humans and mice.

  17. Identification of a novel Gig2 gene family specific to non-amniote vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Bing Zhang

    Full Text Available Gig2 (grass carp reovirus (GCRV-induced gene 2 is first identified as a novel fish interferon (IFN-stimulated gene (ISG. Overexpression of a zebrafish Gig2 gene can protect cultured fish cells from virus infection. In the present study, we identify a novel gene family that is comprised of genes homologous to the previously characterized Gig2. EST/GSS search and in silico cloning identify 190 Gig2 homologous genes in 51 vertebrate species ranged from lampreys to amphibians. Further large-scale search of vertebrate and invertebrate genome databases indicate that Gig2 gene family is specific to non-amniotes including lampreys, sharks/rays, ray-finned fishes and amphibians. Phylogenetic analysis and synteny analysis reveal lineage-specific expansion of Gig2 gene family and also provide valuable evidence for the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD hypothesis. Although Gig2 family proteins exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any known proteins, a typical Gig2 protein appears to consist of two conserved parts: an N-terminus that bears very low homology to the catalytic domains of poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs, and a novel C-terminal domain that is unique to this gene family. Expression profiling of zebrafish Gig2 family genes shows that some duplicate pairs have diverged in function via acquisition of novel spatial and/or temporal expression under stresses. The specificity of this gene family to non-amniotes might contribute to a large extent to distinct physiology in non-amniote vertebrates.

  18. Postpartum family planning: current evidence on successful interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazer C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassandra Blazer, Ndola Prata Bixby Center for Population, Health, and Sustainability, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: We reviewed existing evidence of the efficacy of postpartum family planning interventions targeting women in the 12 months postpartum period in low- and middle-income countries. We searched for studies from January 1, 2004 to September 19, 2015, using the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations to assess evidence quality. Our search resulted in 26 studies: 11 based in sub-Saharan Africa, six in the Middle East and North Africa, and nine in Asia. Twenty of the included studies assessed health facility-based interventions. Three were focused on community interventions, two had community and facility components, and one was a workplace program. Overall quality of the evidence was moderate, including evidence for counseling interventions. Male partner involvement, integration with other service delivery platforms, such as prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and immunization, and innovative product delivery programs may increase knowledge and use during the postpartum period. Community-based and workplace strategies need a much stronger base of evidence to prompt recommendations. Keywords: postpartum period, family planning, birth spacing, interventions, systematic review, contraception, less developed countries

  19. Evidence-based practice for marriage and family therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jo Ellen; Miller, Richard B; Carnes, Stefanie; Wilson, Shanna

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to integrate science into clinical practice by introducing marriage and family therapists to the ideas of evidence-based practice (EBP). Evidence-based practice, which originated in the medical field, refers to the process of using research to make clinical decisions that best meet the needs of each client. Included in the description is a brief history of EBPs and ideas about learning EBPs. Suggestions are also made about the use of EBPs in MFT training programs, and resources are provided to enable clinicians to use EBPs in clinical practice.

  20. Differential roles of TGIF family genes in mammalian reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfree Marilyn B

    2011-09-01

    a change from ubiquitous to tissue-specific expression. The distribution and localization of TGIF2 in tammar adult gonads suggest that there has been an ultra-conserved function for the TGIF family in fertility and that TGIF2 already functioned in spermatogenesis and potentially folliculogenesis long before its retrotransposition to the X-chromosome of eutherian mammals. These results also provide further evidence that the eutherian X-chromosome has actively recruited sex and reproductive-related genes during mammalian evolution.

  1. Familial recurrences of FOXG1-related disorder: Evidence for mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelly Q; Papandreou, Apostolos; Ma, Mandy; Barry, Brenda J; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dobyns, William B; Scott, Richard H; Trump, Natalie; Kurian, Manju A; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2015-12-01

    FOXG1-related disorders are caused by heterozygous mutations in FOXG1 and result in a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes including postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, chorea, and corpus callosum abnormalities. The recurrence risk for de novo mutations in FOXG1-related disorders is assumed to be low. Here, we describe three unrelated sets of full siblings with mutations in FOXG1 (c.515_577del63, c.460dupG, and c.572T > G), representing familial recurrence of the disorder. In one family, we have documented maternal somatic mosaicism for the FOXG1 mutation, and all of the families presumably represent parental gonadal (or germline) mosaicism. To our knowledge, mosaicism has not been previously reported in FOXG1-related disorders. Therefore, this report provides evidence that germline mosaicism for FOXG1 mutations is a likely explanation for familial recurrence and should be considered during recurrence risk counseling for families of children with FOXG1-related disorders.

  2. UBR5 Gene Mutation Is Associated with Familial Adult Myoclonic Epilepsy in a Japanese Family

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The causal gene(s) for familial adult myoclonic epilepsy (FAME) remains undetermined. To identify it, an exome analysis was performed for the proband in a Japanese FAME family. Of the 383 missense/nonsense variants examined, only c.5720G>A mutation (p.Arg1907His) in the UBR5 gene was found in all of the affected individuals in the family, but not in the nonaffected members. Such mutation was not found in any of the 85 healthy individuals in the same community nor in any of the 24 individuals ...

  3. No association of candidate genes with cannabis use in a large sample of Australian twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Zietsch, B.P.; Liu, J.Z.; Medland, S.E.; Lynskey, M.T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Agrawal, A.; Montgomery, G.W.; Heath, A.C.; Martin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    While there is solid evidence that cannabis use is heritable, attempts to identify genetic influences at the molecular level have yielded mixed results. Here, a large twin family sample (n = 7452) was used to test for association between 10 previously reported candidate genes and lifetime frequency

  4. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2014-06-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees' personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees' work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design.

  5. Evidence of digenic inheritance in autoinflammation-associated genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VASSOS NEOCLEOUS; STEFANIA BYROU; MEROPI TOUMBA; CONSTANTINA COSTI; CHRISTOS SHAMMAS; CHRISTINA KYRIAKOU; VIOLETTA CHRISTOPHIDOU-ANASTASIADOU; GEORGE A. TANTELES; ADAMOS HADJIPANAYIS; LEONIDAS A. PHYLACTOU

    2016-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) has traditionally been considered as a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the MEFV gene with highest incidence among Mediterranean populations. In a considerable number of patients with typical FMF, only one MEFV mutation was identified and the possibility that more than one autoinflammatory gene may be responsible for their disease was investigated. In the present study, an extensive search for possiblemutations in three hereditary recurrent fever (HRF) genes was performed in 128 MEFV heterozygous Greek–Cypriots clinically diagnosed based on their phenotype with FMF-like disease from a previous study. Sequence analysis was performedfor MVK, TNFRSF1A and NLRP3 genes which is also known to cause HRFs. In total, three patients were identified with heterozygous mutations and a second mutation in an autoinflammatory gene. Two patients carried a MEFVmutation and a NLRP3 mutation, and an additional third carried a MEFV mutation and a TNFRSF1A mutation. Patient 1 carried MEFV p.[Val726Ala] (NM_000243.2:c.2177T>C) and NLRP3 p.[Val198Met] (NM_001243133.1:c.592G>A) variants and patient 2 carried MEFV p.[Glu148Gln] (NM_000243.2:c.442G>C) variant which is of uncertain significance and NLRP3 p.[Arg176Trp] (NM_001243133.1:c.526C>T). Lastly, patient 3 was identified to carry MEFV p.[Met694Val] (NM_000243.2:c.2080A>G) and TNFRSF1A p.[Arg121Gln] (NM_001065.3:c.362G>A) variants. The results from this study indicate that screening of genes known to cause HRFs in patients already identified with a single MEFV mutation, can reveal quite rare but potentially causative mutational combinations at different loci. Such interaction provide further evidence for possible locus–locus interactions and phenotypes resulting from digenic inheritance.

  6. Identification of metalloprotease gene families in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H.P. Ramos

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteases play a key role in many physiological processes in mammals such as cell migration, tissue remodeling and processing of growth factors. They have also been identified as important factors in the patho-physiology of a number of human diseases, including cancer and hypertension. Many bacterial pathogens rely on proteases in order to infect the host. Several classes of metalloproteases have been described in humans, bacteria, snake venoms and insects. However, the presence and characterization of plant metalloproteases have rarely been described in the literature. In our research, we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST DNA library in order to identify, by homology with sequences deposited in other databases, metalloprotease gene families expressed under different conditions. Protein sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to search the SUCEST data bank. Conserved regions corresponding to different metalloprotease domains and sequence motifs were identified in the reads to characterize each group of enzymes. At least four classes of sugarcane metalloproteases have been identified, i.e. matrix metalloproteases, zincins, inverzincins, and ATP-dependent metalloproteases. Each enzyme class was analyzed for its expression in different conditions and tissues.Metaloproteases exercem papéis importantes em muitos processos fisiológicos em mamíferos tais como migração celular, remodelamento tecidual e processamento de fatores de crescimento. Estas enzimas estão envolvidas também na pato-fisiologia de um grande número de doenças humanas como hipertensão e câncer. Muitas bactérias patogênicas dependem de proteases para infectar o hospedeiro. Diversas classes de metaloproteases foram descritas em seres humanos, bactérias, venenos de serpentes e insetos. No entanto, a presença e a caracterização de metaloproteases em plantas estão pouco descritas na literatura. Neste trabalho, foi

  7. BAG Family Gene and Its Relationship with Lung Adenocarcinoma Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying LI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective BAG genes (Bcl-2-associated athanogene belong to a recently discovered multifunctional anti-apoptosis gene family that regulate various physiological processes which include apoptosis, tumorigenesis, neural differentiation, stress response and cell cycle and so on. The expression status of BAG family genes are related to certain tumor incidence and prognosis. The aim of this study is to explore the association of the BAG family gene expression status with the susceptibility of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods The gene expression data of BAG family genes from 29 cases of lung adenocarcinoma tissues and matched pericancerous lung tissess were generated by microarray chips. Cox regression was used to analyze the association between the expression of BAG family genes and the susceptibility of lung adenocarcinoma and the results were verified by GEO database. Results The expression levels of BAG-1, BAG-2, BAG-5 in cancer tissues were significantly downregulated compared with matched pericancerous lung tissues and were protective factors of lung adenocarcinoma (P < 0.05, OR < 1; while the expression level of BAG-4 in cancer tissues were remankably upregulated compared with the matched pericancerous lung tissues and was risk factor of lung adenocarcinoma (P < 0.05, OR > 1. Conclusion BAG-1, BAG-2, BAG-5 might be the potential protective factors while BAG-4 is possible risk factor of lung adenocarcinoma.

  8. (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families: abundance and selective patterns of distribution according to function and gene length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creation of human gene families was facilitated significantly by gene duplication and diversification. The (TG/CAn repeats exhibit length variability, display genome-wide distribution, and are abundant in the human genome. Accumulation of evidences for their multiple functional roles including regulation of transcription and stimulation of recombination and splicing elect them as functional elements. Here, we report analysis of the distribution of (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families. Results The 1,317 human gene families were classified into six functional classes. Distribution of (TG/CAn repeats were analyzed both from a global perspective and from a stratified perspective based on their biological properties. The number of genes with repeats decreased with increasing repeat length and several genes (53% had repeats of multiple types in various combinations. Repeats were positively associated with the class of Signaling and communication whereas, they were negatively associated with the classes of Immune and related functions and of Information. The proportion of genes with (TG/CAn repeats in each class was proportional to the corresponding average gene length. The repeat distribution pattern in large gene families generally mirrored the global distribution pattern but differed particularly for Collagen gene family, which was rich in repeats. The position and flanking sequences of the repeats of Collagen genes showed high conservation in the Chimpanzee genome. However the majority of these repeats displayed length polymorphism. Conclusion Positive association of repeats with genes of Signaling and communication points to their role in modulation of transcription. Negative association of repeats in genes of Information relates to the smaller gene length, higher expression and fundamental role in cellular physiology. In genes of Immune and related functions negative association of repeats perhaps relates to the smaller gene

  9. A shared promoter region suggests a common ancestor for the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG gene families and the murine CYPT family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin A; Nielsen, John E; Retelska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    Many testis-specific genes from the sex chromosomes are subject to rapid evolution, which can make it difficult to identify murine genes in the human genome. The murine CYPT gene family includes 15 members, but orthologs were undetectable in the human genome. However, using refined homology search...... with the murine SPANX gene and the CYPT family may share a common ancestor. Finally, we present evidence that VCX/Y and SPANX may be paralogs with a similar protein structure consisting of C terminal acidic repeats of variable lengths....

  10. Genome organization and expression of the rat ACBP gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Andreasen, P H; Knudsen, J

    1993-01-01

    pool former. We have molecularly cloned and characterized the rat ACBP gene family which comprises one expressed and four processed pseudogenes. One of these was shown to exist in two allelic forms. A comprehensive computer-aided analysis of the promoter region of the expressed ACBP gene revealed...

  11. The tyrosinase gene family and albinism in fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiaqing; HOU Lin; ZHANG Ruifeng; ZHAO Xintao; JIANG Lijuan; SUN Wenjing; AN Jialu; LI Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosinase exists universally in organisms and is a characterstic enzyme of melanocytes.Tyrosinase family genes in vertebrates consist of 3 related members; tyrosinase (TYR, Tyr),tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1, Tyrpl), and tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2, Tyrp2, Dct). These proteins catalyze melanin biosynthesis in pigment cells and play important roles in determining vertebrate coloration. Transcription of the TYR and TRP genes is useful for studying neural crest and optic vesicle cell migration and differentiation during embryogenesis and important in pigment rescue in fish. In this paper, the structure of gene and protein molecular evolution, function and roles of the TYR family in fish were reviewed.

  12. Update of human and mouse forkhead box (FOX gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The forkhead box (FOX proteins are transcription factors that play complex and important roles in processes from development and organogenesis to regulation of metabolism and the immune system. There are 50 FOX genes in the human genome and 44 in the mouse, divided into 19 subfamilies. All human FOX genes have close mouse orthologues, with one exception: the mouse has a single Foxd4, whereas the human gene has undergone a recent duplication to a total of seven (FOXD4 and FOXD4L1 → FOXD4L6. Evolutionarily ancient family members can be found as far back as the fungi and metazoans. The DNA-binding domain, the forkhead domain, is an example of the winged-helix domain, and is very well conserved across the FOX family and across species, with a few notable exceptions in which divergence has created new functionality. Mutations in FOX genes have been implicated in at least four familial human diseases, and differential expression may play a role in a number of other pathologies -- ranging from metabolic disorders to autoimmunity. Furthermore, FOX genes are differentially expressed in a large number of cancers; their role can be either as an oncogene or tumour suppressor, depending on the family member and cell type. Although some drugs that target FOX gene expression or activity, notably proteasome inhibitors, appear to work well, much more basic research is needed to unlock the complex interplay of upstream and downstream interactions with FOX family transcription factors.

  13. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik J M de Jonge

    Full Text Available For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e.g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M vary considerably under different experimental conditions and therefore their use for normalization is limited. We performed a meta-analysis of 13,629 human gene array samples in order to identify the most stable expressed genes. Here we show novel candidate housekeeping genes (e.g. RPS13, RPL27, RPS20 and OAZ1 with enhanced stability among a multitude of different cell types and varying experimental conditions. None of the commonly used housekeeping genes were present in the top 50 of the most stable expressed genes. In addition, using 2,543 diverse mouse gene array samples we were able to confirm the enhanced stability of the candidate novel housekeeping genes in another mammalian species. Therefore, the identified novel candidate housekeeping genes seem to be the most appropriate choice for normalizing gene expression data.

  14. Evolution of a microbial nitrilase gene family: a comparative and environmental genomics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eads Jonathan R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completed genomes and environmental genomic sequences are bringing a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of gene families, microbial metabolism and community eco-physiology. Here, we used comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses in conjunction with enzymatic data to probe the evolution and functions of a microbial nitrilase gene family. Nitrilases are relatively rare in bacterial genomes, their biological function being unclear. Results We examined the genetic neighborhood of the different subfamily genes and discovered conserved gene clusters or operons associated with specific nitrilase clades. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate nitrilases which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in their enzymatic properties. We present evidence that Darwinian adaptation acted during one of those transitions and identified sites in the enzyme that may have been under positive selection. Conclusion Changes in the observed biochemical properties of the nitrilases associated with the different gene clusters are consistent with a hypothesis that those enzymes have been recruited to a novel metabolic pathway following gene duplication and neofunctionalization. These results demonstrate the benefits of combining environmental genomic sampling and completed genomes data with evolutionary and biochemical analyses in the study of gene families. They also open new directions for studying the functions of nitrilases and the genes they are associated with.

  15. Isolation and characterization of the novel popeye gene family expressed in skeletal muscle and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrée, B; Hillemann, T; Kessler-Icekson, G; Schmitt-John, T; Jockusch, H; Arnold, H H; Brand, T

    2000-07-15

    We identified a novel gene family in vertebrates which is preferentially expressed in developing and adult striated muscle. Three genes of the Popeye (POP) family were detected in human and mouse and two in chicken. Chromosomal mapping indicates that Pop1 and Pop3 genes are clustered on mouse chromosome 10, whereas Pop2 maps to mouse chromosome 16. We found evidence that POP1 and POP3 in chicken may also be linked and multiple transcript isoforms are generated from this locus. The POP genes encode proteins with three potential transmembrane domains that are conserved in all family members. Individual POP genes exhibit specific expression patterns during development and postnatally. Chicken POP3 and mouse Pop1 are first preferentially expressed in atrium and later also in the subepicardial compact layer of the ventricles. Chicken POP1 and mouse Pop2 are expressed in the entire heart except the outflow tract. All three Pop genes are expressed in heart and skeletal muscle of the adult mouse and lower in lung. Pop1 and Pop2 expression is upregulated in uterus of pregnant mice. Like the mouse genes, human POP genes are predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. The strong conservation of POP genes during evolution and their preferential expression in heart and skeletal muscle suggest that these novel proteins may have an important function in these tissues in vertebrates.

  16. Gene turnover and differential retention in the relaxin/insulin-like gene family in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, José Ignacio; Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C

    2012-06-01

    The relaxin/insulin-like gene family is related to the insulin gene family, and includes two separate types of peptides: relaxins (RLNs) and insulin-like peptides (INSLs) that perform a variety of physiological roles including testicular descent, growth and differentiation of the mammary glands, trophoblast development, and cell differentiation. In vertebrates, these genes are found on three separate genomic loci, and in mammals, variation in the number and nature of genes in this family is mostly restricted to the Relaxin Family Locus B. For example, this locus contains a single copy of RLN in platypus and opossum, whereas it contains copies of the INSL6, INSL4, RLN2 and RLN1 genes in human and chimp. The main objective of this research is to characterize changes in the size and membership composition of the RLN/INSL gene family in primates, reconstruct the history of the RLN/INSL genes of primates, and test competing evolutionary scenarios regarding the origin of INSL4 and of the duplicated copies of the RLN gene of apes. Our results show that the relaxin/INSL-like gene family of primates has had a more dynamic evolutionary history than previously thought, including several examples of gene duplications and losses which are consistent with the predictions of the birth-and-death model of gene family evolution. In particular, we found that the differential retention of relatively old paralogs played a key role in shaping the gene complement of this family in primates. Two examples of this phenomenon are the origin of the INSL4 gene of catarrhines (the group that includes Old World monkeys and apes), and of the duplicate RLN1 and RLN2 paralogs of apes. In the case of INSL4, comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the origin of this gene, which was thought to represent a catarrhine-specific evolutionary innovation, is as old as the split between carnivores and primates, which took place approximately 97 million years ago. In addition, in the case

  17. Fifteen million years of evolution in the Oryza genus shows extensive gene family expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Julie; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Haberer, Georg; Billheimer, Dean D; Yu, Yeisoo; Liu, Liana C; Rivera, Luis F; Mayer, Klaus; Chen, Mingsheng; Wing, Rod A

    2014-04-01

    In analyzing gene families in the whole-genome sequences available for O. sativa (AA), O. glaberrima (AA), and O. brachyantha (FF), we observed large size expansions in the AA genomes compared to FF genomes for the super-families F-box and NB-ARC, and five additional families: the Aspartic proteases, BTB/POZ proteins (BTB), Glutaredoxins, Trypsin α-amylase inhibitor proteins, and Zf-Dof proteins. Their evolutionary dynamic was investigated to understand how and why such important size variations are observed between these closely related species. We show that expansions resulted from both amplification, largely by tandem duplications, and contraction by gene losses. For the F-box and NB-ARC gene families, the genes conserved in all species were under strong purifying selection while expanded orthologous genes were under more relaxed purifying selection. In F-box, NB-ARC, and BTB, the expanded groups were enriched in genes with little evidence of expression, in comparison with conserved groups. We also detected 87 loci under positive selection in the expanded groups. These results show that most of the duplicated copies in the expanded groups evolve neutrally after duplication because of functional redundancy but a fraction of these genes were preserved following neofunctionalization. Hence, the lineage-specific expansions observed between Oryza species were partly driven by directional selection.

  18. The tomato terpene synthase gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falara, V.; Akhtar, T.A.; Nguyen, T.T.H.; Spyropoulou, E.A.; Bleeker, P.M.; Schauvinhold, I.; Matsuba, Y.; Bonini, M.E.; Schilmiller, A.L.; Last, R.L.; Schuurink, R.C.; Pichersky, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play many roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of Solanum lycopersicum (cultivated tomato) contains 40 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 28

  19. Review: the dominant flocculation genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae constitute a new subtelomeric gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, A W; Steensma, H Y

    1995-09-15

    The quality of brewing strains is, in large part, determined by their flocculation properties. By classical genetics, several dominant, semidominant and recessive flocculation genes have been recognized. Recent results of experiments to localize the flocculation genes FLO5 and FLO8, combined with the in silicio analysis of the available sequence data of the yeast genome, have revealed that the flocculation genes belong to a family which comprises at least four genes and three pseudogenes. All members of this gene family are located near the end of chromosomes, just like the SUC, MEL and MAL genes, which are also important for good quality baking or brewing strains. Transcription of the flocculation genes is repressed by several regulatory genes. In addition, a number of genes have been found which cause cell aggregation upon disruption or overexpression in an as yet unknown manner. In total, 33 genes have been reported that are involved in flocculation or cell aggregation.

  20. Molecular evolution of the polyamine oxidase gene family in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polticelli Fabio

    2012-06-01

    monophyletic clades including, respectively, all the SMOs and APAOs from vertebrates. The two vertebrate monophyletic clades clustered strictly mirroring the organismal phylogeny of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Evidences from comparative genomic analysis, structural evolution and functional divergence in a phylogenetic framework across Metazoa suggested an evolutionary scenario where the ancestor PAO coding sequence, present in invertebrates as an orthologous gene, has been duplicated in the vertebrate branch to originate the paralogous SMO and APAO genes. A further genome evolution event concerns the SMO gene of placental, but not marsupial and monotremate, mammals which increased its functional variation following an alternative splicing (AS mechanism. Conclusions In this study the explicit integration in a phylogenomic framework of phylogenetic tree construction, structure prediction, and biochemical function data/prediction, allowed inferring the molecular evolutionary history of the PAO gene family and to disambiguate paralogous genes related by duplication event (SMO and APAO and orthologous genes related by speciation events (PAOs, SMOs/APAOs. Further, while in vertebrates experimental data corroborate SMO and APAO molecular function predictions, in invertebrates the finding of a supported phylogenetic clusters of insect PAOs and the co-occurrence of two PAO variants in the amphioxus urgently claim the need for future structure-function studies.

  1. Mitochondrial gene mutations and type 2 diabetes in Chinese families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-zhen; YU De-min; YU Pei; LIU De-min; WANG Kun; TANG Xin-zhi

    2008-01-01

    Background Numerous mitochondrial DNA mutations are significantly correlated with development of diabetes. This study investigated mitochondrial gene, point mutations in patients with type 2 diabetes and their families. Methods Unrelated patients with type 2 diabetes(n=826)were randomly recruited; unrelated and nondiabetic subjects (n=637)served as controls. The clinical and biochemical data of the participants were collected. Total genome was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Polymerase chain reaction, restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)and clonig techniques were used to screen mitochondrial genes including np3316,np3394 and np3426 in the ND1 region and np3243 in the tRNALeu (UUR). Results In 39 diabetics with one or more mitochondrial gene point mutations, the prevalence(4.7%,39/826)of mtDNA mutations was higher than that(0.7%,5/637)in the controls. The identical mutation was found in 23 of 43 tested members from three pedigrees. Affected family members presented with variable clinical features ranging from normal glucose tolerance to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)(n=2),impaired fasting glucose(IFG)(n=1)to type 2 diabetes (n=13)with 3 family members suffering from hearing loss. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes in China is associated with several mitochondrial gene mutations. Aged patients with diabetic family history had a higher prevalence of mutation and various clinical pictures. Mitochondrial gene mutation might be one of the genetic factors contributing to diabetic familial clustering.

  2. The Botrytis cinerea endopolygalacturonase gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.

    2000-01-01

    C ell w all d egrading e nzyme s (CWDEs) secreted by microbial plant pathogens have been suggested to function as virulence factors. Evidence that particular bacterial CWDEs contribute to virulence has emerged in th

  3. The vertebrate RCAN gene family: novel insights into evolution, structure and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Serrano-Candelas

    Full Text Available Recently there has been much interest in the Regulators of Calcineurin (RCAN proteins which are important endogenous modulators of the calcineurin-NFATc signalling pathway. They have been shown to have a crucial role in cellular programmes such as the immune response, muscle fibre remodelling and memory, but also in pathological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy and neurodegenerative diseases. In vertebrates, the RCAN family form a functional subfamily of three members RCAN1, RCAN2 and RCAN3 whereas only one RCAN is present in the rest of Eukarya. In addition, RCAN genes have been shown to collocate with RUNX and CLIC genes in ACD clusters (ACD21, ACD6 and ACD1. How the RCAN genes and their clustering in ACDs evolved is still unknown. After analysing RCAN gene family evolution using bioinformatic tools, we propose that the three RCAN vertebrate genes within the ACD clusters, which evolved from single copy genes present in invertebrates and lower eukaryotes, are the result of two rounds of whole genome duplication, followed by a segmental duplication. This evolutionary scenario involves the loss or gain of some RCAN genes during evolution. In addition, we have analysed RCAN gene structure and identified the existence of several characteristic features that can be involved in RCAN evolution and gene expression regulation. These included: several transposable elements, CpG islands in the 5' region of the genes, the existence of antisense transcripts (NAT associated with the three human genes, and considerable evidence for bidirectional promoters that regulate RCAN gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the CpG island associated with the RCAN3 gene promoter is unmethylated and transcriptionally active. All these results provide timely new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying RCAN function and a more in depth knowledge of this gene family whose members are obvious candidates for the development of future therapies.

  4. Evolution of the YABBY gene family in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finet, Cédric; Floyd, Sandra K; Conway, Stephanie J; Zhong, Bojian; Scutt, Charles P; Bowman, John L

    2016-01-01

    Members of the YABBY gene family of transcription factors in angiosperms have been shown to be involved in the initiation of outgrowth of the lamina, the maintenance of polarity, and establishment of the leaf margin. Although most of the dorsal-ventral polarity genes in seed plants have homologs in non-spermatophyte lineages, the presence of YABBY genes is restricted to seed plants. To gain insight into the origin and diversification of this gene family, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of YABBY gene lineages in seed plants. Our findings suggest that either one or two YABBY genes were present in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants. We also examined the expression of YABBY genes in the gymnosperms Ephedra distachya (Gnetales), Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoales), and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Coniferales). Our data indicate that some YABBY genes are expressed in a polar (abaxial) manner in leaves and female cones in gymnosperms. We propose that YABBY genes already acted as polarity genes in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

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    Serbielle Céline

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs, symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication, by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in

  6. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-08-16

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research.

  7. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: Evidence of linkage to BCL3 in 17 multigenerational families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, J.; Hecht, T. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Stal, S. [Texas Children`s Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common craniofacial developmental defect. Recent segregation analyses have suggested that major genes play a role in the etiology of CL/P. Linkage to 22 candidate genes was tested in 11 multigenerational families with CL/P, and 21 of these candidates were excluded. APOC2, 19q13.1, which is linked to the proto-oncogene BCL3, gave suggestive evidence for linkage to CL/P. The study was expanded to include a total of 39 multigenerational CL/P families. Linkage was tested in all families, using anonymous marker, D19S178, and intragenic markers in BCL3 and APOC2. Linkage was tested under two models, autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance and affecteds-only model. Both models showed evidence of heterogeneity, with 43% of families linked at zero recombination to BCL3 when marker data from BCL3 and APOC2 were included. A maximum multipoint LOD score of 7.00 at BCL3 was found among the 17 families that had posterior probabilities {ge}50% in favor of linkage. The transmission disequilibrium test provided additional evidence for linkage with the 3 allele of BCL3 more often transmitted to affected children. These results suggest that BCL3, or a nearby gene, plays a role in the etiology of CL/P in some families. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Molecular Evolution of the Glycosyltransferase 6 Gene Family in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça-Mattos, Patricia Jeanne de Souza; Harada, Maria Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase 6 gene family includes ABO, Ggta1, iGb3S, and GBGT1 genes and by three putative genes restricted to mammals, GT6m6, GTm6, and GT6m7, only the latter is found in primates. GT6 genes may encode functional and nonfunctional proteins. Ggta1 and GBGT1 genes, for instance, are pseudogenes in catarrhine primates, while iGb3S gene is only inactive in human, bonobo, and chimpanzee. Even inactivated, these genes tend to be conversed in primates. As some of the GT6 genes are related to the susceptibility or resistance to parasites, we investigated (i) the selective pressure on the GT6 paralogs genes in primates; (ii) the basis of the conservation of iGb3S in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo; and (iii) the functional potential of the GBGT1 and GT6m7 in catarrhines. We observed that the purifying selection is prevalent and these genes have a low diversity, though ABO and Ggta1 genes have some sites under positive selection. GT6m7, a putative gene associated with aggressive periodontitis, may have regulatory function, but experimental studies are needed to assess its function. The evolutionary conservation of iGb3S in humans, chimpanzee, and bonobo seems to be the result of proximity to genes with important biological functions. PMID:28044107

  9. Molecular Evolution of the Glycosyltransferase 6 Gene Family in Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Evanovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosyltransferase 6 gene family includes ABO, Ggta1, iGb3S, and GBGT1 genes and by three putative genes restricted to mammals, GT6m6, GTm6, and GT6m7, only the latter is found in primates. GT6 genes may encode functional and nonfunctional proteins. Ggta1 and GBGT1 genes, for instance, are pseudogenes in catarrhine primates, while iGb3S gene is only inactive in human, bonobo, and chimpanzee. Even inactivated, these genes tend to be conversed in primates. As some of the GT6 genes are related to the susceptibility or resistance to parasites, we investigated (i the selective pressure on the GT6 paralogs genes in primates; (ii the basis of the conservation of iGb3S in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo; and (iii the functional potential of the GBGT1 and GT6m7 in catarrhines. We observed that the purifying selection is prevalent and these genes have a low diversity, though ABO and Ggta1 genes have some sites under positive selection. GT6m7, a putative gene associated with aggressive periodontitis, may have regulatory function, but experimental studies are needed to assess its function. The evolutionary conservation of iGb3S in humans, chimpanzee, and bonobo seems to be the result of proximity to genes with important biological functions.

  10. Exploiting gene families for phylogenomic analysis of myzostomid transcriptome data.

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    Stefanie Hartmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In trying to understand the evolutionary relationships of organisms, the current flood of sequence data offers great opportunities, but also reveals new challenges with regard to data quality, the selection of data for subsequent analysis, and the automation of steps that were once done manually for single-gene analyses. Even though genome or transcriptome data is available for representatives of most bilaterian phyla, some enigmatic taxa still have an uncertain position in the animal tree of life. This is especially true for myzostomids, a group of symbiotic (or parasitic protostomes that are either placed with annelids or flatworms. METHODOLOGY: Based on similarity criteria, Illumina-based transcriptome sequences of one myzostomid were compared to protein sequences of one additional myzostomid and 29 reference metazoa and clustered into gene families. These families were then used to investigate the phylogenetic position of Myzostomida using different approaches: Alignments of 989 sequence families were concatenated, and the resulting superalignment was analyzed under a Maximum Likelihood criterion. We also used all 1,878 gene trees with at least one myzostomid sequence for a supertree approach: the individual gene trees were computed and then reconciled into a species tree using gene tree parsimony. CONCLUSIONS: Superalignments require strictly orthologous genes, and both the gene selection and the widely varying amount of data available for different taxa in our dataset may cause anomalous placements and low bootstrap support. In contrast, gene tree parsimony is designed to accommodate multilocus gene families and therefore allows a much more comprehensive data set to be analyzed. Results of this supertree approach showed a well-resolved phylogeny, in which myzostomids were part of the annelid radiation, and major bilaterian taxa were found to be monophyletic.

  11. Genetic variance in the adiponutrin gene family and childhood obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa E Johansson

    Full Text Available AIM: The adiponutrin gene family consists of five genes (PNPLA1-5 coding for proteins with both lipolytic and lipogenic properties. PNPLA3 has previously been associated with adult obesity. Here we investigated the possible association between genetic variants in these genes and childhood and adolescent obesity. METHODS/RESULTS: Polymorphisms in the five genes of the adiponutrin gene family were selected and genotyped using the Sequenom platform in a childhood and adolescent obesity case-control study. Six variants in PNPLA1 showed association with obesity (rs9380559, rs12212459, rs1467912, rs4713951, rs10947600, and rs12199580, p0.05. When analyzing these SNPs in relation to phenotypes, two SNPs in the PNPLA3 gene showed association with insulin sensitivity (rs12483959: beta = -0.053, p = 0.016, and rs2072907: beta = -0.049, p = 0.024. No associations were seen for PNPLA2, PNPLA4, and PNPLA5. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variation in the adiponutrin gene family does not seem to contribute strongly to obesity in children and adolescents. PNPLA1 exhibited a modest effect on obesity and PNPLA3 on insulin sensitivity. These data, however, require confirmation in other cohorts and ethnic groups.

  12. The Investigation of EWS-FLI-1 Fusion Gene in the Ewing Family of Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GangFeng; ZhongquanZhao; DonglinWang

    2004-01-01

    There is evidence that 95% of the Ewing family of tumors (EFT) have a EWS-FLI-1 fusion gene. EWS-FL1-1 is a transcription factor with a pivotal function and it is known to bind to a special DNA sequence. Research has demonstrated that the EWS-FLI-1 fusion gene occurrence is related to the EFT, and it has been used to diagnose, treat and serve as a basis for EFT prognosis. We have briefly summarized the progress of the EWS-FLI-1 fusion gene in basic and clinical investigation within the past several years.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the WRKY gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wangdan; Xu, Xueqin; Zhang, Lin; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2013-07-25

    The WRKY proteins, which contain highly conserved WRKYGQK amino acid sequences and zinc-finger-like motifs, constitute a large family of transcription factors in plants. They participate in diverse physiological and developmental processes. WRKY genes have been identified and characterized in a number of plant species. We identified a total of 58 WRKY genes (JcWRKY) in the genome of the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). On the basis of their conserved WRKY domain sequences, all of the JcWRKY proteins could be assigned to one of the previously defined groups, I-III. Phylogenetic analysis of JcWRKY genes with Arabidopsis and rice WRKY genes, and separately with castor bean WRKY genes, revealed no evidence of recent gene duplication in JcWRKY gene family. Analysis of transcript abundance of JcWRKY gene products were tested in different tissues under normal growth condition. In addition, 47 WRKY genes responded to at least one abiotic stress (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation and nitrogen starvation) in individual tissues (leaf, root and/or shoot cortex). Our study provides a useful reference data set as the basis for cloning and functional analysis of physic nut WRKY genes.

  14. Evolutionary aspects of functional and pseudogene members of the phytochrome gene family in Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Maria Rosario

    2008-08-01

    According to the neutral theory of evolution, mutation and genetic drift are the only forces that shape unconstrained, neutral, gene evolution. Thus, pseudogenes (which often evolve neutrally) provide opportunities to obtain direct estimates of mutation rates that are not biased by selection, and gene families comprising functional and pseudogene members provide useful material for both estimating neutral mutation rates and identifying sites that appear to be under positive or negative selection pressures. Conifers could be very useful for such analyses since they have large and complex genomes. There is evidence that pseudogenes make significant contributions to the size and complexity of gene families in pines, although few studies have examined the composition and evolution of gene families in conifers. In this work, I examine the complexity and rates of mutation of the phytochrome gene family in Pinus sylvestris and show that it includes not only functional genes but also pseudogenes. As expected, the functional PHYO does not appear to have evolved neutrally, while phytochrome pseudogenes show signs of unconstrained evolution.

  15. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  16. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  17. Runx Family Genes in Tissue Stem Cell Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chelsia Qiuxia; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Osato, Motomi

    2017-01-01

    The Runx family genes play important roles in development and cancer, largely via their regulation of tissue stem cell behavior. Their involvement in two organs, blood and skin, is well documented. This review summarizes currently known Runx functions in the stem cells of these tissues. The fundamental core mechanism(s) mediated by Runx proteins has been sought; however, it appears that there does not exist one single common machinery that governs both tissue stem cells. Instead, Runx family genes employ multiple spatiotemporal mechanisms in regulating individual tissue stem cell populations. Such specific Runx requirements have been unveiled by a series of cell type-, developmental stage- or age-specific gene targeting studies in mice. Observations from these experiments revealed that the regulation of stem cells by Runx family genes turned out to be far more complex than previously thought. For instance, although it has been reported that Runx1 is required for the endothelial-to-hematopoietic cell transition (EHT) but not thereafter, recent studies clearly demonstrated that Runx1 is also needed during the period subsequent to EHT, namely at perinatal stage. In addition, Runx1 ablation in the embryonic skin mesenchyme eventually leads to complete loss of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the adult epithelium, suggesting that Runx1 facilitates the specification of skin epithelial stem cells in a cell extrinsic manner. Further in-depth investigation into how Runx family genes are involved in stem cell regulation is warranted.

  18. Expansion of transducin subunit gene families in early vertebrate tetraploidizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Sundström, Görel; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Abalo, Xesús M; Larhammar, Dan

    2012-10-01

    Hundreds of gene families expanded in the early vertebrate tetraploidizations including many gene families in the phototransduction cascade. We have investigated the evolution of the heterotrimeric G-proteins of photoreceptors, the transducins, in relation to these events using both phylogenetic analyses and synteny comparisons. Three alpha subunit genes were identified in amniotes and the coelacanth, GNAT1-3; two of these were identified in amphibians and teleost fish, GNAT1 and GNAT2. Most tetrapods have four beta genes, GNB1-4, and teleosts have additional duplicates. Finally, three gamma genes were identified in mammals, GNGT1, GNG11 and GNGT2. Of these, GNGT1 and GNGT2 were found in the other vertebrates. In frog and zebrafish additional duplicates of GNGT2 were identified. Our analyses show all three transducin families expanded during the early vertebrate tetraploidizations and the beta and gamma families gained additional copies in the teleost-specific genome duplication. This suggests that the tetraploidizations contributed to visual specialisations.

  19. Diverse Roles of ERECTA Family Genes in Plant Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena D.Shpak

    2013-01-01

    Multiple receptor-like kinases (RLKs) enable intercellular communication that coordinates growth and development of plant tissues. ERECTA family receptors (ERfs) are an ancient family of leucine-rich repeat RLKs that in Arabidopsis consists of three genes: ERECTA, ERL1, and ERL2. ERfs sense secreted cysteine-rich peptides from the EPF/EPFL family and transmit the signal through a MAP kinase cascade. This review discusses the functions of ERfs in stomata development, in regulation of longitudinal growth of aboveground organs, during reproductive development, and in the shoot apical meristem. In addition the role of ERECTA in plant responses to biotic and abiotic factors is examined.

  20. Characterization of the bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein gene family – analysis of gene sequences, regulatory regions within the promoter and expression of selected genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs belong to a large family of aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placenta of species in the Artiodactyla order. In cattle, the PAG gene family is comprised of at least 22 transcribed genes, as well as some variants. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the PAG family segregates into 'ancient' and 'modern' groupings. Along with sequence differences between family members, there are clear distinctions in their spatio-temporal distribution and in their relative level of expression. In this report, 1 we performed an in silico analysis of the bovine genome to further characterize the PAG gene family, 2 we scrutinized proximal promoter sequences of the PAG genes to evaluate the evolution pressures operating on them and to identify putative regulatory regions, 3 we determined relative transcript abundance of selected PAGs during pregnancy and, 4 we performed preliminary characterization of the putative regulatory elements for one of the candidate PAGs, bovine (bo PAG-2. Results From our analysis of the bovine genome, we identified 18 distinct PAG genes and 14 pseudogenes. We observed that the first 500 base pairs upstream of the translational start site contained multiple regions that are conserved among all boPAGs. However, a preponderance of conserved regions, that harbor recognition sites for putative transcriptional factors (TFs, were found to be unique to the modern boPAG grouping, but not the ancient boPAGs. We gathered evidence by means of Q-PCR and screening of EST databases to show that boPAG-2 is the most abundant of all boPAG transcripts. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence for the role of ETS- and DDVL-related TFs in the regulation of the boPAG-2 gene. Conclusion PAGs represent a relatively large gene family in the bovine genome. The proximal promoter regions of these genes display differences in putative TF binding sites, likely contributing to observed

  1. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The maize PIN gene family of auxin transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian eForestan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxin is a key regulator of plant development and its differential distribution in plant tissues, established by a polar cell-to-cell transport, can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. A few members of the two families of auxin efflux transport proteins, PIN-formed (PIN and P-glycoprotein (ABCB/PGP, have so far been characterized in maize. Nine new Zea mays auxin efflux carriers PIN family members and two maize PIN-like genes have now been identified. Four members of PIN1 (named ZmPIN1a–d cluster, one gene homologous to AtPIN2 (ZmPIN2, three orthologs of PIN5 (ZmPIN5a–c, one gene paired with AtPIN8 (ZmPIN8, and three monocot-specific PINs (ZmPIN9, ZmPIN10a and b were cloned and the phylogenetic relationships between early land plants, monocots and eudicots PIN proteins investigated, including the new maize PIN proteins. Tissue-specific expression patterns of the twelve maize PIN genes, two PIN-like genes and ZmABCB1, an ABCB auxin efflux carrier, were analyzed using semi-quantitative RT–PCR. ZmPIN gene transcripts have overlapping expression domains in the root apex, during male and female inflorescence differentiation and kernel development. However, some PIN family members have specific tissue localization: ZmPIN1d transcript marks the L1 layer of the SAM and IM during the flowering transition and the monocot-specific ZmPIN9 is expressed in the root endodermis and pericycle. The phylogenetic and gene structure analyses together with the expression pattern of the ZmPIN gene family indicate that subfunctionalization of some maize PINs can be associated to the differentiation and development of monocot-specific organs and tissues and might have occurred after the divergence between dicots and monocots.

  3. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  4. Phylogenomic analysis reveals dynamic evolutionary history of the Drosophila heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia T Levine

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin is the gene-poor, satellite-rich eukaryotic genome compartment that supports many essential cellular processes. The functional diversity of proteins that bind and often epigenetically define heterochromatic DNA sequence reflects the diverse functions supported by this enigmatic genome compartment. Moreover, heterogeneous signatures of selection at chromosomal proteins often mirror the heterogeneity of evolutionary forces that act on heterochromatic DNA. To identify new such surrogates for dissecting heterochromatin function and evolution, we conducted a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of the Heterochromatin Protein 1 gene family across 40 million years of Drosophila evolution. Our study expands this gene family from 5 genes to at least 26 genes, including several uncharacterized genes in Drosophila melanogaster. The 21 newly defined HP1s introduce unprecedented structural diversity, lineage-restriction, and germline-biased expression patterns into the HP1 family. We find little evidence of positive selection at these HP1 genes in both population genetic and molecular evolution analyses. Instead, we find that dynamic evolution occurs via prolific gene gains and losses. Despite this dynamic gene turnover, the number of HP1 genes is relatively constant across species. We propose that karyotype evolution drives at least some HP1 gene turnover. For example, the loss of the male germline-restricted HP1E in the obscura group coincides with one episode of dramatic karyotypic evolution, including the gain of a neo-Y in this lineage. This expanded compendium of ovary- and testis-restricted HP1 genes revealed by our study, together with correlated gain/loss dynamics and chromosome fission/fusion events, will guide functional analyses of novel roles supported by germline chromatin.

  5. Evolutionary History of Cathepsin L (L-like) Family Genes in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Yao-Yang; Li, Qing-Yun; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin L family, an important cysteine protease found in lysosomes, is categorized into cathepsins B, F, H, K, L, S, and W in vertebrates. This categorization is based on their sequence alignment and traditional functional classification, but the evolutionary relationship of family members is unclear. This study determined the evolutionary relationship of cathepsin L family genes in vertebrates through phylogenetic construction. Results showed that cathepsins F, H, S and K, and L and V were chronologically diverged. Tandem-repeat duplication was found to occur in the evolutionary history of cathepsin L family. Cathepsin L in zebrafish, cathepsins S and K in xenopus, and cathepsin L in mice and rats underwent evident tandem-repeat events. Positive selection was detected in cathepsin L-like members in mice and rats, and amino acid sites under positive selection pressure were calculated. Most of these sites appeared at the connection of secondary structures, suggesting that the sites may slightly change spatial structure. Severe positive selection was also observed in cathepsin V (L2) of primates, indicating that this enzyme had some special functions. Our work provided a brief evolutionary history of cathepsin L family and differentiated cathepsins S and K from cathepsin L based on vertebrate appearance. Positive selection was the specific cause of differentiation of cathepsin L family genes, confirming that gene function variation after expansion events was related to interactions with the environment and adaptability.

  6. An insight into the phylogenetic history of HOX linked gene families in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzeschik Karl-Heinz

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human chromosomes 2q, 7, 12q and 17q show extensive intra-genomic homology, containing duplicate, triplicate and quadruplicate paralogous regions centered on the HOX gene clusters. The fact that two or more representatives of different gene families are linked with HOX clusters is taken as evidence that these paralogous gene sets might have arisen from a single chromosomal segment through block or whole chromosome duplication events. This would imply that the constituent genes including the HOX clusters reflect the architecture of a single ancestral block (before vertebrate origin where all of these genes were linked in a single copy. Results In the present study we have employed the currently available set of protein data for a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate genomes to analyze the phylogenetic history of 11 multigene families with three or more of their representatives linked to human HOX clusters. A topology comparison approach revealed four discrete co-duplicated groups: group 1 involves the genes from GLI, HH, INHB, IGFBP (cluster-1, and SLC4A families; group 2 involves ERBB, ZNFN1A, and IGFBP (cluster-2 gene families; group 3 involves the HOX clusters and the SP gene family; group 4 involves the integrin beta chain and myosine light chain families. The distinct genes within each co-duplicated group share the same evolutionary history and are duplicated in concert with each other, while the constituent genes of two different co-duplicated groups may not share their evolutionary history and may not have duplicated simultaneously. Conclusion We conclude that co-duplicated groups may themselves be remnants of ancient small-scale duplications (involving chromosomal segments or gene-clusters which occurred at different time points during chordate evolution. Whereas the recent combination of genes from distinct co-duplicated groups on different chromosomal regions (human chromosomes 2q, 7, 12q, and 17q is

  7. Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczak Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Kirsch S, Pasantes J, Wolf A, Bogdanova N, Münch C, Pennekamp P, Krawczak M, Dworniczak B, Schempp W: Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2008, 8:263 (doi:10.1186/1471-2148-8-263

  8. Origin and evolution of laminin gene family diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Bryony; Degnan, Bernard M

    2012-07-01

    Laminins are a family of multidomain glycoproteins that are important contributors to the structure of metazoan extracellular matrices. To investigate the origin and evolution of the laminin family, we characterized the full complement of laminin-related genes in the genome of the sponge, Amphimedon queenslandica. As a representative of the Demospongiae, a group consistently placed within the earliest diverging branch of animals by molecular phylogenies, Amphimedon is uniquely placed to provide insight into early steps in the evolution of metazoan gene families. Five Amphimedon laminin-related genes possess the conserved molecular features, and most of the domains found in bilaterian laminins, but all display domain architectures distinct from those of the canonical laminin chain types known from model bilaterians. This finding prompted us to perform a comparative genomic analysis of laminins and related genes from a choanoflagellate and diverse metazoans and to conduct phylogenetic analyses using the conserved Laminin N-terminal domain in order to explore the relationships between genes with distinct architectures. Laminin-like genes appear to have originated in the holozoan lineage (choanoflagellates + metazoans + several other unicellular opisthokont taxa), with several laminin domains originating later and appearing only in metazoan (animal) or eumetazoan (placozoans + ctenophores + cnidarians + bilaterians) laminins. Typical bilaterian α, β, and γ laminin chain forms arose in the eumetazoan stem and another chain type that is conserved in Amphimedon, the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and the echinoderm, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, appears to have been lost independently from the placozoan, Trichoplax adhaerens, and from multiple bilaterians. Phylogenetic analysis did not clearly reconstruct relationships between the distinct laminin chain types (with the exception of the α chains) but did reveal how several members of the netrin family were

  9. Gene Expression Divergence and Evolutionary Analysis of the Drosomycin Gene Family in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Juan Deng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosomycin (Drs encoding an inducible 44-residue antifungal peptide is clustered with six additional genes, Dro1, Dro2, Dro3, Dro4, Dro5, and Dro6, forming a multigene family on the 3L chromosome arm in Drosophila melanogaster. To get further insight into the regulation of each member of the drosomycin gene family, here we investigated gene expression patterns of this family by either microbe-free injury or microbial challenges using real time RT-PCR. The results indicated that among the seven drosomycin genes, Drs, Dro2, Dro3, Dro4, and Dro5 showed constitutive expressions. Three out of five, Dro2, Dro3, and Dro5, were able to be upregulated by simple injury. Interestingly, Drs is an only gene strongly upregulated when Drosophila was infected with microbes. In contrast to these five genes, Dro1 and Dro6 were not transcribed at all in either noninfected or infected flies. Furthermore, by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends, two transcription start sites were identified in Drs and Dro2, and one in Dro3, Dro4, and Dro5. In addition, NF-κB binding sites were found in promoter regions of Drs, Dro2, Dro3, and Dro5, indicating the importance of NF-κB binding sites for the inducibility of drosomycin genes. Based on the analyses of flanking sequences of each gene in D. melanogaster and phylogenetic relationship of drosomycins in D. melanogaster species-group, we concluded that gene duplications were involved in the formation of the drosomycin gene family. The possible evolutionary fates of drosomycin genes were discussed according to the combining analysis of gene expression pattern, gene structure, and functional divergence of these genes.

  10. Identifying losses and expansions of selected gene families in incomplete genomic datasets

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Plantae (Archaeplastida) are a natural group of organisms with plastids of primary endosymbiotic origin. Within this group, members of the red algae show evidence of a reduction of their genomic content. In this work, we designed a bioinformatics approach to investigate the few, sometimes incomplete, genomic datasets available for red algae, with the purpose of pointing out possible gene family losses and expansions. Our pipeline first populates a relational database with precomputed ortholog...

  11. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  12. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  13. Genomewide survey and characterization of metacaspase gene family in rice (Oryza sativa)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Likai Wang; Hua Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Metacaspases (MCs), which are cysteine-dependent proteases found in plants, fungi, and protozoa, may be involved in programmed cell death processes, being distant relatives of metazoan caspases. In this study, we analysed the structures, phylogenetic relationship, genome localizations, expression patterns and domestic selections of eight MC genes identified in rice (OsMC). Alignment analysis of the corresponding protein sequences suggested OsMC proteins can be classified into two sub-types. The expression profiles of eight OsMC genes were analysed in 27 tissues covering the whole life cycle of rice. There are four OsMC genes uniquely expressed in mature tissues, indicating that these genes might play certain roles in senescence. Under abiotic and biotic stresses, four OsMC genes were expressed with treatments of one or more of Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) infected, pest damaged, cold stress and drought stress, indicating they might be involved in plant defense. In addition, gene trees and genetic diversity $(\\pi)$ were performed to measure whether candidate genes were selected during rice domestication. The results suggested that all the type I genes could not be domestication genes. However, two of five type II OsMC genes showed strong evidence for selective sweep, suggesting that these genes might be involved in cultivated rice domestication. These results provide a foundation for future functional genomic studies of this family in rice.

  14. Evidence for shared susceptibility to epilepsy and psychosis: a population-based family study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Mary C

    2012-05-01

    There is emerging evidence of an etiological overlap between a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. Here we investigate shared familial vulnerability to psychotic illness and epilepsy in a family-based study.

  15. No evidence for a role of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish families with hereditary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, E P; Freije, D; Xu, J; Nusskern, D R; Suzuki, H; Isaacs, S D; Wiley, K; Bujnovsky, P; Meyers, D A; Walsh, P C; Isaacs, W B

    1999-06-01

    Two genes responsible for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA1 and BRCA2) have been identified, and predisposing mutations identified. Several studies have provided evidence that germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer an increased risk of prostate cancer. Based on these findings, one might expect to find an increased frequency of mutations in these genes in family clusters of prostate cancer. The Ashkenazi Jewish population is unique in that it has an approximate 2% incidence of specific founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (i.e., 185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1, and 6174delT in BRCA2). To address the question of whether or not mutations in either of these genes were overrepresented in prostate cancer families, we searched for these mutations in germline DNA samples collected from affected and unaffected members of 18 Ashkenazi Jewish families, each having at least 3 first-degree relatives affected with prostate cancer. No mutations were found in the BRCA1 gene in any of the 47 individuals tested. One individual possessed a BRCA2 mutation (6174delT). This individual was unaffected at the time of analysis, but had an affected paternal uncle, and an affected first cousin, neither of whom harbored the mutant gene. In this sample of Ashkenazi prostate cancer families, the frequency of founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was not elevated, suggesting that such mutations will account for only a small, perhaps minimal, fraction of familial prostate cancer.

  16. The genetics of alcoholism: identifying specific genes through family studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Studies in humans have begun to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of the risk for alcoholism. Here we briefly review strategies for identifying individual genes in which variations affect the risk for alcoholism and related phenotypes, in the context of one large study that has successfully identified such genes. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is a family-based study that has collected detailed phenotypic data on individuals in families with multiple alcoholic members. A genome-wide linkage approach led to the identification of chromosomal regions containing genes that influenced alcoholism risk and related phenotypes. Subsequently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in positional candidate genes located within the linked chromosomal regions, and analyzed for association with these phenotypes. Using this sequential approach, COGA has detected association with GABRA2, CHRM2 and ADH4; these associations have all been replicated by other researchers. COGA has detected association to additional genes including GABRG3, TAS2R16, SNCA, OPRK1 and PDYN, results that are awaiting confirmation. These successes demonstrate that genes contributing to the risk for alcoholism can be reliably identified using human subjects.

  17. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  18. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  19. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  20. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J; Van Esch, H; Raynaud, M; de Brouwer, A P M; Weinert, S; Froyen, G; Frints, S G M; Laumonnier, F; Zemojtel, T; Love, M I; Richard, H; Emde, A-K; Bienek, M; Jensen, C; Hambrock, M; Fischer, U; Langnick, C; Feldkamp, M; Wissink-Lindhout, W; Lebrun, N; Castelnau, L; Rucci, J; Montjean, R; Dorseuil, O; Billuart, P; Stuhlmann, T; Shaw, M; Corbett, M A; Gardner, A; Willis-Owen, S; Tan, C; Friend, K L; Belet, S; van Roozendaal, K E P; Jimenez-Pocquet, M; Moizard, M-P; Ronce, N; Sun, R; O'Keeffe, S; Chenna, R; van Bömmel, A; Göke, J; Hackett, A; Field, M; Christie, L; Boyle, J; Haan, E; Nelson, J; Turner, G; Baynam, G; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Müller, U; Steinberger, D; Budny, B; Badura-Stronka, M; Latos-Bieleńska, A; Ousager, L B; Wieacker, P; Rodríguez Criado, G; Bondeson, M-L; Annerén, G; Dufke, A; Cohen, M; Van Maldergem, L; Vincent-Delorme, C; Echenne, B; Simon-Bouy, B; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M; Fryns, J-P; Devriendt, K; Ullmann, R; Vingron, M; Wrogemann, K; Wienker, T F; Tzschach, A; van Bokhoven, H; Gecz, J; Jentsch, T J; Chen, W; Ropers, H-H; Kalscheuer, V M

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

  1. The evidence-base for family therapy and systemic interventions for child-focused problems

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review updates similar articles published in the Journal of Family Therapy in 2001 and 2009. It presents evidence from meta-analyses, systematic literature reviews and controlled trials for the effectiveness of systemic interventions for families of children and adolescents with various difficulties. In this context, systemic interventions include both family therapy and other family-based approaches such as parent training. The evidence supports the effectiveness of systemic interventio...

  2. Exclusive gene mapping of congenital microphthalmia in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yanan; LI Hui; YU Ping; ZHOU Qiang; ZHAO Luhang; ZHANG Ya-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Congenital microphthalmia is a developmental ocular disorder and might be caused by the mutations in the genes involved in eye development.To uncover the genetic cause in a six-generation Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital microphthalmia, we performed genescan and linkage analysis in this family. Fourteen microsatellite markers on chromosomes 3, 11, 14 and 15 were selected as genetic markers according to the five previously reported loci associated with microphthalmia (MITF, SOX2, PAX6, MCOP and NN02). The genomic DNA of each member in the pedigree was amplified with 14 pairs of fluorescence labeled primers. Genome screening and genotyping were conducted on ABI377 DNA sequencer and linkage analysis was performed with Linkage software package. All two-point LOD scores of linkage analysis between the suggested disease genes and microsatellite markers were <-2, which indicated that none of the five genes were responsible for microphthalmia in this Chinese family. Microphthalmia in this family may be caused by mutation in a new gene which is essential in eye development.

  3. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Valmik K; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with which CRISPR-induced mutations can be directed to target genes enables easy isolation of homozygous gene knockouts, even without selection. Moreover, the system permits the creation of strains with mutations in multiple genes, gene families, and genes that encode essential functions. This CRISPR system is also effective in a fresh clinical isolate of undetermined ploidy. Our method transforms the ability to manipulate the genome of Candida and provides a new window into the biology of this pathogen.

  4. Positioning the expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon within the transcriptional networks of myogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macqueen, Daniel J., E-mail: djm59@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom); Bower, Neil I., E-mail: nib@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom); Johnston, Ian A., E-mail: iaj@st-andrews.ac.uk [Laboratory of Physiological and Evolutionary Genomics, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} The expanded akirin gene family of Atlantic salmon was characterised. {yields} akirin paralogues are regulated between mono- and multi-nucleated muscle cells. {yields} akirin paralogues positioned within known genetic networks controlling myogenesis. {yields} Co-expression of akirin paralogues is evident across cell types/during myogenesis. {yields} Selection has likely maintained common regulatory elements among akirin paralogues. -- Abstract: Vertebrate akirin genes usually form a family with one-to-three members that regulate gene expression during the innate immune response, carcinogenesis and myogenesis. We recently established that an expanded family of eight akirin genes is conserved across salmonid fish. Here, we measured mRNA levels of the akirin family of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) during the differentiation of primary myoblasts cultured from fast-skeletal muscle. Using hierarchical clustering and correlation, the data was positioned into a network of expression profiles including twenty further genes that regulate myogenesis. akirin1(2b) was not significantly regulated during the maturation of the cell culture. akirin2(1a) and 2(1b), along with IGF-II and several igfbps, were most highly expressed in mononuclear cells, then significantly and constitutively downregulated as differentiation proceeded and myotubes formed/matured. Conversely, akirin1(1a), 1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) were expressed at lowest levels when mononuclear cells dominated the culture and highest levels when confluent layers of myotubes were evident. However, akirin1(2a) and 2(2a) were first upregulated earlier than akirin1(1a), 1(1b) and 2(2b), when rates of myoblast proliferation were highest. Interestingly, akirin1(1b), 1(2a), 2(2a) and 2(2b) formed part of a module of co-expressed genes involved in muscle differentiation, including myod1a, myog, mef2a, 14-3-3{beta} and 14-3-3{gamma}. All akirin paralogues were expressed ubiquitously across ten

  5. Quality of implementation in an evidence-based family prevention program: “The Family Competence Program”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Orte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Family prevention programs need to be evidence-based in order to guarantee the success of their implementation. The Family Competence Program (FCP, a Spanish cultural adaptation of the Strengthening Families Program (SFP, has developed different measures and processes to gauge the quality of the implementation. This article is dedicated specifically to two of these measures: the evaluation of the facilitators and the assessment of the family engagement techniques. For evaluating the facilitators, a Delphi technique with experts and professionals is undertaken. For assessing the family techniques, both self-evaluation of trainers and evaluation by families are used. Finding underpin that, in the case of facilitators, is important that, after to skills and experience, they need to understand the theory of change of the program. In the case of family engagement techniques, more detailed, comprehensive talks, discussions and group activities lead to better family engagement outcomes.

  6. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Mansi; Larroux, Claire; Lu, Daniel R; Mohanty, Kareshma; Chapman, Jarrod; Degnan, Bernard M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-01-01

    LIM homeobox (Lhx) transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons) indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In Nematostella, Lhx gene expression is correlated with neural

  7. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

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    Degnan Bernard M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM homeobox (Lhx transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. Results We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. Conclusions The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In

  8. The WRKY Gene Family in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian A. Ross; Yue Liu; Qingxi J. Shen

    2007-01-01

    WRKYgenes encode transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of various biological processes. These zinc-finger proteins, especially those members mediating stress responses, are uniquely expanded in plants. To facilitate the study of the evolutionary history and functions of this supergene family, we performed an exhaustive search for WRKY genes using HMMER and a Hidden Markov Model that was specifically trained for rice. This work resulted in a comprehensive list of WRKY gene models in Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica and L. ssp. japonica. Mapping of these genes to individual chromosomes facilitated elimination of the redundant, leading to the identification of 98 WRKY genes in japonica and 102 in indica rice. These genes were further categorized according to the number and structure of their zinc-finger domains. Based on a phylogenetic tree of the conserved WRKY domains and the graphic display of WRKY loci on corresponding indica and japonica chromosomes, we identified possible WRKY gene duplications within, and losses between the two closely related rice subspecies. Also reviewed are the roles of WRKY genes in disease resistance and responses to salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, seed development and germination mediated by gibberellins, other developmental processes including senescence, and responses to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid in rice and other plants. The signaling pathways mediating WRKY gene expression are also discussed.

  9. Evidence for gene conversion among immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S H; Rudikoff, S

    1984-03-01

    We have previously reported that the VH region amino acid sequence of a phosphocholine (PC)-binding hybridoma antibody of CBA/J origin, HP101 6G6 (6G6), differs extensively from the VH regions of other PC-binding antibodies. The sequence of 6G6 VH appears to be derived from a gene homologous to the BALB/c V11 gene, a member of the PC VH (T15 VH) gene family not normally used to encode PC-binding antibodies. The 6G6 VH sequence differs from the translated sequence of V11 by six amino acids, four of which occur at the same position in other members of this gene family. This coincidence led to the proposal that the 6G6 VH gene was derived by gene conversion involving three genes of the PC VH gene family. We report here the nucleic acid sequence of the rearranged VH gene of hybridoma 6G6. This sequence supports our previous suggestion of gene conversion by confirming those differences, relative to the BALB/c V11 gene sequence, that are encoded by other members of this gene family, and extends this correlation to include three silent base pair substitutions as well. In addition, 5' noncoding region sequence and Southern blot analysis using probes derived from the coding and 5' noncoding regions confirm that the 6G6 VH gene is likely to be derived from the V11 homologue in CBA/J mice, and suggest that all three genes believed to be involved in the generation of the 6G6 VH gene are present in the CBA/J genome, a prerequisite for their involvement in gene conversion.

  10. Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates

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    Krawczak Michael

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is mostly caused by mutations in the PKD1 (polycystic kidney disease 1 gene located in 16p13.3. Moreover, there are six pseudogenes of PKD1 that are located proximal to the master gene in 16p13.1. In contrast, no pseudogene could be detected in the mouse genome, only a single copy gene on chromosome 17. The question arises how the human situation originated phylogenetically. To address this question we applied comparative FISH-mapping of a human PKD1-containing genomic BAC clone and a PKD1-cDNA clone to chromosomes of a variety of primate species and the dog as a non-primate outgroup species. Results Comparative FISH with the PKD1-cDNA clone clearly shows that in all primate species studied distinct single signals map in subtelomeric chromosomal positions orthologous to the short arm of human chromosome 16 harbouring the master PKD1 gene. Only in human and African great apes, but not in orangutan, FISH with both BAC and cDNA clones reveals additional signal clusters located proximal of and clearly separated from the PKD1 master genes indicating the chromosomal position of PKD1 pseudogenes in 16p of these species, respectively. Indeed, this is in accordance with sequencing data in human, chimpanzee and orangutan. Apart from the master PKD1 gene, six pseudogenes are identified in both, human and chimpanzee, while only a single-copy gene is present in the whole-genome sequence of orangutan. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the PKD1-tree reveals that all human pseudogenes are closely related to the human PKD1 gene, and all chimpanzee pseudogenes are closely related to the chimpanzee PKD1 gene. However, our statistical analyses provide strong indication that gene conversion events may have occurred within the PKD1 family members of human and chimpanzee, respectively. Conclusion PKD1 must have undergone amplification very recently in hominid evolution. Duplicative

  11. Massive expansion of the calpain gene family in unicellular eukaryotes

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    Zhao Sen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calpains are Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that participate in a range of crucial cellular processes. Dysfunction of these enzymes may cause, for instance, life-threatening diseases in humans, the loss of sex determination in nematodes and embryo lethality in plants. Although the calpain family is well characterized in animal and plant model organisms, there is a great lack of knowledge about these genes in unicellular eukaryote species (i.e. protists. Here, we study the distribution and evolution of calpain genes in a wide range of eukaryote genomes from major branches in the tree of life. Results Our investigations reveal 24 types of protein domains that are combined with the calpain-specific catalytic domain CysPc. In total we identify 41 different calpain domain architectures, 28 of these domain combinations have not been previously described. Based on our phylogenetic inferences, we propose that at least four calpain variants were established in the early evolution of eukaryotes, most likely before the radiation of all the major supergroups of eukaryotes. Many domains associated with eukaryotic calpain genes can be found among eubacteria or archaebacteria but never in combination with the CysPc domain. Conclusions The analyses presented here show that ancient modules present in prokaryotes, and a few de novo eukaryote domains, have been assembled into many novel domain combinations along the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. Some of the new calpain genes show a narrow distribution in a few branches in the tree of life, likely representing lineage-specific innovations. Hence, the functionally important classical calpain genes found among humans and vertebrates make up only a tiny fraction of the calpain family. In fact, a massive expansion of the calpain family occurred by domain shuffling among unicellular eukaryotes and contributed to a wealth of functionally different genes.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Y; Wu, P Z; Chen, Y P; Li, M R; Wu, G J; Jiang, H W

    2015-12-29

    GRAS proteins play vital roles in plant growth and development. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) was found to have a total of 48 GRAS family members (JcGRAS), 15 more than those found in Arabidopsis. The JcGRAS genes were divided into 12 subfamilies or 15 ancient monophyletic lineages based on the phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from both flowering and lower plants. The functions of GRAS genes in 9 subfamilies have been reported previously for several plants, while the genes in the remaining 3 subfamilies were of unknown function; we named the latter families U1 to U3. No member of U3 subfamily is present in Arabidopsis and Poaceae species according to public genome sequence data. In comparison with the number of GRAS genes in Arabidopsis, more were detected in physic nut, resulting from the retention of many ancient GRAS subfamilies and the formation of tandem repeats during evolution. No evidence of recent duplication among JcGRAS genes was observed in physic nut. Based on digital gene expression data, 21 of the 48 genes exhibited differential expression in four tissues analyzed. Two members of subfamily U3 were expressed only in buds and flowers, implying that they may play specific roles. Our results provide valuable resources for future studies on the functions of GRAS proteins in physic nut.

  13. Mutation Analysis of HTRA2 Gene in Chinese Familial Essential Tremor and Familial Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ya-Chao; Huang, Pei; Li, Qiong-Qiong; Sun, Qian; Li, Dun-Hui; Wang, Tian; Shen, Jun-Yi; Du, Juan-Juan; Cui, Shi-Shuang; Gao, Chao; Fu, Rao; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-01-01

    Background. HTRA2 has already been nominated as PARK13 which may cause Parkinson's disease, though there are still discrepancies among these results. Recently, Gulsuner et al.'s study found that HTRA2 p.G399S is responsible for hereditary essential tremor and homozygotes of this allele develop Parkinson's disease by examining a six-generation family segregating essential tremor and essential tremor coexisting with Parkinson's disease. We performed this study to validate the condition of HTRA2 gene in Chinese familial essential tremor and familial Parkinson's disease patients, especially essential tremor. Methods. We directly sequenced all eight exons, exon-intron boundaries, and part of the introns in 101 familial essential tremor patients, 105 familial Parkinson's disease patients, and 100 healthy controls. Results. No exonic variant was identified, while one exon-intron boundary variant (rs2241028) and one intron variant (rs2241027) were detected, both with no clinical significance and uncertain function. There was no difference in allele, genotype, and haplotype between groups. Conclusions. HTRA2 exonic variant might be rare among Chinese Parkinson's disease and essential tremor patients with family history, and HTRA2 may not be the cause of familial Parkinson's disease and essential tremor in China.

  14. The Cultural Foundations of Family Business Management: Evidence from Ukraine

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    William D. BRICE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically examines what makes Ukrainian family-firm culture unique by comparing the values and beliefs of Ukrainian family-business members with that of professional bank managers within Ukraine. Morck and Yeung (2003 suggest that the implications of family business are especially relevant for former planned economies such as Ukraine in that government’s social policy on the encouragement or discouragement of privately-held sectors of the economy is yet to be fully formed. Ukraine’s future course in this regard is particularly sensitive as the pre-Soviet Ukrainian economy was almost entirely held in private hands while the Soviet-era economy was almost entirely state-controlled. Family-firm literature stresses the differences between family-firm and professional management in terms of culture, goal-setting, and strategy. Family-firm culture is said to be a resource leading to competitive advantage. This study is based on a survey comparing 76 family-firm members and 99 professional managers. Statistically significant differences between the culture of members of family-owned firms and professional managers were found within Ukraine. Family-firm membership had a significant effect in five culture constructs. We can conclude that differences in Power Distance, Social Cynicism, Social Flexibility, Spirituality and Fate Control describe fundamental aspects of family-firms in Ukraine and may possibly contribute to family-firm competitive advantage as discussed in management literature.

  15. Variation in the RAD51 gene and familial breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lose, Felicity; Lovelock, Paul; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Mann, Graham J; Pupo, Gulietta M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Human RAD51 is a homologue of the Escherichia coli RecA protein and is known to function in recombinational repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Mutations in the lower eukaryotic homologues of RAD51 result in a deficiency in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Loss of RAD51 function would therefore be expected to result in an elevated mutation rate, leading to accumulation of DNA damage and, hence, to increased cancer risk. RAD51 interacts directly or indirectly with a number of proteins implicated in breast cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Similar to BRCA1 mice, RAD51-/- mice are embryonic lethal. The RAD51 gene region has been shown to exhibit loss of heterozygosity in breast tumours, and deregulated RAD51 expression in breast cancer patients has also been reported. Few studies have investigated the role of coding region variation in the RAD51 gene in familial breast cancer, with only one coding region variant – exon 6 c.449G>A (p.R150Q) – reported to date. Methods All nine coding exons of the RAD51 gene were analysed for variation in 46 well-characterised, BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer families using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Genotyping of the exon 6 p.R150Q variant was performed in an additional 66 families. Additionally, lymphoblastoid cell lines from breast cancer patients were subjected to single nucleotide primer extension analysis to assess RAD51 expression. Results No coding region variation was found, and all intronic variation detected was either found in unaffected controls or was unlikely to have functional consequences. Single nucleotide primer extension analysis did not reveal any allele-specific changes in RAD51 expression in all lymphoblastoid cell lines tested. Conclusion Our study indicates that RAD51 is not a major familial breast cancer predisposition gene. PMID:16762046

  16. End-of-life family conferences: rooted in the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautrette, Alexandre; Ciroldi, Magali; Ksibi, Hichem; Azoulay, Elie

    2006-11-01

    Critical care clinicians no longer consider family members as visitors in the intensive care unit. Family-centered care has emerged from the results of qualitative and quantitative studies evaluating the specific needs of families of patients dying in the intensive care unit. In addition, interventional studies have established that intensive and proactive communication empowers family members of dying patients, helping them to share in discussions and decisions, if they so wish. In addition to intensive communication, interventional studies have highlighted the role of nurses, social workers, and palliative care teams in reducing family burden, avoiding futile life-sustaining therapies, and providing effective comfort care. End-of-life family conferences are formal, structured meetings between intensivists and family members. Guidelines for organizing these conferences take into account the specific needs of families, including reassurance that the patient's symptoms will be adequately managed; honest clear information about the patient's condition and treatment; a willingness on the part of physicians to listen and respond to family members and to address their emotions; attention to patient preferences; clear explanations about surrogate decision making; and continuous, compassionate, and technically proficient attention to the patient's needs until death occurs. Means of improving end-of-life care have been identified in epidemiologic and interventional studies. End-of-life family conferences constitute the keystone around which excellent end-of-life care can be built.

  17. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) gene family revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  18. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR gene family revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Golan

    Full Text Available Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1 was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each, whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons. ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA. Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  19. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  20. Evolutionary history of the reprimo tumor suppressor gene family in vertebrates with a description of a new reprimo gene lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Ignacio A; Zavala, Kattina; Hoffmann, Federico G; Vandewege, Michael W; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Amigo, Julio D; Owen, Gareth I; Opazo, Juan C

    2016-10-10

    Genes related to human diseases should be natural targets for evolutionary studies, since they could provide clues regarding the genetic bases of pathologies and potential treatments. Here we studied the evolution of the reprimo gene family, a group of tumor-suppressor genes that are implicated in p53-mediated cell cycle arrest. These genes, especially the reprimo duplicate located on human chromosome 2, have been associated with epigenetic modifications correlated with transcriptional silencing and cancer progression. We demonstrate the presence of a third reprimo lineage that, together with the reprimo and reprimo-like genes, appears to have been differentially retained during the evolutionary history of vertebrates. We present evidence that these reprimo lineages originated early in vertebrate evolution and expanded as a result of the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred in the last common ancestor of vertebrates. The reprimo gene has been lost in birds, and the third reprimo gene lineage has been retained in only a few distantly related species, such as coelacanth and gar. Expression analyses revealed that the reprimo paralogs are mainly expressed in the nervous system. Different vertebrate lineages have retained different reprimo paralogs, and even in species that have retained multiple copies, only one of them is heavily expressed.

  1. Interferon-inducible Ifi200-family genes as modifiers of lupus susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker

    2012-09-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex autoimmune disease. The disease exhibits a strong gender bias and develops predominantly in females. Additionally, most SLE patients exhibit increased serum levels of interferon-α (IFN-α) and the "IFN signature". Studies using the mouse models of lupus have identified several lupus susceptibility loci, including the New Zealand Black (NZB)-derived autoimmunity 2 (Nba2) interval on the chromosome 1. The interval, which is syntenic to the human chromosome 1q region, harbors the FcγR family, SLAM/CD2-family, and the IFN-inducible Ifi200-family genes (encoding for the p200-family proteins). Studies involving the B6.Nba2 congenic mice revealed that the development of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) depends on the age, gender, and activation of type I IFN-signaling. Interestingly, recent studies involving the generation of Nba2 subcongenic mouse lines and generation of mice deficient for the Fcgr2b or Aim2 gene within the interval have provided evidence that epistatic interactions among the Nba2 genes contribute to increased lupus susceptibility. Given that the expression of some of the p200-family proteins is differentially regulated by sex hormones and these proteins differentially regulate cytosolic DNA-induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18), the major known contributors of SLE-associated inflammation, we discuss the recent advancements in our understanding of the role of p200-family proteins in lupus susceptibility modification. An improved understanding of the role of p200-family proteins in the development of autoimmunity is likely to identify new approaches to treat SLE patients.

  2. The Family Impact Lens: A Family-Focused, Evidence-Informed Approach to Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschneider, Karen; Little, Olivia M.; Ooms, Theodora; Benning, Sara; Cadigan, Karen; Corbett, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Families have long been recognized for the contributions they make to their members and to society. Yet families are seldom substantively incorporated into the normal course of policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation. We propose the family impact lens as one way to shift the rhetoric from appreciating families to…

  3. The Family Impact Lens: A Family-Focused, Evidence-Informed Approach to Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschneider, Karen; Little, Olivia M.; Ooms, Theodora; Benning, Sara; Cadigan, Karen; Corbett, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Families have long been recognized for the contributions they make to their members and to society. Yet families are seldom substantively incorporated into the normal course of policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation. We propose the family impact lens as one way to shift the rhetoric from appreciating families to…

  4. Biofuel Potential of Plants Transformed Genetically With NAC Family Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NAC genes contribute to enhance survivability of plants under conditions of environmental stress and in secondary growth of the plants, thereby building biomass. Thus, genetic transformation of plants using NAC genes provides a possibility to tailor made biofuel plants. Over-expression studies have indicated that NAC family genes can provide tolerance to various biotic and abiotic stresses, either by physiological or biochemical changes at the cellular level, or by affecting visible morphological and anatomical changes, for example by development of lateral roots in a number of plants. Over-expression of these genes also work as triggers for development of secondary cell walls. In our laboratory, we have observed a NAC gene from Lepidium latifolium contributing to both enhanced biomass as well as cold stress tolerance of model plants tobacco. Thus, we have reviewed all the developments of genetic engineering using NAC genes which could enhance the traits required for biofuel plants, either by enhancing the stress tolerance or by enhancing the biomass of the plants. KeywordsNAC, Genetically engineered plants, Abiotic stress tolerance, Secondary growth, Cell wall synthesis, Biomass

  5. ADHD and Dyscalculia: Evidence for Independent Familial Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monuteaux, Michael C.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Herzig, Kathleen; Navsaria, Neha; Biederman, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The familial relationship between dyscalculia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was assessed. We conducted a familial risk analysis using probands with and without ADHD of both genders and their first-degree relatives. Participants were assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and a cognitive test battery. We found elevated…

  6. Gene turnover in the avian globin gene families and evolutionary changes in hemoglobin isoform expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Witt, Christopher C; Berenbrink, Michael; Storz, Jay F

    2015-04-01

    The apparent stasis in the evolution of avian chromosomes suggests that birds may have experienced relatively low rates of gene gain and loss in multigene families. To investigate this possibility and to explore the phenotypic consequences of variation in gene copy number, we examined evolutionary changes in the families of genes that encode the α- and β-type subunits of hemoglobin (Hb), the tetrameric α2β2 protein responsible for blood-O2 transport. A comparative genomic analysis of 52 bird species revealed that the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families have remained remarkably constant during approximately 100 My of avian evolution. Most interspecific variation in gene content is attributable to multiple independent inactivations of the α(D)-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunit of a functionally distinct Hb isoform (HbD) that is expressed in both embryonic and definitive erythrocytes. Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates products of the α(A)-globin gene), recurrent losses of α(D)-globin contribute to among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity. Analysis of HbA/HbD expression levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal. In comparison with the homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa.

  7. Genomic analysis of the TRIM family reveals two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanella Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TRIM family is composed of multi-domain proteins that display the Tripartite Motif (RING, B-box and Coiled-coil that can be associated with a C-terminal domain. TRIM genes are involved in ubiquitylation and are implicated in a variety of human pathologies, from Mendelian inherited disorders to cancer, and are also involved in cellular response to viral infection. Results Here we defined the entire human TRIM family and also identified the TRIM sets of other vertebrate (mouse, rat, dog, cow, chicken, tetraodon, and zebrafish and invertebrate species (fruitfly, worm, and ciona. By means of comparative analyses we found that, after assembly of the tripartite motif in an early metazoan ancestor, few types of C-terminal domains have been associated with this module during evolution and that an important increase in TRIM number occurred in vertebrate species concomitantly with the addition of the SPRY domain. We showed that the human TRIM family is split into two groups that differ in domain structure, genomic organization and evolutionary properties. Group 1 members present a variety of C-terminal domains, are highly conserved among vertebrate species, and are represented in invertebrates. Conversely, group 2 is absent in invertebrates, is characterized by the presence of a C-terminal SPRY domain and presents unique sets of genes in each mammal examined. The generation of independent sets of group 2 genes is also evident in the other vertebrate species. Comparing the murine and human TRIM sets, we found that group 1 and 2 genes evolve at different speeds and are subject to different selective pressures. Conclusion We found that the TRIM family is composed of two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties. Group 2 is younger, highly dynamic, and might act as a reservoir to develop novel TRIM functions. Since some group 2 genes are implicated in innate immune response, their evolutionary features may account for

  8. Family processes in the development of youth depression: translating the evidence to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restifo, K.; Bögels, S.

    2009-01-01

    There is strong evidence that family factors play a role in the development, maintenance and course of youth depression. However, to date few clinical trials of psychotherapy for youth depression employ family therapy interventions or target the known family risk factors. This is surprising given re

  9. Evolutionary history of chordate PAX genes: dynamics of change in a complex gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rodrigues Paixão-Côrtes

    Full Text Available Paired box (PAX genes are transcription factors that play important roles in embryonic development. Although the PAX gene family occurs in animals only, it is widely distributed. Among the vertebrates, its 9 genes appear to be the product of complete duplication of an original set of 4 genes, followed by an additional partial duplication. Although some studies of PAX genes have been conducted, no comprehensive survey of these genes across the entire taxonomic unit has yet been attempted. In this study, we conducted a detailed comparison of PAX sequences from 188 chordates, which revealed restricted variation. The absence of PAX4 and PAX8 among some species of reptiles and birds was notable; however, all 9 genes were present in all 74 mammalian genomes investigated. A search for signatures of selection indicated that all genes are subject to purifying selection, with a possible constraint relaxation in PAX4, PAX7, and PAX8. This result indicates asymmetric evolution of PAX family genes, which can be associated with the emergence of adaptive novelties in the chordate evolutionary trajectory.

  10. Genome-wide characterization of soybean P 1B -ATPases gene family provides functional implications in cadmium responses

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lei; Deng, Xiaojuan; Wang, Peng; Ma, Qibin; Nian, Hai; Wang, Yingxiang; Yang, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Background The P1B-ATPase subfamily is an important group involved in transporting heavy metals and has been extensively studied in model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Emerging evidence indicates that one homolog in Glycine max is also involved in cadmium (Cd) stress, but the gene family has not been fully investigated in soybean. Results Here, we identified 20 heavy metal ATPase (HMA) family members in the soybean genome, presented as 10 paralogous pairs, which is si...

  11. FlyPhy: a phylogenomic analysis platform for Drosophila genes and gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Qiyu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of 12 fully sequenced Drosophila species genomes provides an excellent opportunity to explore the evolutionary mechanism, structure and function of gene families in Drosophila. Currently, several important resources, such as FlyBase, FlyMine and DroSpeGe, have been devoted to integrating genetic, genomic, and functional data of Drosophila into a well-organized form. However, all of these resources are gene-centric and lack the information of the gene families in Drosophila. Description FlyPhy is a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis platform devoted to analyzing the genes and gene families in Drosophila. Genes were classified into families using a graph-based Markov Clustering algorithm and extensively annotated by a number of bioinformatic tools, such as basic sequence features, functional category, gene ontology terms, domain organization and sequence homolog to other databases. FlyPhy provides a simple and user-friendly web interface to allow users to browse and retrieve the information at multiple levels. An outstanding feature of the FlyPhy is that all the retrieved results can be added to a workset for further data manipulation. For the data stored in the workset, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction and visualization can be easily performed to investigate the sequence variation of each given family and to explore its evolutionary mechanism. Conclusion With the above functionalities, FlyPhy will be a useful resource and convenient platform for the Drosophila research community. The FlyPhy is available at http://bioinformatics.zj.cn/fly/.

  12. Search for cardiac calcium cycling gene mutations in familial ventricular arrhythmias resembling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toivonen Lauri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a severe inherited cardiac disorder caused by mutations predominantly in the ryanodine receptor (RyR2 gene. We sought to identify mutations in genes affecting cardiac calcium cycling in patients with CPVT and in less typical familial exercise-related ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results We recruited 33 consecutive patients with frequent ventricular premature complexes (VPCs without structural heart disease and often history of syncope or sudden death in family. Sixteen of the patients featured a phenotype typical of CPVT. In 17 patients, VPCs emerged also at rest. Exercise stress test and echocardiography were performed to each patient and 232 family members. Familial background was evident in 42% of cases (n = 14. We sequenced all the coding exons of the RyR2, FKBP1B, ATP2A2 and SLC8A1 genes from the index patients. Single channel recordings of a mutant RyR2 were performed in planar lipid bilayers. Two novel RyR2 missense mutations (R1051P and S616L and two RyR2 exon 3 deletions were identified, explaining 25% of the CPVT phenotypes. A rare variant (N3308S with open probabilities similar to the wild type channels in vitro, was evident in a patient with resting VPCs. No disease-causing variants were detectable in the FKBP1B, ATP2A2 or SLC8A1 genes. Conclusion We report two novel CPVT-causing RyR2 mutations and a novel RyR2 variant of uncertain clinical significance in a patient with abundant resting VPCs. Our data also strengthen the previous assumption that exon 3 deletions of RyR2 should screened for in CPVT and related phenotypes.

  13. Influence of family structure on child health: evidence from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Ram, Faujdar

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines the association between family structure and child health in India using the third round of the National Family Health Survey, conducted during 2005-06. Two important child health indicators - underweight and full immunization - are used as dependent variables. Descriptive and multivariate statistics are deployed to establish the relationship between family structure and child health. The results of the descriptive statistics show that children who belong to a non-nuclear family have better nutritional status and higher immunization coverage than those in nuclear families. Children living with siblings have worse health status than those living without siblings for both the outcomes. Multivariate analysis shows that family structure has a small effect on the two child health outcomes, which is no longer significant after adjusting for socioeconomic measures and region. However, number of siblings is significantly and negatively associated with the nutritional status of children and full immunization coverage, even after other socio-demographic and geographic factors are controlled for. Along with family structure, parent's educational attainment, age of the mother and household economic status are significant determinants of underweight and full immunization.

  14. BRCA1 Gene Mutations in Chinese Families with Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurong Shi; Chenbin Li; Ruifang Niu; Xishan Hao; Xiangcheng Zhi; Liansheng Ning

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the frequency of BRCA1 gene mutations in breast cancer families in China.METHODS Genomic DNA was obtained by conventional techniques from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from 94 persons derived from 45 breast cancer families. All participants gave written informed consent. The mutations in the BRCA1 gene were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism(PCR-SSCP). Then , the samples of interest were sent for direct DNA sequencing.RESULTS No mutation sites were found in exon 2 or 20 by DNA sequencing.Eight sites were found in exon 11 such as 2201C>T (Ser694Ser),3232A>G(Glu 1038Gly), 2201C >A/G (Ser694Arg), 2731C >T (Pro871Leu),2086A >T(Asn591lle) and three sites of 1584G>T (Glu424Stop). Three mutation sites were found in exon 16 which included 5106A >G (Met1663Val),5208delT(Stop 1639) and 4956A>G (Ser 1613Gly).CONCLUSION These mutation sites may be related to breast cancer, but more investigation is needed to determine whether the mutation sites are hot spots of mutations in Chinese familial breast cancer patients.

  15. Family genetic algorithms based on gene exchange and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianhua; Ding Xiangqian; Wang Sunan; Yu Qing

    2006-01-01

    Genetic Algorithms (GA) are a search techniques based on mechanics of nature selection and have already been successfully applied in many diverse areas. However, increasing samples show that GA's performance is not as good as it was expected to be. Criticism of this algorithm includes the slow speed and premature result during convergence procedure. In order to improve the performance, the population size and individuals' space is emphatically described. The influence of individuals' space and population size on the operators is analyzed. And a novel family genetic algorithm (FGA) is put forward based on this analysis. In this novel algorithm, the optimum solution families closed to quality individuals is constructed, which is exchanged found by a search in the world space. Search will be done in this microspace. The family that can search better genes in a limited period of time would win a new life. At the same time, the best gene of this micro space with the basic population in the world space is exchanged. Finally, the FGA is applied to the function optimization and image matching through several experiments. The results show that the FGA possessed high performance.

  16. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C. [NIDR, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  17. Family involvement, internal control and agency costs – Evidences from China's listed family firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wangfeng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the agency costs of 314 family firms listed on Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchange in China. The results show that agency costs of family firms increase significantly with the enhancement of family's ownership and the separation of ownership and control, while family involvement in management can reduce the agency costs. By including the variable proxying internal control and the interaction term between internal control and family involvement in the empirical model, we still find that the effects of family involvement on agency costs are contingent on the quality of internal control.

  18. Multiple inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfers in the evolution of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmei Peng

    Full Text Available Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought.

  19. A novel mutation of KCNQ3 gene in a Chinese family with benign familial neonatal convulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Nan; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanmin; Guo, Jifeng; Xia, Kun; Pan, Qian; Tang, Beisha

    2008-03-01

    Benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC, also named benign familial neonatal seizures, BFNS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited epilepsy syndrome with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Two voltage-gated potassium channel subunit genes, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, have been identified to cause BFNC1 and BFNC2, respectively. To date, only three mutations of KCNQ3, all located within exon 5, have been reported. By limited linkage analysis and mutation analysis of KCNQ3 in a Chinese family with BFNC, we identified a novel missense mutation of KCNQ3, c.988C>T located within exon 6. c.988C>T led to the substitution Cys for Arg in amino acid position 330 (p.R330C) in KCNQ3 potassium channel, which possibly impaired the neuronal M-current and altered neuronal excitability. Seizures of all BFNC patients started from day 2 to 3 after birth and remitted during 1 month, and no recurrence was found. One family member who displayed fever-associated seizures for two times at age 5 years and was diagnosed as febrile seizures, however, did not carry this mutation, which suggests that febrile seizures and BFNC have different pathogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of KCNQ3 mutation in Chinese family with BFNC.

  20. Duplications and positive selection drive the evolution of parasitism associated gene families in the nematode Strongyloides papillosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Praveen; Jaleta, Tegegn G; Streit, Adrian; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2017-03-02

    Gene duplication is one major mechanism playing a role in the evolution of phenotypic complexity and in the generation of novel traits. By comparing parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes, a recent study found that the evolution of parasitism in Strongyloididae is associated with a large expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families.To gain novel insights into the developmental processes in the sheep parasite Strongyloides papillosus, we sequenced transcriptomes of different developmental stages and sexes. Overall, we found that the majority of genes are developmentally regulated and have one-to-one orthologs in the diverged S. ratti genome. Together with the finding of similar expression profiles between S. papillosus and S. ratti, these results indicate a strong evolutionary constraint acting against change at sequence and expression levels. However, the comparison between parasitic and free-living females demonstrates a quite divergent pattern that is mostly due to the previously mentioned expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families. More detailed phylogenetic analysis of both gene families shows that most members date back to single expansion events early in the Strongyloides lineage and have undergone subfunctionalization resulting in clusters that are highly expressed either in infective larvae or in parasitic females. Finally, we found increased evidence for positive selection in both gene families relative to the genome-wide expectation.In summary, our study reveals first insights into the developmental transcriptomes of S. papillosus and provides a detailed analysis of sequence and expression evolution in parasitism associated gene families.

  1. The ANKH gene and familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Patrick; Bardin, Thomas; Bianchi, Arnaud; Richette, Pascal; Loeuille, Damien

    2004-09-01

    Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease is a chronic condition in which CPPD microcrystals deposit in the joint fluid, cartilage, and periarticular tissues. Two forms of familial CPPD disease have been identified: CCAL1 and CCAL2. The CCAL1 locus is located on the long arm of chromosome 8 and is associated with CPPD and severe osteoarthritis. The CCAL2 locus has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 5 and identified in families from the Alsace region of France and the United Kingdom. The ANKH protein is involved in pyrophosphate metabolism and, more specifically, in pyrophosphate transport from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Numerous ANKH gene mutations cause familial CCAL2; they enhance ANKH protein activity, thereby elevating extracellular pyrophosphate levels and promoting the formation of pyrophosphate crystals, which produce the manifestations of the disease. Recent studies show that growth factors and cytokines can modify the expression of the normal ANKH protein. These results suggest a role for ANKH in sporadic CPPD disease and in CPPD associated with degenerative disease.

  2. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: 1 Family, 2 Phenotypes, and 2 Mutated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M K; Laouina, S; El Alloussi, M; Dollfus, H; Bloch-Zupan, A

    2016-12-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by enamel defects. The authors have identified a large consanguineous Moroccan family segregating different clinical subtypes of hypoplastic and hypomineralized AI in different individuals within the family. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, the authors identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in COL17A1 (c.1873C>T, p.R625*) segregating with hypoplastic AI and a novel homozygous 8-bp deletion in C4orf26 (c.39_46del, p.Cys14Glyfs*18) segregating with hypomineralized-hypoplastic AI in this family. This study highlights the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of AI that can exist even within a single consanguineous family. Furthermore, the identification of novel mutations in COL17A1 and C4orf26 and their correlation with distinct AI phenotypes can contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AI and the contribution of these genes to amelogenesis.

  3. Families of Diaporthales based on morphological and phylogenetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, I C; Crous, P W; Groenewald, J Z; Maharachchikumbura, S S N; Jeewon, R; Phillips, A J L; Bhat, J D; Perera, R H; Li, Q R; Li, W J; Tangthirasunun, N; Norphanphoun, C; Karunarathna, S C; Camporesi, E; Manawasighe, I S; Al-Sadi, A M; Hyde, K D

    2017-03-01

    Diaporthales is an important ascomycetous order comprising phytopathogenic, saprobic, and endophytic fungi, but interfamilial taxonomic relationships are still ambiguous. Despite its cosmopolitan distribution and high diversity with distinctive morphologies, this order has received relativelyiaceae, Macrohilaceae, Melanconidaceae, Pseudoplagiostomaceae, Schizoparmaceae, Stilbosporaceae and Sydowiellaceae. Taxonomic uncertainties among genera are also clarified and recurrent discrepancies in the taxonomic position of families within the Diaporthales are discussed. An updated outline and key to families and genera of the order is presented.

  4. A reticular rhapsody: phylogenic evolution and nomenclature of the RTN/Nogo gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertle, Thomas; Klinger, Michael; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Schwab, Martin E

    2003-07-01

    Reticulon (RTN) genes code for a family of proteins relatively recently described in higher vertebrates. The four known mammalian paralogues (RTN1, -2, -3, and -4/Nogo) have homologous carboxyl termini with two characteristic large hydrophobic regions. Except for RTN4-A/Nogo-A, thought to be an inhibitor for neurite outgrowth, restricting the regenerative capabilities of the mammalian CNS after injury, the functions of other family members are largely unknown. The overall occurrence of RTNs in different phyla and the evolution of the RTN gene family have hitherto not been analyzed. Here we expound data showing that the RTN family has arisen during early eukaryotic evolution potentially concerted to the establishment of the endomembrane system. Over 250 reticulon-like (RTNL) genes were identified in deeply diverging eukaryotes, fungi, plants, and animals. A systematic nomenclature for all identified family members is introduced. The analysis of exon-intron arrangements and of protein homologies allowed us to isolate key steps in the history of these genes. Our data corroborate the hypothesis that present RTNs evolved from an intron-rich reticulon ancestor mainly by the loss of different introns in diverse phyla. We also present evidence that the exceptionally large RTN4-A-specific exon 3, which harbors a potent neurite growth inhibitory region, may have arisen de novo approximately 350 MYA during transition to land vertebrates. These data emphasize on the one hand the universal role of reticulons in the eukaryotic system and on the other hand the acquisition of putative new functions through acquirement of novel amino-terminal exons.

  5. Happiness and success: genes, families, and the psychological effects of socioeconomic position and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittker, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence linking success -- including wealth, marriage, and friendships -- to happiness, this relationship might not reflect, as is often assumed, the effects of the proximate environment on well-being. Such an interpretation is contravened by evidence that both happiness and the environment are influenced by genetic factors and family upbringing. Using the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, which includes a subsample of twins, this study evaluates the relationship between happiness and various features of success before and after eliminating the influence of endowments. The results suggest that many putative indicators of the environment are highly heritable and, indeed, that the same genes that affect the environment may affect happiness as well. Yet the results also suggest that the role of genetic endowments varies considerably across different features of success, suggesting complex patterns of selection, reinforcement, and causation among genes and the environment.

  6. Family composition and children's dental health behavior: evidence from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether children's dental health behavior differs between family compositions of either natural parents or birth mothers together with stepfathers. We use data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) public use file. This is the first nationally r ep resentative sample on child health in Germany and particularly contains variables for dental attendance, tooth care, and eating behavior of 13,904 children below 14 years of age. A series of zero-inflated Poisson, ordinary least squares, binary, and ordered logistic regression models was set up in order to identify whether family composition is a significant explanatory variable for children's dental health behavior. Family composition turned out as a significant parameter for some aspects of children's dental health behavior. Specifically, children who grow up in families with a birth mother and a stepfather have only half the probability to access dental services but, once seeking treatment, the number of visits is significantly higher in comparison with children raised by their natural parents. Moreover, children growing up in such a patchwork family setting consume a higher amount of sugary foods and drinks. This appears mainly attributable to differential consumption habits for juices, cookies, and chocolate. Children who grow up in settings other than the nuclear family may develop different dental health behaviors than children who grow up with both natural parents, albeit more research is needed to identify the extent to which such behavioral changes lead to variations in caries occurrence.

  7. Available Evidence on Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharashi, Maan; Fulton, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a group of severe inherited retinal dystrophies that lead to early childhood blindness. In the last decade, interest in LCA has increased as advances in genetics have been applied to better identify, classify, and treat LCA. To date, 23 LCA genes have been identified. Gene replacement in the RPE65 form of LCA represents a major advance in treatment, although limitations have been recognized. In this article, we review the clinical and genetic features of LCA and evaluate the evidence available for gene therapy in RPE65 disease.

  8. Impact of obesity on IL-12 family gene expression in insulin responsive tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Heesun; Ferguson, Bradley S; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Morrison, Ron F

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence has established a role for chronic inflammation in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, as genetic ablation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines elevated in obesity improves insulin signaling in vitro and in vivo. Recent evidence further highlights interleukin (IL)-12 family cytokines as prospective inflammatory mediators linking obesity to insulin resistance. In this study, we present empirical evidence demonstrating that IL-12 family related genes are expressed and regulated in insulin-responsive tissues under conditions of obesity. First, we report that respective mRNAs for each of the known members of this cytokine family are expressed within detectable ranges in WAT, skeletal muscle, liver and heart. Second, we show that these cytokines and their cognate receptors are divergently regulated with genetic obesity in a tissue-specific manner. Third, we demonstrate that select IL-12 family cytokines are regulated in WAT in a manner that is dependent on the developmental stage of obesity as well as the inflammatory progression associated with obesity. Fourth, we report that respective mRNAs for IL-12 cytokines and receptors are also expressed and divergently regulated in cultured adipocytes under conditions of inflammatory stress. To our knowledge, this report is the first study to systemically evaluated mRNA expression of all IL-12 family cytokines and receptors in any tissue under conditions of obesity highlighting select family members as potential mediators linking excess nutrient intake to metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, diabetes and heart disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Two Chinese Families with Dyschromatoses by Targeted Gene Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Wei Liu; Asan; Jun Sun; Sergio Vano-Galvan; Feng-Xia Liu; Xiu-Xiu Wei; Dong-Lai Ma

    2016-01-01

    Background: The dyschromatoses are a group of disorders characterized by simultaneous hyperpigmented macules together with hypopigmented macules.Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) and dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria are two major types.While clinical and histological presentations are similar in these two diseases, genetic diagnosis is critical in the differential diagnosis of these entities.Methods: Three patients initially diagnosed with DUH were included.The gene test was carried out by targeted gene sequencing.All mutations detected on ADAR1 and ABCB6 genes were analyzed according to the frequency in control database, the mutation types, and the published evidence to determine the pathogenicity.Results: Family pedigree and clinical presentations were reported in 3 patients from two Chinese families.All patients have prominent cutaneous dyschromatoses involving the whole body without systemic complications.Different pathogenic genes in these patients with similar phenotype were identified: One novel mutation on ADAR1 (c.1325C>G) and one recurrent mutation in ABCB6 (c.1270T>C), which successfully distinguished two diseases with the similar phenotype.Conclusion: Targeted gene sequencing is an effective tool for genetic diagnosis in pigmentary skin diseases.

  10. Genome-wide characterization of soybean P 1B -ATPases gene family provides functional implications in cadmium responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lei; Deng, Xiaojuan; Wang, Peng; Ma, Qibin; Nian, Hai; Wang, Yingxiang; Yang, Cunyi

    2016-05-20

    The P1B-ATPase subfamily is an important group involved in transporting heavy metals and has been extensively studied in model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Emerging evidence indicates that one homolog in Glycine max is also involved in cadmium (Cd) stress, but the gene family has not been fully investigated in soybean. Here, we identified 20 heavy metal ATPase (HMA) family members in the soybean genome, presented as 10 paralogous pairs, which is significantly greater than the number in Arabidopsis or rice, and was likely caused by the latest whole genome duplication event in soybean. A phylogenetic analysis divided the 20 members into six groups, each having conserved or divergent gene structures and protein motif patterns. The integration of RNA-sequencing and qRT-PCR data from multiple tissues provided an overall expression pattern for the HMA family in soybean. Further comparisons of expression patterns and the single nucleotide polymorphism distribution between paralogous pairs suggested functional conservation and the divergence of HMA genes during soybean evolution. Finally, analyses of the HMAs expressed in response to Cd stress provided evidence on how plants manage Cd tolerance, at least in the two contrasting soybean genotypes examined. The genome-wide identification, chromosomal distribution, gene structures, and evolutionary and expression analyses of the 20 HMA genes in soybean provide an overall insight into their potential involvement in Cd responses. These results will facilitate further research on the HMA gene family, and their conserved and divergent biological functions in soybean.

  11. Management of asymptomatic gene carriers of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hartmut H-J; Barroso, Fabio; González-Duarte, Alejandra; Conceição, Isabel; Obici, Laura; Keohane, Denis; Amass, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a rare, severe, and irreversible, adult-onset, hereditary disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in the TTR gene that increase the intrinsic propensity of transthyretin protein to misfold and deposit systemically as insoluble amyloid fibrils in nerve tissues, the heart, and other organs. TTR-FAP is characterized by relentless, progressively debilitating polyneuropathy, and leads to death, on average, within 10 years of symptom onset without treatment. With increased availability of disease-modifying treatment options for a wider spectrum of patients with TTR-FAP, timely detection of the disease may offer substantial clinical benefits. This review discusses mutation-specific predictive genetic testing in first-degree relatives of index patients diagnosed with TTR-FAP and the structured clinical follow-up of asymptomatic gene carriers for prompt diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention before accumulation of substantial damage. Muscle Nerve 54: 353-360, 2016.

  12. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-07-15

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins.

  13. Family Coaching as a delivery modality for evidence-based prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Youssef, Maryann K

    2017-08-01

    Family Coaching is proposed as a new delivery format for evidence-based prevention programs (EBPPs). Three recent developments in health promotion support the potential efficacy of Family Coaching: (1) renewed interest in integrated prevention programs for multiple risk factors and behavior changes, (2) broad and long-term impacts of family-based interventions, and (3) popular acceptance of "coaching" as a nonstigmatizing, goal-focused intervention strategy. Family coaches are community members and paraprofessionals trained in common elements of EBPP. Family Coaching has specific goals, is short term, and has definable outcomes. Coaches frame the program's goals to be consistent with the family's values, normalize the family's experience, assess their strengths, and help the family set goals and develop skills and routines to problem solve challenging situations. Broad dissemination of EBPP will be facilitated with delivery formats that are flexible to meet families' priorities and providers' desires and capacities to tailor programs to local contexts.

  14. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion.

  15. Molecular Evolution of the TET Gene Family in Mammals

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    Hiromichi Akahori

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten-eleven translocation (TET proteins, a family of Fe2+- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, are involved in DNA demethylation. They also help regulate various cellular functions. Three TET paralogs have been identified (TET1, TET2, and TET3 in humans. This study focuses on the evolution of mammalian TET genes. Distinct patterns in TET1 and TET2 vs. TET3 were revealed by codon-based tests of positive selection. Results indicate that TET1 and TET2 genes have experienced positive selection more frequently than TET3 gene, and that the majority of codon sites evolved under strong negative selection. These findings imply that the selective pressure on TET3 may have been relaxed in several lineages during the course of evolution. Our analysis of convergent amino acid substitutions also supports the different evolutionary dynamics among TET gene subfamily members. All of the five amino acid sites that are inferred to have evolved under positive selection in the catalytic domain of TET2 are localized at the protein’s outer surface. The adaptive changes of these positively selected amino acid sites could be associated with dynamic interactions between other TET-interacting proteins, and positive selection thus appears to shift the regulatory scheme of TET enzyme function.

  16. Incarceration and Family Stress as Understood through the Family Process Theory: Evidence from Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Wing Hong

    2016-01-01

    The myriad of negative effects brought about by the incarceration of a family member have consistently been demonstrated in research. However, previous works have tended to focus on the perspectives of family members separately, rather than exploring the dynamic relationships within the family as an entire unit. Moreover, such research is still limited in the Chinese cultural context. Thus, the current study aimed to examine the applicability of the Family Process Theory on a small sample of Chinese fathers who were imprisoned and have returned to their communities, conceptualizing the challenges faced by their families under the theoretical elements of rules of transformation, rituals, ambiguous loss, and boundary ambiguity. A total of 17 participants were recruited through the assistance of service organizations, and data were collected via semi-structured interviews. As congruent with the theory, inmates' families were found to come across problems particularly in the transitioning phase and establishment of new rituals, while ambiguity surrounding the incarceration and the blurred role of the father led to problems with fatherhood identity both during and after the incarceration. Recommendations are made, in line with these findings and the suggestions of ex-prisoners, for services to have more of a focus on preserving the integrity of inmates' families. Given the right circumstances, families can even serve as a motivator for incarcerated fathers to improve themselves and mature, leveraging the important supportive role of the family and the fear of again being separated from one's family as effective deterrents to recidivism.

  17. Association of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genes with Hodgkin's Lymphoma in a Familial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Fionnuala; Orsi, Laurent; Amiel, Corinne; Lependeven, Catherine; Antoni, Guillemette; Hermine, Olivier; Brice, Pauline; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Canioni, Danielle; Brière, Josette; Raphael, Martine; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Clavel, Jacqueline; Middleton, Derek; Vivier, Eric; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the major environmental factor associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), a common lymphoma in young adults. Natural killer (NK) cells are key actors of the innate immune response against viruses. The regulation of NK cell function involves activating and inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which are expressed in variable numbers on NK cells. Various viral and virus-related malignant disorders have been associated with the presence/absence of certain KIR genes in case/control studies. We investigated the role of the KIR cluster in HL in a family-based association study. Methodology We included 90 families with 90 HL index cases (age 16–35 years) and 255 first-degree relatives (parents and siblings). We developed a procedure for reconstructing full genotypic information (number of gene copies) at each KIR locus from the standard KIR gene content. Out of the 90 collected families, 84 were informative and suitable for further analysis. An association study was then carried out with specific family-based analysis methods on these 84 families. Principal Findings Five KIR genes in strong linkage disequilibrium were found significantly associated with HL. Refined haplotype analysis showed that the association was supported by a dominant protective effect of KIR3DS1 and/or KIR2DS1, both of which are activating receptors. The odds ratios for developing HL in subjects with at least one copy of KIR3DS1 or KIR2DS1 with respect to subjects with neither of these genes were 0.44[95% confidence interval 0.23–0.85] and 0.42[0.21–0.85], respectively. No significant association was found in a tentative replication case/control study of 68 HL cases (age 18–71 years). In the familial study, the protective effect of KIR3DS1/KIR2DS1 tended to be stronger in HL patients with detectable EBV in blood or tumour cells. Conclusions This work defines a template for family-based association studies based on full genotypic

  18. Association of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes with Hodgkin's lymphoma in a familial study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Besson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is the major environmental factor associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL, a common lymphoma in young adults. Natural killer (NK cells are key actors of the innate immune response against viruses. The regulation of NK cell function involves activating and inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which are expressed in variable numbers on NK cells. Various viral and virus-related malignant disorders have been associated with the presence/absence of certain KIR genes in case/control studies. We investigated the role of the KIR cluster in HL in a family-based association study. METHODOLOGY: We included 90 families with 90 HL index cases (age 16-35 years and 255 first-degree relatives (parents and siblings. We developed a procedure for reconstructing full genotypic information (number of gene copies at each KIR locus from the standard KIR gene content. Out of the 90 collected families, 84 were informative and suitable for further analysis. An association study was then carried out with specific family-based analysis methods on these 84 families. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five KIR genes in strong linkage disequilibrium were found significantly associated with HL. Refined haplotype analysis showed that the association was supported by a dominant protective effect of KIR3DS1 and/or KIR2DS1, both of which are activating receptors. The odds ratios for developing HL in subjects with at least one copy of KIR3DS1 or KIR2DS1 with respect to subjects with neither of these genes were 0.44[95% confidence interval 0.23-0.85] and 0.42[0.21-0.85], respectively. No significant association was found in a tentative replication case/control study of 68 HL cases (age 18-71 years. In the familial study, the protective effect of KIR3DS1/KIR2DS1 tended to be stronger in HL patients with detectable EBV in blood or tumour cells. CONCLUSIONS: This work defines a template for family-based association studies based on full

  19. MADS-box gene family in rice: genome-wide identification, organization and expression profiling during reproductive development and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rita; Agarwal, Pinky; Ray, Swatismita; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pal; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2007-07-18

    genes under stress conditions is also evident. An attempt has been made to gain insight into plausible functions of rice MADS-box genes by collating the expression data of functionally validated genes in rice and Arabidopsis. Only a limited number of MADS genes have been functionally validated in rice. A comprehensive annotation and transcriptome profiling undertaken in this investigation adds to our understanding of the involvement of MADS-box family genes during reproductive development and stress in rice and also provides the basis for selection of candidate genes for functional validation studies.

  20. MADS-box gene family in rice: genome-wide identification, organization and expression profiling during reproductive development and stress

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    Tyagi Akhilesh K

    2007-07-01

    . Differential expression of seven genes under stress conditions is also evident. An attempt has been made to gain insight into plausible functions of rice MADS-box genes by collating the expression data of functionally validated genes in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion Only a limited number of MADS genes have been functionally validated in rice. A comprehensive annotation and transcriptome profiling undertaken in this investigation adds to our understanding of the involvement of MADS-box family genes during reproductive development and stress in rice and also provides the basis for selection of candidate genes for functional validation studies.

  1. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  2. Mutation analysis of PAX6 gene in a large Chinese family with aniridia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shu-juan; LIU Ying-zhi; CONG Ri-chang; JIN Ying; HOU Zhi-qiang; MA Zhi-zhong; REN Guo-cheng; LI Ling-song

    2005-01-01

    Background Mutations in PAX6 gene have been shown to be the genetic cause of aniridia, which is a severe panocular eye disease characterised by iris hypoplasia. However, there is no study to do genetic analysis of aniridia, although there are several case reports in China. Here, we describe a mutation analysis of PAX6 in a large Chinese family with aniridia. Methods Genomic DNA from venous blood samples was prepared. Haplotype analysis was performed with two genetic markers (D11S904 and D11S935). Fourteen exons of the PAX6 gene were amplified from genomic DNA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of each exon were analysed by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP). The PCR products having an abnormal pattern were sequenced to confirm the mutation.Results Significant evidence for allele sharing in affected patients was detected suggesting that PAX6 mutation links to aniridia in this family. An extra band corresponding to exon 9 in PAX6 was found by single strand conformational polymorphism analysis in all the aniridia patients in this family, but not detected in the unaffected members. A mutation of C to T was detected by sequencing at the nucleotide 1080 that converts the Arg codon (CGA) to the termination codon (TGA).Conclusions Aniridia is caused by a nonsense mutation of PAX6 gene in the large Chinese kindred. Genetic test is important to prevent the transmission of aniridia to their offsprings in the kindred by prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Non-family manager in family businesses: Evidence from the Czech Republic

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    Zuzana Fraňková

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents selected results of a pilot survey of the project “The Business Processes in Relation to Selected Aspects of The Business Environment“. This project is focused on the processes in a company and looks at a company from three selected aspects: an organizational structure, ownership and a relationship to the environment. This article concerns the ownership aspect, concretely family ownership in the relation with an organizational structure of the company. In framework of these aspects, the article shows the difference between family and non-family companies. Next, it describes presence of an external manager in the family firm and how this fact influences selected variables. The results show that there is the difference between family firms with an external manager and these with only family members in the management.

  4. Babesia bovis expresses Bbo-6cys-E, a member of a novel gene family that is homologous to the 6-cys family of Plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel Babesia bovis gene family encoding proteins with similarities to the Plasmodium 6cys protein family was identified by TBLASTN searches of the Babesia bovis genome using the sequence of the P. falciparum PFS230 protein as query, and was termed Bbo-6cys gene family. The Bbo-cys6 gene family co...

  5. Global Analysis of miRNA Gene Clusters and Gene Families Reveals Dynamic and Coordinated Expression

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    Li Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To further understand the potential expression relationships of miRNAs in miRNA gene clusters and gene families, a global analysis was performed in 4 paired tumor (breast cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples using deep sequencing datasets. The compositions of miRNA gene clusters and families are not random, and clustered and homologous miRNAs may have close relationships with overlapped miRNA species. Members in the miRNA group always had various expression levels, and even some showed larger expression divergence. Despite the dynamic expression as well as individual difference, these miRNAs always indicated consistent or similar deregulation patterns. The consistent deregulation expression may contribute to dynamic and coordinated interaction between different miRNAs in regulatory network. Further, we found that those clustered or homologous miRNAs that were also identified as sense and antisense miRNAs showed larger expression divergence. miRNA gene clusters and families indicated important biological roles, and the specific distribution and expression further enrich and ensure the flexible and robust regulatory network.

  6. Slovenia: Generous family policy without evidence of any fertility impact

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    Milivoja Šircelj

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia was not a typical socialist country; the transformation that had started at the end of the 1980s did not cause such great turbulences as in other countries in transition. However, unfavorable consequences did accompany the transition, particularly for some segments of the population. Fertility trends in Slovenia, as seen in the total fertility rate, have not surpassed the replacement level since the end of the 1970s. The lowest level of 1.21 was reached during the 1999-2003 period. Since then, the total fertility rate has been increasing slightly. Postponement in childbearing began with cohorts born after 1960. In today's Slovenian society, on average young women achieve higher education than men, and they perceive (potential motherhood as a drawback in the labor market. Almost all parents in Slovenia are employed full-time, even those with small children. Nevertheless, the traditional gender-division of roles persists in the family. Extended education, relatively high unemployment among the young, and a shortage of adequate housing prolong the stay in the parental home. Together with insecure employment, a responsible parenthood norm, and the perceived high costs of children, this results in childbearing postponement and a lower final number of children. Slovenia has a relatively well-developed family policy, particularly on parental leave and pre-school childcare. Notwithstanding, almost no impact of family policy on fertility has ever been observed.

  7. The inhibitor of growth (ING) gene family: potential role in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Mehmet; Gunduz, Esra; Rivera, Rosario S; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2008-06-01

    The discovery of ING1 gene paved the way to the identification of other ING members (ING2-5) and their isoforms associated with cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The ING family has been an emerging putative tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in which the major mechanism is through interaction with the determinants of chromatin function and gene-specific transcription factors. The regulatory mechanism highly involves the conserved plant homeodomain (PHD), which binds to histones in a methylation-sensitive manner, suggesting that ING proteins may contribute to the maintenance of the epigenetic code. Furthermore, ING family members contain nuclear localization signals and N-terminal sequences important in the interaction with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetyltransferase (HDAC) that regulate gene promoter activity within chromatin. Although ING proteins have the same PHD motif, the variation in the N-terminal dictates the differences in tumor the suppressive ability of ING in various tumors. Inactivation of the normal function is achieved through allelic loss of genomic regions containing the ING gene, alteration in the ING promoter region, variation of mRNA splicing efficacy or reduced mRNA stability. It is most probably the apparent combination of these aberrant mechanisms that resulted in reduced availability of functional ING protein. In cancer cells, ING transcript levels are often suppressed but the genes are rarely mutated. The mechanism of suppression of ING expression may have to do with the abnormally high methylation levels of the ING gene promoter, which have been correlated with low transcript levels. Emerging evidence on the function of ING and related regulatory mechanisms strongly points to ING as a candidate TSG and therefore a potential target in the molecular therapy of some types of tumor.

  8. Evidence of the role of tick subolesin in gene expression

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    Blouin Edmour F

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subolesin is an evolutionary conserved protein that was discovered recently in Ixodes scapularis as a tick protective antigen and has a role in tick blood digestion, reproduction and development. In other organisms, subolesin orthologs may be involved in the control of developmental processes. Because of the profound effect of subolesin knockdown in ticks and other organisms, we hypothesized that subolesin plays a role in gene expression, and therefore affects multiple cellular processes. The objective of this study was to provide evidence for the role of subolesin in gene expression. Results Two subolesin-interacting proteins were identified and characterized by yeast two-hybrid screen, co-affinity purification and RNA interference (RNAi. The effect of subolesin knockdown on the tick gene expression pattern was characterized by microarray analysis and demonstrated that subolesin RNAi affects the expression of genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. The analysis of subolesin and interacting protein sequences identified regulatory motifs and predicted the presence of conserved protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylation sites. Conclusion Collectively, these results provide evidence that subolesin plays a role in gene expression in ticks.

  9. The Keratin 6 gene family. La familia de genes de la queratina 6; Caracterizacion y regulacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Espinel, J.M. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Dept. Biologia (Spain))

    1992-01-01

    Cytokeratins are a family of ca. 30 proteins that are expressed exclusively in epithelial cells, where they constitute the intermediate filaments cytoskeleton. Keratin 6 is expressed in some tissues (tongue, esophagus, foot sole epidermis, etc.), as well as in the suprabasal layers of epidermis under hyperproliferative stimuli, such as tpa, wound healing, etc. In addition, it is expressed in most cultured epidermal cells lines. We have found that there are three different genes coding for similar-but not identical-k6 polypeptides in the cow. We have used CAT assays, gel retardation and footprinting techniques to analyze the promoter of one of the genes in several cell lines and have found two elements implicated in the regulation of this gene. One of them is a AP1-like site and the other seems to be a retinoic-acid responsive element. Implications of these findings for the regulation of the K6 gene are discussed. (author).250 refs, 48 figs.

  10. Families, Communities, and Education in America: Exploring the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Jay; Putnam, Robert D.

    What the empirical evidence suggests about the relationship between parental involvement in noninstructional educational activities or wider networks of community engagement on the one hand and effective schools and student learning on the other is explored. Parent participation is discussed as direct involvement in school governance or as…

  11. The plant non-specific phospholipase C gene family. Novel competitors in lipid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokotylo, Igor; Pejchar, Přemysl; Potocký, Martin; Kocourková, Daniela; Krčková, Zuzana; Ruelland, Eric; Kravets, Volodymyr; Martinec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-specific phospholipases C (NPCs) were discovered as a novel type of plant phospholipid-cleaving enzyme homologous to bacterial phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and responsible for lipid conversion during phosphate-limiting conditions. The six-gene family was established in Arabidopsis, and growing evidence suggests the involvement of two articles NPCs in biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as phytohormone actions. In addition, the diacylglycerol produced via NPCs is postulated to participate in membrane remodelling, general lipid metabolism and cross-talk with other phospholipid signalling systems in plants. This review summarises information concerning this new plant protein family and focusses on its sequence analysis, biochemical properties, cellular and tissue distribution and physiological functions. Possible modes of action are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Three novel mutations of APC gene in Chinese patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Sen; Qu, Shengqiang; Wang, Yu; Tang, Qingzhu; Ma, Hongwei; Luo, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of colonic adenomas and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), encoding a large multidomain protein involved in antagonizing the Wnt signaling pathway, has been identified as the main causative gene responsible for FAP. In this study, we identified three novel mutations as well as two recurrent mutations in the APC in five Chinese FAP families by sequencing. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that among these mutations, a nonsense mutation (c.2510C>G) and two small deletions (c.2016_2047del, c.3180_3184del) led to the truncation of the APC protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the colorectal samples from affected individuals, respectively. Our study expands the database on mutations of APC and provides evidence to understand the function of APC in FAP.

  13. The evolution of gene expression and binding specificity of the largest transcription factor family in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Mathew, Lisha; Wong, Alex; Trono, Didier; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZF) proteins represent the largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in humans, yet for the great majority, their function and specific genomic target remain unknown. However, it has been shown that a large fraction of these genes arose from segmental duplications, and that they have expanded in gene and zinc finger number throughout vertebrate evolution. To determine whether this expansion is linked to selective pressures acting on different domains, we have manually curated all KRAB-ZF genes present in the human genome together with their orthologous genes in three closely related species and assessed the evolutionary forces acting at the sequence level as well as on their expression profiles. We provide evidence that KRAB-ZFs can be separated into two categories according to the polymorphism present in their DNA-contacting residues. Those carrying a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in their DNA-contacting amino acids exhibit significantly reduced expression in all tissues, have emerged in a recent lineage, and seem to be less strongly constrained evolutionarily than those without such a polymorphism. This work provides evidence for a link between age of the TF, as well as polymorphism in their DNA-contacting residues and expression levels-both of which may be jointly affected by selection.

  14. Discovery and identification of candidate genes from the chitinase gene family for Verticillium dahliae resistance in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Tian, Liangliang; Wang, Guilin; Zhang, Xueying; Wang, Xinyu; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-06-29

    Verticillium dahliae, a destructive and soil-borne fungal pathogen, causes massive losses in cotton yields. However, the resistance mechanism to V. dahilae in cotton is still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that chitinases are crucial hydrolytic enzymes, which attack fungal pathogens by catalyzing the fungal cell wall degradation. As a large gene family, to date, the chitinase genes (Chis) have not been systematically analyzed and effectively utilized in cotton. Here, we identified 47, 49, 92, and 116 Chis from four sequenced cotton species, diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5), G. arboreum (A2), tetraploid G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 (AD1), and G. barbadense acc. 3-79 (AD2), respectively. The orthologous genes were not one-to-one correspondence in the diploid and tetraploid cotton species, implying changes in the number of Chis in different cotton species during the evolution of Gossypium. Phylogenetic classification indicated that these Chis could be classified into six groups, with distinguishable structural characteristics. The expression patterns of Chis indicated their various expressions in different organs and tissues, and in the V. dahliae response. Silencing of Chi23, Chi32, or Chi47 in cotton significantly impaired the resistance to V. dahliae, suggesting these genes might act as positive regulators in disease resistance to V. dahliae.

  15. The Medicago truncatula lysin [corrected] motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysin [corrected] motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known.

  16. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene family of Anopheles gambiae

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    Isaac R Elwyn

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the M2 family of peptidases, related to mammalian angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, play important roles in regulating a number of physiological processes. As more invertebrate genomes are sequenced, there is increasing evidence of a variety of M2 peptidase genes, even within a single species. The function of these ACE-like proteins is largely unknown. Sequencing of the A. gambiae genome has revealed a number of ACE-like genes but probable errors in the Ensembl annotation have left the number of ACE-like genes, and their structure, unclear. Results TBLASTN and sequence analysis of cDNAs revealed that the A. gambiae genome contains nine genes (AnoACE genes which code for proteins with similarity to mammalian ACE. Eight of these genes code for putative single domain enzymes similar to other insect ACEs described so far. AnoACE9, however, has several features in common with mammalian somatic ACE such as a two domain structure and a hydrophobic C terminus. Four of the AnoACE genes (2, 3, 7 and 9 were shown to be expressed at a variety of developmental stages. Expression of AnoACE3, AnoACE7 and AnoACE9 is induced by a blood meal, with AnoACE7 showing the largest (approximately 10-fold induction. Conclusion Genes coding for two-domain ACEs have arisen several times during the course of evolution suggesting a common selective advantage to having an ACE with two active-sites in tandem in a single protein. AnoACE7 belongs to a sub-group of insect ACEs which are likely to be membrane-bound and which have an unusual, conserved gene structure.

  17. Children's experience of family disruption and family formation: Evidence from 16 FFS countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a number of descriptive measures on children's experience of family disruption and family formation. We use data from the Fertility and Family Surveys of 15 European countries and corresponding data from the USA in order to find out what kind of family circumstances children are born into and what experience they subsequently have of various family-transformation events of their mothers. Our presentation reveals some similarities but also striking differences in the family-demographic experience of children in different countries. The USA stands out as one extreme case with its very high proportion of children born to a lone mother, with a higher probability of children who experience a union disruption of their parents than anywhere else, and with many children having the experience of living in a stepfamily. Italy stands out at the other end of the scale. Practically all children here are born to a married mother and very few of them experience the dissolution of their parents' union before they turn 15.

  18. Relaxin gene family in teleosts: phylogeny, syntenic mapping, selective constraint, andexpression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the relaxin family of signaling molecules has been shown to play diverse roles in mammalian physiology, but little is known about its diversity or physiology in teleosts, an infraclass of the bony fishes comprising ~ 50% of all extant vertebrates. In this paper, 32 relaxin family sequences were obtained by searching genomic and cDNA databases from eight teleost species; phylogenetic, molecular evolutionary, and syntenic data analyses were conducted to understand the relationship and differential patterns of evolution of relaxin family genes in teleosts compared with mammals. Additionally, real-time quantitative PCR was used to confirm and assess the tissues of expression of five relaxin family genes in Danio rerio and in situ hybridization used to assess the site-specific expression of the insulin 3-like gene in D. rerio testis. Results Up to six relaxin family genes were identified in each teleost species. Comparative syntenic mapping revealed that fish possess two paralogous copies of human RLN3, which we call rln3a and rln3b, an orthologue of human RLN2, rln, two paralogous copies of human INSL5, insl5a and insl5b, and an orthologue of human INSL3, insl3. Molecular evolutionary analyses indicated that: rln3a, rln3b and rln are under strong evolutionary constraint, that insl3 has been subject to moderate rates of sequence evolution with two amino acids in insl3/INSL3 showing evidence of positively selection, and that insl5b exhibits a higher rate of sequence evolution than its paralogue insl5a suggesting that it may have been neo-functionalized after the teleost whole genome duplication. Quantitative PCR analyses in D. rerio indicated that rln3a and rln3b are expressed in brain, insl3 is highly expressed in gonads, and that there was low expression of both insl5 genes in adult zebrafish. Finally, in situ hybridization of insl3 in D. rerio testes showed highly specific hybridization to interstitial Leydig

  19. A novel CHSY1 gene mutation underlies Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Gulab; Naeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome (TPBS) is an autosomal recessive rare disorder characterized by hyperphalangism of digits, facial dysmorphism, dental anomalies, sensorineural hearing loss, delayed motor and mental development, and growth retardation. Loss of function mutations have been recently reported in the CHSY1 gene to cause the TPBS. Here, we report a novel missense mutation (c.1897 G > A) in the CHSY1 gene in two TPBS patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. The mutation predicted substitution of a highly conserved aspartate amino acid residue to asparagine at position 633 in the protein (D633N). Polyphen analysis supported the pathogenicity of D36N mutation. Our finding extends the body of recent evidence that supports the role of CHSY1 as a potential mediator of BMP signaling.

  20. Revisiting Vitis vinifera subtilase gene family: a possible role in grapevine resistance against Plasmopara viticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Figueiredo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subtilisin-like proteases, also known as subtilases, are a very diverse family of serine peptidases present in many organisms. In grapevine, there are hints of the involvement of subtilases in defence mechanisms, but their role is not yet understood. The first characterization of the subtilase gene family was performed in 2014. However, simultaneously, the grapevine genome was re-annotated and several sequences were re-annotated or retrieved. We have performed a re-characterization of this family in grapevine and identified 82 genes coding for 97 putative proteins, as result of alternative splicing. All the subtilases identified present the characteristic S8 peptidase domain and the majority of them also have a pro-domain I9 inhibitor, a protease-associated (PA domain and a signal peptide for targeting to the secretory pathway. Phylogenetic studies revealed six subtilase groups denominated VvSBT1 to VvSBT6. As several evidences have highlighted the participation of plant subtilases in response to biotic stimulus, we have investigated subtilase participation in grapevine resistance to Plasmopara viticola, the causative agent of downy mildew. Fourteen grapevine subtilases presenting either high homology to P69C from tomato, SBT3.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana or located near the Resistance to Plasmopara viticola (RPV locus were selected. Expression studies were conducted in the grapevine-P. viticola pathosystem with resistant and susceptible cultivars. Our results may indicate that some of grapevine subtilisins are potentially participating in the defence response against this biotrophic oomycete.

  1. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

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    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  2. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    , which have occurred within the GC gene family during metazoan evolution. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal that the rGC and sGC multi-domain proteins evolved early in eumetazoan evolution. Subsequent gene duplications, tissue specific expression patterns and lineage specific expansions resulted in the evolution of new networks of interaction and new biological functions associated with the maintenance of organismal complexity and homeostasis.

  3. Evolution of the multifaceted eukaryotic akirin gene family

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    Johnston Ian A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Akirins are nuclear proteins that form part of an innate immune response pathway conserved in Drosophila and mice. This studies aim was to characterise the evolution of akirin gene structure and protein function in the eukaryotes. Results akirin genes are present throughout the metazoa and arose before the separation of animal, plant and fungi lineages. Using comprehensive phylogenetic analysis, coupled with comparisons of conserved synteny and genomic organisation, we show that the intron-exon structure of metazoan akirin genes was established prior to the bilateria and that a single proto-orthologue duplicated in the vertebrates, before the gnathostome-agnathan separation, producing akirin1 and akirin2. Phylogenetic analyses of seven vertebrate gene families with members in chromosomal proximity to both akirin1 and akirin2 were compatible with a common duplication event affecting the genomic neighbourhood of the akirin proto-orthologue. A further duplication of akirins occurred in the teleost lineage and was followed by lineage-specific patterns of paralogue loss. Remarkably, akirins have been independently characterised by five research groups under different aliases and a comparison of the available literature revealed diverse functions, generally in regulating gene expression. For example, akirin was characterised in arthropods as subolesin, an important growth factor and in Drosophila as bhringi, which has an essential myogenic role. In vertebrates, akirin1 was named mighty in mice and was shown to regulate myogenesis, whereas akirin2 was characterised as FBI1 in rats and promoted carcinogenesis, acting as a transcriptional repressor when bound to a 14-3-3 protein. Both vertebrate Akirins have evolved under comparably strict constraints of purifying selection, although a likelihood ratio test predicted that functional divergence has occurred between paralogues. Bayesian and maximum likelihood tests identified amino

  4. A Comprehensive Family-Based Replication Study of Schizophrenia Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Karolina A.; Liu, Youfang; Bukszár, Jozsef; McClay, Joseph L.; Khachane, Amit N.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas; Corvin, Aiden; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gurling, Hugh; Ophoff, Roel; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Riley, Brien; Webb, Todd; Kendler, Kenneth; O’Donovan, Mick; Craddock, Nick; Kirov, George; Owen, Mike; Rujescu, Dan; St Clair, David; Werge, Thomas; Hultman, Christina M.; Delisi, Lynn E.; Sullivan, Patrick; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating psychiatric condition. Identifying the specific genetic variants and pathways that increase susceptibility to SCZ is critical to improve disease understanding and address the urgent need for new drug targets. Objective To identify SCZ susceptibility genes. Design We integrated results from a meta-analysis of 18 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) involving 1 085 772 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 6 databases that showed significant informativeness for SCZ. The 9380 most promising SNPs were then specifically genotyped in an independent family-based replication study that, after quality control, consisted of 8107 SNPs. Setting Linkage meta-analysis, brain transcriptome meta-analysis, candidate gene database, OMIM, relevant mouse studies, and expression quantitative trait locus databases. Patients We included 11 185 cases and 10 768 control subjects from 6 databases and, after quality control 6298 individuals (including 3286 cases) from 1811 nuclear families. Main Outcomes and Measures Case-control status for SCZ. Results Replication results showed a highly significant enrichment of SNPs with small P values. Of the SNPs with replication values of P<.01, the proportion of SNPs that had the same direction of effects as in the GWAS meta-analysis was 89% in the combined ancestry group (sign test, P<2.20×10−16) and 93% in subjects of European ancestry only (P<2.20×10−16). Our results supported the major histocompatibility complex region showing a 3.7-fold overall enrichment of replication values of P<.01 in subjects from European ancestry. We replicated SNPs in TCF4 (P=2.53×10−10) and NOTCH4 (P=3.16×10−7) that are among the most robust SCZ findings. More novel findings included POM121L2 (P=3.51×10−7), AS3MT (P=9.01×10−7), CNNM2 (P=6.07×10−7), and NT5C2 (P=4.09×10−7). To explore the many small effects, we performed pathway analyses. The most significant pathways involved neuronal function

  5. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases

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    Stephen eTechtmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is commonly known as a toxic gas, yet it is used by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and many archaea. In this study, we determined the prevalence of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (anaerobic CODHs, or [Ni,Fe]-CODHs in currently available genomic sequence databases. More than 6% (185 genomes out of 2887 bacterial and archaeal genome sequences in the IMG database possess at least one gene encoding [Ni,Fe]-CODH, the key enzyme for anaerobic CO utilization. The phylogenetic study of this extended protein family revealed nine distinct clades of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs. These clades consisted of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs that, while apparently monophyletic within the clades, were encoded by microorganisms of disparate phylogeny, based on 16S rRNA sequences, and widely ranging physiology. Following this discovery, it was therefore of interest to examine the extent and possible routes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT affecting [Ni,Fe]-CODH genes and gene clusters that include [Ni,Fe]-CODHs.The genome sequence of the extreme thermophile Thermosinus carboxydivorans was used as a case study for HGT. The [Ni,Fe]-CODH operon of T. carboxydivorans differs from its whole genome in its G+C content by 8.2 mol%. Here, we apply statistical methods to establish acquisition by T. carboxydivorans of the gene cluster including [Ni,Fe]-CODH via HGT. Analysis of tetranucleotide frequency and codon usage with application of the Kullback-Leibler divergence metric showed that the [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon of T. carboxidyvorans is quite dissimilar to the whole genome. Using the same metrics, the T. carboxydivorans [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon is highly similar to the genome of the phylogenetically distant anaerobic carboxydotroph Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. These results allow to assume recent HTG of the gene cluster from a relative of C. hydrogenoformans to T. carboxydivorans or a more ancient transfer from a C. hydrogenoformans ancestor to a T. carboxydivorans

  6. Gene family level comparative analysis of gene expression in mammals validates the ortholog conjecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, Igor B; Managadze, David; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-04-01

    The ortholog conjecture (OC), which is central to functional annotation of genomes, posits that orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared with orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. However, several subsequent studies suggest that GO annotations and microarray data could artificially inflate functional similarity between paralogs from the same organism. We sought to test the OC using approaches distinct from those used in previous studies. Analysis of a large RNAseq data set from multiple human and mouse tissues shows that expression similarity (correlations coefficients, rank's, or Z-scores) between orthologs is substantially greater than that for between-species paralogs with the same sequence divergence, in agreement with the OC and the results of recent detailed analyses. These findings are further corroborated by a fine-grain analysis in which expression profiles of orthologs and paralogs were compared separately for individual gene families. Expression profiles of within-species paralogs are more strongly correlated than profiles of orthologs but it is shown that this is caused by high background noise, that is, correlation between profiles of unrelated genes in the same organism. Z-scores and rank scores show a nonmonotonic dependence of expression profile similarity on sequence divergence. This complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication might be at least partially caused by selection for protein dosage rebalancing following gene duplication.

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, B; Peric, S.; Ross, D. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Campertown (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene is a useful predictor of human plasma ACE levels. ACE levels tend to be lowest in subjects with ACE genotype DD and intermediate in subjects with ACE genotype ID. Angiotensin II (Ang II) as a product of ACE is a cardiac growth factor and produces a marked hypertrophy of the chick myocyte in cell culture. Rat experiments also suggest that a small dose of ACE inhibitor that does not affect the afterload results in prevention or regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In order to study the relationship of ACE and the severity of hypertrophy, the ACE genotype has been determined in 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and 51 normal subjects. The respective frequencies of I and D alleles were: 0.52 and 0.48 (in FHC patients) and 0.44 and 0.56 (in the normal controls). There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies between FHC and normal subjects ({chi}{sup 2}=0.023, p>0.05). The II, ID, and DD genotypes were present in 7, 15, and 6 FHC patients, respectively. The averages of maximal thickness of the interventricular septum measured by echocardiography or at autopsy were 18 {plus_minus}3, 19{plus_minus}4, and 19{plus_minus}3 mm in II, ID and DD genotypes, respectively. The ACE gene polymorphism did not correlate with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy in FHC patients (r{sub s}=0.231, p>0.05). These results do not necessarily exclude the possible effect of Ang II on the hypertrophy since the latter may be produced through the action of chymase in the human ventricles. However, ACE gene polymorphism is not a useful predictor of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy in FHC patients.

  8. Functional evolution in the plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development.

  9. Patterns of Positive Selection of the Myogenic Regulatory Factor Gene Family in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Yu, Qi; Huang, Ling; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The functional divergence of transcriptional factors is critical in the evolution of transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanism of functional divergence among these factors remains unclear. Here, we performed an evolutionary analysis for positive selection in members of the myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) gene family of vertebrates. We selected 153 complete vertebrate MRF nucleotide sequences from our analyses, which revealed substantial evidence of positive selection. Here, we show that sites under positive selection were more frequently detected and identified from the genes encoding the myogenic differentiation factors (MyoG and Myf6) than the genes encoding myogenic determination factors (Myf5 and MyoD). Additionally, the functional divergence within the myogenic determination factors or differentiation factors was also under positive selection pressure. The positive selection sites were more frequently detected from MyoG and MyoD than Myf6 and Myf5, respectively. Amino acid residues under positive selection were identified mainly in their transcription activation domains and on the surface of protein three-dimensional structures. These data suggest that the functional gain and divergence of myogenic regulatory factors were driven by distinct positive selection of their transcription activation domains, whereas the function of the DNA binding domains was conserved in evolution. Our study evaluated the mechanism of functional divergence of the transcriptional regulation factors within a family, whereby the functions of their transcription activation domains diverged under positive selection during evolution. PMID:24651579

  10. Genetic variations in the KIR gene family may contribute to susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hai-Ning; Wang, Zhi-Long; Cui, Dao-Ran; Xin, Da-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    The present meta-analysis of relevant case-control studies was conducted to investigate the possible relationships between genetic variations in the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene clusters of the human KIR gene family and susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The following electronic databases were searched for relevant articles without language restrictions: the Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Database, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, covering all papers published until 2013. STATA statistical software was adopted in this meta-analysis as well. We also calculated the crude odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence intervals (95 % CI). Seven case-control studies with 1,004 patients diagnosed with AS and 2,138 healthy cases were implicated in our meta-analysis, and 15 genes in the KIR gene family were also evaluated. The results of our meta-analysis show statistical significance between the genetic variations in the KIR2DL1, KIR2DS4, KIR2DS5 and KIR3DS1 genes and an increased susceptibility to AS (KIR2DL1: OR 7.82, 95% CI 3.87-15.81, P0.05). The current meta-analysis provides reliable evidence that genetic variations in the KIR gene family may contribute to susceptibility to AS, especially for the KIR2DL1, KIR2DS4, KIR2DS5 and KIR3DS1 genes.

  11. MicroSyn: A user friendly tool for detection of microsynteny in a gene family

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    Yang Xiaohan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional phylogeny analysis within gene family is mainly based on DNA or amino acid sequence homologies. However, these phylogenetic tree analyses are not suitable for those "non-traditional" gene families like microRNA with very short sequences. For the normal protein-coding gene families, low bootstrap values are frequently encountered in some nodes, suggesting low confidence or likely inappropriateness of placement of those members in those nodes. Results We introduce MicroSyn software as a means of detecting microsynteny in adjacent genomic regions surrounding genes in gene families. MicroSyn searches for conserved, flanking colinear homologous gene pairs between two genomic fragments to determine the relationship between two members in a gene family. The colinearity of homologous pairs is controlled by a statistical distance function. As a result, gene duplication history can be inferred from the output independent of gene sequences. MicroSyn was designed for both experienced and non-expert users with a user-friendly graphical-user interface. MicroSyn is available from: http://fcsb.njau.edu.cn/microsyn/. Conclusions Case studies of the microRNA167 genes in plants and Xyloglucan ndotransglycosylase/Hydrolase family in Populus trichocarpa were presented to show the utility of the software. The easy using of MicroSyn in these examples suggests that the software is an additional valuable means to address the problem intrinsic in the computational methods and sequence qualities themselves in gene family analysis.

  12. Extensive gene remodeling in the viral world: new evidence for nongradual evolution in the mobilome network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachiet, Pierre-Alain; Colson, Philippe; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2014-08-07

    Complex nongradual evolutionary processes such as gene remodeling are difficult to model, to visualize, and to investigate systematically. Despite these challenges, the creation of composite (or mosaic) genes by combination of genetic segments from unrelated gene families was established as an important adaptive phenomena in eukaryotic genomes. In contrast, almost no general studies have been conducted to quantify composite genes in viruses. Although viral genome mosaicism has been well-described, the extent of gene mosaicism and its rules of emergence remain largely unexplored. Applying methods from graph theory to inclusive similarity networks, and using data from more than 3,000 complete viral genomes, we provide the first demonstration that composite genes in viruses are 1) functionally biased, 2) involved in key aspects of the arm race between cells and viruses, and 3) can be classified into two distinct types of composite genes in all viral classes. Beyond the quantification of the widespread recombination of genes among different viruses of the same class, we also report a striking sharing of genetic information between viruses of different classes and with different nucleic acid types. This latter discovery provides novel evidence for the existence of a large and complex mobilome network, which appears partly bound by the sharing of genetic information and by the formation of composite genes between mobile entities with different genetic material. Considering that there are around 10E31 viruses on the planet, gene remodeling appears as a hugely significant way of generating and moving novel sequences between different kinds of organisms on Earth.

  13. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Profiles of the Superoxide Dismutase Gene Family in Gossypium

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    Jingbo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD as a group of significant and ubiquitous enzymes plays a critical function in plant growth and development. Previously this gene family has been investigated in Arabidopsis and rice; it has not yet been characterized in cotton. In our study, it was the first time for us to perform a genome-wide analysis of SOD gene family in cotton. Our results showed that 10 genes of SOD gene family were identified in Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, including 6 Cu-Zn-SODs, 2 Fe-SODs, and 2 Mn-SODs. The chromosomal distribution analysis revealed that SOD genes are distributed across 7 chromosomes in Gossypium arboreum and 8 chromosomes in Gossypium raimondii. Segmental duplication is predominant duplication event and major contributor for expansion of SOD gene family. Gene structure and protein structure analysis showed that SOD genes have conserved exon/intron arrangement and motif composition. Microarray-based expression analysis revealed that SOD genes have important function in abiotic stress. Moreover, the tissue-specific expression profile reveals the functional divergence of SOD genes in different organs development of cotton. Taken together, this study has imparted new insights into the putative functions of SOD gene family in cotton. Findings of the present investigation could help in understanding the role of SOD gene family in various aspects of the life cycle of cotton.

  14. Evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer from the draft genome of a tardigrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Thomas C; Tenlen, Jennifer R; Smith, Frank W; Wang, Jeremy R; Patanella, Kiera A; Nishimura, Erin Osborne; Tintori, Sophia C; Li, Qing; Jones, Corbin D; Yandell, Mark; Messina, David N; Glasscock, Jarret; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-12-29

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the transfer of genes between species, has been recognized recently as more pervasive than previously suspected. Here, we report evidence for an unprecedented degree of HGT into an animal genome, based on a draft genome of a tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. Tardigrades are microscopic eight-legged animals that are famous for their ability to survive extreme conditions. Genome sequencing, direct confirmation of physical linkage, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that a large fraction of the H. dujardini genome is derived from diverse bacteria as well as plants, fungi, and Archaea. We estimate that approximately one-sixth of tardigrade genes entered by HGT, nearly double the fraction found in the most extreme cases of HGT into animals known to date. Foreign genes have supplemented, expanded, and even replaced some metazoan gene families within the tardigrade genome. Our results demonstrate that an unexpectedly large fraction of an animal genome can be derived from foreign sources. We speculate that animals that can survive extremes may be particularly prone to acquiring foreign genes.

  15. Evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer from the draft genome of a tardigrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Thomas C.; Tenlen, Jennifer R.; Smith, Frank W.; Wang, Jeremy R.; Patanella, Kiera A.; Osborne Nishimura, Erin; Tintori, Sophia C.; Li, Qing; Jones, Corbin D.; Yandell, Mark; Glasscock, Jarret; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the transfer of genes between species, has been recognized recently as more pervasive than previously suspected. Here, we report evidence for an unprecedented degree of HGT into an animal genome, based on a draft genome of a tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. Tardigrades are microscopic eight-legged animals that are famous for their ability to survive extreme conditions. Genome sequencing, direct confirmation of physical linkage, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that a large fraction of the H. dujardini genome is derived from diverse bacteria as well as plants, fungi, and Archaea. We estimate that approximately one-sixth of tardigrade genes entered by HGT, nearly double the fraction found in the most extreme cases of HGT into animals known to date. Foreign genes have supplemented, expanded, and even replaced some metazoan gene families within the tardigrade genome. Our results demonstrate that an unexpectedly large fraction of an animal genome can be derived from foreign sources. We speculate that animals that can survive extremes may be particularly prone to acquiring foreign genes. PMID:26598659

  16. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession.

  17. Molecular characterization of edestin gene family in Cannabis sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docimo, Teresa; Caruso, Immacolata; Ponzoni, Elena; Mattana, Monica; Galasso, Incoronata

    2014-11-01

    Globulins are the predominant class of seed storage proteins in a wide variety of plants. In many plant species globulins are present in several isoforms encoded by gene families. The major seed storage protein of Cannabis sativa L. is the globulin edestin, widely known for its nutritional potential. In this work, we report the isolation of seven cDNAs encoding for edestin from the C. sativa variety Carmagnola. Southern blot hybridization is in agreement with the number of identified edestin genes. All seven sequences showed the characteristic globulin features, but they result to be divergent members/forms of two edestin types. According to their sequence similarity four forms named CsEde1A, CsEde1B, CsEde1C, CsEde1D have been assigned to the edestin type 1 and the three forms CsEde2A, CsEde2B, CsEde2C to the edestin type 2. Analysis of the coding sequences revealed a high percentage of similarity (98-99%) among the different forms belonging to the same type, which decreased significantly to approximately 64% between the forms belonging to different types. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that both edestin types are expressed in developing hemp seeds and the amount of CsEde1 was 4.44 ± 0.10 higher than CsEde2. Both edestin types exhibited a high percentage of arginine (11-12%), but CsEde2 resulted particularly rich in methionine residues (2.36%) respect to CsEde1 (0.82%). The amino acid composition determined in CsEde1 and CsEde2 types suggests that these seed proteins can be used to improve the nutritional quality of plant food-stuffs.

  18. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liang

    Full Text Available Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  19. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Shen, Yong-Yi; Pan, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Tai-Cheng; Yang, Chao; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises) are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii) and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus) for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  20. Evidence for ASD recurrence rates and reproductive stoppage from large UK ASD research family databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Claire L; Warnell, Frances; Johnson, Mary; Hames, Annette; Pearce, Mark S; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R

    2015-02-01

    Following a diagnosis of a developmental disorder such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in early childhood, parents may decide to have fewer children than previously planned. The tendency for families to halt reproduction after receiving a diagnosis for one child is known as reproductive stoppage. Stoppage may lead to an underestimate of recurrence risk estimates of parents having more than one child with ASD. Using two large UK ASD family databases, we investigated recurrence rates for ASD and evidence for reproductive stoppage for both ASD and undiagnosed ASD/broader autism phenotype in a subgroup of families. Reproductive stoppage was tested for using the Mann-Whitney U-test to disprove the null hypothesis that affected and nonaffected children were distributed randomly by birth order. Dahlberg's later-sib method was used to estimate recurrence risk and take stoppage into account. Data were available from 299 families (660 children) including 327 with ASD. Ten percent of the complete families had more than one child with an ASD. Using Dahlberg's later-sib method, the recurrence risk for ASD was 24.7% overall and 50.0% in families with two or more older siblings with ASD. Children with ASD were born significantly later in families than those without ASD in all sibship combinations. This study shows strong evidence that ASD is associated with reproductive stoppage. These data have important implications for family planning and genetic counseling. © 2014 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF......Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...

  2. FGF: a web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF...... is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  3. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF...... is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  4. Evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate transferrin multi-gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2014-11-01

    In a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate transferrins (TFs), six major clades (subfamilies) were identified: (a) S, the mammalian serotransferrins; (b) ICA, the mammalian inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase (ICA) homologs; (c) L, the mammalian lactoferrins; (d) O, the ovotransferrins of birds and reptiles; (e) M, the melanotransferrins of bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; and (f) M-like, a newly identified TF subfamily found in bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. A phylogenetic tree based on the joint alignment of N-lobes and C-lobes supported the hypothesis that three separate events of internal duplication occurred in vertebrate TFs: (a) in the common ancestor of the M subfamily, (b) in the common ancestor of the M-like subfamily, and (c) in the common ancestor of other vertebrate TFs. The S, ICA, and L subfamilies were found only in placental mammals, and the phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis that these three subfamilies arose by gene duplication after the divergence of placental mammals from marsupials. The M-like subfamily was unusual in several respects, including the presence of a uniquely high proportion of clade-specific conserved residues, including distinctive but conserved residues in the sites homologous to those functioning in carbonate binding of human serotransferrin. The M-like family also showed an unusually high proportion of cationic residues in the positively charged region corresponding to human lactoferrampin, suggesting a distinctive role of this region in the M-like subfamily, perhaps in antimicrobial defense.

  5. Redox Homeostasis via Gene Families of Ascorbate-Glutathione Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi ePandey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The imposition of environmental stresses on plants brings about disturbance in their metabolism thereby negatively affecting their growth and development and leading to reduction in the productivity. One of the manifestations of abiotic and biotic stress conditions is the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be hazardous to cells. Therefore, in order to protect themselves against toxic ROS, plant cells employ the anti-oxidant defense system. The ascorbate-glutathione pathway (Halliwell-Asada cycle is an indispensible component of the ROS homeostasis mechanism of plants. This pathway entails the antioxidant metabolites: ascorbate, glutathione and NADPH along with the enzymes linking them. The ascorbate-glutathione pathway is functional in different subcellular compartments and all the enzymes of this pathway exist as multiple isoforms. The expression of different isoforms of the enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione pathway is developmentally as well as spatially regulated. Moreover, various abiotic and biotic stress conditions modulate the expression of the enzyme- isoforms differently. It is the intricate regulation of expression of different isoforms of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes that helps in the maintenance of redox balance in plants under various abiotic and biotic stress conditions. The present review provides an insight into the gene families of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway, shedding light on their role in different abiotic and biotic stress conditions as well as in the growth and development of plants.

  6. Genome scan for quantitative trait loci influencing HDL levels: evidence for multilocus inheritance in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, France; Jarvik, Gail P; Badzioch, Michael D; Motulsky, Arno G; Brunzell, John D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2005-09-01

    Several genome scans in search of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been performed. However, to date the actual identification of genes implicated in the regulation of common forms of HDL abnormalities remains unsuccessful. This may be due, in part, to the oligogenic and multivariate nature of HDL regulation, and potentially, pleiotropy affecting HDL and other lipid-related traits. Using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach, we recently provided evidence of linkage of HDL level variation to the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex, in familial combined hyperlipidemia pedigrees, with an estimated number of two to three large QTLs remaining to be identified. We also presented results consistent with pleiotropy affecting HDL and triglycerides at the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex. Here we use the same MCMC analytic strategy, which allows for oligogenic trait models, as well as simultaneous incorporation of covariates, in the context of multipoint analysis. We now present results from a genome scan in search for the additional HDL QTLs in these pedigrees. We provide evidence of linkage for additional HDL QTLs on chromosomes 3p14 and 13q32, with results on chromosome 3 further supported by maximum parametric and variance component LOD scores of 3.0 and 2.6, respectively. Weaker evidence of linkage was also obtained for 7q32, 12q12, 14q31-32 and 16q23-24.

  7. The IQD gene family in soybean: structure, phylogeny, evolution and expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Feng

    Full Text Available Members of the plant-specific IQ67-domain (IQD protein family are involved in plant development and the basal defense response. Although systematic characterization of this family has been carried out in Arabidopsis, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, Brachypodium distachyon and rice (Oryza sativa, systematic analysis and expression profiling of this gene family in soybean (Glycine max have not previously been reported. In this study, we identified and structurally characterized IQD genes in the soybean genome. A complete set of 67 soybean IQD genes (GmIQD1-67 was identified using Blast search tools, and the genes were clustered into four subfamilies (IQD I-IV based on phylogeny. These soybean IQD genes are distributed unevenly across all 20 chromosomes, with 30 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplication has played a major role in the expansion of the soybean IQD gene family. Analysis of the Ka/Ks ratios showed that the duplicated genes of the GmIQD family primarily underwent purifying selection. Microsynteny was detected in most pairs: genes in clade 1-3 might be present in genome regions that were inverted, expanded or contracted after the divergence; most gene pairs in clade 4 showed high conservation with little rearrangement among these gene-residing regions. Of the soybean IQD genes examined, six were most highly expressed in young leaves, six in flowers, one in roots and two in nodules. Our qRT-PCR analysis of 24 soybean IQD III genes confirmed that these genes are regulated by MeJA stress. Our findings present a comprehensive overview of the soybean IQD gene family and provide insights into the evolution of this family. In addition, this work lays a solid foundation for further experiments aimed at determining the biological functions of soybean IQD genes in growth and development.

  8. Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer: Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    predispose to breast cancer . These mutations are always in the context of Cowden’s Syndrome, and do not appear in families with brest cancer in the...AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4307 TITLE: Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCA1 PRINCIPAL...Aug97-) Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other than BRCA1 6. AUTHOR{S) Mary-Clair King, Ph.D. 7

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in the cylindromatosis (CYLD) gene in a Chinese family with multiple familial trichoepithelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J W; Xiao, S X; Huo, J; An, J G; Ren, J W

    2014-11-01

    Multiple familial trichoepithelioma (MFT) (OMIM: 601606) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by numerous, skin-colored papules and nodules with pilar differentiation. Recently, several mutations in the cylindromatosis (CYLD) gene have been reported in MFT. In this study, a mutation analysis of the CYLD was conducted in a Chinese pedigree of typical MFT. Affected individuals were identified through probands from Shanxi Province, China. Lesional skin biopsy of the proband revealed the typical histopathological characteristics of trichoepithelioma. Individuals belonging to five consecutive generations were similarly affected, which indicated an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes using standard phenol/chloroform extraction method. All the coding exons (4-20) and exon-intron boundaries of the CYLD gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Direct sequencing of all PCR products amplified from the complete coding regions of the CYLD gene was performed to identify mutations. Sequencing of the CYLD gene was performed in a further 100 unrelated, unaffected control individuals to exclude the possibility of polymorphism. A novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1169_1170delCA (p.Thr390Argfs) was identified in exon 10 of the CYLD gene in the affected family members. This mutation was also detected in unaffected family members, but not in the unrelated, healthy individuals who were also analyzed. Our study expands the database on the CYLD gene mutations in MFT and should be useful in providing genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for families affected by MFT.

  10. Costs of a work-family intervention: evidence from the work, family, and health network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Carolina; Bray, Jeremy W; Brockwood, Krista; Reeves, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the cost to the workplace of implementing initiatives to reduce work-family conflict. Prospective cost analysis conducted alongside a group-randomized multisite controlled experimental study, using a microcosting approach. An information technology firm. Employees (n = 1004) and managers (n = 141) randomized to the intervention arm. STAR (Start. Transform. Achieve. Results.) to enhance employees' control over their work time, increase supervisor support for employees to manage work and family responsibilities, and reorient the culture toward results. A taxonomy of activities related to customization, start-up, and implementation was developed. Resource use and unit costs were estimated for each activity, excluding research-related activities. Economic costing approach (accounting and opportunity costs). Sensitivity analyses on intervention costs. The total cost of STAR was $709,654, of which $389,717 was labor costs and $319,937 nonlabor costs (including $313,877 for intervention contract). The cost per employee participation in the intervention was $340 (95% confidence interval: $330-$351); $597 ($561-$634) for managers and $300 ($292-$308) for other employees (2011 prices). A detailed activity costing approach allows for more accurate cost estimates and identifies key drivers of cost. The key cost driver was employees' time spent on receiving the intervention. Ignoring this cost, which is usual in studies that cost workplace interventions, would seriously underestimate the cost of a workplace initiative.

  11. Reconciling gene and genome duplication events: using multiple nuclear gene families to infer the phylogeny of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Rob W; Graham, Sean W; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2011-11-01

    Most plant phylogenetic inference has used DNA sequence data from the plastid genome. This genome represents a single genealogical sample with no recombination among genes, potentially limiting the resolution of evolutionary relationships in some contexts. In contrast, nuclear DNA is inherently more difficult to employ for phylogeny reconstruction because major mutational events in the genome, including polyploidization, gene duplication, and gene extinction can result in homologous gene copies that are difficult to identify as orthologs or paralogs. Gene tree parsimony (GTP) can be used to infer the rooted species tree by fitting gene genealogies to species trees while simultaneously minimizing the estimated number of duplications needed to reconcile conflicts among them. Here, we use GTP for five nuclear gene families and a previously published plastid data set to reconstruct the phylogenetic backbone of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae. Plastid-based phylogenetic studies strongly supported extensive paraphyly of Eichhornia (one of the four major genera) but also depicted considerable ambiguity concerning the true root placement for the family. Our results indicate that species trees inferred from the nuclear genes (alone and in combination with the plastid data) are highly congruent with gene trees inferred from plastid data alone. Consideration of optimal and suboptimal gene tree reconciliations place the root of the family at (or near) a branch leading to the rare and locally restricted E. meyeri. We also explore methods to incorporate uncertainty in individual gene trees during reconciliation by considering their individual bootstrap profiles and relate inferred excesses of gene duplication events on individual branches to whole-genome duplication events inferred for the same branches. Our study improves understanding of the phylogenetic history of Pontederiaceae and also demonstrates the utility of GTP for phylogenetic analysis.

  12. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Grauso, Marta; Sattelle, David B

    2005-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of widely selling insecticides. We have identified the nAChR gene family from the genome of the malaria mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, to be the second complete insect nAChR gene family described following that of Drosophila melanogaster. Like Drosophila, Anopheles possesses 10 nAChR subunits with orthologous relationships evident between the two insects. Interestingly, the Anopheles orthologues of Dbeta2 and Dbeta3 possess the vicinal cysteines that define alpha subunits. As with Dalpha4 and Dalpha6, the Anopheles orthologues are alternatively spliced at equivalent exons. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis shows that RNA A-to-I editing sites conserved between Dalpha6 of Drosophila and alpha7-2 of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, are not shared with the equivalent nAChR subunit of Anopheles. Indeed, RNA-editing sites identified in functionally significant regions of Dbeta1, Dalpha5, and Dalpha6 are not conserved in the mosquito orthologues, indicating considerable divergence of RNA molecules targeted for editing within the insect order Diptera. These findings shed further light on the diversity of nAChR subunits and may present a useful basis for the development of improved malaria control agents by enhancing our understanding of a validated mosquito insecticide target.

  13. A novel approach for multi-domain and multi-gene family identification provides insights into evolutionary dynamics of disease resistance genes in core eudicot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Johannes A; Zhou, Beifei; Tang, Haibao; Jones, Jonathan D G; Schranz, M Eric

    2014-11-08

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques resulted in more than forty sequenced plant genomes representing a diverse set of taxa of agricultural, energy, medicinal and ecological importance. However, gene family curation is often only inferred from DNA sequence homology and lacks insights into evolutionary processes contributing to gene family dynamics. In a comparative genomics framework, we integrated multiple lines of evidence provided by gene synteny, sequence homology and protein-based Hidden Markov Modelling to extract homologous super-clusters composed of multi-domain resistance (R)-proteins of the NB-LRR type (for NUCLEOTIDE BINDING/LEUCINE-RICH REPEATS), that are involved in plant innate immunity. To assess the diversity of R-proteins within and between species, we screened twelve eudicot plant genomes including six major crops and found a total of 2,363 NB-LRR genes. Our curated R-proteins set shows a 50% average for tandem duplicates and a 22% fraction of gene copies retained from ancient polyploidy events (ohnologs). We provide evidence for strong positive selection and show significant differences in molecular evolution rates (Ka/Ks-ratio) among tandem- (mean = 1.59), ohnolog (mean = 1.36) and singleton (mean = 1.22) R-gene duplicates. To foster the process of gene-edited plant breeding, we report species-specific presence/absence of all 140 NB-LRR genes present in the model plant Arabidopsis and describe four distinct clusters of NB-LRR "gatekeeper" loci sharing syntenic orthologs across all analyzed genomes. By curating a near-complete set of multi-domain R-protein clusters in an eudicot-wide scale, our analysis offers significant insight into evolutionary dynamics underlying diversification of the plant innate immune system. Furthermore, our methods provide a blueprint for future efforts to identify and more rapidly clone functional NB-LRR genes from any plant species.

  14. DO FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAMS DECREASE POVERTY? EVIDENCE FROM PUBLIC CENSUS DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Martha J.; Malkova, Olga; Norling, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides new evidence that family planning programs are associated with a decrease in the share of children and adults living in poverty. Our research design exploits the county roll-out of U.S. family planning programs in the late 1960s and early 1970s and examines their relationship with poverty rates in the short and longer-term in public census data. We find that cohorts born after federal family planning programs began were less likely to live in poverty in childhood and that these same cohorts were less likely to live in poverty as adults. PMID:25346655

  15. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuraku Shigehiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution.

  16. Evolutionary expansion of SPOP and associated TD/POZ gene family: impact of evolutionary route on gene expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Kong-Bung; Chuang, Trees-Juen; Lin, Wan-Yi; Chang, Che-Ming; Tsai, Yao-Hui; Huang, Chiu-Jung

    2010-07-15

    Evolutionary expansion of a gene family may occur at both the DNA and RNA levels. The rat testis-specific Rtdpoz-T2 and -T1 (rT2 and rT1) retrogenes are members of the TD/POZ gene family which also includes the well-characterized SPOP gene. In this study, rT2/rT1 transcriptional activation in cancer cells is demonstrated; the cancer rT2/rT1 transcripts are structurally similar to the embryonic transcripts reported previously in frequent exonization of transposed elements. On database interrogation, we have identified an uncharacterized rT2/rT1-like SPOP paralog, designated as SPOP-like (SPOPL), in the human and rodent genomes. Ka/Ks analysis indicates that the SPOPL genes are under functional constraints implicating biological functions. Phylogenetic analyses further suggest that segmental duplication and retrotransposition events had occurred giving rise to new gene members or retrogenes in the human-rodent ancestors during the evolution of the TD/POZ gene family. Based on this and previous works, a model is proposed to map the routes of evolutionary expansion of the TD/POZ gene family. More importantly, different gene expression patterns of members of the family are depicted: intron-harboring members are ubiquitously expressed whereas retrogenes are expressed in tissue-specific and developmentally regulated manner, and are fortuitously re-activated in cancer cells involving exonization of transposed elements.

  17. The Oligopeptide Transporters: A Small Gene Family with a Diverse Group of Substrates and Functions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Lubkowitz

    2011-01-01

    T Genes in the Oligopeptide Transport family encode integral membrane proteins that are believed to translocate their substrates from either the extracellular environment or an organelle into the cytosol. Phylogenetic analyses of plant transporters have revealed two distant clades: the Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) proteins and the so-called Oligopeptide Transporters (OPTs), for which the family was named. Three categories of substrates have been identified for this family: small peptides, secondary amino acids bound to metals, and glutathione. Notably, the YSL transporters are involved in metal homeostasis through the translocation of metal-chelates, indicating a level of conservation both in biological function as well as substrates. In contrast, the functions of OPT proteins seem to be less defined and, in this review, I will examine the supporting and contradictory evidence for the proposed roles of OPTs in such diverse functions as long-distance sulfur distribution, nitrogen mobilization, metal homeostasis, and heavy metal sequestration through the transport of glutathione, metal-chelates, and peptides.

  18. A novel ATP1A2 gene mutation in familial hemiplegic migraine and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cinzia; Prontera, Paolo; Sarchielli, Paola; Tonelli, Alessandra; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Cupini, Letizia Maria; Caproni, Stefano; Siliquini, Sabrina; Donti, Emilio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominant migraine subtype, characterized by fully reversible motor weakness as a specific symptom of aura. Mutations in the ion transportation coding genes CACNA1A , ATP1A2 and SCN1A are responsible for the FHM phenotype. Moreover, some mutations in ATP1A2 or SCN1A also may lead to epilepsy. Here we report on a three-generation family with five patients having a novel ATP1A2 mutation on exon 19, causing guanine-to-adenine substitution (c.2620G>A, p.Gly874Ser) that co-segregated in the five living relatives with migraine, four of whom had hemiplegic migraine. Moreover, three patients presented with epilepsy, one of whom had generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). The present study provides further evidence on the involvement of ATP1A2 mutations in both migraine and epilepsy, underlying the relevance of genetic analysis in families with a comorbidity of both disorders.

  19. The role of gene duplication and unconstrained selective pressures in the melanopsin gene family evolution and vertebrate circadian rhythm regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Rui; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin is a photosensitive cell protein involved in regulating circadian rhythms and other non-visual responses to light. The melanopsin gene family is represented by two paralogs, OPN4x and OPN4m, which originated through gene duplication early in the emergence of vertebrates. Here we studied the melanopsin gene family using an integrated gene/protein evolutionary approach, which revealed that the rhabdomeric urbilaterian ancestor had the same amino acid patterns (DRY motif and the Y and E conterions) as extant vertebrate species, suggesting that the mechanism for light detection and regulation is similar to rhabdomeric rhodopsins. Both OPN4m and OPN4x paralogs are found in vertebrate genomic paralogons, suggesting that they diverged following this duplication event about 600 million years ago, when the complex eye emerged in the vertebrate ancestor. Melanopsins generally evolved under negative selection (ω = 0.171) with some minor episodes of positive selection (proportion of sites = 25%) and functional divergence (θ(I) = 0.349 and θ(II) = 0.126). The OPN4m and OPN4x melanopsin paralogs show evidence of spectral divergence at sites likely involved in melanopsin light absorbance (200F, 273S and 276A). Also, following the teleost lineage-specific whole genome duplication (3R) that prompted the teleost fish radiation, type I divergence (θ(I) = 0.181) and positive selection (affecting 11% of sites) contributed to amino acid variability that we related with the photo-activation stability of melanopsin. The melanopsin intracellular regions had unexpectedly high variability in their coupling specificity of G-proteins and we propose that Gq/11 and Gi/o are the two G-proteins most-likely to mediate the melanopsin phototransduction pathway. The selection signatures were mainly observed on retinal-related sites and the third and second intracellular loops, demonstrating the physiological plasticity of the melanopsin protein group. Our results provide new insights on

  20. The role of gene duplication and unconstrained selective pressures in the melanopsin gene family evolution and vertebrate circadian rhythm regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Borges

    Full Text Available Melanopsin is a photosensitive cell protein involved in regulating circadian rhythms and other non-visual responses to light. The melanopsin gene family is represented by two paralogs, OPN4x and OPN4m, which originated through gene duplication early in the emergence of vertebrates. Here we studied the melanopsin gene family using an integrated gene/protein evolutionary approach, which revealed that the rhabdomeric urbilaterian ancestor had the same amino acid patterns (DRY motif and the Y and E conterions as extant vertebrate species, suggesting that the mechanism for light detection and regulation is similar to rhabdomeric rhodopsins. Both OPN4m and OPN4x paralogs are found in vertebrate genomic paralogons, suggesting that they diverged following this duplication event about 600 million years ago, when the complex eye emerged in the vertebrate ancestor. Melanopsins generally evolved under negative selection (ω = 0.171 with some minor episodes of positive selection (proportion of sites = 25% and functional divergence (θ(I = 0.349 and θ(II = 0.126. The OPN4m and OPN4x melanopsin paralogs show evidence of spectral divergence at sites likely involved in melanopsin light absorbance (200F, 273S and 276A. Also, following the teleost lineage-specific whole genome duplication (3R that prompted the teleost fish radiation, type I divergence (θ(I = 0.181 and positive selection (affecting 11% of sites contributed to amino acid variability that we related with the photo-activation stability of melanopsin. The melanopsin intracellular regions had unexpectedly high variability in their coupling specificity of G-proteins and we propose that Gq/11 and Gi/o are the two G-proteins most-likely to mediate the melanopsin phototransduction pathway. The selection signatures were mainly observed on retinal-related sites and the third and second intracellular loops, demonstrating the physiological plasticity of the melanopsin protein group. Our results provide new

  1. The epithelial sodium channel γ-subunit gene and blood pressure: family based association, renal gene expression, and physiological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsst, Cara J; Bloomer, Lisa D S; Scurrah, Katrina J; Ellis, Justine A; Barnes, Timothy A; Charchar, Fadi J; Braund, Peter; Hopkins, Paul N; Samani, Nilesh J; Hunt, Steven C; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Harrap, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Variants in the gene encoding the γ-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (SCNN1G) are associated with both Mendelian and quantitative effects on blood pressure. Here, in 4 cohorts of 1611 white European families composed of a total of 8199 individuals, we undertook staged testing of candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms for SCNN1G (supplemented with imputation based on data from the 1000 Genomes Project) followed by a meta-analysis in all of the families of the strongest candidate. We also examined relationships between the genotypes and relevant intermediate renal phenotypes, as well as expression of SCNN1G in human kidneys. We found that an intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism of SCNN1G (rs13331086) was significantly associated with age-, sex-, and body mass index-adjusted blood pressure in each of the 4 populations (Ppressure and 0.52-mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure (SE=0.33, P=0.002 for systolic blood pressure; SE=0.21, P=0.011 for diastolic blood pressure). The same allele was also associated with higher 12-hour overnight urinary potassium excretion (P=0.04), consistent with increased epithelial sodium channel activity. Renal samples from hypertensive subjects showed a nonsignificant (P=0.07) 1.7-fold higher expression of SCNN1G compared with normotensive controls. These data provide genetic and phenotypic evidence in support of a role for a common genetic variant of SCNN1G in blood pressure determination.

  2. A novel nonsense mutation in BBS4 gene identified in a Chinese family with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qian; Zhang Yongpeng; Jia Liyun; Peng Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease,and information about BBS in Chinese populations is very limited.The purpose of the present study was to determine the genetic cause of BBS in a Chinese Han family.Methods Clinical data were recorded for the 4-year-old female proband and the available family members.The proband was screened for mutation by Sanger sequencing for a total of 142 exons of the 12 BBS-causing genes (BBS1-BBS12).The variants detected in the proband were further confirmed in the other family members.Results We identified a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.70A>T,p.K24X) in the BBS4 gene exon 2 in the proband.Such mutant allele was predicted to cause a premature truncation in the N-terminal of the BBS4 protein,and probably induced the nonsense-mediated decay of BBS4 messenger RNAs.The proband's parents and brother were heterozygous for the nonsense mutant allele.It was absent in 50 Chinese control subjects.An additional rare heterozygous missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) named rs200718870 in BBS10 gene was also detected in the proband,her father and her brother.Some manifestations of the proband including atypical retinitis pigmentosa,choroidal sclerosis,high myopia,and early onset of obesity might be associated with this mutation in BBS4 gene.The proband's father also reported surgical removal of an extra finger during childhood.Conclusions The present study described a novel nonsense mutation in BBS4 gene in a Chinese family.This homozygous mutation was predicted to completely abolish the synthesis of the BBS4 protein.We also detected a rare heterozygous missense SNP in BBS10 gene in the family,but did not find sufficient evidence to support the triallelic inheritance.

  3. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes. Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments.

  4. Duplication and Divergence of Floral MADS-Box Genes in Grasses: Evidence for the Generation and Modification of Novel Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixia Xu; Hongzhi Kong

    2007-01-01

    The process of flowering is controlled by a hierarchy of floral genes that act as flowering time genes, inflorescence/floral meristem identity genes, and/or floral organ-identity genes. The most important and well-characterized floral genes are those that belong to the MADS-box family of transcription factors. Compelling evidence suggests that floral MADS-box genes have experienced a few large-scale duplication events. In particular, the pre-core eudicot duplication events have been considered to correlate with the emergence and diversification of core eudicots. Duplication of floral MADS-box genes has also been documented in monocots, particularly in grasses, although a systematic study is lacking. In the present study, by conducting extensive phylogenetic analyses, we identified pre-Poaceae gene duplication events in each of the AP1, PI, AG, AGL11, AGL2/3/4, and AGL9gene lineages. Comparative genomic studies further indicated that some of these duplications actually resulted from the genome doubling event that occurred 66-70 million years ago (MYA). In addition, we found that after gene duplication, exonization (of intron sequences) and pseudoexonization (of exon sequences) have contributed to the divergence of duplicate genes in sequence structure and, possibly, gene function.

  5. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, D. [INSERM, Paris (France); Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C. [and others

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Multiple members of the plasminogen-apolipoprotein(a) gene family associated with thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinose, Akitada (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-03-31

    Plasminogen and apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) are closely related plasma proteins that are associated with hereditary thrombophilia. Low plasminogen levels are found in some patients who developed venous thrombosis, while a population with high plasma concentrations of apo(a) have a higher incidence of arterial thrombosis. Two different gene coding for human apo(a) have been isolated and characterized in order to study and compare these genes with four other closely related genes in the plasminogen-apo(a) gene family. These include the gene coding for plasminogen, two unique plasminogen-related genes, and a gene coding for hepatocyte growth factor. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these genes revealed that the exons and their boundaries of these genes for plasminogen and apo(a), and the plasminogen-related genes, differ only 1-5% in sequence. The types of exon/intron junctions and positions of introns in the molecules are also exactly identical, suggesting that these genes have evolved from an ancestral plasminogen gene via duplication and exon shuffling. By utilizing these results, gene-specific probes have been designed for the analysis of each of the genes in this gene family. The plasminogen and two apo(a) genes were all localized to chromosome 6 by employing the gene-specific primers and genomic DNAs from human-hamster cell hybrids. These data also make it possible to characterize the apo(a) and plasminogen genes in individuals by in vitro amplification.

  7. Inferring hypotheses on functional relationships of genes: Analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana subtilase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Rautengarten

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The gene family of subtilisin-like serine proteases (subtilases in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 56 members, divided into six distinct subfamilies. Whereas the members of five subfamilies are similar to pyrolysins, two genes share stronger similarity to animal kexins. Mutant screens confirmed 144 T-DNA insertion lines with knockouts for 55 out of the 56 subtilases. Apart from SDD1, none of the confirmed homozygous mutants revealed any obvious visible phenotypic alteration during growth under standard conditions. Apart from this specific case, forward genetics gave us no hints about the function of the individual 54 non-characterized subtilase genes. Therefore, the main objective of our work was to overcome the shortcomings of the forward genetic approach and to infer alternative experimental approaches by using an integrative bioinformatics and biological approach. Computational analyses based on transcriptional co-expression and co-response pattern revealed at least two expression networks, suggesting that functional redundancy may exist among subtilases with limited similarity. Furthermore, two hubs were identified, which may be involved in signalling or may represent higher-order regulatory factors involved in responses to environmental cues. A particular enrichment of co-regulated genes with metabolic functions was observed for four subtilases possibly representing late responsive elements of environmental stress. The kexin homologs show stronger associations with genes of transcriptional regulation context. Based on the analyses presented here and in accordance with previously characterized subtilases, we propose three main functions of subtilases: involvement in (i control of development, (ii protein turnover, and (iii action as downstream components of signalling cascades. Supplemental material is available in the Plant Subtilase Database (PSDB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/psdb.html, as well as from the CSB.DB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

  8. Inferring Hypotheses on Functional Relationships of Genes: Analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana Subtilase Gene Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The gene family of subtilisin-like serine proteases (subtilases in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 56 members, divided into six distinct subfamilies. Whereas the members of five subfamilies are similar to pyrolysins, two genes share stronger similarity to animal kexins. Mutant screens confirmed 144 T-DNA insertion lines with knockouts for 55 out of the 56 subtilases. Apart from SDD1, none of the confirmed homozygous mutants revealed any obvious visible phenotypic alteration during growth under standard conditions. Apart from this specific case, forward genetics gave us no hints about the function of the individual 54 non-characterized subtilase genes. Therefore, the main objective of our work was to overcome the shortcomings of the forward genetic approach and to infer alternative experimental approaches by using an integrative bioinformatics and biological approach. Computational analyses based on transcriptional co-expression and co-response pattern revealed at least two expression networks, suggesting that functional redundancy may exist among subtilases with limited similarity. Furthermore, two hubs were identified, which may be involved in signalling or may represent higher-order regulatory factors involved in responses to environmental cues. A particular enrichment of co-regulated genes with metabolic functions was observed for four subtilases possibly representing late responsive elements of environmental stress. The kexin homologs show stronger associations with genes of transcriptional regulation context. Based on the analyses presented here and in accordance with previously characterized subtilases, we propose three main functions of subtilases: involvement in (i control of development, (ii protein turnover, and (iii action as downstream components of signalling cascades. Supplemental material is available in the Plant Subtilase Database (PSDB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/psdb.html , as well as from the CSB.DB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

  9. Cloning of the mouse BTG3 gene and definition of a new gene family (the BTG family) involved in the negative control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéhenneux, F; Duret, L; Callanan, M B; Bouhas, R; Hayette, S; Berthet, C; Samarut, C; Rimokh, R; Birot, A M; Wang, Q; Magaud, J P; Rouault, J P

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that loss of tumor suppressor genes and more generally of antiproliferative genes plays a key role in the development of most tumors. We report here the cloning of the mouse BTG3 gene and show that its human counterpart maps on chromosome 21. This evolutionarily conserved gene codes for a 30 kDa protein and is expressed in most adult murine and human tissues analyzed. However, we demonstrate that its expression is cell cycle dependent and peaks at the end of the G1 phase. This gene is homologous to the human BTG1, BTG2 and TOB genes which were demonstrated to act as inhibitors of cell proliferation. Its description allowed us to define better this seven gene family (the BTG gene family) at the structural level and to speculate about its physiological role in normal and tumoral cells. This family is mainly characterized by the presence of two conserved domains (BTG boxes A and B) of as yet undetermined function which are separated by a non-conserved 20-25 amino acid sequence.

  10. Functionally recurrent rearrangements of the MAST kinase and Notch gene families in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dan R; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Wu, Yi-Mi; Shankar, Sunita; Cao, Xuhong; Ateeq, Bushra; Asangani, Irfan A; Iyer, Matthew; Maher, Christopher A; Grasso, Catherine S; Lonigro, Robert J; Quist, Michael; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Jing, Xiaojun; Giordano, Thomas J; Sabel, Michael S; Kleer, Celina G; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou B; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2011-11-20

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that has a wide range of molecular aberrations and clinical outcomes. Here we used paired-end transcriptome sequencing to explore the landscape of gene fusions in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and tissues. We observed that individual breast cancers have a variety of expressed gene fusions. We identified two classes of recurrent gene rearrangements involving genes encoding microtubule-associated serine-threonine kinase (MAST) and members of the Notch family. Both MAST and Notch-family gene fusions have substantial phenotypic effects in breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines harboring Notch gene rearrangements are uniquely sensitive to inhibition of Notch signaling, and overexpression of MAST1 or MAST2 gene fusions has a proliferative effect both in vitro and in vivo. These findings show that recurrent gene rearrangements have key roles in subsets of carcinomas and suggest that transcriptome sequencing could identify individuals with rare, targetable gene fusions.

  11. Identification and distribution of the NBS-LRR gene family in the cassava genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant resistance genes (R genes) exist in large families and usually contain both a nucleotide-binding site domain and a leucine-rich repeat domain, denoted NBS-LRR. The genome sequence of cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a valuable resource for analyzing the genomic organization of resistance genes i...

  12. Genomewide analysis of the lateral organ boundaries domain gene family in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Liu, Cai-Yun; Liu, Chun-Xiang; Zhao, Yue-Ling; Xu, Rui-Rui

    2016-09-01

    In plants, the transcription factor families have been implicated in many important biological processes. These processes include morphogenesis, signal transduction and environmental stress responses. Proteins containing the lateral organ boundaries domain (LBD), which encodes a zinc finger-like domain are only found in plants. This finding indicates that this unique gene family regulates only plant-specific biological processes. LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of plants such as Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays, poplar, apple and tomato. However, relatively little is known about the LBD genes in grape (Vitis vinifera). In this study, we identified 40 LBD genes in the grape genome. A complete overview of the chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, structures and expression profiles of this gene family during development in grape is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the LBD genes could be divided into classes I and II, together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. We mapped the 40 LBD genes on the grape chromosomes (chr1-chr19) and found that 37 of the predicted grape LBD genes were distributed in different densities across 12 chromosomes. Grape LBDs were found to share a similar intron/exon structure and gene length within the same class. The expression profiles of grape LBD genes at different developmental stages were analysed using microarray data. Results showed that 21 grape LBD genes may be involved in grape developmental processes, including preveraison, veraison and ripening. Finally, we analysed the expression patterns of six LBD genes through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reation analysis. The six LBD genes showed differential expression patterns among the three representative grape tissues, and five of these genes were found to be involved in responses to mannitol, sodium chloride, heat stress and low temperature treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the LBD gene family in

  13. Genomewide analysis of the lateral organ boundaries domain gene family in Vitis vinifera

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUI CAO; CAI-YUN LIU; HUN-XIANG LIU; YUE-LING ZHAO; RUI-RUI XU

    2016-09-01

    In plants, the transcription factor families have been implicated in many important biological processes. These processes include morphogenesis, signal transduction and environmental stress responses. Proteins containing the lateral organ bound-aries domain (LBD), which encodes a zinc finger-like domain are only found in plants. This finding indicates that this unique gene family regulates only plant-specific biological processes. LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of plants such as Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays , poplar, apple and tomato. However, relatively little is known about the LBD genes in grape ( Vitis vinifera). In this study, we identified 40 LBD genes in the grape genome. A complete overview of the chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, structures and expression profiles of this gene family during development in grape is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the LBD genes could be divided into classes I and II, together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. We mapped the 40 LBD genes on the grape chromosomes (chr1–chr19) and found that 37 of the predicted grape LBD genes were distributed in different densities across 12 chromosomes. Grape LBDs were found to share a similar intron/exon structure and gene length within the same class. The expression profiles of grape LBD genes at different developmental stages were analysed using microarray data. Results showed that 21 grape LBD genes may be involved in grape developmental processes, including preveraison, veraison and ripening. Finally, we analysed the expres-sion patterns of six LBD genes through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reation analysis. The six LBD genes showed differential expression patterns among the three representative grape tissues, and five of these genes were found to be involved in responses to mannitol, sodium chloride, heat stress and low temperature treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the LBD gene

  14. The molecular evolutionary dynamics of the vomeronasal receptor (class 1) genes in primates: a gene family on the verge of a functional breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Anne D; Larsen, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction plays a critical role in both survival of the individual and in the propagation of species. Studies from across the mammalian clade have found a remarkable correlation between organismal lifestyle and molecular evolutionary properties of receptor genes in both the main olfactory system (MOS) and the vomeronasal system (VNS). When a large proportion of intact (and putatively functional) copies is observed, the inference is made that a particular mode of chemoreception is critical for an organism's fit to its environment and is thus under strong positive selection. Conversely, when the receptors in question show a disproportionately large number of pseudogene copies, this contraction is interpreted as evidence of relaxed selection potentially leading to gene family extinction. Notably, it appears that a risk factor for gene family extinction is a high rate of nonsynonymous substitution. A survey of intact vs. pseudogene copies among primate vomeronasal receptor Class one genes (V1Rs) appears to substantiate this hypothesis. Molecular evolutionary complexities in the V1R gene family combine rapid rates of gene duplication, gene conversion, lineage-specific expansions, deletions, and/or pseudogenization. An intricate mix of phylogenetic footprints and current adaptive landscapes have left their mark on primate V1Rs suggesting that the primate clade offers an ideal model system for exploring the molecular evolutionary and functional properties of the VNS of mammals. Primate V1Rs tell a story of ancestral function and divergent selection as species have moved into ever diversifying adaptive regimes. The sensitivity to functional collapse in these genes, consequent to their precariously high rates of nonsynonymous substitution, confer a remarkable capacity to reveal the lifestyles of the genomes that they presently occupy as well as those of their ancestors.

  15. Evolution of the chitin synthase gene family correlates with fungal morphogenesis and adaption to ecological niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Xu, Chuan; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Wang, Shiyi; Fang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    The fungal kingdom potentially has the most complex chitin synthase (CHS) gene family, but evolution of the fungal CHS gene family and its diversification to fulfill multiple functions remain to be elucidated. Here, we identified the full complement of CHSs from 231 fungal species. Using the largest dataset to date, we characterized the evolution of the fungal CHS gene family using phylogenetic and domain structure analysis. Gene duplication, domain recombination and accretion are major mechanisms underlying the diversification of the fungal CHS gene family, producing at least 7 CHS classes. Contraction of the CHS gene family is morphology-specific, with significant loss in unicellular fungi, whereas family expansion is lineage-specific with obvious expansion in early-diverging fungi. ClassV and ClassVII CHSs with the same domain structure were produced by the recruitment of domains PF00063 and PF08766 and subsequent duplications. Comparative analysis of their functions in multiple fungal species shows that the emergence of ClassV and ClassVII CHSs is important for the morphogenesis of filamentous fungi, development of pathogenicity in pathogenic fungi, and heat stress tolerance in Pezizomycotina fungi. This work reveals the evolution of the fungal CHS gene family, and its correlation with fungal morphogenesis and adaptation to ecological niches. PMID:28300148

  16. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  17. Functional evolution of ADAMTS genes: Evidence from analyses of phylogeny and gene organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Meir Erwin G

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ADAMTS (A Disintegrin-like and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin motifs proteins are a family of metalloproteases with sequence similarity to the ADAM proteases, that contain the thrombospondin type 1 sequence repeat motifs (TSRs common to extracellular matrix proteins. ADAMTS proteins have recently gained attention with the discovery of their role in a variety of diseases, including tissue and blood disorders, cancer, osteoarthritis, Alzheimer's and the genetic syndromes Weill-Marchesani syndrome (ADAMTS10, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (ADAMTS13, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC (ADAMTS2 in humans and belted white-spotting mutation in mice (ADAMTS20. Results Phylogenetic analysis and comparison of the exon/intron organization of vertebrate (Homo, Mus, Fugu, chordate (Ciona and invertebrate (Drosophila and Caenorhabditis ADAMTS homologs has elucidated the evolutionary relationships of this important gene family, which comprises 19 members in humans. Conclusions The evolutionary history of ADAMTS genes in vertebrate genomes has been marked by rampant gene duplication, including a retrotransposition that gave rise to a distinct ADAMTS subfamily (ADAMTS1, -4, -5, -8, -15 that may have distinct aggrecanase and angiogenesis functions.

  18. The cloning and expression characterization of the centrosome protein genes family (centrin genes) in rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Xiaodong(孙晓冬); GE; Yehua(葛晔华); MA; Jing(马静); YU; Zuoren(俞作仁); LI; Sai(李赛); WANG; Yongchao(王永潮); XUE; Shepu(薛社普); HAN; Daishu(韩代书)

    2002-01-01

    Centrins are members of the centrosome protein family, which is highly conserved during revolution. The homologous genes of centrin in many organisms had been cloned, but the sequences of the rat centrin genes were not reported yet in GenBank. We cloned the cDNA fragments of centrin-1, -2 and -3 from the rat testis by RT-PCR, and analyzed the homology of the deduced amino acid sequences. The expression characterization of centrin genes in rat spermatogenesis was carried out by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that the homology of the corresponding centrin proteins in human, mouse and rat is high. The expression of centrin-1 is testis-specific, spermatogenic cell-specific and developmental stage-related. Centrin-1 begins to be transcribed when the meiosis occurs, and its mRNA level reaches the peak in round spermatids. Centrin-2 and centrin-3 are highly expressed in spermatogonia and their mRNA level decreases markedly when meiosis occurs. These results suggest that centrin-1 may play roles in meiosis and spermiogenesis, and centrin-2 and centrin-3 may be related to mitosis.

  19. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cockram

    Full Text Available Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare. Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  20. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Bailey, Paul C; O'Sullivan, Donal M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL) and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF) genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR) gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  1. Using family history information to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diseases; a discussion of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Paula W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A family history, reflecting genetic susceptibility as well as shared environmental and behavioral factors, is an important risk factor for common chronic multifactorial diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and many cancers. Discussion The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the evidence for the use of family history as a tool for primary prevention of common chronic diseases, in particular for tailored interventions aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles. The following questions are addressed: (1 What is the value of family history information as a determinant of personal disease risk?; (2How can family history information be used to motivate at-risk individuals to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles in order to prevent disease?; and (3 What additional studies are needed to assess the potential value of family history information as a tool to promote a healthy lifestyle? Summary In addition to risk assessment, family history information can be used to personalize health messages, which are potentially more effective in promoting healthy lifestyles than standardized health messages. More research is needed on the evidence for the effectiveness of such a tool.

  2. Improving Access to Quality Care in Family Planning: WHO's Four Cornerstones of Evidence-based Guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang-chun WU; Yan ZOU; K Church; O Meirik

    2007-01-01

    The four cornerstones of guidance in technique service of family planning are established by WHO based on high quality evidences. They have been updated according to the appearing new evidences, and the consensuses were reached by the international experts in this field. The four documents include Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, Decision-making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers and The Global Handbook for Family Planning Providers. The first two documents mainlyface to the policy-makers and programme managers and were treated as the important references for creating the local guideline. The other two documents were developed for the front-line health-care and family planning providers at different levels, which include plenty of essential technical information to help providers improve their ability in service delivery and counselling. China paid great attention to the introduction and application of WHO guidelines. As soon as the newer editions of these documents were available, the Chinese version would be followed. WHO guidelines have been primarily adapted with the newly issued national guideline, The Clinical Practical Skill Guidelines- Family Planning Part, which was established by China Medical Association. At the same time, the WHO guidelines have been introduced to some of the linicians and family planning providers at different levels. In the future, more special training courses will be introduced to the township level based on the needs of grassroot providers.

  3. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization.

  4. Diversification of the C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) gene family in angiosperms, and evolution of plant-family specific CEP genes.

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    Ogilvie, Huw A; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2014-10-06

    Small, secreted signaling peptides work in parallel with phytohormones to control important aspects of plant growth and development. Genes from the C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) family produce such peptides which negatively regulate plant growth, especially under stress, and affect other important developmental processes. To illuminate how the CEP gene family has evolved within the plant kingdom, including its emergence, diversification and variation between lineages, a comprehensive survey was undertaken to identify and characterize CEP genes in 106 plant genomes. Using a motif-based system developed for this study to identify canonical CEP peptide domains, a total of 916 CEP genes and 1,223 CEP domains were found in angiosperms and for the first time in gymnosperms. This defines a narrow band for the emergence of CEP genes in plants, from the divergence of lycophytes to the angiosperm/gymnosperm split. Both CEP genes and domains were found to have diversified in angiosperms, particularly in the Poaceae and Solanaceae plant families. Multispecies orthologous relationships were determined for 22% of identified CEP genes, and further analysis of those groups found selective constraints upon residues within the CEP peptide and within the previously little-characterized variable region. An examination of public Oryza sativa RNA-Seq datasets revealed an expression pattern that links OsCEP5 and OsCEP6 to panicle development and flowering, and CEP gene trees reveal these emerged from a duplication event associated with the Poaceae plant family. The characterization of the plant-family specific CEP genes OsCEP5 and OsCEP6, the association of CEP genes with angiosperm-specific development processes like panicle development, and the diversification of CEP genes in angiosperms provides further support for the hypothesis that CEP genes have been integral to the evolution of novel traits within the angiosperm lineage. Beyond these findings, the comprehensive set of CEP

  5. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

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    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  6. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor

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    Chan Jeannie

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carboxylesterases (CES perform diverse metabolic roles in mammalian organisms in the detoxification of a broad range of drugs and xenobiotics and may also serve in specific roles in lipid, cholesterol, pheromone and lung surfactant metabolism. Five CES families have been reported in mammals with human CES1 and CES2 the most extensively studied. Here we describe the genetics, expression and phylogeny of CES isozymes in the opossum and report on the sequences and locations of CES1, CES2 and CES6 'like' genes within two gene clusters on chromosome one. We also discuss the likely sequence of gene duplication events generating multiple CES genes during vertebrate evolution. Results We report a cDNA sequence for an opossum CES and present evidence for CES1 and CES2 like genes expressed in opossum liver and intestine and for distinct gene locations of five opossum CES genes,CES1, CES2.1, CES2.2, CES2.3 and CES6, on chromosome 1. Phylogenetic and sequence alignment studies compared the predicted amino acid sequences for opossum CES with those for human, mouse, chicken, frog, salmon and Drosophila CES gene products. Phylogenetic analyses produced congruent phylogenetic trees depicting a rapid early diversification into at least five distinct CES gene family clusters: CES2, CES1, CES7, CES3, and CES6. Molecular divergence estimates based on a Bayesian relaxed clock approach revealed an origin for the five mammalian CES gene families between 328–378 MYA. Conclusion The deduced amino acid sequence for an opossum cDNA was consistent with its identity as a mammalian CES2 gene product (designated CES2.1. Distinct gene locations for opossum CES1 (1: 446,222,550–446,274,850, three CES2 genes (1: 677,773,395–677,927,030 and a CES6 gene (1: 677,585,520–677,730,419 were observed on chromosome 1. Opossum CES1 and multiple CES2 genes were expressed in liver and intestine. Amino acid sequences for opossum CES1 and three CES2 gene products

  7. Detection of filaggrin gene mutation (2282del4) in Pakistani Ichthyosis vulgaris families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Naghma; Samdani, Azam Jah

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to detect an 811 bp filaggrin (FLG) gene fragment known to carry a mutation 2282del4 which causes ichthyosis vulgaris. Seven clinically examined ichthyosis vulgaris families were included in this study. An 811 bp FLG gene fragment was targeted in the genomic DNA of all the members of the seven families by PCR amplification using known primers RPT1P7 and RPT2P1. Successful amplification of an 811 bp FLG gene fragment in all the families suggested the possible role of the 2282del4 mutation in causing ichthyosis vulgaris in Pakistani population.

  8. Folate-related gene variants in Irish families affected by neural tube defects

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    Ridgely eFisk Green

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Periconceptional folic acid use can often prevent neural tube defects (NTDs. Variants of genes involved in folate metabolism in mothers and children have been associated with occurrence of NTDs. We identified Irish families with individuals affected by neural tube defects. In these families, we observed that neural tube defects and birth defects overall occurred at a higher rate in the maternal lineage compared with the paternal lineage. The goal of this study was to look for evidence for genetic effects that could explain the discrepancy in the occurrence of these birth defects in the maternal vs. paternal lineage. We genotyped blood samples from 322 individuals from NTD-affected Irish families, identified through their membership in spina bifida associations. We looked for differences in distribution in maternal vs. paternal lineages of five genetic polymorphisms: the DHFR 19bp deletion, MTHFD1 1958G>A, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTHFR 677C>T, and SLC19A1 80A>G. In addition to looking at genotypes individually, we determined the number of genotypes associated with decreased folate metabolism in each relative (risk genotypes and compared the distribution of these genotypes in maternal vs. paternal relatives. Overall, maternal relatives had a higher number of genotypes associated with lower folate metabolism than paternal relatives (p=0.017. We expected that relatives would share the same risk genotype as the individuals with NTDs and/or their mothers. However, we observed that maternal relatives had an over-abundance of any risk genotype, rather than one specific genotype. The observed genetic effects suggest an epigenetic mechanism in which decreased folate metabolism results in epigenetic alterations related to the increased rate of NTDs and other birth defects seen in the maternal lineage. Future studies on the etiology of NTDs and other birth defects could benefit from including multigenerational extended families, in order to explore potential

  9. Two families of rep-like genes that probably originated by interspecies recombination are represented in viral, plasmid, bacterial, and parasitic protozoan genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Mark J; Smeianov, Vladimir V; Steele, James L; Upcroft, Peter; Efimov, Boris A

    2006-06-01

    Two families of genes related to, and including, rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) genes were defined by sequence similarity and by evidence of intergene family recombination. The Rep genes of circoviruses were the best characterized members of the "RecRep1 family." Other members of the RecRep1 family were Rep-like genes found in the genomes of the Canarypox virus, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia duodenalis and in a plasmid, p4M, from the Gram-positive bacterium, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum. The "RecRep2 family" comprised some previously identified Rep-like genes from plasmids of phytoplasmas and similar Rep-like genes from the genomes of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactococcus lactis, and Phytoplasma asteris. Both RecRep1 and RecRep2 proteins have a nucleotide-binding domain significantly similar to the helicases (2C proteins) of picorna-like viruses. On the N-terminal side of the nucleotide binding domain, RecRep1 proteins have a domain significantly similar to one found in nanovirus Reps, whereas RecRep2 proteins have a domain significantly similar to one in the Reps of pLS1 plasmids. We speculate that RecRep genes have been transferred from viruses or plasmids to parasitic protozoan and bacterial genomes and that Rep proteins were themselves involved in the original recombination events that generated the ancestral RecRep genes.

  10. Conservation, Divergence, and Genome-Wide Distribution of PAL and POX A Gene Families in Plants

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    H. C. Rawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic and syntenic comparison were performed for the genes responsible for phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and peroxidase A (POX A enzymes in nine plant species representing very diverse groups like legumes (Glycine max and Medicago truncatula, fruits (Vitis vinifera, cereals (Sorghum bicolor, Zea mays, and Oryza sativa, trees (Populus trichocarpa, and model dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot (Brachypodium distachyon species. A total of 87 and 1045 genes in PAL and POX A gene families, respectively, have been identified in these species. The phylogenetic and syntenic comparison along with motif distributions shows a high degree of conservation of PAL genes, suggesting that these genes may predate monocot/eudicot divergence. The POX A family genes, present in clusters at the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes, might be evolving and expanding with higher rate than the PAL gene family. Our analysis showed that during the expansion of POX A gene family, many groups and subgroups have evolved, resulting in a high level of functional divergence among monocots and dicots. These results will act as a first step toward the understanding of monocot/eudicot evolution and functional characterization of these gene families in the future.

  11. Evidence-based behavioral interventions to promote diabetes management in children, adolescents, and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Powell, Priscilla W; Anderson, Barbara J

    2016-10-01

    As members of multidisciplinary diabetes care teams, psychologists are well-suited to support self-management among youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their families. Psychological and behavioral interventions can promote adherence to the complex and demanding diabetes care regimen, with the goals of promoting high quality of life, achieving optimal glycemic control, and ultimately preventing disease-related complications. This article reviews well-researched contemporary behavioral interventions to promote optimal diabetes family- and self-management and health outcomes in youth with T1D, in the context of key behavioral theories. The article summarizes the evidence base for established diabetes skills training programs, family interventions, and multisystemic interventions, and introduces emerging evidence for technology and mobile health interventions and health care delivery system interventions. Next steps in behavioral T1D intervention research include tailoring interventions to meet individuals' and families' unique needs and strengths, and systematically evaluating cost-effectiveness to advocate for dissemination of well-developed interventions. Although in its infancy, this article reviews observational and intervention research for youth with T2D and their families and discusses lessons for future research with this population. Interventions for youth with T2D will need to incorporate family members, consider cultural and family issues related to health behaviors, and take into account competing priorities for resources. As psychologists and behavioral scientists, we must advocate for the integration of behavioral health into routine pediatric diabetes care in order to effectively promote meaningful change in the behavioral and medical well-being of youth and families living with T1D and T2D. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. A unified theory of autism revisited: linkage evidence points to chromosome X using a high-risk subset of AGRE families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Cannon, Dale; Robison, Reid; McMahon, William M; Coon, Hilary

    2010-04-01

    Zhao et al. [2007] in their "Unified Theory of Autism" hypothesized that incidence of autism in males could be explained by essentially two types of family structures: majority of autism cases are from low-risk autism families with de novo mutations, and a minority of cases are from high-risk multiplex families, where risk to male offspring approximates 50% consistent with a dominant model and high penetrance. Using the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) data set, Zhao et al. identified 86 high-risk families with likely dominant transmission. As genotype data are now available for many members of the AGRE resource, the objective of this manuscript was to determine if dominant linkage evidence for an autism predisposition gene exists in these 86 high-risk families. HumanHap550K Illumina SNP data were available for 92% of 455 total family members in these 86 high-risk families. We performed a linkage analysis using a pruned subset of markers where markers in high linkage disequilibrium were removed. We observed a single suggestive peak (maximum LOD 2.01, maximum HLOD 2.08) under a dominant model on chromosome Xp22.11-p21.2 that encompasses the IL1RAPL1 gene. Mutations or deletions in IL1RAPL1 have been previously reported in three families with autism. In our study, 11 families contributed nominally (P0.588) to the chromosome X peak. These results demonstrate that identification of a more homogeneous subset of autism cases, which was based on family structure in this study, may help to identify, localize and further our understanding of autism predisposition genes.

  13. Hypomanic personality, social anhedonia and impulsive nonconformity: evidence for familial aggregation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T D; Hautzinger, M

    2001-08-01

    Schizophrenic and affective spectrum disorders aggregate in the families of patients afflicted with such disorders. Possible vulnerability markers for these disorders should therefore also run in families. The Chapmans and their coworkers developed the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HYP) to identify people at risk for affective disorders, and the scales Social Anhedonia (SA) and Impulsive Nonconformity (IMP) to assess schizotypy (Chapman et al., 1976, 1984; Eckblad & Chapman, 1986). The present family study investigated the familial resemblance of the HYP, SA, and IMP Scale using a maximum-likelihood approach. Index participants and their relatives (n = 717) completed a questionnaire packet that included the above-mentioned scales. Stepwise several models of familial correlations were specified and tested dealing with the influence of sex of parents and offspring and of interindividual cross-trait resemblance. For all three measures, there was evidence of familial resemblance. For SA and IMP, we found hints for possible assortative mating; additionally for HYP and IMP, an interindividual cross-trait resemblance (with correlations of 0.14 and 0.18, respectively) between family members emerged. The results support the validity of the HYP, SA, and IMP Scale. It is discussed whether HYP and IMP represent different aspects of a shared latent liability.

  14. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L..

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    Zhi Zou

    Full Text Available WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III. Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae, comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  15. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Wang, Danhua; Huang, Qixing; Mo, Yeyong; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae) genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III). Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  16. Saltatory evolution of the ectodermal neural cortex gene family at the vertebrate origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Nathalie; Murakami, Yasunori; Breithut, Lisa; Mazan, Sylvie; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    The ectodermal neural cortex (ENC) gene family, whose members are implicated in neurogenesis, is part of the kelch repeat superfamily. To date, ENC genes have been identified only in osteichthyans, although other kelch repeat-containing genes are prevalent throughout bilaterians. The lack of elaborate molecular phylogenetic analysis with exhaustive taxon sampling has obscured the possible link of the establishment of this gene family with vertebrate novelties. In this study, we identified ENC homologs in diverse vertebrates by means of database mining and polymerase chain reaction screens. Our analysis revealed that the ENC3 ortholog was lost in the basal eutherian lineage through single-gene deletion and that the triplication between ENC1, -2, and -3 occurred early in vertebrate evolution. Including our original data on the catshark and the zebrafish, our comparison revealed high conservation of the pleiotropic expression pattern of ENC1 and shuffling of expression domains between ENC1, -2, and -3. Compared with many other gene families including developmental key regulators, the ENC gene family is unique in that conventional molecular phylogenetic inference could identify no obvious invertebrate ortholog. This suggests a composite nature of the vertebrate-specific gene repertoire, consisting not only of de novo genes introduced at the vertebrate origin but also of long-standing genes with no apparent invertebrate orthologs. Some of the latter, including the ENC gene family, may be too rapidly evolving to provide sufficient phylogenetic signals marking orthology to their invertebrate counterparts. Such gene families that experienced saltatory evolution likely remain to be explored and might also have contributed to phenotypic evolution of vertebrates.

  17. "It's good to know": experiences of gene identification and result disclosure in familial epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vears, Danya F; Dunn, Karen L; Wake, Samantha A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-05-01

    Recognition of the role of genetics in the epilepsies has increased dramatically, impacting on clinical practice across many epilepsy syndromes. There is limited research investigating the impact of gene identification on individuals and families with epilepsy. While research has focused on the impact of delivering genetic information to families at the time of diagnosis in genetic diseases more broadly, little is known about how genetic results in epileptic diseases influences people's lives many years after it has been conveyed. This study used qualitative methods to explore the experience of receiving a genetic result in people with familial epilepsy. Interviews were conducted with individuals with familial epilepsies in whom the underlying genetic mutation had been identified. Recorded interviews underwent thematic analysis. 20 individuals from three families with different epilepsy syndromes and causative genes were interviewed. Multiple generations within families were studied. The mean time from receiving the genetic result prior to interview was 10.9 years (range 5-14 years). Three major themes were identified: 1) living with epilepsy: an individual's experience of the severity of epilepsy in their family influenced their view. 2) Clinical utility of the test: participants expressed varying reactions to receiving a genetic result. While for some it provided helpful information and relief, others were not surprised by the finding given the familial context. Some valued the use of genetic information for reproductive decision-making, particularly in the setting of severely affected family members. While altruistic reasons for participating in genetic research were discussed, participants emphasised the benefit of participation to them and their families. 3) 'Talking about the family genes': individuals reported poor communication between family members about their epilepsy and its genetic implications. The results provide important insights into the family

  18. Global identification and expression analysis of stress-responsive genes of the Argonaute family in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruirui; Liu, Caiyun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Shizhong

    2016-12-01

    Argonaute (AGO) proteins, which are found in yeast, animals, and plants, are the core molecules of the RNA-induced silencing complex. These proteins play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic stresses. The complete analysis and classification of the AGO gene family have been recently reported in different plants. Nevertheless, systematic analysis and expression profiling of these genes have not been performed in apple (Malus domestica). Approximately 15 AGO genes were identified in the apple genome. The phylogenetic tree, chromosome location, conserved protein motifs, gene structure, and expression of the AGO gene family in apple were analyzed for gene prediction. All AGO genes were phylogenetically clustered into four groups (i.e., AGO1, AGO4, MEL1/AGO5, and ZIPPY/AGO7) with the AGO genes of Arabidopsis. These groups of the AGO gene family were statistically analyzed and compared among 31 plant species. The predicted apple AGO genes are distributed across nine chromosomes at different densities and include three segment duplications. Expression studies indicated that 15 AGO genes exhibit different expression patterns in at least one of the tissues tested. Additionally, analysis of gene expression levels indicated that the genes are mostly involved in responses to NaCl, PEG, heat, and low-temperature stresses. Hence, several candidate AGO genes are involved in different aspects of physiological and developmental processes and may play an important role in abiotic stress responses in apple. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report a comprehensive analysis of the apple AGO gene family. Our results provide useful information to understand the classification and putative functions of these proteins, especially for gene members that may play important roles in abiotic stress responses in M. hupehensis.

  19. A Patient With Desmoid Tumors and Familial FAP Having Frame Shift Mutation of the APC Gene

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    Sanambar Sadighi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Desmoids tumors, characterized by monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblasts, could occur in 5-10% of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP as an extra-colonic manifestation of the disease. FAP can develop when there is a germ-line mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene. Although mild or attenuated FAP may follow mutations in 5΄ extreme of the gene, it is more likely that 3΄ extreme mutations haveamore severe manifestation of thedisease. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran with an abdominal painful mass. She had strong family history of FAP and underwent prophylactic total colectomy. Pre-operative CT scans revealed a large mass. Microscopic observation showed diffuse fibroblast cell infiltration of the adjacent tissue structures. Peripheral blood DNA extraction followed by adenomatous polyposis coli gene exon by exon sequencing was performed to investigate the mutation in adenomatous polyposis coli gene. Analysis of DNA sequencing demonstrated a mutation of 4 bpdeletions at codon 1309-1310 of the exon 16 of adenomatous polyposis coli gene sequence which was repeated in 3 members of the family. Some of them had desmoid tumor without classical FAP history. Even when there is no familial history of adenomatous polyposis, the adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutation should be investigated in cases of familial desmoids tumors for a suitable prevention. The 3΄ extreme of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene is still the best likely location in such families.

  20. Multiple independent insertions of 5S rRNA genes in the spliced-leader gene family of trypanosome species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauparlant, Marc A; Drouin, Guy

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of the 5S rRNA genes found in the spliced-leader (SL) gene repeat units of numerous trypanosome species suggest that such linkages were not inherited from a common ancestor, but were the result of independent 5S rRNA gene insertions. In trypanosomes, 5S rRNA genes are found either in the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes or in independent tandemly repeated units. Given that trypanosome species where 5S rRNA genes are within the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes are phylogenetically related, one might hypothesize that this arrangement is the result of an ancestral insertion of 5S rRNA genes into the tandemly repeated SL gene family of trypanosomes. Here, we use the types of 5S rRNA genes found associated with SL genes, the flanking regions of the inserted 5S rRNA genes and the position of these insertions to show that most of the 5S rRNA genes found within SL gene repeat units of trypanosome species were not acquired from a common ancestor but are the results of independent insertions. These multiple 5S rRNA genes insertion events in trypanosomes are likely the result of frequent founder events in different hosts and/or geographical locations in species having short generation times.

  1. Genomewide linkage scan for myopia susceptibility loci among Ashkenazi Jewish families shows evidence of linkage on chromosome 22q12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Dwight; Ibay, Grace; Reider, Lauren; Dana, Debra; Moy, Chris; Schlifka, Melissa; Holmes, Taura; Ciner, Elise; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2004-09-01

    Mild/moderate (common) myopia is a very common disorder, with both genetic and environmental influences. The environmental factors are related to near work and can be measured. There are no known genetic loci for common myopia. Our goal is to find evidence for a myopia susceptibility gene causing common myopia. Cycloplegic and manifest refraction were performed on 44 large American families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, each with at least two affected siblings. Individuals with at least -1.00 diopter or lower in each meridian of both eyes were classified as myopic. Microsatellite genotyping with 387 markers was performed by the Center for Inherited Disease Research. Linkage analyses were conducted with parametric and nonparametric methods by use of 12 different penetrance models. The family-based association test was used for an association scan. A maximum multipoint parametric heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score of 3.54 was observed at marker D22S685, and nonparametric linkage analyses gave consistent results, with a P value of.0002 at this marker. The parametric multipoint HLOD scores exceeded 3.0 for a 4-cM interval, and significant evidence of genetic heterogeneity was observed. This genomewide scan is the first step toward identifying a gene on chromosome 22 with an influence on common myopia. At present, we are following up our linkage results on chromosome 22 with a dense map of >1,500 single-nucleotide-polymorphism markers for fine mapping and association analyses. Identification of a susceptibility locus in this region may eventually lead to a better understanding of gene-environment interactions in the causation of this complex trait.

  2. CRDB: database of chemosensory receptor gene families in vertebrate.

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    Dong Dong

    Full Text Available Chemosensory receptors (CR are crucial for animals to sense the environmental changes and survive on earth. The emergence of whole-genome sequences provides us an opportunity to identify the entire CR gene repertoires. To completely gain more insight into the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates, we identified the nearly all CR genes in 25 vertebrates using homology-based approaches. Among these CR gene repertoires, nearly half of them were identified for the first time in those previously uncharacterized species, such as the guinea pig, giant panda and elephant, etc. Consistent with previous findings, we found that the numbers of CR genes vary extensively among different species, suggesting an extreme form of 'birth-and-death' evolution. For the purpose of facilitating CR gene analysis, we constructed a database with the goals to provide a resource for CR genes annotation and a web tool for exploring their evolutionary patterns. Besides a search engine for the gene extraction from a specific chromosome region, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of CR genes. Our work can provide a rigorous platform for further study on the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates.

  3. Revisiting the diffusion approximation to estimate evolutionary rates of gene family diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Haydon, Daniel T; David Barry, J; Cobbold, Christina A

    2014-01-21

    Genetic diversity in multigene families is shaped by multiple processes, including gene conversion and point mutation. Because multi-gene families are involved in crucial traits of organisms, quantifying the rates of their genetic diversification is important. With increasing availability of genomic data, there is a growing need for quantitative approaches that integrate the molecular evolution of gene families with their higher-scale function. In this study, we integrate a stochastic simulation framework with population genetics theory, namely the diffusion approximation, to investigate the dynamics of genetic diversification in a gene family. Duplicated genes can diverge and encode new functions as a result of point mutation, and become more similar through gene conversion. To model the evolution of pairwise identity in a multigene family, we first consider all conversion and mutation events in a discrete manner, keeping track of their details and times of occurrence; second we consider only the infinitesimal effect of these processes on pairwise identity accounting for random sampling of genes and positions. The purely stochastic approach is closer to biological reality and is based on many explicit parameters, such as conversion tract length and family size, but is more challenging analytically. The population genetics approach is an approximation accounting implicitly for point mutation and gene conversion, only in terms of per-site average probabilities. Comparison of these two approaches across a range of parameter combinations reveals that they are not entirely equivalent, but that for certain relevant regimes they do match. As an application of this modelling framework, we consider the distribution of nucleotide identity among VSG genes of African trypanosomes, representing the most prominent example of a multi-gene family mediating parasite antigenic variation and within-host immune evasion. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ancient signals: comparative genomics of plant MAPK and MAPKK gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Sritubtim, Somrudee;

    2006-01-01

    MAPK signal transduction modules play crucial roles in regulating many biological processes in plants, and their components are encoded by highly conserved genes. The recent availability of genome sequences for rice and poplar now makes it possible to examine how well the previously described...... Arabidopsis MAPK and MAPKK gene family structures represent the broader evolutionary situation in plants, and analysis of gene expression data for MPK and MKK genes in all three species allows further refinement of those families, based on functionality. The Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature appears sufficiently...... robust to allow it to be usefully extended to other well-characterized plant systems....

  5. Presymptomatic detection or exclusion of prion protein gene defects in families with inherited prion diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The identification of defects in the prion protein (PrP) gene in families with inherited Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or Gerstmann-Straussler syndrome allows presymptomatic diagnosis or exclusion of these disorders in subjects at risk. After counseling, PrP gene analysis was performed in three such individuals: two from families with a 144-bp insert and one with a point mutation at codon 102 in the PrP gene. The presence of a PrP gene defect was confirmed in one and excluded in two. Despite the ...

  6. A novel missense adenine nucleotide translocator-1 gene mutation in a Greek adPEO family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, L; Bordoni, A; Zeviani, M; Hadjigeorgiou, G M; Sciacco, M; Tiranti, V; Terentiou, A; Moggio, M; Papadimitriou, A; Scarlato, G; Comi, G P

    2001-12-26

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is caused by mutations in at least three different genes: ANT1 (chromosome 4q34-35), TWINKLE, and POLG. The ANT1 gene encodes the adenine nucleotide translocator-1 (ANT1). We identified a heterozygous T293C mutation of the ANT1 gene in a Greek family with adPEO. The resulting leucine to proline substitution likely modifies the secondary structure of the ANT1 protein. ANT1 gene mutations may account for adPEO in families with different ethnic backgrounds.

  7. Exclusion of the APC gene as the cause of a variant form of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, A.; Resta, N.; Susca, F.; Guanti, G.; Gentile, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Mareni, C.; Montera, P. (Universita di Genova (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a premalignant disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, characterized by hundreds to thousands of polyps in the colorectal tract. Recently, the syndrome has been shown to be caused by mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene located on chromosome 5q21. The authors studied two families that both presented a phenotype different from that of the classical form of FAP. The most important findings observed in these two kindreds are (a) low and variable number of colonic polyps (from 5 to 100) and (b) a slower evolution of the disease, with colon cancer occurring at a more advanced age than in FAP in spite of the early onset of intestinal manifestations. To determine whether mutations of the APC gene are also responsible for this variant syndrome, linkage studies were performed by using a series of markers both intragenic and tightly linked to the APC gene. The results provide evidence for exclusion of the APC gene as the cause of the variant form of polyposis present in the two families described. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Mutation Analysis in the BRCA1 Gene in Chinese Breast Cancer Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhengyan; ZHENLinlin; FANPing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutation of BRCA1 gene in Chinese breast cancer families. Methods:Fifteen families were selected, involving 41 members, consisting of 23 breast cancer patients. Using poly-merase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and subsequent DNA sequencing, the mutation of BRCA1 genes were analyzed. Results: Four mutations were found in all fam-ilies, and the proportion of mutation was 26.7% (4/15) in breast cancer families. One of the 4 mutations was 2228 insC, resulting in chain termination at codon 711. The remaining 3 mutations were 1884A→T and 3232A→G, resulting in single amino acid change respectively. Conclusion: BRCA1 is a breast cancer susceptibility gene. The relatively low proportion and frequency of BRCA1 mutations in our study hints additional BRCA genes existed.

  9. Analysis of Five Differentially Expressed Gene Families in Fast Elongating Cotton Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xun FENG; Sheng-Jian JI; Yong-Hui SHI; Yu XU; Gang WEI; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2004-01-01

    Using the suppression subtractive hybridization method, we isolated five gene families,including proline-rich proteins (PRPs), arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), expansins, tubulins and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), from fast elongating cotton fiber cells. Expression profile analysis using cDNA array technology showed that most of these gene families were highly expressed during early cotton fiber developmental stages (0-20 days post anthesis, DPA). Many transcripts accumulated over 50-fold in 10 DPA fiber cells than in 0 DPA samples. The entire gene family-AGP, together with 20 individual members in other 4 gene families, are reported in cotton for the first time. Accumulation of cell wall proteins, wall loosening enzymes, microtubules and lipid transfer proteins may contribute directly to the elongation and development of fiber cells.

  10. The Therapist's Role in Effective Marriage and Family Therapy Practice: The Case for Evidence Based Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Adrian J; Karam, Eli A

    2016-09-30

    In this paper we argue that the therapist is a crucial change variable in psychotherapy as a whole and in couple, marital, and family therapy specifically. Therapists who work with complex systems require more skills to negotiate demanding therapy contexts. Yet, little is known about what differentiates effective couple, marital, and family therapists from those who are less effective, what innate therapy skills they possess, how they learn, and how they operationalize their knowledge in the therapy room. We discuss the need to emphasize evidence based therapists (as opposed to therapies), and implications of the importance of the role therapists for training, practice, research priorities, and policy.

  11. Putting Evidence into Practice: nursing assessment and interventions to reduce family caregiver strain and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honea, Norissa J; Brintnall, Ruthann; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula; Colao, Deirdre B; Somers, Susan C; Northouse, Laurel L

    2008-06-01

    Family caregiving often is associated with multiple rewards, yet the diversity and intensity of caregiving roles also can result in caregiver strain and burden. Using interventions to reduce the strain and burden on caregivers of patients with cancer is an important role nurses play. This article is a critical review and synthesis of the evidence regarding assessment tools and interventions aimed at reducing caregiver strain and burden in the oncology population. Although the striking finding is the limited number of interventions targeted toward oncology caregivers, suggestions from the literature are offered to support and promote healthy outcomes for family caregivers.

  12. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Bringaud

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis, Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease. Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function.

  13. Diversification of the monoterpene synthase gene family (TPSb) in Protium, a highly diverse genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Felipe; Fine, Paul V A

    2013-09-01

    Plant monoterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites mediating biotic and abiotic interactions with direct effects on plant fitness. To evaluate the hypothesis that monoterpene diversity is related to functional diversification after gene duplication, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of monoterpene synthases (TPSb)--the genes underlying monoterpene synthesis--in Protium, a taxonomically and chemically diverse genus of tropical trees. We isolated multiple copies of TPSb genes from chemically divergent Protium species, reconstructed the phylogeny of this gene family, used maximum-likelihood estimation of selection coefficients, and inferred residues evolving under positive selection. We found evidence for one ancient and multiple more recent duplication events giving rise to three, and potentially five, copies of TPSb genes currently present in Protium. There was evidence for adaptive evolution in one copy with a positively selected residue likely involved in protein folding and product specificity. All other copies were inferred to be evolving under a combination of stabilizing and/or relaxed selection. Although gene copy number is consistent with the extensive phenotypic diversity in monoterpenes shown in Protium, selection analyses suggest that not all copies are undergoing divergent selection consistent with a coevolutionary arms race with enemies, but instead may be under stabilizing and relaxed selection consistent with signaling or physiological stress functionality.

  14. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  15. Phylogenomic analysis of UDP glycosyltransferase 1 multigene family in Linum usitatissimum identified genes with varied expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barvkar Vitthal T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosylation process, catalyzed by ubiquitous glycosyltransferase (GT family enzymes, is a prevalent modification of plant secondary metabolites that regulates various functions such as hormone homeostasis, detoxification of xenobiotics and biosynthesis and storage of secondary metabolites. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. is a commercially grown oilseed crop, important because of its essential fatty acids and health promoting lignans. Identification and characterization of UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT genes from flax could provide valuable basic information about this important gene family and help to explain the seed specific glycosylated metabolite accumulation and other processes in plants. Plant genome sequencing projects are useful to discover complexity within this gene family and also pave way for the development of functional genomics approaches. Results Taking advantage of the newly assembled draft genome sequence of flax, we identified 137 UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT genes from flax using a conserved signature motif. Phylogenetic analysis of these protein sequences clustered them into 14 major groups (A-N. Expression patterns of these genes were investigated using publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST, microarray data and reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR. Seventy-three per cent of these genes (100 out of 137 showed expression evidence in 15 tissues examined and indicated varied expression profiles. The RT-qPCR results of 10 selected genes were also coherent with the digital expression analysis. Interestingly, five duplicated UGT genes were identified, which showed differential expression in various tissues. Of the seven intron loss/gain positions detected, two intron positions were conserved among most of the UGTs, although a clear relationship about the evolution of these genes could not be established. Comparison of the flax UGTs with orthologs from four other sequenced dicot

  16. A novel mutation in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jie; JIANG Zhi-sheng; WANG Lu-ya; LIU Shu; WANG Xu-min; YONG Qiang; YANG Ya; DU Lan-ping; PAN Xiao-dong; WANG Xu

    2010-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal disorder associated with elevated plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels leading to premature coronary heart disease (CHD). As a result of long-term hyperlipemia, FH patients will present endarterium thickening and atherosclerosis. In the present study we scanned the related gene of a clinically diagnosed autosomal genetic hypercholesterolemia family for the possible mutations and established eukaryotic expression vector of mutation of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene with gene recombination technique to investigate the contributions of the variation on low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) metabolism and function alternation.Methods Mutation detection was conducted for LDL-R, apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) and PCSK9 gene with nucleotide sequencing in a Chinese FH family. The full-length cDNA of wild type PCSK9 gene (WT-PCSK9) was obtained from Bel-7402. Site mutagenesis was used to establish the recombinant eukaryotic expression vector carrying pathogenic type of PCSK9 gene and the inserted fragment was sequenced. With the blank vector as control, liposome transfection method was used to transfect the Bel-7402 cells with recombinant plasmid. The expression of LDL-R mRNA was examined by RT-PCR. PCSK9 and the expression of LDL-R protein were determined by Western blotting. Results The G→T mutation at the 918 nucleotide of PCSK9 gene resulted in the substitution of the arginine by a serine at the codon 306 of exon 6. After sequencing, it was confirmed that the inserted fragment of established expression vector had correct size and sequence and the mutant was highly expressed in Bel-7402 cells. There was no significant variation in the levels of LDL-R mRNA. LDL-R mature protein was decreased by 57% after the cells were transfected by WT-PCSK9 plasmid. Mature LDL-R was significantly decreased by 12% after the cells were transfected by R306S mutant as evidenced by gray scale

  17. POWERDRESS and diversified expression of the MIR172 gene family bolster the floral stem cell network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rae Eden Yumul

    Full Text Available Termination of the stem cells in the floral meristem (also known as floral determinacy is critical for the reproductive success of plants, and the molecular activities regulating floral determinacy are precisely orchestrated during the course of floral development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, regulators of floral determinacy include several transcription factor genes, such as APETALA2 (AP2, AGAMOUS (AG, SUPERMAN (SUP, and CRABSCLAW (CRC, as well as a microRNA (miRNA, miR172, which targets AP2. How the transcription factor and miRNA genes are coordinately regulated to achieve floral determinacy is unknown. A mutation in POWERDRESS (PWR, a previously uncharacterized gene encoding a SANT-domain-containing protein, was isolated in this study as an enhancer of the weakly indeterminate ag-10 allele. PWR was found to promote the transcription of CRC, MIR172a, b, and c and/or enhance Pol II occupancy at their promoters, without affecting MIR172d or e. A mutation in mature miR172d was additionally found to enhance the determinacy defects of ag-10 in an AP2-dependent manner, providing direct evidence that miR172d is functional in repressing AP2 and thereby contributes to floral determinacy. Thus, while PWR promotes floral determinacy by enhancing the expression of three of the five MIR172 members as well as CRC, MIR172d, whose expression is PWR-independent, also functions in floral stem cell termination. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how transcriptional diversification and functional redundancy of a miRNA family along with PWR-mediated co-regulation of miRNA and transcription factor genes contribute to the robustness of the floral determinacy network.

  18. MS/MS networking guided analysis of molecule and gene cluster families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Don Duy; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Moree, Wilna J; Lamsa, Anne; Medema, Marnix H; Zhao, Xiling; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Aparicio, Marystella; Atencio, Librada; Jackson, Chanaye; Ballesteros, Javier; Sanchez, Joel; Watrous, Jeramie D; Phelan, Vanessa V; van de Wiel, Corine; Kersten, Roland D; Mehnaz, Samina; De Mot, René; Shank, Elizabeth A; Charusanti, Pep; Nagarajan, Harish; Duggan, Brendan M; Moore, Bradley S; Bandeira, Nuno; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Pogliano, Kit; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-07-09

    The ability to correlate the production of specialized metabolites to the genetic capacity of the organism that produces such molecules has become an invaluable tool in aiding the discovery of biotechnologically applicable molecules. Here, we accomplish this task by matching molecular families with gene cluster families, making these correlations to 60 microbes at one time instead of connecting one molecule to one organism at a time, such as how it is traditionally done. We can correlate these families through the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization MS/MS, an ambient pressure MS technique, in conjunction with MS/MS networking and peptidogenomics. We matched the molecular families of peptide natural products produced by 42 bacilli and 18 pseudomonads through the generation of amino acid sequence tags from MS/MS data of specific clusters found in the MS/MS network. These sequence tags were then linked to biosynthetic gene clusters in publicly accessible genomes, providing us with the ability to link particular molecules with the genes that produced them. As an example of its use, this approach was applied to two unsequenced Pseudoalteromonas species, leading to the discovery of the gene cluster for a molecular family, the bromoalterochromides, in the previously sequenced strain P. piscicida JCM 20779(T). The approach itself is not limited to 60 related strains, because spectral networking can be readily adopted to look at molecular family-gene cluster families of hundreds or more diverse organisms in one single MS/MS network.

  19. Candidate colorectal cancer predisposing gene variants in Chinese early-onset and familial cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.X.; Fu, L.; Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Jin, P.; Lv, C.X.; Verwiel, E.T.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kuiper, R.P.; Sheng, J.Q.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether whole-exome sequencing may serve as an efficient method to identify known or novel colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposing genes in early-onset or familial CRC cases. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing in 23 Chinese patients from 21 families with non-polyposis CRC

  20. Cognitive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pairs with ADHD: Familial Clustering and Dopamine Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Sandra K.; Rich, Erika Carpenter; Ishii, Janeen; McGough, James; McCracken, James; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper examines familiality and candidate gene associations of cognitive measures as potential endophenotypes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The sample consists of 540 participants, aged 6 to 18, who were diagnosed with ADHD from 251 families recruited for a larger genetic study of ADHD. All members of…

  1. Expansion of the gamma-gliadin gene family in Aegilops and Triticum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goryunova, S.V.; Salentijn, E.M.J.; Chikida, N.N.; Kochieva, E.Z.; Meer, van der I.M.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - The gamma-gliadins are considered to be the oldest of the gliadin family of storage proteins in Aegilops/Triticum. However, the expansion of this multigene family has not been studied in an evolutionary perspective. Results - We have cloned 59 gamma-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triti

  2. Meeting the complex needs of urban youth and their families through the 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program: The "real world" meets evidence-informed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Latoya; Jackson, Jerrold; Gopalan, Geetha; McKay, Mary McKernan

    2015-07-01

    Youth living in poverty face compounding familial and environmental challenges in utilizing effective community mental health services. They have ongoing stressors that increase their dropout rate in mental health service use. Difficulties also exist in staying engaged in services when they are involved with the child welfare system. This study examines the 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program, developed across four broad conceptual categories related to parenting skills and family processes that form a multiple family group service delivery approach. A total of 321 families were enrolled in this randomized intervention study, assigned to either the 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program or standard care services. Caregivers and their children randomly assigned to the experimental condition received a 16 week multiple family group intervention through their respective outpatient community mental health clinic. Data was collected at baseline, midtest (8 weeks), posttest (16 weeks), and 6 month follow-up. Major findings include high engagement in the 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program, compared to standard services. Although child welfare status is not related to attendance, family stress and parental depression are also related to participant engagement in this multiple family group intervention. Involvement in the 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program resulted in improved effects for child behaviors. Lastly, no evidence of moderation effects on family stress, child welfare involvement, or parental needs were found. The 4Rs 2Ss Family Strengthening Program appeared able to engage families with more complex "real world" needs.

  3. Genome-wide identification, characterization, and expression analysis of the MLO gene family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S J; Jing, Z; Shi, J L

    2013-12-11

    Mildew resistance locus o (MLO) is a plant-specific seven-transmembrane (TM) gene family. Several studies have revealed that certain members of the MLO gene family mediate powdery mildew susceptibility in three plant species, namely, Arabidopsis, barley, and tomato. The sequenced cucumber genome provides an opportunity to conduct a comprehensive overview of the MLO gene family. Fourteen genes (designated CsMLO01 through CsMLO14) have been identified within the Cucumis sativus genome by using an in silico cloning method with the MLO amino acid sequences of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice as probes. Sequence alignment revealed that numerous features of the gene family, such as TMs, a calmodulin-binding domain, peptide domains I and II, and 30 important amino acid residues for MLO function, are well conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of the MLO genes from cucumber and other plant species reveals seven different clades (I through VII). Three of these clades comprised MLO genes from A. thaliana, rice, maize, and cucumber, suggesting that these genes may have evolved after the divergence of monocots and dicots. In silico mapping showed that these CsMLOs were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 without any obvious clustering, except CsMLO01. To our knowledge, this paper is the first comprehensive report on MLO genes in C. sativus. These findings will facilitate the functional characterization of the MLOs related to powdery mildew susceptibility and assist in the development of disease resistance in cucumber.

  4. Molecular Evolution and Expression Divergence of Aconitase (ACO Gene Family in Land Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ming Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aconitase (ACO is a key enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization of citrate to isocitrate in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA and glyoxylate cycles. The function of ACOs has been well studied in model plants, such as Arabidopsis. In contrast, the evolutionary patterns of the ACO family in land plants are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically examined the molecular evolution and expression divergence of the ACO gene family in 12 land plant species. Thirty-six ACO genes were identified from the 12 land plant species representing the four major land plant lineages: bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. All of these ACOs belong to the cytosolic isoform. Three gene duplication events contributed to the expansion of the ACO family in angiosperms. The ancestor of angiosperms may have contained only one ACO gene. One gene duplication event split angiosperm ACOs into two distinct clades. Two clades showed a divergence in selective pressure and gene expression patterns. The cis-acting elements that function in light responsiveness were most abundant in the promoter region of the ACO genes, indicating that plant ACO genes might participate in light regulatory pathways. Our findings provide comprehensive insights into the ACO gene family in land plants.

  5. Evidence for a Familial Speech Sound Disorder Subtype in a Multigenerational Study of Oral and Hand Motor Sequencing Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate phenotypic expressions of speech sound disorder (SSD) in multigenerational families with evidence of familial forms of SSD. Method: Members of five multigenerational families (N = 36) produced rapid sequences of monosyllables and disyllables and tapped computer keys with repetitive and alternating movements. Results: Measures…

  6. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Brunner, A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  7. Understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in crossbred bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Alex, Rani; Raja, T. V.; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R.; Kumar, Sushil; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal; Singh, Rani; Prakash, B.

    2015-12-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein composed of a large catalytic subunit (alpha), a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta), and gamma subunit. The beta subunit is essential for ion recognition as well as maintenance of the membrane integrity. Present study was aimed to analyze the expression pattern of ATPase beta subunit genes (ATPase B1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3) among the crossbred bulls under different ambient temperatures (20-44 °C). The present study was also aimed to look into the relationship of HSP70 with the ATPase beta family genes. Our results demonstrated that among beta family genes, transcript abundance of ATPase B1 and ATPase B2 is significantly ( P P < 0.01) with HSP70, representing that the change in the expression pattern of these genes is positive and synergistic. These may provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in cattle.

  8. Systematic design of mouse Vh gene family-specific oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijen, AM; Seijen, HG; Bos, NA

    2001-01-01

    Kabat's database has often been used to design mouse Vh gene-specific 5 ' primers. The emphasis was mostly on constructing a universal (degenerate) 5 ' primer or 5 ' primer set, which would be able to match every mouse Vh gene. We were interested in finding oligonucleotides that could be used as pri

  9. Gene-Environment Interplay, Family Relationships, and Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral genetic research from the past decade that has moved beyond simply studying the independent influences of genes and environments. The studies considered in this review have instead focused on understanding gene-environment interplay, including genotype-environment correlation (rGE) and genotype x environment…

  10. Structure of the omega-gliadin gene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The '-gliadins are one of the classes of wheat seed storage proteins, but are the least characterized. In this report, an analysis is made of all available '-gliadin DNA sequences including '-gliadins genes within a large genomic clone, previously reported gene sequences, and ESTs identified from th...

  11. Gene-Environment Interplay, Family Relationships, and Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral genetic research from the past decade that has moved beyond simply studying the independent influences of genes and environments. The studies considered in this review have instead focused on understanding gene-environment interplay, including genotype-environment correlation (rGE) and genotype x environment…

  12. Systematic design of mouse Vh gene family-specific oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijen, AM; Seijen, HG; Bos, NA

    2001-01-01

    Kabat's database has often been used to design mouse Vh gene-specific 5 ' primers. The emphasis was mostly on constructing a universal (degenerate) 5 ' primer or 5 ' primer set, which would be able to match every mouse Vh gene. We were interested in finding oligonucleotides that could be used as pri

  13. Duplication, divergence and persistence in the Phytochrome photoreceptor gene family of cottons (Gossypium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdukarimov Abdusattor

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytochromes are a family of red/far-red photoreceptors that regulate a number of important developmental traits in cotton (Gossypium spp., including plant architecture, fiber development, and photoperiodic flowering. Little is known about the composition and evolution of the phytochrome gene family in diploid (G. herbaceum, G. raimondii or allotetraploid (G. hirsutum, G. barbadense cotton species. The objective of this study was to obtain a preliminary inventory and molecular-evolutionary characterization of the phytochrome gene family in cotton. Results We used comparative sequence resources to design low-degeneracy PCR primers that amplify genomic sequence tags (GSTs for members of the PHYA, PHYB/D, PHYC and PHYE gene sub-families from A- and D-genome diploid and AD-genome allotetraploid Gossypium species. We identified two paralogous PHYA genes (designated PHYA1 and PHYA2 in diploid cottons, the result of a Malvaceae-specific PHYA gene duplication that occurred approximately 14 million years ago (MYA, before the divergence of the A- and D-genome ancestors. We identified a single gene copy of PHYB, PHYC, and PHYE in diploid cottons. The allotetraploid genomes have largely retained the complete gene complements inherited from both of the diploid genome ancestors, with at least four PHYA genes and two genes encoding PHYB, PHYC and PHYE in the AD-genomes. We did not identify a PHYD gene in any cotton genomes examined. Conclusions Detailed sequence analysis suggests that phytochrome genes retained after duplication by segmental duplication and allopolyploidy appear to be evolving independently under a birth-and-death-process with strong purifying selection. Our study provides a preliminary phytochrome gene inventory that is necessary and sufficient for further characterization of the biological functions of each of the cotton phytochrome genes, and for the development of 'candidate gene' markers that are potentially useful for

  14. Diversification of the ant odorant receptor gene family and positive selection on candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engsontia, Patamarerk; Sangket, Unitsa; Robertson, Hugh M; Satasook, Chutamas

    2015-08-27

    Chemical communication plays important roles in the social behavior of ants making them one of the most successful groups of animals on earth. However, the molecular evolutionary process responsible for their chemosensory adaptation is still elusive. Recent advances in genomic studies have led to the identification of large odorant receptor (Or) gene repertoires from ant genomes providing fruitful materials for molecular evolution analysis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diversification of this gene family is involved in olfactory adaptation of each species. We annotated the Or genes from the genome sequences of two leaf-cutter ants, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes (385 and 376 putative functional genes, respectively). These were used, together with Or genes from Camponotus floridanus, Harpegnathos saltator, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, Linepithema humile, Cerapachys biroi, Solenopsis invicta and Apis mellifera, in molecular evolution analysis. Like the Or family in other insects, ant Or genes evolve by the birth-and-death model of gene family evolution. Large gene family expansions involving tandem gene duplications, and gene gains outnumbering losses, are observed. Codon analysis of genes in lineage-specific expansion clades revealed signatures of positive selection on the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor genes (9-exon subfamily) of Cerapachys biroi, Camponotus floridanus, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes. Positively selected amino acid positions are primarily in transmembrane domains 3 and 6, which are hypothesized to contribute to the odor-binding pocket, presumably mediating changing ligand specificity. This study provides support for the hypothesis that some ant lineage-specific Or genes have evolved under positive selection. Newly duplicated genes particularly in the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor clade that have evolved under positive selection may contribute to the highly sophisticated lineage

  15. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas Guilherme

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were: a to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM in primary care; b to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour.

  16. Characterization and gene expression analysis of the cir multi-gene family of plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi (AS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawton Jennifer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pir genes comprise the largest multi-gene family in Plasmodium, with members found in P. vivax, P. knowlesi and the rodent malaria species. Despite comprising up to 5% of the genome, little is known about the functions of the proteins encoded by pir genes. P. chabaudi causes chronic infection in mice, which may be due to antigenic variation. In this model, pir genes are called cirs and may be involved in this mechanism, allowing evasion of host immune responses. In order to fully understand the role(s of CIR proteins during P. chabaudi infection, a detailed characterization of the cir gene family was required. Results The cir repertoire was annotated and a detailed bioinformatic characterization of the encoded CIR proteins was performed. Two major sub-families were identified, which have been named A and B. Members of each sub-family displayed different amino acid motifs, and were thus predicted to have undergone functional divergence. In addition, the expression of the entire cir repertoire was analyzed via RNA sequencing and microarray. Up to 40% of the cir gene repertoire was expressed in the parasite population during infection, and dominant cir transcripts could be identified. In addition, some differences were observed in the pattern of expression between the cir subgroups at the peak of P. chabaudi infection. Finally, specific cir genes were expressed at different time points during asexual blood stages. Conclusions In conclusion, the large number of cir genes and their expression throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle of development indicates that CIR proteins are likely to be important for parasite survival. In particular, the detection of dominant cir transcripts at the peak of P. chabaudi infection supports the idea that CIR proteins are expressed, and could perform important functions in the biology of this parasite. Further application of the methodologies described here may allow the elucidation of CIR sub-family

  17. Evidence of gene conversion in genes encoding the Gal/GalNac lectin complex of Entamoeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Weedall

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica, uses a lectin complex on its cell surface to bind to mucin and to ligands on the intestinal epithelia. Binding to mucin is necessary for colonisation and binding to intestinal epithelia for invasion, therefore blocking this binding may protect against amoebiasis. Acquired protective immunity raised against the lectin complex should create a selection pressure to change the amino acid sequence of lectin genes in order to avoid future detection. We present evidence that gene conversion has occurred in lineages leading to E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and E. dispar strain SAW760. This evolutionary mechanism generates diversity and could contribute to immune evasion by the parasites.

  18. Evidence of gene conversion in genes encoding the Gal/GalNac lectin complex of Entamoeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Weedall

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica, uses a lectin complex on its cell surface to bind to mucin and to ligands on the intestinal epithelia. Binding to mucin is necessary for colonisation and binding to intestinal epithelia for invasion, therefore blocking this binding may protect against amoebiasis. Acquired protective immunity raised against the lectin complex should create a selection pressure to change the amino acid sequence of lectin genes in order to avoid future detection. We present evidence that gene conversion has occurred in lineages leading to E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and E. dispar strain SAW760. This evolutionary mechanism generates diversity and could contribute to immune evasion by the parasites.

  19. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bañuls Anne-Laure

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. Conclusion PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs

  20. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  1. Duplication of OsHAP family genes and their association with heading date in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuping; Yan, Wenhao; Chen, Huaxia; Tan, Cong; Han, Zhongmin; Yao, Wen; Li, Guangwei; Yuan, Mengqi; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-03-01

    Heterotrimeric Heme Activator Protein (HAP) family genes are involved in the regulation of flowering in plants. It is not clear how many HAP genes regulate heading date in rice. In this study, we identified 35 HAP genes, including seven newly identified genes, and performed gene duplication and candidate gene-based association analyses. Analyses showed that segmental duplication and tandem duplication are the main mechanisms of HAP gene duplication. Expression profiling and functional identification indicated that duplication probably diversifies the functions of HAP genes. A nucleotide diversity analysis revealed that 13 HAP genes underwent selection. A candidate gene-based association analysis detected four HAP genes related to heading date. An investigation of transgenic plants or mutants of 23 HAP genes confirmed that overexpression of at least four genes delayed heading date under long-day conditions, including the previously cloned Ghd8/OsHAP3H. Our results indicate that the large number of HAP genes in rice was mainly produced by gene duplication, and a few HAP genes function to regulate heading date. Selection of HAP genes is probably caused by their diverse functions rather than regulation of heading.

  2. Expressional and Biochemical Characterization of Rice Disease Resistance Gene Xa3/Xa26 Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songjie Xu; Yinglong Cao; Xianghua Li; Shiping Wang

    2007-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) Xa3/Xa26 gene, conferring race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease and encoding a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase-like protein, belongs to a multigene family consisting of tandem clustered homologous genes, colocalizing with several uncharacterized genes for resistance to bacterial blight or fungal blast. To provide more information on the expressional and biochemical characteristics of the Xa3/Xa26 family, we analyzed the family members. Four Xa3/Xa26 family members in the indica rice variety Teqing, which carries a bacterial blight resistance gene with a chromosomal location tightly linked to Xa3/Xa26, and five Xa3/Xa26 family members in the japonica rice variety Nipponbare, which carries at least one uncharacterized blast resistance gene, were constitutively expressed in leaf tissue. The result suggests that some of the family members may be candidates of these uncharacterized resistance genes. At least five putative N-glycosylation sites in the LRR domain of XA3/XA26 protein are not glycosylated. The XA3/XA26 and its family members MRKa and MRKc all possess the consensus sequences of paired cysteines, which putatively function in dimerization of the receptor proteins for signal transduction, immediately before the first LRR and immediately after the last LRR. However, no homo-dimer between the XA3/XA26 molecules or hetero-dimer between XA3/XA26 and MRKa or MRKc were formed, indicating that XA3/XA26 protein might function either as a monomer or a hetero-dimer formed with other protein outside of the XA3/XA26 family. These results provide valuable information for further extensive investigation into this multiple protein family.

  3. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  4. Whole exome sequencing in extended families with autism spectrum disorder implicates four candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Nicola H; Nato, Alejandro Q; Bernier, Raphael; Ankenman, Katy; Sohi, Harkirat; Munson, Jeff; Patowary, Ashok; Archer, Marilyn; Blue, Elizabeth M; Webb, Sara Jane; Coon, Hilary; Raskind, Wendy H; Brkanac, Zoran; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, characterized by impairment in communication and social interactions, and by repetitive behaviors. ASDs are highly heritable, and estimates of the number of risk loci range from hundreds to >1000. We considered 7 extended families (size 12-47 individuals), each with ≥3 individuals affected by ASD. All individuals were genotyped with dense SNP panels. A small subset of each family was typed with whole exome sequence (WES). We used a 3-step approach for variant identification. First, we used family-specific parametric linkage analysis of the SNP data to identify regions of interest. Second, we filtered variants in these regions based on frequency and function, obtaining exactly 200 candidates. Third, we compared two approaches to narrowing this list further. We used information from the SNP data to impute exome variant dosages into those without WES. We regressed affected status on variant allele dosage, using pedigree-based kinship matrices to account for relationships. The p value for the test of the null hypothesis that variant allele dosage is unrelated to phenotype was used to indicate strength of evidence supporting the variant. A cutoff of p = 0.05 gave 28 variants. As an alternative third filter, we required Mendelian inheritance in those with WES, resulting in 70 variants. The imputation- and association-based approach was effective. We identified four strong candidate genes for ASD (SEZ6L, HISPPD1, FEZF1, SAMD11), all of which have been previously implicated in other studies, or have a strong biological argument for their relevance.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  6. YeastWeb: a workset-centric web resource for gene family analysis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Haihua

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, a number of yeast genomes with different physiological features have been sequenced and annotated, which provides invaluable information to investigate yeast genetics, evolutionary mechanism, structure and function of gene families. Description YeastWeb is a novel database created to provide access to gene families derived from the available yeast genomes by assigning the genes into putative families. It has many useful features that complement existing databases, such as SGD, CYGD and Génolevures: 1 Detailed computational annotation was conducted with each entry with InterProScan, EMBOSS and functional/pathway databases, such as GO, COG and KEGG; 2 A well established user-friendly environment was created to allow users to retrieve the annotated genes and gene families using functional classification browser, keyword search or similarity-based search; 3 Workset offers users many powerful functions to manage the retrieved data efficiently, associate the individual items easily and save the intermediate results conveniently; 4 A series of comparative genomics and molecular evolution analysis tools are neatly implemented to allow users to view multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree of gene families. At present, YeastWeb holds the gene families clustered from various MCL inflation values from a total of 13 available yeast genomes. Conclusions Given the great interest in yeast research, YeastWeb has the potential to become a useful resource for the scientific community of yeast biologists and related researchers investigating the evolutionary relationship of yeast gene families. YeastWeb is available at http://centre.bioinformatics.zj.cn/Yeast/.

  7. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Larsen, Line H G; Johannesen, Katrine M

    2016-01-01

    -causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared...... to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients......In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis...

  8. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J;

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes ...

  9. Variation in the nucleotide sequence of a prolamin gene family in wild rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, P; Ishihama, A

    1990-07-01

    Variation in the DNA sequence of the 10 kDa prolamin gene family within the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon was probed using the direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genes. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences of eight Asian strains of O. rufipogon and one strain of the related African species O. longistaminata is presented.

  10. Analysis of AGXT gene mutation in primary hyperoxaluria type I family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高延霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical characteristics,and to analyze the AGXT gene mutation in three siblings with primary hyperoxaluria typeⅠ(PHI).Methods AGXT gene mutation was analyzed by direct sequencing analysis in this family,and the minor allele status was also tested.One hundred unrelated healthy subjects were also analyzed as controls.Results Three mutations in

  11. Metagenomic natural product discovery in lichen provides evidence for a family of biosynthetic pathways in diverse symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampa, Annette; Gagunashvili, Andrey N; Gulder, Tobias A M; Morinaka, Brandon I; Daolio, Cristina; Godejohann, Markus; Miao, Vivian P W; Piel, Jörn; Andrésson, Ólafur S

    2013-08-13

    Bacteria are a major source of natural products that provide rich opportunities for both chemical and biological investigation. Although the vast majority of known bacterial metabolites derive from free-living organisms, increasing evidence supports the widespread existence of chemically prolific bacteria living in symbioses. A strategy based on bioinformatic prediction, symbiont cultivation, isotopic enrichment, and advanced analytics was used to characterize a unique polyketide, nosperin, from a lichen-associated Nostoc sp. cyanobacterium. The biosynthetic gene cluster and the structure of nosperin, determined from 30 μg of compound, are related to those of the pederin group previously known only from nonphotosynthetic bacteria associated with beetles and marine sponges. The presence of this natural product family in such highly dissimilar associations suggests that some bacterial metabolites may be specific to symbioses with eukaryotes and encourages exploration of other symbioses for drug discovery and better understanding of ecological interactions mediated by complex bacterial metabolites.

  12. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fupeng Li; Chaoyun Hao; Lin Yan; Baoduo Wu; Xiaowei Qin; Jianxiong Lai; Yinghui Song

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family.

  13. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fupeng; Hao, Chaoyun; Yan, Lin; Wu, Baoduo; Qin, Xiaowei; Lai, Jianxiong; Song, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family.

  14. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants.

  15. The SOD gene family in tomato: identification, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kun feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutases (SODs are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants.

  16. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants. PMID:27625661

  17. Interferon-inducible Ifi200-family genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker; Panchanathan, Ravichandran

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototype of complex autoimmune diseases. Studies have suggested that genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors contribute to the development of the disease. Interestingly, several recent studies involving SLE patients and mouse models of the disease have suggested a role for interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the development of SLE. One family of ISGs is the Ifi200-family, which includes mouse (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, and Ifi205) and human (IFI16, MNDA, AIM2, and IFIX) genes. The mouse genes cluster between serum amyloid P-component (Apcs) and α-spectrin (Spna-1) genes on chromosome 1 and the human genes cluster in syntenic region 1q23. The Ifi200-family genes encode structurally and functionally-related proteins (the p200-family proteins). Increased expression of certain p200-family proteins in cells is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, modulation of apoptosis, and cell differentiation. Our studies involving generation of B6.Nba2 congenic mice, coupled with gene expression analyses, identified the Ifi202 as a candidate lupus-susceptibility gene. Importantly, recent studies using different mouse models of SLE have suggested that increased expression of Ifi202 gene (encoding p202 protein) in immune cells contributes to lupus susceptibility. Consistent with a functional role for the p202 protein in lupus susceptibility, increased levels of IFI16 protein in human SLE patients are associated with the diseases. This review summarizes recent findings concerning the regulation and role of p200-family proteins in the development of SLE. PMID:18598717

  18. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  19. MS/MS networking guided analysis of molecule and gene cluster families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Don Duy; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Moree, Wilna J.; Lamsa, Anne; Medema, Marnix H.; Zhao, Xiling; Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Aparicio, Marystella; Atencio, Librada; Jackson, Chanaye; Ballesteros, Javier; Sanchez, Joel; Watrous, Jeramie D.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; van de Wiel, Corine; Kersten, Roland D.; Mehnaz, Samina; De Mot, René; Shank, Elizabeth A.; Charusanti, Pep; Nagarajan, Harish; Duggan, Brendan M.; Moore, Bradley S.; Bandeira, Nuno; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Pogliano, Kit; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to correlate the production of specialized metabolites to the genetic capacity of the organism that produces such molecules has become an invaluable tool in aiding the discovery of biotechnologically applicable molecules. Here, we accomplish this task by matching molecular families with gene cluster families, making these correlations to 60 microbes at one time instead of connecting one molecule to one organism at a time, such as how it is traditionally done. We can correlate these families through the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization MS/MS, an ambient pressure MS technique, in conjunction with MS/MS networking and peptidogenomics. We matched the molecular families of peptide natural products produced by 42 bacilli and 18 pseudomonads through the generation of amino acid sequence tags from MS/MS data of specific clusters found in the MS/MS network. These sequence tags were then linked to biosynthetic gene clusters in publicly accessible genomes, providing us with the ability to link particular molecules with the genes that produced them. As an example of its use, this approach was applied to two unsequenced Pseudoalteromonas species, leading to the discovery of the gene cluster for a molecular family, the bromoalterochromides, in the previously sequenced strain P. piscicida JCM 20779T. The approach itself is not limited to 60 related strains, because spectral networking can be readily adopted to look at molecular family–gene cluster families of hundreds or more diverse organisms in one single MS/MS network. PMID:23798442

  20. Gene conversions in the growth hormone gene family of primates: stronger homogenizing effects in the Hominidae lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronella, Nicholas; Drouin, Guy

    2011-09-01

    In humans, the growth hormone/chorionic somatomammotropin gene family is composed of five highly similar genes. We characterized the gene conversions that occurred between the growth hormone genes of 11 primate species. We detected 48 conversions using GENECONV and others were only detected using phylogenetic analyses. Gene conversions were detected in all species analyzed, their average size (±standard deviation) is 197.8±230.4 nucleotides, the size of the conversions is correlated with sequence similarity and converted regions are significantly more GC-rich than non-converted regions. Gene conversions have a stronger homogenizing effect in Hominidae genes than in other primate species. They are also less frequent in conserved gene regions and towards functionally important genes. This suggests that the high degree of sequence similarity observed between the growth hormone genes of primate species is a consequence of frequent gene conversions in gene regions which are under little selective constraints. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of snail genes in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis: insight into snail gene family evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Price, Alivia L; Parchem, Ronald J; Patel, Nipam H

    2012-05-01

    The transcriptional repressor snail was first discovered in Drosophila melanogaster, where it initially plays a role in gastrulation and mesoderm formation, and later plays a role in neurogenesis. Among arthropods, this role of snail appears to be conserved in the insects Tribolium and Anopheles gambiae, but not in the chelicerates Cupiennius salei and Achaearanea tepidariorum, the myriapod Glomeris marginata, or the Branchiopod crustacean Daphnia magna. These data imply that within arthropoda, snail acquired its role in gastrulation and mesoderm formation in the insect lineage. However, crustaceans are a diverse group with several major taxa, making analysis of more crustaceans necessary to potentially understand the ancestral role of snail in Pancrustacea (crustaceans + insects) and thus in the ancestor of insects as well. To address these questions, we examined the snail family in the Malacostracan crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. We found three snail homologs, Ph-snail1, Ph-snail2 and Ph-snail3, and one scratch homolog, Ph-scratch. Parhyale snail genes are expressed after gastrulation, during germband formation and elongation. Ph-snail1, Ph-snail2, and Ph-snail3 are expressed in distinct patterns in the neuroectoderm. Ph-snail1 is the only Parhyale snail gene expressed in the mesoderm, where its expression cycles in the mesodermal stem cells, called mesoteloblasts. The mesoteloblasts go through a series of cycles, where each cycle is composed of a migration phase and a division phase. Ph-snail1 is expressed during the migration phase, but not during the division phase. We found that as each mesoteloblast division produces one segment's worth of mesoderm, Ph-snail1 expression is linked to both the cell cycle and the segmental production of mesoderm.

  2. Assembled Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes, as well as Nuclear Genes, Place the Parasite Family Cynomoriaceae in the Saxifragales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Sidonie; Cusimano, Natalie; Luo, Shixiao; Sun, Guiling; Zarre, Shahin; Gröger, Andreas; Temsch, Eva; Renner, Susanne S

    2016-08-03

    Cynomoriaceae, one of the last unplaced families of flowering plants, comprise one or two species or subspecies of root parasites that occur from the Mediterranean to the Gobi Desert. Using Illumina sequencing, we assembled the mitochondrial and plastid genomes as well as some nuclear genes of a Cynomorium specimen from Italy. Selected genes were also obtained by Sanger sequencing from individuals collected in China and Iran, resulting in matrices of 33 mitochondrial, 6 nuclear, and 14 plastid genes and rDNAs enlarged to include a representative angiosperm taxon sampling based on data available in GenBank. We also compiled a new geographic map to discern possible discontinuities in the parasites' occurrence. Cynomorium has large genomes of 13.70-13.61 (Italy) to 13.95-13.76 pg (China). Its mitochondrial genome consists of up to 49 circular subgenomes and has an overall gene content similar to that of photosynthetic angiosperms, while its plastome retains only 27 of the normally 116 genes. Nuclear, plastid and mitochondrial phylogenies place Cynomoriaceae in Saxifragales, and we found evidence for several horizontal gene transfers from different hosts, as well as intracellular gene transfers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. On the history of gout: paleopathological evidence from the Medici family of Florence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffra, Valentina; Minozzi, Simona; Vitiello, Angelica; Fornaciari, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Throughout history, gout has been referred to as the "disease of the kings", and has been clearly associated with the lifestyle of the aristocratic social classes. According to the written sources, several members of the famous Medici family of Florence suffered from an arthritic disease that contemporary physicians called "gout". A paleopathological study carried out on the skeletal remains of some members of the family, exhumed from their tombs in the Church of San Lorenzo in Florence, offered a unique opportunity to directly investigate the evidence of the arthritic diseases affecting this elite group. The skeletal remains of several members of the family were examined macroscopically and submitted to x-ray investigation. The results of the study allowed us to ascertain that the so-called "gout of the Medici" should be considered the clinical manifestation of three different joint conditions: diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, rheumatoid arthritis and uratic gout. In particular, uric acid gout was diagnosed in the Grand Duke Ferdinand I (1549-1609). Recently, a new case of this disease was diagnosed in Anton Francesco Maria (1618-1659), a probable illegitimate member of the family. With this new case, uratic gout was observed in 2 out of 9 adult males, leading to suppose that the disease should have been a common health problem within the family. The aetiology of the disease has to be searched in environmental factors, since both historical and paleonutritional studies demonstrated that the diet of this aristocratic court was rich in meat and wine.

  4. Identification of two novel mutations in the GALNT3 gene in a Chinese family with hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihao; Zhao, Lin; Du, Lianjun; Zhang, Peipei; Zhang, Minjia; Li, Min; Liu, Tingting; Ye, Lei; Tao, Bei; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Jianmin; Ding, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disease. This disease is characterized by the progressive calcification of soft tissues leading to symptoms of pressure and hyperphosphatemia but normal concentrations of serum calcium with or without an elevation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels.HFTC is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the GALNT3, FGF23 or KL genes. Here, we identified two novel mutations in the GALNT3 gene in a Chinese family with HFTC. Identification of a novel genotype in HFTC provides clues for understanding the phenotype-genotype relationships in HFTC and may assist not only in the clinical diagnosis of HFTC but also in the interpretation of the genetic information used for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  5. Further Evidence That Cannabis Moderates Familial Correlation of Psychosis-Related Experiences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud van Winkel

    Full Text Available Familial correlations underlie heritability estimates of psychosis. If gene-environment interactions are important, familial correlation will vary as a function of environmental exposure.Associations between sibling and parental schizotypy (n = 669 pairs, n = 1222 observations, and between sibling schizotypy and patient CAPE psychosis (n = 978 pairs, n = 1723 observations were examined as a function of sibling cannabis use. This design is based on the prediction that in unaffected siblings who are not exposed, vulnerability for psychosis will remain latent, whereas in case of exposure, latent psychosis vulnerability may become expressed, at the level of schizotypal symptoms, causing the phenotypic correlation between relatives to become "visible" under the influence of cannabis.Siblings exposed to recent cannabis use resembled their patient-relative more closely in terms of positive schizotypy (urinalysis(+:B = 0.30, P<.001; urinalysis(-:B = 0.10, p<0.001; p-interaction = 0.0135. Similarly, the familial correlation in positive schizotypy between parent and sibling was significantly greater in siblings recently exposed to cannabis (urinalysis(+:B = 0.78, P<.001; urinalysis(-:B = 0.43, p<0.001; p interaction = 0.0017. Results were comparable when using lifetime cannabis frequency of use as exposure instead of recent use. Parental schizotypy did not predict cannabis use in the healthy sibling, nor in the patient. Similarly, parental cannabis use was not associated with level of schizotypy in the sibling, nor with psychotic symptoms in the patient, making gene-environment correlation unlikely.Familial correlation of psychosis-related experiences varies considerably as a function of exposure to cannabis, confirming the importance of gene-cannabis interaction in shifts of expression of psychosis-related experiences.

  6. No evidence for the association of DRD4 with ADHD in a Taiwanese population within-family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yu-Shu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent and highly heritable childhood disorder. The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4 gene has shown a genetic association with ADHD in Caucasian populations with meta-analysis indicating a small but significant effect across datasets. It remains uncertain whether this association can be generalised to non-Caucasian ethnic groups. Here we investigate two markers within the DRD4 gene in a Taiwanese population, the exon 3 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR and a 5' 120 base-pair duplication. Methods Within-family transmission disequilibrium tests of association of the 5' 120 base-pair duplication, and exon 3 VNTR in a Taiwanese population. Results No evidence of association of ADHD with either polymorphism in this population was observed. Conclusion The DRD4 gene markers investigated were not found to be associated with ADHD in this Taiwanese sample. Further work in Taiwanese and other Asian populations will therefore be required to establish whether the reports of association of DRD4 genetic variants in Caucasian samples can be generalised to Asian populations.

  7. Further localization of the gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) in 15 Australasian families: Linkage and loss of heterozygosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenevix-Trench, G.; Wicking, C.; Berkman, J.; Sharpe, H.; Hockey, A.; Haan, E.; Oley, C.; Ravine, D.; Turner, A.; Searle, J. (and others)

    1993-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS; basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome) is a cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene for NBCCS has been mapped to 9q23.1-q31 in North Americal and European families. In addition, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for genetic markers in this region has been detected in sporadic BCCs, indicating that the NBCCs gene is probably a tumor-suppressor gene. In this study the authors have determined that the NBCCS gene is also linked to this region in Australasian pedigrees and that there is no significant evidence of heterogeneity. They have defined the localization of the gene by multipoint and haplotype analysis of 15 families, using four microsatellite markers. LOH at these loci was detected in 50% of sporadic BCCs, a rate that is significantly higher than that in other skin lesions used as controls. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. From manual curation to visualization of gene families and networks across Solanaceae plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Anuradha; Menda, Naama; Bombarely, Aureliano; Edwards, Jeremy D.; Strickler, Susan R.; Mueller, Lukas A.

    2013-01-01

    High-quality manual annotation methods and practices need to be scaled to the increased rate of genomic data production. Curation based on gene families and gene networks is one approach that can significantly increase both curation efficiency and quality. The Sol Genomics Network (SGN; http://solgenomics.net) is a comparative genomics platform, with genetic, genomic and phenotypic information of the Solanaceae family and its closely related species that incorporates a community-based gene and phenotype curation system. In this article, we describe a manual curation system for gene families aimed at facilitating curation, querying and visualization of gene interaction patterns underlying complex biological processes, including an interface for efficiently capturing information from experiments with large data sets reported in the literature. Well-annotated multigene families are useful for further exploration of genome organization and gene evolution across species. As an example, we illustrate the system with the multigene transcription factor families, WRKY and Small Auxin Up-regulated RNA (SAUR), which both play important roles in responding to abiotic stresses in plants. Database URL: http://solgenomics.net/ PMID:23681907

  9. Genomic characterization of the LEED..PEEDs, a gene family unique to the medicago lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Diana I; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Young, Nevin D

    2014-08-25

    The LEED..PEED (LP) gene family in Medicago truncatula (A17) is composed of 13 genes coding small putatively secreted peptides with one to two conserved domains of negatively charged residues. This family is not present in the genomes of Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, or the IRLC species Cicer arietinum. LP genes were also not detected in a Trifolium pratense draft genome or Pisum sativum nodule transcriptome, which were sequenced de novo in this study, suggesting that the LP gene family arose within the past 25 million years. M. truncatula accession HM056 has 13 LP genes with high similarity to those in A17, whereas M. truncatula ssp. tricycla (R108) and M. sativa have 11 and 10 LP gene copies, respectively. In M. truncatula A17, 12 LP genes are located on chromosome 7 within a 93-kb window, whereas one LP gene copy is located on chromosome 4. A phylogenetic analysis of the gene family is consistent with most gene duplications occurring prior to Medicago speciation events, mainly through local tandem duplications and one distant duplication across chromosomes. Synteny comparisons between R108 and A17 confirm that gene order is conserved between the two subspecies, although a further duplication occurred solely in A17. In M. truncatula A17, all 13 LPs are exclusively transcribed in nodules and absent from other plant tissues, including roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, seed shells, and pods. The recent expansion of LP genes in Medicago spp. and their timing and location of expression suggest a novel function in nodulation, possibly as an aftermath of the evolution of bacteroid terminal differentiation or potentially associated with rhizobial-host specificity.

  10. [Mapping of pathogenic genes in two families with autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Wu, Ling-Qian; Liang, De-Sheng; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Pan, Qian; Bu, Feng-Xiao; Peng, Yu; Xia, Kun; Xia, Jia-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To localize the pathogenic genes of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris, we ascertained two ichthyosis vulgaris families from Hunan Province. Venous blood samples were collected from affected and unaffected family members and genomic DNA was extracted. We then performed genome scan and linkage analysis using microsatellite markers around known ichthyosis vulgaris loci in chromosomes 1 and 10. In family 1, the locus linked to ichthyosis vulgaris was located near D1S498 (1q21), which overlapped with known ichthyosis vulgaris loci. In family 2, however, all known loci for ichthyosis vulgaris were excluded and the new locus remains to be identified.

  11. Molecular evolution of the rice miR395 gene family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sreelatha GUDDETI; De Chun ZHANG; Ai Li LI; Chuck H. LESEBERG; Hui KANG; Xiao Guang LI; Wen Xue ZHAI; Mitrick A. JOHNS; Long MAO

    2005-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20-22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs that play important roles in plant and animal development.They are usually processed from larger precursors that can form stem-loop structures. Among 20 miRNA families that are conserved between Arabidopsis and rice, the rice miR395 gene family was unique because it was organized into compact clusters that could be transcribed as one single transcript. We show here that in fact this family had four clusters of total 24 genes. Three of these clusters were segmental duplications. They contained miR395 genes of both 120 bp and 66 bp long. However, only the latter was repeatedly duplicated. The fourth cluster contained miR395 genes of two different sizes that could be the consequences of intergenic recombination of genes from the first three clusters.On each cluster, both 1-duplication and 2-duplication histories were observed based on the sequence similarity between miR395 genes, some of which were nearly identical suggesting a recent origin. This was supported by a miR395 locus survey among several species of the genus Oryza, where two clusters were only found in species with an AA genome,the genome of the cultivated rice. A comparative study of the genomic organization of Medicago truncatula miR395 gene family showed significant expansion of intergenic spaces indicating that the originally clustered genes were drifting away from each other. The diverse genomic organizations of a conserved microRNA gene family in different plant genomes indicated that this important negative gene regulation system has undergone dramatic tune-ups in plant genomes.

  12. Detection of ATP2C1 Gene Mutation in Familial Benign Chronic Pemphigus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The ATP2C1 gene mutation in one case of familial benign chronic pemphigus was investigated.One patient was diagnosed as familial benign chronic pemphigus by pathology, ultrastructral examination and clinical features. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples. Mutation of ATP2C1 gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The results showed that deletion mutation was detected in ATP2C1 gene in this patient, which was 2374delTTTG. No mutation was found in the family members and normal individuals. It was concluded that the 2374delTTTG mutation in ATP2C1 gene was the specific mutation for the clinical phenotype for this patient and was a de novo mutation.

  13. Gene tree parsimony of multilocus snake venom protein families reveals species tree conflict as a result of multiple parallel gene loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Wagstaff, Simon C; Harrison, Robert A; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    The proliferation of gene data from multiple loci of large multigene families has been greatly facilitated by considerable recent advances in sequence generation. The evolution of such gene families, which often undergo complex histories and different rates of change, combined with increases in sequence data, pose complex problems for traditional phylogenetic analyses, and in particular, those that aim to successfully recover species relationships from gene trees. Here, we implement gene tree parsimony analyses on multicopy gene family data sets of snake venom proteins for two separate groups of taxa, incorporating Bayesian posterior distributions as a rigorous strategy to account for the uncertainty present in gene trees. Gene tree parsimony largely failed to infer species trees congruent with each other or with species phylogenies derived from mitochondrial and single-copy nuclear sequences. Analysis of four toxin gene families from a large expressed sequence tag data set from the viper genus Echis failed to produce a consistent topology, and reanalysis of a previously published gene tree parsimony data set, from the family Elapidae, suggested that species tree topologies were predominantly unsupported. We suggest that gene tree parsimony failure in the family Elapidae is likely the result of unequal and/or incomplete sampling of paralogous genes and demonstrate that multiple parallel gene losses are likely responsible for the significant species tree conflict observed in the genus Echis. These results highlight the potential for gene tree parsimony analyses to be undermined by rapidly evolving multilocus gene families under strong natural selection.

  14. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes.

  15. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Olfactory receptor gene family evolution in stickleback and medaka fishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of olfactory receptor (OR) genes with environmental odors is regarded as the first step of olfaction.In this study,OR genes of two fish,medaka (Oryzias latipes) and stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus),were identified and an evolutional analysis was conducted.The selection pressure of different TM regions and complete coding region were compared.Three TM regions (TM4,TM5 and TM6) were found to have higher average Ka/Ks values,which might be partly caused by positive selection as suggested by subsequent positive selection analysis.Further analysis showed that many PTSs overlap,or are adjacent to previously deduced binding sites in mammals.These results support the hypothesis that binding sites of fish OR genes may evolved under positive selection.

  17. Characterization of the laminin gene family and evolution in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztal, Tamar; Berger, Silke; Currie, Peter D; Hall, Thomas E

    2011-02-01

    Laminins are essential components of all basement membranes and are fundamental to tissue development and homeostasis. Humans possess at least 16 different heterotrimeric laminin complexes formed through different combinations of alpha, beta, and gamma chains. Individual chains appear to exhibit unique expression patterns, leading to the notion that overlap between expression domains governs the constitution of complexes found within particular tissues. However, the spatial and temporal expression of laminin genes has not been comprehensively analyzed in any vertebrate model to date. Here, we describe the tissue-specific expression patterns of all laminin genes in the zebrafish, throughout embryonic development and into the "post-juvenile" period, which is representative of the adult body form. In addition, we present phylogenetic and microsynteny analyses, which demonstrate that the majority of our zebrafish sequences are orthologous to human laminin genes. Together, these data represent a fundamental resource for the study of vertebrate laminins.

  18. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1 which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689 flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders.

  19. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures...... to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  20. Functional Genomics of Allergen Gene Families in Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maghuly

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fruit consumption is encouraged for health reasons; however, fruits may harbour a series of allergenic proteins that may cause discomfort or even represent serious threats to certain individuals. Thus, the identification and characterization of allergens in fruits requires novel approaches involving genomic and proteomic tools. Since avoidance of fruits also negatively affects the quality of patients’ lives, biotechnological interventions are ongoing to produce low allergenic fruits by down regulating specific genes. In this respect, the control of proteins associated with allergenicity could be achieved by fine tuning the spatial and temporal expression of the relevant genes.

  1. Familial aggregation in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it genes or environment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiago Nunes; Gionata Fiorino; Silvio Danese; Miquel Sans

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops in genetically susceptible individuals due to the influence of environmental factors, leading to an abnormal recognition of microbiota antigens by the innate immune system which triggers an exaggerated immune response and subsequent bowel tissue damage. IBD has been more frequently found in families, an observation that could be due to either genetic, environmental or both types of factors present in these families. In addition to expanding our knowledge on IBD pathogenesis, defining the specific contribution to familial IBD of each one of these factors might have also clinical usefulness. We review the available evidence on familial IBD pathogenesis.

  2. Differential and correlation analyses of microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jinghua; Li, Shuxia;

    2008-01-01

    The widespread microarray technology capable of analyzing global gene expression at the level of transcription is expanding its application not only in medicine but also in studies on basic biology. This paper presents our analysis on microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families...... focusing on the demographic characteristics such as age and sex on differential gene expression patterns. Our results show that the differential gene expression pattern between age groups is dominated by down-regulated transcriptional activities in the old subjects. Functional analysis on age......-regulated genes identifies cell-cell signaling as an important functional category implicated in human aging. Sex-dependent gene expression is characterized by genes that may escape X-inactivation and, most interestingly, such a pattern is not affected by the aging process. Analysis on sibship correlation on gene...

  3. Diverse Transcriptional Programs Associated with Environmental Stress and Hormones in the Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Chae; Sylvia Sudat; Sandrine Dudoit; Tong Zhu; Sheng Luan

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes more than 600 receptor-like kinase (RLK) genes, by far the dominant class of receptors found in land plants. Although similar to the mammalian receptor tyrosine kinases, plant RLKs are serine/threonine kinases that represent a novel signaling innovation unique to plants and, consequently, an excellent opportunity to understand how extracellular signaling evolved and functions in plants as opposed to animals. RLKs are predicted to be major components of the signaling pathways that allow plants to respond to environmental and developmental conditions. However, breakthroughs in identifying these processes have been limited to only a handful of individual RLKs. Here, we used a Syngenta custom Arabidopsis GeneChip array to compile a detailed profile of the transcriptional activity of 604 receptor-like kinase genes after exposure to a cross-section of known signaling factors in plants,including abiotic stresses, biotic stresses, and hormones. In the 68 experiments comprising the study, we found that 582 of the 604 RLK genes displayed a two-fold or greater change in expression to at least one of 12 types of treatments, thereby providing a large body of experimental evidence for targeted functional screens of individual RLK genes. We investigated whether particular subfamilies of RLK genes are responsive to specific types of signals and found that each subfamily displayed broad ranges of expression, as opposed to being targeted towards particular signal classes. Finally, by analyzing the divergence of sequence and gene expression among the RLK subfamilies, we present evidence as to the functional basis for the expansion of the RLKs and how this expansion may have affected conservation and divergences in their function. Taken as a whole, our study represents a preliminary, working model of processes and interactions in which the members of the RLK gene family may be involved, where such information has remained elusive for so many

  4. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haroon; Graner, Sonja; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-03-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Involved in de novo DNA methylation 2 (IDN2) and the closely related factor of DNA methylation (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1-VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins.

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis of the RNA Helicase Gene Family in Gossypium raimondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA helicases, which help to unwind stable RNA duplexes, and have important roles in RNA metabolism, belong to a class of motor proteins that play important roles in plant development and responses to stress. Although this family of genes has been the subject of systematic investigation in Arabidopsis, rice, and tomato, it has not yet been characterized in cotton. In this study, we identified 161 putative RNA helicase genes in the genome of the diploid cotton species Gossypium raimondii. We classified these genes into three subfamilies, based on the presence of either a DEAD-box (51 genes, DEAH-box (52 genes, or DExD/H-box (58 genes in their coding regions. Chromosome location analysis showed that the genes that encode RNA helicases are distributed across all 13 chromosomes of G. raimondii. Syntenic analysis revealed that 62 of the 161 G. raimondii helicase genes (38.5% are within the identified syntenic blocks. Sixty-six (40.99% helicase genes from G. raimondii have one or several putative orthologs in tomato. Additionally, GrDEADs have more conserved gene structures and more simple domains than GrDEAHs and GrDExD/Hs. Transcriptome sequencing data demonstrated that many of these helicases, especially GrDEADs, are highly expressed at the fiber initiation stage and in mature leaves. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in cotton.

  6. Evolutionary analysis of the jacalin-related lectin family genes in 11 fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Lv, Yueqing

    2016-09-01

    Jacalin-related lectins are a type of carbohydrate-binding proteins, which are distributed across a wide variety of organisms and involved in some important biological processes. The evolution of this gene family in fishes is unknown. Here, 47 putative jacalin genes in 11 fish species were identified and divided into 4 groups through phylogenetic analysis. Conserved gene organization and motif distribution existed in each group, suggesting their functional conservation. Some fishes have eleven jacalin genes, while others have only one or zero gene in their genomes, suggesting dynamic changes in the number of jacalin genes during the evolution of fishes. Intragenic recombination played a key role in the evolution of jacalin genes. Synteny analyses of jacalin genes in some fishes implied conserved and dynamic evolution characteristics of this gene family and related genome segments. Moreover, a few functional divergence sites were identified within each group pairs. Divergent expression profiles of the zebra fish jacalin genes were further investigated in different stresses. The results provided a foundation for exploring the characterization of the jacalin genes in fishes and will offer insights for additional functional studies.

  7. The phylogeny and evolutionary history of the Lesion Simulating Disease (LSD) gene family in Viridiplantae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabreira, Caroline; Cagliari, Alexandro; Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; de Freitas, Loreta B; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria Helena

    2015-12-01

    The Lesion Simulating Disease (LSD) genes encode a family of zinc finger proteins that play a role in programmed cell death (PCD) and other biological processes, such as plant growth and photosynthesis. In the present study, we report the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the LSD gene family in Viridiplantae. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the monocot and eudicot genes were distributed along the phylogeny, indicating that the expansion of the family occurred prior to the diversification between these clades. Sequences encoding proteins that present one, two, or three LSD domains formed separate groups. The secondary structure of these different LSD proteins presented a similar composition, with the β-sheets being their main component. The evolution by gene duplication was identified only to the genes that contain three LSD domains, which generated proteins with equal structure. Moreover, genes encoding proteins with one or two LSD domains evolved as single-copy genes and did not result from loss or gain in LSD domains. These results were corroborated by synteny analysis among regions containing paralogous/orthologous genes in Glycine max and Populus trichocarpa. The Ka/Ks ratio between paralogous/orthologous genes revealed that a subfunctionalization process possibly could be occurring with the LSD genes, explaining the involvement of LSD members in different biological processes, in addition to the negative regulation of PCD. This study presents important novelty in the evolutionary history of the LSD family and provides a basis for future research on individual LSD genes and their involvement in important pathway networks in plants.

  8. carboxylate synthase gene family in Arabidopsis, rice, grapevine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... mungbean, rose (Johnson et al., 1998; Ge et al., 2000) etc. Though .... of molecular evolution that follows gene duplications (Martinez-. Castilla et al. ..... Dong J, Kim W, Yip W, Thompson G, Li L, Bennett A (1991). Cloning of.

  9. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial

  10. Organisation and structural evolution of the rice glutathione S-transferase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranzo, N; Sari Gorla, M; Mizzi, L; De Toma, G; Frova, C

    2004-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of key defence enzymes against xenobiotic toxicity. Here we describe the comprehensive characterisation of this important multigene family in the model monocot species rice [ Oryza sativa(L.)]. Furthermore, we investigate the molecular evolution of the family based on the analysis of (1) the patterns of within-genome duplication, and (2) the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary divergence among rice, Arabidopsis, maize and soybean GSTs. By in-silico screening of the EST and genome divisions of the Genbank/EMBL/DDBJ database we have isolated 59 putative genes and two pseudogenes, making this the largest plant GST family characterised to date. Of these, 38 (62%) are represented by genomic and EST sequences and 23 (38%) are known only from their genomic sequences. A preliminary survey of EST collections shows a large degree of variability in gene expression between different tissues and environmental conditions, with a small number of genes (13) accounting for 80% of all ESTs. Rice GSTs are organised in four main phylogenetic classes, with 91% of all rice genes belonging to the two plant-specific classes Tau (40 genes) and Phi (16 genes). Pairwise identity scores range between 17 and 98% for proteins of the same class, and 7 and 21% for interclass comparisons. Rapid evolution by gene duplication is suggested by the discovery of two large clusters of 7 and 23 closely related genes on chromosomes 1 and 10, respectively. A comparison of the complete GST families in two monocot and two dicot species suggests a monophyletic origin for all Theta and Zeta GSTs, and no more than three common ancestors for all Phi and Tau genes.

  11. Rice Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Gene Family and Its Role in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jai S. Rohila; Yinong Yang

    2007-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MARK) cascade is an important signaling module that transduces extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. An increasing body of evidence has shown that the MAPK-mediated cellular signaling is crucial to plant growth and development, as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. To date, a total of 17 MARK genes have been identified from the rice genome. Expression profiling, biochemical characterization and/or functional analysis were carried out with many members of the rice MARK gene family, especially those associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this review, the phylogenetic relationship and classification of rice MARK genes are discussed to facilitate a simple nomenclature and standard annotation of the rice MARK gene family. Functional data relating to biotic and abiotic stress responses are reviewed for each MARK group and show that despite overlapping in functionality, there is a certain level of functional specificity among different rice MAP kinases. The future challenges are to functionally characterize each MARK, to identify their downstream substrates and upstream kinases, and to genetically manipulate the MARK signaling pathway in rice crops for the improvement of agronomically important traits.

  12. Gene mapping in an anophthalmic pedigree of a consanguineous Pakistani family opened new horizons for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical anophthalmia is a rare inherited disease of the eye and phenotype refers to the absence of ocular tissue in the orbit of eye. Patients may have unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia, and generally have short palpebral fissures and small orbits. Anophthalmia may be isolated or associated with a broader syndrome and may have genetic or environmental causes. However, genetic cause has been defined in only a small proportion of cases, therefore, a consanguineous Pakistani family of the Pashtoon ethnic group, with isolated clinical anophthalmia was investigated using linkage mapping. A family pedigree was created to trace the possible mode of inheritance of the disease. Blood samples were collected from affected as well as normal members of this family, and screened for disease-associated mutations. This family was analyzed for linkage to all the known loci of clinical anophthalmia, using microsatellite short tandem repeat (STR markers. Direct sequencing was performed to find out disease-associated mutations in the candidate gene. This family with isolated clinical anophthalmia, was mapped to the SOX2 gene that is located at chromosome 3q26.3-q27. However, on exonic and regulatory regions mutation screening of the SOX2 gene, the disease-associated mutation was not identified. It showed that another gene responsible for development of the eye might be present at chromosome 3q26.3-q27 and needs to be identified and screened for the disease-associated mutation in this family.

  13. Global gene expression analysis and regulation of the principal genes expressed in bovine placenta in relation to the transcription factor AP-2 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizaki Keiichiro

    2007-04-01

    situ hybridization showed that TFAP2A, TFAP2B and TFAP2C mRNAs were localized in trophoblast cells but were expressed by different cells. TFAP2A was expressed in cotyledonary epithelial cells including BNC, TFAP2B was specifically expressed in BNC, and TFAP2C in mononucleate cells. Conclusion We detected gestational-stage-specific gene expression profiles in bovine placentomes using a combination of microarray and in silico analysis. In silico analysis indicated that the AP-2 family may be a consensus regulator for the gene cluster that characteristically appears in bovine placenta as gestation progresses. In particular, TFAP2A and TFAP2B may be involved in regulating binucleate cell-specific genes such as CSH1, some PAG or SULT1E1. These results suggest that the AP-2 family is a specific transcription factor for clusters of crucial placental genes. This is the first evidence that TFAP2A may regulate the differentiation and specific functions of BNC in bovine placenta.

  14. Cross-species gene-family fluctuations reveal the dynamics of horizontal transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Jacopo; Romano, Mariacristina; Bassetti, Federico; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Prokaryotes vary their protein repertoire mainly through horizontal transfer and gene loss. To elucidate the links between these processes and the cross-species gene-family statistics, we perform a large-scale data analysis of the cross-species variability of gene-family abundance (the number of members of the family found on a given genome). We find that abundance fluctuations are related to the rate of horizontal transfers. This is rationalized by a minimal theoretical model, which predicts this link. The families that are not captured by the model show abundance profiles that are markedly peaked around a mean value, possibly because of specific abundance selection. Based on these results, we define an abundance variability index that captures a family's evolutionary behavior (and thus some of its relevant functional properties) purely based on its cross-species abundance fluctuations. Analysis and model, combined, show a quantitative link between cross-species family abundance statistics and horizontal transfer dynamics, which can be used to analyze genome 'flux'. Groups of families with different values of the abundance variability index correspond to genome sub-parts having different plasticity in terms of the level of horizontal exchange allowed by natural selection.

  15. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash M. Veerappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4% than in UGT2B15 (17.6%. Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases.

  16. Identification and characterization of the RCI2 gene family in maize (Zea mays)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yang Zhao; Haiqing Tong; Ronghao Cai; Xiaojian Peng; Xiaoyu Li; Defang Gan; Suwen Zhu

    2014-12-01

    Rare-cold-inducible (RCI2) genes are structurally conserved members that encode small, highly hydrophobic proteins involved in response to various abiotic stresses. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of these genes have been conducted in Arabidopsis, but an extensive investigation of the RCI2 gene family has not yet been carried out in maize. In the present study, 10 RCI2 genes were identified in a fully sequenced maize genome. Structural characterization and expression pattern analysis of 10 ZmRCI2s (Zea mays RCI2 genes) were subsequently determined. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that ZmRCI2s are highly conserved, and most of them could be grouped with their orthologues from other organisms. Chromosomal location analysis indicated that ZmRCI2s were distributed unevenly on seven chromosomes with two segmental duplication events, suggesting that maize RCI2 gene family is an evolutionarily conserved family. Putative stress-responsive cis-elements were detected in the 2-kb promoter regions of the 10 ZmRCI2s. In addition, the 10 ZmRCI2s showed different expression patterns in maize development based on transcriptome analysis. Further, microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that each maize RCI2 genes were responsive to drought stress, suggesting their important roles in drought stress response. The results of this work provide a basis for future cloning and application studies of maize RCI2 genes.

  17. Identification and characterization of the RCI2 gene family in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Tong, Haiqing; Cai, Ronghao; Peng, Xiaojian; Li, Xiaoyu; Gan, Defang; Zhu, Suwen

    2014-12-01

    Rare-cold-inducible (RCI2) genes are structurally conserved members that encode small, highly hydrophobic proteins involved in response to various abiotic stresses. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of these genes have been conducted in Arabidopsis, but an extensive investigation of the RCI2 gene family has not yet been carried out in maize. In the present study, 10 RCI2 genes were identified in a fully sequenced maize genome. Structural characterization and expression pattern analysis of 10 ZmRCI2s (Zea mays RCI2 genes) were subsequently determined. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that ZmRCI2s are highly conserved, and most of them could be grouped with their orthologues from other organisms. Chromosomal location analysis indicated that ZmRCI2s were distributed unevenly on seven chromosomes with two segmental duplication events, suggesting that maize RCI2 gene family is an evolutionarily conserved family. Putative stress-responsive cis-elements were detected in the 2-kb promoter regions of the 10 ZmRCI2s. In addition, the 10 ZmRCI2s showed different expression patterns in maize development based on transcriptome analysis. Further, microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that each maize RCI2 genes were responsive to drought stress, suggesting their important roles in drought stress response. The results of this work provide a basis for future cloning and application studies of maize RCI2 genes.

  18. Dichotomy in the NRT gene families of dicots and grass species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Plett

    Full Text Available A large proportion of the nitrate (NO(3(- acquired by plants from soil is actively transported via members of the NRT families of NO(3(- transporters. In Arabidopsis, the NRT1 family has eight functionally characterised members and predominantly comprises low-affinity transporters; the NRT2 family contains seven members which appear to be high-affinity transporters; and there are two NRT3 (NAR2 family members which are known to participate in high-affinity transport. A modified reciprocal best hit (RBH approach was used to identify putative orthologues of the Arabidopsis NRT genes in the four fully sequenced grass genomes (maize, rice, sorghum, Brachypodium. We also included the poplar genome in our analysis to establish whether differences between Arabidopsis and the grasses may be generally applicable to monocots and dicots. Our analysis reveals fundamental differences between Arabidopsis and the grass species in the gene number and family structure of all three families of NRT transporters. All grass species possessed additional NRT1.1 orthologues and appear to lack NRT1.6/NRT1.7 orthologues. There is significant separation in the NRT2 phylogenetic tree between NRT2 genes from dicots and grass species. This indicates that determination of function of NRT2 genes in grass species will not be possible in cereals based simply on sequence homology to functionally characterised Arabidopsis NRT2 genes and that proper functional analysis will be required. Arabidopsis has a unique NRT3.2 gene which may be a fusion of the NRT3.1 and NRT3.2 genes present in all other species examined here. This work provides a framework for future analysis of NO(3(- transporters and NO(3(- transport in grass crop species.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Aquaporin Gene Family in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deokar, Amit A; Tar'an, Bunyamin

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential membrane proteins that play critical role in the transport of water and many other solutes across cell membranes. In this study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis identified 40 AQP genes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). A complete overview of the chickpea AQP (CaAQP) gene family is presented, including their chromosomal locations, gene structure, phylogeny, gene duplication, conserved functional motifs, gene expression, and conserved promoter motifs. To understand AQP's evolution, a comparative analysis of chickpea AQPs with AQP orthologs from soybean, Medicago, common bean, and Arabidopsis was performed. The chickpea AQP genes were found on all of the chickpea chromosomes, except chromosome 7, with a maximum of six genes on chromosome 6, and a minimum of one gene on chromosome 5. Gene duplication analysis indicated that the expansion of chickpea AQP gene family might have been due to segmental and tandem duplications. CaAQPs were grouped into four subfamilies including 15 NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), 13 tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) based on sequence similarities and phylogenetic position. Gene structure analysis revealed a highly conserved exon-intron pattern within CaAQP subfamilies supporting the CaAQP family classification. Functional prediction based on conserved Ar/R selectivity filters, Froger's residues, and specificity-determining positions suggested wide differences in substrate specificity among the subfamilies of CaAQPs. Expression analysis of the AQP genes indicated that some of the genes are tissue-specific, whereas few other AQP genes showed differential expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Promoter profiling of CaAQP genes for conserved cis-acting regulatory elements revealed enrichment of cis-elements involved in circadian control, light response, defense and stress responsiveness

  20. Tissue specificity and diurnal change in gene expression of the sucrose phosphate synthase gene family in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masaki; Aoki, Naohiro; Hirose, Tatsuro; Yonekura, Madoka; Ohto, Chikara; Ohsugi, Ryu

    2011-08-01

    The rice genome contains 5 isogenes for sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), the key enzyme in sucrose synthesis; however, little is known about their transcriptional regulation. In order to determine the expression patterns of the SPS gene family in rice plants, we conducted an expression analysis in various tissues and developmental stages by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. At the transcript level, the rice SPS genes, particularly SPS1, were preferentially expressed in source tissues, whereas SPS2, SPS6, and SPS8 were expressed equally in source and sink tissues. We also investigated diurnal changes in SPS gene expression, SPS activity, and soluble sugar content in leaf blades. Interestingly, the expression of all the SPS genes, particularly that of SPS1 and SPS11, tended to be higher at night when the activation state of the SPS proteins was low, and the mRNA levels of SPS1 and SPS6 were negatively correlated with sucrose content. Furthermore, the temporal patterns of SPS gene expression and sugar content under continuous light conditions suggested the involvement of endogenous rhythm and/or sucrose sensing in the transcriptional regulation of SPS genes. Our data revealed differential expression patterns in the rice SPS gene family and part of the complex mechanisms of their transcriptional control.

  1. Characterization of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) in Apple (Malus 6domestica Borkh.) and their evolutionary history of the Rosaceae family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain accounts for the largest number of disease resistance genes and is one of the largest gene families in plants. We have identified 868 RGAs in the genome of the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) cultivar ‘Golden...

  2. Expression and phylogenetic analysis of the zic gene family in the evolution and development of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layden Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background zic genes are members of the gli/glis/nkl/zic super-family of C2H2 zinc finger (ZF transcription factors. Homologs of the zic family have been implicated in patterning neural and mesodermal tissues in bilaterians. Prior to this study, the origin of the metazoan zic gene family was unknown and expression of zic gene homologs during the development of early branching metazoans had not been investigated. Results Phylogenetic analyses of novel zic candidate genes identified a definitive zic homolog in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, two gli/glis/nkl-like genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, confirmed the presence of three gli/glis/nkl-like genes in Porifera, and confirmed the five previously identified zic genes in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the cnidarian N. vectensis, zic homologs are expressed in ectoderm and the gastrodermis (a bifunctional endomesoderm, in presumptive and developing tentacles, and in oral and sensory apical tuft ectoderm. The Capitella teleta zic homolog (Ct-zic is detectable in a subset of the developing nervous system, the foregut, and the mesoderm associated with the segmentally repeated chaetae. Lastly, expression of gli and glis homologs in Mnemiopsis. leidyi is detected exclusively in neural cells in floor of the apical organ. Conclusions Based on our analyses, we propose that the zic gene family arose in the common ancestor of the Placozoa, Cnidaria and Bilateria from a gli/glis/nkl-like gene and that both ZOC and ZF-NC domains evolved prior to cnidarian-bilaterian divergence. We also conclude that zic expression in neural ectoderm and developing neurons is pervasive throughout the Metazoa and likely evolved from neural expression of an ancestral gli/glis/nkl/zic gene. zic expression in bilaterian mesoderm may be related to the expression in the gastrodermis of a cnidarian-bilaterian common ancestor.

  3. Expression and phylogenetic analysis of the zic gene family in the evolution and development of metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Michael J; Meyer, Néva P; Pang, Kevin; Seaver, Elaine C; Martindale, Mark Q

    2010-11-05

    zic genes are members of the gli/glis/nkl/zic super-family of C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) transcription factors. Homologs of the zic family have been implicated in patterning neural and mesodermal tissues in bilaterians. Prior to this study, the origin of the metazoan zic gene family was unknown and expression of zic gene homologs during the development of early branching metazoans had not been investigated. Phylogenetic analyses of novel zic candidate genes identified a definitive zic homolog in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, two gli/glis/nkl-like genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, confirmed the presence of three gli/glis/nkl-like genes in Porifera, and confirmed the five previously identified zic genes in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the cnidarian N. vectensis, zic homologs are expressed in ectoderm and the gastrodermis (a bifunctional endomesoderm), in presumptive and developing tentacles, and in oral and sensory apical tuft ectoderm. The Capitella teleta zic homolog (Ct-zic) is detectable in a subset of the developing nervous system, the foregut, and the mesoderm associated with the segmentally repeated chaetae. Lastly, expression of gli and glis homologs in Mnemiopsis. leidyi is detected exclusively in neural cells in floor of the apical organ. Based on our analyses, we propose that the zic gene family arose in the common ancestor of the Placozoa, Cnidaria and Bilateria from a gli/glis/nkl-like gene and that both ZOC and ZF-NC domains evolved prior to cnidarian-bilaterian divergence. We also conclude that zic expression in neural ectoderm and developing neurons is pervasive throughout the Metazoa and likely evolved from neural expression of an ancestral gli/glis/nkl/zic gene. zic expression in bilaterian mesoderm may be related to the expression in the gastrodermis of a cnidarian-bilaterian common ancestor.

  4. Cloning and developmental expression of the murine neurofilament gene family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); D.N. Meijer (Dies); D. Flavell (David); J. Hurst; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractDNA clones encoding the 3 mouse neurofilament (NF) genes have been isolated by cross-hybridization with a previously described NF-L cDNA probe from the rat. Screening of a lambda gt10 cDNA library prepared from mouse brain RNA led to the cloning of an NF-L cDNA of 2.0 kb that spans the e

  5. A novel mutation of the apolipoprotein A-I gene in a family with familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Livia; Fasano, Tommaso; Calabresi, Laura; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Borrini, Claudia; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2008-05-01

    We report a large family in which four members showed a plasma lipid profile consistent with the clinical diagnosis of familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL). One of these patients was found to have markedly reduced HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) (0.72 mmol/l) and Apo A-I (72 mg/dl) levels, a condition suggestive of the presence of a mutation in one of the HDL-related genes. The analysis of APOA1 gene revealed that this patient was heterozygous for a cytosine insertion in exon 3 (c.49-50 ins C), resulting in a frame-shift and premature stop codon at position 26 of pro-Apo A-I (Q17PFsX10). This novel mutation, which prevents the synthesis of Apo A-I, was also found in four family members, including three siblings and the daughter of the proband. Carriers of Apo A-I mutation had significantly lower HDL-C and Apo A-I than non-carriers family members (0.77+/-0.15 mmol/l vs. 1.15+/-0.20 mmol/l, P<0.005; 71.4+/-9.1mg/dl vs. 134.0+/-14.7 mg/dl, P<0.005, respectively). Two of the APOA1 mutation carriers, who were also heavy smokers, had fibrous plaques in the carotid arteries causing mild stenosis (20%). The intimal-media thickness in the two other adult carriers was within the normal range. The other non-carriers family members with FCHL had either overt vascular disease or carotid atherosclerosis at ultrasound examination. This observation suggests that the low HDL-C/low Apo A-I phenotype may result from a genetic defect directly affecting HDL metabolism, even in the context of a dyslipidemia which, like FCHL, is associated with low plasma HDL-C.

  6. OncoSearch: cancer gene search engine with literature evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Jin; Dang, Tien Cuong; Lee, Hyunju; Park, Jong C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify genes that are involved in oncogenesis and to understand how such genes affect cancers, abnormal gene expressions in cancers are actively studied. For an efficient access to the results of such studies that are reported in biomedical literature, the relevant information is accumulated via text-mining tools and made available through the Web. However, current Web tools are not yet tailored enough to allow queries that specify how a cancer changes along with the change in gene expression level, which is an important piece of information to understand an involved gene's role in cancer progression or regression. OncoSearch is a Web-based engine that searches Medline abstracts for sentences that mention gene expression changes in cancers, with queries that specify (i) whether a gene expression level is up-regulated or down-regulated, (ii) whether a certain type of cancer progresses or regresses along with such gene expression change and (iii) the expected role of the gene in the cancer. OncoSearch is available through http://oncosearch.biopathway.org.

  7. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  8. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  9. Genomewide analysis of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain gene family in Zea mays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yue-Min Zhang; Shi-Zhong Zhang; Cheng-Chao Zheng

    2014-04-01

    The investigation of transcription factor (TF) families is a major focus of postgenomic research. The plant-specific ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2-LIKE (ASL) / LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain (LBD) proteins constitute a major zincfinger-like-domain transcription factor family, and regulate diverse biological processes in plants. However, little is known about LBD genes in maize (Zea mays). In this study, a total of 44 LBD genes were identified in maize genome and were phylogenetically clustered into two groups (I and II), together with LBDs from Arabidopsis. The predicted maize LBDs were distributed across all the 10 chromosomes with different densities. In addition, the gene structures of maize LBDs were analysed. The expression profiles of the maize LBD genes under normal growth conditions were analysed by microarray data and qRT-PCR. The results indicated that LBDs might be involved in various aspects of physiological and developmental processes in maize. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genomewide analysis of the maize LBD gene family, which would provide valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of the gene family.

  10. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in sesame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-09-10

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an oil crop that contributes to the daily oil and protein requirements of almost half of the world's population; therefore, a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family is needed. Fifty-seven MADS-box genes were identified from 14 linkage groups of the sesame genome. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships with Arabidopsis thaliana, Utricularia gibba and Solanum lycopersicum MADS-box genes was performed. Sesame MADS-box genes were clustered into four groups: 28 MIKC(c)-type, 5 MIKC(⁎)-type, 14 Mα-type and 10 Mγ-type. Gene structure analysis revealed from 1 to 22 exons of sesame MADS-box genes. The number of exons in type II MADS-box genes greatly exceeded the number in type I genes. Motif distribution analysis of sesame MADS-box genes also indicated that type II MADS-box genes contained more motifs than type I genes. These results suggested that type II sesame MADS-box genes had more complex structures. By analyzing expression profiles of MADS-box genes in seven sesame transcriptomes, we determined that MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes played significant roles in sesame flower and seed development. Although most MADS-box genes in the same clade showed similar expression features, some gene functions were diversified from the orthologous Arabidopsis genes. This research will contribute to uncovering the role of MADS-box genes in sesame development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1(-/-)) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1(+/+) ), rag1(-/-) acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1(-/-) fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1(-/-) zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1(-/-) zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies, it might

  12. Familial congenital bilateral vocal fold paralysis: a novel gene translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Amy K; Rosow, David E; Wallerstein, Robert J; April, Max M

    2015-03-01

    True vocal fold (TVF) paralysis is a common cause of neonatal stridor and airway obstruction, though bilateral TVF paralysis is seen less frequently. Rare cases of familial congenital TVF paralysis have been described with implied genetic origin, but few genetic abnormalities have been discovered to date. The purpose of this study is to describe a novel chromosomal translocation responsible for congenital bilateral TVF immobility. The charts of three patients were retrospectively reviewed: a 35 year-old woman and her two children. The mother had bilateral TVF paralysis at birth requiring tracheotomy. Her oldest child had a similar presentation at birth and also required tracheotomy, while the younger child had laryngomalacia without TVF paralysis. Standard karyotype analysis was done using samples from all three patients and the parents of the mother, to assess whether a chromosomal abnormality was responsible. Karyotype analysis revealed the same balanced translocation between chromosomes 5 and 14, t(5;14) (p15.3, q11.2) in the mother and her two daughters. No other genetic abnormalities were identified. Neither maternal grandparent had the translocation, which appeared to be a spontaneous mutation in the mother with autosomal dominant inheritance and variable penetrance. A novel chromosomal translocation was identified that appears to be responsible for familial congenital bilateral TVF paralysis. While there are other reports of genetic abnormalities responsible for this condition, we believe this is the first describing this particular translocation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  14. Health and work in the family: Evidence from spouses' cancer diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung-Hee; Pohl, R Vincent

    2017-01-20

    Using Canadian administrative data from multiple sources, we provide the first nationally representative estimates for the effect of spouses' cancer diagnoses on individuals' employment and earnings and on family income. Our identification strategy exploits unexpected health shocks and combines matching with individual fixed effects in a generalized difference-in-differences framework to control for observable and unobservable heterogeneity. While the effect of spousal health shocks on labor supply is theoretically ambiguous, we find strong evidence for a decline in employment and earnings of individuals whose spouses are diagnosed with cancer. We interpret this result as individuals reducing their labor supply to provide care to their sick spouses and to enjoy joint leisure. Family income substantially declines after spouses' cancer diagnoses, suggesting that the financial consequences of such health shocks are considerable.

  15. Evidence that genetic variation in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene influences social cognition in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Willmott, M; Vetuz, G; Toye, C; Kirley, A; Hawi, Z; Brookes, K J; Gill, M; Kent, L

    2010-05-30

    Some children with ADHD also have social and communication difficulties similar to those seen in children with autistic spectrum disorders and this may be due to shared genetic liability. As the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene has been implicated in social cognition and autistic spectrum disorders, this study investigated whether OXTR polymorphisms previously implicated in autism were associated with ADHD and whether they influenced OXTR mRNA expression in 27 normal human amygdala brain samples. The family-based association sample consisted of 450 DSM-IV diagnosed ADHD probands and their parents. Although there was no association with the ADHD phenotype, an association with social cognitive impairments in a subset of the ADHD probands (N=112) was found for SNP rs53576 (F=5.24, p=0.007) with post-hoc tests demonstrating that the AA genotype was associated with better social ability compared to the AG genotype. Additionally, significant association was also found for rs13316193 (F=3.09, p=0.05) with post-hoc tests demonstrating that the CC genotype was significantly associated with poorer social ability than the TT genotype. No significant association between genotype and OXTR mRNA expression was found. This study supports previous evidence that the OXTR gene is implicated in social cognition.

  16. Molecular phylogeny of rodents, with special emphasis on murids: evidence from nuclear gene LCAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M; Catzeflis, F; Briolay, J; Mouchiroud, D

    1997-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 19 extant species of rodents, with special emphasis on rats, mice, and allied Muroidea, were studied using sequences of the nuclear protein-coding gene LCAT (lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase), an enzyme of cholesterol metabolism. Analysis of 705 base pairs from the exonic regions of LCAT confirmed known groupings in and around Muroidea. Strong support was found for the families Sciuridae (squirrel and marmot) and Gliridae (dormice) and for suprafamilial taxa Muroidea and Caviomorpha (guinea pig and allies). Within Muroidea, the first branching leads to the fossorial mole rats Spalacinae and bamboo rats Rhizomyinae. The other Muroidea appear as a polytomy from which are issued Gerbillinae (gerbils), Murinae (rats and mice), Sigmodontinae (New World cricetids), Cricetinae (hamsters), and Arvicolinae (voles). Evidence from LCAT sequences agrees with that from a number of previous molecular and morphological studies, both concerning branching orders inside Muroidea and the bush-like radiation of rodent suprafamilial taxa (caviomorphs, sciurids, glirids, muroids), thus suggesting that this nuclear gene is an appropriate candidate for addressing questions of rodents relationships.

  17. Systematic Identification of Rice ABC1 Gene Family and Its Response to Abiotic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qing-song; ZHANG Dan; Xu Liang; XU Chen-wu

    2011-01-01

    Members of the activity of bc1 complex (ABC1) family are protein kinases that are widely found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.Previous studies showed that several plant ABC1 genes participated in the abiotic stress response.Here,we present the systematic identification of rice and Arabidopsis ABC1 genes and the expression analysis of rice ABC1 genes.A total of 15 and 17 ABC1 genes from the rice and Arabidopsis genomes,respectively,were identified using a bioinformatics approach.Phylogenetic analyses of these proteins suggested that the divergence of this family had occurred and their main characteristics were established before the monocot-dicot split.Indeed,species-specific expansion contributed to the evolution of this family in rice and Arabidopsis after the monocot-dicot split.Intron/exon structure analysis indicated that most of the orthologous genes had similar exon sizes,but diverse intron sizes,and the rice genes contained larger introns,moreover,intron gain was an important event accompanying the recent evolution of the rice ABC1 family.Multiple sequence alignment revealed one conserved amino acid segment and four conserved amino acids in the ABC1 domain.Online subcellular localization predicted that nine rice ABC1 proteins were localized in chloroplasts.Real-time RT-PCR established that the rice ABC1 genes were primarily expressed in leaves and the expression could be modulated by a broad range of abiotic factors such as H2O2,abscisic acid,low temperature,drought,darkness and high salinity.These results reveal that the rice ABC1 gene family plays roles in the environmental stress response and specific biological processes of rice.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of mir-548 Gene Family Reveals Evolutionary and Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingming Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available mir-548 is a larger, poorly conserved primate-specific miRNA gene family. 69 human mir-548 genes located in almost all human chromosomes whose widespread distribution pattern implicates the evolutionary origin from transposable elements. Higher level of nucleotide divergence was detected between these human miRNA genes, which mainly derived from divergence of multicopy pre-miRNAs and homologous miRNA genes. Products of  mir-548, miR-548-5p, and miR-548-3p showed inconsistent evolutionary patterns, which partly contributed to larger genetic distances between pre-miRNAs. “Seed shifting” events could be detected among miR-548 sequences due to various 5′ ends. The events led to shift of seed sequences and target mRNAs, even generated to new target mRNAs. Additionally, the phenomenon of miRNA:miRNA interaction in the miRNA gene family was found. The potential interaction between miRNAs may be contributed to dynamic miRNA expression profiles by complementarily binding events to form miRNA:miRNA duplex with 5′-/3′-overhangs. The miRNA gene family had important roles in multiple biological processes, including signaling pathways and some cancers. The potential abundant roles and functional implication further led to the larger and poorly conserved gene family with genetic variation based on transposable elements. The evolutionary pattern of the primate-specific gene family might contribute to dynamic expression profiles and regulatory network.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the NADK gene family in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NAD(H kinase (NADK is the key enzyme that catalyzes de novo synthesis of NADP(H from NAD(H for NADP(H-based metabolic pathways. In plants, NADKs form functional subfamilies. Studies of these families in Arabidopsis thaliana indicate that they have undergone considerable evolutionary selection; however, the detailed evolutionary history and functions of the various NADKs in plants are not clearly understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a comparative genomic analysis that identified 74 NADK gene homologs from 24 species representing the eight major plant lineages within the supergroup Plantae: glaucophytes, rhodophytes, chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and eudicots. Phylogenetic and structural analysis classified these NADK genes into four well-conserved subfamilies with considerable variety in the domain organization and gene structure among subfamily members. In addition to the typical NAD_kinase domain, additional domains, such as adenylate kinase, dual-specificity phosphatase, and protein tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domains, were found in subfamily II. Interestingly, NADKs in subfamily III exhibited low sequence similarity (∼30% in the kinase domain within the subfamily and with the other subfamilies. These observations suggest that gene fusion and exon shuffling may have occurred after gene duplication, leading to specific domain organization seen in subfamilies II and III, respectively. Further analysis of the exon/intron structures showed that single intron loss and gain had occurred, yielding the diversified gene structures, during the process of structural evolution of NADK family genes. Finally, both available global microarray data analysis and qRT-RCR experiments revealed that the NADK genes in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa show different expression patterns in different developmental stages and under several different abiotic/biotic stresses and hormone treatments, underscoring the

  20. Gene duplications and losses among vertebrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases of the non-TK1 Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutahir, Zeeshan; Christiansen, Louise Slot; Clausen, Anders R.;

    2016-01-01

    , among vertebrates only four mammalian dNKs have been studied for their substrate specificity and kinetic properties. However, some vertebrates, such as fish, frogs, and birds, apparently possess a duplicated homolog of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK). In this study, we characterized a family of d......CK/deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK)-like enzymes from a frog Xenopus laevis and a bird Gallus gallus. We showed that X. laevis has a duplicated dCK gene and a dGK gene, whereas G. gallus has a duplicated dCK gene but has lost the dGK gene. We cloned, expressed, purified, and subsequently determined the kinetic parameters...

  1. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30–70 percentage points within 1–3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women

  2. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-09-28

    Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30-70 percentage points within 1-3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women family planning

  3. Phylogenetic conservation and physical mapping of members of the H6 homeobox gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Murray, J C; Leysens, N J; Goodfellow, P J; Solursh, M

    1995-06-01

    Homeobox genes represent a class of transcription factors that play key roles in the regulation of embryogenesis and development. Here we report the identification of a homeobox-containing gene family that is highly conserved at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels in a diverse number of species. These species encompass both vertebrate and invertebrate phylogenies, ranging from Homo sapiens to Drosophila melanogaster. In humans, at least two homeobox sequences from this family were identified representing a previously reported member of this family as well as a novel homeobox sequence that we physically mapped to the 10q25.2-q26.3 region of human Chromosome (Chr) 10. Multiple members of this family were also detected in three additional vertebrate species including Equus caballus (horse), Gallus gallus (Chicken), and Mus musculus (mouse), whereas only single members were detected in Tripneustes gratilla (sea urchin), Petromyzon marinus (lamprey), Salmo salar (salmon), Ovis aries (sheep), and D. melanogaster (fruit fly).

  4. Novel paralogous gene families with potential function in legume nodules and seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Kevin A T; Graham, Michelle A; VandenBosch, Kathryn A

    2006-04-01

    Within the plant kingdom, legumes are unusual in their ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules in symbiosis with certain bacteria in the family Rhizobiaceae (rhizhobia). Genes that are required for signaling between plant and symbiont, and for the development and maintenance of the nodule, were either created de novo or adopted from other plant pathways. Only in recent years have genome-scale sequence data from legumes made it possible to identify large, novel families of genes probably evolved to function in nodulation. Members of these novel families are expressed in seeds or nodules, and are homologous to defense-related proteins. Perhaps the most striking example is a large family (of more than 340 members) of cysteine cluster proteins that have homology to plant defensins.

  5. PHYLOGENETIC STATUS OF BABYLONIA ZEYLANICA (FAMILY BABYLONIIDAE BASED ON 18S rRNA GENE FRAGMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaithilingam RAVITCHANDIRANE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neogastropoda, highly diversed group of predatory marine snails, often been confused by shell colour and design pattern for identification. Gastropod resources which became economically important in India during the last decade are the whelk. The species Babylonia zeylanica of the family Babyloniidae began to be fished and exported from the country to China, Singapore, Thailand and Europe. This paper reports the molecular study of the group published to date with eight families of neogastropod taxa. For this study the 18S rRNA gene of B. zeylanica and other published data were collected from the GenBank. Kimura-2-Parameter genetic distance, nucleotide composition and neighbour joining analyses were conducted in all the eight families. The result clearly shows that Babyloniidae is clustered closely with Columbellidae of super family of Buccinoidea. Further additional gene data and increased sampling is warranted to give new insights into the phylogenetic relationships of Neogastropoda.

  6. Exons 16 and 17 of the amyloid precursor protein gene in familial inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, K; Cervenáková, L; Dalakas, M C; Leon-Monzon, M; Isaacson, S H; Nagle, J W; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-08-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (A beta) occurs in some muscle fibers of patients with inclusion body myopathy and resembles the type of amyloid deposits seen in the affected tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. Because mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been identified in patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease and Dutch-type cerebrovascular amyloidosis, we searched for mutations of the same region in patients with familial inclusion body myopathy. Sequencing of both alleles in 8 patients from four unrelated families did not reveal any mutations in these exons. The amyloid deposition in familial forms of inclusion body myopathy may be either due to errors in other gene loci, or it is secondary reflecting altered beta APP metabolism or myocyte degeneration and cell membrane degradation.

  7. Novel heterozygous nonsense mutation of the OPTN gene segregating in a Danish family with ALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Gredal, Ole

    2012-01-01

    , mutations of the optineurin gene (OPTN), which is involved in open-angle glaucoma, were identified in 3 Japanese patients/families with ALS, and subsequently in a few FALS patients of European descent. We found a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.493C>T, p.Gln165X, exon 6) in the OPTN gene in a Danish......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. About 10% of ALS cases are familial (FALS) and the genetic defect is known only in approximately 20%-30% of these cases. The most common genetic cause of ALS is SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) mutation. Very recently...... mutation reported in a Danish family and is likely involved in disease pathogenesis. Until now, only few OPTN mutations have been associated with ALS. As the underlying genetic defect is known only in approximately 20%-30% of FALS families, further screening of these cases is necessary for establishing...

  8. Gene Prospector: An evidence gateway for evaluating potential susceptibility genes and interacting risk factors for human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury Muin J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified as a result of the human genome project and the rapid advance of high throughput genotyping technology. Genetic association studies, such as recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS, have provided a springboard for exploring the contribution of inherited genetic variation and gene/environment interactions in relation to disease. Given the capacity of such studies to produce a plethora of information that may then be described in a number of publications, selecting possible disease susceptibility genes and identifying related modifiable risk factors is a major challenge. A Web-based application for finding evidence of such relationships is key to the development of follow-up studies and evidence for translational research. We developed a Web-based application that selects and prioritizes potential disease-related genes by using a highly curated and updated literature database of genetic association studies. The application, called Gene Prospector, also provides a comprehensive set of links to additional data sources. Results We compared Gene Prospector results for the query "Parkinson" with a list of 13 leading candidate genes (Top Results from a curated, specialty database for genetic associations with Parkinson disease (PDGene. Nine of the thirteen leading candidate genes from PDGene were in the top 10th percentile of the ranked list from Gene Prospector. In fact, Gene Prospector included more published genetic association studies for the 13 leading candidate genes than PDGene did. Conclusion Gene Prospector provides an online gateway for searching for evidence about human genes in relation to diseases, other phenotypes, and risk factors, and provides links to published literature and other online data sources. Gene Prospector can be accessed via http://www.hugenavigator.net/HuGENavigator/geneProspectorStartPage.do.

  9. Novel chloride channel gene mutations in two unrelated Chinese families with myotonia congenita

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    Gao Feng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita (MC is a genetic disease characterized by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1. To date, approximately 130 different mutations on the CLCN1 gene have been identified. However, most of the studies have focused on Caucasians, and reports on CLCN1 mutations in Chinese population are rare. This study investigated the mutation of CLCN1 in two Chinese families with MC. Direct sequencing of the CLCN1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation (892G>A, resulting in A298T in one family and a compound heterozygous mutations (782A>G, resulting in Y261C; 1679T>C, resulting in M560T in the other family, None of the 100 normal controls had these mutations. Our findings add more to the available information on the CLCN1 mutation spectrum, and provide a valuable reference for studying the mutation types and inheritance pattern of CLCN1 in the Chinese population.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 gene families revealing relationships between Hagfishes, Lampreys, and Gnathostomata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuiyan Yu; Weiwei Zhang; Ling Li; Huifang Huang; Fei Ma; Qingwei Li

    2008-01-01

    It has become clear that the extant vertebrates are divided into three major groups, that is, hagfishes, lampreys, and jawed vertebrates.Morphological and molecular studies, however, have resulted in conflicting views with regard m their interrelationships. To clarify the phylogenetic relationships between them, 48 orthologous protein-coding gene families were analyzed. Even as the analysis of 34 nuclear gene families supported the monophyly of cyclostomes, the analysis of 14 mitochondrial gene families suggested a closer relationship between lampreys and gnathostomes compared to hagfishes. Lampreys were sister group of gnathostomes. The results of this study sup-ported the eyclostomes. Choice of outgroup, tree-making methods, and software may affect the phylogenetic prediction, which may have caused much debate over the subject. Development of new methods for tackling such problems is still necessary.

  11. [Mutation analysis of FGFR3 gene in a family featuring hereditary dwarfism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Jiang, Hai-ou; Quan, Qing-li; Li, Jun; He, Ting; Huang, Xue-shuang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the clinical symptoms and potential mutation in FGFR3 gene for a family featuring hereditary dwarfism in order to attain diagnosis and provide prenatal diagnosis. Five patients and two unaffected relatives from the family, in addition with 100 healthy controls, were recruited. Genome DNA was extracted. Exons 10 and 13 of the FGFR3 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR products were sequenced in both directions. All patients had similar features including short stature, short limbs, lumbar hyperlordosis but normal craniofacial features. A heterozygous mutation G1620T (N540K) was identified in the cDNA from all patients but not in the unaffected relatives and 100 control subjects. A heterozygous G380R mutation was excluded. The hereditary dwarfism featured by this family has been caused by hypochondroplasia (HCH) due to a N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene.

  12. Using linkage analysis to detect gene-gene interaction by stratifying family data on known disease, or disease-associated, alleles.

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    Barbara Corso

    Full Text Available Detecting gene-gene interaction in complex diseases is a major challenge for common disease genetics. Most interaction detection approaches use disease-marker associations and such methods have low power and unknown reliability in real data. We developed and tested a powerful linkage-analysis-based gene-gene interaction detection strategy based on conditioning the family data on a known disease-causing allele or disease-associated marker allele. We computer-generated multipoint linkage data for a disease caused by two epistatically interacting loci (A and B. We examined several two-locus epistatic inheritance models: dominant-dominant, dominant-recessive, recessive-dominant, recessive-recessive. At one of the loci (A, there was a known disease-related allele. We stratified the family data on the presence of this allele, eliminating family members who were without it. This elimination step has the effect of raising the "penetrance" at the second locus (B. We then calculated the lod score at the second locus (B and compared the pre- and post-stratification lod scores at B. A positive difference indicated interaction. We also examined if it was possible to detect interaction with locus B based on a disease-marker association (instead of an identified disease allele at locus A. We also tested whether the presence of genetic heterogeneity would generate false positive evidence of interaction. The power to detect interaction for a known disease allele was 60-90%. The probability of false positives, based on heterogeneity, was low. Decreasing linkage disequilibrium between the disease and marker at locus A decreased the likelihood of detecting interaction. The allele frequency of the associated marker made little difference to the power.

  13. Molecular analysis and test of linkage between the FMR-I gene and infantile autism in multiplex families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallmayer, J.; Pintado, E.; Lotspeich, L.; Spiker, D.; Kraemer, H.C.; Lee Wong, D.; Lin, A.; Herbert, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Ciaranello, R.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Approximately 2%-5% of autistic children show cytogenetic evidence of the fragile X syndrome. This report tests whether infantile autism in multiplex autism families arises from an unusual manifestion of the fragile X syndrome. This could arise either by expansion of the (CGG)n trinucleotide repeat in FMR-1 or from a mutation elsewhere in the gene. We studied 35 families that met stringent criteria for multiplex autism. Amplification of the trinucleotide repeat and analysis of methylation status were performed in 79 autistic children and in 31 of their unaffected siblings by Southern blot analysis. No examples of amplified repeats were seen in the autistic or control children or in their parents or grandparents. We next examined the hypothesis that there was a mutation elsewhere in the FMR-1 gene, by linkage analysis in 32 of these families. We tested four different dominant models and a recessive model. Linkage to FMR-1 could be excluded (lod score between -24 and -62) in all models by using probes DXS548, FRAXAC1, and FRAXAC2 and the CGG repeat itself. Tests for heterogeneity in this sample were negative, and the occurrence of positive lod scores in this data set could be attributed to chance. Analysis of the data by the affected-sib method also did not show evidence for linkage of any marker to autism. These results enable us to reject the hypothesis that multiplex autism arises from expansion of the (CGG)n trinucleotide repeat in FMR-1. Further, because the overall lod scores for all probes in all models tested were highly negative, linkage to FMR-1 can also be ruled out in multiplex autistic families. 35 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Sequence analysis of candidate genes in two Roma families with severe tooth agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriková Dana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective tooth agenesis is the most common congenital disorder affecting the formation of dentition in humans. Both its forms (hypodontia and more severe oligodontia can be found either in isolated form and they can be associated with systemic condition (syndromic tooth agenesis. In addition to previously known genes (PAX9, MSX1 and AXIN2 mutations in EDA, EDARADD and WNT10 gene were recently found to be involved in isolated forms of tooth agenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of affected members in two large families of Roma origin segregating severe isolated tooth agenesis with very variable phenotype and to perform mutation analysis of seven genes with aim to find causal mutation. 26 family members were clinically examined and coding regions of seven genes (MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were sequenced. With exclusion of third molars, average number of missing teeth was 8.2 ± 4.9 in family 1 and 7.1 ± 2.3 in family 2. The most frequently missing teeth were maxillary lateral incisors and first premolars and mandibular central incisors. Sequencing revealed four potentially damaging variants (g.Ala40Gly in MSX1, g.Ala240Pro in PAX9, g.Pro50Ser in AXIN2 and g.Met9Ile in EDARADD; however, none of them was present in all affected family members. Variable phenotype in both families examined in this study is in favour of heterogeneous genetic cause of tooth agenesis in these families: possible interaction of several defected genes, sequence variants in regulatory regions and additional environmental factors is assumed.

  15. Promoter polymorphism G-6A, which modulates angiotensinogen gene expression, is associated with non-familial sick sinus syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Yow Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that familial sick sinus syndrome (SSS is caused by functional alterations of ion channels and gap junction. Limited information is available on the mechanism of age-related non-familial SSS. Although evidence shows a close link between arrhythmia and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS, it remains to be determined whether the RAS is involved in the pathogenesis of non-familial SSS. METHODS: In this study, 113 patients with documented non-familial SSS and 125 controls were screened for angiotensinogen (AGT and gap junction protein-connexin 40 (Cx40 promoter polymorphisms by gene sequencing, followed by an association study. A luciferase assay was used to determine the transcriptional activity of the promoter polymorphism. The interaction between nuclear factors and the promoter polymorphism was characterized by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. RESULTS: Association study showed the Cx40 -44/+71 polymorphisms are not associated with non-familial SSS; however, it indicated that four polymorphic sites at positions -6, -20, -152, and -217 in the AGT promoter are linked to non-familial SSS. Compared to controls, SSS patients had a lower frequency of the G-6A AA genotype (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.58-5.22, P = 0.001 and a higher frequency of the G allele at -6 position (OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.54-4.57, P = 0.0003. EMSA and luciferase assays confirmed that nucleotide G at position -6 modulates the binding affinity with nuclear factors and yields a lower transcriptional activity than nucleotide A (P<0.01. CONCLUSION: G-6A polymorphism, which modulates the transcriptional activity of the AGT promoter, may contribute to non-familial SSS susceptibility.

  16. Identification and analysis of the germin-like gene family in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiang-Jing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germin and germin-like proteins constitute a ubiquitous family of plant proteins. A role of some family members in defense against pathogen attack had been proposed based on gene regulation studies and transgenic approaches. Soybean (G. max L. Merr. germin genes had not been characterized at the molecular and functional levels. Results In the present study, twenty-one germin gene members in soybean cultivar 'Maple Arrow' (partial resistance to Sclerotinia stem rot of soybean were identified by in silico identification and RACE method (GmGER 1 to GmGER 21. A genome-wide analyses of these germin-like protein genes using a bioinformatics approach showed that the genes located on chromosomes 8, 1, 15, 20, 16, 19, 7, 3 and 10, on which more disease-resistant genes were located on. Sequence comparison revealed that the genes encoded three germin-like domains. The phylogenetic relationships and functional diversity of the germin gene family of soybean were analyzed among diverse genera. The expression of the GmGER genes treated with exogenous IAA suggested that GmGER genes might be regulated by auxin. Transgenic tobacco that expressed the GmGER 9 gene exhibited high tolerance to the salt stress. In addition, the GmGER mRNA increased transiently at darkness and peaked at a time that corresponded approximately to the critical night length. The mRNA did not accumulate significantly under the constant light condition, and did not change greatly under the SD and LD treatments. Conclusions This study provides a complex overview of the GmGER genes in soybean. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the germin and germin-like genes of the plant species that had been founded might be evolved by independent gene duplication events. The experiment indicated that germin genes exhibited diverse expression patterns during soybean development. The different time courses of the mRNAs accumulation of GmGER genes in soybean leaves appeared to have a

  17. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of auxin response factor (ARF gene family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yirong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin signaling is vital for plant growth and development, and plays important role in apical dominance, tropic response, lateral root formation, vascular differentiation, embryo patterning and shoot elongation. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs are the transcription factors that regulate the expression of auxin responsive genes. The ARF genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants. The first draft of full maize genome assembly has recently been released, however, to our knowledge, the ARF gene family from maize (ZmARF genes has not been characterized in detail. Results In this study, 31 maize (Zea mays L. genes that encode ARF proteins were identified in maize genome. It was shown that maize ARF genes fall into related sister pairs and chromosomal mapping revealed that duplication of ZmARFs was associated with the chromosomal block duplications. As expected, duplication of some ZmARFs showed a conserved intron/exon structure, whereas some others were more divergent, suggesting the possibility of functional diversification for these genes. Out of these 31 ZmARF genes, 14 possess auxin-responsive element in their promoter region, among which 7 appear to show small or negligible response to exogenous auxin. The 18 ZmARF genes were predicted to be the potential targets of small RNAs. Transgenic analysis revealed that increased miR167 level could cause degradation of transcripts of six potential targets (ZmARF3, 9, 16, 18, 22 and 30. The expressions of maize ARF genes are responsive to exogenous auxin treatment. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes were observed in different stages of embryo development. Conclusions Maize ARF gene family is expanded (31 genes as compared to Arabidopsis (23 genes and rice (25 genes. The expression of these genes in maize is regulated by auxin and small RNAs. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes in embryo at different stages were detected which suggest that maize ARF genes may

  18. Evolutionary Pattern and Regulation Analysis to Support Why Diversity Functions Existed within PPAR Gene Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyu; Yan, Xiping; Wang, Guosong; Liu, Hehe; Gan, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jiwen; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) gene family members exhibit distinct patterns of distribution in tissues and differ in functions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolutionary impacts on diversity functions of PPAR members and the regulatory differences on gene expression patterns. 63 homology sequences of PPAR genes from 31 species were collected and analyzed. The results showed that three isolated types of PPAR gene family may emerge from twice times of gene duplication events. The conserved domains of HOLI (ligand binding domain of hormone receptors) domain and ZnF_C4 (C4 zinc finger in nuclear in hormone receptors) are essential for keeping basic roles of PPAR gene family, and the variant domains of LCRs may be responsible for their divergence in functions. The positive selection sites in HOLI domain are benefit for PPARs to evolve towards diversity functions. The evolutionary variants in the promoter regions and 3' UTR regions of PPARs result into differential transcription factors and miRNAs involved in regulating PPAR members, which may eventually affect their expressions and tissues distributions. These results indicate that gene duplication event, selection pressure on HOLI domain, and the variants on promoter and 3' UTR are essential for PPARs evolution and diversity functions acquired.

  19. The bovine 5' AMPK gene family: mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Stephanie D; White, Stephen N; Kata, Srinivas R; Loan, Raymond; Womack, James E

    2003-12-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family is an ancient stress response system whose primary function is regulation of cellular ATP. Activation of AMPK, which is instigated by environmental and nutritional stresses, initiates energy-conserving measures that protect the cell by inhibition and phosphorylation of key enzymes in energy-consuming biochemical pathways. The seven genes that comprise the bovine AMPK family were mapped in cattle by using a radiation hybrid panel. The seven genes mapped to six different cattle chromosomes, each with a LOD score greater than 10.0. PRKAA1 mapped to BTA 20, PRKAA2 and PRKAB2 to BTA 3, PRKAB1 to BTA 17, PRKAG1 to BTA 5, PRKAG2 to BTA 4, and PRKAG3 to BTA 2. Five of the seven genes mapped to regions expected from human/cattle comparative maps. PRKAB2 and PRKAG3, however, have not been mapped in humans. We predict these genes to be located on HSA 1 and 2, respectively. Additionally, one synonymous and one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) were detected in PRKAG3 in Bos taurus cattle. In an effort to determine ancestral origins, various herds of mixed breed cattle as well as other ruminant species were characterized for sequence variation in this region of PRKAG3. Owing to the physiological importance of this gene family, we believe that its individual genes are candidate genes for conferring resistance to diseases in cattle.

  20. Gene expression in response to ionizing radiation and family history of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Francesca; Silvestrini, Francesco; Siniscalchi, Ester; Palli, Domenico; Saieva, Calogero; Crebelli, Riccardo

    2011-03-01

    Genes and molecular pathways involved in familial clustering of gastric cancer have not yet been identified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate gene expression changes in response to a cellular stress, and its link with a positive family history for this neoplasia. To this aim leukocytes of healthy first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients and controls were challenged in vitro with ionizing radiation and gene expression evaluated 4 h later on microarrays with 1,800 cancer-related genes. Eight genes, mainly involved in signal transduction and cell cycle regulation, were differentially expressed in healthy relatives of gastric cancer cases. Functional class scoring by Gene Ontology classification highlighted two G-protein related pathways, implicated in the proliferation of neoplastic tissue, which were differentially expressed in healthy subjects with positive family history of gastric cancer. The relative expression of 84 genes related to these pathways was examined using the SYBR green-based quantitative real-time PCR. The results confirmed the indication of an involvement of G-protein coupled receptor pathways in GC familiarity provided by microarray analysis. This study indicates a possible association between familiarity for gastric cancer and altered transcriptional response to ionizing radiation.

  1. The polyphenol oxidase gene family in land plants: Lineage-specific duplication and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Lan T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs are enzymes that typically use molecular oxygen to oxidize ortho-diphenols to ortho-quinones. These commonly cause browning reactions following tissue damage, and may be important in plant defense. Some PPOs function as hydroxylases or in cross-linking reactions, but in most plants their physiological roles are not known. To better understand the importance of PPOs in the plant kingdom, we surveyed PPO gene families in 25 sequenced genomes from chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. The PPO genes were then analyzed in silico for gene structure, phylogenetic relationships, and targeting signals. Results Many previously uncharacterized PPO genes were uncovered. The moss, Physcomitrella patens, contained 13 PPO genes and Selaginella moellendorffii (spike moss and Glycine max (soybean each had 11 genes. Populus trichocarpa (poplar contained a highly diversified gene family with 11 PPO genes